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Sample records for reveal flexible domains

  1. Structure of a mutant [beta] toxin from Staphylococcus aureus reveals domain swapping and conformational flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Huseby, Medora J.; Shi, Ke; Digre, Jeff; Ohlendorf, Douglas H.; Earhart, Cathleen A.

    2011-09-16

    The 3.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mutant form of the staphylococcal sphingomyelinase {beta} toxin in which a conserved hydrophobic {beta}-hairpin has been deleted is reported. It is shown that this mutation induces domain swapping of a C-terminal {beta}-strand, leading to the formation of dimers linked by a conformationally flexible hinge region. Eight dimers are seen in the asymmetric unit, exhibiting a broad spectrum of conformations trapped in place by intermolecular contacts within the crystal lattice. Furthermore, the 16 monomers within each asymmetric unit exhibit a remarkable heterogeneity in thermal factors, which can be accounted for by the varying degrees to which each monomer interacts with other molecules in the crystal. This structure provides a unique example of the challenges associated with crystallographic study of flexible proteins.

  2. Non-Linear and Flexible Regions of the Human Notch1 Extracellular Domain Revealed by High-Resolution Structural Studies

    PubMed Central

    Weisshuhn, Philip C.; Sheppard, Devon; Taylor, Paul; Whiteman, Pat; Lea, Susan M.; Handford, Penny A.; Redfield, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Notch receptor is a key component of a core metazoan signaling pathway activated by Delta/Serrate/Lag-2 ligands expressed on an adjacent cell. This results in a short-range signal with profound effects on cell-fate determination, cell proliferation, and cell death. Key to understanding receptor function is structural knowledge of the large extracellular portion of Notch which contains multiple repeats of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains. Here we investigate the EGF4-13 region of human Notch1 (hN1) using a multidisciplinary approach. Ca2+-binding measurements, X-ray crystallography, {1H}-15N heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings support a non-linear organization for the EGF4-13 region with a rigid, bent conformation for EGF4-7 and a single flexible linkage between EGF9 and EGF10. These data allow us to construct an informed model for EGF10-13 which, in conjunction with comparative binding studies, demonstrates that EGF10 has an important role in determining Notch receptor sensitivity to Dll-4. PMID:26996961

  3. A Crystal Structure of the Dengue Virus NS5 Protein Reveals a Novel Inter-domain Interface Essential for Protein Flexibility and Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongqian; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; Zheng, Jie; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Phoo, Wint Wint; Lee, Chin Chin; Tay, Moon Y. F.; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Cornvik, Tobias C.; Lim, Siew Pheng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Lescar, Julien; Vasudevan, Subhash G.; Luo, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    Flavivirus RNA replication occurs within a replication complex (RC) that assembles on ER membranes and comprises both non-structural (NS) viral proteins and host cofactors. As the largest protein component within the flavivirus RC, NS5 plays key enzymatic roles through its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase) and C-terminal RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains, and constitutes a major target for antivirals. We determined a crystal structure of the full-length NS5 protein from Dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3) at a resolution of 2.3 Å in the presence of bound SAH and GTP. Although the overall molecular shape of NS5 from DENV3 resembles that of NS5 from Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV), the relative orientation between the MTase and RdRp domains differs between the two structures, providing direct evidence for the existence of a set of discrete stable molecular conformations that may be required for its function. While the inter-domain region is mostly disordered in NS5 from JEV, the NS5 structure from DENV3 reveals a well-ordered linker region comprising a short 310 helix that may act as a swivel. Solution Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS) analysis reveals an increased mobility of the thumb subdomain of RdRp in the context of the full length NS5 protein which correlates well with the analysis of the crystallographic temperature factors. Site-directed mutagenesis targeting the mostly polar interface between the MTase and RdRp domains identified several evolutionarily conserved residues that are important for viral replication, suggesting that inter-domain cross-talk in NS5 regulates virus replication. Collectively, a picture for the molecular origin of NS5 flexibility is emerging with profound implications for flavivirus replication and for the development of therapeutics targeting NS5. PMID:25775415

  4. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  5. Genetically engineered immunoglobulins reveal structural features controlling segmental flexibility.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, W P; Wensel, T G; Stryer, L; Oi, V T

    1988-01-01

    We have carried out nanosecond fluorescence polarization studies of genetically engineered immunoglobulins to determine the structural features controlling their segmental flexibility. The proteins studied were hybrids of a relatively rigid isotype (mouse IgG1) and a relatively flexible one (mouse IgG2a). They have identical light chains and heavy chain variable regions and have the same combining sites for epsilon-dansyl-L-lysine, a fluorescent hapten. The fluorescence of the bound dansyl chromophore was excited at 348 nm with subnanosecond laser pulses, and the emission in the nanosecond time range was measured with a single-photon-counting apparatus. The emission anisotropy kinetics of the hybrid antibodies revealed that segmental flexibility is controlled by the heavy chain constant region 1 (CH1) as well as by the hinge. In contrast, the CH2 and CH3 domains did not influence segmental flexibility. The hinge and CH1 domains must be properly matched to allow facile movement of the Fab units. Studies of hybrids of IgG1 and IgG2a within CH1 showed that the loop formed by residues 131-139 is important in controlling segmental flexibility. X-ray crystallographic studies by others of human IgG1 have shown that this loop makes several van der Waals contacts with the hinge. Images PMID:3128789

  6. Structural domains and main-chain flexibility in prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Blinov, N; Berjanskii, M; Wishart, D S; Stepanova, M

    2009-02-24

    In this study we describe a novel approach to define structural domains and to characterize the local flexibility in both human and chicken prion proteins. The approach we use is based on a comprehensive theory of collective dynamics in proteins that was recently developed. This method determines the essential collective coordinates, which can be found from molecular dynamics trajectories via principal component analysis. Under this particular framework, we are able to identify the domains where atoms move coherently while at the same time to determine the local main-chain flexibility for each residue. We have verified this approach by comparing our results for the predicted dynamic domain systems with the computed main-chain flexibility profiles and the NMR-derived random coil indexes for human and chicken prion proteins. The three sets of data show excellent agreement. Additionally, we demonstrate that the dynamic domains calculated in this fashion provide a highly sensitive measure of protein collective structure and dynamics. Furthermore, such an analysis is capable of revealing structural and dynamic properties of proteins that are inaccessible to the conventional assessment of secondary structure. Using the collective dynamic simulation approach described here along with a high-temperature simulations of unfolding of human prion protein, we have explored whether locations of relatively low stability could be identified where the unfolding process could potentially be facilitated. According to our analysis, the locations of relatively low stability may be associated with the beta-sheet formed by strands S1 and S2 and the adjacent loops, whereas helix HC appears to be a relatively stable part of the protein. We suggest that this kind of structural analysis may provide a useful background for a more quantitative assessment of potential routes of spontaneous misfolding in prion proteins. PMID:19178154

  7. Binding to retinoblastoma pocket domain does not alter the inter-domain flexibility of the J domain of SV40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina K; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Hammel, Michal; Pipas, James; Chazin, Walter J

    2012-02-15

    Simian Virus 40 uses the large T antigen (Tag) to bind and inactivate retinoblastoma tumor suppressor proteins (Rb), which can result in cellular transformation. Tag is a modular protein with four domains connected by flexible linkers. The N-terminal J domain of Tag is necessary for Rb inactivation. Binding of Rb is mediated by an LXCXE consensus motif immediately C-terminal to the J domain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to study the structural dynamics and interaction of Rb with the LXCXE motif, the J domain and a construct (N(260)) extending from the J domain through the origin binding domain (OBD). NMR and SAXS data revealed substantial flexibility between the domains in N(260). Binding of pRb to a construct containing the LXCXE motif and the J domain revealed weak interactions between pRb and the J domain. Analysis of the complex of pRb and N(260) indicated that the OBD is not involved and retains its dynamic independence from the remainder of Tag. These results support a 'chaperone' model in which the J domain of Tag changes its orientation as it acts upon different protein complexes. PMID:22227098

  8. Domain decomposition approach to flexible multibody dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, JunYoung; Chun, TaeYoung; Shin, SangJoon; Bauchau, Olivier A.

    2014-01-01

    Finite element based formulations for flexible multibody systems are becoming increasingly popular and as the complexity of the configurations to be treated increases, so does the computational cost. It seems natural to investigate the applicability of parallel processing to this type of problems; domain decomposition techniques have been used extensively for this purpose. In this approach, the computational domain is divided into non-overlapping sub-domains, and the continuity of the displacement field across sub-domain boundaries is enforced via the Lagrange multiplier technique. In the finite element literature, this approach is presented as a mathematical algorithm that enables parallel processing. In this paper, the divided system is viewed as a flexible multibody system, and the sub-domains are connected by kinematic constraints. Consequently, all the techniques applicable to the enforcement of constraints in multibody systems become applicable to the present problem. In particular, it is shown that a combination of the localized Lagrange multiplier technique with the augmented Lagrange formulation leads to interesting solution strategies. The proposed algorithm is compared with the well-known FETI approach with regards to convergence and efficiency characteristics. The present algorithm is relatively simple and leads to improved convergence and efficiency characteristics. Finally, implementation on a parallel computer was conducted for the proposed approach.

  9. Mapping flexible protein domains at subnanometer resolution with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Müller, D J; Fotiadis, D; Engel, A

    1998-06-23

    The mapping of flexible protein domains with the atomic force microscope is reviewed. Examples discussed are the bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarum, the head-tail-connector from phage phi29, and the hexagonally packed intermediate layer from Deinococcus radiodurans which all were recorded in physiological buffer solution. All three proteins undergo reversible structural changes that are reflected in standard deviation maps calculated from aligned topographs of individual protein complexes. Depending on the lateral resolution (up to 0.8 nm) flexible surface regions can ultimately be correlated with individual polypeptide loops. In addition, multivariate statistical classification revealed the major conformations of the protein surface. PMID:9678604

  10. Architecture of cognitive flexibility revealed by lesion mapping

    PubMed Central

    Barbey, Aron K.; Colom, Roberto; Grafman, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscience has made remarkable progress in understanding the architecture of human intelligence, identifying a distributed network of brain structures that support goal-directed, intelligent behavior. However, the neural foundations of cognitive flexibility and adaptive aspects of intellectual function remain to be well characterized. Here, we report a human lesion study (n = 149) that investigates the neural bases of key competencies of cognitive flexibility (i.e., mental flexibility and the fluent generation of new ideas) and systematically examine their contributions to a broad spectrum of cognitive and social processes, including psychometric intelligence (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), emotional intelligence (Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test), and personality (Neuroticism–Extraversion–Openness Personality Inventory). Latent variable modeling was applied to obtain error-free indices of each factor, followed by voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to elucidate their neural substrates. Regression analyses revealed that latent scores for psychometric intelligence reliably predict latent scores for cognitive flexibility (adjusted R2 = 0.94). Lesion mapping results further indicated that these convergent processes depend on a shared network of frontal, temporal, and parietal regions, including white matter association tracts, which bind these areas into an integrated system. A targeted analysis of the unique variance explained by cognitive flexibility further revealed selective damage within the right superior temporal gyrus, a region known to support insight and the recognition of novel semantic relations. The observed findings motivate an integrative framework for understanding the neural foundations of adaptive behavior, suggesting that core elements of cognitive flexibility emerge from a distributed network of brain regions that support specific competencies for human intelligence. PMID:23721727

  11. Architecture of cognitive flexibility revealed by lesion mapping.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Aron K; Colom, Roberto; Grafman, Jordan

    2013-11-15

    Neuroscience has made remarkable progress in understanding the architecture of human intelligence, identifying a distributed network of brain structures that support goal-directed, intelligent behavior. However, the neural foundations of cognitive flexibility and adaptive aspects of intellectual function remain to be well characterized. Here, we report a human lesion study (n=149) that investigates the neural bases of key competencies of cognitive flexibility (i.e., mental flexibility and the fluent generation of new ideas) and systematically examine their contributions to a broad spectrum of cognitive and social processes, including psychometric intelligence (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), emotional intelligence (Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test), and personality (Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory). Latent variable modeling was applied to obtain error-free indices of each factor, followed by voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to elucidate their neural substrates. Regression analyses revealed that latent scores for psychometric intelligence reliably predict latent scores for cognitive flexibility (adjusted R(2)=0.94). Lesion mapping results further indicated that these convergent processes depend on a shared network of frontal, temporal, and parietal regions, including white matter association tracts, which bind these areas into an integrated system. A targeted analysis of the unique variance explained by cognitive flexibility further revealed selective damage within the right superior temporal gyrus, a region known to support insight and the recognition of novel semantic relations. The observed findings motivate an integrative framework for understanding the neural foundations of adaptive behavior, suggesting that core elements of cognitive flexibility emerge from a distributed network of brain regions that support specific competencies for human intelligence. PMID:23721727

  12. Frequency domain identification experiment on a large flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Yam, Y.; Scheid, R. E.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experiences in the field of flexible structure control in space have indicated a need for on-orbit system identification to support robust control redesign to avoid in-flight instabilities and maintain high spacecraft performance. The authors highlight an automated frequency domain system identification methodology recently developed to fill this need. The methodology supports (1) the estimation of system quantities useful for robust control analysis and design, (2) experiment design tailored to performing system identification in a typically constrained on-orbit environment, and (3) the automation of operations to reduce human-in-the-loop requirements. A basic overview of the methodology is presented first, followed by an experimental verification of the approach performed on the JPL/AFAL testbed facility.

  13. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat. PMID:12750370

  14. Structure and Mutagenesis of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Domains Evidence for Flexibility in the Placement of Polysialic Acid Attachment Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Deirdre A.; Swartzentruber, Kristin G.; Lavie, Arnon; Colley, Karen J.

    2010-11-09

    The addition of {alpha}2,8-polysialic acid to the N-glycans of the neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, is critical for brain development and plays roles in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, neuronal regeneration, and the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells. Our previous work indicates that the polysialylation of two N-glycans located on the fifth immunoglobulin domain (Ig5) of NCAM requires the presence of specific sequences in the adjacent fibronectin type III repeat (FN1). To understand the relationship of these two domains, we have solved the crystal structure of the NCAM Ig5-FN1 tandem. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals that the sites of Ig5 polysialylation are on the opposite face from the FN1 residues previously found to be critical for N-glycan polysialylation, suggesting that the Ig5-FN1 domain relationship may be flexible and/or that there is flexibility in the placement of Ig5 glycosylation sites for polysialylation. To test the latter possibility, new Ig5 glycosylation sites were engineered and their polysialylation tested. We observed some flexibility in glycosylation site location for polysialylation and demonstrate that the lack of polysialylation of a glycan attached to Asn-423 may be in part related to a lack of terminal processing. The data also suggest that, although the polysialyltransferases do not require the Ig5 domain for NCAM recognition, their ability to engage with this domain is necessary for polysialylation to occur on Ig5 N-glycans.

  15. Conformation switching of AIM2 PYD domain revealed by NMR relaxation and MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haobo; Yang, Lijiang; Niu, Xiaogang

    2016-04-29

    Protein absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is a double-strand DNA (ds DNA) sensor mainly located in cytoplasm of cell. It includes one N terminal PYD domain and one C terminal HIN domain. When the ds DNA such as DNA viruses and bacteria entered cytoplasm, the HIN domain of AIM2 will recognize and bind to DNA, and the PYD domain will bind to ASC protein which will result in the formation of AIM2 inflammasome. Three AIM2 PYD domain structures have been solved, but every structure yields a unique conformation around the α3 helix region. To understand why different AIM2 PYD structures show different conformations in this region, we use NMR relaxation techniques to study the backbone dynamics of mouse AIM2 PYD domain and perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on both mouse and human AIM2 PYD structures. Our results indicate that this region is highly flexible in both mouse and human AIM2 PYD domains, and the PYD domain may exist as a conformation ensemble in solution. Different environment makes the population vary among pre-existing conformational substrates of the ensemble, which may be the reason why different AIM2 PYD structures were observed under different conditions. Further docking analysis reveals that the conformation switching may be important for the autoinhibition of the AIM2 protein. PMID:27037024

  16. Modal domain fiber optic sensor for closed loop vibration control of a flexible beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D.; Thomas, D.; Reichard, K.; Lindner, D.; Claus, R. O.

    1990-01-01

    The use of a modal domain sensor in a vibration control experiment is described. An optical fiber is bonded along the length of a flexible beam. A control signal derived from the output of the modal domain sensor is used to suppress vibrations induced in the beam. A distributed effect model for the modal domain sensor is developed and combined with models of the beam and actuator dynamics to produce a system suitable for control design.

  17. Discrimination reversal learning reveals greater female behavioural flexibility in guppies

    PubMed Central

    Lucon-Xiccato, Tyrone; Bisazza, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Behavioural flexibility allows an animal to adapt its behaviour in response to changes in the environment. Research conducted in primates, rodents and domestic fowl suggests greater behavioural persistence and reduced behavioural flexibility in males. We investigated sex differences in behavioural flexibility in fish by comparing male and female guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in a reversal learning task. Fish were first trained on a colour discrimination, which was learned equally rapidly by males and females. However, once the reward contingency was reversed, females were better at inhibiting the previous response and reached criterion twice as fast as males. When reward reversing was repeated, males gradually reduced the number of errors, and the two sexes had a comparable performance after four reversals. We suggest that sex differences in behavioural flexibility in guppies can be explained in terms of the different roles that males and females play in reproduction.

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  19. Eye Movements Reveal Components of Flexible Reading Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shebilske, Wayne L.; Fisher, Dennis F.

    The eye movements of two college graduates were monitored in a study of flexible reading, which is defined as the ability to adjust one's rate and approach to reading according to the purpose of reading, the difficulty of the material, and one's knowledge of the subject matter. The subjects were told to read an excerpt from a tenth grade biology…

  20. The Role of Flexibility and Conformational Selection in the Binding Promiscuity of PDZ Domains

    PubMed Central

    Münz, Márton; Hein, Jotun; Biggin, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    In molecular recognition, it is often the case that ligand binding is coupled to conformational change in one or both of the binding partners. Two hypotheses describe the limiting cases involved; the first is the induced fit and the second is the conformational selection model. The conformational selection model requires that the protein adopts conformations that are similar to the ligand-bound conformation in the absence of ligand, whilst the induced-fit model predicts that the ligand-bound conformation of the protein is only accessible when the ligand is actually bound. The flexibility of the apo protein clearly plays a major role in these interpretations. For many proteins involved in signaling pathways there is the added complication that they are often promiscuous in that they are capable of binding to different ligand partners. The relationship between protein flexibility and promiscuity is an area of active research and is perhaps best exemplified by the PDZ domain family of proteins. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the relationship between flexibility and promiscuity in five PDZ domains: the human Dvl2 (Dishevelled-2) PDZ domain, the human Erbin PDZ domain, the PDZ1 domain of InaD (inactivation no after-potential D protein) from fruit fly, the PDZ7 domain of GRIP1 (glutamate receptor interacting protein 1) from rat and the PDZ2 domain of PTP-BL (protein tyrosine phosphatase) from mouse. We show that despite their high structural similarity, the PDZ binding sites have significantly different dynamics. Importantly, the degree of binding pocket flexibility was found to be closely related to the various characteristics of peptide binding specificity and promiscuity of the five PDZ domains. Our findings suggest that the intrinsic motions of the apo structures play a key role in distinguishing functional properties of different PDZ domains and allow us to make predictions that can be experimentally tested. PMID:23133356

  1. Knowledge-Guided Docking of WW Domain Proteins and Flexible Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haiyun; Li, Hao; Banu Bte Sm Rashid, Shamima; Leow, Wee Kheng; Liou, Yih-Cherng

    Studies of interactions between protein domains and ligands are important in many aspects such as cellular signaling. We present a knowledge-guided approach for docking protein domains and flexible ligands. The approach is applied to the WW domain, a small protein module mediating signaling complexes which have been implicated in diseases such as muscular dystrophy and Liddle’s syndrome. The first stage of the approach employs a substring search for two binding grooves of WW domains and possible binding motifs of peptide ligands based on known features. The second stage aligns the ligand’s peptide backbone to the two binding grooves using a quasi-Newton constrained optimization algorithm. The backbone-aligned ligands produced serve as good starting points to the third stage which uses any flexible docking algorithm to perform the docking. The experimental results demonstrate that the backbone alignment method in the second stage performs better than conventional rigid superposition given two binding constraints. It is also shown that using the backbone-aligned ligands as initial configurations improves the flexible docking in the third stage. The presented approach can also be applied to other protein domains that involve binding of flexible ligand to two or more binding sites.

  2. Trials of flexible pipe in sour service reveal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Maslamani, M.J.

    1996-11-04

    Field trials on flexible pipe offshore Qatar have shown that, under sour conditions, the layered, composite material can suffer severe degradation leading to failure. The failure demonstrates the significant effects of stress level, environmental aggressiveness, and localized hard zones in promoting sulfide stress cracking. Permeability of the sour gas through the composite layer of the flexible pipe resulted in varying degrees of sulfide attack and hydrogen embrittlement, depending on the susceptibility of the multilayered material. In the trials, the material was used as a gas-lift line in a sour-oil field in the Arabian Gulf. Flexible pipes have been used successfully for transporting methanol, benzene, and gas condensates in wet sweet environments at temperatures of up to 80 C. Little or no information, however, has been available as to its corrosion resistance in sour-service wells containing 6% CO{sub 2} with 3% H{sub 2}S partial pressures and at moderate temperatures. The paper discusses an underwater survey to evaluate the damage, visual inspection, mechanical tests, metallographic exam, and trial results.

  3. Controller design for flexible, distributed parameter mechanical arms via combined state space and frequency domain techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, W. J.; Majett, M.

    1982-01-01

    The potential benefits of the ability to control more flexible mechanical arms are discussed. A justification is made in terms of speed of movement. A new controller design procedure is then developed to provide this capability. It uses both a frequency domain representation and a state variable representation of the arm model. The frequency domain model is used to update the modal state variable model to insure decoupled states. The technique is applied to a simple example with encouraging results.

  4. Vibration sensing in flexible structures using a distributed-effect modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichard, Karl M.; Lindner, Douglas K.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    Modal domain optical fiber sensors have recently been employed in the implementation of system identification algorithms and the closed-loop control of vibrations in flexible structures. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor used in these applications, however, only accounted for the effects of strain in the direction of the fiber's longitudinal axis. In this paper, we extend this model to include the effects of arbitrary stress. Using this sensor model, we characterize the sensor's sensitivity and dynamic range.

  5. Role of the vaccinia virus O3 protein in cell entry can be fulfilled by its Sequence flexible transmembrane domain

    SciTech Connect

    Satheshkumar, P.S.; Chavre, James; Moss, Bernard

    2013-09-15

    The vaccinia virus O3 protein, a component of the entry–fusion complex, is encoded by all chordopoxviruses. We constructed truncation mutants and demonstrated that the transmembrane domain, which comprises two-thirds of this 35 amino acid protein, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with the entry–fusion complex and function in cell entry. Nevertheless, neither single amino acid substitutions nor alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed essential amino acids within the transmembrane domain. Moreover, replication-competent mutant viruses were generated by randomization of 10 amino acids of the transmembrane domain. Of eight unique viruses, two contained only two amino acids in common with wild type and the remainder contained one or none within the randomized sequence. Although these mutant viruses formed normal size plaques, the entry–fusion complex did not co-purify with the mutant O3 proteins suggesting a less stable interaction. Thus, despite low specific sequence requirements, the transmembrane domain is sufficient for function in entry. - Highlights: • The 35 amino acid O3 protein is required for efficient vaccinia virus entry. • The transmembrane domain of O3 is necessary and sufficient for entry. • Mutagenesis demonstrated extreme sequence flexibility compatible with function.

  6. Polyglutamine domain flexibility mediates the proximity between flanking sequences in huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Nicholas Stephane; Desmond, Carly Robyn; Xia, Jianrun; Truant, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG expansion within the huntingtin gene that encodes a polymorphic glutamine tract at the amino terminus of the huntingtin protein. HD is one of nine polyglutamine expansion diseases. The clinical threshold of polyglutamine expansion for HD is near 37 repeats, but the mechanism of this pathogenic length is poorly understood. Using Förster resonance energy transfer, we describe an intramolecular proximity between the N17 domain and the downstream polyproline region that flanks the polyglutamine tract of huntingtin. Our data support the hypothesis that the polyglutamine tract can act as a flexible domain, allowing the flanking domains to come into close spatial proximity. This flexibility is impaired with expanded polyglutamine tracts, and we can detect changes in huntingtin conformation at the pathogenic threshold for HD. Altering the structure of N17, either via phosphomimicry or with small molecules, also affects the proximity between the flanking domains. The structural capacity of N17 to fold back toward distal regions within huntingtin requires an interacting protein, protein kinase C and casein kinase 2 substrate in neurons 1 (PACSIN1). This protein has the ability to bind both N17 and the polyproline region, stabilizing the interaction between these two domains. We also developed an antibody-based FRET assay that can detect conformational changes within endogenous huntingtin in wild-type versus HD fibroblasts. Therefore, we hypothesize that wild-type length polyglutamine tracts within huntingtin can form a flexible domain that is essential for proper functional intramolecular proximity, conformations, and dynamics. PMID:23898200

  7. Active control for vibration suppression in a flexible beam using a modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. E.; Lindner, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the use of a modal-domain (MD) fiber-optic sensor as an active control system component for vibration suppression, whose output is proportional to the integral of the axial strain along the optical fiber. When an MD sensor is attached to, or embedded in, a flexible structure, it senses the strain in the structure along its gage length. On the basis of the present integration of the sensor model into a flexible-structure model, it becomes possible to design a control system with a dynamic compensator which adds damping to the low-order modes of the flexible structure. This modeling procedure has been experimentally validated.

  8. Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1981-01-01

    Flexibility is an important aspect of all sports and recreational activities. Flexibility can be developed and maintained by stretching exercises. Exercises designed to develop flexibility in ankle joints, knees, hips, and the lower back are presented. (JN)

  9. Importance of a flexible hinge near the motor domain in kinesin-driven motility.

    PubMed Central

    Grummt, M; Woehlke, G; Henningsen, U; Fuchs, S; Schleicher, M; Schliwa, M

    1998-01-01

    Conventional kinesin is a molecular motor consisting of an N-terminal catalytic motor domain, an extended stalk and a small globular C-terminus. Whereas the structure and function of the catalytic motor domain has been investigated, little is known about the function of domains outside the globular head. A short coiled-coil region adjacent to the motor domain, termed the neck, is known to be important for dimerization and may be required for kinesin processivity. We now provide evidence that a helix-disrupting hinge region (hinge 1) that separates the neck from the first extended coiled-coil of the stalk plays an essential role in basic motor activity. A fast fungal kinesin from Syncephalastrum racemosum was used for these studies. Deletion, substitution by a coiled-coil and truncation of the hinge 1 region all reduce motor speed and uncouple ATP turnover from gliding velocity. Insertion of hinge 1 regions from two conventional kinesins, Nkin and DmKHC, fully restores motor activity, whereas insertion of putative flexible linkers of other proteins does not, suggesting that hinge 1 regions of conventional kinesins can functionally replace each other. We suggest that this region is essential for kinesin movement in its promotion of chemo-mechanical coupling of the two heads and therefore the functional motor domain should be redefined to include not only the catalytic head but also the adjacent neck and hinge 1 domains. PMID:9755154

  10. Structural characterization of intramolecular Hg2+ transfer between flexibly-linked domains of mercuric ion reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Harwood, Ian M; Parks, Jerry M; Nauss, Rachel; Smith, Jeremy C; Liang, Liyuan; Miller, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme mercuric ion reductase, MerA, is the central component of bacterial mercury resistance encoded by the mer operon. Many MerA proteins possess a metallochaperone-like N-terminal domain, NmerA, that can transfer Hg2+ to the catalytic core (Core) for reduction to Hg0. These domains are tethered to the homodimeric Core by ~30-residue linkers that are subject to proteolysis, which has limited structural and functional characterization of the interactions of these domains. Here, we report purification of homogeneous full-length MerA using a fusion protein construct and combine small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering with molecular dynamics simulation to characterize the structure of constructs that mimic the system before and during handoff of Hg2+ from NmerA to the Core. The radii of gyration, distance distribution functions and Kratky plots derived from the small-angle X-ray scattering data are consistent with full-length MerA adopting elongated conformations resulting from flexibility in the linkers to the NmerA domains. The scattering profiles are best reproduced using an ensemble of linker conformations. This flexible attachment of NmerA may facilitate fast and efficient removal of Hg2+ from diverse protein substrates. Using a specific mutant of MerA allowed determination of the position and relative orientation of NmerA to the Core during Hg2+ handoff. The small buried surface area at the site of interaction suggests molecular recognition may be of less importance for the integrity of metal ion transfers between tethered domains than for transfers between separate proteins in metal trafficking pathways.

  11. Novel domain formation reveals proto-architecture in inferotemporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Srihasam, Krishna; Vincent, Justin L.; Livingstone, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    Primate inferotemporal cortex is subdivided into domains for biologically important categories, like faces, bodies, and scenes, as well as domains for culturally entrained categories, like text or buildings. These domains are in stereotyped locations in most humans and monkeys. To ask what determines the location of such domains, we intensively trained 7 juvenile monkeys to recognize 3 distinct sets of shapes. After training, the monkeys developed regions that were selectively responsive to each trained set. The location of each specialization was similar across monkeys, despite differences in training order. This indicates that the location of training effects does not depend on function or expertise, but rather some kind of proto-organization. We explore the possibility that this proto-organization is retinotopic or shape-based. PMID:25362472

  12. Novel domain formation reveals proto-architecture in inferotemporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Srihasam, Krishna; Vincent, Justin L; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2014-12-01

    Primate inferotemporal cortex is subdivided into domains for biologically important categories, such as faces, bodies and scenes, as well as domains for culturally entrained categories, such as text or buildings. These domains are in stereotyped locations in most humans and monkeys. To ask what determines the locations of such domains, we intensively trained seven juvenile monkeys to recognize three distinct sets of shapes. After training, the monkeys developed regions that were selectively responsive to each trained set. The location of each specialization was similar across monkeys, despite differences in training order. This indicates that the location of training effects does not depend on function or expertise, but rather on some kind of proto-organization. We explore the possibility that this proto-organization is retinotopic or shape-based. PMID:25362472

  13. Structural characterization of intramolecular Hg(2+) transfer between flexibly linked domains of mercuric ion reductase.

    PubMed

    Johs, Alexander; Harwood, Ian M; Parks, Jerry M; Nauss, Rachel E; Smith, Jeremy C; Liang, Liyuan; Miller, Susan M

    2011-10-28

    The enzyme mercuric ion reductase MerA is the central component of bacterial mercury resistance encoded by the mer operon. Many MerA proteins possess metallochaperone-like N-terminal domains (NmerA) that can transfer Hg(2+) to the catalytic core domain (Core) for reduction to Hg(0). These domains are tethered to the homodimeric Core by ~30-residue linkers that are susceptible to proteolysis, the latter of which has prevented characterization of the interactions of NmerA and the Core in the full-length protein. Here, we report purification of homogeneous full-length MerA from the Tn21 mer operon using a fusion protein construct and combine small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering with molecular dynamics simulation to characterize the structures of full-length wild-type and mutant MerA proteins that mimic the system before and during handoff of Hg(2+) from NmerA to the Core. The radii of gyration, distance distribution functions, and Kratky plots derived from the small-angle X-ray scattering data are consistent with full-length MerA adopting elongated conformations as a result of flexibility in the linkers to the NmerA domains. The scattering profiles are best reproduced using an ensemble of linker conformations. This flexible attachment of NmerA may facilitate fast and efficient removal of Hg(2+) from diverse protein substrates. Using a specific mutant of MerA allowed the formation of a metal-mediated interaction between NmerA and the Core and the determination of the position and relative orientation of NmerA to the Core during Hg(2+) handoff. PMID:21893070

  14. Calcium binding by the PKD1 domain regulates interdomain flexibility in Vibrio cholerae metalloprotease PrtV☆

    PubMed Central

    Edwin, Aaron; Rompikuntal, Pramod; Björn, Erik; Stier, Gunter; Wai, Sun N.; Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, releases several virulence factors including secreted proteases when it infects its host. These factors attack host cell proteins and break down tissue barriers and cellular matrix components such as collagen, laminin, fibronectin, keratin, elastin, and they induce necrotic tissue damage. The secreted protease PrtV constitutes one virulence factors of V. cholerae. It is a metalloprotease belonging to the M6 peptidase family. The protein is expressed as an inactive, multidomain, 102 kDa pre-pro-protein that undergoes several N- and C-terminal modifications after which it is secreted as an intermediate variant of 81 kDa. After secretion from the bacteria, additional proteolytic steps occur to produce the 55 kDa active M6 metalloprotease. The domain arrangement of PrtV is likely to play an important role in these maturation steps, which are known to be regulated by calcium. However, the molecular mechanism by which calcium controls proteolysis is unknown. In this study, we report the atomic resolution crystal structure of the PKD1 domain from V. cholera PrtV (residues 755–838) determined at 1.1 Å. The structure reveals a previously uncharacterized Ca2+-binding site located near linker regions between domains. Conformational changes in the Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bound forms suggest that Ca2+-binding at the PKD1 domain controls domain linker flexibility, and plays an important structural role, providing stability to the PrtV protein. PMID:23905008

  15. Defining the Intrinsically Disordered C-Terminal Domain of SSB Reveals DNA-Mediated Compaction.

    PubMed

    Green, Matthew; Hatter, Louise; Brookes, Emre; Soultanas, Panos; Scott, David J

    2016-01-29

    The bacterial single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein SSB is a strictly conserved and essential protein involved in diverse functions of DNA metabolism, including replication and repair. SSB comprises a well-characterized tetrameric core of N-terminal oligonucleotide binding OB folds that bind ssDNA and four intrinsically disordered C-terminal domains of unknown structure that interact with partner proteins. The generally accepted, albeit speculative, mechanistic model in the field postulates that binding of ssDNA to the OB core induces the flexible, undefined C-terminal arms to expand outwards encouraging functional interactions with partner proteins. In this structural study, we show that the opposite is true. Combined small-angle scattering with X-rays and neutrons coupled to coarse-grained modeling reveal that the intrinsically disordered C-terminal arms are relatively collapsed around the tetrameric OB core and collapse further upon ssDNA binding. This implies a mechanism of action, in which the disordered C-terminal domain collapse traps the ssDNA and pulls functional partners onto the ssDNA. PMID:26707201

  16. Ultrafast differential flexibility of Cro-protein binding domains of two operator DNAs with different sequences.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Susobhan; Ghosh, Basusree; Singh, Priya; Ghosh, Raka; Roy, Siddhartha; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-07-21

    The nature of the interface of specific protein-DNA complexes has attracted immense interest in contemporary molecular biology. Although extensive studies on the role of flexibility of DNA in the specific interaction in the genetic regulatory activity of lambda Cro (Cro-protein) have been performed, the exploration of quantitative features remains deficient. In this study, we have mutated (site directed mutagenesis: SDM) Cro-protein at the 37th position with a cysteine residue (G37C) retaining the functional integrity of the protein and labelled the cysteine residue, which is close to the interface, with a fluorescent probe (AEDANS), for the investigation of its interface with operator DNAs (OR3 and OR2). We have employed picosecond resolved polarization gated fluorescence spectroscopy and the well known strategy of solvation dynamics for the exploration of physical motions of the fluorescent probes and associated environments, respectively. Even though this particular probe on the protein (AEDANS) shows marginal changes in its structural flexibility upon interaction with the DNAs, a non-covalent DNA bound probe (DAPI), which binds to the minor groove, shows a major differential alteration in the dynamical flexibility in the OR3-Cro complex when compared to that of the OR2 complex with the Cro-protein. We attempt to correlate the observed significant structural fluctuation of the Cro-protein binding domain of OR3 for the specificity of the protein to the operator DNA. PMID:27326896

  17. Impact of intracellular domain flexibility upon properties of activated human 5-HT3 receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kozuska, J L; Paulsen, I M; Belfield, W J; Martin, I L; Cole, D J; Holt, A; Dunn, S M J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been proposed that arginine residues lining the intracellular portals of the homomeric 5-HT3A receptor cause electrostatic repulsion of cation flow, accounting for a single-channel conductance substantially lower than that of the 5-HT3AB heteromer. However, comparison of receptor homology models for wild-type pentamers suggests that salt bridges in the intracellular domain of the homomer may impart structural rigidity, and we hypothesized that this rigidity could account for the low conductance. Experimental Approach Mutations were introduced into the portal region of the human 5-HT3A homopentamer, such that putative salt bridges were broken by neutralizing anionic partners. Single-channel and whole cell currents were measured in transfected tsA201 cells and in Xenopus oocytes respectively. Computational simulations of protein flexibility facilitated comparison of wild-type and mutant receptors. Key Results Single-channel conductance was increased substantially, often to wild-type heteromeric receptor values, in most 5-HT3A mutants. Conversely, introduction of arginine residues to the portal region of the heteromer, conjecturally creating salt bridges, decreased conductance. Gating kinetics varied significantly between different mutant receptors. EC50 values for whole-cell responses to 5-HT remained largely unchanged, but Hill coefficients for responses to 5-HT were usually significantly smaller in mutants. Computational simulations suggested increased flexibility throughout the protein structure as a consequence of mutations in the intracellular domain. Conclusions and Implications These data support a role for intracellular salt bridges in maintaining the quaternary structure of the 5-HT3 receptor and suggest a role for the intracellular domain in allosteric modulation of cooperativity and agonist efficacy. Linked Article This article is commented on by Vardy and Kenakin, pp. 1614–1616 of volume 171 issue 7. To view this commentary

  18. WW domain folding complexity revealed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Caitlin M; Dyer, R Brian

    2014-09-01

    Although the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of proteins offers a convenient probe of protein folding, interpretation of the fluorescence spectrum is often difficult because it is sensitive to both global and local changes. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy offers a complementary measure of structural changes involved in protein folding, because it probes changes in the secondary structure of the protein backbone. Here we demonstrate the advantages of using multiple probes, infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy, to study the folding of the FBP28 WW domain. Laser-induced temperature jumps coupled with fluorescence or infrared spectroscopy have been used to probe changes in the peptide backbone on the submillisecond time scale. The relaxation dynamics of the β-sheets and β-turn were measured independently by probing the corresponding IR bands assigned in the amide I region. Using these wavelength-dependent measurements, we observe three kinetics phases, with the fastest process corresponding to the relaxation kinetics of the turns. In contrast, fluorescence measurements of the wild-type WW domain and tryptophan mutants exhibit single-exponential kinetics with a lifetime that corresponds to the slowest phase observed by infrared spectroscopy. Mutant sequences provide evidence of an intermediate dry molten globule state. The slowest step in the folding of this WW domain is the tight packing of the side chains in the transition from the dry molten globule intermediate to the native structure. This study demonstrates that using multiple complementary probes enhances the interpretation of protein folding dynamics. PMID:25121968

  19. Structural insights into the role of domain flexibility in human DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takashi; Wu, Qian; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Grossmann, J Günter; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Blundell, Tom L

    2012-07-01

    Knowledge of the architecture of DNA ligase IV (LigIV) and interactions with XRCC4 and XLF-Cernunnos is necessary for understanding its role in the ligation of double-strand breaks during nonhomologous end joining. Here we report the structure of a subdomain of the nucleotidyltrasferase domain of human LigIV and provide insights into the residues associated with LIG4 syndrome. We use this structural information together with the known structures of the BRCT/XRCC4 complex and those of LigIV orthologs to interpret small-angle X-ray scattering of LigIV in complex with XRCC4 and size exclusion chromatography of LigIV, XRCC4, and XLF-Cernunnos. Our results suggest that the flexibility of the catalytic region is limited in a manner that affects the formation of the LigIV/XRCC4/XLF-Cernunnos complex. PMID:22658747

  20. Structural Insights into the Role of Domain Flexibility in Human DNA Ligase IV

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Takashi; Wu, Qian; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Grossmann, J. Günter; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Knowledge of the architecture of DNA ligase IV (LigIV) and interactions with XRCC4 and XLF-Cernunnos is necessary for understanding its role in the ligation of double-strand breaks during nonhomologous end joining. Here we report the structure of a subdomain of the nucleotidyltrasferase domain of human LigIV and provide insights into the residues associated with LIG4 syndrome. We use this structural information together with the known structures of the BRCT/XRCC4 complex and those of LigIV orthologs to interpret small-angle X-ray scattering of LigIV in complex with XRCC4 and size exclusion chromatography of LigIV, XRCC4, and XLF-Cernunnos. Our results suggest that the flexibility of the catalytic region is limited in a manner that affects the formation of the LigIV/XRCC4/XLF-Cernunnos complex. PMID:22658747

  1. Generalized Frequency Domain State-Space Models for Analyzing Flexible Rotating Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, James D.; Elgohary, Tarek A.

    2012-06-01

    The mathematical model for a flexible spacecraft that is rotating about a single axis rotation is described by coupled rigid and flexible body degrees-of-freedom, where the equations of motion are modeled by integro-partial differential equations. Beam-like structures are often useful for analyzing boom-like flexible appendages. The equations of motion are analyzed by introducing generalized Fourier series that transform the governing equations into a system of ordinary differential equations. Though technically straightforward, two problems arise with this approach: (1) the model is frequency-truncated because a finite number of series terms are retained in the model, and (2) computationally intense matrix-valued transfer function calculations are required for understanding the frequency domain behavior of the system. Both of these problems are resolved by: (1) computing the Laplace transform of the governing integro-partial differential equation of motion; and (2) introducing a generalized state space (consisting of the deformational coordinate and three spatial partial derivatives, as well as single and double spatial integrals of the deformational coordinate). The resulting math model is cast in the form of a linear state-space differential equation that is solved in terms of a matrix exponential and convolution integral. The structural boundary conditions defined by Hamilton's principle are enforced on the closed-form solution for the generalized state space. The generalized state space model is then manipulated to provide analytic scalar transfer function models for original integro-partial differential system dynamics. Symbolic methods are used to obtain closed-form eigen decomposition- based solutions for the matrix exponential/convolution integral algorithm. Numerical results are presented that compare the classical series based approach with the generalized state space approach for computing representative spacecraft transfer function models.

  2. Structure of the ERM protein moesin reveals the FERM domain fold masked by an extended actin binding tail domain.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M A; Reczek, D; Bretscher, A; Karplus, P A

    2000-04-28

    The ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) protein family link actin filaments of cell surface structures to the plasma membrane, using a C-terminal F-actin binding segment and an N-terminal FERM domain, a common membrane binding module. ERM proteins are regulated by an intramolecular association of the FERM and C-terminal tail domains that masks their binding sites. The crystal structure of a dormant moesin FERM/tail complex reveals that the FERM domain has three compact lobes including an integrated PTB/PH/ EVH1 fold, with the C-terminal segment bound as an extended peptide masking a large surface of the FERM domain. This extended binding mode suggests a novel mechanism for how different signals could produce varying levels of activation. Sequence conservation suggests a similar regulation of the tumor suppressor merlin. PMID:10847681

  3. The Vanderbilt Expertise Test Reveals Domain-General and Domain-Specific Sex Effects in Object Recognition

    PubMed Central

    McGugin, Rankin W.; Richler, Jennifer J.; Herzmann, Grit; Speegle, Magen; Gauthier, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in face recognition are often contrasted with differences in object recognition using a single object category. Likewise, individual differences in perceptual expertise for a given object domain have typically been measured relative to only a single category baseline. In Experiment 1, we present a new test of object recognition, the Vanderbilt Expertise Test (VET), which is comparable in methods to the Cambridge Face Memory Task (CFMT) but uses eight different object categories. Principal component analysis reveals that the underlying structure of the VET can be largely explained by two independent factors, which demonstrate good reliability and capture interesting sex differences inherent in the VET structure. In Experiment 2, we show how the VET can be used to separate domain-specific from domain-general contributions to a standard measure of perceptual expertise. While domain-specific contributions are found for car matching for both men and women and for plane matching in men, women in this sample appear to use more domain-general strategies to match planes. In Experiment 3, we use the VET to demonstrate that holistic processing of faces predicts face recognition independently of general object recognition ability, which has a sex-specific contribution to face recognition. Overall, the results suggest that the VET is a reliable and valid measure of object recognition abilities and can measure both domain-general skills and domain-specific expertise, which were both found to depend on the sex of observers. PMID:22877929

  4. Flexibility of the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Phototaxis Transducer II from Natronomonas pharaonis

    PubMed Central

    Budyak, Ivan L.; Mironova, Olga S.; Yanamala, Naveena; Manoharan, Vijayalaxmi; Büldt, Georg; Schlesinger, Ramona; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Chemo- and phototaxis systems in bacteria and archaea serve as models for more complex signal transduction mechanisms in higher eukaryotes. Previous studies of the cytoplasmic fragment of the phototaxis transducer (pHtrII-cyt) from the halophilic archaeon Natronomonas pharaonis showed that it takes the shape of a monomeric or dimeric rod under low or high salt conditions, respectively. CD spectra revealed only approximately 24% helical structure, even in 4 M KCl, leaving it an open question how the rod-like shape is achieved. Here, we conducted CD, FTIR, and NMR spectroscopic studies under different conditions to address this question. We provide evidence that pHtrII-cyt is highly dynamic with strong helical propensity, which allows it to change from monomeric to dimeric helical coiled-coil states without undergoing dramatic shape changes. A statistical analysis of predicted disorder for homologous sequences suggests that structural flexibility is evolutionarily conserved within the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein family. PMID:20107574

  5. Solution NMR of MPS-1 reveals a random coil cytosolic domain structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Shi, Pan; Lai, Chaohua; Li, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans MPS1 is a single transmembrane helical auxiliary subunit that co-localizes with the voltage-gated potassium channel KVS1 in the nematode nervous system. MPS-1 shares high homology with KCNE (potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E member) auxiliary subunits, and its cytosolic domain was reported to have a serine/threonine kinase activity that modulates KVS1 channel function via phosphorylation. In this study, NMR spectroscopy indicated that the full length and truncated MPS-1 cytosolic domain (134-256) in the presence or absence of n-dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles adopted a highly flexible random coil secondary structure. In contrast, protein kinases usually adopt a stable folded conformation in order to implement substrate recognition and phosphoryl transfer. The highly flexible random coil secondary structure suggests that MPS-1 in the free state is unstructured but may require a substrate or binding partner to adopt stable structure required for serine/threonine kinase activity. PMID:25347290

  6. Solution NMR of MPS-1 Reveals a Random Coil Cytosolic Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chaohua; Li, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans MPS1 is a single transmembrane helical auxiliary subunit that co-localizes with the voltage-gated potassium channel KVS1 in the nematode nervous system. MPS-1 shares high homology with KCNE (potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E member) auxiliary subunits, and its cytosolic domain was reported to have a serine/threonine kinase activity that modulates KVS1 channel function via phosphorylation. In this study, NMR spectroscopy indicated that the full length and truncated MPS-1 cytosolic domain (134–256) in the presence or absence of n-dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles adopted a highly flexible random coil secondary structure. In contrast, protein kinases usually adopt a stable folded conformation in order to implement substrate recognition and phosphoryl transfer. The highly flexible random coil secondary structure suggests that MPS-1 in the free state is unstructured but may require a substrate or binding partner to adopt stable structure required for serine/threonine kinase activity. PMID:25347290

  7. Transcriptomic Signature of the SHATTERPROOF2 Expression Domain Reveals the Meristematic Nature of Arabidopsis Gynoecial Medial Domain.

    PubMed

    Villarino, Gonzalo H; Hu, Qiwen; Manrique, Silvia; Flores-Vergara, Miguel; Sehra, Bhupinder; Robles, Linda; Brumos, Javier; Stepanova, Anna N; Colombo, Lucia; Sundberg, Eva; Heber, Steffen; Franks, Robert G

    2016-05-01

    Plant meristems, like animal stem cell niches, maintain a pool of multipotent, undifferentiated cells that divide and differentiate to give rise to organs. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the carpel margin meristem is a vital meristematic structure that generates ovules from the medial domain of the gynoecium, the female floral reproductive structure. The molecular mechanisms that specify this meristematic region and regulate its organogenic potential are poorly understood. Here, we present a novel approach to analyze the transcriptional signature of the medial domain of the Arabidopsis gynoecium, highlighting the developmental stages that immediately proceed ovule initiation, the earliest stages of seed development. Using a floral synchronization system and a SHATTERPROOF2 (SHP2) domain-specific reporter, paired with FACS and RNA sequencing, we assayed the transcriptome of the gynoecial medial domain with temporal and spatial precision. This analysis reveals a set of genes that are differentially expressed within the SHP2 expression domain, including genes that have been shown previously to function during the development of medial domain-derived structures, including the ovules, thus validating our approach. Global analyses of the transcriptomic data set indicate a similarity of the pSHP2-expressing cell population to previously characterized meristematic domains, further supporting the meristematic nature of this gynoecial tissue. Our method identifies additional genes including novel isoforms, cis-natural antisense transcripts, and a previously unrecognized member of the REPRODUCTIVE MERISTEM family of transcriptional regulators that are potential novel regulators of medial domain development. This data set provides genome-wide transcriptional insight into the development of the carpel margin meristem in Arabidopsis. PMID:26983993

  8. Transcriptomic Signature of the SHATTERPROOF2 Expression Domain Reveals the Meristematic Nature of Arabidopsis Gynoecial Medial Domain1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Villarino, Gonzalo H.; Hu, Qiwen; Flores-Vergara, Miguel; Sehra, Bhupinder; Brumos, Javier; Stepanova, Anna N.; Sundberg, Eva; Heber, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Plant meristems, like animal stem cell niches, maintain a pool of multipotent, undifferentiated cells that divide and differentiate to give rise to organs. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the carpel margin meristem is a vital meristematic structure that generates ovules from the medial domain of the gynoecium, the female floral reproductive structure. The molecular mechanisms that specify this meristematic region and regulate its organogenic potential are poorly understood. Here, we present a novel approach to analyze the transcriptional signature of the medial domain of the Arabidopsis gynoecium, highlighting the developmental stages that immediately proceed ovule initiation, the earliest stages of seed development. Using a floral synchronization system and a SHATTERPROOF2 (SHP2) domain-specific reporter, paired with FACS and RNA sequencing, we assayed the transcriptome of the gynoecial medial domain with temporal and spatial precision. This analysis reveals a set of genes that are differentially expressed within the SHP2 expression domain, including genes that have been shown previously to function during the development of medial domain-derived structures, including the ovules, thus validating our approach. Global analyses of the transcriptomic data set indicate a similarity of the pSHP2-expressing cell population to previously characterized meristematic domains, further supporting the meristematic nature of this gynoecial tissue. Our method identifies additional genes including novel isoforms, cis-natural antisense transcripts, and a previously unrecognized member of the REPRODUCTIVE MERISTEM family of transcriptional regulators that are potential novel regulators of medial domain development. This data set provides genome-wide transcriptional insight into the development of the carpel margin meristem in Arabidopsis. PMID:26983993

  9. Crystal structures of ryanodine receptor SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains reveal a critical FKBP12 binding determinant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Yuen, Siobhan M. Wong King; Lau, Kelvin; Underhill, Ainsley Q.; Cornea, Razvan L.; Fessenden, James D.; van Petegem, Filip

    2015-08-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) form calcium release channels located in the membranes of the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. RyRs play a major role in excitation-contraction coupling and other Ca2+-dependent signalling events, and consist of several globular domains that together form a large assembly. Here we describe the crystal structures of the SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains at 1.2-1.5 Å resolution, which reveal several structural elements not detected in recent cryo-EM reconstructions of RyRs. The cryo-EM studies disagree on the position of SPRY domains, which had been proposed based on homology modelling. Computational docking of the crystal structures, combined with FRET studies, show that the SPRY1 domain is located next to FK506-binding protein (FKBP). Molecular dynamics flexible fitting and mutagenesis experiments suggest a hydrophobic cluster within SPRY1 that is crucial for FKBP binding. A RyR1 disease mutation, N760D, appears to directly impact FKBP binding through interfering with SPRY1 folding.

  10. Crystal structures of Ryanodine Receptor SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains reveal a critical FKBP12 binding determinant

    PubMed Central

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Wong King Yuen, Siobhan M.; Lau, Kelvin; Underhill, Ainsley Q.; Cornea, Razvan L.; Fessenden, James D.; Van Petegem, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) form calcium release channels located in the membranes of the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. RyRs play a major role in excitation-contraction coupling and other Ca2+-dependent signaling events, and consist of several globular domains that together form a large assembly. Here we describe the crystal structures of the SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains at 1.2 – 1.5Å resolution, which reveal several structural elements not detected in recent cryo-EM reconstructions of RyRs. The cryo-EM studies disagree on the position of SPRY domains, which had been proposed based on homology modeling. Computational docking of the crystal structures, combined with FRET studies, show that the SPRY1 domain is located next to FK506-Binding Protein (FKBP). Molecular dynamics flexible fitting and mutagenesis experiments suggest a hydrophobic cluster within SPRY1 that is crucial for FKBP binding. A RyR1 disease mutation, N760D, appears to directly impact FKBP binding through interfering with SPRY1 folding. PMID:26245150

  11. Flexible coprocessor architectures for ambient intelligent applications in the mobile communication and automotive domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, Winfried; Jachalsky, Joern; Wahle, Martin; Kruijtzer, Wido; Alba, Carlos; Sethuraman, Ramanathan

    2003-04-01

    Ambient Intelligent is expected to become one of the driving key factors of the semiconductors industry in this decade. One of the most promising areas in this respect is the advent of embedded smart imaging applications in a variety of consumer applications, like mobile communication devices and the automotive domain. The efficient VLSI implementation of these applications requires architectural concepts that enable the extraction of objects and associated information out of video sequences in real-time. The main architectural challenge is to find an appropriate trade-off between architectural flexibility and scalability in order to cope with moderate variations of the applied smart imaging algorithms on one hand and cost efficiency of the implementation on the other hand. This paper describes the algorithmic and architectural requirements for the implementation of smart imaging applications in the mentioned fields. The target system, based on an embedded RISC processor, embedded memory, and cores for accelerating essential functions, like morphological operations, connected component labeling, motion extraction etc., is presented. The functional system partitioning applied is based on HW acceleration of core functions that enable the extraction of low-level information out of the images of a video sequence. This information is provided to the embedded RISC processor for further abstraction of the image content information and interpretation of the image content by SW means. One of the focal points of this paper is the derivation of efficient architectural concepts for smart imaging coprocessors, acting as a system toolbox for accelerating the required smart imaging core functions.

  12. The backbone model of the Arabis mosaic virus reveals new insights into functional domains of Nepovirus capsid.

    PubMed

    Lai-Kee-Him, Joséphine; Schellenberger, Pascale; Dumas, Christian; Richard, Eric; Trapani, Stefano; Komar, Véronique; Demangeat, Gerard; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Bron, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV) and Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) are two picorna-like viruses from the genus Nepovirus, consisting in a bipartite RNA genome encapsidated into a 30 nm icosahedral viral particle formed by 60 copies of a single capsid protein (CP). They are responsible for a severe degeneration of grapevines that occurs in most vineyards worldwide. Although sharing a high level of sequence identity between their CP, ArMV is transmitted exclusively by the ectoparasitic nematode Xiphinema diversicaudatum whereas GFLV is specifically transmitted by the nematode X. index. The structural determinants involved in the transmission specificity of both viruses map solely to their respective CP. Recently, reverse genetic and crystallographic studies on GFLV revealed that a positively charged pocket in the CP B domain located at the virus surface may be responsible for vector specificity. To go further into delineating the coat protein determinants involved in transmission specificity, we determined the 6.5 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of ArMV and used homology modeling and flexible fitting approaches to build its pseudo-atomic structure. This study allowed us to resolve ArMV CP architecture and delineate connections between ArMV capsid shell and its RNA. Comparison of ArMV and GFLV CPs reveals structural differences in the B domain pocket, thus strengthening the hypothesis of a key role of this region in the viral transmission specificity and identifies new potential functional domains of Nepovirus capsid. PMID:23376736

  13. Extensive small-angle X-ray scattering studies of blood coagulation factor VIIa reveal interdomain flexibility.

    PubMed

    Mosbaek, Charlotte Rode; Nolan, David; Persson, Egon; Svergun, Dmitri I; Bukrinsky, Jens Thostrup; Vestergaard, Bente

    2010-11-16

    Blood coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) is used in the treatment of replacement therapy resistant hemophilia patients, and FVIIa is normally activated upon complex formation with tissue factor (TF), potentially in context with structural rearrangements. The solution behavior of uncomplexed FVIIa is important for understanding the mechanism of activation and for the stability and activity of the pharmaceutical product. However, crystal structures of FVIIa in complex with TF and of truncated free FVIIa reveal different overall conformations while previous small-angle scattering studies suggest FVIIa always to be fully extended in solution. Here, small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of multiple forms of FVIIa and TF under several experimental conditions elaborate extensively on the understanding of the solution behavior of FVIIa. We reveal significant FVIIa domain flexibility in solution, whereas TF has a well-defined conformation. Unspecific formation of dimers of FVIIa is also observed and varies with experimental conditions. In particular, active site-inhibited FVIIa displays a distinct solution behavior different from that of uninhibited FVIIa, which may reflect structural rearrangements causing resistance to activation, thereby emphasizing the connection between the distribution of different conformations of FVII and the mechanism of activation. PMID:20873866

  14. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    SciTech Connect

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  15. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction. PMID:27349982

  16. Comparison of S. cerevisiae F-BAR domain structures reveals a conserved inositol phosphate binding site

    PubMed Central

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Alvarado, Diego; Schmitz, Karl R.; Kenniston, Jon A.; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY F-BAR domains control membrane interactions in endocytosis, cytokinesis, and cell signaling. Although generally thought to bind curved membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids, numerous functional studies argue that differences in lipid-binding selectivities of F-BAR domains are functionally important. Here, we compare membrane-binding properties of the S. cerevisiae F-BAR domains in vitro and in vivo. Whereas some F-BAR domains (such as Bzz1p and Hof1p F-BARs) bind equally well to all phospholipids, the F-BAR domain from the RhoGAP Rgd1p preferentially binds phosphoinositides. We determined X-ray crystal structures of F-BAR domains from Hof1p and Rgd1p, the latter bound to an inositol phosphate. The structures explain phospholipid-binding selectivity differences, and reveal an F-BAR phosphoinositide binding site that is fully conserved in a mammalian RhoGAP called Gmip, and is partly retained in certain other F-BAR domains. Our findings reveal previously unappreciated determinants of F-BAR domain lipid-binding specificity, and provide a basis for its prediction from sequence. PMID:25620000

  17. IQGAP proteins reveal an atypical phosphoinositide (aPI) binding domain with a pseudo C2 domain fold.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Miles J; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R; van Aalten, Daan M F; Downes, C Peter; Batty, Ian H

    2012-06-29

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP(3)). The binding affinity for PtdInsP(3), together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP(3) effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules. PMID:22493426

  18. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  19. Coupled protein domain motion in Taq polymerase revealed by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Zimei; Biehl, Ralf; Monkenbusch, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Callaway, David J. E.

    2005-01-01

    Long-range conformational changes in proteins are ubiquitous in biology for the transmission and amplification of signals; such conformational changes can be triggered by small-amplitude, nanosecond protein domain motion. Understanding how conformational changes are initiated requires the characterization of protein domain motion on these timescales and on length scales comparable to protein dimensions. Using neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE), normal mode analysis, and a statistical-mechanical framework, we reveal overdamped, coupled domain motion within DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus (Taq polymerase). This protein utilizes correlated domain dynamics over 70 Å to coordinate nucleotide synthesis and cleavage during DNA synthesis and repair. We show that NSE spectroscopy can determine the domain mobility tensor, which determines the degree of dynamical coupling between domains. The mobility tensor defines the domain velocity response to a force applied to it or to another domain, just as the sails of a sailboat determine its velocity given the applied wind force. The NSE results provide insights into the nature of protein domain motion that are not appreciated by conventional biophysical techniques. PMID:16306270

  20. Characterizing WW Domain Interactions of Tumor Suppressor WWOX Reveals Its Association with Multiprotein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Bar-Mag, Tomer; Huang, Haiming; Kim, TaeHyung; Salah, Zaidoun; Abdeen, Suhaib K.; Sudol, Marius; Reichmann, Dana; Sidhu, Sachdev; Kim, Philip M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2014-01-01

    WW domains are small modules present in regulatory and signaling proteins that mediate specific protein-protein interactions. The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a 46-kDa tumor suppressor that contains two N-terminal WW domains and a central short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain. Based on its ligand recognition motifs, the WW domain family is classified into four groups. The largest one, to which WWOX belongs, recognizes ligands with a PPXY motif. To pursue the functional properties of the WW domains of WWOX, we employed mass spectrometry and phage display experiments to identify putative WWOX-interacting partners. Our analysis revealed that the first WW (WW1) domain of WWOX is the main functional interacting domain. Furthermore, our study uncovered well known and new PPXY-WW1-interacting partners and shed light on novel LPXY-WW1-interacting partners of WWOX. Many of these proteins are components of multiprotein complexes involved in molecular processes, including transcription, RNA processing, tight junction, and metabolism. By utilizing GST pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays, we validated that WWOX is a substrate of the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH, which contains two LPXY motifs. We found that ITCH mediates Lys-63-linked polyubiquitination of WWOX, leading to its nuclear localization and increased cell death. Our data suggest that the WW1 domain of WWOX provides a versatile platform that links WWOX with individual proteins associated with physiologically important networks. PMID:24550385

  1. Inversion Domain Boundaries in GaN Wires Revealed by Coherent Bragg Imaging.

    PubMed

    Labat, Stéphane; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Dupraz, Maxime; Gailhanou, Marc; Beutier, Guillaume; Verdier, Marc; Mastropietro, Francesca; Cornelius, Thomas W; Schülli, Tobias U; Eymery, Joël; Thomas, Olivier

    2015-09-22

    Interfaces between polarity domains in nitride semiconductors, the so-called Inversion Domain Boundaries (IDB), have been widely described, both theoretically and experimentally, as perfect interfaces (without dislocations and vacancies). Although ideal planar IDBs are well documented, the understanding of their configurations and interactions inside crystals relies on perfect-interface assumptions. Here, we report on the microscopic configuration of IDBs inside n-doped gallium nitride wires revealed by coherent X-ray Bragg imaging. Complex IDB configurations are evidenced with 6 nm resolution and the absolute polarity of each domain is unambiguously identified. Picoscale displacements along and across the wire are directly extracted from several Bragg reflections using phase retrieval algorithms, revealing rigid relative displacements of the domains and the absence of microscopic strain away from the IDBs. More generally, this method offers an accurate inner view of the displacements and strain of interacting defects inside small crystals that may alter optoelectronic properties of semiconductor devices. PMID:26322655

  2. Flexibility unleashed in acyclic monoterpenes: conformational space of citronellal revealed by broadband rotational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Sérgio R; Pérez, Cristóbal; Medcraft, Chris; Pinacho, Pablo; Schnell, Melanie

    2016-06-22

    Conformational flexibility is intrinsically related to the functionality of biomolecules. Elucidation of the potential energy surface is thus a necessary step towards understanding the mechanisms for molecular recognition such as docking of small organic molecules to larger macromolecular systems. In this work, we use broadband rotational spectroscopy in a molecular jet experiment to unravel the complex conformational space of citronellal. We observe fifteen conformations in the experimental conditions of the molecular jet, the highest number of conformers reported to date for a chiral molecule of this size using microwave spectroscopy. Studies of relative stability using different carrier gases in the supersonic expansion reveal conformational relaxation pathways that strongly favour ground-state structures with globular conformations. This study provides a blueprint of the complex conformational space of an important biosynthetic precursor and gives insights on the relation between its structure and biological functionality. PMID:27298210

  3. Action dynamics reveal two types of cognitive flexibility in a homonym relatedness judgment task

    PubMed Central

    Dshemuchadse, Maja; Grage, Tobias; Scherbaum, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive flexibility is a central component of executive functions that allow us to behave meaningful in an ever changing environment. Here, we support a distinction between two different types of cognitive flexibility, shifting flexibility and spreading flexibility, based on independent underlying mechanisms commonly subsumed under the ability to shift cognitive sets. We use a homonym relatedness judgment task and combine it with mouse tracking to show that these two types of cognitive flexibility follow independent temporal patterns in their influence on participants' mouse movements during relatedness judgments. Our results are in concordance with the predictions of a neural field based framework that assumes the independence of the two types of flexibility. We propose that future studies about cognitive flexibility in the area of executive functions should take independent types into account, especially when studying moderators of cognitive flexibility. PMID:26379580

  4. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  5. Structural and functional characterizations reveal the importance of a zinc binding domain in Bloom's syndrome helicase

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rong-bin; Rigolet, Pascal; Zargarian, Loussiné; Fermandjian, Serge; Xi, Xu Guang

    2005-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive human disorder characterized by genomic instability and a predisposition to a wide variety of cancers. The gene mutated in BS, BLM, encodes a protein containing three domains: an N-terminal domain whose function remains elusive, a helicase domain characterized by seven ‘signature’ motifs conserved in a wide range of helicases and a C-terminal extension that can be further divided into two sub-domains: RecQ-Ct and HRDC. The RecQ-Ct domain appears essential because two point-mutations altering highly conserved cysteine residues within this domain have been found in BS patients. We report herein that BLM contains a zinc ion. Modelling studies suggest that four conserved cysteine residues within the RecQ-Ct domain coordinate this zinc ion and subsequent mutagenesis studies further confirm this prediction. Biochemical and biophysical studies show that the ATPase, helicase and DNA binding activities of the mutants are severely modified. Structural analysis of both wild-type and mutant proteins reveal that alteration of cysteine residues does not significantly change the overall conformation. The observed defects in ATPase and helicase activities were inferred to result from a compromise of DNA binding. Our results implicate an important role of this zinc binding domain in both DNA binding and protein conformation. They could be pivotal for understanding the molecular basis of BS disease. PMID:15930159

  6. Deletion of a Cys-His motif from the Alpharetrovirus nucleocapsid domain reveals late domain mutant-like budding defects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Linial, Maxine L

    2006-03-30

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag polyprotein is the only protein required for virus assembly and release. We previously found that deletion of either one of the two Cys-His (CH) motifs in the RSV nucleocapsid (NC) protein did not abrogate Gag-Gag interactions, RNA binding, or packaging but greatly reduced virus production (E-G. Lee, A. Alidina et al., J. Virol. 77: 2010-2020, 2003). In this report, we have further investigated the effects of mutations in the CH motifs on virus assembly and release. Precise deletion of either CH motif, without affecting surrounding basic residues, reduced virus production by approximately 10-fold, similar to levels seen for late (L) domain mutants. Strikingly, transmission electron microscopy revealed that virions of both DeltaCH1 and DeltaCH2 mutants were assembled normally at the plasma membrane but were arrested in budding. Virus particles remained tethered to the membrane or to each other, reminiscent of L domain mutants, although the release defect appears to be independent of the L domain functions. Therefore, two CH motifs are likely to be required for budding independent of a requirement for either Gag-Gag interactions or RNA packaging. PMID:16406458

  7. Deletion of a Cys-His motif from the Alpharetrovirus nucleocapsid domain reveals late domain mutant-like budding defects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Linial, Maxine L. . E-mail: mlinial@fhcrc.org

    2006-03-30

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag polyprotein is the only protein required for virus assembly and release. We previously found that deletion of either one of the two Cys-His (CH) motifs in the RSV nucleocapsid (NC) protein did not abrogate Gag-Gag interactions, RNA binding, or packaging but greatly reduced virus production (E-G. Lee, A. Alidina et al., J. Virol. 77: 2010-2020, 2003). In this report, we have further investigated the effects of mutations in the CH motifs on virus assembly and release. Precise deletion of either CH motif, without affecting surrounding basic residues, reduced virus production by approximately 10-fold, similar to levels seen for late (L) domain mutants. Strikingly, transmission electron microscopy revealed that virions of both {delta}CH1 and {delta}CH2 mutants were assembled normally at the plasma membrane but were arrested in budding. Virus particles remained tethered to the membrane or to each other, reminiscent of L domain mutants, although the release defect appears to be independent of the L domain functions. Therefore, two CH motifs are likely to be required for budding independent of a requirement for either Gag-Gag interactions or RNA packaging.

  8. The prokaryotic Cys2His2 zinc-finger adopts a novel fold as revealed by the NMR structure of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ros DNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Malgieri, Gaetano; Russo, Luigi; Esposito, Sabrina; Baglivo, Ilaria; Zaccaro, Laura; Pedone, Emilia M.; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Isernia, Carla; Pedone, Paolo V.; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The first putative prokaryotic Cys2His2 zinc-finger domain has been identified in the transcriptional regulator Ros from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, indicating that the Cys2His2 zinc-finger domain, originally thought to be confined to the eukaryotic kingdom, could be widespread throughout the living kingdom from eukaryotic, both animal and plant, to prokaryotic. In this article we report the NMR solution structure of Ros DNA-binding domain (Ros87), providing 79 structural characterization of a prokaryotic Cys2His2 zinc-finger domain. The NMR structure of Ros87 shows that the putative prokaryotic Cys2His2 zinc-finger sequence is indeed part of a significantly larger zinc-binding globular domain that possesses a novel protein fold very different from the classical fold reported for the eukaryotic classical zinc-finger. The Ros87 globular domain consists of 58 aa (residues 9–66), is arranged in a βββαα topology, and is stabilized by an extensive 15-residue hydrophobic core. A backbone dynamics study of Ros87, based on 15N R1, 15N R2, and heteronuclear 15N-{1H}-NOE measurements, has further confirmed that the globular domain is uniformly rigid and flanked by two flexible tails. Mapping of the amino acids necessary for the DNA binding onto Ros87 structure reveals the protein surface involved in the DNA recognition mechanism of this new zinc-binding protein domain. PMID:17956987

  9. Crystal Structure of Human SSRP1 Middle Domain Reveals a Role in DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Zeng, Fuxing; Liu, Yiwei; Shao, Chen; Li, Sai; Lv, Hui; Shi, Yunyu; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    SSRP1 is a subunit of the FACT complex, an important histone chaperone required for transcriptional regulation, DNA replication and damage repair. SSRP1 also plays important roles in transcriptional regulation independent of Spt16 and interacts with other proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of the middle domain of SSRP1. It consists of tandem pleckstrin homology (PH) domains. These domains differ from the typical PH domain in that PH1 domain has an extra conserved βαβ topology. SSRP1 contains the well-characterized DNA-binding HMG-1 domain. Our studies revealed that SSRP1-M can also participate in DNA binding, and that this binding involves one positively charged patch on the surface of the structure. In addition, SSRP1-M did not bind to histones, which was assessed through pull-down assays. This aspect makes the protein different from other related proteins adopting the double PH domain structure. Our studies facilitate the understanding of SSRP1 and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of interaction with DNA and histones of the FACT complex. PMID:26687053

  10. The wing of the enhancer-binding domain of Mu phage transposase is flexible and is essential for efficient transposition.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Mizuuchi, M; Huth, J R; Omichinski, J G; Savilahti, H; Mizuuchi, K; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1996-02-01

    A tetramer of the Mu transposase (MuA) pairs the recombination sites, cleaves the donor DNA, and joins these ends to a target DNA by strand transfer. Juxtaposition of the recombination sites is accomplished by the assembly of a stable synaptic complex of MuA protein and Mu DNA. This initial critical step is facilitated by the transient binding of the N-terminal domain of MuA to an enhancer DNA element within the Mu genome (called the internal activation sequence, IAS). Recently we solved the three-dimensional solution structure of the enhancer-binding domain of Mu phage transposase (residues 1-76, MuA76) and proposed a model for its interaction with the IAS element. Site-directed mutagenesis coupled with an in vitro transposition assay has been used to assess the validity of the model. We have identified five residues on the surface of MuA that are crucial for stable synaptic complex formation but dispensable for subsequent events in transposition. These mutations are located in the loop (wing) structure and recognition helix of the MuA76 domain of the transposase and do not seriously perturb the structure of the domain. Furthermore, in order to understand the dynamic behavior of the MuA76 domain prior to stable synaptic complex formation, we have measured heteronuclear 15N relaxation rates for the unbound MuA76 domain. In the DNA free state the backbone atoms of the helix-turn-helix motif are generally immobilized whereas the residues in the wing are highly flexible on the pico- to nanosecond time scale. Together these studies define the surface of MuA required for enhancement of transposition in vitro and suggest that a flexible loop in the MuA protein required for DNA recognition may become structurally ordered only upon DNA binding. PMID:8577730

  11. Domain folding and flexibility of Escherichia coli FtsZ determined by tryptophan site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo; Garcés, Andrea P.; Arbildua, José J.; Montecinos, Felipe; Brunet, Juan E.; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2007-01-01

    FtsZ has two domains, the amino GTPase domain with a Rossmann fold, and the carboxyl domain that resembles the chorismate mutase fold. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that the interdomain interaction is stronger than the interaction of the protofilament longitudinal interfaces. Crystal B factor analysis of FtsZ and detected conformational changes suggest a connection between these domains. The unfolding/folding characteristics of each domain of FtsZ were tested by introducing tryptophans into the flexible region of the amino (F135W) and the carboxyl (F275W and I294W) domains. As a control, the mutation F40W was introduced in a more rigid part of the amino domain. These mutants showed a native-like structure with denaturation and renaturation curves similar to wild type. However, the I294W mutant showed a strong loss of functionality, both in vivo and in vitro when compared to the other mutants. The functionality was recovered with the double mutant I294W/F275A, which showed full in vivo complementation with a slight increment of in vitro GTPase activity with respect to the single mutant. The formation of a stabilizing aromatic interaction involving a stacking between the tryptophan introduced at position 294 and phenylalanine 275 could account for these results. Folding/unfolding of these mutants induced by guanidinium chloride was compatible with a mechanism in which both domains within the protein show the same stability during FtsZ denaturation and renaturation, probably because of strong interface interactions. PMID:17656575

  12. Biomimetic and Live Medusae Reveal the Mechanistic Advantages of a Flexible Bell Margin

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Sean P.; Costello, John H.; Dabiri, John O.; Villanueva, Alex; Blottman, John B.; Gemmell, Brad J.; Priya, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Flexible bell margins are characteristic components of rowing medusan morphologies and are expected to contribute towards their high propulsive efficiency. However, the mechanistic basis of thrust augmentation by flexible propulsors remained unresolved, so the impact of bell margin flexibility on medusan swimming has also remained unresolved. We used biomimetic robotic jellyfish vehicles to elucidate that propulsive thrust enhancement by flexible medusan bell margins relies upon fluid dynamic interactions between entrained flows at the inflexion point of the exumbrella and flows expelled from under the bell. Coalescence of flows from these two regions resulted in enhanced fluid circulation and, therefore, thrust augmentation for flexible margins of both medusan vehicles and living medusae. Using particle image velocimetry (PIV) data we estimated pressure fields to demonstrate a mechanistic basis of enhanced flows associated with the flexible bell margin. Performance of vehicles with flexible margins was further enhanced by vortex interactions that occur during bell expansion. Hydrodynamic and performance similarities between robotic vehicles and live animals demonstrated that the propulsive advantages of flexible margins found in nature can be emulated by human-engineered propulsors. Although medusae are simple animal models for description of this process, these results may contribute towards understanding the performance of flexible margins among other animal lineages. PMID:23145016

  13. Replicate altitudinal clines reveal that evolutionary flexibility underlies adaptation to drought stress in annual Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed

    Kooyers, Nicholas J; Greenlee, Anna B; Colicchio, Jack M; Oh, Morgan; Blackman, Benjamin K

    2015-04-01

    Examining how morphology, life history and physiology vary along environmental clines can reveal functional insight into adaptations to climate and thus inform predictions about evolutionary responses to global change. Widespread species occurring over latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in seasonal water availability are excellent systems for investigating multivariate adaptation to drought stress. Under common garden conditions, we characterized variation in 27 traits for 52 annual populations of Mimulus guttatus sampled from 10 altitudinal transects. We also assessed variation in the critical photoperiod for flowering and surveyed neutral genetic markers to control for demography when analyzing clinal patterns. Many drought escape (e.g. flowering time) and drought avoidance (e.g. specific leaf area, succulence) traits exhibited geographic or climatic clines, which often remained significant after accounting for population structure. Critical photoperiod and flowering time in glasshouse conditions followed distinct clinal patterns, indicating different aspects of seasonal phenology confer adaptation to unique agents of selection. Although escape and avoidance traits were negatively correlated range-wide, populations from sites with short growing seasons produced both early flowering and dehydration avoidance phenotypes. Our results highlight how abundant genetic variation in the component traits that build multivariate adaptations to drought stress provides flexibility for intraspecific adaptation to diverse climates. PMID:25407964

  14. Torsional flexibility of B-DNA as revealed by conformational analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhurkin, V B; Lysov, Y P; Florentiev, V L; Ivanov, V I

    1982-01-01

    The thermal fluctuations of a regular double helix belonging to the B-family were studied by means of atom-atomic potentials method. The winding angle fluctuation was found to be 2.4 degrees for poly(dA):poly(dT) and 3.0 degrees for poly(dG):poly(dC). The reasonable agreement of these estimations with those obtained experimentally reveals the essential role of the small-amplitude torsional vibrations of atoms in the mechanism of the double helix flexibility. The calculated equilibrium winding angle, tau 0, essentially depends on the degree of neutralization of phosphate groups, being about 35.5 degrees for the full neutralization. The deoxyribose pucker is closely related to the tau angle: while tau proceeds from 30 degrees to 45 degrees the pseudorotation phase angle, P, increases from 126 degrees to 164 degrees. Fluctuations of the angles TL and TW, which specify inclination of the bases to the helix axis, were evaluated to be 5 degrees-10 degrees. Possible correlation between conformational changes in the adjacent nucleotides is discussed. PMID:7071023

  15. Conformational Flexibility in the Flap Domains of Ligand-Free HIV Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Heaslet, H.; Rosenfeld, R.; Giffin, M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Tam, K.; Torbett, B.E.; Elder, J.H.; Stout, C.D.

    2009-06-01

    The crystal structures of wild-type HIV protease (HIV PR) in the absence of substrate or inhibitor in two related crystal forms at 1.4 and 2.15 {angstrom} resolution are reported. In one crystal form HIV PR adopts an 'open' conformation with a 7.7 {angstrom} separation between the tips of the flaps in the homodimer. In the other crystal form the tips of the flaps are 'curled' towards the 80s loop, forming contacts across the local twofold axis. The 2.3 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a sixfold mutant of HIV PR in the absence of substrate or inhibitor is also reported. The mutant HIV PR, which evolved in response to treatment with the potent inhibitor TL-3, contains six point mutations relative to the wild-type enzyme (L24I, M46I, F53L, L63P, V77I, V82A). In this structure the flaps also adopt a 'curled' conformation, but are separated and not in contact. Comparison of the apo structures to those with TL-3 bound demonstrates the extent of conformational change induced by inhibitor binding, which includes reorganization of the packing between twofold-related flaps. Further comparison with six other apo HIV PR structures reveals that the 'open' and 'curled' conformations define two distinct families in HIV PR. These conformational states include hinge motion of residues at either end of the flaps, opening and closing the entire {beta}-loop, and translational motion of the flap normal to the dimer twofold axis and relative to the 80s loop. The alternate conformations also entail changes in the {beta}-turn at the tip of the flap. These observations provide insight into the plasticity of the flap domains, the nature of their motions and their critical role in binding substrates and inhibitors.

  16. The exomer cargo adaptor structure reveals a novel GTPase-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E; Richardson, Brian C; Strassner, Amanda M; Fromme, J Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Cargo adaptors control intracellular trafficking of transmembrane proteins by sorting them into membrane transport carriers. The COPI, COPII, and clathrin cargo adaptors are structurally well characterized, but other cargo adaptors remain poorly understood. Exomer is a specialized cargo adaptor that sorts specific proteins into trans-Golgi network (TGN)-derived vesicles in response to cellular signals. Exomer is recruited to the TGN by the Arf1 GTPase, a universally conserved trafficking regulator. Here, we report the crystal structure of a tetrameric exomer complex composed of two copies each of the Chs5 and Chs6 subunits. The structure reveals the FN3 and BRCT domains of Chs5, which together we refer to as the FBE domain (FN3–BRCT of exomer), project from the exomer core complex. The overall architecture of the FBE domain is reminiscent of the appendage domains of other cargo adaptors, although it exhibits a distinct topology. In contrast to appendage domains, which bind accessory factors, we show that the primary role of the FBE domain is to bind Arf1 for recruitment of exomer to membranes. PMID:23000721

  17. Role of the Cro repressor carboxy-terminal domain and flexible dimer linkage in operator and nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, A J; Bracco, L P; Eisenbeis, S J; Gayle, R B; Beaton, G; Caruthers, M H

    1990-10-01

    A series of mutations comprising single and multiple substitutions, deletions, and extensions within the carboxy-terminal domain of the bacteriophage lambda Cro repressor have been constructed. These mutations generally affect the affinity of repressor for specific and nonspecific DNA. Additionally, substitution of the carboxy-terminal alanine with several amino acids capable of hydrogen-bonding interactions leads to improved specific binding affinities. A mutation is also described whereby cysteine links the two Cro monomers by a disulfide bond. As a consequence, a significant improvement in nonspecific binding and a concomitant reduction in specific binding are observed with this mutant. These results provide evidence that the carboxy terminus of Cro repressor is an important DNA binding domain and that a flexible connection between the two repressor monomers is a critical factor in modulating the affinity of wild-type repressor for DNA. PMID:2271592

  18. Social inequalities in the impact of flexible employment on different domains of psychosocial health

    PubMed Central

    Artazcoz, L.; Benach, J.; Borrell, C.; Cortes, I.

    2005-01-01

    Study objectives: (1) To analyse the impact of flexible employment on mental health and job dissatisfaction; and (2) to examine the constraints imposed by flexible employment on men's and women's partnership formation and people's decision to become parents. For the two objectives the potentially different patterns by sex and social class are explored. Design: Cross sectional health survey. Multiple logistic regression models separated for sex and social class (manual and non-manual workers) and controlling for age were fitted. Four types of contractual arrangements have been considered: permanent, fixed term temporary contract, non-fixed term temporary contract, and no contract. Setting: Catalonia (a region in the north east of Spain). Participants: Salaried workers interviewed in the 2002 Catalonian health survey with no longstanding limiting illness, aged 16–64 (1474 men and 998 women). Main results: Fixed term temporary contracts were not associated with poor mental health status. The impact of other forms of flexible employment on mental health depended on the type of contractual arrangement, sex, and social class and it was restricted to less privileged workers, women, and manual male workers. The impact of flexible employment on living arrangements was higher in men. Among both manual and non-manual male workers, those with fixed term temporary contracts were less likely to have children when married or cohabiting and, additionally, among non-manual male workers they also were more likely to remain single (aOR = 2.35; 95%CI = 1.13 to 4.90). Conclusion: Some forms of temporary contracts are related to adverse health and psychosocial outcomes with different patterns depending on the outcome analysed and on sex and social class. Future research should incorporate variables to capture situations of precariousness associated with flexible employment. PMID:16100314

  19. Temporally chimeric mice reveal flexibility of circadian period-setting in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Smyllie, Nicola J.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Hamnett, Ryan; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Hastings, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian clock controlling daily behavior in mammals. It consists of a heterogeneous network of neurons, in which cell-autonomous molecular feedback loops determine the period and amplitude of circadian oscillations of individual cells. In contrast, circuit-level properties of coherence, synchrony, and ensemble period are determined by intercellular signals and are embodied in a circadian wave of gene expression that progresses daily across the SCN. How cell-autonomous and circuit-level mechanisms interact in timekeeping is poorly understood. To explore this interaction, we used intersectional genetics to create temporally chimeric mice with SCN containing dopamine 1a receptor (Drd1a) cells with an intrinsic period of 24 h alongside non-Drd1a cells with 20-h clocks. Recording of circadian behavior in vivo alongside cellular molecular pacemaking in SCN slices in vitro demonstrated that such chimeric circuits form robust and resilient circadian clocks. It also showed that the computation of ensemble period is nonlinear. Moreover, the chimeric circuit sustained a wave of gene expression comparable to that of nonchimeric SCN, demonstrating that this circuit-level property is independent of differences in cell-intrinsic periods. The relative dominance of 24-h Drd1a and 20-h non-Drd1a neurons in setting ensemble period could be switched by exposure to resonant or nonresonant 24-h or 20-h lighting cycles. The chimeric circuit therefore reveals unanticipated principles of circuit-level operation underlying the emergent plasticity, resilience, and robustness of the SCN clock. The spontaneous and light-driven flexibility of period observed in chimeric mice provides a new perspective on the concept of SCN pacemaker cells. PMID:26966234

  20. Temporally chimeric mice reveal flexibility of circadian period-setting in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Smyllie, Nicola J; Chesham, Johanna E; Hamnett, Ryan; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Hastings, Michael H

    2016-03-29

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian clock controlling daily behavior in mammals. It consists of a heterogeneous network of neurons, in which cell-autonomous molecular feedback loops determine the period and amplitude of circadian oscillations of individual cells. In contrast, circuit-level properties of coherence, synchrony, and ensemble period are determined by intercellular signals and are embodied in a circadian wave of gene expression that progresses daily across the SCN. How cell-autonomous and circuit-level mechanisms interact in timekeeping is poorly understood. To explore this interaction, we used intersectional genetics to create temporally chimeric mice with SCN containing dopamine 1a receptor (Drd1a) cells with an intrinsic period of 24 h alongside non-Drd1a cells with 20-h clocks. Recording of circadian behavior in vivo alongside cellular molecular pacemaking in SCN slices in vitro demonstrated that such chimeric circuits form robust and resilient circadian clocks. It also showed that the computation of ensemble period is nonlinear. Moreover, the chimeric circuit sustained a wave of gene expression comparable to that of nonchimeric SCN, demonstrating that this circuit-level property is independent of differences in cell-intrinsic periods. The relative dominance of 24-h Drd1a and 20-h non-Drd1a neurons in setting ensemble period could be switched by exposure to resonant or nonresonant 24-h or 20-h lighting cycles. The chimeric circuit therefore reveals unanticipated principles of circuit-level operation underlying the emergent plasticity, resilience, and robustness of the SCN clock. The spontaneous and light-driven flexibility of period observed in chimeric mice provides a new perspective on the concept of SCN pacemaker cells. PMID:26966234

  1. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks.

  2. Mechanism of intermediate filament recognition by plakin repeat domains revealed by envoplakin targeting of vimentin

    PubMed Central

    Fogl, Claudia; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Al-Jassar, Caezar; Jeeves, Mark; Knowles, Timothy J.; Rodriguez-Zamora, Penelope; White, Scott A.; Odintsova, Elena; Overduin, Michael; Chidgey, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    Plakin proteins form critical connections between cell junctions and the cytoskeleton; their disruption within epithelial and cardiac muscle cells cause skin-blistering diseases and cardiomyopathies. Envoplakin has a single plakin repeat domain (PRD) which recognizes intermediate filaments through an unresolved mechanism. Herein we report the crystal structure of envoplakin's complete PRD fold, revealing binding determinants within its electropositive binding groove. Four of its five internal repeats recognize negatively charged patches within vimentin via five basic determinants that are identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mutations of the Lys1901 or Arg1914 binding determinants delocalize heterodimeric envoplakin from intracellular vimentin and keratin filaments in cultured cells. Recognition of vimentin is abolished when its residues Asp112 or Asp119 are mutated. The latter slot intermediate filament rods into basic PRD domain grooves through electrosteric complementarity in a widely applicable mechanism. Together this reveals how plakin family members form dynamic linkages with cytoskeletal frameworks. PMID:26935805

  3. Revealing a new activity of the human Dicer DUF283 domain in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kurzynska-Kokorniak, Anna; Pokornowska, Maria; Koralewska, Natalia; Hoffmann, Weronika; Bienkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The ribonuclease Dicer is a multidomain enzyme that plays a fundamental role in the biogenesis of small regulatory RNAs (srRNAs), which control gene expression by targeting complementary transcripts and inducing their cleavage or repressing their translation. Recent studies of Dicer’s domains have permitted to propose their roles in srRNA biogenesis. For all of Dicer’s domains except one, called DUF283 (domain of unknown function), their involvement in RNA substrate recognition, binding or cleavage has been postulated. For DUF283, the interaction with Dicer’s protein partners has been the only function suggested thus far. In this report, we demonstrate that the isolated DUF283 domain from human Dicer is capable of binding single-stranded nucleic acids in vitro. We also show that DUF283 can act as a nucleic acid annealer that accelerates base-pairing between complementary RNA/DNA molecules in vitro. We further demonstrate an annealing activity of full length human Dicer. The overall results suggest that Dicer, presumably through its DUF283 domain, might facilitate hybridization between short RNAs and their targets. The presented findings reveal the complex nature of Dicer, whose functions may extend beyond the biogenesis of srRNAs. PMID:27045313

  4. Structure analysis reveals the flexibility of the ADAMTS-5 active site.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Tomasselli, Alfredo G; Mathis, Karl J; Schnute, Mark E; Woodard, Scott S; Caspers, Nicole; Williams, Jennifer M; Kiefer, James R; Munie, Grace; Wittwer, Arthur; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Tortorella, Micky D

    2011-04-01

    A ((1S,2R)-2-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl) succinamide derivative (here referred to as Compound 12) shows significant activity toward many matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-13. Modeling studies had predicted that this compound would not bind to ADAMTS-5 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5) due to its shallow S1' pocket. However, inhibition analysis revealed it to be a nanomolar inhibitor of both ADAMTS-4 and -5. The observed inconsistency was explained by analysis of crystallographic structures, which showed that Compound 12 in complex with the catalytic domain of ADAMTS-5 (cataTS5) exhibits an unusual conformation in the S1' pocket of the protein. This first demonstration that cataTS5 can undergo an induced conformational change in its active site pocket by a molecule like Compound 12 should enable the design of new aggrecanase inhibitors with better potency and selectivity profiles. PMID:21370305

  5. Pax-3-DNA interaction: flexibility in the DNA binding and induction of DNA conformational changes by paired domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chalepakis, G; Wijnholds, J; Gruss, P

    1994-01-01

    The mouse Pax-3 gene encodes a protein that is a member of the Pax family of DNA binding proteins. Pax-3 contains two DNA binding domains: a paired domain (PD) and a paired type homeodomain (HD). Both domains are separated by 53 amino acids and interact synergistically with a sequence harboring an ATTA motif (binding to the HD) and a GTTCC site (binding to the PD) separated by 5 base pairs. Here we show that the interaction of Pax-3 with these two binding sites is independent of their angular orientation. In addition, the protein spacer region between the HD and the PD can be shortened without changing the spatial flexibility of the two DNA binding domains which interact with DNA. Furthermore, by using circular permutation analysis we determined that binding of Pax-3 to a DNA fragment containing a specific binding site causes conformational changes in the DNA, as indicated by the different mobilities of the Pax-3-DNA complexes. The ability to change the conformation of the DNA was found to be an intrinsic property of the Pax-3 PD and of all Pax proteins that we tested so far. These in vitro studies suggest that interaction of Pax proteins with their specific sequences in vivo may result in an altered DNA conformation. Images PMID:8065927

  6. Structure of the Response Regulator PhoP from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals a Dimer Through the Receiver Domain

    SciTech Connect

    S Menon; S Wang

    2011-12-31

    The PhoP protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a response regulator of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily, whose structure consists of an N-terminal receiver domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain. How the DNA-binding activities are regulated by phosphorylation of the receiver domain remains unclear due to a lack of structural information on the full-length proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length PhoP of M. tuberculosis. Unlike other known structures of full-length proteins of the same subfamily, PhoP forms a dimer through its receiver domain with the dimer interface involving {alpha}4-{beta}5-{alpha}5, a common interface for activated receiver domain dimers. However, the switch residues, Thr99 and Tyr118, are in a conformation resembling those of nonactivated receiver domains. The Tyr118 side chain is involved in the dimer interface interactions. The receiver domain is tethered to the DNA-binding domain through a flexible linker and does not impose structural constraints on the DNA-binding domain. This structure suggests that phosphorylation likely facilitates/stabilizes receiver domain dimerization, bringing the DNA-binding domains to close proximity, thereby increasing their binding affinity for direct repeat DNA sequences.

  7. Efficiency and Flexibility of Indirect Addition in the Domain of Multi-Digit Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbeyns, Joke; Ghesquiere, Pol; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the characteristics of the indirect addition strategy (IA) in the domain of multi-digit subtraction. In two studies, adults' use of IA on three-digit subtractions with a small, medium, or large difference between the integers was analysed using the choice/no-choice method. Results from both studies indicate that adults…

  8. Single-cell sequencing of Thiomargarita reveals genomic flexibility for adaptation to dynamic redox conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Winkel, Matthias; Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Woyke, Tanja; Richter, Michael; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N.; Flood, Beverly E.; Bailey, Jake V.; Mußmann, Marc

    2016-06-21

    Large, colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (LSB) of the family Beggiatoaceae form thick mats at sulfidic sediment surfaces, where they efficiently detoxify sulfide before it enters the water column. The genus Thiomargarita harbors the largest known free-living bacteria with cell sizes of up to 750 μm in diameter. In addition to their ability to oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, some Thiornargarita spp. are known to store large amounts of nitrate, phosphate and elemental sulfur internally. To date little is known about their energy yielding metabolic pathways, and how these pathways compare to other Beggiatoaceae. Here, we present a draft single-cell genome of amore » chain-forming "Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Thio36", and conduct a comparative analysis to five draft and one full genome of other members of the Beggiatoaceae. "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" is able to respire nitrate to both ammonium and dinitrogen, which allows them to flexibly respond to environmental changes. Genes for sulfur oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation confirmed that "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" can function as a chemolithoautotroph. Carbon can be fixed via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, which is common among the Beggiatoaceae. In addition we found key genes of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle that point toward an alternative CO2 fixation pathway. Surprisingly, "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" also encodes key genes of the C2-cycle that convert 2-phosphoglycolate to 3-phosphoglycerate during photorespiration in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Moreover, we identified a novel trait of a flavin-based energy bifurcation pathway coupled to a Na+-translocating membrane complex (Rnf). The coupling of these pathways may be key to surviving long periods of anoxia. As other Beggiatoaceae "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" encodes many genes similar to those of (filamentous) cyanobacteria. In conclusion, the genome of "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" provides additional insight into the ecology of giant sulfur

  9. Single-cell Sequencing of Thiomargarita Reveals Genomic Flexibility for Adaptation to Dynamic Redox Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Winkel, Matthias; Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Woyke, Tanja; Richter, Michael; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N.; Flood, Beverly E.; Bailey, Jake V.; Mußmann, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Large, colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (LSB) of the family Beggiatoaceae form thick mats at sulfidic sediment surfaces, where they efficiently detoxify sulfide before it enters the water column. The genus Thiomargarita harbors the largest known free-living bacteria with cell sizes of up to 750 μm in diameter. In addition to their ability to oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, some Thiomargarita spp. are known to store large amounts of nitrate, phosphate and elemental sulfur internally. To date little is known about their energy yielding metabolic pathways, and how these pathways compare to other Beggiatoaceae. Here, we present a draft single-cell genome of a chain-forming “Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Thio36”, and conduct a comparative analysis to five draft and one full genome of other members of the Beggiatoaceae. “Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36” is able to respire nitrate to both ammonium and dinitrogen, which allows them to flexibly respond to environmental changes. Genes for sulfur oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation confirmed that “Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36” can function as a chemolithoautotroph. Carbon can be fixed via the Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle, which is common among the Beggiatoaceae. In addition we found key genes of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle that point toward an alternative CO2 fixation pathway. Surprisingly, “Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36” also encodes key genes of the C2-cycle that convert 2-phosphoglycolate to 3-phosphoglycerate during photorespiration in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Moreover, we identified a novel trait of a flavin-based energy bifurcation pathway coupled to a Na+-translocating membrane complex (Rnf). The coupling of these pathways may be key to surviving long periods of anoxia. As other Beggiatoaceae “Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36” encodes many genes similar to those of (filamentous) cyanobacteria. In summary, the genome of “Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36” provides additional insight into the ecology of

  10. Single-cell Sequencing of Thiomargarita Reveals Genomic Flexibility for Adaptation to Dynamic Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Matthias; Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Woyke, Tanja; Richter, Michael; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N; Flood, Beverly E; Bailey, Jake V; Mußmann, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Large, colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (LSB) of the family Beggiatoaceae form thick mats at sulfidic sediment surfaces, where they efficiently detoxify sulfide before it enters the water column. The genus Thiomargarita harbors the largest known free-living bacteria with cell sizes of up to 750 μm in diameter. In addition to their ability to oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, some Thiomargarita spp. are known to store large amounts of nitrate, phosphate and elemental sulfur internally. To date little is known about their energy yielding metabolic pathways, and how these pathways compare to other Beggiatoaceae. Here, we present a draft single-cell genome of a chain-forming "Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Thio36", and conduct a comparative analysis to five draft and one full genome of other members of the Beggiatoaceae. "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" is able to respire nitrate to both ammonium and dinitrogen, which allows them to flexibly respond to environmental changes. Genes for sulfur oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation confirmed that "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" can function as a chemolithoautotroph. Carbon can be fixed via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, which is common among the Beggiatoaceae. In addition we found key genes of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle that point toward an alternative CO2 fixation pathway. Surprisingly, "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" also encodes key genes of the C2-cycle that convert 2-phosphoglycolate to 3-phosphoglycerate during photorespiration in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Moreover, we identified a novel trait of a flavin-based energy bifurcation pathway coupled to a Na(+)-translocating membrane complex (Rnf). The coupling of these pathways may be key to surviving long periods of anoxia. As other Beggiatoaceae "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" encodes many genes similar to those of (filamentous) cyanobacteria. In summary, the genome of "Ca. T. nelsonii Thio36" provides additional insight into the ecology of giant sulfur

  11. Activation of Nanoscale Allosteric Protein Domain Motion Revealed by Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Farago, Bela; Li, Jianquan; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2010-01-01

    NHERF1 is a multidomain scaffolding protein that assembles signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by the membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 Ångstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length-scales and on submicrosecond timescales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much-simplified coarse-grained model suffices to describe interdomain motion of a multidomain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves changes in long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond timescales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE. PMID:21081097

  12. Crystal structure of the HCV IRES central domain reveals strategy for start-codon positioning.

    PubMed

    Berry, Katherine E; Waghray, Shruti; Mortimer, Stefanie A; Bai, Yun; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2011-10-12

    Translation of hepatitis C viral proteins requires an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located in the 5' untranslated region of the viral mRNA. The core domain of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) IRES contains a four-way helical junction that is integrated within a predicted pseudoknot. This domain is required for positioning the mRNA start codon correctly on the 40S ribosomal subunit during translation initiation. Here, we present the crystal structure of this RNA, revealing a complex double-pseudoknot fold that establishes the alignment of two helical elements on either side of the four-helix junction. The conformation of this core domain constrains the open reading frame's orientation for positioning on the 40S ribosomal subunit. This structure, representing the last major domain of HCV-like IRESs to be determined at near-atomic resolution, provides the basis for a comprehensive cryoelectron microscopy-guided model of the intact HCV IRES and its interaction with 40S ribosomal subunits. PMID:22000514

  13. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  14. Nonlinear effects of a modal domain optical fiber sensor in a vibration suppression control loop for a flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, D. K.; Zvonar, G. A.; Baumann, W. T.; Delos, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a modal domain optical fiber sensor has been demonstrated as a sensor in a control system for vibration suppression of a flexible cantilevered beam. This sensor responds to strain through a mechanical attachment to the structure. Because this sensor is of the interferometric type, the output of the sensor has a sinusoidal nonlinearity. For small levels of strain, the sensor can be operated in its linear region. For large levels of strain, the detection electronics can be configured to count fringes. In both of these configurations, the sensor nonlinearity imposes some restrictions on the performance of the control system. In this paper we investigate the effects of these sensor nonlinearities on the control system, and identify the region of linear operation in terms of the optical fiber sensor parameters.

  15. Origins of Structural Flexibility in Protein-Based Supramolecular Polymers Revealed by DEER Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Modular assembly of bio-inspired supramolecular polymers is a powerful technique to develop new soft nanomaterials, and protein folding is a versatile basis for preparing such materials. Previous work demonstrated a significant difference in the physical properties of closely related supramolecular polymers composed of building blocks in which identical coiled-coil-forming peptides are cross-linked by one of two subtly different organic linkers (one flexible and the other rigid). Herein, we investigate the molecular basis for this observation by isolating a single subunit of the supramolecular polymer chain and probing its structure and conformational flexibility by double electron–electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy. Experimental spin–spin distance distributions for two different labeling sites coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into how the linker structure impacts chain dynamics in the coiled-coil supramolecular polymer. PMID:25060334

  16. Origins of structural flexibility in protein-based supramolecular polymers revealed by DEER spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tavenor, Nathan A; Silva, K Ishara; Saxena, Sunil; Horne, W Seth

    2014-08-21

    Modular assembly of bio-inspired supramolecular polymers is a powerful technique to develop new soft nanomaterials, and protein folding is a versatile basis for preparing such materials. Previous work demonstrated a significant difference in the physical properties of closely related supramolecular polymers composed of building blocks in which identical coiled-coil-forming peptides are cross-linked by one of two subtly different organic linkers (one flexible and the other rigid). Herein, we investigate the molecular basis for this observation by isolating a single subunit of the supramolecular polymer chain and probing its structure and conformational flexibility by double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy. Experimental spin-spin distance distributions for two different labeling sites coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into how the linker structure impacts chain dynamics in the coiled-coil supramolecular polymer. PMID:25060334

  17. On the robust, flexible and consistent implementation of time domain impedance boundary conditions for compressible flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaensch, S.; Sovardi, C.; Polifke, W.

    2016-06-01

    The accurate simulation of compressible flows requires the appropriate modeling of the reflection of acoustic waves at the boundaries. In the present study we discuss time domain impedance boundary conditions (TDIBC). The formulation proposed allows to impose a desired reflection coefficient at the inflow and outflow boundaries. Our formulation is an extension of the well known Navier-Stokes characteristic boundary conditions. The frequency dependent reflections at the boundaries are implemented with a state-space model in the time domain. We provide a comprehensive discussion on how such state-space models can be constructed and interpreted. This discussion shows that the state-space description allows a robust and flexible implementation. It allows to consider complex reflection coefficients and account for non-constant CFD time steps in a straight forward manner. Furthermore, we prove analytically and demonstrate numerically that the formulation proposed is consistent, i.e. the formulation ensures that the flow simulation exhibits the reflection coefficient imposed accurately, as long as the waves impinging on the boundary are plane, and it prohibits drift of the mean flow variables. Finally, the boundary conditions are tested successfully for laminar and turbulent flows.

  18. Evolutionary comparison reveals that diverging CTCF sites are signatures of ancestral topological associating domains borders.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marín, Carlos; Tena, Juan J; Acemel, Rafael D; López-Mayorga, Macarena; Naranjo, Silvia; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Maeso, Ignacio; Beccari, Leonardo; Aneas, Ivy; Vielmas, Erika; Bovolenta, Paola; Nobrega, Marcelo A; Carvajal, Jaime; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2015-06-16

    Increasing evidence in the last years indicates that the vast amount of regulatory information contained in mammalian genomes is organized in precise 3D chromatin structures. However, the impact of this spatial chromatin organization on gene expression and its degree of evolutionary conservation is still poorly understood. The Six homeobox genes are essential developmental regulators organized in gene clusters conserved during evolution. Here, we reveal that the Six clusters share a deeply evolutionarily conserved 3D chromatin organization that predates the Cambrian explosion. This chromatin architecture generates two largely independent regulatory landscapes (RLs) contained in two adjacent topological associating domains (TADs). By disrupting the conserved TAD border in one of the zebrafish Six clusters, we demonstrate that this border is critical for preventing competition between promoters and enhancers located in separated RLs, thereby generating different expression patterns in genes located in close genomic proximity. Moreover, evolutionary comparison of Six-associated TAD borders reveals the presence of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) sites with diverging orientations in all studied deuterostomes. Genome-wide examination of mammalian HiC data reveals that this conserved CTCF configuration is a general signature of TAD borders, underscoring that common organizational principles underlie TAD compartmentalization in deuterostome evolution. PMID:26034287

  19. Evolutionary comparison reveals that diverging CTCF sites are signatures of ancestral topological associating domains borders

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Marín, Carlos; Tena, Juan J.; Acemel, Rafael D.; López-Mayorga, Macarena; Naranjo, Silvia; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Maeso, Ignacio; Beccari, Leonardo; Aneas, Ivy; Vielmas, Erika; Bovolenta, Paola; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Carvajal, Jaime; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence in the last years indicates that the vast amount of regulatory information contained in mammalian genomes is organized in precise 3D chromatin structures. However, the impact of this spatial chromatin organization on gene expression and its degree of evolutionary conservation is still poorly understood. The Six homeobox genes are essential developmental regulators organized in gene clusters conserved during evolution. Here, we reveal that the Six clusters share a deeply evolutionarily conserved 3D chromatin organization that predates the Cambrian explosion. This chromatin architecture generates two largely independent regulatory landscapes (RLs) contained in two adjacent topological associating domains (TADs). By disrupting the conserved TAD border in one of the zebrafish Six clusters, we demonstrate that this border is critical for preventing competition between promoters and enhancers located in separated RLs, thereby generating different expression patterns in genes located in close genomic proximity. Moreover, evolutionary comparison of Six-associated TAD borders reveals the presence of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) sites with diverging orientations in all studied deuterostomes. Genome-wide examination of mammalian HiC data reveals that this conserved CTCF configuration is a general signature of TAD borders, underscoring that common organizational principles underlie TAD compartmentalization in deuterostome evolution. PMID:26034287

  20. Structures of the CDK12/CycK complex with AMP-PNP reveal a flexible C-terminal kinase extension important for ATP binding

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Cheng, S.-W. Grace; Morin, Gregg B.; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (CDK12) promotes transcriptional elongation by phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD). Structure-function studies show that this activity is dependent on a C-terminal kinase extension, as well as the binding of cyclin K (CycK). To better define these interactions we determined the crystal structure of the human CDK12/CycK complex with and without the kinase extension in the presence of AMP-PNP. The structures revealed novel features for a CDK, including a large β4-β5 loop insertion that contributes to the N-lobe interaction with the cyclin. We also observed two different conformations of the C-terminal kinase extension that effectively open and close the ATP pocket. Most notably, bound AMP-PNP was only observed when trapped in the closed state. Truncation of this C-terminal structure also diminished AMP-PNP binding, as well as the catalytic activity of the CDK12/CycK complex. Further kinetic measurements showed that the full length CDK12/CycK complex was significantly more active than the two crystallised constructs suggesting a critical role for additional domains. Overall, these results demonstrate the intrinsic flexibility of the C-terminal extension in CDK12 and highlight its importance for both ATP binding and kinase activity. PMID:26597175

  1. Single-Molecule FRET Reveals Three Conformations for the TLS Domain of Brome Mosaic Virus Genome.

    PubMed

    Vieweger, Mario; Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2015-12-15

    Metabolite-dependent conformational switching in RNA riboswitches is now widely accepted as a critical regulatory mechanism for gene expression in bacterial systems. More recently, similar gene regulation mechanisms have been found to be important for viral systems as well. One of the most abundant and best-studied systems is the tRNA-like structure (TLS) domain, which has been found to occur in many plant viruses spread across numerous genera. In this work, folding dynamics for the TLS domain of Brome Mosaic Virus have been investigated using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. In particular, burst fluorescence methods are exploited to observe metal-ion ([M(n+)])-induced folding in freely diffusing RNA constructs resembling the minimal TLS element of brome mosaic virus RNA3. The results of these experiments reveal a complex equilibrium of at least three distinct populations. A stepwise, or consecutive, thermodynamic model for TLS folding is developed, which is in good agreement with the [M(n+)]-dependent evolution of conformational populations and existing structural information in the literature. Specifically, this folding pathway explains the metal-ion dependent formation of a functional TLS domain from unfolded RNAs via two consecutive steps: 1) hybridization of a long-range stem interaction, followed by 2) formation of a 3'-terminal pseudoknot. These two conformational transitions are well described by stepwise dissociation constants for [Mg(2+)] (K1 = 328 ± 30 μM and K2 = 1092 ± 183 μM) and [Na(+)] (K1 = 74 ± 6 mM and K2 = 243 ± 52 mM)-induced folding. The proposed thermodynamic model is further supported by inhibition studies of the long-range stem interaction using a complementary DNA oligomer, which effectively shifts the dynamic equilibrium toward the unfolded conformation. Implications of this multistep conformational folding mechanism are discussed with regard to regulation of virus replication. PMID:26682819

  2. Fosmid-Based Structure-Function Analysis Reveals Functionally Distinct Domains in the Cytoplasmic Domain of Drosophila Crumbs

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Sven; Flores-Benitez, David; Riedel, Falko; Knust, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved transmembrane protein Crumbs is required for epithelial polarity and morphogenesis in the embryo, control of tissue size in imaginal discs and morphogenesis of photoreceptor cells, and prevents light-dependent retinal degeneration. The small cytoplasmic domain contains two highly conserved regions, a FERM (i.e., protein 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin)-binding and a PDZ (i.e., postsynaptic density/discs large/ZO-1)-binding domain. Using a fosmid-based transgenomic approach, we analyzed the role of the two domains during invagination of the tracheae and the salivary glands in the Drosophila embryo. We provide data to show that the PDZ-binding domain is essential for the maintenance of cell polarity in both tissues. In contrast, in embryos expressing a Crumbs protein with an exchange of a conserved Tyrosine residue in the FERM-binding domain to an Alanine, both tissues are internalized, despite some initial defects in apical constriction, phospho-Moesin recruitment, and coordinated invagination movements. However, at later stages these embryos fail to undergo dorsal closure, germ band retraction, and head involution. In addition, frequent defects in tracheal fusion were observed. These results suggest stage and/or tissue specific binding partners. We discuss the power of this fosmid-based system for detailed structure-function analyses in comparison to the UAS/Gal4 system. PMID:23390593

  3. The interactome of a PTB domain-containing adapter protein, Odin, revealed by SILAC

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jun; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Gucek, Marjan; Cole, Robert N.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2011-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways are tightly controlled by positive and negative regulators. We have previously identified Odin (also known as ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain containing 1A; gene symbol AKNS1A) as a negative regulator of growth factor signaling; however, the mechanisms through which Odin regulates these pathways remain to be elucidated. To determine how Odin negatively regulates growth factor signaling, we undertook a proteomic approach to systematically identify proteins that interact with Odin using the SILAC strategy. In this study, we identified 18 molecules that were specifically associated in a protein complex with Odin. Our study established that the complete family of 14-3-3 proteins occur in a protein complex with Odin, which is also supported by earlier reports that identified a few members of the 14-3-3 family as Odin interactors. Among the novel protein interactors of Odin were CD2-associated protein, SH3 domain kinase binding protein 1 and DAB2 interacting protein. We confirmed 8 of the eighteen interactions identified in the Odin protein complex by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Finally, a literature-based network analysis revealed that Odin interacting partners are involved in various cellular processes, some of which are key molecules in regulating receptor endocytosis. PMID:21081186

  4. Impaired neurodevelopment by the low complexity domain of CPEB4 reveals a convergent pathway with neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jihae; Salameh, Johnny S.; Richter, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    CPEB4 is an RNA binding protein expressed in neuronal tissues including brain and spinal cord. CPEB4 has two domains: one that is structured for RNA binding and one that is unstructured and low complexity that has no known function. Unstructured low complexity domains (LCDs) in proteins are often found in RNA-binding proteins and have been implicated in motor neuron degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, indicating that these regions mediate normal RNA processing as well as pathological events. While CPEB4 null knockout mice are normal, animals expressing only the CPEB4 LCD are neonatal lethal with impaired mobility that display defects in neuronal development such as reduced motor axon branching and abnormal neuromuscular junction formation. Although full-length CPEB4 is nearly exclusively cytoplasmic, the CPEB4 LCD forms nucleolar aggregates and CPEB4 LCD-expressing animals have altered ribosomal RNA biogenesis, ribosomal protein gene expression, and elevated levels of stress response genes such as the actin-bundling protein DRR1, which impedes neurite outgrowth. Some of these features share similarities with other LCD-related neurodegenerative disease. Most strikingly, DRR1 appears to be a common focus of several neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Our study reveals a possible molecular convergence between a neurodevelopmental defect and neurodegeneration mediated by LCDs. PMID:27381259

  5. Impaired neurodevelopment by the low complexity domain of CPEB4 reveals a convergent pathway with neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jihae; Salameh, Johnny S; Richter, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    CPEB4 is an RNA binding protein expressed in neuronal tissues including brain and spinal cord. CPEB4 has two domains: one that is structured for RNA binding and one that is unstructured and low complexity that has no known function. Unstructured low complexity domains (LCDs) in proteins are often found in RNA-binding proteins and have been implicated in motor neuron degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, indicating that these regions mediate normal RNA processing as well as pathological events. While CPEB4 null knockout mice are normal, animals expressing only the CPEB4 LCD are neonatal lethal with impaired mobility that display defects in neuronal development such as reduced motor axon branching and abnormal neuromuscular junction formation. Although full-length CPEB4 is nearly exclusively cytoplasmic, the CPEB4 LCD forms nucleolar aggregates and CPEB4 LCD-expressing animals have altered ribosomal RNA biogenesis, ribosomal protein gene expression, and elevated levels of stress response genes such as the actin-bundling protein DRR1, which impedes neurite outgrowth. Some of these features share similarities with other LCD-related neurodegenerative disease. Most strikingly, DRR1 appears to be a common focus of several neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Our study reveals a possible molecular convergence between a neurodevelopmental defect and neurodegeneration mediated by LCDs. PMID:27381259

  6. Mutations at the Subunit Interface of Yeast Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Reveal a Versatile Regulatory Domain

    PubMed Central

    Halmai, Miklos; Frittmann, Orsolya; Szabo, Zoltan; Daraba, Andreea; Gali, Vamsi K.; Balint, Eva; Unk, Ildiko

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays a key role in many cellular processes and due to that it interacts with a plethora of proteins. The main interacting surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PCNA have been mapped to the interdomain connecting loop and to the carboxy-terminal domain. Here we report that the subunit interface of yeast PCNA also has regulatory roles in the function of several DNA damage response pathways. Using site-directed mutagenesis we engineered mutations at both sides of the interface and investigated the effect of these alleles on DNA damage response. Genetic experiments with strains bearing the mutant alleles revealed that mutagenic translesion synthesis, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination are all regulated through residues at the subunit interface. Moreover, genetic characterization of one of our mutants identifies a new sub-branch of nucleotide excision repair. Based on these results we conclude that residues at the subunit boundary of PCNA are not only important for the formation of the trimer structure of PCNA, but they constitute a regulatory protein domain that mediates different DNA damage response pathways, as well. PMID:27537501

  7. Subdiffraction-resolution fluorescence microscopy reveals a domain of the centrosome critical for pericentriolar material organization.

    PubMed

    Mennella, V; Keszthelyi, B; McDonald, K L; Chhun, B; Kan, F; Rogers, G C; Huang, B; Agard, D A

    2012-11-01

    As the main microtubule-organizing centre in animal cells, the centrosome has a fundamental role in cell function. Surrounding the centrioles, the pericentriolar material (PCM) provides a dynamic platform for nucleating microtubules. Although the importance of the PCM is established, its amorphous electron-dense nature has made it refractory to structural investigation. By using SIM and STORM subdiffraction-resolution microscopies to visualize proteins critical for centrosome maturation, we demonstrate that the PCM is organized into two main structural domains: a layer juxtaposed to the centriole wall, and proteins extending farther away from the centriole organized in a matrix. Analysis of Pericentrin-like protein (PLP) reveals that its carboxy terminus is positioned at the centriole wall, it radiates outwards into the matrix and is organized in clusters having quasi-nine-fold symmetry. By RNA-mediated interference (RNAi), we show that PLP fibrils are required for interphase recruitment and proper mitotic assembly of the PCM matrix. PMID:23086239

  8. Comprehensive Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry Reveals Parallel Orientation and Flexible Conformations of Plant HOP2-MND1.

    PubMed

    Rampler, Evelyn; Stranzl, Thomas; Orban-Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Hollenstein, David Maria; Hudecz, Otto; Schloegelhofer, Peter; Mechtler, Karl

    2015-12-01

    The HOP2-MND1 heterodimer is essential for meiotic homologous recombination in plants and other eukaryotes and promotes the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We investigated the conformational flexibility of HOP2-MND1, important for understanding the mechanistic details of the heterodimer, with chemical cross-linking in combination with mass spectrometry (XL-MS). The final XL-MS workflow encompassed the use of complementary cross-linkers, quenching, digestion, size exclusion enrichment, and HCD-based LC-MS/MS detection prior to data evaluation. We applied two different homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linkers (DSS and BS(2)G) and one zero-length heterobifunctional cross-linker (EDC). Cross-linked peptides of four biological replicates were analyzed prior to 3D structure prediction by protein threading and protein-protein docking for cross-link-guided molecular modeling. Miniaturization of the size-exclusion enrichment step reduced the required starting material, led to a high amount of cross-linked peptides, and allowed the analysis of replicates. The major interaction site of HOP2-MND1 was identified in the central coiled-coil domains, and an open colinear parallel arrangement of HOP2 and MND1 within the complex was predicted. Moreover, flexibility of the C-terminal capping helices of both complex partners was observed, suggesting the coexistence of a closed complex conformation in solution. PMID:26535604

  9. The Structure of Plasmodium falciparum Blood-Stage 6-Cys Protein Pf41 Reveals an Unexpected Intra-Domain Insertion Required for Pf12 Coordination.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michelle L; Peng, Fangni; Boulanger, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is an apicomplexan parasite and the etiological agent of severe human malaria. The complex P. falciparum life cycle is supported by a diverse repertoire of surface proteins including the family of 6-Cys s48/45 antigens. Of these, Pf41 is localized to the surface of the blood-stage merozoite through its interaction with the glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored Pf12. Our recent structural characterization of Pf12 revealed two juxtaposed 6-Cys domains (D1 and D2). Pf41, however, contains an additional segment of 120 residues predicted to form a large spacer separating its two 6-Cys domains. To gain insight into the assembly mechanism and overall architecture of the Pf12-Pf41 complex, we first determined the 2.45 Å resolution crystal structure of Pf41 using zinc single-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Structural analysis revealed an unexpected domain organization where the Pf41 6-Cys domains are, in fact, intimately associated and the additional residues instead map predominately to an inserted domain-like region (ID) located between two β-strands in D1. Notably, the ID is largely proteolyzed in the final structure suggesting inherent flexibility. To assess the contribution of the ID to complex formation, we engineered a form of Pf41 where the ID was replaced by a short glycine-serine linker and showed by isothermal titration calorimetry that binding to Pf12 was abrogated. Finally, protease protection assays showed that the proteolytic susceptibility of the ID was significantly reduced in the complex, consistent with the Pf41 ID directly engaging Pf12. Collectively, these data establish the architectural organization of Pf41 and define an essential role for the Pf41 ID in promoting assembly of the Pf12-Pf41 heterodimeric complex. PMID:26414347

  10. Co-evolutionary Analysis of Domains in Interacting Proteins Reveals Insights into Domain–Domain Interactions Mediating Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jothi, Raja; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Tasneem, Asba; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in functional genomics have helped generate large-scale high-throughput protein interaction data. Such networks, though extremely valuable towards molecular level understanding of cells, do not provide any direct information about the regions (domains) in the proteins that mediate the interaction. Here, we performed co-evolutionary analysis of domains in interacting proteins in order to understand the degree of co-evolution of interacting and non-interacting domains. Using a combination of sequence and structural analysis, we analyzed protein–protein interactions in F1-ATPase, Sec23p/Sec24p, DNA-directed RNA polymerase and nuclear pore complexes, and found that interacting domain pair(s) for a given interaction exhibits higher level of co-evolution than the noninteracting domain pairs. Motivated by this finding, we developed a computational method to test the generality of the observed trend, and to predict large-scale domain–domain interactions. Given a protein–protein interaction, the proposed method predicts the domain pair(s) that is most likely to mediate the protein interaction. We applied this method on the yeast interactome to predict domain–domain interactions, and used known domain–domain interactions found in PDB crystal structures to validate our predictions. Our results show that the prediction accuracy of the proposed method is statistically significant. Comparison of our prediction results with those from two other methods reveals that only a fraction of predictions are shared by all the three methods, indicating that the proposed method can detect known interactions missed by other methods. We believe that the proposed method can be used with other methods to help identify previously unrecognized domain–domain interactions on a genome scale, and could potentially help reduce the search space for identifying interaction sites. PMID:16949097

  11. Localized domain wall nucleation dynamics in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings revealed by direct time-resolved magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We report time-resolved observations of field-induced domain wall nucleation in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings using single direction field pulses and rotating fields. We show that the asymmetric geometry of a ring allows for controlling the position of nucleation events, when a domain wall is nucleated by a rotating magnetic field. Direct observation by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) reveals that the nucleation of domain walls occurs through the creation of transient ripplelike structures. This magnetization state is found to exhibit a surprisingly high reproducibility even at room temperature and we determine the combinations of field strengths and field directions that allow for reliable nucleation of domain walls and directly quantify the stability of the magnetic states. Our analysis of the processes occurring during field induced domain wall nucleation shows how the effective fields determine the nucleation location reproducibly, which is a key prerequisite toward using domain walls for spintronic devices.

  12. Domain analysis of the Nematostella vectensis SNAIL ortholog reveals unique nucleolar localization that depends on the zinc-finger domains

    PubMed Central

    Dattoli, Ada A.; Hink, Mark A.; DuBuc, Timothy Q.; Teunisse, Bram J.; Goedhart, Joachim; Röttinger, Eric; Postma, Marten

    2015-01-01

    SNAIL transcriptional factors are key regulators during development and disease. They arose early during evolution, and in cnidarians such as Nematostella vectensis, NvSNAILA/B are detected in invaginating tissues during gastrulation. The function of SNAIL proteins is well established in bilaterians but their roles in cnidarians remain unknown. The structure of NvSNAILA and B is similar to the human SNAIL1 and 2, including SNAG and zinc-finger domains. Here, we performed a molecular analysis on localization and mobility of NvSNAILA/B using mammalian cells and Nematostella embryos. NvSNAILA/B display nuclear localization and mobility similar to HsSNAIL1/2. Strikingly, NvSNAILA is highly enriched in the nucleoli and shuttles between the nucleoli and the nucleoplasm. Truncation of the N-terminal SNAG domain, reported to contain Nuclear Localization Signals, markedly reduces nucleolar levels, without effecting nuclear localization or mobility. Truncation of the C-terminal zinc-fingers, involved in DNA binding in higher organisms, significantly affects subcellular localization and mobility. Specifically, the zinc-finger domains are required for nucleolar enrichment of NvSNAILA. Differently from SNAIL transcriptional factors described before, NvSNAILA is specifically enriched in the nucleoli co-localizing with nucleolar markers even after nucleolar disruption. Our findings implicate additional roles for SNAG and zinc-finger domains, suggesting a role for NvSNAILA in the nucleolus. PMID:26190255

  13. Domain analysis of the Nematostella vectensis SNAIL ortholog reveals unique nucleolar localization that depends on the zinc-finger domains.

    PubMed

    Dattoli, Ada A; Hink, Mark A; DuBuc, Timothy Q; Teunisse, Bram J; Goedhart, Joachim; Röttinger, Eric; Postma, Marten

    2015-01-01

    SNAIL transcriptional factors are key regulators during development and disease. They arose early during evolution, and in cnidarians such as Nematostella vectensis, NvSNAILA/B are detected in invaginating tissues during gastrulation. The function of SNAIL proteins is well established in bilaterians but their roles in cnidarians remain unknown. The structure of NvSNAILA and B is similar to the human SNAIL1 and 2, including SNAG and zinc-finger domains. Here, we performed a molecular analysis on localization and mobility of NvSNAILA/B using mammalian cells and Nematostella embryos. NvSNAILA/B display nuclear localization and mobility similar to HsSNAIL1/2. Strikingly, NvSNAILA is highly enriched in the nucleoli and shuttles between the nucleoli and the nucleoplasm. Truncation of the N-terminal SNAG domain, reported to contain Nuclear Localization Signals, markedly reduces nucleolar levels, without effecting nuclear localization or mobility. Truncation of the C-terminal zinc-fingers, involved in DNA binding in higher organisms, significantly affects subcellular localization and mobility. Specifically, the zinc-finger domains are required for nucleolar enrichment of NvSNAILA. Differently from SNAIL transcriptional factors described before, NvSNAILA is specifically enriched in the nucleoli co-localizing with nucleolar markers even after nucleolar disruption. Our findings implicate additional roles for SNAG and zinc-finger domains, suggesting a role for NvSNAILA in the nucleolus. PMID:26190255

  14. Repeat Tracking of Individual Songbirds Reveals Consistent Migration Timing but Flexibility in Route

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Kevin C.; McKinnon, Emily A.; Stutchbury, Bridget J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Tracking repeat migratory journeys of individual animals is required to assess phenotypic plasticity of individual migration behaviour in space and time. We used light-level geolocators to track the long-distance journeys of migratory songbirds (wood thrush, Hylocichla mustelina), and, for the first time, repeat journeys of individuals. We compare between- and within-individual variation in migration to examine flexibility of timing and route in spring and autumn. Date of departure from wintering sites in Central America, along with sex and age factors, explained most of the variation (71%) in arrival date at North American breeding sites. Spring migration showed high within-individual repeatability in timing, but not in route. In particular, spring departure dates of individuals were highly repeatable, with a mean difference between years of just 3 days. Autumn migration timing and routes were not repeatable. Our results provide novel evidence of low phenotypic plasticity in timing of spring migration, which may limit the ability of individuals to adjust migration schedules in response to climate change. PMID:22848395

  15. XANES Reveals the Flexible Nature of Hydrated Strontium in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paola; Migliorati, Valentina; Sessa, Francesco; Mancini, Giordano; Persson, Ingmar

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been used to determine the structure of the hydrated strontium in aqueous solution. The XANES analysis has been carried out using solid [Sr(H2O)8](OH)2 as reference model. Classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out and in the former case two different sets of Lennard-Jones parameters have been used for the Sr(2+) ion. The best performing theoretical approach has been chosen on the basis of the experimental results. XANES spectra have been calculated starting from MD trajectories, without carrying out any minimization of the structural parameters. This procedure allowed us to properly account for thermal and structural fluctuations occurring in the aqueous solution in the analysis of the experimental spectrum. A deconvolution procedure has been applied to the raw absorption data thus increasing the sensitivity of XANES spectroscopy. One of the classical MD simulations has been found to provide a XANES theoretical spectrum in better agreement with the experimental data. An 8-fold hydration complex with a Sr-O distance of 2.60 Å has been found to be compatible with the XANES data, in agreement with previous findings. However, the hydration shells of the strontium ions have been found to have a flexible nature with a fast ligand exchange rate between the first and second hydration shell occurring in the picosecond time scale. PMID:27065305

  16. Flexible and scalable methods for quantifying stochastic variability in the era of massive time-domain astronomical data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Becker, Andrew C.; Sobolewska, Malgosia; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Uttley, Phil

    2014-06-10

    We present the use of continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models as a method for estimating the variability features of a light curve, and in particular its power spectral density (PSD). CARMA models fully account for irregular sampling and measurement errors, making them valuable for quantifying variability, forecasting and interpolating light curves, and variability-based classification. We show that the PSD of a CARMA model can be expressed as a sum of Lorentzian functions, which makes them extremely flexible and able to model a broad range of PSDs. We present the likelihood function for light curves sampled from CARMA processes, placing them on a statistically rigorous foundation, and we present a Bayesian method to infer the probability distribution of the PSD given the measured light curve. Because calculation of the likelihood function scales linearly with the number of data points, CARMA modeling scales to current and future massive time-domain data sets. We conclude by applying our CARMA modeling approach to light curves for an X-ray binary, two active galactic nuclei, a long-period variable star, and an RR Lyrae star in order to illustrate their use, applicability, and interpretation.

  17. Genome-wide search for eliminylating domains reveals novel function for BLES03-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Khater, Shradha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial phosphothreonine lyases catalyze a novel posttranslational modification involving formation of dehydrobutyrine/dehyroalanine by β elimination of the phosphate group of phosphothreonine or phosphoserine residues in their substrate proteins. Though there is experimental evidence for presence of dehydro amino acids in human proteins, no eukaryotic homologs of these lyases have been identified as of today. A comprehensive genome-wide search for identifying phosphothreonine lyase homologs in eukaryotes was carried out. Our fold-based search revealed structural and catalytic site similarity between bacterial phosphothreonine lyases and BLES03 (basophilic leukemia-expressed protein 03), a human protein with unknown function. Ligand induced conformational changes similar to bacterial phosphothreonine lyases, and movement of crucial arginines in the loop region to the catalytic pocket upon binding of phosphothreonine-containing peptides was seen during docking and molecular dynamics studies. Genome-wide search for BLES03 homologs using sensitive profile-based methods revealed their presence not only in eukaryotic classes such as chordata and fungi but also in bacterial and archaebacterial classes. The synteny of these archaebacterial BLES03-like proteins was remarkably similar to that of type IV lantibiotic synthetases which harbor LanL-like phosphothreonine lyase domains. Hence, context-based analysis reinforced our earlier sequence/structure-based prediction of phosphothreonine lyase catalytic function for BLES03. Our in silico analysis has revealed that BLES03-like proteins with previously unknown function are novel eukaryotic phosphothreonine lyases involved in biosynthesis of dehydro amino acids, whereas their bacterial and archaebacterial counterparts might be involved in biosynthesis of natural products similar to lantibiotics. PMID:25062915

  18. Joint annotation of chromatin state and chromatin conformation reveals relationships among domain types and identifies domains of cell-type-specific expression

    PubMed Central

    Libbrecht, Maxwell W.; Ay, Ferhat; Hoffman, Michael M.; Gilbert, David M.; Bilmes, Jeffrey A.; Noble, William Stafford

    2015-01-01

    The genomic neighborhood of a gene influences its activity, a behavior that is attributable in part to domain-scale regulation. Previous genomic studies have identified many types of regulatory domains. However, due to the difficulty of integrating genomics data sets, the relationships among these domain types are poorly understood. Semi-automated genome annotation (SAGA) algorithms facilitate human interpretation of heterogeneous collections of genomics data by simultaneously partitioning the human genome and assigning labels to the resulting genomic segments. However, existing SAGA methods cannot integrate inherently pairwise chromatin conformation data. We developed a new computational method, called graph-based regularization (GBR), for expressing a pairwise prior that encourages certain pairs of genomic loci to receive the same label in a genome annotation. We used GBR to exploit chromatin conformation information during genome annotation by encouraging positions that are close in 3D to occupy the same type of domain. Using this approach, we produced a model of chromatin domains in eight human cell types, thereby revealing the relationships among known domain types. Through this model, we identified clusters of tightly regulated genes expressed in only a small number of cell types, which we term “specific expression domains.” We found that domain boundaries marked by promoters and CTCF motifs are consistent between cell types even when domain activity changes. Finally, we showed that GBR can be used to transfer information from well-studied cell types to less well-characterized cell types during genome annotation, making it possible to produce high-quality annotations of the hundreds of cell types with limited available data. PMID:25677182

  19. Structure of USP7 catalytic domain and three Ubl-domains reveals a connector α-helix with regulatory role.

    PubMed

    Kim, Robbert Q; van Dijk, Willem J; Sixma, Titia K

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquitin conjugation is an important signal in cellular pathways, changing the fate of a target protein, by degradation, relocalisation or complex formation. These signals are balanced by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which antagonize ubiquitination of specific protein substrates. Because ubiquitination pathways are critically important, DUB activity is often carefully controlled. USP7 is a highly abundant DUB with numerous targets that plays complex roles in diverse pathways, including DNA regulation, p53 stress response and endosomal protein recycling. Full-length USP7 switches between an inactive and an active state, tuned by the positioning of 5 Ubl folds in the C-terminal HUBL domain. The active state requires interaction between the last two Ubls (USP7(45)) and the catalytic domain (USP7(CD)), and this can be promoted by allosteric interaction from the first 3 Ubl domains of USP7 (USP7(123)) interacting with GMPS. Here we study the transition between USP7 states. We provide a crystal structure of USP7(CD123) and show that CD and Ubl123 are connected via an extended charged alpha helix. Mutational analysis is used to determine whether the charge and rigidity of this 'connector helix' are important for full USP7 activity. PMID:27183903

  20. Structure and flexibility of the endosomal Vps34 complex reveals the basis of its function on membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Yohei; Zhang, Lufei; Pardon, Els; Burke, John E.; Masson, Glenn R.; Johnson, Chris; Steyaert, Jan; Ktistakis, Nicholas T.; Williams, Roger L.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Vps34 complexes regulate intracellular membrane trafficking in endocytic sorting, cytokinesis and autophagy. We present the 4.4 Å crystal structure of the 385 kDa endosomal complex II (PIK3C3-CII), consisting of Vps34, Vps15 (p150), Vps30/Atg6 (Beclin 1) and Vps38 (UVRAG). The subunits form a Y-shaped complex, centered on the Vps34 C2 domain. Vps34 and Vps15 intertwine in one arm where the Vps15 kinase domain engages the Vps34 activation loop to regulate its activity. Vps30 and Vps38 form the other arm that brackets the Vps15/Vps34 heterodimer, suggesting a path for complex assembly. Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS) revealed conformational changes accompanying membrane binding and identified a Vps30 loop that is critical for the ability of complex II to phosphorylate giant liposomes on which complex I is inactive. PMID:26450213

  1. Structure of inorganic pyrophosphatase from Staphylococcus aureus reveals conformational flexibility of the active site.

    PubMed

    Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Zhang, Xinyi; Wei, Yinan; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2015-02-01

    Cytoplasmic inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPiase) is an enzyme essential for survival of organisms, from bacteria to human. PPiases are divided into two structurally distinct families: family I PPiases are Mg(2+)-dependent and present in most archaea, eukaryotes and prokaryotes, whereas the relatively less understood family II PPiases are Mn(2+)-dependent and present only in some archaea, bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. Staphylococcus aureus (SA), a dangerous pathogen and a frequent cause of hospital infections, contains a family II PPiase (PpaC), which is an attractive potential target for development of novel antibacterial agents. We determined a crystal structure of SA PpaC in complex with catalytic Mn(2+) at 2.1Å resolution. The active site contains two catalytic Mn(2+) binding sites, each half-occupied, reconciling the previously observed 1:1 Mn(2+):enzyme stoichiometry with the presence of two divalent metal ion sites in the apo-enzyme. Unexpectedly, despite the absence of the substrate or products in the active site, the two domains of SA PpaC form a closed active site, a conformation observed in structures of other family II PPiases only in complex with substrate or product mimics. A region spanning residues 295-298, which contains a conserved substrate binding RKK motif, is flipped out of the active site, an unprecedented conformation for a PPiase. Because the mutant of Arg295 to an alanine is devoid of activity, this loop likely undergoes an induced-fit conformational change upon substrate binding and product dissociation. This closed conformation of SA PPiase may serve as an attractive target for rational design of inhibitors of this enzyme. PMID:25576794

  2. Histone H3 Dynamics Reveal Domains with Distinct Proliferation Potential in the Arabidopsis Root.

    PubMed

    Otero, Sofía; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Peiró, Ramón; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2016-06-01

    A coordinated transition from cell proliferation to differentiation is crucial for organogenesis. We found that extensive chromatin reorganization, shown here for histone H3 proteins, characterizes cell population dynamics in the root developmental compartments. The canonical H3.1 protein, incorporated during S-phase, is maintained at high levels in cells dividing at a high rate but is massively evicted in cells undergoing their last cell cycle before exit to differentiation. A similar pattern was observed in the quadruple mutant for the H3.1-encoding genes HTR1, HTR2, HTR3, and HTR9 (htr1,2,3,9), in which H3.1 is expressed only from the HTR13 gene. H3 eviction is a fast process occurring within the G2 phase of the last cell cycle, which is longer than G2 in earlier cell cycles. This longer G2 likely contributes to lower the H3.1/H3.3 ratio in cells leaving the root meristem. The high H3.1/H3.3 ratio and H3.1 eviction process also occurs in endocycling cells before differentiation, revealing a common principle of H3 eviction in the proliferating and endocycling domains of the root apex. Mutants in the H3.1 chaperone CAF-1 (fas1-4) maintain a pattern similar to that of wild-type roots. Our studies reveal that H3 incorporation and eviction dynamics identify cells with different cell division potential during organ patterning. PMID:27207857

  3. Experimental demonstration of an OpenFlow based software-defined optical network employing packet, fixed and flexible DWDM grid technologies on an international multi-domain testbed.

    PubMed

    Channegowda, M; Nejabati, R; Rashidi Fard, M; Peng, S; Amaya, N; Zervas, G; Simeonidou, D; Vilalta, R; Casellas, R; Martínez, R; Muñoz, R; Liu, L; Tsuritani, T; Morita, I; Autenrieth, A; Elbers, J P; Kostecki, P; Kaczmarek, P

    2013-03-11

    Software defined networking (SDN) and flexible grid optical transport technology are two key technologies that allow network operators to customize their infrastructure based on application requirements and therefore minimizing the extra capital and operational costs required for hosting new applications. In this paper, for the first time we report on design, implementation & demonstration of a novel OpenFlow based SDN unified control plane allowing seamless operation across heterogeneous state-of-the-art optical and packet transport domains. We verify and experimentally evaluate OpenFlow protocol extensions for flexible DWDM grid transport technology along with its integration with fixed DWDM grid and layer-2 packet switching. PMID:23482120

  4. In vivo role of the HNF4α AF-1 activation domain revealed by exon swapping

    PubMed Central

    Briançon, Nadège; Weiss, Mary C

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding the nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) generates isoforms HNF4α1 and HNF4α7 from usage of alternative promoters. In particular, HNF4α7 is expressed in the pancreas whereas HNF4α1 is found in liver, and mutations affecting HNF4α function cause impaired insulin secretion and/or hepatic defects in humans and in tissue-specific ‘knockout' mice. HNF4α1 and α7 isoforms differ exclusively by amino acids encoded by the first exon which, in HNF4α1 but not in HNF4α7, includes the activating function (AF)-1 transactivation domain. To investigate the roles of HNF4α1 and HNF4α7 in vivo, we generated mice expressing only one isoform under control of both promoters, via reciprocal swapping of the isoform-specific first exons. Unlike Hnf4α gene disruption which causes embryonic lethality, these ‘α7-only' and ‘α1-only' mice are viable, indicating functional redundancy of the isoforms. However, the former show dyslipidemia and preliminary results indicate impaired glucose tolerance for the latter, revealing functional specificities of the isoforms. These ‘knock-in' mice provide the first test in vivo of the HNF4α AF-1 function and have permitted identification of AF-1-dependent target genes. PMID:16498401

  5. Magnetic domain-wall motion study under an electric field in a Finemet® thin film on flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ngo Thi; Mercone, Silvana; Moulin, Johan; Bahoui, Anouar El; Faurie, Damien; Zighem, Fatih; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Haddadi, Halim

    2015-01-01

    We study the influence of applied in-plane elastic strains on the static magnetic configuration of a 530 nm magnetostrictive FeCuNbSiB (Finemet®) thin film. The in-plane strains are induced via the application of a voltage to a piezoelectric actuator on which the film/substrate system was glued. A quantitative characterization of the voltage dependence of the induced-strain at the surface of the film was performed using a digital image correlation technique. Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) images at remanence (H=0 Oe and U=0 V) clearly reveal the presence of weak stripe domains. The effect of the voltage-induced strain shows the existence of a voltage threshold value for the strike configuration break. For a maximum strain of εXX ~ 0.5 ×10-3 we succeed in destabilizing the stripes configuration helping the setting up of a complete homogeneous magnetic pattern.

  6. Simulations reveal the role of composition into the atomic-level flexibility of bioactive glass cements.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kun Viviana; Chass, Gregory A; Di Tommaso, Devis

    2016-01-14

    Bioactive glass ionomer cements (GICs), the reaction product of a fluoro-alumino-silicate glass and polyacrylic acid, have been in effective use in dentistry for over 40 years and more recently in orthopaedics and medical implantation. Their desirable properties have affirmed GIC's place in the medical materials community, yet are limited to non-load bearing applications due to the brittle nature of the hardened composite cement, thought to arise from the glass component and the interfaces it forms. Towards helping resolve the fundamental bases of the mechanical shortcomings of GICs, we report the 1st ever computational models of a GIC-relevant component. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were employed to generate and characterise three fluoro-alumino-silicate glasses of differing compositions with focus on resolving the atomic scale structural and dynamic contributions of aluminium, phosphorous and fluorine. Analyses of the glasses revealed rising F-content leading to the expansion of the glass network, compression of Al-F bonding, angular constraint at Al-pivots, localisation of alumino-phosphates and increased fluorine diffusion. Together, these changes to the structure, speciation and dynamics with raised fluorine content impart an overall rigidifying effect on the glass network, and suggest a predisposition to atomic-level inflexibility, which could manifest in the ionomer cements they form. PMID:26646505

  7. Flexibility and Stability in Sensory Processing Revealed Using Visual-to-Auditory Sensory Substitution.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Uri; Amedi, Amir

    2015-08-01

    The classical view of sensory processing involves independent processing in sensory cortices and multisensory integration in associative areas. This hierarchical structure has been challenged by evidence of multisensory responses in sensory areas, and dynamic weighting of sensory inputs in associative areas, thus far reported independently. Here, we used a visual-to-auditory sensory substitution algorithm (SSA) to manipulate the information conveyed by sensory inputs while keeping the stimuli intact. During scan sessions before and after SSA learning, subjects were presented with visual images and auditory soundscapes. The findings reveal 2 dynamic processes. First, crossmodal attenuation of sensory cortices changed direction after SSA learning from visual attenuations of the auditory cortex to auditory attenuations of the visual cortex. Secondly, associative areas changed their sensory response profile from strongest response for visual to that for auditory. The interaction between these phenomena may play an important role in multisensory processing. Consistent features were also found in the sensory dominance in sensory areas and audiovisual convergence in associative area Middle Temporal Gyrus. These 2 factors allow for both stability and a fast, dynamic tuning of the system when required. PMID:24518756

  8. Structural-Functional Analysis Reveals a Specific Domain Organization in Family GH20 Hexosaminidases

    PubMed Central

    Val-Cid, Cristina; Biarnés, Xevi; Faijes, Magda; Planas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Hexosaminidases are involved in important biological processes catalyzing the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-hexosaminyl residues in glycosaminoglycans and glycoconjugates. The GH20 enzymes present diverse domain organizations for which we propose two minimal model architectures: Model A containing at least a non-catalytic GH20b domain and the catalytic one (GH20) always accompanied with an extra α-helix (GH20b-GH20-α), and Model B with only the catalytic GH20 domain. The large Bifidobacterium bifidum lacto-N-biosidase was used as a model protein to evaluate the minimal functional unit due to its interest and structural complexity. By expressing different truncated forms of this enzyme, we show that Model A architectures cannot be reduced to Model B. In particular, there are two structural requirements general to GH20 enzymes with Model A architecture. First, the non-catalytic domain GH20b at the N-terminus of the catalytic GH20 domain is required for expression and seems to stabilize it. Second, the substrate-binding cavity at the GH20 domain always involves a remote element provided by a long loop from the catalytic domain itself or, when this loop is short, by an element from another domain of the multidomain structure or from the dimeric partner. Particularly, the lacto-N-biosidase requires GH20b and the lectin-like domain at the N- and C-termini of the catalytic GH20 domain to be fully soluble and functional. The lectin domain provides this remote element to the active site. We demonstrate restoration of activity of the inactive GH20b-GH20-α construct (model A architecture) by a complementation assay with the lectin-like domain. The engineering of minimal functional units of multidomain GH20 enzymes must consider these structural requirements. PMID:26024355

  9. The cloning of Grb10 reveals a new family of SH2 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Ooi, J; Yajnik, V; Immanuel, D; Gordon, M; Moskow, J J; Buchberg, A M; Margolis, B

    1995-04-20

    SH2 domains function to bind proteins containing phosphotyrosine and are components of proteins that are important signal transducers for tyrosine kinases. We have cloned SH2 domain proteins by screening bacterial expression libraries with the tyrosine phosphorylated carboxyterminus of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Here we report the identification of a new SH2 domain protein, Grb10. Grb10 is highly related to Grb7, an SH2 domain protein that we have previously identified. In addition to an SH2 domain, Grb7 and Grb10 have a central domain with similarity to a putative C. elegans gene likely to be involved in neuronal migration. At least three forms of Grb10 exist in fibroblasts apparently due to alternate translational start sites. Grb10 undergoes serine but not tyrosine phosphorylation after EGF treatment resulting in a shift mobility in a large fraction of Grb10 molecules. However Grb10 appears to bind poorly to EGF-Receptor and the true binding partner for the Grb10 SH2 domain is unclear. Grb10 maps to mouse chromosome 11 very close to the EGF-Receptor which is remarkably similar to Grb7 that maps near the EGF-Receptor related HER2 receptor. The finding of multiple family members with evolutionarily conserved domains indicates that these SH2 domain proteins are likely to have an important, although as of yet, unidentified function. PMID:7731717

  10. Novel binding motif and new flexibility revealed by structural analyses of a pyruvate dehydrogenase-dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase subcomplex from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S; Reynolds, Shelley; Brown, Ian; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Calero, Guillermo; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2014-10-24

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex contains multiple copies of three enzymatic components, E1p, E2p, and E3, that sequentially carry out distinct steps in the overall reaction converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Efficient functioning requires the enzymatic components to assemble into a large complex, the integrity of which is maintained by tethering of the displaced, peripheral E1p and E3 components to the E2p core through non-covalent binding. We here report the crystal structure of a subcomplex between E1p and an E2p didomain containing a hybrid lipoyl domain along with the peripheral subunit-binding domain responsible for tethering to the core. In the structure, a region at the N terminus of each subunit in the E1p homodimer previously unseen due to crystallographic disorder was observed, revealing a new folding motif involved in E1p-E2p didomain interactions, and an additional, unexpected, flexibility was discovered in the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex, both of which probably have consequences in the overall multienzyme complex assembly. This represents the first structure of an E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex involving a homodimeric E1p, and the results may be applicable to a large range of complexes with homodimeric E1 components. Results of HD exchange mass spectrometric experiments using the intact, wild type 3-lipoyl E2p and E1p are consistent with the crystallographic data obtained from the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex as well as with other biochemical and NMR data reported from our groups, confirming that our findings are applicable to the entire E1p-E2p assembly. PMID:25210042

  11. Analysis of TALE superclass homeobox genes (MEIS, PBC, KNOX, Iroquois, TGIF) reveals a novel domain conserved between plants and animals.

    PubMed Central

    Bürglin, T R

    1997-01-01

    A new Caenorhabditis elegans homeobox gene, ceh-25, is described that belongs to the TALE superclass of atypical homeodomains, which are characterized by three extra residues between helix 1 and helix 2. ORF and PCR analysis revealed a novel type of alternative splicing within the homeobox. The alternative splicing occurs such that two different homeodomains can be generated, which differ in their first 25 amino acids. ceh-25 is an orthologue of the vertebrate Meis genes and it shares a new conserved domain of 130 amino acids with them. A thorough analysis of all TALE homeobox genes was performed and a new classification is presented. Four TALE classes are identified in animals: PBC, MEIS, TGIF and IRO (Iroquois); two types in fungi: the mating type genes (M-ATYP) and the CUP genes; and two types in plants: KNOX and BEL. The IRO class has a new conserved motif downstream of the homeodomain. For the KNOX class, a conserved domain, the KNOX domain, was defined upstream of the homeodomain. Comparison of the KNOX domain and the MEIS domain shows significant sequence similarity revealing the existence of an archetypal group of homeobox genes that encode two associated conserved domains. Thus TALE homeobox genes were already present in the common ancestor of plants, fungi and animals and represent a branch distinct from the typical homeobox genes. PMID:9336443

  12. Structural analysis of the KRIT1 ankyrin repeat and FERM domains reveals a conformationally stable ARD-FERM interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong; Li, Xiaofeng; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-10-14

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular dysplasias that usually occur in the brain and are associated with mutations in the KRIT1/CCM1, CCM2/MGC4607/OSM/Malcavernin, and PDCD10/CCM3/ TFAR15 genes. Here we report the 2.9 Å crystal structure of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) and FERM domain of the protein product of KRIT1 (KRIT1; Krev interaction trapped 1). The crystal structure reveals that the KRIT1 ARD contains 4 ankyrin repeats. There is also an unusual conformation in the ANK4 repeat that is stabilized by Trp-404, and the structure reveals a solvent exposed ankyrin groove. Domain orientations of the three copies within the asymmetric unit suggest a stable interaction between KRIT1 ARD and FERM domains, indicating a globular ARD–FERM module. It resembles the additional F0 domain found N-terminal to the FERM domain of talin. Structural analysis of KRIT1 ARD–FERM highlights surface regions of high evolutionary conservation, and suggests potential sites that could mediate interaction with binding partners. The structure therefore provides a better understanding of KRIT1 at the molecular level.

  13. Polyketide intermediate mimics as probes for revealing cryptic stereochemistry of ketoreductase domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Fiers, William D; Bernard, Steffen M; Smith, Janet L; Aldrich, Courtney C; Fecik, Robert A

    2014-12-19

    Among natural product families, polyketides have shown the most promise for combinatorial biosynthesis of natural product-like libraries. Though recent research in the area has provided many mechanistic revelations, a basic-level understanding of kinetic and substrate tolerability is still needed before the full potential of combinatorial biosynthesis can be realized. We have developed a novel set of chemical probes for the study of ketoreductase domains of polyketide synthases. This chemical tool-based approach was validated using the ketoreductase of pikromycin module 2 (PikKR2) as a model system. Triketide substrate mimics 12 and 13 were designed to increase stability (incorporating a nonhydrolyzable thioether linkage) and minimize nonessential functionality (truncating the phosphopantetheinyl arm). PikKR2 reduction product identities as well as steady-state kinetic parameters were determined by a combination of LC-MS/MS analysis of synthetic standards and a NADPH consumption assay. The d-hydroxyl product is consistent with bioinformatic analysis and results from a complementary biochemical and molecular biological approach. When compared to widely employed substrates in previous studies, diketide 63 and trans-decalone 64, substrates 12 and 13 showed 2-10 fold lower K(M) values (2.4 ± 0.8 and 7.8 ± 2.7 mM, respectively), indicating molecular recognition of intermediate-like substrates. Due to an abundance of the nonreducable enol-tautomer, the k(cat) values were attenuated by as much as 15-336 fold relative to known substrates. This study reveals the high stereoselectivity of PikKR2 in the face of gross substrate permutation, highlighting the utility of a chemical probe-based approach in the study of polyketide ketoreductases. PMID:25299319

  14. Polyketide Intermediate Mimics as Probes for Revealing Cryptic Stereochemistry of Ketoreductase Domains

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Among natural product families, polyketides have shown the most promise for combinatorial biosynthesis of natural product-like libraries. Though recent research in the area has provided many mechanistic revelations, a basic-level understanding of kinetic and substrate tolerability is still needed before the full potential of combinatorial biosynthesis can be realized. We have developed a novel set of chemical probes for the study of ketoreductase domains of polyketide synthases. This chemical tool-based approach was validated using the ketoreductase of pikromycin module 2 (PikKR2) as a model system. Triketide substrate mimics 12 and 13 were designed to increase stability (incorporating a nonhydrolyzable thioether linkage) and minimize nonessential functionality (truncating the phosphopantetheinyl arm). PikKR2 reduction product identities as well as steady-state kinetic parameters were determined by a combination of LC-MS/MS analysis of synthetic standards and a NADPH consumption assay. The d-hydroxyl product is consistent with bioinformatic analysis and results from a complementary biochemical and molecular biological approach. When compared to widely employed substrates in previous studies, diketide 63 and trans-decalone 64, substrates 12 and 13 showed 2–10 fold lower KM values (2.4 ± 0.8 and 7.8 ± 2.7 mM, respectively), indicating molecular recognition of intermediate-like substrates. Due to an abundance of the nonreducable enol-tautomer, the kcat values were attenuated by as much as 15–336 fold relative to known substrates. This study reveals the high stereoselectivity of PikKR2 in the face of gross substrate permutation, highlighting the utility of a chemical probe-based approach in the study of polyketide ketoreductases. PMID:25299319

  15. A Naturally-Occurring Transcript Variant of MARCO Reveals the SRCR Domain is Critical for Function

    PubMed Central

    Novakowski, Kyle E.; Huynh, Angela; Han, SeongJun; Dorrington, Michael G.; Yin, Charles; Tu, Zhongyuan; Pelka, Peter; Whyte, Peter; Guarné, Alba; Sakamoto, Kaori; Bowdish, Dawn M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) is a Class A Scavenger Receptor (cA-SR) that recognizes and phagocytoses of a wide variety of pathogens. Most cA-SRs that contain a C-terminal Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich (SRCR) domain use the proximal collagenous domain to bind ligands. In contrast, for the role of the SRCR domain of MARCO in phagocytosis, adhesion and pro-inflammatory signalling is less clear. The discovery of a naturally-occurring transcript variant lacking the SRCR domain, MARCOII, provided the opportunity to study the role of the SRCR domain of MARCO. We tested whether the SRCR domain is required for ligand binding, promoting downstream signalling, and enhancing cellular adhesion. Unlike cells expressing full-length MARCO, ligand binding was abolished in MARCOII-expressing cells. Furthermore, co-expression of MARCO and MARCOII impaired phagocytic function, indicating that MARCOII acts as a dominant negative variant. Unlike MARCO, expression of MARCOII did not enhance Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2)-mediated pro-inflammatory signalling in response to bacterial stimulation. MARCO-expressing cells were more adherent and exhibited a dendritic-like phenotype, while MARCOII-expressing cells were less adherent and did not exhibit changes in morphology. These data suggest the SRCR domain of MARCO is the key domain in modulating ligand binding, enhancing downstream pro-inflammatory signalling, and MARCO-mediated cellular adhesion. PMID:26888252

  16. Replication Fork Polarity Gradients Revealed by Megabase-Sized U-Shaped Replication Timing Domains in Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Antoine; Audit, Benjamin; Chen, Chun-Long; Moindrot, Benoit; Leleu, Antoine; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Rappailles, Aurélien; Vaillant, Cédric; Goldar, Arach; Mongelard, Fabien; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Hyrien, Olivier; Thermes, Claude; Arneodo, Alain

    2012-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, replication program specification in different cell types remains to be fully understood. We show for seven human cell lines that about half of the genome is divided in domains that display a characteristic U-shaped replication timing profile with early initiation zones at borders and late replication at centers. Significant overlap is observed between U-domains of different cell lines and also with germline replication domains exhibiting a N-shaped nucleotide compositional skew. From the demonstration that the average fork polarity is directly reflected by both the compositional skew and the derivative of the replication timing profile, we argue that the fact that this derivative displays a N-shape in U-domains sustains the existence of large-scale gradients of replication fork polarity in somatic and germline cells. Analysis of chromatin interaction (Hi-C) and chromatin marker data reveals that U-domains correspond to high-order chromatin structural units. We discuss possible models for replication origin activation within U/N-domains. The compartmentalization of the genome into replication U/N-domains provides new insights on the organization of the replication program in the human genome. PMID:22496629

  17. Crystal Structure of the Mycoplasma arthritidis-Derived Mitogen in Apo Form Reveals a 3D Domain-Swapped Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Li, Z; Guo, Y; VanVranken, S; Mourad, W; Li, H

    2010-01-01

    Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing particular V{beta} elements of T cell receptor. Here, we report the crystal structure of a MAM mutant K201A in apo form (unliganded) at 2.8-{angstrom} resolutions. We also partially refined the crystal structures of the MAM wild type and another MAM mutant L50A in apo forms at low resolutions. Unexpectedly, the structures of these apo MAM molecules display a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimer. The entire C-terminal domains of these MAM molecules are involved in the domain swapping. Functional analyses demonstrated that the K201A and L50A mutants do not show altered ability to bind to their host receptors and that they stimulate the activation of T cells as efficiently as does the wild type. Structural comparisons indicated that the 'reconstituted' MAM monomer from the domain-swapped dimer displays large differences at the hinge regions from the MAM{sub wt} molecule in the receptor-bound form. Further comparison indicated that MAM has a flexible N-terminal loop, implying that conformational changes could occur upon receptor binding.

  18. Metagenome-based screening reveals worldwide distribution of LOV-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Gopal P; Losi, Aba; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomes from various environments were screened for sequences homologous to light, oxygen, voltage (LOV)-domain proteins. LOV domains are flavin binding, blue-light (BL)-sensitive photoreceptors present in 10-15% of deposited prokaryotic genomes. The LOV domain has been selected, since BL is an ever present and sometimes harmful environmental factor for microbial communities. The majority of the metagenome material originated from the Sargasso Sea Project and from open-ocean sampling. In total, more than 40 million open reading frames were investigated for LOV-domain sequences. Most sequences were identified from aquatic material, but they were also found in metagenomes from soil and extreme environments, e.g. hypersaline ponds, acidic mine drainage or wastewater treatment facilities. A total of 578 LOV domains was assigned by three criteria: (1) the highly conserved core region, (2) the presence of minimally 14 essential amino acids and (3) a minimal length of 80 amino acids. More than three quarters of these identified genes showed a sequence divergence of more than 20% from database-deposited LOV domains from known organisms, indicating the large variation of this photoreceptor motif. The broad occurrence of LOV domains in metagenomes emphasizes their important physiological role for light-induced signal transduction, stress adaptation and survival mechanisms. PMID:22044076

  19. Computational studies reveal phosphorylation-dependent changes in the unstructured R domain of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Tamás; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; He, Lihua; Riordan, John R

    2008-05-16

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-dependent chloride channel that is mutated in cystic fibrosis, an inherited disease of high morbidity and mortality. The phosphorylation of its approximately 200 amino acid R domain by protein kinase A is obligatory for channel gating under normal conditions. The R domain contains more than ten PKA phosphorylation sites. No individual site is essential but phosphorylation of increasing numbers of sites enables progressively greater channel activity. In spite of numerous studies of the role of the R domain in CFTR regulation, its mechanism of action remains largely unknown. This is because neither its structure nor its interactions with other parts of CFTR have been completely elucidated. Studies have shown that the R domain lacks well-defined secondary structural elements and is an intrinsically disordered region of the channel protein. Here, we have analyzed the disorder pattern and employed computational methods to explore low-energy conformations of the R domain. The specific disorder and secondary structure patterns detected suggest the presence of molecular recognition elements (MoREs) that may mediate phosphorylation-regulated intra- and inter-domain interactions. Simulations were performed to generate an ensemble of accessible R domain conformations. Although the calculated structures may represent more compact conformers than occur in vivo, their secondary structure propensities are consistent with predictions and published experimental data. Equilibrium simulations of a mimic of a phosphorylated R domain showed that it exhibited an increased radius of gyration. In one possible interpretation of these findings, by changing its size, the globally unstructured R domain may act as an entropic spring to perturb the packing of membrane-spanning sequences that constitute the ion permeability pathway and thereby activate channel gating. PMID:18423665

  20. Computational studies reveal phosphorylation dependent changes in the unstructured R domain of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Hegedűs, Tamás; Serohijos, Adrian W.R.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; He, Lihua; Riordan, John R.

    2008-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP dependent chloride channel that is mutated in cystic fibrosis, an inherited disease of high morbidity and mortality. The phosphorylation of its ∼200 amino acid R domain by protein kinase A is obligatory for channel gating under normal conditions. The R domain contains more than ten PKA phosphorylation sites. No individual site is essential but phosphorylation of increasing numbers of sites enables progressively greater channel activity. In spite of numerous studies of the role of the R domain in CFTR regulation, its mechanism of action remains largely unknown. This is because neither its structure nor its interactions with other parts of CFTR have been completely elucidated. Studies have shown that the R domain lacks well-defined secondary structural elements and is an intrinsically disordered region of the channel protein. Here, we have analyzed the disorder pattern and employed computational methods to explore low energy conformations of the R domain. Specific disorder and secondary structure patterns detected suggest the presence of Molecular Recognition Elements (MoREs) that may mediate phosphorylation regulated intra- and inter-domain interactions. Simulations were performed to generate an ensemble of accessible R domain conformations. Although the calculated structures may represent more compact conformers than occur in vivo, their secondary structure propensities are consistent with predictions and published experimental data. Equilibrium simulations of a mimic of a phosphorylated R domain showed that it exhibited an increased radius of gyration. In one possible interpretation of these findings, by changing its size, the globally unstructured R domain may act as an entropic spring to perturb the packing of membrane-spanning sequences that constitute the ion permeability pathway and thereby activate channel gating. PMID:18423665

  1. Contrasting lithospheric mantle domains beneath the Massif Central (France) revealed by geochemistry of peridotite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenoir, Xavier; Garrido, Carlos J.; Bodinier, Jean-Louis; Dautria, Jean-Marie

    2000-09-01

    We report major and trace element analyses for 82 coarse-grained peridotite xenoliths from 25 Cenozoic volcanic centres throughout the Massif Central (France). These data cover a region of about 150×150 km, allowing an investigation of large scale compositional variations in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). In agreement with textural variations, geochemical data define two contrasting lithospheric domains, situated north and south of latitude 45°30'. Peridotites of the northern domain show protogranular textures, characterised by clustered pyroxene-spinel distributions. They are rather refractory and depleted in MREE relative to HREE, but pervasively enriched in LREE and other highly incompatible elements. The samples show mantle-normalised patterns with negative anomalies of Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf, similar to enriched mantle xenoliths ascribed to carbonatitic metasomatism. In contrast, the peridotites of the southern domain are devoid of pyroxene-spinel clusters and are therefore referred to as coarse-granular. They are distinguished from the northern suite by more fertile compositions and relatively flat MREE-HREE patterns. In addition, only the harzburgites and a few lherzolites are enriched in LREE. Most southern domain lherzolites are depleted in these elements and the average composition of the southern suite is comparable to that of depleted MORB-source mantle (DMM). The main compositional differences between the two domains cannot be accounted for by a secular evolution of the Massif Central SCLM caused by Cenozoic plume upwelling. Instead, these differences record the existence of distinct lithospheric blocks assembled during the Variscan orogeny. To some degree, the northern and southern domains are reminiscent of cratonic and circumcratonic SCLM domains. Being relatively refractory and pervasively enriched in LREE, the northern domain displays similarities with cratonic SCLM. It is interpreted as a relatively ancient (pre

  2. fMRI reveals reciprocal inhibition between social and physical cognitive domains

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Anthony I.; Dawson, Abigail; Begany, Katelyn; Leckie, Regina L.; Barry, Kevin; Ciccia, Angela; Snyder, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Two lines of evidence indicate that there exists a reciprocal inhibitory relationship between opposed brain networks. First, most attention-demanding cognitive tasks activate a stereotypical set of brain areas, known as the task-positive network and simultaneously deactivate a different set of brain regions, commonly referred to as the task negative or default mode network. Second, functional connectivity analyses show that these same opposed networks are anti-correlated in the resting state. We hypothesize that these reciprocally inhibitory effects reflect two incompatible cognitive modes, each of which is directed towards understanding the external world. Thus, engaging one mode activates one set of regions and suppresses activity in the other. We test this hypothesis by identifying two types of problem-solving task which, on the basis of prior work, have been consistently associated with the task positive and task negative regions: tasks requiring social cognition, i.e., reasoning about the mental states of other persons, and tasks requiring physical cognition, i.e., reasoning about the causal/mechanical properties of inanimate objects. Social and mechanical reasoning tasks were presented to neurologically normal participants during fMRI. Each task type was presented using both text and video clips. Regardless of presentation modality, we observed clear evidence of reciprocal suppression: social tasks deactivated regions associated with mechanical reasoning and mechanical tasks deactivated regions associated with social reasoning. These findings are not explained by self-referential processes, task engagement, mental simulation, mental time travel or external vs. internal attention, all factors previously hypothesized to explain default mode network activity. Analyses of resting state data revealed a close match between the regions our tasks identified as reciprocally inhibitory and regions of maximal anti-correlation in the resting state. These results indicate

  3. Fractal Nature of Metallic and Insulating Domain Configurations in a VO2 Thin Film Revealed by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Ahrum; Kanki, Teruo; Sakai, Kotaro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the surface work function (WS) and its spatial distribution for epitaxial VO2/TiO2 thin films using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Nearly grain-boundary-free samples allowed observation of metallic and insulating domains with distinct WS values, throughout the metal–insulator transition. The metallic fraction, estimated from WS maps, describes the evolution of the resistance based on a two-dimensional percolation model. The KPFM measurements also revealed the fractal nature of the domain configuration. PMID:25982229

  4. Hydrogen–Deuterium Exchange and Mass Spectrometry Reveal the pH-Dependent Conformational Changes of Diphtheria Toxin T Domain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The translocation (T) domain of diphtheria toxin plays a critical role in moving the catalytic domain across the endosomal membrane. Translocation/insertion is triggered by a decrease in pH in the endosome where conformational changes of T domain occur through several kinetic intermediates to yield a final trans-membrane form. High-resolution structural studies are only applicable to the static T-domain structure at physiological pH, and studies of the T-domain translocation pathway are hindered by the simultaneous presence of multiple conformations. Here, we report the application of hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) for the study of the pH-dependent conformational changes of the T domain in solution. Effects of pH on intrinsic HDX rates were deconvolved by converting the on-exchange times at low pH into times under our “standard condition” (pH 7.5). pH-Dependent HDX kinetic analysis of T domain clearly reveals the conformational transition from the native state (W-state) to a membrane-competent state (W+-state). The initial transition occurs at pH 6 and includes the destabilization of N-terminal helices accompanied by the separation between N- and C-terminal segments. The structural rearrangements accompanying the formation of the membrane-competent state expose a hydrophobic hairpin (TH8–9) to solvent, prepare it to insert into the membrane. At pH 5.5, the transition is complete, and the protein further unfolds, resulting in the exposure of its C-terminal hydrophobic TH8–9, leading to subsequent aggregation in the absence of membranes. This solution-based study complements high resolution crystal structures and provides a detailed understanding of the pH-dependent structural rearrangement and acid-induced oligomerization of T domain. PMID:25290210

  5. Comparative Hi-C reveals that CTCF underlies evolution of chromosomal domain architecture.

    PubMed

    Vietri Rudan, Matteo; Barrington, Christopher; Henderson, Stephen; Ernst, Christina; Odom, Duncan T; Tanay, Amos; Hadjur, Suzana

    2015-03-01

    Topological domains are key architectural building blocks of chromosomes, but their functional importance and evolutionary dynamics are not well defined. We performed comparative high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) in four mammals and characterized the conservation and divergence of chromosomal contact insulation and the resulting domain architectures within distantly related genomes. We show that the modular organization of chromosomes is robustly conserved in syntenic regions and that this is compatible with conservation of the binding landscape of the insulator protein CTCF. Specifically, conserved CTCF sites are co-localized with cohesin, are enriched at strong topological domain borders, and bind to DNA motifs with orientations that define the directionality of CTCF's long-range interactions. Conversely, divergent CTCF binding between species is correlated with divergence of internal domain structure, likely driven by local CTCF binding sequence changes, demonstrating how genome evolution can be linked to a continuous flux of local conformation changes. We also show that large-scale domains are reorganized during genome evolution as intact modules. PMID:25732821

  6. Domain structure of secretin PulD revealed by limited proteolysis and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nouwen, N; Stahlberg, H; Pugsley, A P; Engel, A

    2000-05-15

    Secretins, a superfamily of multimeric outer membrane proteins, mediate the transport of large macromolecules across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Limited proteolysis of secretin PulD from the Klebsiella oxytoca pullulanase secretion pathway showed that it consists of an N-terminal domain and a protease-resistant C-terminal domain that remains multimeric after proteolysis. The stable C-terminal domain starts just before the region in PulD that is highly conserved in the secretin superfamily and apparently lacks the region at the C-terminal end to which the secretin-specific pilot protein PulS binds. Electron microscopy showed that the stable fragment produced by proteolysis is composed of two stacked rings that encircle a central channel and that it lacks the peripheral radial spokes that are seen in the native complex. Moreover, the electron microscopic images suggest that the N-terminal domain folds back into the large cavity of the channel that is formed by the C-terminal domain of the native complex, thereby occluding the channel, consistent with previous electrophysiological studies showing that the channel is normally closed. PMID:10811614

  7. An intelligent inter-domain routing scheme under the consideration of diffserv QoS and energy saving in multi-domain software-defined flexible optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jijun; Li, Fengyun; Ren, Danping; Hu, Jinhua; Yao, Qiuyan; Li, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Large scale multi-domain software-defined optical networks (SDON) provisioning has become a key area with increased scalable bandwidth services across wider network regions. Although distributed schemes could achieve lightpath routing by the ergodic process of domain boundary nodes, it increases the complexity of the signaling procedure and deployment of the interface. Moreover, the physical impairments are always the main factor of the infrastructure layer in SDON, which affect the transmission quality of the signal. Meanwhile, with increasing energy consumption of the Internet, it is imperative to design energy-efficient networks. To address the above issues, in this paper, an intelligent inter-domain routing scheme, which is supported by hierarchical control plane architecture, is presented based on sub-topology graph under the consideration of diffserv quality-of-service (QoS) and energy saving. The proposed scheme could achieve multi-domain quality of transmission (QoT), energy aware routing and spectrum assignment (RSA). We explore the scenarios where the multi-domain SDON achieve energy efficiency on the basis of meeting the QoT requirement. The blocking, energy consumption and average set up delay performances of the proposed schemes are estimated. The results indicate that the introduction of sub-topology in multi-domain RSA scheme has the better performance comparing with the distributed scheme.

  8. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Truschel, S.T.; Heroux, A.; Sengupta, D.; Foote, A.; Macbeth, M. R.; Linstedt, A. D.

    2011-06-10

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  9. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    S Truschel; D Sengupta; A Foote; A Heroux; M Macbeth; A Linstedt

    2011-12-31

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  10. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Truschel, Steven T.; Sengupta, Debrup; Foote, Adam; Heroux, Annie; Macbeth, Mark R.; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2011-01-01

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae. PMID:21515684

  11. Crystal structure of a beta-finger domain of Prp8 reveals analogy to ribosomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.; Heroux, A.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, R.

    2008-09-16

    Prp8 stands out among hundreds of splicing factors as a key regulator of spliceosome activation and a potential cofactor of the splicing reaction. We present here the crystal structure of a 274-residue domain (residues 1,822-2,095) near the C terminus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Prp8. The most striking feature of this domain is a {beta}-hairpin finger protruding out of the protein (hence, this domain will be referred to as the {beta}-finger domain), resembling many globular ribosomal proteins with protruding extensions. Mutations throughout the {beta}-finger change the conformational equilibrium between the first and the second catalytic step. Mutations at the base of the {beta}-finger affect U4/U6 unwinding-mediated spliceosome activation. Prp8 may insert its {beta}-finger into the first-step complex (U2/U5/U6/pre-mRNA) or U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP and stabilize these complexes. Mutations on the {beta}-finger likely alter these interactions, leading to the observed mutant phenotypes. Our results suggest a possible mechanism of how Prp8 regulates spliceosome activation. These results also demonstrate an analogy between a spliceosomal protein and ribosomal proteins that insert extensions into folded rRNAs and stabilize the ribosome.

  12. Generic Language Use Reveals Domain Differences in Young Children's Expectations about Animal and Artifact Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandone, Amanda C.; Gelman, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to explore domain differences in young children's expectations about the structure of animal and artifact categories. We examined 5-year-olds' and adults' use of category-referring generic noun phrases (e.g., "Birds fly") about novel animals and artifacts. The same stimuli served as both animals and artifacts;…

  13. Annotation of Protein Domains Reveals Remarkable Conservation in the Functional Make up of Proteomes Across Superkingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Naeem, Aisha; Khan, Muhammad Jawad; Lopez-Nicora, Horacio D.; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    The functional repertoire of a cell is largely embodied in its proteome, the collection of proteins encoded in the genome of an organism. The molecular functions of proteins are the direct consequence of their structure and structure can be inferred from sequence using hidden Markov models of structural recognition. Here we analyze the functional annotation of protein domain structures in almost a thousand sequenced genomes, exploring the functional and structural diversity of proteomes. We find there is a remarkable conservation in the distribution of domains with respect to the molecular functions they perform in the three superkingdoms of life. In general, most of the protein repertoire is spent in functions related to metabolic processes but there are significant differences in the usage of domains for regulatory and extra-cellular processes both within and between superkingdoms. Our results support the hypotheses that the proteomes of superkingdom Eukarya evolved via genome expansion mechanisms that were directed towards innovating new domain architectures for regulatory and extra/intracellular process functions needed for example to maintain the integrity of multicellular structure or to interact with environmental biotic and abiotic factors (e.g., cell signaling and adhesion, immune responses, and toxin production). Proteomes of microbial superkingdoms Archaea and Bacteria retained fewer numbers of domains and maintained simple and smaller protein repertoires. Viruses appear to play an important role in the evolution of superkingdoms. We finally identify few genomic outliers that deviate significantly from the conserved functional design. These include Nanoarchaeum equitans, proteobacterial symbionts of insects with extremely reduced genomes, Tenericutes and Guillardia theta. These organisms spend most of their domains on information functions, including translation and transcription, rather than on metabolism and harbor a domain repertoire characteristic of

  14. A unique PDZ domain and arrestin-like fold interaction reveals mechanistic details of endocytic recycling by SNX27-retromer

    PubMed Central

    Gallon, Matthew; Clairfeuille, Thomas; Steinberg, Florian; Mas, Caroline; Ghai, Rajesh; Sessions, Richard B.; Teasdale, Rohan D.; Collins, Brett M.; Cullen, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The sorting nexin 27 (SNX27)-retromer complex is a major regulator of endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling of transmembrane cargos that contain a PSD95, Dlg1, zo-1 (PDZ)-binding motif. Here we describe the core interaction in SNX27-retromer assembly and its functional relevance for cargo sorting. Crystal structures and NMR experiments reveal that an exposed β-hairpin in the SNX27 PDZ domain engages a groove in the arrestin-like structure of the vacuolar protein sorting 26A (VPS26A) retromer subunit. The structure establishes how the SNX27 PDZ domain simultaneously binds PDZ-binding motifs and retromer-associated VPS26. Importantly, VPS26A binding increases the affinity of the SNX27 PDZ domain for PDZ- binding motifs by an order of magnitude, revealing cooperativity in cargo selection. With disruption of SNX27 and retromer function linked to synaptic dysfunction and neurodegenerative disease, our work provides the first step, to our knowledge, in the molecular description of this important sorting complex, and more broadly describes a unique interaction between a PDZ domain and an arrestin-like fold. PMID:25136126

  15. A unique PDZ domain and arrestin-like fold interaction reveals mechanistic details of endocytic recycling by SNX27-retromer.

    PubMed

    Gallon, Matthew; Clairfeuille, Thomas; Steinberg, Florian; Mas, Caroline; Ghai, Rajesh; Sessions, Richard B; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M; Cullen, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    The sorting nexin 27 (SNX27)-retromer complex is a major regulator of endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling of transmembrane cargos that contain a PSD95, Dlg1, zo-1 (PDZ)-binding motif. Here we describe the core interaction in SNX27-retromer assembly and its functional relevance for cargo sorting. Crystal structures and NMR experiments reveal that an exposed β-hairpin in the SNX27 PDZ domain engages a groove in the arrestin-like structure of the vacuolar protein sorting 26A (VPS26A) retromer subunit. The structure establishes how the SNX27 PDZ domain simultaneously binds PDZ-binding motifs and retromer-associated VPS26. Importantly, VPS26A binding increases the affinity of the SNX27 PDZ domain for PDZ- binding motifs by an order of magnitude, revealing cooperativity in cargo selection. With disruption of SNX27 and retromer function linked to synaptic dysfunction and neurodegenerative disease, our work provides the first step, to our knowledge, in the molecular description of this important sorting complex, and more broadly describes a unique interaction between a PDZ domain and an arrestin-like fold. PMID:25136126

  16. Characterization of a Fasciola gigantica protein carrying two DM9 domains reveals cellular relocalization property.

    PubMed

    Phadungsil, Wansika; Smooker, Peter M; Vichasri-Grams, Suksiri; Grams, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    Even at the present age of whole-organism analysis, e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, the biological roles of many proteins remain unresolved. Classified among the proteins of unknown function is a family of proteins harboring repeats of the DM9 domain, a 60-75 amino acids motif first described in a small number of Drosophila melanogaster proteins. Proteins may carry two or more DM9 domains either in combination with other domains or as their sole constituent. Here we have characterized a 16.8kDa Fasciola gigantica protein comprising two tandem repeated DM9 domains (FgDM9-1). The protein was located in the parenchyma of the immature and mature parasite and consequently it was not detected in the ES product of the parasite but only in the whole worm extract. Interestingly, extraction with SDS yielded a substantially higher amount of the protein suggesting association with insoluble cell components. In Sf9 insect cells a heterologously expressed EGFP-FgDM9-1 chimera showed cell-wide distribution but relocated to vesicle-like structures in the cytoplasm after stimulating cellular stress by bacteria, heat shock or chloroquine. These structures did not colocalize with the markers of endocytosis/phagocytosis ubiquitin, RAB7, GABARAP. The same behavior was noted for Aedes aegypti PRS1, a homologous mosquito DM9 protein as a positive control while EGFP did not exhibit such relocation in the insect cells. Cross-linking experiments on soluble recombinant FgDM9-1 indicated that the protein can undergo specific oligomerization. It is speculated that proteins carrying the DM9 domain have a role in vesicular transport in flatworms and insects. PMID:26946400

  17. Structure of glycosylated NPC1 luminal domain C reveals insights into NPC2 and Ebola virus interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuguang; Ren, Jingshan; Harlos, Karl; Stuart, David I

    2016-03-01

    Niemann-pick type C1 (NPC1) is an endo/lysosomal membrane protein involved in intracellular cholesterol trafficking, and its luminal domain C is an essential endosomal receptor for Ebola and Marburg viruses. We have determined the crystal structure of glycosylated NPC1 luminal domain C and find all seven possible sites are glycosylated. Mapping the disease mutations onto the glycosylated structure reveals a potential binding face for NPC2. Knowledge-based docking of NPC1 onto Ebola viral glycoprotein and sequence analysis of filovirus susceptible and refractory species reveals four critical residues, H418, Q421, F502 and F504, some or all of which are likely responsible for the species-specific susceptibility to the virus infection. PMID:26846330

  18. The Laminin 511/521 Binding Site on the Lutheran Blood Group Glycoprotein is Located at theFlexible Junction of Ig Domains 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelow, Tosti J.; Burton, Nicholas; Stedansdottir, Fanney O.; Spring, Frances A.; Parsons, Stephen F.; Pesersen, Jan S.; Oliveira, Cristiano L.P.; Lammie, Donna; Wess, Timothy; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel A.; Brady, R. Leo; Anstee, David J.

    2007-07-01

    The Lutheran blood group glycoprotein, first discovered on erythrocytes, is widely expressed in human tissues. It is a ligand for the {alpha}5 subunit of Laminin 511/521, an extracellular matrix protein. This interaction may contribute to vasocclusive events that are an important cause of morbidity in sickle cell disease. Using X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering and site directed mutagenesis we show that the extracellular region of Lutheran forms an extended structure with a distinctive bend between the second and third immunoglobulin-like domains. The linker between domains 2 and 3 appears to be flexible and is a critical determinant in maintaining an overall conformation for Lutheran that is capable of binding to Laminin. Mutagenesis studies indicate that Asp312 of Lutheran and the surrounding cluster of negatively charged residues in this linker region form the Laminin binding site. Unusually, receptor binding is therefore not a function of the domains expected to be furthermost from the plasma membrane. These studies imply that structural flexibility of Lutheran may be essential for its interaction with Laminin and present a novel opportunity for the development of therapeutics for sickle cell disease.

  19. Functional Organization of Color Domains in V1 and V2 of Macaque Monkey Revealed by Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haidong D.; Roe, Anna W.

    2009-01-01

    Areas V1 and V2 of Macaque monkey visual cortex are characterized by unique cytochrome-oxidase (CO)--staining patterns. Initial electrophysiological studies associated CO blobs in V1 with processing of surface properties such as color and brightness and the interblobs with contour information processing. However, many subsequent studies showed controversial results, some supporting this proposal and others failing to find significant functional differences between blobs and interblobs. In this study, we have used optical imaging to map color-selective responses in V1 and V2. In V1, we find striking “blob-like” patterns of color response. Fine alignment of optical maps and CO-stained tissue revealed that color domains in V1 strongly associate with CO blobs. We also find color domains in V1 align along centers of ocular dominance columns. Furthermore, color blobs in V1 have low orientation selectivity and do not overlap with centers of orientation domains. In V2, color domains coincide with thin stripes; orientation-selective domains coincide with thick and pale stripes. We conclude that color and orientation-selective responses are preferentially located in distinct CO compartments in V1 and V2. We propose that the term “blob” encompasses both the concept of “CO blob” and “color domain” in V1. PMID:17576751

  20. ATTENUATION OF THE GANGLION CELL LAYER IN A PREMATURE INFANT REVEALED WITH HANDHELD SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Mara R.; Zakka, Fouad R.; Carroll, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report on subclinical retinal abnormalities shown through handheld spectral domain optical coherence tomography on a premature infant. Methods: Case report. Results: The initial and follow-up exams on a premature infant revealed severely attenuated ganglion cell and nerve fiber layers. There was cystoid macular edema in both eyes at the initial visits, which resolved by the 1-year follow-up. Discussion: Optical coherence tomography can reveal significant retinal abnormalities in premature infants which are not detectable through funduscopic exam. Documenting such findings may be useful for the comprehensive management of vision problems in children with a history of premature birth. PMID:26529438

  1. A green fluorescent protein solubility screen in E. coli reveals domain boundaries of the GTP-binding domain in the P element transposase

    PubMed Central

    Sabogal, Alex; Rio, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding and hydrolysis events often act as molecular switches in proteins, modulating conformational changes between active and inactive states in many signaling molecules and transport systems. The P element transposase of Drosophila melanogaster requires GTP binding to proceed along its reaction pathway, following initial site-specific DNA binding. GTP binding is unique to P elements and may represent a novel form of transpositional regulation, allowing the bound transposase to find a second site, looping the transposon DNA for strand cleavage and excision. The GTP-binding activity has been previously mapped to the central portion of the transposase protein; however, the P element transposase contains little sequence identity with known GTP-binding folds. To identify soluble, active transposase domains, a GFP solubility screen was used testing the solubility of random P element gene fragments in E. coli. The screen produced a single clone spanning known GTP-binding residues in the central portion of the transposase coding region. This clone, amino acids 275–409 in the P element transposase, was soluble, highly expressed in E.coli and active for GTP-binding activity, therefore is a candidate for future biochemical and structural studies. In addition, the chimeric screen revealed a minimal N-terminal THAP DNA-binding domain attached to an extended leucine zipper coiled-coil dimerization domain in the P element transposase, precisely delineating the DNA-binding and dimerization activities on the primary sequence. This study highlights the use of a GFP-based solubility screen on a large multidomain protein to identify highly expressed, soluble truncated domain subregions. PMID:20842711

  2. NMR Study Reveals the Receiver Domain of Arabidopsis ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 Ethylene Receptor as an Atypical Type Response Regulator.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Jiang, Ingjye; Lee, Yi-Zong; Wen, Chi-Kuang; Sue, Shih-Che

    2016-01-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene, recognized by plant ethylene receptors, plays a pivotal role in various aspects of plant growth and development. ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1) is an ethylene receptor isolated from Arabidopsis and has a structure characteristic of prokaryotic two-component histidine kinase (HK) and receiver domain (RD), where the RD structurally resembles bacteria response regulators (RRs). The ETR1 HK domain has autophosphorylation activity, and little is known if the HK can transfer the phosphoryl group to the RD for receptor signaling. Unveiling the correlation of the receptor structure and phosphorylation status would advance the studies towards the underlying mechanisms of ETR1 receptor signaling. In this study, using the nuclear magnetic resonance technique, our data suggested that the ETR1-RD is monomeric in solution and the rigid structure of the RD prevents the conserved aspartate residue phosphorylation. Comparing the backbone dynamics with other RRs, we propose that backbone flexibility is critical to the RR phosphorylation. Besides the limited flexibility, ETR1-RD has a unique γ loop conformation of opposite orientation, which makes ETR1-RD unfavorable for phosphorylation. These two features explain why ETR1-RD cannot be phosphorylated and is classified as an atypical type RR. As a control, phosphorylation of the ETR1-RD was also impaired when the sequence was swapped to the fragment of the bacterial typical type RR, CheY. Here, we suggest a molecule insight that the ETR1-RD already exists as an active formation and executes its function through binding with the downstream factors without phosphorylation. PMID:27486797

  3. NMR Study Reveals the Receiver Domain of Arabidopsis ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 Ethylene Receptor as an Atypical Type Response Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Zong; Wen, Chi-Kuang; Sue, Shih-Che

    2016-01-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene, recognized by plant ethylene receptors, plays a pivotal role in various aspects of plant growth and development. ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1) is an ethylene receptor isolated from Arabidopsis and has a structure characteristic of prokaryotic two-component histidine kinase (HK) and receiver domain (RD), where the RD structurally resembles bacteria response regulators (RRs). The ETR1 HK domain has autophosphorylation activity, and little is known if the HK can transfer the phosphoryl group to the RD for receptor signaling. Unveiling the correlation of the receptor structure and phosphorylation status would advance the studies towards the underlying mechanisms of ETR1 receptor signaling. In this study, using the nuclear magnetic resonance technique, our data suggested that the ETR1-RD is monomeric in solution and the rigid structure of the RD prevents the conserved aspartate residue phosphorylation. Comparing the backbone dynamics with other RRs, we propose that backbone flexibility is critical to the RR phosphorylation. Besides the limited flexibility, ETR1-RD has a unique γ loop conformation of opposite orientation, which makes ETR1-RD unfavorable for phosphorylation. These two features explain why ETR1-RD cannot be phosphorylated and is classified as an atypical type RR. As a control, phosphorylation of the ETR1-RD was also impaired when the sequence was swapped to the fragment of the bacterial typical type RR, CheY. Here, we suggest a molecule insight that the ETR1-RD already exists as an active formation and executes its function through binding with the downstream factors without phosphorylation. PMID:27486797

  4. Crystal structure of group II intron domain 1 reveals a template for RNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Marcia, Marco; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2015-12-01

    Although the importance of large noncoding RNAs is increasingly appreciated, our understanding of their structures and architectural dynamics remains limited. In particular, we know little about RNA folding intermediates and how they facilitate the productive assembly of RNA tertiary structures. Here, we report the crystal structure of an obligate intermediate that is required during the earliest stages of group II intron folding. Composed of domain 1 from the Oceanobacillus iheyensis group II intron (266 nucleotides), this intermediate retains native-like features but adopts a compact conformation in which the active site cleft is closed. Transition between this closed and the open (native) conformation is achieved through discrete rotations of hinge motifs in two regions of the molecule. The open state is then stabilized by sequential docking of downstream intron domains, suggesting a 'first come, first folded' strategy that may represent a generalizable pathway for assembly of large RNA and ribonucleoprotein structures. PMID:26502156

  5. Crystal structure of group II intron domain 1 reveals a template for RNA assembly

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Marcia, Marco; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of large noncoding RNAs is increasingly appreciated, our understanding of their structures and architectural dynamics remains limited. In particular, we know little about RNA folding intermediates and how they facilitate the productive assembly of RNA tertiary structures. Here, we report the crystal structure of an obligate intermediate that is required during the earliest stages of group II intron folding. Comprised of intron domain 1 from the Oceanobacillus iheyensis group II intron (D1, 266 nts), this intermediate retains native-like features but adopts a compact conformation in which the active-site cleft is closed. Transition between this closed and open (native) conformation is achieved through discrete rotations of hinge motifs in two regions of the molecule. The open state is then stabilized by sequential docking of downstream intron domains, suggesting a “first comes, first folds” strategy that may represent a generalizable pathway for assembly of large RNA and ribonucleoprotein structures. PMID:26502156

  6. Crystal structures reveal transient PERK luminal domain tetramerization in endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Marta; Prischi, Filippo; Nowak, Piotr R; Ali, Maruf MU

    2015-01-01

    Stress caused by accumulation of misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicits a cellular unfolded protein response (UPR) aimed at maintaining protein-folding capacity. PERK, a key upstream component, recognizes ER stress via its luminal sensor/transducer domain, but the molecular events that lead to UPR activation remain unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structures of mammalian PERK luminal domains captured in dimeric state as well as in a novel tetrameric state. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis (SAXS) supports the existence of both crystal structures also in solution. The salient feature of the tetramer interface, a helix swapped between dimers, implies transient association. Moreover, interface mutations that disrupt tetramer formation in vitro reduce phosphorylation of PERK and its target eIF2α in cells. These results suggest that transient conversion from dimeric to tetrameric state may be a key regulatory step in UPR activation. PMID:25925385

  7. Amino acid coevolution reveals three-dimensional structure and functional domains of insect odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A.; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ihara, Sayoko; Touhara, Kazushige; Marks, Debora S.; Benton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Insect Odorant Receptors (ORs) comprise an enormous protein family that translates environmental chemical signals into neuronal electrical activity. These heptahelical receptors are proposed to function as ligand-gated ion channels and/or to act metabotropically as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Resolving their signalling mechanism has been hampered by the lack of tertiary structural information and primary sequence similarity to other proteins. We use amino acid evolutionary covariation across these ORs to define restraints on structural proximity of residue pairs, which permit de novo generation of three-dimensional models. The validity of our analysis is supported by the location of functionally important residues in highly constrained regions of the protein. Importantly, insect OR models exhibit a distinct transmembrane domain packing arrangement to that of canonical GPCRs, establishing the structural unrelatedness of these receptor families. The evolutionary couplings and models predict odour binding and ion conduction domains, and provide a template for rationale structure-activity dissection. PMID:25584517

  8. Internal Domains of Natural Porous Media Revealed: Critical Locations for Transport, Storage, and Chemical Reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zachara, John; Brantley, Sue; Chorover, Jon; Ewing, Robert; Kerisit, Sebastien; Liu, Chongxuan; Perfect, Edmund; Rother, Gernot; Stack, Andrew G.

    2016-02-05

    Internal pore domains exist within rocks, lithic fragments, subsurface sediments, and soil aggregates. These domains, termed internal domains in porous media (IDPM), represent a subset of a material’s porosity, contain a significant fraction of their porosity as nanopores, dominate the reactive surface area of diverse media types, and are important locations for chemical reactivity and fluid storage. IDPM are key features controlling hydrocarbon release from shales in hydraulic fracture systems, organic matter decomposition in soil, weathering and soil formation, and contaminant behavior in the vadose zone and groundwater. It is traditionally difficult to interrogate, advances in instrumentation and imaging methodsmore » are providing new insights on the physical structures and chemical attributes of IDPM, and their contributions to system behaviors. We discuss analytical methods to characterize IDPM, evaluate information on their size distributions, connectivity, and extended structures; determine whether they exhibit unique chemical reactivity; and assess the potential for their inclusion in reactive transport models. Moreover, ongoing developments in measurement technologies and sensitivity, and computer-assisted interpretation will improve understanding of these critical features in the future. Finally, impactful research opportunities exist to advance understanding of IDPM, and to incorporate their effects in reactive transport models for improved environmental simulation and prediction.« less

  9. Domain organization of human chromosomes revealed by mapping of nuclear lamina interactions.

    PubMed

    Guelen, Lars; Pagie, Ludo; Brasset, Emilie; Meuleman, Wouter; Faza, Marius B; Talhout, Wendy; Eussen, Bert H; de Klein, Annelies; Wessels, Lodewyk; de Laat, Wouter; van Steensel, Bas

    2008-06-12

    The architecture of human chromosomes in interphase nuclei is still largely unknown. Microscopy studies have indicated that specific regions of chromosomes are located in close proximity to the nuclear lamina (NL). This has led to the idea that certain genomic elements may be attached to the NL, which may contribute to the spatial organization of chromosomes inside the nucleus. However, sequences in the human genome that interact with the NL in vivo have not been identified. Here we construct a high-resolution map of the interaction sites of the entire genome with NL components in human fibroblasts. This map shows that genome-lamina interactions occur through more than 1,300 sharply defined large domains 0.1-10 megabases in size. These lamina-associated domains (LADs) are typified by low gene-expression levels, indicating that LADs represent a repressive chromatin environment. The borders of LADs are demarcated by the insulator protein CTCF, by promoters that are oriented away from LADs, or by CpG islands, suggesting possible mechanisms of LAD confinement. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the human genome is divided into large, discrete domains that are units of chromosome organization within the nucleus. PMID:18463634

  10. Internal Domains of Natural Porous Media Revealed: Critical Locations for Transport, Storage, and Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zachara, John; Brantley, Sue; Chorover, Jon; Ewing, Robert; Kerisit, Sebastien; Liu, Chongxuan; Perfect, Edmund; Rother, Gernot; Stack, Andrew G

    2016-03-15

    Internal pore domains exist within rocks, lithic fragments, subsurface sediments, and soil aggregates. These domains, termed internal domains in porous media (IDPM), represent a subset of a material's porosity, contain a significant fraction of their porosity as nanopores, dominate the reactive surface area of diverse media types, and are important locations for chemical reactivity and fluid storage. IDPM are key features controlling hydrocarbon release from shales in hydraulic fracture systems, organic matter decomposition in soil, weathering and soil formation, and contaminant behavior in the vadose zone and groundwater. Traditionally difficult to interrogate, advances in instrumentation and imaging methods are providing new insights on the physical structures and chemical attributes of IDPM, and their contributions to system behaviors. Here we discuss analytical methods to characterize IDPM, evaluate information on their size distributions, connectivity, and extended structures; determine whether they exhibit unique chemical reactivity; and assess the potential for their inclusion in reactive transport models. Ongoing developments in measurement technologies and sensitivity, and computer-assisted interpretation will improve understanding of these critical features in the future. Impactful research opportunities exist to advance understanding of IDPM, and to incorporate their effects in reactive transport models for improved environmental simulation and prediction. PMID:26849204

  11. X-Ray Crystal Structure of the Full Length Human Chitotriosidase (CHIT1) Reveals Features of Its Chitin Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Firas; Zhao, Yuguang; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ruiz, Francesc X.; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Chitinases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of chitin. Human chitotriosidase (CHIT1) is one of the two active human chitinases, involved in the innate immune response and highly expressed in a variety of diseases. CHIT1 is composed of a catalytic domain linked by a hinge to its chitin binding domain (ChBD). This latter domain belongs to the carbohydrate-binding module family 14 (CBM14 family) and facilitates binding to chitin. So far, the available crystal structures of the human chitinase CHIT1 and the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (AMCase) comprise only their catalytic domain. Here, we report a crystallization strategy combining cross-seeding and micro-seeding cycles which allowed us to obtain the first crystal structure of the full length CHIT1 (CHIT1-FL) at 1.95 Å resolution. The CHIT1 chitin binding domain (ChBDCHIT1) structure shows a distorted β-sandwich 3D fold, typical of CBM14 family members. Accordingly, ChBDCHIT1 presents six conserved cysteine residues forming three disulfide bridges and several exposed aromatic residues that probably are involved in chitin binding, including the highly conserved Trp465 in a surface- exposed conformation. Furthermore, ChBDCHIT1 presents a positively charged surface which may be involved in electrostatic interactions. Our data highlight the strong structural conservation of CBM14 family members and uncover the structural similarity between the human ChBDCHIT1, tachycitin and house mite dust allergens. Overall, our new CHIT1-FL structure, determined with an adapted crystallization approach, is one of the few complete bi-modular chitinase structures available and reveals the structural features of a human CBM14 domain. PMID:27111557

  12. Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of the promiscuous EphA4 receptor reveals two distinct conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Singla, Nikhil; Goldgur, Yehuda; Xu, Kai; Paavilainen, Sari; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Himanen, Juha P.

    2010-09-08

    Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are important mediators of cell-cell communication. They are divided in two subclasses based on their affinities for each other and on sequence conservation. Receptor-ligand binding within each subclass is fairly promiscuous, while binding cross the subclasses happens rarely. EphA4 is an exception to this general rule, since it has long been known to bind both A- and B-class ephrin ligands but the reason for this exceptional behavior has not been worked out at molecular level. Recent structural and biochemical studies on EphA4 ligand-binding domain alone and in complex with its ligands have addressed this question. However, the published structures of EphA4/ephrin complexes differ considerably from each other and strikingly different explanations for the exceptional promiscuity of EphA4 were proposed. To address these contradictory findings, we have determined a crystal structure of the EphA4 ligand-binding domain at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and show that the receptor has an unprecedented ability to exist in two very different, well-ordered conformations even in the unbound state. Our results suggest that the ligand promiscuity of the Ephs is directly correlated with the structural flexibility of the ligand-binding surface of the receptor.

  13. The first crystal structure of a Mimosoideae lectin reveals a novel quaternary arrangement of a widespread domain.

    PubMed

    Gallego del Sol, Francisca; Nagano, Celso; Cavada, Benildo S; Calvete, Juan J

    2005-10-28

    The crystal structures of the apo and mannose-bound Parkia platycephala seed lectin represent the first structure of a Mimosoideae lectin and a novel circular arrangement of beta-prism domains, and highlight the adaptability of the beta-prism fold as a building block in the evolution of plant lectins. The P.platycephala lectin is a dimer both in solution and in the crystals. Mannose binding to each of the three homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains of the lectin occurs through different modes, and restrains the flexibility of surface-exposed loops and residues involved in carbohydrate recognition. The planar array of carbohydrate-binding sites on the rim of the toroid-shaped structure of the P.platycephala lectin dimer immediately suggests a mechanism to promote multivalent interactions leading to cross-linking of carbohydrate ligands as part of the host strategy against phytopredators and pathogens. The cyclic structure of the P.platycephala lectin points to the convergent evolution of a structural principle for the construction of lectins involved in host defense or in attacking other organisms. PMID:16185708

  14. Structure of the WD40 domain of SCAP from fission yeast reveals the molecular basis for SREBP recognition.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xin; Li, Jingxian; Shao, Wei; Wu, Jianping; Qian, Hongwu; Ren, Ruobing; Espenshade, Peter; Yan, Nieng

    2015-04-01

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) and SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) are central players in the SREBP pathway, which control the cellular lipid homeostasis. SCAP binds to SREBP through their carboxyl (C) domains and escorts SREBP from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi upon sterol depletion. A conserved pathway, with the homologues of SREBP and SCAP being Sre1 and Scp1, was identified in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of the complex between the C domains of Sre1 and Scp1 as well as the crystal structure of the WD40 domain of Scp1 at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure reveals an eight-bladed β-propeller that exhibits several distinctive features from a canonical WD40 repeat domain. Structural and biochemical characterization led to the identification of two Scp1 elements that are involved in Sre1 recognition, an Arg/Lys-enriched surface patch on the top face of the WD40 propeller and a 30-residue C-terminal tail. The structural and biochemical findings were corroborated by in vivo examinations. These studies serve as a framework for the mechanistic understanding and further functional characterization of the SREBP and SCAP proteins in fission yeast and higher organisms. PMID:25771684

  15. Structure of the WD40 domain of SCAP from fission yeast reveals the molecular basis for SREBP recognition

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin; Li, Jingxian; Shao, Wei; Wu, Jianping; Qian, Hongwu; Ren, Ruobing; Espenshade, Peter; Yan, Nieng

    2015-01-01

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) and SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) are central players in the SREBP pathway, which control the cellular lipid homeostasis. SCAP binds to SREBP through their carboxyl (C) domains and escorts SREBP from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi upon sterol depletion. A conserved pathway, with the homologues of SREBP and SCAP being Sre1 and Scp1, was identified in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of the complex between the C domains of Sre1 and Scp1 as well as the crystal structure of the WD40 domain of Scp1 at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure reveals an eight-bladed β-propeller that exhibits several distinctive features from a canonical WD40 repeat domain. Structural and biochemical characterization led to the identification of two Scp1 elements that are involved in Sre1 recognition, an Arg/Lys-enriched surface patch on the top face of the WD40 propeller and a 30-residue C-terminal tail. The structural and biochemical findings were corroborated by in vivo examinations. These studies serve as a framework for the mechanistic understanding and further functional characterization of the SREBP and SCAP proteins in fission yeast and higher organisms. PMID:25771684

  16. Bax crystal structures reveal how BH3 domains activate Bax and nucleate its oligomerization to induce apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Czabotar, Peter E; Westphal, Dana; Dewson, Grant; Ma, Stephen; Hockings, Colin; Fairlie, W Douglas; Lee, Erinna F; Yao, Shenggen; Robin, Adeline Y; Smith, Brian J; Huang, David C S; Kluck, Ruth M; Adams, Jerry M; Colman, Peter M

    2013-01-31

    In stressed cells, apoptosis ensues when Bcl-2 family members Bax or Bak oligomerize and permeabilize the mitochondrial outer membrane. Certain BH3-only relatives can directly activate them to mediate this pivotal, poorly understood step. To clarify the conformational changes that induce Bax oligomerization, we determined crystal structures of BaxΔC21 treated with detergents and BH3 peptides. The peptides bound the Bax canonical surface groove but, unlike their complexes with prosurvival relatives, dissociated Bax into two domains. The structures define the sequence signature of activator BH3 domains and reveal how they can activate Bax via its groove by favoring release of its BH3 domain. Furthermore, Bax helices α2-α5 alone adopted a symmetric homodimer structure, supporting the proposal that two Bax molecules insert their BH3 domain into each other's surface groove to nucleate oligomerization. A planar lipophilic surface on this homodimer may engage the membrane. Our results thus define critical Bax transitions toward apoptosis. PMID:23374347

  17. Förster resonance energy transfer studies of calmodulin produced by native protein ligation reveal inter-domain electrostatic repulsion.

    PubMed

    Hellstrand, Erik; Kukora, Stephanie; Shuman, Cynthia F; Steenbergen, Sara; Thulin, Eva; Kohli, Anita; Krouse, Beth; Linse, Sara; Åkerfeldt, Karin S

    2013-06-01

    This study explores the influence of long-range intra-protein electrostatic interactions on the conformation of calmodulin in solution. Ensemble Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is measured for calmodulin with a fluorophore pair incorporated specifically with a donor at residue 17 and an acceptor at position 117. This construct was generated by a combination of solid phase peptide synthesis, cloning, expression and native chemical ligation. This labelling method has not previously been used with calmodulin and represents a convenient method for ensuring the explicit positioning of the fluorophores. The ensemble FRET experiments reveal significant electrostatic repulsion between the globular domains in the calcium-free protein. At low salt, calmodulin has a relatively extended conformation and the distance between the domains is further increased by denaturation, by heat or by non-ionic denaturants. The repulsion between domains is screened by salt and is also diminished by calcium binding, which changes the protein net charge from -23 to -15. Compared with the calcium-free form at low salt, the FRET efficiency for the calcium-bound form has, on average, increased 10-fold. The conformation of the calcium form is insensitive to salt screening. These results imply that when the two globular domains of calmodulin interact with target, there is no significant free energy penalty due to electrostatic interactions. PMID:23552119

  18. prdm12b specifies the p1 progenitor domain and reveals a role for V1 interneurons in swim movements.

    PubMed

    Zannino, Denise A; Downes, Gerald B; Sagerström, Charles G

    2014-06-15

    Proper functioning of the vertebrate central nervous system requires the precise positioning of many neuronal cell types. This positioning is established during early embryogenesis when gene regulatory networks pattern the neural tube along its anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. Dorsoventral patterning of the embryonic neural tube gives rise to multiple progenitor cell domains that go on to differentiate unique classes of neurons and glia. While the genetic program is reasonably well understood for some lineages, such as ventrally derived motor neurons and glia, other lineages are much less characterized. Here we show that prdm12b, a member of the PR domain containing-family of transcriptional regulators, is expressed in the p1 progenitor domain of the zebrafish neural tube in response to Sonic Hedgehog signaling. We find that disruption of prdm12b function leads to dorsal expansion of nkx6.1 expression and loss of p1-derived eng1b-expressing V1 interneurons, while the adjacent p0 and p2 domains are unaffected. We also demonstrate that prdm12b-deficient fish exhibit an abnormal touch-evoked escape response with excessive body contractions and a prolonged response time, as well as an inability to coordinate swimming movements, thereby revealing a functional role for V1 interneurons in locomotor circuits. We conclude that prdm12b is required for V1 interneuron specification and that these neurons control swimming movements in zebrafish. PMID:24631215

  19. Domain Motions and Functionally-Key Residues of L-Alanine Dehydrogenase Revealed by an Elastic Network Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Yuan; Zhang, Jing-Chao; Zhu, Yan-Ying; Su, Ji-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (L-MtAlaDH) plays an important role in catalyzing L-alanine to ammonia and pyruvate, which has been considered to be a potential target for tuberculosis treatment. In the present work, the functional domain motions encoded in the structure of L-MtAlaDH were investigated by using the Gaussian network model (GNM) and the anisotropy network model (ANM). The slowest modes for the open-apo and closed-holo structures of the enzyme show that the domain motions have a common hinge axis centered in residues Met133 and Met301. Accompanying the conformational transition, both the 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-binding domain (NBD) and the substrate-binding domain (SBD) move in a highly coupled way. The first three slowest modes of ANM exhibit the open-closed, rotation and twist motions of L-MtAlaDH, respectively. The calculation of the fast modes reveals the residues responsible for the stability of the protein, and some of them are involved in the interaction with the ligand. Then, the functionally-important residues relevant to the binding of the ligand were identified by using a thermodynamic method. Our computational results are consistent with the experimental data, which will help us to understand the physical mechanism for the function of L-MtAlaDH. PMID:26690143

  20. prdm12b specifies the p1 progenitor domain and reveals a role for V1 interneurons in swim movements

    PubMed Central

    Zannino, Denise A.; Downes, Gerald B.; Sagerström, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    Proper functioning of the vertebrate central nervous system requires the precise positioning of many neuronal cell types. This positioning is established during early embryogenesis when gene regulatory networks pattern the neural tube along its anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. Dorsoventral patterning of the embryonic neural tube gives rise to multiple progenitor cell domains that go on to differentiate unique classes of neurons and glia. While the genetic program is reasonably well understood for some lineages, such as ventrally derived motor neurons and glia, other lineages are much less characterized. Here we show that prdm12b, a member of the PR domain containing-family of transcriptional regulators, is expressed in the p1 progenitor domain of the zebrafish neural tube in response to Sonic Hedgehog signaling. We find that disruption of prdm12b function leads to dorsal expansion of nkx6.1 expression and loss of p1-derived eng1b-expressing V1 interneurons, while the adjacent p0 and p2 domains are unaffected. We also demonstrate that prdm12b-deficient fish exhibit an abnormal touch-evoked escape response with excessive body contractions and a prolonged response time, as well as an inability to coordinate swimming movements, thereby revealing a functional role for V1 interneurons in locomotor circuits. We conclude that prdm12b is required for V1 interneuron specification and that these neurons control swimming movements in zebrafish. PMID:24631215

  1. A novel imaging method revealed phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate-rich domains in the endosome/lysosome membrane

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Sho; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed a new method to observe distribution of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(3,5)P2] using electron microscopy. In freeze-fracture replicas of quick-frozen samples, PtdIns(3,5)P2 was labeled specifically using recombinant ATG18 tagged with glutathione S-transferase and 4×FLAG, which was mixed with an excess of recombinant PX domain to suppress binding of ATG18 to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Using this method, PtdIns(3,5)P2 was found to be enriched in limited domains in the yeast vacuole and mammalian endosomes. In the yeast vacuole exposed to hyperosmolar stress, PtdIns(3,5)P2 was distributed at a significantly higher density in the intramembrane particle (IMP)-deficient liquid-ordered domains than in the surrounding IMP-rich domains. In mammalian cells, PtdIns(3,5)P2 was observed in endosomes of tubulo-vesicular morphology labeled for RAB5 or RAB7. Notably, distribution density of PtdIns(3,5)P2 in the endosome was significantly higher in the vesicular portion than in the tubular portion. The nano-scale distribution of PtdIns(3,5)P2 revealed in the present study is important to understand its functional roles in the vacuole and endosomes. PMID:27195064

  2. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  3. In vivo selection of lethal mutations reveals two functional domains in arginyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Geslain, R; Martin, F; Delagoutte, B; Cavarelli, J; Gangloff, J; Eriani, G

    2000-01-01

    Using random mutagenesis and a genetic screening in yeast, we isolated 26 mutations that inactivate Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS). The mutations were identified and the kinetic parameters of the corresponding proteins were tested after purification of the expression products in Escherichia coli. The effects were interpreted in the light of the crystal structure of ArgRS. Eighteen functional residues were found around the arginine-binding pocket and eight others in the carboxy-terminal domain of the enzyme. Mutations of these residues all act by strongly impairing the rates of tRNA charging and arginine activation. Thus, ArgRS and tRNA(Arg) can be considered as a kind of ribonucleoprotein, where the tRNA, before being charged, is acting as a cofactor that activates the enzyme. Furthermore, by using different tRNA(Arg) isoacceptors and heterologous tRNA(Asp), we highlighted the crucial role of several residues of the carboxy-terminal domain in tRNA recognition and discrimination. PMID:10744027

  4. Mutation analysis of the Pip interaction domain reveals critical residues for protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Maria Antonia; Light, James; Maki, Richard A.; Assa-Munt, Nuria

    1999-01-01

    The PU.1 interaction partner (Pip) is a member of the interferon regulatory factor family that regulates gene expression through heterodimerization with the ETS transcription factor PU.1. Binding of Pip alone to DNA is weak, and usually it is recruited by phosphorylated PU.1 to form a strong ternary complex with specific DNA sequences. An approach combining sequence homology analysis, secondary structure predictions, and a precise mutational strategy has been used to determine critical residues within the Pip heterodimerization domain that contribute to ternary complex formation. We have delimited the Pip interaction domain to residues 245–422 by using deletion analysis. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved polar amino acids within two predicted α-helices contained in this region, and which are highly conserved in the IRF family, confirmed the importance of these residues for Pip–PU.1 interaction with DNA as well as for trans-activation activity. Our results suggest the existence of a functional epitope essential for heterodimerization between Pip and PU.1 and possibly, in general, between interferon regulatory factor family members and their partners. PMID:10077581

  5. Site-directed mutants of human RECQ1 reveal functional importance of the zinc binding domain.

    PubMed

    Sami, Furqan; Gary, Ronald K; Fang, Yayin; Sharma, Sudha

    2016-08-01

    RecQ helicases are a highly conserved family of ATP-dependent DNA-unwinding enzymes with key roles in DNA replication and repair in all kingdoms of life. The RECQ1 gene encodes the most abundant RecQ homolog in humans. We engineered full-length RECQ1 harboring point mutations in the zinc-binding motif (amino acids 419-480) within the conserved RecQ-specific-C-terminal (RQC) domain known to be critical for diverse biochemical and cellular functions of RecQ helicases. Wild-type RECQ1 contains a zinc ion. Substitution of three of the four conserved cysteine residues that coordinate zinc severely impaired the ATPase and DNA unwinding activities but retained DNA binding and single strand DNA annealing activities. Furthermore, alteration of these residues attenuated zinc binding and significantly changed the overall conformation of full-length RECQ1 protein. In contrast, substitution of cysteine residue at position 471 resulted in a wild-type like RECQ1 protein. Differential contribution of the conserved cysteine residues to the structure and functions of the RECQ1 protein is also inferred by homology modeling. Overall, our results indicate that the zinc binding motif in the RQC domain of RECQ1 is a key structural element that is essential for the structure-functions of RECQ1. Given the recent association of RECQ1 mutations with breast cancer, these results will contribute to understanding the molecular basis of RECQ1 functions in cancer etiology. PMID:27248010

  6. Magnetic tweezers-based force clamp reveals mechanically distinct apCAM domain interactions.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Devrim; Blasiak, Agata; O'Mahony, James J; Suter, Daniel M; Lee, Gil U

    2012-09-19

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgCAMs) play a crucial role in cell-cell interactions during nervous system development and function. The Aplysia CAM (apCAM), an invertebrate IgCAM, shares structural and functional similarities with vertebrate NCAM and therefore has been considered as the Aplysia homolog of NCAM. Despite these similarities, the binding properties of apCAM have not been investigated thus far. Using magnetic tweezers, we applied physiologically relevant, constant forces to apCAM-coated magnetic particles interacting with apCAM-coated model surfaces and characterized the kinetics of bond rupture. The average bond lifetime decreased with increasing external force, as predicted by theoretical considerations. Mathematical simulations suggest that the apCAM homophilic interaction is mediated by two distinct bonds, one involving all five immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains in an antiparallel alignment and the other involving only two Ig domains. In summary, this study provides biophysical evidence that apCAM undergoes homophilic interactions, and that magnetic tweezers-based, force-clamp measurements provide a rapid and reliable method for characterizing relatively weak CAM interactions. PMID:22995484

  7. Function of the ATR N-terminal domain revealed by an ATM/ATR chimera

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xinping; Zhao Runxiang; Glick, Gloria G.; Cortez, David . E-mail: david.cortez@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-05-01

    The ATM and ATR kinases function at the apex of checkpoint signaling pathways. These kinases share significant sequence similarity, phosphorylate many of the same substrates, and have overlapping roles in initiating cell cycle checkpoints. However, they sense DNA damage through distinct mechanisms. ATR primarily senses single stranded DNA (ssDNA) through its interaction with ATRIP, and ATM senses double strand breaks through its interaction with Nbs1. We determined that the N-terminus of ATR contains a domain that binds ATRIP. Attaching this domain to ATM allowed the fusion protein (ATM*) to bind ATRIP and associate with RPA-coated ssDNA. ATM* also gained the ability to localize efficiently to stalled replication forks as well as double strand breaks. Despite having normal kinase activity when tested in vitro and being phosphorylated on S1981 in vivo, ATM* is defective in checkpoint signaling and does not complement cellular deficiencies in either ATM or ATR. These data indicate that the N-terminus of ATR is sufficient to bind ATRIP and to promote localization to sites of replication stress.

  8. Domain swapping reveals that the C- and N-terminal domains of DnaG and DnaB, respectively, are functional homologues.

    PubMed

    Chintakayala, Kiran; Larson, Marilynn A; Grainger, William H; Scott, David J; Griep, Mark A; Hinrichs, Steven H; Soultanas, Panos

    2007-03-01

    The bacterial primase (DnaG)-helicase (DnaB) interaction is mediated by the C-terminal domain of DnaG (p16) and a linker that joins the N- and C-terminal domains (p17 and p33 respectively) of DnaB. The crystal and nuclear magnetic resonance structures of p16 from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus DnaG proteins revealed a unique structural homology with p17, despite the lack of amino acid sequence similarity. The functional significance of this is not clear. Here, we have employed a 'domain swapping' approach to replace p17 with its structural homologue p16 to create chimeras. p33 alone hydrolyses ATP but exhibits no helicase activity. Fusing p16 (p16-p33) or DnaG (G-p33) to the N-terminus of p33 produced chimeras with partially restored helicase activities. Neither chimera interacted with DnaG. The p16-p33 chimera formed hexamers while G-p33 assembled into tetramers. Furthermore, G-p33 and DnaB formed mixed oligomers with ATPase activity better than that of the DnaB/DnaG complex and helicase activity better than the sum of the individual DnaB and G-p33 activities but worse than that of the DnaB/DnaG complex. Our combined data provide direct evidence that p16 and p17 are not only structural but also functional homologues, albeit their amino acid composition differences are likely to influence their precise roles. PMID:17367384

  9. Structure of the cold-shock domain protein from Neisseria meningitidis reveals a strand-exchanged dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jingshan; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Sainsbury, Sarah; Saunders, Nigel J.; Owens, Raymond J.

    2008-04-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the cold-shock domain protein from N. meningitidis reveals a strand-exchanged dimer. The structure of the cold-shock domain protein from Neisseria meningitidis has been solved to 2.6 Å resolution and shown to comprise a dimer formed by the exchange of two β-strands between protein monomers. The overall fold of the monomer closely resembles those of other bacterial cold-shock proteins. The neisserial protein behaved as a monomer in solution and was shown to bind to a hexathymidine oligonucleotide with a stoichiometry of 1:1 and a K{sub d} of 1.25 µM.

  10. The crystal structure of Mtr4 reveals a novel arch domain required for rRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.N.; Robinson, H.; Klauer, A. A.; Hintze, B. J.; van Hoof, A.; Johnson, S. J.

    2010-07-01

    The essential RNA helicase, Mtr4, performs a critical role in RNA processing and degradation as an activator of the nuclear exosome. The molecular basis for this vital function is not understood and detailed analysis is significantly limited by the lack of structural data. In this study, we present the crystal structure of Mtr4. The structure reveals a new arch-like domain that is specific to Mtr4 and Ski2 (the cytosolic homologue of Mtr4). In vivo and in vitro analyses demonstrate that the Mtr4 arch domain is required for proper 5.8S rRNA processing, and suggest that the arch functions independently of canonical helicase activity. In addition, extensive conservation along the face of the putative RNA exit site highlights a potential interface with the exosome. These studies provide a molecular framework for understanding fundamental aspects of helicase function in exosome activation, and more broadly define the molecular architecture of Ski2-like helicases.

  11. Evolutionary study of leporid CD4 reveals a hotspot of genetic variability within the D2 domain.

    PubMed

    de Sousa-Pereira, Patricia; Abrantes, Joana; Baldauf, Hanna-Mari; Keppler, Oliver T; Esteves, Pedro J

    2016-07-01

    CD4 is the major receptor on T helper cells involved in the uptake of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) into their host cells. Evolutionary studies of CD4 in primates revealed signatures of positive selection in the D1 domain that interacts with primate exogenous lentivirus gp120 proteins. Here, we studied the evolution of CD4 in lagomorphs by comparing sequences obtained for the genera Oryctolagus, Sylvilagus, Lepus, and Ochotona. Our results reveal an overall higher divergence in lagomorphs compared to primates with highest divergence in the D2 domain. A detailed analysis of a small fragment of 33 nucleotides coding for amino acids 169 to 179 in the D2 domain showed dramatic amino acid alterations with a dN/dS value of 3.2 for lagomorphs, suggesting that CD4 is under strong positive selection in this particular region. Within each leporid genus, no significant amino acid changes were observed for the D2 domain which indicates that the genetic differentiation occurred in the ancestor of each genus before the species radiation. The rabbit endogenous lentivirus type K (RELIK) found in leporids shares high structural similarity with HIV which suggests a possible interaction between RELIK and CD4. The presence of RELIK in the studied leporids, the high structural similarity to modern-day exogenous lentiviruses and the absence of exogenous lentiviruses in leporids, allows us to hypothesize that this endogenous retrovirus, that was most probably exogenous in the past, drove the divergent evolution of leporid CD4. PMID:26979977

  12. Death Domain Assembly Mechanism Revealed by Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric PIDDosome Core Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park,H.; Logette, E.; Raunser, S.; Cuenin, S.; Walz, T.; Tschopp, J.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Proteins of the death domain (DD) superfamily mediate assembly of oligomeric signaling complexes for the activation of caspases and kinases via unknown mechanisms. Here we report the crystal structure of the PIDD DD and RAIDD DD complex, which forms the core of the caspase-2-activating complex PIDDosome. Although RAIDD DD and PIDD DD are monomers, they assemble into a complex that comprises seven RAIDD DDs and five PIDD DDs. Despite the use of an asymmetric assembly mechanism, all DDs in the complex are in quasi-equivalent environments. The structure provided eight unique asymmetric interfaces, which can be classified into three types. These three types of interactions together cover a majority of the DD surface. Mutagenesis on almost all interfaces leads to disruption of the assembly, resulting in defective caspase-2 activation. The three types of interactions may represent most, if not all, modes of interactions in the DD superfamily for assembling complexes of different stoichiometry.

  13. Death Domain Assembly Mechanism Revealed by Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric PIDDosome Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Ho; Logette, Emmanuelle; Raunser, Stefan; Cuenin, Solange; Walz, Thomas; Tschopp, Jurg; Wu, Hao

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Proteins of the death domain (DD) superfamily mediate assembly of oligomeric signaling complexes for the activation of caspases and kinases via unknown mechanisms. Here we report the crystal structure of the PIDD DD and RAIDD DD complex, which forms the core of the caspase-2 activating complex PIDDosome. While RAIDD DD and PIDD DD are monomers, they assemble into a complex that comprises seven RAIDD DDs and five PIDD DDs. Despite the use of an asymmetric assembly mechanism, all DDs in the complex are in quasi-equivalent environments. The structure provided eight unique asymmetric interfaces, which can be classified into three types. These three types of interactions together cover a majority of the DD surface. Mutagenesis on almost all interfaces leads to disruption of the assembly resulting in defective caspase-2 activation. The three types of interactions may represent most, if not all, modes of interactions in the DD superfamily for assembling complexes of different stoichiometry. PMID:17289572

  14. Edge morphology evolution of graphene domains during chemical vapor deposition cooling revealed through hydrogen etching.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoran; Zhang, Yanhui; Zhang, Yaqian; Chen, Zhiying; Sui, Yanping; Ge, Xiaoming; Yu, Guanghui; Jin, Zhi; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-02-21

    During cooling, considerable changes such as wrinkle formation and edge passivation occur in graphene synthesized on the Cu substrate. Wrinkle formation is caused by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of graphene and its substrate. This work emphasizes the cooling-induced edge passivation. The graphene-edge passivation can limit the regrowth of graphene at the domain edge. Our work shows that silicon-containing particles tend to accumulate at the graphene edge, and the formation of these particles is related to cooling. Furthermore, a clear curvature can be observed at the graphene edge on the Cu substrate, indicating the sinking of the graphene edge into the Cu substrate. Both the sinking of the graphene edge and the accumulation of silicon-containing particles are responsible for edge passivation. In addition, two kinds of graphene edge morphologies are observed after etching, which were explained by different etching mechanisms that illustrate the changes of the graphene edge during cooling. PMID:26866950

  15. Image-Based Modeling Reveals Dynamic Redistribution of DNA Damageinto Nuclear Sub-Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Costes Sylvain V., Ponomarev Artem, Chen James L.; Nguyen, David; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-08-03

    Several proteins involved in the response to DNA doublestrand breaks (DSB) f orm microscopically visible nuclear domains, orfoci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF)are believed to be located where DNA damage occurs. To test thisassumption, we analyzed the spatial distribution of 53BP1, phosphorylatedATM, and gammaH2AX RIF in cells irradiated with high linear energytransfer (LET) radiation and low LET. Since energy is randomly depositedalong high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also berandomly distributed. The probability to induce DSB can be derived fromDNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gelelectrophoresis. We used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations topredict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by acomplete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope opticsfrom real experiments. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weightedrandom (Poisson) distributions. In contrast, the distributions of RIFobtained as early as 5 min after exposure to high LET (1 GeV/amu Fe) werenon-random. This deviation from the expected DNA-weighted random patterncan be further characterized by "relative DNA image measurements." Thisnovel imaging approach shows that RIF were located preferentially at theinterface between high and low DNA density regions, and were morefrequent than predicted in regions with lower DNA density. The samepreferential nuclear location was also measured for RIF induced by 1 Gyof low-LET radiation. This deviation from random behavior was evidentonly 5 min after irradiation for phosphorylated ATM RIF, while gammaH2AXand 53BP1 RIF showed pronounced deviations up to 30 min after exposure.These data suggest that DNA damage induced foci are restricted to certainregions of the nucleus of human epithelial cells. It is possible that DNAlesions are collected in these nuclear sub-domains for more efficientrepair.

  16. Chromosome Model reveals Dynamic Redistribution of DNA Damage into Nuclear Sub-domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costes, Sylvain V.; Ponomarev, Artem; Chen, James L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Barcellos-Hoff, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Several proteins involved in the response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB) form microscopically visible nuclear domains, or foci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF) are believed to be located where DNA damage is induced. To test this assumption, we analyzed the spatial distribution of 53BP1, phosphorylated ATM and gammaH2AX RIF in cells irradiated with high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Since energy is randomly deposited along high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also be randomly distributed. The probability to induce DSB can be derived from DNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations to predict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by a complete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope optics from real experiments. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weighted random (Poisson) distributions. In contrast, the distributions of RIF obtained as early as 5 min after exposure to high LET (1 GeV/amu Fe) were non-random. This deviation from the expected DNA-weighted random pattern can be further characterized by relative DNA image measurements. This novel imaging approach shows that RIF were located preferentially at the interface between high and low DNA density regions, and were more frequent in regions with lower density DNA than predicted. This deviation from random behavior was more pronounced within the first 5 min following irradiation for phosphorylated ATM RIF, while gammaH2AX and 53BP1 RIF showed very pronounced deviation up to 30 min after exposure. These data suggest the existence of repair centers in mammalian epithelial cells. These centers would be nuclear sub-domains where DNA lesions would be collected for more efficient repair.

  17. Solution structure of the PsIAA4 oligomerization domain reveals interaction modes for transcription factors in early auxin response.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Dhurvas Chandrasekaran; Kovermann, Michael; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Hellmuth, Antje; Calderón Villalobos, Luz Irina A; Lilie, Hauke; Balbach, Jochen; Abel, Steffen

    2015-05-12

    The plant hormone auxin activates primary response genes by facilitating proteolytic removal of auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA)-inducible repressors, which directly bind to transcriptional auxin response factors (ARF). Most AUX/IAA and ARF proteins share highly conserved C-termini mediating homotypic and heterotypic interactions within and between both protein families. The high-resolution NMR structure of C-terminal domains III and IV of the AUX/IAA protein PsIAA4 from pea (Pisum sativum) revealed a globular ubiquitin-like β-grasp fold with homologies to the Phox and Bem1p (PB1) domain. The PB1 domain of wild-type PsIAA4 features two distinct surface patches of oppositely charged amino acid residues, mediating front-to-back multimerization via electrostatic interactions. Mutations of conserved basic or acidic residues on either face suppressed PsIAA4 PB1 homo-oligomerization in vitro and confirmed directional interaction of full-length PsIAA4 in vivo (yeast two-hybrid system). Mixing of oppositely mutated PsIAA4 PB1 monomers enabled NMR mapping of the negatively charged interface of the reconstituted PsIAA4 PB1 homodimer variant, whose stoichiometry (1:1) and equilibrium binding constant (KD ∼ 6.4 μM) were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. In silico protein-protein docking studies based on NMR and yeast interaction data derived a model of the PsIAA4 PB1 homodimer, which is comparable with other PB1 domain dimers, but indicated considerable differences between the homodimeric interfaces of AUX/IAA and ARF PB1 domains. Our study provides an impetus for elucidating the molecular determinants that confer specificity to complex protein-protein interaction circuits between members of the two central families of transcription factors important to the regulation of auxin-responsive gene expression. PMID:25918389

  18. Structure of an Arrestin2-clathrin Complex Reveals a Novel Clathrin Binding Domain that Modulates Receptor Trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, D.; Kern, R; Puthenveedu, M; von Zastrow, M; Williams, J; Benovic, J

    2009-01-01

    Non-visual arrestins play a pivotal role as adaptor proteins in regulating the signaling and trafficking of multiple classes of receptors. Although arrestin interaction with clathrin, AP-2, and phosphoinositides contributes to receptor trafficking, little is known about the configuration and dynamics of these interactions. Here, we identify a novel interface between arrestin2 and clathrin through x-ray diffraction analysis. The intrinsically disordered clathrin binding box of arrestin2 interacts with a groove between blades 1 and 2 in the clathrin {beta}-propeller domain, whereas an 8-amino acid splice loop found solely in the long isoform of arrestin2 (arrestin2L) interacts with a binding pocket formed by blades 4 and 5 in clathrin. The apposition of the two binding sites in arrestin2L suggests that they are exclusive and may function in higher order macromolecular structures. Biochemical analysis demonstrates direct binding of clathrin to the splice loop in arrestin2L, whereas functional analysis reveals that both binding domains contribute to the receptor-dependent redistribution of arrestin2L to clathrin-coated pits. Mutagenesis studies reveal that the clathrin binding motif in the splice loop is (L/I){sub 2}GXL. Taken together, these data provide a framework for understanding the dynamic interactions between arrestin2 and clathrin and reveal an essential role for this interaction in arrestin-mediated endocytosis.

  19. Structure of the Trichomonas vaginalis Myb3 DNA-binding domain bound to a promoter sequence reveals a unique C-terminal β-hairpin conformation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shu-Yi; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Tsai, Jia-Yin; Ho, Meng-Ru; Chou, Chun-Chi; Rajasekaran, M; Hsu, Hong-Ming; Tai, Jung-Hsiang; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Chen, Chinpan

    2012-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis Myb3 transcription factor (tvMyb3) recognizes the MRE-1 promoter sequence and regulates ap65-1 gene, which encodes a hydrogenosomal malic enzyme that may play a role in the cytoadherence of the parasite. Here, we identified tvMyb3(53-180) as the essential fragment for DNA recognition and report the crystal structure of tvMyb3(53-180) bound to MRE-1 DNA. The N-terminal fragment adopts the classical conformation of an Myb DNA-binding domain, with the third helices of R2 and R3 motifs intercalating in the major groove of DNA. The C-terminal extension forms a β-hairpin followed by a flexible tail, which is stabilized by several interactions with the R3 motif and is not observed in other Myb proteins. Interestingly, this unique C-terminal fragment does not stably connect with DNA in the complex structure but is involved in DNA binding, as demonstrated by NMR chemical shift perturbation, (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear-nuclear Overhauser effect and intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. Site-directed mutagenesis also revealed that this C-terminal fragment is crucial for DNA binding, especially the residue Arg(153) and the fragment K(170)KRK(173). We provide a structural basis for MRE-1 DNA recognition and suggest a possible post-translational regulation of tvMyb3 protein. PMID:21908401

  20. Edge morphology evolution of graphene domains during chemical vapor deposition cooling revealed through hydrogen etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haoran; Zhang, Yanhui; Zhang, Yaqian; Chen, Zhiying; Sui, Yanping; Ge, Xiaoming; Yu, Guanghui; Jin, Zhi; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-02-01

    During cooling, considerable changes such as wrinkle formation and edge passivation occur in graphene synthesized on the Cu substrate. Wrinkle formation is caused by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of graphene and its substrate. This work emphasizes the cooling-induced edge passivation. The graphene-edge passivation can limit the regrowth of graphene at the domain edge. Our work shows that silicon-containing particles tend to accumulate at the graphene edge, and the formation of these particles is related to cooling. Furthermore, a clear curvature can be observed at the graphene edge on the Cu substrate, indicating the sinking of the graphene edge into the Cu substrate. Both the sinking of the graphene edge and the accumulation of silicon-containing particles are responsible for edge passivation. In addition, two kinds of graphene edge morphologies are observed after etching, which were explained by different etching mechanisms that illustrate the changes of the graphene edge during cooling.During cooling, considerable changes such as wrinkle formation and edge passivation occur in graphene synthesized on the Cu substrate. Wrinkle formation is caused by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of graphene and its substrate. This work emphasizes the cooling-induced edge passivation. The graphene-edge passivation can limit the regrowth of graphene at the domain edge. Our work shows that silicon-containing particles tend to accumulate at the graphene edge, and the formation of these particles is related to cooling. Furthermore, a clear curvature can be observed at the graphene edge on the Cu substrate, indicating the sinking of the graphene edge into the Cu substrate. Both the sinking of the graphene edge and the accumulation of silicon-containing particles are responsible for edge passivation. In addition, two kinds of graphene edge morphologies are observed after etching, which were explained by different etching mechanisms that

  1. Touchscreen-paradigm for mice reveals cross-species evidence for an antagonistic relationship of cognitive flexibility and stability.

    PubMed

    Richter, S Helene; Vogel, Anne S; Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Muzzillo, Chiara; Vogt, Miriam A; Lankisch, Katja; Armbruster-Genç, Diana J N; Riva, Marco A; Fiebach, Christian J; Gass, Peter; Vollmayr, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The abilities to either flexibly adjust behavior according to changing demands (cognitive flexibility) or to maintain it in the face of potential distractors (cognitive stability) are critical for adaptive behavior in many situations. Recently, a novel human paradigm has found individual differences of cognitive flexibility and stability to be related to common prefrontal networks. The aims of the present study were, first, to translate this paradigm from humans to mice and, second, to test conceptual predictions of a computational model of prefrontal working memory mechanisms, the Dual State Theory, which assumes an antagonistic relation between cognitive flexibility and stability. Mice were trained in a touchscreen-paradigm to discriminate visual cues. The task involved "ongoing" and cued "switch" trials. In addition distractor cues were interspersed to test the ability to resist distraction, and an ambiguous condition assessed the spontaneous switching between two possible responses without explicit cues. While response times did not differ substantially between conditions, error rates (ER) increased from the "ongoing" baseline condition to the most complex condition, where subjects were required to switch between two responses in the presence of a distracting cue. Importantly, subjects switching more often spontaneously were found to be more distractible by task irrelevant cues, but also more flexible in situations, where switching was required. These results support a dichotomy of cognitive flexibility and stability as predicted by the Dual State Theory. Furthermore, they replicate critical aspects of the human paradigm, which indicates the translational potential of the testing procedure and supports the use of touchscreen procedures in preclinical animal research. PMID:24834036

  2. A numerical approach for simulating fluid structure interaction of flexible thin shells undergoing arbitrarily large deformations in complex domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    We present a new numerical methodology for simulating fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems involving thin flexible bodies in an incompressible fluid. The FSI algorithm uses the Dirichlet-Neumann partitioning technique. The curvilinear immersed boundary method (CURVIB) is coupled with a rotation-free finite element (FE) model for thin shells enabling the efficient simulation of FSI problems with arbitrarily large deformation. Turbulent flow problems are handled using large-eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky model in conjunction with a wall model to reconstruct boundary conditions near immersed boundaries. The CURVIB and FE solvers are coupled together on the flexible solid-fluid interfaces where the structural nodal positions, displacements, velocities and loads are calculated and exchanged between the two solvers. Loose and strong coupling FSI schemes are employed enhanced by the Aitken acceleration technique to ensure robust coupling and fast convergence especially for low mass ratio problems. The coupled CURVIB-FE-FSI method is validated by applying it to simulate two FSI problems involving thin flexible structures: 1) vortex-induced vibrations of a cantilever mounted in the wake of a square cylinder at different mass ratios and at low Reynolds number; and 2) the more challenging high Reynolds number problem involving the oscillation of an inverted elastic flag. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with previous numerical simulations and/or experiential measurements. Grid convergence tests/studies are carried out for both the cantilever and inverted flag problems, which show that the CURVIB-FE-FSI method provides their convergence. Finally, the capability of the new methodology in simulations of complex cardiovascular flows is demonstrated by applying it to simulate the FSI of a tri-leaflet, prosthetic heart valve in an anatomic aorta and under physiologic pulsatile conditions.

  3. A Flexible Domain-Domain Hinge Promotes an Induced-fit Dominant Mechanism for the Loading of Guide-DNA into Argonaute Protein in Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhe; Jiang, Hanlun; Sheong, Fu Kit; Cui, Xuefeng; Gao, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-03-17

    Argonaute proteins (Ago) are core components of the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) that load and utilize small guide nucleic acids to silence mRNAs or cleave foreign DNAs. Despite the essential role of Ago in gene regulation and defense against virus, the molecular mechanism of guide-strand loading into Ago remains unclear. We explore such a mechanism in the bacterium Thermus thermophilus Ago (TtAgo), via a computational approach combining molecular dynamics, bias-exchange metadynamics, and protein-DNA docking. We show that apo TtAgo adopts multiple closed states that are unable to accommodate guide-DNA. Conformations able to accommodate the guide are beyond the reach of thermal fluctuations from the closed states. These results suggest an induced-fit dominant mechanism for guide-strand loading in TtAgo, drastically different from the two-step mechanism for human Ago 2 (hAgo2) identified in our previous study. Such a difference between TtAgo and hAgo2 is found to mainly originate from the distinct rigidity of their L1-PAZ hinge. Further comparison among known Ago structures from various species indicates that the L1-PAZ hinge may be flexible in general for prokaryotic Ago's but rigid for eukaryotic Ago's. PMID:26908081

  4. Spectral-domain OCT imaging using a spectrally flexible wavelength-swept fiber laser based on dispersion tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takubo, Y.; Yamashita, S.

    2014-05-01

    The broadband source with the arbitrary spectrum based on dispersion tuning technique was demonstrated. While a dispersion-tuned wavelength-swept laser is capable of fast and widely wavelength sweep, it can also be used as a broadband spectrally-flexible source by controlling the sweep waveform. It is the first demonstration of spectrallytunable source to the best of our knowledge. We used the dispersion-tuned laser as a broadband source for SD-OCT system by synchronizing sweep rate of a laser and exposure time of a CCD camera in SD-OCT system. We successfully obtained the images of an adhesive tape and a human finger.

  5. Solution structure of Atg8 reveals conformational polymorphism of the N-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarten, Melanie; Stoldt, Matthias; Mohrlueder, Jeannine; Willbold, Dieter

    2010-05-07

    During autophagy a crescent shaped like membrane is formed, which engulfs the material that is to be degraded. This membrane grows further until its edges fuse to form the double membrane covered autophagosome. Atg8 is a protein, which is required for this initial step of autophagy. Therefore, a multistage conjugation process of newly synthesized Atg8 to phosphatidylethanolamine is of critical importance. Here we present the high resolution structure of unprocessed Atg8 determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Its C-terminal subdomain shows a well-defined ubiquitin-like fold with slightly elevated mobility in the pico- to nanosecond timescale as determined by heteronuclear NOE data. In comparison to unprocessed Atg8, cleaved Atg8{sup G116} shows a decreased mobility behaviour. The N-terminal domain adopts different conformations within the micro- to millisecond timescale. The possible biological relevance of the differences in dynamic behaviours between both subdomains as well as between the cleaved and uncleaved forms is discussed.

  6. Characterization of PA-N terminal domain of Influenza A polymerase reveals sequence specific RNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kausiki; Wolkerstorfer, Andrea; Szolar, Oliver H J; Cusack, Stephen; Klumpp, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Influenza virus uses a unique cap-snatching mechanism characterized by hijacking and cleavage of host capped pre-mRNAs, resulting in short capped RNAs, which are used as primers for viral mRNA synthesis. The PA subunit of influenza polymerase carries the endonuclease activity that catalyzes the host mRNA cleavage reaction. Here, we show that PA is a sequence selective endonuclease with distinct preference to cleave at the 3' end of a guanine (G) base in RNA. The G specificity is exhibited by the native influenza polymerase complex associated with viral ribonucleoprotein particles and is conferred by an intrinsic G specificity of the isolated PA endonuclease domain PA-Nter. In addition, RNA cleavage site choice by the full polymerase is also guided by cap binding to the PB2 subunit, from which RNA cleavage preferentially occurs at the 12th nt downstream of the cap. However, if a G residue is present in the region of 10-13 nucleotides from the cap, cleavage preferentially occurs at G. This is the first biochemical evidence of influenza polymerase PA showing intrinsic sequence selective endonuclease activity. PMID:23847103

  7. A Cell-Based Assay Reveals Nuclear Translocation of Intracellular Domains Released by SPPL Proteases.

    PubMed

    Mentrup, Torben; Häsler, Robert; Fluhrer, Regina; Saftig, Paul; Schröder, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    During regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) a membrane-spanning substrate protein is cleaved by an ectodomain sheddase and an intramembrane cleaving protease. A cytoplasmic intracellular domain (ICD) is liberated, which can migrate to the nucleus thereby influencing transcriptional regulation. Signal peptide peptidase-like (SPPL) 2a and 2b have been implicated in RIP of type II transmembrane proteins. Even though SPPL2a might represent a potential pharmacological target for treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmunity, no specific and potent inhibitors for this enzyme are currently available. We report here on the first quantitative cell-based assay for measurement of SPPL2a/b activity. Demonstrating the failure of standard Gal4/VP16 reporter assays for SPPL2a/b analysis, we have devised a novel system employing β-galactosidase (βGal) complementation. This is based on detecting nuclear translocation of the proteolytically released substrate ICDs, which results in specific restoration of βGal activity. Utilizing this potentially high-throughput compatible new setup, we demonstrate nuclear translocation of the ICDs from integral membrane protein 2B (ITM2B), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and CD74 and identify secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2) as potential transcriptional downstream target of the CD74 ICD. We show that the presented assay is easily adaptable to other intramembrane proteases and therefore represents a valuable tool for the functional analysis and development of new inhibitors of this class of enzymes. PMID:25824657

  8. Essential helix interactions in the anion transporter domain of prestin revealed by evolutionary trace analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Lavanya; Patel, Nimish; Madabushi, Srinivasan; Goddard, Julie Anne; Anjan, Venkat; Lin, Feng; Shope, Cindy; Farrell, Brenda; Lichtarge, Olivier; Davidson, Amy L; Brownell, William E; Pereira, Fred A

    2006-12-01

    Prestin, a member of the SLC26A family of anion transporters, is a polytopic membrane protein found in outer hair cells (OHCs) of the mammalian cochlea. Prestin is an essential component of the membrane-based motor that enhances electromotility of OHCs and contributes to frequency sensitivity and selectivity in mammalian hearing. Mammalian cells expressing prestin display a nonlinear capacitance (NLC), widely accepted as the electrical signature of electromotility. The associated charge movement requires intracellular anions reflecting the membership of prestin in the SLC26A family. We used the computational approach of evolutionary trace analysis to identify candidate functional (trace) residues in prestin for mutational studies. We created a panel of mutations at each trace residue and determined membrane expression and nonlinear capacitance associated with each mutant. We observe that several residue substitutions near the conserved sulfate transporter domain of prestin either greatly reduce or eliminate NLC, and the effect is dependent on the size of the substituted residue. These data suggest that packing of helices and interactions between residues surrounding the "sulfate transporter motif" is essential for normal prestin activity. PMID:17151276

  9. Image analysis reveals that Escherichia coli RecA protein consists of two domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RecA protein catalyzes homologous genetic recombination by forming helical polymers around DNA molecules. These polymers have an ATPase activity, which is essential for the movement of strands between two DNA molecules. One obstacle to structural studies of the RecA filament has been that the ATPase results in a dynamical polymer containing a mixture of states with respect to the bound ATP and its hydrolytic products. We have formed filaments which are trapped in the ADP-Pi state by substituting AIF4- for the Pi, and have used these stable filaments to generate a three-dimensional reconstruction from electron micrographs. The resolution of the reconstruction is sufficient to resolve the 38-k RecA subunit into two nearly equal domains. This reconstruction provides the most detailed view yet of the RecA protein, and serves as a framework within which existing biochemical data on RecA can be understood. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12 PMID:2137715

  10. Crystal Structure of the APOBEC3G Catalytic Domain Reveals Potential Oligomerization Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Gross, Phillip J.; Valesano, Johnathan C.; Shindo, Keisuke; Li, Ming; Munson, Mary; Royer, William E.; Harjes, Elena; Kono, Takahide; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-02-11

    APOBEC3G is a DNA cytidine deaminase that has antiviral activity against HIV-1 and other pathogenic viruses. In this study the crystal structure of the catalytically active C-terminal domain was determined to 2.25 {angstrom}. This structure corroborates features previously observed in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, a bulge in the second {beta} strand and a lengthening of the second {alpha} helix. Oligomerization is postulated to be critical for the function of APOBEC3G. In this structure, four extensive intermolecular interfaces are observed, suggesting potential models for APOBEC3G oligomerization. The structural and functional significance of these interfaces was probed by solution NMR and disruptive variants were designed and tested for DNA deaminase and anti-HIV activities. The variant designed to disrupt the most extensive interface lost both activities. NMR solution data provides evidence that another interface, which coordinates a novel zinc site, also exists. Thus, the observed crystallographic interfaces of APOBEC3G may be important for both oligomerization and function.

  11. C1 inhibitor serpin domain structure reveals the likely mechanism of heparin potentiation and conformational disease.

    PubMed

    Beinrohr, László; Harmat, Veronika; Dobó, József; Lörincz, Zsolt; Gál, Péter; Závodszky, Péter

    2007-07-20

    C1 inhibitor, a member of the serpin family, is a major down-regulator of inflammatory processes in blood. Genetic deficiency of C1 inhibitor results in hereditary angioedema, a dominantly inheritable, potentially lethal disease. Here we report the first crystal structure of the serpin domain of human C1 inhibitor, representing a previously unreported latent form, which explains functional consequences of several naturally occurring mutations, two of which are discussed in detail. The presented structure displays a novel conformation with a seven-stranded beta-sheet A. The unique conformation of the C-terminal six residues suggests its potential role as a barrier in the active-latent transition. On the basis of surface charge pattern, heparin affinity measurements, and docking of a heparin disaccharide, a heparin binding site is proposed in the contact area of the serpin-proteinase encounter complex. We show how polyanions change the activity of the C1 inhibitor by a novel "sandwich" mechanism, explaining earlier reaction kinetic and mutagenesis studies. These results may help to improve therapeutic C1 inhibitor preparations used in the treatment of hereditary angioedema, organ transplant rejection, and heart attack. PMID:17488724

  12. X-ray crystal structure of a TRPM assembly domain reveals an antiparallel four-stranded coiled-coil

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Minor, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels comprise a large family of tetrameric cation-selective ion channels that respond to diverse forms of sensory input. Previous studies have shown that members of the TRPM subclass possess a self-assembling tetrameric C-terminal cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain that underlies channel assembly and trafficking. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of the coiled-coil domain of the channel enzyme TRPM7. The crystal structure, together with biochemical experiments, reveals an unexpected four-stranded antiparallel coiled-coil architecture that bears unique features relative to other antiparallel coiled-coils. Structural analysis indicates that a limited set of interactions encode assembly specificity determinants and uncovers a previously unnoticed segregation of TRPM assembly domains into two families that correspond with the phylogenetic divisions seen for the complete subunits. Together, the data provide a framework for understanding the mechanism of the TRPM channel assembly and highlight the diversity of forms found in the coiled-coil fold. PMID:18782578

  13. X-ray crystal structure of a TRPM assembly domain reveals an antiparallel four-stranded coiled-coil.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Minor, Daniel L

    2008-11-21

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels comprise a large family of tetrameric cation-selective ion channels that respond to diverse forms of sensory input. Earlier studies showed that members of the TRPM subclass possess a self-assembling tetrameric C-terminal cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain that underlies channel assembly and trafficking. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of the coiled-coil domain of the channel enzyme TRPM7. The crystal structure, together with biochemical experiments, reveals an unexpected four-stranded antiparallel coiled-coil architecture that bears unique features relative to other antiparallel coiled-coils. Structural analysis indicates that a limited set of interactions encode assembly specificity determinants and uncovers a previously unnoticed segregation of TRPM assembly domains into two families that correspond with the phylogenetic divisions seen for the complete subunits. Together, the data provide a framework for understanding the mechanism of TRPM channel assembly and highlight the diversity of forms found in the coiled-coil fold. PMID:18782578

  14. X-Ray Crystal Structure of a TRPM Assembly Domain Reveals An Antiparallel Four-Stranded Coiled-Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Minor, D.L.; Jr.

    2009-05-18

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels comprise a large family of tetrameric cation-selective ion channels that respond to diverse forms of sensory input. Earlier studies showed that members of the TRPM subclass possess a self-assembling tetrameric C-terminal cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain that underlies channel assembly and trafficking. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of the coiled-coil domain of the channel enzyme TRPM7. The crystal structure, together with biochemical experiments, reveals an unexpected four-stranded antiparallel coiled-coil architecture that bears unique features relative to other antiparallel coiled-coils. Structural analysis indicates that a limited set of interactions encode assembly specificity determinants and uncovers a previously unnoticed segregation of TRPM assembly domains into two families that correspond with the phylogenetic divisions seen for the complete subunits. Together, the data provide a framework for understanding the mechanism of TRPM channel assembly and highlight the diversity of forms found in the coiled-coil fold.

  15. Structure of KRT4 binding domain of Srr-1 from Streptococcus agalactiae reveals a novel β-sheet complementation.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Ramya; Samen, Ulrike; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2015-04-01

    The serine rich repeat protein-1 (Srr-1) is an adhesive protein of Streptococcus agalactiae. It is the first bacterial protein identified to interact with human keratin 4 (K4 or KRT4). Within Srr-1, the residues 311-641 constitute the non-repeat ligand binding region (Srr-1-BR(311-641)). The C-terminal part of Srr-1-BR(311-641), comprising of residues 485-642 (termed Srr-1-K4BD), have been identified to bind to K4. Here we report the crystal structure of recombinant Srr-1-K4BD(485-642) and its possible mode of interaction with K4 through docking studies. The dimeric structure of Srr-1-K4BD(485-642) reveals a novel two way "slide lock" parallel β-sheet complementation where the C-terminal strand of one monomer is positioned anti-parallel to the N-terminal strand of the adjacent monomer and this arrangement is not seen so far in any of the homologous structures. The dimerization of Srr-1-K4BD(485-642) observed both in the crystal structure and in solution suggests that similar domain association could also be possible in in vivo and we propose this association would likely generate a new binding site for another host molecule. It is likely that the adhesin can recognize multiple ligands using its ligand binding sub-domains through their intra and inter domain association with one another. PMID:25603146

  16. Phylogeography of Y-Chromosome Haplogroup I Reveals Distinct Domains of Prehistoric Gene Flow in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rootsi, Siiri; Magri, Chiara; Kivisild, Toomas; Benuzzi, Giorgia; Help, Hela; Bermisheva, Marina; Kutuev, Ildus; Barać, Lovorka; Peričić, Marijana; Balanovsky, Oleg; Pshenichnov, Andrey; Dion, Daniel; Grobei, Monica; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Battaglia, Vincenza; Achilli, Alessandro; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Parik, Jüri; King, Roy; Cinnioğlu, Cengiz; Khusnutdinova, Elsa; Rudan, Pavao; Balanovska, Elena; Scheffrahn, Wolfgang; Simonescu, Maya; Brehm, Antonio; Goncalves, Rita; Rosa, Alexandra; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Chaventre, Andre; Ferak, Vladimir; Füredi, Sandor; Oefner, Peter J.; Shen, Peidong; Beckman, Lars; Mikerezi, Ilia; Terzić, Rifet; Primorac, Dragan; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Krumina, Astrida; Torroni, Antonio; Underhill, Peter A.; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Villems, Richard; Semino, Ornella

    2004-01-01

    To investigate which aspects of contemporary human Y-chromosome variation in Europe are characteristic of primary colonization, late-glacial expansions from refuge areas, Neolithic dispersals, or more recent events of gene flow, we have analyzed, in detail, haplogroup I (Hg I), the only major clade of the Y phylogeny that is widespread over Europe but virtually absent elsewhere. The analysis of 1,104 Hg I Y chromosomes, which were identified in the survey of 7,574 males from 60 population samples, revealed several subclades with distinct geographic distributions. Subclade I1a accounts for most of Hg I in Scandinavia, with a rapidly decreasing frequency toward both the East European Plain and the Atlantic fringe, but microsatellite diversity reveals that France could be the source region of the early spread of both I1a and the less common I1c. Also, I1b*, which extends from the eastern Adriatic to eastern Europe and declines noticeably toward the southern Balkans and abruptly toward the periphery of northern Italy, probably diffused after the Last Glacial Maximum from a homeland in eastern Europe or the Balkans. In contrast, I1b2 most likely arose in southern France/Iberia. Similarly to the other subclades, it underwent a postglacial expansion and marked the human colonization of Sardinia ∼9,000 years ago. PMID:15162323

  17. Methyl-CpG-binding domain sequencing reveals a prognostic methylation signature in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Decock, Anneleen; Ongenaert, Maté; Cannoodt, Robrecht; Verniers, Kimberly; De Wilde, Bram; Laureys, Geneviève; Van Roy, Nadine; Berbegall, Ana P.; Bienertova-Vasku, Julie; Bown, Nick; Clément, Nathalie; Combaret, Valérie; Haber, Michelle; Hoyoux, Claire; Murray, Jayne; Noguera, Rosa; Pierron, Gaelle; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Schulte, Johannes H.; Stallings, Ray L.; Tweddle, Deborah A.; De Preter, Katleen; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of neuroblastoma outcome prediction remains challenging. Therefore, this study aims at establishing novel prognostic tumor DNA methylation biomarkers. In total, 396 low- and high-risk primary tumors were analyzed, of which 87 were profiled using methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) sequencing for differential methylation analysis between prognostic patient groups. Subsequently, methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assays were developed for 78 top-ranking differentially methylated regions and tested on two independent cohorts of 132 and 177 samples, respectively. Further, a new statistical framework was used to identify a robust set of MSP assays of which the methylation score (i.e. the percentage of methylated assays) allows accurate outcome prediction. Survival analyses were performed on the individual target level, as well as on the combined multimarker signature. As a result of the differential DNA methylation assessment by MBD sequencing, 58 of the 78 MSP assays were designed in regions previously unexplored in neuroblastoma, and 36 are located in non-promoter or non-coding regions. In total, 5 individual MSP assays (located in CCDC177, NXPH1, lnc-MRPL3-2, lnc-TREX1-1 and one on a region from chromosome 8 with no further annotation) predict event-free survival and 4 additional assays (located in SPRED3, TNFAIP2, NPM2 and CYYR1) also predict overall survival. Furthermore, a robust 58-marker methylation signature predicting overall and event-free survival was established. In conclusion, this study encompasses the largest DNA methylation biomarker study in neuroblastoma so far. We identified and independently validated several novel prognostic biomarkers, as well as a prognostic 58-marker methylation signature. PMID:26646589

  18. Methyl-CpG-binding domain sequencing reveals a prognostic methylation signature in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Decock, Anneleen; Ongenaert, Maté; Cannoodt, Robrecht; Verniers, Kimberly; De Wilde, Bram; Laureys, Geneviève; Van Roy, Nadine; Berbegall, Ana P; Bienertova-Vasku, Julie; Bown, Nick; Clément, Nathalie; Combaret, Valérie; Haber, Michelle; Hoyoux, Claire; Murray, Jayne; Noguera, Rosa; Pierron, Gaelle; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Schulte, Johannes H; Stallings, Ray L; Tweddle, Deborah A; De Preter, Katleen; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-12

    Accurate assessment of neuroblastoma outcome prediction remains challenging. Therefore, this study aims at establishing novel prognostic tumor DNA methylation biomarkers. In total, 396 low- and high-risk primary tumors were analyzed, of which 87 were profiled using methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) sequencing for differential methylation analysis between prognostic patient groups. Subsequently, methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assays were developed for 78 top-ranking differentially methylated regions and tested on two independent cohorts of 132 and 177 samples, respectively. Further, a new statistical framework was used to identify a robust set of MSP assays of which the methylation score (i.e. the percentage of methylated assays) allows accurate outcome prediction. Survival analyses were performed on the individual target level, as well as on the combined multimarker signature. As a result of the differential DNA methylation assessment by MBD sequencing, 58 of the 78 MSP assays were designed in regions previously unexplored in neuroblastoma, and 36 are located in non-promoter or non-coding regions. In total, 5 individual MSP assays (located in CCDC177, NXPH1, lnc-MRPL3-2, lnc-TREX1-1 and one on a region from chromosome 8 with no further annotation) predict event-free survival and 4 additional assays (located in SPRED3, TNFAIP2, NPM2 and CYYR1) also predict overall survival. Furthermore, a robust 58-marker methylation signature predicting overall and event-free survival was established. In conclusion, this study encompasses the largest DNA methylation biomarker study in neuroblastoma so far. We identified and independently validated several novel prognostic biomarkers, as well as a prognostic 58-marker methylation signature. PMID:26646589

  19. Structure of the RAG1 Nonamer Binding Domain with DNA Reveals a Dimer that Mediates DNA Synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, F.; Bailey, S; Innis, C; Ciubotaru, M; Kamtekar, S; Steitz, T; Schatz, D

    2009-01-01

    The products of recombination-activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 mediate the assembly of antigen receptor genes during lymphocyte development in a process known as V(D)J recombination. Lack of structural information for the RAG proteins has hindered mechanistic studies of this reaction. We report here the crystal structure of an essential DNA binding domain of the RAG1 catalytic core bound to its nonamer DNA recognition motif. The RAG1 nonamer binding domain (NBD) forms a tightly interwoven dimer that binds and synapses two nonamer elements, with each NBD making contact with both DNA molecules. Biochemical and biophysical experiments confirm that the two nonamers are in close proximity in the RAG1/2-DNA synaptic complex and demonstrate the functional importance of the protein-DNA contacts revealed in the structure. These findings reveal a previously unsuspected function for the NBD in DNA synapsis and have implications for the regulation of DNA binding and cleavage by RAG1 and RAG2.

  20. The structure of the caspase recruitment domain of BinCARD reveals that all three cysteines can be oxidized.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai En; Richards, Ayanthi A; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T; Vajjhala, Parimala R; Robin, Gautier; Lua, Linda H L; Hill, Justine M; Schroder, Kate; Sweet, Matthew J; Kellie, Stuart; Kobe, Bostjan; Martin, Jennifer

    2013-05-01

    The caspase recruitment domain (CARD) is present in death-domain superfamily proteins involved in inflammation and apoptosis. BinCARD is named for its ability to interact with Bcl10 and inhibit downstream signalling. Human BinCARD is expressed as two isoforms that encode the same N-terminal CARD region but which differ considerably in their C-termini. Both isoforms are expressed in immune cells, although BinCARD-2 is much more highly expressed. Crystals of the CARD fold common to both had low symmetry (space group P1). Molecular replacement was unsuccessful in this low-symmetry space group and, as the construct contains no methionines, first one and then two residues were engineered to methionine for MAD phasing. The double-methionine variant was produced as a selenomethionine derivative, which was crystallized and the structure was solved using data measured at two wavelengths. The crystal structures of the native and selenomethionine double mutant were refined to high resolution (1.58 and 1.40 Å resolution, respectively), revealing the presence of a cis-peptide bond between Tyr39 and Pro40. Unexpectedly, the native crystal structure revealed that all three cysteines were oxidized. The mitochondrial localization of BinCARD-2 and the susceptibility of its CARD region to redox modification points to the intriguing possibility of a redox-regulatory role. PMID:23633586

  1. Analysis of the chromatin domain organisation around the plastocyanin gene reveals an MAR-specific sequence element in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    van Drunen, C M; Oosterling, R W; Keultjes, G M; Weisbeek, P J; van Driel, R; Smeekens, S C

    1997-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome is currently being sequenced, eventually leading towards the unravelling of all potential genes. We wanted to gain more insight into the way this genome might be organized at the ultrastructural level. To this extent we identified matrix attachment regions demarking potential chromatin domains, in a 16 kb region around the plastocyanin gene. The region was cloned and sequenced revealing six genes in addition to the plastocyanin gene. Using an heterologous in vitro nuclear matrix binding assay, to search for evolutionary conserved matrix attachment regions (MARs), we identified three such MARs. These three MARs divide the region into two small chromatin domains of 5 kb, each containing two genes. Comparison of the sequence of the three MARs revealed a degenerated 21 bp sequence that is shared between these MARs and that is not found elsewhere in the region. A similar sequence element is also present in four other MARs of Arabidopsis.Therefore, this sequence may constitute a landmark for the position of MARs in the genome of this plant. In a genomic sequence database of Arabidopsis the 21 bp element is found approximately once every 10 kb. The compactness of the Arabidopsis genome could account for the high incidence of MARs and MRSs we observed. PMID:9380515

  2. The C Terminus of the Core β-Ladder Domain in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Is Flexible for Accommodation of Heterologous Epitope Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Li-Chen; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NS1 is the only nonstructural protein that enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where NS1 is glycosylated, forms a dimer, and is subsequently secreted during flavivirus replication as dimers or hexamers, which appear to be highly immunogenic to the infected host, as protective immunity can be elicited against homologous flavivirus infections. Here, by using a trans-complementation assay, we identified the C-terminal end of NS1 derived from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which was more flexible than other regions in terms of housing foreign epitopes without a significant impact on virus replication. This mapped flexible region is located in the conserved tip of the core β-ladder domain of the multimeric NS1 structure and is also known to contain certain linear epitopes, readily triggering specific antibody responses from the host. Despite becoming attenuated, recombinant JEV with insertion of a neutralizing epitope derived from enterovirus 71 (EV71) into the C-terminal end of NS1 not only could be normally released from infected cells, but also induced dual protective immunity for the host to counteract lethal challenge with either JEV or EV71 in neonatal mice. These results indicated that the secreted multimeric NS1 of flaviviruses may serve as a natural protein carrier to render epitopes of interest more immunogenic in the C terminus of the core β-ladder domain. IMPORTANCE The positive-sense RNA genomes of mosquito-borne flaviviruses appear to be flexible in terms of accommodating extra insertions of short heterologous antigens into their virus genes. Here, we illustrate that the newly identified C terminus of the core β-ladder domain in NS1 could be readily inserted into entities such as EV71 epitopes, and the resulting NS1-epitope fusion proteins appeared to maintain normal virus replication, secretion ability, and multimeric formation from infected cells. Nonetheless, such an insertion attenuated the recombinant JEV in mice

  3. Structural and functional characterization of TesB from Yersinia pestis reveals a unique octameric arrangement of hotdog domains

    PubMed Central

    Swarbrick, C. M. D.; Perugini, M. A.; Cowieson, N.; Forwood, J. K.

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-CoA thioesterases catalyse the hydrolysis of the thioester bonds present within a wide range of acyl-CoA substrates, releasing free CoASH and the corresponding fatty-acyl conjugate. The TesB-type thioesterases are members of the TE4 thioesterase family, one of 25 thioesterase enzyme families characterized to date, and contain two fused hotdog domains in both prokaryote and eukaryote homologues. Only two structures have been elucidated within this enzyme family, and much of the current understanding of the TesB thioesterases has been based on the Escherichia coli structure. Yersinia pestis, a highly virulent bacterium, encodes only one TesB-type thioesterase in its genome; here, the structural and functional characterization of this enzyme are reported, revealing unique elements both within the protomer and quaternary arrangements of the hotdog domains which have not been reported previously in any thioesterase family. The quaternary structure, confirmed using a range of structural and biophysical techniques including crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography, exhibits a unique octameric arrangement of hotdog domains. Interestingly, the same biological unit appears to be present in both TesB structures solved to date, and is likely to be a conserved and distinguishing feature of TesB-type thioesterases. Analysis of the Y. pestis TesB thioesterase activity revealed a strong preference for octanoyl-CoA and this is supported by structural analysis of the active site. Overall, the results provide novel insights into the structure of TesB thioesterases which are likely to be conserved and distinguishing features of the TE4 thioesterase family. PMID:25849407

  4. Early doors (Edo) mutant mouse reveals the importance of period 2 (PER2) PAS domain structure for circadian pacemaking

    PubMed Central

    Militi, Stefania; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Sandate, Colby R.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Parsons, Michael J.; Vibert, Jennifer L.; Joynson, Greg M.; Partch, Carrie L.; Hastings, Michael H.; Nolan, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) defines 24 h of time via a transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loop in which transactivation of Per (period) and Cry (cryptochrome) genes by BMAL1–CLOCK complexes is suppressed by PER–CRY complexes. The molecular/structural basis of how circadian protein complexes function is poorly understood. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation, early doors (Edo), in the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain dimerization region of period 2 (PER2) (I324N) that accelerates the circadian clock of Per2Edo/Edo mice by 1.5 h. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed that Edo alters the packing of the highly conserved interdomain linker of the PER2 PAS core such that, although PER2Edo complexes with clock proteins, its vulnerability to degradation mediated by casein kinase 1ε (CSNK1E) is increased. The functional relevance of this mutation is revealed by the ultrashort (<19 h) but robust circadian rhythms in Per2Edo/Edo; Csnk1eTau/Tau mice and the SCN. These periods are unprecedented in mice. Thus, Per2Edo reveals a direct causal link between the molecular structure of the PER2 PAS core and the pace of SCN circadian timekeeping. PMID:26903623

  5. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32*

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Matthew J.; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R.; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D.; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I. Martha

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32. PMID:25969535

  6. High-Throughput Ligand Discovery Reveals a Sitewise Gradient of Diversity in Broadly Evolved Hydrophilic Fibronectin Domains

    PubMed Central

    Woldring, Daniel R.; Holec, Patrick V.; Zhou, Hong; Hackel, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Discovering new binding function via a combinatorial library in small protein scaffolds requires balance between appropriate mutations to introduce favorable intermolecular interactions while maintaining intramolecular integrity. Sitewise constraints exist in a non-spatial gradient from diverse to conserved in evolved antibody repertoires; yet non-antibody scaffolds generally do not implement this strategy in combinatorial libraries. Despite the fact that biased amino acid distributions, typically elevated in tyrosine, serine, and glycine, have gained wider use in synthetic scaffolds, these distributions are still predominantly applied uniformly to diversified sites. While select sites in fibronectin domains and DARPins have shown benefit from sitewise designs, they have not been deeply evaluated. Inspired by this disparity between diversity distributions in natural libraries and synthetic scaffold libraries, we hypothesized that binders resulting from discovery and evolution would exhibit a non-spatial, sitewise gradient of amino acid diversity. To identify sitewise diversities consistent with efficient evolution in the context of a hydrophilic fibronectin domain, >105 binders to six targets were evolved and sequenced. Evolutionarily favorable amino acid distributions at 25 sites reveal Shannon entropies (range: 0.3–3.9; median: 2.1; standard deviation: 1.1) supporting the diversity gradient hypothesis. Sitewise constraints in evolved sequences are consistent with complementarity, stability, and consensus biases. Implementation of sitewise constrained diversity enables direct selection of nanomolar affinity binders validating an efficient strategy to balance inter- and intra-molecular interaction demands at each site. PMID:26383268

  7. A light-sensing knot revealed by the structure of the chromophore-binding domain of phytochrome.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jeremiah R; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Forest, Katrina T; Vierstra, Richard D

    2005-11-17

    Phytochromes are red/far-red light photoreceptors that direct photosensory responses across the bacterial, fungal and plant kingdoms. These include photosynthetic potential and pigmentation in bacteria as well as chloroplast development and photomorphogenesis in plants. Phytochromes consist of an amino-terminal region that covalently binds a single bilin chromophore, followed by a carboxy-terminal dimerization domain that often transmits the light signal through a histidine kinase relay. Here we describe the three-dimensional structure of the chromophore-binding domain of Deinococcus radiodurans phytochrome assembled with its chromophore biliverdin in the Pr ground state. Our model, refined to 2.5 A resolution, reaffirms Cys 24 as the chromophore attachment site, locates key amino acids that form a solvent-shielded bilin-binding pocket, and reveals an unusually formed deep trefoil knot that stabilizes this region. The structure provides the first three-dimensional glimpse into the photochromic behaviour of these photoreceptors and helps to explain the evolution of higher plant phytochromes from prokaryotic precursors. PMID:16292304

  8. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32. PMID:25969535

  9. Single-molecule studies of the lysine riboswitch reveal effector-dependent conformational dynamics of the aptamer domain.

    PubMed

    Fiegland, Larry R; Garst, Andrew D; Batey, Robert T; Nesbitt, David J

    2012-11-13

    The lysine riboswitch is a cis-acting RNA genetic regulatory element found in the leader sequence of bacterial mRNAs coding for proteins related to biosynthesis or transport of lysine. Structural analysis of the lysine-binding aptamer domain of this RNA has revealed that it completely encapsulates the ligand and therefore must undergo a structural opening/closing upon interaction with lysine. In this work, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) methods are used to monitor these ligand-induced structural transitions that are central to lysine riboswitch function. Specifically, a model FRET system has been developed for characterizing the lysine dissociation constant as well as the opening/closing rate constants for the Bacillus subtilis lysC aptamer domain. These techniques permit measurement of the dissociation constant (K(D)) for lysine binding of 1.7(5) mM and opening/closing rate constants of 1.4(3) s(-1) and 0.203(7) s(-1), respectively. These rates predict an apparent dissociation constant for lysine binding (K(D,apparent)) of 0.25(9) mM at near physiological ionic strength, which differs markedly from previous reports. PMID:23067368

  10. Single-Molecule Studies of the Lysine Riboswitch Reveal Effector Dependent Conformational Dynamics of the Aptamer Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fiegland, Larry R.; Garst, Andrew D.; Batey, Robert T.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The lysine riboswitch is a cis-acting RNA genetic regulatory element found in the leader sequence of bacterial mRNAs coding for proteins related to biosynthesis or transport of lysine. Structural analysis of the lysine-binding aptamer domain of this RNA has revealed that it completely encapsulates the ligand and therefore must undergo a structural opening/closing upon interaction with lysine. In this work, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) methods are used to monitor these ligand-induced structural transitions that are central to lysine riboswitch function. Specifically, a model FRET system has been developed for characterizing the lysine dissociation constant, as well as the opening/closing rate constants for the Bacillus subtilis lysC aptamer domain. These techniques permit measurement of the dissociation constant (KD) for lysine binding of 1.7(5) mM, and opening/closing rate constants of 1.4(3) s−1 and 0.203(7) s−1, respectively. These rates predict an apparent dissociation constant for lysine binding (KD, apparent) of 0.25(9) mM at near physiological ionic strength, which differs markedly from previous reports. PMID:23067368

  11. Sub-diffraction-resolution fluorescence microscopy reveals a domain of the centrosome critical for pericentriolar material organization

    PubMed Central

    Mennella, V.; Keszthelyi, B.; McDonald, K.L.; Chhun, B.; Kan, F.; Rogers, G.C.; Huang, B; Agard, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    As the main microtubule-organizing center in animal cells, the centrosome has a fundamental role in cell function. Surrounding the centrioles, the Pericentriolar material (PCM) provides a dynamic platform for nucleating microtubules. While the PCM’s importance is established, its amorphous electron-dense nature has made it refractory to structural investigation. By using SIM and STORM sub-diffraction resolution microscopies to visualize proteins critical for centrosome maturation, we demonstrate that the PCM is organized into two major structural domains: a layer juxtaposed to the centriole wall, and proteins extending further away from the centriole organized in a matrix. Analysis of Pericentrin-like protein (Plp) reveals that its C-terminus is positioned at the centriole wall, it radiates outward into the matrix and is organized in clusters having quasi-nine-fold symmetry. By RNAi we show that Plp fibrils are required for interphase recruitment and proper mitotic assembly of the PCM matrix. PMID:23086239

  12. Structure of Leishmania donovani coronin coiled coil domain reveals an antiparallel 4 helix bundle with inherent asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Ashok Ranjan; Karade, Sharanbasappa Shrimant; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Rana, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, C M; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A; Pratap, J Venkatesh

    2016-07-01

    Coiled coils are ubiquitous structural motifs that serve as a platform for protein-protein interactions and play a central role in myriad physiological processes. Though the formation of a coiled coil requires only the presence of suitably spaced hydrophobic residues, sequence specificities have also been associated with specific oligomeric states. RhXXhE is one such sequence motif, associated with parallel trimers, found in coronins and other proteins. Coronin, present in all eukaryotes, is an actin-associated protein involved in regulating actin turnover. Most eukaryotic coronins possess the RhXXhE trimerization motif. However, a unique feature of parasitic kinetoplastid coronin is that the positions of R and E are swapped within their coiled coil domain, but were still expected to form trimers. To understand the role of swapped motif in oligomeric specificity, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of Leishmania donovani coronin coiled coil domain (LdCoroCC) at 2.2Å, which surprisingly, reveals an anti-parallel tetramer assembly. Small angle X-ray scattering studies and chemical crosslinking confirm the tetramer in solution and is consistent with the oligomerization observed in the full length protein. Structural analyses reveal that LdCoroCC possesses an inherent asymmetry, in that one of the helices of the bundle is axially shifted with respect to the other three. The analysis also identifies steric reasons that cause this asymmetry. The bundle adapts an extended a-d-e core packing, the e residue being polar (with an exception) which results in a thermostable bundle with polar and apolar interfaces, unlike the existing a-d-e core antiparallel homotetramers with apolar core. Functional implications of the anti-parallel association in kinetoplastids are discussed. PMID:26940672

  13. Phylogenetic conservation and homology modeling help reveal a novel domain within the budding yeast heterochromatin protein Sir1.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhonggang; Danzer, John R; Mendoza, Liza; Bose, Melissa E; Müller, Ulrika; Williams, Barry; Fox, Catherine A

    2009-02-01

    The yeast Sir1 protein's ability to bind and silence the cryptic mating-type locus HMRa requires a protein-protein interaction between Sir1 and the origin recognition complex (ORC). A domain within the C-terminal half of Sir1, the Sir1 ORC interaction region (Sir1OIR), and the conserved bromo-adjacent homology (BAH) domain within Orc1, the largest subunit of ORC, mediate this interaction. The structure of the Sir1OIR-Orc1BAH complex is known. Sir1OIR and Orc1BAH interacted with a high affinity in vitro, but the Sir1OIR did not inhibit Sir1-dependent silencing when overproduced in vivo, suggesting that other regions of Sir1 helped it bind HMRa. Comparisons of diverged Sir1 proteins revealed two highly conserved regions, N1 and N2, within Sir1's poorly characterized N-terminal half. An N-terminal portion of Sir1 (residues 27 to 149 [Sir1(27-149)]) is similar in sequence to the Sir1OIR; homology modeling predicted a structure for Sir1(27-149) in which N1 formed a submodule similar to the known Orc1BAH-interacting surface on Sir1. Consistent with these findings, two-hybrid assays indicated that the Sir1 N terminus could interact with BAH domains. Amino acid substitutions within or near N1 or N2 reduced full-length Sir1's ability to bind and silence HMRa and to interact with Orc1BAH in a two-hybrid assay. Purified recombinant Sir1 formed a large protease-resistant structure within which the Sir1OIR domain was protected, and Orc1BAH bound Sir1OIR more efficiently than full-length Sir1 in vitro. Thus, the Sir1 N terminus exhibited both positive and negative roles in the formation of a Sir1-ORC silencing complex. This functional duality might contribute to Sir1's selectivity for silencer-bound ORCs in vivo. PMID:19029247

  14. Nanoscale Pulling of Type IV Pili Reveals Their Flexibility and Adhesion to Surfaces over Extended Lengths of the Pili

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shun; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Harvey, Hanjeong; Burrows, Lori L.; Wickham, Robert A.; Dutcher, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Type IV pili (T4P) are very thin protein filaments that extend from and retract into bacterial cells, allowing them to interact with and colonize a broad array of chemically diverse surfaces. The physical aspects that allow T4P to mediate adherence to many different surfaces remain unclear. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoscale pulling experiments were used to measure the mechanical properties of T4P of a mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 unable to retract its T4P. After adhering bacteria to the end of an AFM cantilever and approaching surfaces of mica, gold, or polystyrene, we observed adhesion of the T4P to all of the surfaces. Pulling of single and multiple T4P on retraction of the cantilever from the surfaces could be described using the worm-like chain (WLC) model. Distinct peaks in the measured distributions of the best-fit values of the persistence length Lp on two different surfaces provide strong evidence for close-packed bundling of very flexible T4P. In addition, we observed force plateaus indicating that adhesion of the T4P to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces occurs along extended lengths of the T4P. These data shed new light, to our knowledge, on T4P flexibility and support a low-affinity, high-avidity adhesion mechanism that mediates bacteria-surface interactions. PMID:26083926

  15. Atomic structure of recombinant thaumatin II reveals flexible conformations in two residues critical for sweetness and three consecutive glycine residues.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito

    2014-11-01

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein used as a sweetener, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although two major variants designated thaumatin I and thaumatin II exist in plants, there have been few dedicated thaumatin II structural studies and, to date, data beyond atomic resolution had not been obtained. To identify the detailed structural properties explaining why thaumatin elicits a sweet taste, the structure of recombinant thaumatin II was determined at the resolution of 0.99 Å. Atomic resolution structural analysis with riding hydrogen atoms illustrated the differences in the direction of the side-chains more precisely and the electron density maps of the C-terminal regions were markedly improved. Though it had been suggested that the three consecutive glycine residues (G142-G143-G144) have highly flexible conformations, G143, the central glycine residue was successfully modelled in two conformations for the first time. Furthermore, the side chain r.m.s.d. values for two residues (R67 and R82) critical for sweetness exhibited substantially higher values, suggesting that these residues are highly disordered. These results demonstrated that the flexible conformations in two critical residues favoring their interaction with sweet taste receptors are prominent features of the intensely sweet taste of thaumatin. PMID:25066915

  16. Genome-scale analysis of metazoan replication origins reveals their organization in specific but flexible sites defined by conserved features

    PubMed Central

    Cayrou, Christelle; Coulombe, Philippe; Vigneron, Alice; Stanojcic, Slavica; Ganier, Olivier; Peiffer, Isabelle; Rivals, Eric; Puy, Aurore; Laurent-Chabalier, Sabine; Desprat, Romain; Méchali, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    In metazoans, thousands of DNA replication origins (Oris) are activated at each cell cycle. Their genomic organization and their genetic nature remain elusive. Here, we characterized Oris by nascent strand (NS) purification and a genome-wide analysis in Drosophila and mouse cells. We show that in both species most CpG islands (CGI) contain Oris, although methylation is nearly absent in Drosophila, indicating that this epigenetic mark is not crucial for defining the activated origin. Initiation of DNA synthesis starts at the borders of CGI, resulting in a striking bimodal distribution of NS, suggestive of a dual initiation event. Oris contain a unique nucleotide skew around NS peaks, characterized by G/T and C/A overrepresentation at the 5′ and 3′ of Ori sites, respectively. Repeated GC-rich elements were detected, which are good predictors of Oris, suggesting that common sequence features are part of metazoan Oris. In the heterochromatic chromosome 4 of Drosophila, Oris correlated with HP1 binding sites. At the chromosome level, regions rich in Oris are early replicating, whereas Ori-poor regions are late replicating. The genome-wide analysis was coupled with a DNA combing analysis to unravel the organization of Oris. The results indicate that Oris are in a large excess, but their activation does not occur at random. They are organized in groups of site-specific but flexible origins that define replicons, where a single origin is activated in each replicon. This organization provides both site specificity and Ori firing flexibility in each replicon, allowing possible adaptation to environmental cues and cell fates. PMID:21750104

  17. Initiation factor 2 crystal structure reveals a different domain organization from eukaryotic initiation factor 5B and mechanism among translational GTPases.

    PubMed

    Eiler, Daniel; Lin, Jinzhong; Simonetti, Angelita; Klaholz, Bruno P; Steitz, Thomas A

    2013-09-24

    The initiation of protein synthesis uses initiation factor 2 (IF2) in prokaryotes and a related protein named eukaryotic initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) in eukaryotes. IF2 is a GTPase that positions the initiator tRNA on the 30S ribosomal initiation complex and stimulates its assembly to the 50S ribosomal subunit to make the 70S ribosome. The 3.1-Å resolution X-ray crystal structures of the full-length Thermus thermophilus apo IF2 and its complex with GDP presented here exhibit two different conformations (all of its domains except C2 domain are visible). Unlike all other translational GTPases, IF2 does not have an effecter domain that stably contacts the switch II region of the GTPase domain. The domain organization of IF2 is inconsistent with the "articulated lever" mechanism of communication between the GTPase and initiator tRNA binding domains that has been proposed for eIF5B. Previous cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions, NMR experiments, and this structure show that IF2 transitions from being flexible in solution to an extended conformation when interacting with ribosomal complexes. PMID:24029018

  18. The solution structure of the MANEC-type domain from hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 reveals an unexpected PAN/apple domain-type fold.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zebin; Nowakowski, Michal; Spronk, Chris; Petersen, Steen V; Andreasen, Peter A; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Mulder, Frans A A; Jensen, Jan K

    2015-03-01

    A decade ago, motif at N-terminus with eight-cysteines (MANEC) was defined as a new protein domain family. This domain is found exclusively at the N-terminus of >400 multi-domain type-1 transmembrane proteins from animals. Despite the large number of MANEC-containing proteins, only one has been characterized at the protein level: hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 (HAI-1). HAI-1 is an essential protein, as knockout mice die in utero due to placental defects. HAI-1 is an inhibitor of matriptase, hepsin and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) activator, all serine proteases with important roles in epithelial development, cell growth and homoeostasis. Dysregulation of these proteases has been causatively implicated in pathological conditions such as skin diseases and cancer. Detailed functional understanding of HAI-1 and other MANEC-containing proteins is hampered by the lack of structural information on MANEC. Although many MANEC sequences exist, sequence-based database searches fail to predict structural homology. In the present paper, we present the NMR solution structure of the MANEC domain from HAI-1, the first three-dimensional (3D) structure from the MANEC domain family. Unexpectedly, MANEC is a new subclass of the PAN/apple domain family, with its own unifying features, such as two additional disulfide bonds, two extended loop regions and additional α-helical elements. As shown for other PAN/apple domain-containing proteins, we propose a similar active role of the MANEC domain in intramolecular and intermolecular interactions. The structure provides a tool for the further elucidation of HAI-1 function as well as a reference for the study of other MANEC-containing proteins. PMID:25510835

  19. The functional integrity of the serpin domain of C1-inhibitor depends on the unique N-terminal domain, as revealed by a pathological mutant.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Lubbers, Yvonne T P; Roem, Dorina; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Hack, C Erik; Eldering, Eric

    2003-08-01

    C1-inhibitor (C1-Inh) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) with a unique, non-conserved N-terminal domain of unknown function. Genetic deficiency of C1-Inh causes hereditary angioedema. A novel type of mutation (Delta 3) in exon 3 of the C1-Inh gene, resulting in deletion of Asp62-Thr116 in this unique domain, was encountered in a hereditary angioedema pedigree. Because the domain is supposedly not essential for inhibitory activity, the unexpected loss-of-function of this deletion mutant was further investigated. The Delta 3 mutant and three additional mutants starting at Pro76, Gly98, and Ser115, lacking increasing parts of the N-terminal domain, were produced recombinantly. C1-Inh76 and C1-Inh98 retained normal conformation and interaction kinetics with target proteases. In contrast, C1-Inh115 and Delta 3, which both lack the connection between the serpin and the non-serpin domain via two disulfide bridges, were completely non-functional because of a complex-like and multimeric conformation, as demonstrated by several criteria. The Delta 3 mutant also circulated in multimeric form in plasma from affected family members. The C1-Inh mutant reported here is unique in that deletion of an entire amino acid stretch from a domain not shared by other serpins leads to a loss-of-function. The deletion in the unique N-terminal domain results in a "multimerization phenotype" of C1-Inh, because of diminished stability of the central beta-sheet. This phenotype, as well as the location of the disulfide bridges between the serpin and the non-serpin domain of C1-Inh, suggests that the function of the N-terminal region may be similar to one of the effects of heparin in antithrombin III, maintenance of the metastable serpin conformation. PMID:12773530

  20. Biochemical characterization and crystal structure of a GH10 xylanase from termite gut bacteria reveal a novel structural feature and significance of its bacterial Ig-like domain.

    PubMed

    Han, Qian; Liu, Ning; Robinson, Howard; Cao, Lin; Qian, Changli; Wang, Qianfu; Xie, Lei; Ding, Haizhen; Wang, Qian; Huang, Yongping; Li, Jianyong; Zhou, Zhihua

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial Ig-like (Big) domains are commonly distributed in glycoside hydrolases (GH), but their structure and function remains undefined. Xylanase is a GH, and catalyzes the hydrolysis of the internal β-xylosidic linkages of xylan. In this study, we report the molecular cloning, biochemical and biophysical characterization, and crystal structure of a termite gut bacterial xylanase, Xyl-ORF19, which was derived from gut bacteria of a wood-feeding termite (Globitermes brachycerastes). The protein architecture of Xyl-ORF19 reveals that it has two domains, a C-terminal GH10 catalytic domain and an N-terminal Big_2 non-catalytic domain. The catalytic domain folds in an (α/β)8 barrel as most GH10 xylanases do, but it has two extra β-strands. The non-catalytic domain is structurally similar to an immunoglobulin-like domain of intimins. The recombinant enzyme without the non-catalytic domain has fairly low catalytic activity, and is different from the full-length enzyme in kinetic parameters, pH and temperature profiles, which suggests the non-catalytic domain could affect the enzyme biochemical and biophysical properties as well as the role for enzyme localization. This study provides a molecular basis for future efforts in xylanase bioengineering. PMID:23794438

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Transposon and Retroviral Insertions Reveals Preferential Integrations in Regions of DNA Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Vrljicak, Pavle; Tao, Shijie; Varshney, Gaurav K.; Quach, Helen Ngoc Bao; Joshi, Adita; LaFave, Matthew C.; Burgess, Shawn M.; Sampath, Karuna

    2016-01-01

    DNA transposons and retroviruses are important transgenic tools for genome engineering. An important consideration affecting the choice of transgenic vector is their insertion site preferences. Previous large-scale analyses of Ds transposon integration sites in plants were done on the basis of reporter gene expression or germ-line transmission, making it difficult to discern vertebrate integration preferences. Here, we compare over 1300 Ds transposon integration sites in zebrafish with Tol2 transposon and retroviral integration sites. Genome-wide analysis shows that Ds integration sites in the presence or absence of marker selection are remarkably similar and distributed throughout the genome. No strict motif was found, but a preference for structural features in the target DNA associated with DNA flexibility (Twist, Tilt, Rise, Roll, Shift, and Slide) was observed. Remarkably, this feature is also found in transposon and retroviral integrations in maize and mouse cells. Our findings show that structural features influence the integration of heterologous DNA in genomes, and have implications for targeted genome engineering. PMID:26818075

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of Transposon and Retroviral Insertions Reveals Preferential Integrations in Regions of DNA Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Vrljicak, Pavle; Tao, Shijie; Varshney, Gaurav K; Quach, Helen Ngoc Bao; Joshi, Adita; LaFave, Matthew C; Burgess, Shawn M; Sampath, Karuna

    2016-01-01

    DNA transposons and retroviruses are important transgenic tools for genome engineering. An important consideration affecting the choice of transgenic vector is their insertion site preferences. Previous large-scale analyses of Ds transposon integration sites in plants were done on the basis of reporter gene expression or germ-line transmission, making it difficult to discern vertebrate integration preferences. Here, we compare over 1300 Ds transposon integration sites in zebrafish with Tol2 transposon and retroviral integration sites. Genome-wide analysis shows that Ds integration sites in the presence or absence of marker selection are remarkably similar and distributed throughout the genome. No strict motif was found, but a preference for structural features in the target DNA associated with DNA flexibility (Twist, Tilt, Rise, Roll, Shift, and Slide) was observed. Remarkably, this feature is also found in transposon and retroviral integrations in maize and mouse cells. Our findings show that structural features influence the integration of heterologous DNA in genomes, and have implications for targeted genome engineering. PMID:26818075

  3. Flexible working memory representation of the relationship between an object and its location as revealed by interactions with attention

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Joseph B.; Courtney, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Working memory (WM) selectively maintains a limited amount of currently relevant information in an active state to influence future perceptual processing, thought, and behavior. The representation of the information held in WM is unknown, particularly the degree of separation between the representation of an object’s identity and its location. The current experiments examined the flexibility of object and location WM representations by measuring reaction times on a visual discrimination task during the delay period of a WM recognition task for object identities, locations, or both. Results demonstrate that during WM delay periods attention is biased toward information that matches the current contents of WM. Attention is not biased toward information that was present in the encoded memory sample but not relevant for the memory recognition test. This specificity of the interaction between WM and attention applies to both the identity and the location of the remembered stimulus and to the relationship between an object and its location. The results suggest that when this relationship is necessary for task performance, WM represents an object and its identity in an integrated manner. However, if this relationship is not task relevant, the object and location information are represented in WM separately. PMID:19801613

  4. Peptide–polymer ligands for a tandem WW-domain, an adaptive multivalent protein–protein interaction: lessons on the thermodynamic fitness of flexible ligands

    PubMed Central

    Koschek, Katharina; Durmaz, Vedat; Krylova, Oxana; Wieczorek, Marek; Gupta, Shilpi; Richter, Martin; Bujotzek, Alexander; Fischer, Christina; Haag, Rainer; Freund, Christian; Weber, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Three polymers, poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) (pHPMA), hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG), and dextran were investigated as carriers for multivalent ligands targeting the adaptive tandem WW-domain of formin-binding protein (FBP21). Polymer carriers were conjugated with 3–9 copies of the proline-rich decapeptide GPPPRGPPPR-NH2 (P1). Binding of the obtained peptide–polymer conjugates to the tandem WW-domain was investigated employing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to determine the binding affinity, the enthalpic and entropic contributions to free binding energy, and the stoichiometry of binding for all peptide–polymer conjugates. Binding affinities of all multivalent ligands were in the µM range, strongly amplified compared to the monovalent ligand P1 with a K D > 1 mM. In addition, concise differences were observed, pHPMA and hPG carriers showed moderate affinity and bound 2.3–2.8 peptides per protein binding site resulting in the formation of aggregates. Dextran-based conjugates displayed affinities down to 1.2 µM, forming complexes with low stoichiometry, and no precipitation. Experimental results were compared with parameters obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the observed differences between the three carrier materials. In summary, the more rigid and condensed peptide–polymer conjugates based on the dextran scaffold seem to be superior to induce multivalent binding and to increase affinity, while the more flexible and dendritic polymers, pHPMA and hPG are suitable to induce crosslinking upon binding. PMID:26124884

  5. Peptide-polymer ligands for a tandem WW-domain, an adaptive multivalent protein-protein interaction: lessons on the thermodynamic fitness of flexible ligands.

    PubMed

    Koschek, Katharina; Durmaz, Vedat; Krylova, Oxana; Wieczorek, Marek; Gupta, Shilpi; Richter, Martin; Bujotzek, Alexander; Fischer, Christina; Haag, Rainer; Freund, Christian; Weber, Marcus; Rademann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Three polymers, poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) (pHPMA), hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG), and dextran were investigated as carriers for multivalent ligands targeting the adaptive tandem WW-domain of formin-binding protein (FBP21). Polymer carriers were conjugated with 3-9 copies of the proline-rich decapeptide GPPPRGPPPR-NH2 (P1). Binding of the obtained peptide-polymer conjugates to the tandem WW-domain was investigated employing isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to determine the binding affinity, the enthalpic and entropic contributions to free binding energy, and the stoichiometry of binding for all peptide-polymer conjugates. Binding affinities of all multivalent ligands were in the µM range, strongly amplified compared to the monovalent ligand P1 with a K D > 1 mM. In addition, concise differences were observed, pHPMA and hPG carriers showed moderate affinity and bound 2.3-2.8 peptides per protein binding site resulting in the formation of aggregates. Dextran-based conjugates displayed affinities down to 1.2 µM, forming complexes with low stoichiometry, and no precipitation. Experimental results were compared with parameters obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the observed differences between the three carrier materials. In summary, the more rigid and condensed peptide-polymer conjugates based on the dextran scaffold seem to be superior to induce multivalent binding and to increase affinity, while the more flexible and dendritic polymers, pHPMA and hPG are suitable to induce crosslinking upon binding. PMID:26124884

  6. Crystal structure of Src-like adaptor protein 2 reveals close association of SH3 and SH2 domains through β-sheet formation.

    PubMed

    Wybenga-Groot, Leanne E; McGlade, C Jane

    2013-12-01

    The Src-like adaptor proteins (SLAP/SLAP2) are key components of Cbl-dependent downregulation of antigen receptor, cytokine receptor, and receptor tyrosine kinase signaling in hematopoietic cells. SLAP and SLAP2 consist of adjacent SH3 and SH2 domains that are most similar in sequence to Src family kinases (SFKs). Notably, the SH3-SH2 connector sequence is significantly shorter in SLAP/SLAP2 than in SFKs. To understand the structural implication of a short SH3-SH2 connector sequence, we solved the crystal structure of a protein encompassing the SH3 domain, SH3-SH2 connector, and SH2 domain of SLAP2 (SLAP2-32). While both domains adopt typical folds, the short SH3-SH2 connector places them in close association. Strand βe of the SH3 domain interacts with strand βA of the SH2 domain, resulting in the formation of a continuous β sheet that spans the length of the protein. Disruption of the SH3/SH2 interface through mutagenesis decreases SLAP-32 stability in vitro, consistent with inter-domain binding being an important component of SLAP2 structure and function. The canonical peptide binding pockets of the SH3 and SH2 domains are fully accessible, in contrast to other protein structures that display direct interaction between SH3 and SH2 domains, in which either peptide binding surface is obstructed by the interaction. Our results reveal potential sites of novel interaction for SH3 and SH2 domains, and illustrate the adaptability of SH2 and SH3 domains in mediating interactions. As well, our results suggest that the SH3 and SH2 domains of SLAP2 function interdependently, with implications on their mode of substrate binding. PMID:24018043

  7. Time-domain parameter identification of aeroelastic loads by forced-vibration method for response of flexible structures subject to transient wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bochao

    Slender structures representing civil, mechanical and aerospace systems such as long-span bridges, high-rise buildings, stay cables, power-line cables, high light mast poles, crane-booms and aircraft wings could experience vortex-induced and buffeting excitations below their design wind speeds and divergent self-excited oscillations (flutter) beyond a critical wind speed because these are flexible. Traditional linear aerodynamic theories that are routinely applied for their response prediction are not valid in the galloping, or near-flutter regime, where large-amplitude vibrations could occur and during non-stationary and transient wind excitations that occur, for example, during hurricanes, thunderstorms and gust fronts. The linear aerodynamic load formulation for lift, drag and moment are expressed in terms of aerodynamic functions in frequency domain that are valid for straight-line winds which are stationary or weakly-stationary. Application of the frequency domain formulation is restricted from use in the nonlinear and transient domain because these are valid for linear models and stationary wind. The time-domain aerodynamic force formulations are suitable for finite element modeling, feedback-dependent structural control mechanism, fatigue-life prediction, and above all modeling of transient structural behavior during non-stationary wind phenomena. This has motivated the developing of time-domain models of aerodynamic loads that are in parallel to the existing frequency-dependent models. Parameters defining these time-domain models can be now extracted from wind tunnel tests, for example, the Rational Function Coefficients defining the self-excited wind loads can be extracted using section model tests using the free vibration technique. However, the free vibration method has some limitations because it is difficult to apply at high wind speeds, in turbulent wind environment, or on unstable cross sections with negative aerodynamic damping. In the current

  8. Photoluminescence Decay Dynamics in Blue and Green InGaN LED Structures Revealed by the Frequency-Domain Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reklaitis, I.; Kudžma, R.; Miasojedovas, S.; Vitta, P.; Žukauskas, A.; Tomašiūnas, R.; Pietzonka, I.; Strassburg, M.

    2016-05-01

    An extended study of charge-carrier localization and delocalization in blue and green InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) test structures has been performed. Using the frequency-domain lifetime measurement (FDLM) technique based on direct harmonic modulation of photoluminescence excitation in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 100 MHz, carrier lifetimes were estimated at scales spanning from milliseconds to nanoseconds. The time resolution was determined using fast Fourier transform analysis. A system comprising a radiative and several nonradiative recombination channels was used to describe the complex photoluminescence decay. Due to the broad timescale, even stretched exponential decays from 2 ns to 4 ns up to 1.5 μs (stretching parameter 0.5 to 0.6) were revealed. A higher degree of carrier delocalization was observed for the blue compared with the green light-emitting structure, providing qualitative insight into disorder, which is tentatively assigned to spatial fluctuations of the indium concentration in the quantum wells. A nanosecond nonradiative recombination channel for the green light-emitting structure was found to be unsaturated throughout the entire photoexcitation power density range and was interpreted as being related to the higher defect density and lower internal quantum efficiency of the sample. To expand the study of lifetimes to much higher photoexcitation power density, time-resolved photoluminescence kinetics were measured.

  9. Photoluminescence Decay Dynamics in Blue and Green InGaN LED Structures Revealed by the Frequency-Domain Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reklaitis, I.; Kudžma, R.; Miasojedovas, S.; Vitta, P.; Žukauskas, A.; Tomašiūnas, R.; Pietzonka, I.; Strassburg, M.

    2016-07-01

    An extended study of charge-carrier localization and delocalization in blue and green InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) test structures has been performed. Using the frequency-domain lifetime measurement (FDLM) technique based on direct harmonic modulation of photoluminescence excitation in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 100 MHz, carrier lifetimes were estimated at scales spanning from milliseconds to nanoseconds. The time resolution was determined using fast Fourier transform analysis. A system comprising a radiative and several nonradiative recombination channels was used to describe the complex photoluminescence decay. Due to the broad timescale, even stretched exponential decays from 2 ns to 4 ns up to 1.5 μs (stretching parameter 0.5 to 0.6) were revealed. A higher degree of carrier delocalization was observed for the blue compared with the green light-emitting structure, providing qualitative insight into disorder, which is tentatively assigned to spatial fluctuations of the indium concentration in the quantum wells. A nanosecond nonradiative recombination channel for the green light-emitting structure was found to be unsaturated throughout the entire photoexcitation power density range and was interpreted as being related to the higher defect density and lower internal quantum efficiency of the sample. To expand the study of lifetimes to much higher photoexcitation power density, time-resolved photoluminescence kinetics were measured.

  10. Structure of trigger factor binding domain in biologically homologous complex with eubacterial ribosome reveals its chaperone action

    SciTech Connect

    Baram, David; Pyetan, Erez; Sittner, Assa; Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada

    2010-07-13

    Trigger factor (TF), the first chaperone in eubacteria to encounter the emerging nascent chain, binds to the large ribosomal subunit in the vicinity of the protein exit tunnel opening and forms a sheltered folding space. Here, we present the 3.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of the physiological complex of the large ribosomal subunit from the eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans with the N-terminal domain of TF (TFa) from the same organism. For anchoring, TFa exploits a small ribosomal surface area in the vicinity of proteins L23 and L29, by using its 'signature motif' as well as additional structural elements. The molecular details of TFa interactions reveal that L23 is essential for the association of TF with the ribosome and may serve as a channel of communication with the nascent chain progressing in the tunnel. L29 appears to induce a conformational change in TFa, which results in the exposure of TFa hydrophobic patches to the opening of the ribosomal exit tunnel, thus increasing its affinity for hydrophobic segments of the emerging nascent polypeptide. This observation implies that, in addition to creating a protected folding space for the emerging nascent chain, TF association with the ribosome prevents aggregation by providing a competing hydrophobic environment and may be critical for attaining the functional conformation necessary for chaperone activity.

  11. Retinal Structure of Birds of Prey Revealed by Ultra-High Resolution Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Marco; Major, James C.; McKeown, Craig; Knighton, Robert W.; Puliafito, Carmen A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To reveal three-dimensional (3-D) information about the retinal structures of birds of prey in vivo. Methods. An ultra-high resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system was built for in vivo imaging of retinas of birds of prey. The calibrated imaging depth and axial resolution of the system were 3.1 mm and 2.8 μm (in tissue), respectively. 3-D segmentation was performed for calculation of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) map. Results. High-resolution OCT images were obtained of the retinas of four species of birds of prey: two diurnal hawks (Buteo platypterus and Buteo brachyurus) and two nocturnal owls (Bubo virginianus and Strix varia). These images showed the detailed retinal anatomy, including the retinal layers and the structure of the deep and shallow foveae. The calculated thickness map showed the RNFL distribution. Traumatic injury to one bird's retina was also successfully imaged. Conclusions. Ultra-high resolution SD-OCT provides unprecedented high-quality 2-D and 3-D in vivo visualization of the retinal structures of birds of prey. SD-OCT is a powerful imaging tool for vision research in birds of prey. PMID:20554605

  12. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of four EphB kinase domains reveals contrasting thermodynamic, kinetic and inhibition profiles.

    PubMed

    Overman, Ross C; Debreczeni, Judit E; Truman, Caroline M; McAlister, Mark S; Attwood, Teresa K

    2013-01-01

    The Eph (erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma) B receptors are important in a variety of cellular processes through their roles in cell-to-cell contact and signalling; their up-regulation and down-regulation has been shown to have implications in a variety of cancers. A greater understanding of the similarities and differences within this small, highly conserved family of tyrosine kinases will be essential to the identification of effective therapeutic opportunities for disease intervention. In this study, we have developed a route to production of multi-milligram quantities of highly purified, homogeneous, recombinant protein for the kinase domain of these human receptors in Escherichia coli. Analyses of these isolated catalytic fragments have revealed stark contrasts in their amenability to recombinant expression and their physical properties: e.g., a >16°C variance in thermal stability, a 3-fold difference in catalytic activity and disparities in their inhibitor binding profiles. We find EphB3 to be an outlier in terms of both its intrinsic stability, and more importantly its ligand-binding properties. Our findings have led us to speculate about both their biological significance and potential routes for generating EphB isozyme-selective small-molecule inhibitors. Our comprehensive methodologies provide a template for similar in-depth studies of other kinase superfamily members. PMID:23627399

  13. Structural Studies of the Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein Copper-Binding Domain Reveal How It Binds Copper Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, G.K.-W.; Adams, J.J.; Harris, H.H.; Boas, J.F.; Curtain, C.C.; Galatis, D.; Master, C.L.; Barnham, K.J.; McKinstry, W.J.; Cappai, R.; Parker, M.W.; /Sydney U. /Monash U. /Melbourne U.

    2007-07-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia. Amyloid {beta} peptide (A {beta}), generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is central to AD pathogenesis. APP can function as a metalloprotein and modulate copper (Cu) transport, presumably via its extracellular Cu-binding domain (CuBD). Cu binding to the CuBD reduces A{beta} levels, suggesting that a Cu mimetic may have therapeutic potential. We describe here the atomic structures of apo CuBD from three crystal forms and found they have identical Cu-binding sites despite the different crystal lattices. The structure of Cu[2+]-bound CuBD reveals that the metal ligands are His147, His151, Tyrl68 and two water molecules, which are arranged in a square pyramidal geometry. The site resembles a Type 2 non-blue Cu center and is supported by electron paramagnetic resonance and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies. A previous study suggested that Met170 might be a ligand but we suggest that this residue plays a critical role as an electron donor in CuBDs ability to reduce Cu ions. The structure of Cu[+]-bound CuBD is almost identical to the Cu[2+]-bound structure except for the loss of one of the water ligands. The geometry of the site is unfavorable for Cu[+], thus providing a mechanism by which CuBD could readily transfer Cu ions to other proteins.

  14. Targeted mutagenesis of the human papillomavirus type 16 E2 transactivation domain reveals separable transcriptional activation and DNA replication functions.

    PubMed

    Sakai, H; Yasugi, T; Benson, J D; Dowhanick, J J; Howley, P M

    1996-03-01

    The E2 gene products of papillomavirus play key roles in viral replication, both as regulators of viral transcription and as auxiliary factors that act with E1 in viral DNA replication. We have carried out a detailed structure-function analysis of conserved amino acids within the N-terminal domain of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E2 protein. These mutants were tested for their transcriptional activation activities as well as transient DNA replication and E1 binding activities. Analysis of the stably expressed mutants revealed that the transcriptional activation and replication activities of HPV16 E2 could be dissociated. The 173A mutant was defective for the transcriptional activation function but retained wild-type DNA replication activity, whereas the E39A mutant wild-type transcriptional activation function but was defective in transient DNA replication assays. The E39A mutant was also defective for HPV16 E1 binding in vitro, suggesting that the ability of E2 protein to form a complex with E1 appears to be essential for its function as an auxiliary replication factor. PMID:8627680

  15. Task Effects Reveal Cognitive Flexibility Responding to Frequency and Predictability: Evidence from Eye Movements in Reading and Proofreading

    PubMed Central

    Schotter, Elizabeth R.; Bicknell, Klinton; Howard, Ian; Levy, Roger; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that word frequency and predictability affect processing time. These effects change magnitude across tasks, but studies testing this use tasks with different response types (e.g., lexical decision, naming, and fixation time during reading; Schilling, Rayner & Chumbley, 1998), preventing direct comparison. Recently, Kaakinen and Hyönä (2010) overcame this problem, comparing fixation times in reading for comprehension and proofreading, showing that the frequency effect was larger in proofreading than in reading. This result could be explained by readers exhibiting substantial cognitive flexibility, and qualitatively changing how they process words in the proofreading task in a way that magnifies effects of word frequency. Alternatively, readers may not change word processing so dramatically, and instead may perform more careful identification generally, increasing the magnitude of many word processing effects (e.g., both frequency and predictability). We tested these possibilities with two experiments: subjects read for comprehension and then proofread for spelling errors (letter transpositions) that produce nonwords (e.g., trcak for track as in Kaakinen & Hyönä) or that produce real but unintended words (e.g., trial for trail) to compare how the task changes these effects. Replicating Kaakinen and Hyönä, frequency effects increased during proofreading. However, predictability effects only increased when integration with the sentence context was necessary to detect errors (i.e., when spelling errors produced words that were inappropriate in the sentence; trial for trail). The results suggest that readers adopt sophisticated word processing strategies to accommodate task demands. PMID:24434024

  16. Structure of the unique SEFIR domain from human interleukin 17 receptor A reveals a composite ligand-binding site containing a conserved α-helix for Act1 binding and IL-17 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Liu, Caini; Qian, Wen; Han, Yue; Li, Xiaoxia; Deng, Junpeng

    2014-05-01

    Crystal structure of the SEFIR domain from human IL-17 receptor A provides new insights into IL-17 signaling. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) cytokines play a crucial role in mediating inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. A unique intracellular signaling domain termed SEFIR is found within all IL-17 receptors (IL-17Rs) as well as the key adaptor protein Act1. SEFIR-mediated protein–protein interaction is a crucial step in IL-17 cytokine signaling. Here, the 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the SEFIR domain of IL-17RA, the most commonly shared receptor for IL-17 cytokine signaling, is reported. The structure includes the complete SEFIR domain and an additional α-helical C-terminal extension, which pack tightly together to form a compact unit. Structural comparison between the SEFIR domains of IL-17RA and IL-17RB reveals substantial differences in protein topology and folding. The uniquely long insertion between strand βC and helix αC in IL-17RA SEFIR is mostly well ordered, displaying a helix (αCC′{sub ins}) and a flexible loop (CC′). The DD′ loop in the IL-17RA SEFIR structure is much shorter; it rotates nearly 90° with respect to the counterpart in the IL-17RB SEFIR structure and shifts about 12 Å to accommodate the αCC′{sub ins} helix without forming any knots. Helix αC was identified as critical for its interaction with Act1 and IL-17-stimulated gene expression. The data suggest that the heterotypic SEFIR–SEFIR association via helix αC is a conserved and signature mechanism specific for IL-17 signaling. The structure also suggests that the downstream motif of IL-17RA SEFIR together with helix αC could provide a composite ligand-binding surface for recruiting Act1 during IL-17 signaling.

  17. Origin and Evolution of Glutamyl-prolyl tRNA Synthetase WHEP Domains Reveal Evolutionary Relationships within Holozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partho Sarothi; Fox, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated domains in proteins that have undergone duplication or loss, and sequence divergence, are especially informative about phylogenetic relationships. We have exploited divergent repeats of the highly structured, 50-amino acid WHEP domains that join the catalytic subunits of bifunctional glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) as a sequence-informed repeat (SIR) to trace the origin and evolution of EPRS in holozoa. EPRS is the only fused tRNA synthetase, with two distinct aminoacylation activities, and a non-canonical translation regulatory function mediated by the WHEP domains in the linker. Investigating the duplications, deletions and divergence of WHEP domains, we traced the bifunctional EPRS to choanozoans and identified the fusion event leading to its origin at the divergence of ichthyosporea and emergence of filozoa nearly a billion years ago. Distribution of WHEP domains from a single species in two or more distinct clades suggested common descent, allowing the identification of linking organisms. The discrete assortment of choanoflagellate WHEP domains with choanozoan domains as well as with those in metazoans supported the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates as the closest sister group to metazoans. Analysis of clustering and assortment of WHEP domains provided unexpected insights into phylogenetic relationships amongst holozoan taxa. Furthermore, observed gaps in the transition between WHEP domain groupings in distant taxa allowed the prediction of undiscovered or extinct evolutionary intermediates. Analysis based on SIR domains can provide a phylogenetic counterpart to palaentological approaches of discovering “missing links” in the tree of life. PMID:24968216

  18. A network-level analysis of cognitive flexibility reveals a differential influence of the anterior cingulate cortex in bilinguals versus monolinguals.

    PubMed

    Becker, Theresa M; Prat, Chantel S; Stocco, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that bilingual development may change the brain in a way that gives rise to differences in non-linguistic cognitive functioning; however, only a limited number of studies have investigated the mechanism by which bilingualism shapes the brain. The current study used a network-level analysis to investigate differences in the mechanisms by which bilinguals and monolinguals flexibly adapt their neural networks in the face of novel task demands. Three competing hypotheses concerning differences in network-level adaptation were examined using Dynamic Causal Modeling of data from 15 bilinguals and 14 monolinguals who performed a Rapid Instructed Task Learning paradigm. The results demonstrated that the best-fitting model for the data from both groups specified that novel task execution is accomplished through a modulation of the influence of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and on the striatum. Further examination of the best-fitting model revealed that ACC activity increased DLPFC and striatal activity in bilinguals but decreased activity in these regions in monolinguals. Interestingly, an increased positive connection between the ACC and striatum was associated with decreased accuracy across groups. Taken together, the results suggest that regardless of language experience, the ACC plays a critical role in cognitive flexibility, but the exact influence of the ACC on other primary control regions seems to be dependent on language experience. When paired with the behavioral results, these results suggest that bilinguals and monolinguals may employ different neurocognitive mechanisms for conflict monitoring to flexibly adapt to novel situations. PMID:26796713

  19. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein SA1388 from S. aureus reveals a capped hexameric toroid with two PII domain lids and a dinuclear metal center

    SciTech Connect

    Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Zhang, Xuejun; Kinch, Lisa; Leybourne, Matthew; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong

    2009-01-26

    The protein encoded by the SA1388 gene from Staphylococcus aureus was chosen for structure determination to elucidate its domain organization and confirm our earlier remote homology based prediction that it housed a nitrogen regulatory PII protein-like domain. SA1388 was predicted to contain a central PII-like domain and two flanking regions, which together belong to the NIF3-like protein family. Proteins like SA1388 remain a poorly studied group and their structural characterization could guide future investigations aimed at understanding their function. The structure of SA1388 has been solved to 2.0{angstrom} resolution by single wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method using selenium anomalous signals. It reveals a canonical NIF3-like fold containing two domains with a PII-like domain inserted in the middle of the polypeptide. The N and C terminal halves of the NIF3-like domains are involved in dimerization, while the PII domain forms trimeric contacts with symmetry related monomers. Overall, the NIF3-like domains of SA1388 are organized as a hexameric toroid similar to its homologs, E. coli ybgI and the hypothetical protein SP1609 from Streptococcus pneumoniae. The openings on either side of the toroid are partially covered by trimeric 'lids' formed by the PII domains. The junction of the two NIF3 domains has two zinc ions bound at what appears to be a histidine rich active site. A well-defined electron density corresponding to an endogenously bound ligand of unknown identity is observed in close proximity to the metal site. SA1388 is the third member of the NIF3-like family of proteins to be structurally characterized, the other two also being hypothetical proteins of unknown function. The structure of SA1388 confirms our earlier prediction that the inserted domain that separates the two NIF3 domains adopts a PII-like fold and reveals an overall capped toroidal arrangement for the protein hexamer. The six PII-like domains form two trimeric 'lids' that

  20. Solution NMR Structure of Lin0431 Protein from Listeria innocua Reveals High Structural Similarity with Domain II of Bacterial Transcription Antitermination Protein NusG

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuefeng; Xiao, Rong; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Janjua, Haleema; Lee, Dong Yup; Everett, John K.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Acton, Thomas B.; Rost, Burkhard; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2010-01-01

    Lin0431 protein from Listeria innocua (UniProtKB/TrEMBL ID Q92EM7/Q92EM7_LISIN) was selected as a target of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (target ID: LkR112). Here, we present the high-quality NMR solution structure of this protein which is the first representative for a member of DUF1312 domain family. Lin0431 protein exhibits a β-sandwich topology. Four anti-parallel β-strands form one face of the sandwich and the other three anti-parallel β-strands together with a short α-helix form the other face of the sandwich. Structure alignment by Dali reveals an unexpected structural similarity with domain II of NusG from Aquifex aeolicus. Analyses of the electrostatic protein surface potential and searches for protein surface cavities reveal the conserved basic charged surface cavities of both the Lin0431 and domain II of AaeNusG, suggesting they may bind the negatively charged nucleic acids and/or and other binding partners. The high structural similarity and similar surface features, despite the lack of recognizable sequence similarity, between Lin0431 and AaeNusG domain II suggest that the domain II of NusG and DUF1312 domains have a homologous relationship and may share similar biochemical functions. PMID:20602357

  1. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  2. In Vivo Monitoring of mRNA Movement in Drosophila Body Wall Muscle Cells Reveals the Presence of Myofiber Domains

    PubMed Central

    Pilgram, Gonneke S. K.; Fradkin, Lee G.; Noordermeer, Jasprina N.; Tanke, Hans J.; Jost, Carolina R.

    2009-01-01

    Background In skeletal muscle each muscle cell, commonly called myofiber, is actually a large syncytium containing numerous nuclei. Experiments in fixed myofibers show that mRNAs remain localized around the nuclei in which they are produced. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we generated transgenic flies that allowed us to investigate the movement of mRNAs in body wall myofibers of living Drosophila embryos. We determined the dynamic properties of GFP-tagged mRNAs using in vivo confocal imaging and photobleaching techniques and found that the GFP-tagged mRNAs are not free to move throughout myofibers. The restricted movement indicated that body wall myofibers consist of three domains. The exchange of mRNAs between the domains is relatively slow, but the GFP-tagged mRNAs move rapidly within these domains. One domain is located at the centre of the cell and is surrounded by nuclei while the other two domains are located at either end of the fiber. To move between these domains mRNAs have to travel past centrally located nuclei. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that the domains made visible in our experiments result from prolonged interactions with as yet undefined structures close to the nuclei that prevent GFP-tagged mRNAs from rapidly moving between the domains. This could be of significant importance for the treatment of myopathies using regenerative cell-based therapies. PMID:19684860

  3. Solution NMR studies reveal the location of the second transmembrane domain of the human sigma-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Amin, Nader T.; Schnell, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane chaperone protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and modulation of ion channel activities at the plasma membrane. We report here a solution NMR study of a S1R construct (S1R(Δ35)) in which only the first transmembrane domain and the eight-residue N-terminus have been removed. The second transmembrane helix is found to be composed of residues 91–107, which corresponds to the first steroid binding domain-like region. The cytosolic domain is found to contain three helices, and the secondary structure and backbone dynamics of the chaperone domain are consistent with that determined previously for the chaperone domain alone. The position of TM2 provides a framework for ongoing studies of S1R ligand binding and oligomerisation. PMID:25647032

  4. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  5. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication.

    PubMed

    Carr, Stephen B; Phillips, Simon E V; Thomas, Christopher D

    2016-03-18

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  6. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  7. The structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09836 reveals a two-domain organization and suggests involvement in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Grishin, Nick V.; Kumar, Abhinav; Carlton, Dennis; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Burra, Prasad; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with the DUF2063 domain constitute a new Pfam family, PF09836. The crystal structure of a member of this family, NGO1945 from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, has been determined and reveals that the N-terminal DUF2063 domain is likely to be a DNA-binding domain. In conjunction with the rest of the protein, NGO1945 is likely to be involved in transcriptional regulation, which is consistent with genomic neighborhood analysis. Of the 216 currently known proteins that contain a DUF2063 domain, the most significant sequence homologs of NGO1945 (∼40–99% sequence identity) are from various Neisseria and Haemophilus species. As these are important human pathogens, NGO1945 represents an interesting candidate for further exploration via biochemical studies and possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:20944208

  8. Quantitative Analysis of the Association Angle between T-cell Receptor Vα/Vβ Domains Reveals Important Features for Epitope Recognition.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Krackhardt, Angela M; Antes, Iris

    2015-07-01

    T-cell receptors (TCR) play an important role in the adaptive immune system as they recognize pathogen- or cancer-based epitopes and thus initiate the cell-mediated immune response. Therefore there exists a growing interest in the optimization of TCRs for medical purposes like adoptive T-cell therapy. However, the molecular mechanisms behind T-cell signaling are still predominantly unknown. For small sets of TCRs it was observed that the angle between their Vα- and Vβ-domains, which bind the epitope, can vary and might be important for epitope recognition. Here we present a comprehensive, quantitative study of the variation in the Vα/Vβ interdomain-angle and its influence on epitope recognition, performing a systematic bioinformatics analysis based on a representative set of experimental TCR structures. For this purpose we developed a new, cuboid-based superpositioning method, which allows a unique, quantitative analysis of the Vα/Vβ-angles. Angle-based clustering led to six significantly different clusters. Analysis of these clusters revealed the unexpected result that the angle is predominantly influenced by the TCR-clonotype, whereas the bound epitope has only a minor influence. Furthermore we could identify a previously unknown center of rotation (CoR), which is shared by all TCRs. All TCR geometries can be obtained by rotation around this center, rendering it a new, common TCR feature with the potential of improving the accuracy of TCR structure prediction considerably. The importance of Vα/Vβ rotation for signaling was confirmed as we observed larger variances in the Vα/Vβ-angles in unbound TCRs compared to epitope-bound TCRs. Our results strongly support a two-step mechanism for TCR-epitope: First, preformation of a flexible TCR geometry in the unbound state and second, locking of the Vα/Vβ-angle in a TCR-type specific geometry upon epitope-MHC association, the latter being driven by rotation around the unique center of rotation. PMID:26185983

  9. Solution NMR and X-ray Crystal Structures of Membrane-associated Lipoprotein-17 Domain Reveal a Novel Fold

    SciTech Connect

    R Mani; S Vorobiev; G Swapna; H Neely; H Janjua; C Ciccosanti; D Xiao; J Hunt; G Montelione; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The conserved Lipoprotein-17 domain of membrane-associated protein Q9PRA0{_}UREPA from Ureaplasma parvum was selected for structure determination by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, as part of the Protein Structure Initiative's program on structure-function analysis of protein domains from large domain sequence families lacking structural representatives. The 100-residue Lipoprotein-17 domain is a 'domain of unknown function' (DUF) that is a member of Pfam protein family PF04200, a large domain family for which no members have characterized biochemical functions. The three-dimensional structure of the Lipoprotein-17 domain of protein Q9PRA0{_}UREPA was determined by both solution NMR and by X-ray crystallography at 2.5 {angstrom}. The two structures are in good agreement with each other. The domain structure features three {alpha}-helices, {alpha}1 through {alpha}3, and five {beta}-strands. Strands {beta}1/{beta}2, {beta}3/{beta}4, {beta}4/{beta}5 are anti-parallel to each other. Strands {beta}1 and {beta}2 are orthogonal to strands {beta}3, {beta}4, {beta}5, while helix {alpha}3 is formed between the strands {beta}3 and {beta}4. One-turn helix {alpha}2 is formed between the strands {beta}1 and {beta}2, while helix {alpha}1 occurs in the N-terminal polypeptide segment. Searches of the Protein Data Bank do not identify any other protein with significant structural similarity to Lipoprotein-17 domain of Q9PRA0{_}UREPA, indicating that it is a novel protein fold.

  10. Crystal structure of the trithorax group protein ASH2L reveals a forkhead-like DNA binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvan, Sabina; Avdic, Vanja; Tremblay, Véronique; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Blais, Alexandre; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Brand, Marjorie; Couture, Jean-François

    2012-05-02

    Absent, small or homeotic discs-like 2 (ASH2L) is a trithorax group (TrxG) protein and a regulatory subunit of the SET1 family of lysine methyltransferases. Here we report that ASH2L binds DNA using a forkhead-like helix-wing-helix (HWH) domain. In vivo, the ASH2L HWH domain is required for binding to the {beta}-globin locus control region, histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4) trimethylation and maximal expression of the {beta}-globin gene (Hbb-1), validating the functional importance of the ASH2L DNA binding domain.

  11. Crystal Structure of Human ADP-ribose Transferase ARTD15/PARP16 Reveals a Novel Putative Regulatory Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Karlberg, Tobias; Thorsell, Ann-Gerd; Kallas, Åsa; Schüler, Herwig

    2012-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is involved in the regulation of DNA repair, transcription, and other processes. The 18 human ADP-ribose transferases with diphtheria toxin homology include ARTD1/PARP1, a cancer drug target. Knowledge of other family members may guide therapeutics development and help evaluate potential drug side effects. Here, we present the crystal structure of human ARTD15/PARP16, a previously uncharacterized enzyme. ARTD15 features an α-helical domain that packs against its transferase domain without making direct contact with the NAD+-binding crevice or the donor loop. Thus, this novel domain does not resemble the regulatory domain of ARTD1. ARTD15 displays auto-mono(ADP-ribosylation) activity and is affected by canonical poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors. These results add to a framework that will facilitate research on a medically important family of enzymes. PMID:22661712

  12. Conformational flexibility in the apolipoprotein E amino-terminal domain structure determined from three new crystal forms: implications for lipid binding.

    PubMed Central

    Segelke, B. W.; Forstner, M.; Knapp, M.; Trakhanov, S. D.; Parkin, S.; Newhouse, Y. M.; Bellamy, H. D.; Weisgraber, K. H.; Rupp, B.

    2000-01-01

    An amino-terminal fragment of human apolipoprotein E3 (residues 1-165) has been expressed and crystallized in three different crystal forms under similar crystallization conditions. One crystal form has nearly identical cell dimensions to the previously reported orthorhombic (P2(1)2(1)2(1)) crystal form of the amino-terminal 22 kDa fragment of apolipoprotein E (residues 1-191). A second orthorhombic crystal form (P2(1)2(1)2(1) with cell dimensions differing from the first form) and a trigonal (P3(1)21) crystal form were also characterized. The structures of the first orthorhombic and the trigonal form were determined by seleno-methionine multiwavelength anomalous dispersion, and the structure of the second orthorhombic form was determined by molecular replacement using the structure from the trigonal form as a search model. A combination of modern experimental and computational techniques provided high-quality electron-density maps, which revealed new features of the apolipoprotein E structure, including an unambiguously traced loop connecting helices 2 and 3 in the four-helix bundle and a number of multiconformation side chains. The three crystal forms contain a common intermolecular, antiparallel packing arrangement. The electrostatic complimentarity observed in this antiparallel packing resembles the interaction of apolipoprotein E with the monoclonal antibody 2E8 and the low density lipoprotein receptor. Superposition of the model structures from all three crystal forms reveals flexibility and pronounced kinks in helices near one end of the four-helix bundle. This mobility at one end of the molecule provides new insights into the structural changes in apolipoprotein E that occur with lipid association. PMID:10850798

  13. Outcome measures for hand function naturally reveal three latent domains in older adults: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Emily L.; Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Fassola, Isabella; Requejo, Philip; Leclercq, Caroline; Winstein, Carolee J.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mapping between individual outcome measures and the latent functional domains of interest is critical to a quantitative evaluation and rehabilitation of hand function. We examined whether and how the associations among six hand-specific outcome measures reveal latent functional domains in elderly individuals. We asked 66 healthy older adult participants (38F, 28M, 66.1 ± 11.6 years, range: 45–88 years) and 33 older adults (65.8 ± 9.7 years, 44–81 years, 51 hands) diagnosed with osteoarthritis (OA) of the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint, to complete six functional assessments: hand strength (Grip, Key and Precision Pinch), Box and Block, Nine Hole Pegboard, and Strength-Dexterity tests. The first three principal components suffice to explain 86% of variance among the six outcome measures in healthy older adults, and 84% of variance in older adults with CMC OA. The composition of these dominant associations revealed three distinct latent functional domains: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing. Furthermore, in participants with thumb CMC OA we found a blurring of the associations between the latent functional domains of strength and coordinated upper extremity function. This motivates future work to understand how the physiological effects of thumb CMC OA lead upper extremity coordination to become strongly associated with strength, while dynamic sensorimotor ability remains an independent functional domain. Thus, when assessing the level of hand function in our growing older adult populations, it is particularly important to acknowledge its multidimensional nature—and explicitly consider how each outcome measure maps to these three latent and fundamental domains of function. Moreover, this ability to distinguish among latent functional domains may facilitate the design of treatment modalities to target the rehabilitation of each of them. PMID:26097455

  14. Structure of the ectodomain of the electron transporter Rv2874 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals a thioredoxin-like domain combined with a carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, David C; Metcalf, Peter; Baker, Edward N

    2016-01-01

    The members of the CcdA family are integral membrane proteins that use a disulfide cascade to transport electrons from the thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system in the interior of the cell into the extracytoplasmic space. The core transmembrane portion of this family is often elaborated with additional hydrophilic domains that act as adapters to deliver reducing potential to targets outside the cellular membrane. To investigate the function of family members in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the structure of the C-terminal ectodomain from Rv2874, one of three CcdA-family members present in the genome, was determined. The crystal structure, which was refined at 1.9 Å resolution with R = 0.195 and Rfree = 0.219, reveals the predicted thioredoxin-like domain with its conserved Cys-X-X-Cys active-site motif. Unexpectedly, this domain is combined with a second domain with a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) fold, this being the first reported example of a CBM in association with a thioredoxin-like domain fold. A cavity in the CBM adjacent to the thioredoxin active site suggests a likely carbohydrate-binding site, representing a broadening of the substrate range for CcdA-family members and an expansion of the thioredoxin-domain functionality to carbohydrate modification. PMID:26894533

  15. Crystal structure of histidine-rich glycoprotein N2 domain reveals redox activity at an interdomain disulfide bridge: implications for angiogenic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kassaar, Omar; McMahon, Stephen A.; Thompson, Rory; Botting, Catherine H.; Naismith, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is a plasma protein consisting of 6 distinct functional domains and is an important regulator of key cardiovascular processes, including angiogenesis and coagulation. The protein is composed of 2 N-terminal domains (N1 and N2), 2 proline-rich regions (PRR1 and PRR2) that flank a histidine-rich region (HRR), and a C-terminal domain. To date, structural information of HRG has largely come from sequence analysis and spectroscopic studies. It is thought that an HRG fragment containing the HRR, released via plasmin-mediated cleavage, acts as a negative regulator of angiogenesis in vivo. However, its release also requires cleavage of a disulphide bond suggesting that its activity is mediated by a redox process. Here, we present a 1.93 Å resolution crystal structure of the N2 domain of serum-purified rabbit HRG. The structure confirms that the N2 domain, which along with the N1 domain, forms an important molecular interaction site on HRG, possesses a cystatin-like fold composed of a 5-stranded antiparallel β-sheet wrapped around a 5-turn α-helix. A native N-linked glycosylation site was identified at Asn184. Moreover, the structure reveals the presence of an S-glutathionyl adduct at Cys185, which has implications for the redox-mediated release of the antiangiogenic cleavage product from HRG. PMID:24501222

  16. Cross‐species chimeras reveal BamA POTRA and β‐barrel domains must be fine‐tuned for efficient OMP insertion

    PubMed Central

    Bavro, Vassiliy N.; Mason, Jessica L.; Sevastsyanovich, Yanina R.; Rossiter, Amanda E.; Jeeves, Mark; Wells, Timothy J.; Knowles, Timothy J.; Cunningham, Adam F.; Donald, James W.; Palmer, Tracy; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary BAM is a conserved molecular machine, the central component of which is BamA. Orthologues of BamA are found in all Gram‐negative bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria where it is required for the folding and insertion of β‐barrel containing integral outer membrane proteins (OMPs) into the outer membrane. BamA binds unfolded β‐barrel precursors via the five polypeptide transport‐associated (POTRA) domains at its N‐terminus. The C‐terminus of BamA folds into a β‐barrel domain, which tethers BamA to the outer membrane and is involved in OMP insertion. BamA orthologues are found in all Gram‐negative bacteria and appear to function in a species‐specific manner. Here we investigate the nature of this species‐specificity by examining whether chimeric E scherichia coli  BamA fusion proteins, carrying either the β‐barrel or POTRA domains from various BamA orthologues, can functionally replace E . coli  BamA. We demonstrate that the β‐barrel domains of many BamA orthologues are functionally interchangeable. We show that defects in the orthologous POTRA domains can be rescued by compensatory mutations within the β‐barrel. These data reveal that the POTRA and barrel domains must be precisely aligned to ensure efficient OMP insertion. PMID:25943387

  17. Crystal structures of a CTXphi pIII domain unbound and in complex with a Vibrio cholerae TolA domain reveal novel interaction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ford, Christopher G; Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Phan, Hanh T H; Waldor, Matthew K; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Craig, Lisa

    2012-10-19

    Vibrio cholerae colonize the small intestine where they secrete cholera toxin, an ADP-ribosylating enzyme that is responsible for the voluminous diarrhea characteristic of cholera disease. The genes encoding cholera toxin are located on the genome of the filamentous bacteriophage, CTXϕ, that integrates as a prophage into the V. cholerae chromosome. CTXϕ infection of V. cholerae requires the toxin-coregulated pilus and the periplasmic protein TolA. This infection process parallels that of Escherichia coli infection by the Ff family of filamentous coliphage. Here we demonstrate a direct interaction between the N-terminal domain of the CTXϕ minor coat protein pIII (pIII-N1) and the C-terminal domain of TolA (TolA-C) and present x-ray crystal structures of pIII-N1 alone and in complex with TolA-C. The structures of CTXϕ pIII-N1 and V. cholerae TolA-C are similar to coliphage pIII-N1 and E. coli TolA-C, respectively, yet these proteins bind via a distinct interface that in E. coli TolA corresponds to a colicin binding site. Our data suggest that the TolA binding site on pIII-N1 of CTXϕ is accessible in the native pIII protein. This contrasts with the Ff family phage, where the TolA binding site on pIII is blocked and requires a pilus-induced unfolding event to become exposed. We propose that CTXϕ pIII accesses the periplasmic TolA through retraction of toxin-coregulated pilus, which brings the phage through the outer membrane pilus secretin channel. These data help to explain the process by which CTXϕ converts a harmless marine microbe into a deadly human pathogen. PMID:22942280

  18. Slow dynamics in protein fluctuations revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis: The case of domain motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2011-02-01

    Protein dynamics on a long time scale was investigated using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA). We selected the lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO) as a target protein and focused on its domain motions in the open state. A MD simulation of the LAO in explicit water was performed for 600 ns, in which slow and large-amplitude domain motions of the LAO were observed. After extracting domain motions by rigid-body domain analysis, the tICA was applied to the obtained rigid-body trajectory, yielding slow modes of the LAO's domain motions in order of decreasing time scale. The slowest mode detected by the tICA represented not a closure motion described by a largest-amplitude mode determined by the principal component analysis but a twist motion with a time scale of tens of nanoseconds. The slow dynamics of the LAO were well described by only the slowest mode and were characterized by transitions between two basins. The results show that tICA is promising for describing and analyzing slow dynamics of proteins.

  19. Factors Influencing Local Membrane Curvature Induction by N-BAR Domains as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Philip D.; Swenson, Richard D.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    N-BAR domains are protein modules that bind to and induce curvature in membranes via a charged concave surface and N-terminal amphipathic helices. Recently, molecular dynamics simulations have demonstrated that the N-BAR domain can induce a strong local curvature that matches the curvature of the BAR domain surface facing the bilayer. Here we present further molecular dynamics simulations that examine in greater detail the roles of the concave surface and amphipathic helices in driving local membrane curvature. We find that the strong curvature induction observed in our previous simulations requires the stable presentation of the charged concave surface to the membrane and is not driven by the membrane-embedded amphipathic helices. Nevertheless, without these amphipathic helices embedded in the membrane, the N-BAR domain does not maintain a close association with the bilayer, and fails to drive membrane curvature. Increasing the membrane negative charge through the addition of PIP2 facilitates closer association with the membrane in the absence of embedded helices. At sufficiently high concentrations, amphipathic helices embedded in the membrane drive membrane curvature independently of the BAR domain. PMID:18469070

  20. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels. PMID:25963832

  1. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels.

  2. Organization of Subunits in the Membrane Domain of the Bovine F-ATPase Revealed by Covalent Cross-linking*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer; Ding, ShuJing; Walpole, Thomas B.; Holding, Andrew N.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The F-ATPase in bovine mitochondria is a membrane-bound complex of about 30 subunits of 18 different kinds. Currently, ∼85% of its structure is known. The enzyme has a membrane extrinsic catalytic domain, and a membrane intrinsic domain where the turning of the enzyme's rotor is generated from the transmembrane proton-motive force. The domains are linked by central and peripheral stalks. The central stalk and a hydrophobic ring of c-subunits in the membrane domain constitute the enzyme's rotor. The external surface of the catalytic domain and membrane subunit a are linked by the peripheral stalk, holding them static relative to the rotor. The membrane domain contains six additional subunits named ATP8, e, f, g, DAPIT (diabetes-associated protein in insulin-sensitive tissues), and 6.8PL (6.8-kDa proteolipid), each with a single predicted transmembrane α-helix, but their orientation and topography are unknown. Mutations in ATP8 uncouple the enzyme and interfere with its assembly, but its roles and the roles of the other five subunits are largely unknown. We have reacted accessible amino groups in the enzyme with bifunctional cross-linking agents and identified the linked residues. Cross-links involving the supernumerary subunits, where the structures are not known, show that the C terminus of ATP8 extends ∼70 Å from the membrane into the peripheral stalk and that the N termini of the other supernumerary subunits are on the same side of the membrane, probably in the mitochondrial matrix. These experiments contribute significantly toward building up a complete structural picture of the F-ATPase. PMID:25851905

  3. Meta-Stable Magnetic Domain States That Prevent Reliable Absolute Palaeointensity Experiments Revealed By Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, L. V.; Fabian, K.; Bakelaar, I. A.; Dekkers, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the absolute palaeointensity of the Earth's magnetic field is notoriously difficult. Many methods to obtain paleointensities from suitable records such as lavas and archeological artifacts involve heating the samples. These heating steps are believed to induce 'magnetic alteration' - a process that is still poorly understood but prevents obtaining correct paleointensity estimates. To observe this magnetic alteration directly we imaged the magnetic domain state of titanomagnetite particles - a common carrier of the magnetic remanence in samples used for paleointensity studies. We selected samples from the 1971-flow of Mt. Etna from a site that systematically yields underestimates of the known intensity of the paleofield - in spite of rigorous testing by various groups. Magnetic Force Microscope images were taken before and after a heating step typically used in absolute palaeointensity experiments. Before heating, the samples feature distinct, blocky domains that sometimes seem to resemble a classical magnetite domain structure. After imparting a partial thermo-remanent magnetization at a temperature often critical to paleointensity experiments (250 °C) the domain state of the same titanomagnetite grains changes into curvier, wavy domains. Furthermore, these structures appeared to be unstable over time: after one-year storage in a magnetic field-free environment the domain states evolved into a viscous remanent magnetization state. Our observations may qualitatively explain reported underestimates from technically successful paleointensity experiments for this site and other sites reported previously. Furthermore the occurrence of intriguing observations such as 'the drawer storage effect' by Shaar et al (EPSL, 2011), and viscous magnetizations observed by Muxworthy and Williams (JGR, 2006) may be (partially) explained by our observations. The major implications of our study for all palaeointensity methods involving heating may be

  4. Structure of the C-Terminal Half of UvrC Reveals an RNase H Endonuclease Domain with an Argonaute-like Catalytic Triad

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Truglio, J.; Croteau, D.; Rhau, B.; Wang, L.; Van Houten, B.; Kisker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Removal and repair of DNA damage by the nucleotide excision repair pathway requires two sequential incision reactions, which are achieved by the endonuclease UvrC in eubacteria. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of UvrC, which contains the catalytic domain responsible for 5' incision and a helix-hairpin-helix-domain that is implicated in DNA binding. Surprisingly, the 5' catalytic domain shares structural homology with RNase H despite the lack of sequence homology and contains an uncommon DDH triad. The structure also reveals two highly conserved patches on the surface of the protein, which are not related to the active site. Mutations of residues in one of these patches led to the inability of the enzyme to bind DNA and severely compromised both incision reactions. Based on our results, we suggest a model of how UvrC forms a productive protein-DNA complex to excise the damage from DNA.

  5. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 E. coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. PMID:25043589

  6. Biochemical Characterization of Nonamer Binding Domain of RAG1 Reveals its Thymine Preference with Respect to Length and Position.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Deepthi; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2016-01-01

    RAG complex consisting of RAG1 and RAG2 is a site-specific endonuclease responsible for the generation of antigen receptor diversity. It cleaves recombination signal sequence (RSS), comprising of conserved heptamer and nonamer. Nonamer binding domain (NBD) of RAG1 plays a central role in the recognition of RSS. To investigate the DNA binding properties of the domain, NBD of murine RAG1 was cloned, expressed and purified. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that NBD binds with high affinity to nonamer in the context of 12/23 RSS or heteroduplex DNA. NBD binding was specific to thymines when single stranded DNA containing poly A, C, G or T were used. Biolayer interferometry studies showed that poly T binding to NBD was robust and comparable to that of 12RSS. More than 23 nt was essential for NBD binding at homothymidine stretches. On a double-stranded DNA, NBD could bind to A:T stretches, but not G:C or random sequences. Although NBD is indispensable for sequence specific activity of RAGs, external supplementation of purified nonamer binding domain to NBD deleted cRAG1/cRAG2 did not restore its activity, suggesting that the overall domain architecture of RAG1 is important. Therefore, we define the sequence requirements of NBD binding to DNA. PMID:26742581

  7. Biochemical Characterization of Nonamer Binding Domain of RAG1 Reveals its Thymine Preference with Respect to Length and Position

    PubMed Central

    Raveendran, Deepthi; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    RAG complex consisting of RAG1 and RAG2 is a site-specific endonuclease responsible for the generation of antigen receptor diversity. It cleaves recombination signal sequence (RSS), comprising of conserved heptamer and nonamer. Nonamer binding domain (NBD) of RAG1 plays a central role in the recognition of RSS. To investigate the DNA binding properties of the domain, NBD of murine RAG1 was cloned, expressed and purified. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that NBD binds with high affinity to nonamer in the context of 12/23 RSS or heteroduplex DNA. NBD binding was specific to thymines when single stranded DNA containing poly A, C, G or T were used. Biolayer interferometry studies showed that poly T binding to NBD was robust and comparable to that of 12RSS. More than 23 nt was essential for NBD binding at homothymidine stretches. On a double-stranded DNA, NBD could bind to A:T stretches, but not G:C or random sequences. Although NBD is indispensable for sequence specific activity of RAGs, external supplementation of purified nonamer binding domain to NBD deleted cRAG1/cRAG2 did not restore its activity, suggesting that the overall domain architecture of RAG1 is important. Therefore, we define the sequence requirements of NBD binding to DNA. PMID:26742581

  8. Metagenomic Analysis of Upwelling-Affected Brazilian Coastal Seawater Reveals Sequence Domains of Type I PKS and Modular NRPS.

    PubMed

    Cuadrat, Rafael R C; Cury, Juliano C; Dávila, Alberto M R

    2015-01-01

    Marine environments harbor a wide range of microorganisms from the three domains of life. These microorganisms have great potential to enable discovery of new enzymes and bioactive compounds for industrial use. However, only ~1% of microorganisms from the environment can currently be identified through cultured isolates, limiting the discovery of new compounds. To overcome this limitation, a metagenomics approach has been widely adopted for biodiversity studies on samples from marine environments. In this study, we screened metagenomes in order to estimate the potential for new natural compound synthesis mediated by diversity in the Polyketide Synthase (PKS) and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase (NRPS) genes. The samples were collected from the Praia dos Anjos (Angel's Beach) surface water-Arraial do Cabo (Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil), an environment affected by upwelling. In order to evaluate the potential for screening natural products in Arraial do Cabo samples, we used KS (keto-synthase) and C (condensation) domains (from PKS and NRPS, respectively) to build Hidden Markov Models (HMM) models. From both samples, a total of 84 KS and 46 C novel domain sequences were obtained, showing the potential of this environment for the discovery of new genes of biotechnological interest. These domains were classified by phylogenetic analysis and this was the first study conducted to screen PKS and NRPS genes in an upwelling affected sample. PMID:26633360

  9. Metagenomic Analysis of Upwelling-Affected Brazilian Coastal Seawater Reveals Sequence Domains of Type I PKS and Modular NRPS

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrat, Rafael R. C.; Cury, Juliano C.; Dávila, Alberto M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Marine environments harbor a wide range of microorganisms from the three domains of life. These microorganisms have great potential to enable discovery of new enzymes and bioactive compounds for industrial use. However, only ~1% of microorganisms from the environment can currently be identified through cultured isolates, limiting the discovery of new compounds. To overcome this limitation, a metagenomics approach has been widely adopted for biodiversity studies on samples from marine environments. In this study, we screened metagenomes in order to estimate the potential for new natural compound synthesis mediated by diversity in the Polyketide Synthase (PKS) and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase (NRPS) genes. The samples were collected from the Praia dos Anjos (Angel’s Beach) surface water—Arraial do Cabo (Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil), an environment affected by upwelling. In order to evaluate the potential for screening natural products in Arraial do Cabo samples, we used KS (keto-synthase) and C (condensation) domains (from PKS and NRPS, respectively) to build Hidden Markov Models (HMM) models. From both samples, a total of 84 KS and 46 C novel domain sequences were obtained, showing the potential of this environment for the discovery of new genes of biotechnological interest. These domains were classified by phylogenetic analysis and this was the first study conducted to screen PKS and NRPS genes in an upwelling affected sample PMID:26633360

  10. Characterization of Bacterial, Archaeal and Eukaryote Symbionts from Antarctic Sponges Reveals a High Diversity at a Three-Domain Level and a Particular Signature for This Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Marconi, Susana; De la Iglesia, Rodrigo; Díez, Beatriz; Fonseca, Cássio A; Hajdu, Eduardo; Trefault, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Sponge-associated microbial communities include members from the three domains of life. In the case of bacteria, they are diverse, host specific and different from the surrounding seawater. However, little is known about the diversity and specificity of Eukarya and Archaea living in association with marine sponges. This knowledge gap is even greater regarding sponges from regions other than temperate and tropical environments. In Antarctica, marine sponges are abundant and important members of the benthos, structuring the Antarctic marine ecosystem. In this study, we used high throughput ribosomal gene sequencing to investigate the three-domain diversity and community composition from eight different Antarctic sponges. Taxonomic identification reveals that they belong to families Acarnidae, Chalinidae, Hymedesmiidae, Hymeniacidonidae, Leucettidae, Microcionidae, and Myxillidae. Our study indicates that there are different diversity and similarity patterns between bacterial/archaeal and eukaryote microbial symbionts from these Antarctic marine sponges, indicating inherent differences in how organisms from different domains establish symbiotic relationships. In general, when considering diversity indices and number of phyla detected, sponge-associated communities are more diverse than the planktonic communities. We conclude that three-domain microbial communities from Antarctic sponges are different from surrounding planktonic communities, expanding previous observations for Bacteria and including the Antarctic environment. Furthermore, we reveal differences in the composition of the sponge associated bacterial assemblages between Antarctic and tropical-temperate environments and the presence of a highly complex microbial eukaryote community, suggesting a particular signature for Antarctic sponges, different to that reported from other ecosystems. PMID:26421612

  11. Characterization of Bacterial, Archaeal and Eukaryote Symbionts from Antarctic Sponges Reveals a High Diversity at a Three-Domain Level and a Particular Signature for This Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Marconi, Susana; De la Iglesia, Rodrigo; Díez, Beatriz; Fonseca, Cássio A.; Hajdu, Eduardo; Trefault, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Sponge-associated microbial communities include members from the three domains of life. In the case of bacteria, they are diverse, host specific and different from the surrounding seawater. However, little is known about the diversity and specificity of Eukarya and Archaea living in association with marine sponges. This knowledge gap is even greater regarding sponges from regions other than temperate and tropical environments. In Antarctica, marine sponges are abundant and important members of the benthos, structuring the Antarctic marine ecosystem. In this study, we used high throughput ribosomal gene sequencing to investigate the three-domain diversity and community composition from eight different Antarctic sponges. Taxonomic identification reveals that they belong to families Acarnidae, Chalinidae, Hymedesmiidae, Hymeniacidonidae, Leucettidae, Microcionidae, and Myxillidae. Our study indicates that there are different diversity and similarity patterns between bacterial/archaeal and eukaryote microbial symbionts from these Antarctic marine sponges, indicating inherent differences in how organisms from different domains establish symbiotic relationships. In general, when considering diversity indices and number of phyla detected, sponge-associated communities are more diverse than the planktonic communities. We conclude that three-domain microbial communities from Antarctic sponges are different from surrounding planktonic communities, expanding previous observations for Bacteria and including the Antarctic environment. Furthermore, we reveal differences in the composition of the sponge associated bacterial assemblages between Antarctic and tropical-temperate environments and the presence of a highly complex microbial eukaryote community, suggesting a particular signature for Antarctic sponges, different to that reported from other ecosystems. PMID:26421612

  12. Structural and functional analysis of the Crb2–BRCT2 domain reveals distinct roles in checkpoint signaling and DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Doré, Andrew S.; Roe, S. Mark; Nestoras, Konstantinos; Ho, Jenny C.Y.; Watts, Felicity Z.; Pearl, Laurence H.

    2008-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Crb2 is a checkpoint mediator required for the cellular response to DNA damage. Like human 53BP1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad9 it contains Tudor2 and BRCT2 domains. Crb2-Tudor2 domain interacts with methylated H4K20 and is required for recruitment to DNA dsDNA breaks. The BRCT2 domain is required for dimerization, but its precise role in DNA damage repair and checkpoint signaling is unclear. The crystal structure of the Crb2–BRCT2 domain, alone and in complex with a phosphorylated H2A.1 peptide, reveals the structural basis for dimerization and direct interaction with γ-H2A.1 in ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF). Mutational analysis in vitro confirms the functional role of key residues and allows the generation of mutants in which dimerization and phosphopeptide binding are separately disrupted. Phenotypic analysis of these in vivo reveals distinct roles in the DNA damage response. Dimerization mutants are genotoxin sensitive and defective in checkpoint signaling, Chk1 phosphorylation, and Crb2 IRIF formation, while phosphopeptide-binding mutants are only slightly sensitive to IR, have extended checkpoint delays, phosphorylate Chk1, and form Crb2 IRIF. However, disrupting phosphopeptide binding slows formation of ssDNA-binding protein (Rpa1/Rad11) foci and reduces levels of Rad22(Rad52) recombination foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. PMID:18676809

  13. Three deaf mice: mouse models for TECTA-based human hereditary deafness reveal domain-specific structural phenotypes in the tectorial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Legan, P. Kevin; Goodyear, Richard J.; Morín, Matías; Mencia, Angeles; Pollard, Hilary; Olavarrieta, Leticia; Korchagina, Julia; Modamio-Hoybjor, Silvia; Mayo, Fernando; Moreno, Felipe; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel-Angel; Richardson, Guy P.

    2014-01-01

    Tecta is a modular, non-collagenous protein of the tectorial membrane (TM), an extracellular matrix of the cochlea essential for normal hearing. Missense mutations in Tecta cause dominant forms of non-syndromic deafness and a genotype–phenotype correlation has been reported in humans, with mutations in different Tecta domains causing mid- or high-frequency hearing impairments that are either stable or progressive. Three mutant mice were created as models for human Tecta mutations; the TectaL1820F,G1824D/+ mouse for zona pellucida (ZP) domain mutations causing stable mid-frequency hearing loss in a Belgian family, the TectaC1837G/+ mouse for a ZP-domain mutation underlying progressive mid-frequency hearing loss in a Spanish family and the TectaC1619S/+ mouse for a zonadhesin-like (ZA) domain mutation responsible for progressive, high-frequency hearing loss in a French family. Mutations in the ZP and ZA domains generate distinctly different changes in the structure of the TM. Auditory brainstem response thresholds in the 8–40 kHz range are elevated by 30–40 dB in the ZP-domain mutants, whilst those in the ZA-domain mutant are elevated by 20–30 dB. The phenotypes are stable and no evidence has been found for a progressive deterioration in TM structure or auditory function. Despite elevated auditory thresholds, the Tecta mutant mice all exhibit an enhanced tendency to have audiogenic seizures in response to white noise stimuli at low sound pressure levels (≤84 dB SPL), revealing a previously unrecognised consequence of Tecta mutations. These results, together with those from previous studies, establish an allelic series for Tecta unequivocally demonstrating an association between genotype and phenotype. PMID:24363064

  14. Structure of the iSH2 domain of Human phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 beta Subunit Reveals Conformational Plasticity in the Interhelical Turn Region

    SciTech Connect

    C Schauder; L Ma; R Krug; G Montelione; R Guan

    2011-12-31

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) proteins actively trigger signaling pathways leading to cell growth, proliferation and survival. These proteins have multiple isoforms and consist of a catalytic p110 subunit and a regulatory p85 subunit. The iSH2 domain of the p85 {beta} isoform has been implicated in the binding of nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A viruses. Here, the crystal structure of human p85 {beta} iSH2 determined to 3.3 {angstrom} resolution is reported. The structure reveals that this domain mainly consists of a coiled-coil motif. Comparison with the published structure of the bovine p85 {beta} iSH2 domain bound to the influenza A virus nonstructural protein 1 indicates that little or no structural change occurs upon complex formation. By comparing this human p85 {beta} iSH2 structure with the bovine p85 {beta} iSH2 domain, which shares 99% sequence identity, and by comparing the multiple conformations observed within the asymmetric unit of the bovine iSH2 structure, it was found that this coiled-coil domain exhibits a certain degree of conformational variability or 'plasticity' in the interhelical turn region. It is speculated that this plasticity of p85 {beta} iSH2 may play a role in regulating its functional and molecular-recognition properties.

  15. Structure of the starch-debranching enzyme barley limit dextrinase reveals homology of the N-terminal domain to CBM21.

    PubMed

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte; Henriksen, Anette

    2012-09-01

    Barley limit dextrinase (HvLD) is a debranching enzyme from glycoside hydrolase family 13 subfamily 13 (GH13_13) that hydrolyses α-1,6-glucosidic linkages in limit dextrins derived from amylopectin. The structure of HvLD was solved and refined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure has a glycerol molecule in the active site and is virtually identical to the structures of HvLD in complex with the competitive inhibitors α-cyclodextrin and β-cyclodextrin solved to 2.5 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. However, three loops in the N-terminal domain that are shown here to resemble carbohydrate-binding module family 21 were traceable and were included in the present HvLD structure but were too flexible to be traced and included in the structures of the two HvLD-inhibitor complexes. PMID:22949184

  16. Electron microscopic imaging revealed the flexible filamentous structure of the cell attachment protein P2 of Rice dwarf virus located around the icosahedral 5-fold axes.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Higashiura, Akifumi; Higashiura, Tomoko; Akita, Fusamichi; Hibino, Hiroyuki; Omura, Toshihiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Iwasaki, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    The minor outer capsid protein P2 of Rice dwarf virus (RDV), a member of the genus Phytoreovirus in the family Reoviridae, is essential for viral cell entry. Here, we clarified the structure of P2 and the interactions to host insect cells. Negative stain electron microscopy (EM) showed that P2 proteins are monomeric and flexible L-shaped filamentous structures of ∼20 nm in length. Cryo-EM structure revealed the spatial arrangement of P2 in the capsid, which was prescribed by the characteristic virion structure. The P2 proteins were visualized as partial rod-shaped structures of ∼10 nm in length in the cryo-EM map and accommodated in crevasses on the viral surface around icosahedral 5-fold axes with hydrophobic interactions. The remaining disordered region of P2 assumed to be extended to the radial direction towards exterior. Electron tomography clearly showed that RDV particles were away from the cellular membrane at a uniform distance and several spike-like densities, probably corresponding to P2, connecting a viral particle to the host cellular membrane during cell entry. By combining the in vitro and in vivo structural information, we could gain new insights into the detailed mechanism of the cell entry of RDV. PMID:26374901

  17. Structure of the mouse galectin-4 N-terminal carbohydrate-recognition domain reveals the mechanism of oligosaccharide recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Krejciríková, Veronika; Pachl, Petr; Fábry, Milan; Malý, Petr; Rezácová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jirí

    2011-11-18

    Galectin-4, a member of the tandem-repeat subfamily of galectins, participates in cell-membrane interactions and plays an important role in cell adhesion and modulation of immunity and malignity. The oligosaccharide specificity of the mouse galectin-4 carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) has been reported previously. In this work, the structure and binding properties of the N-terminal domain CRD1 were further investigated and the crystal structure of CRD1 in complex with lactose was determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. The lactose-binding affinity was characterized by fluorescence measurements and two lactose-binding sites were identified: a high-affinity site with a K{sub d} value in the micromolar range (K{sub d1} = 600 {+-} 70 {mu}M) and a low-affinity site with K{sub d2} = 28 {+-} 10 mM.

  18. The three-dimensional folding of the α-globin gene domain reveals formation of chromatin globules.

    PubMed

    Baù, Davide; Sanyal, Amartya; Lajoie, Bryan R; Capriotti, Emidio; Byron, Meg; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Dekker, Job; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2011-01-01

    We developed a general approach that combines chromosome conformation capture carbon copy (5C) with the Integrated Modeling Platform (IMP) to generate high-resolution three-dimensional models of chromatin at the megabase scale. We applied this approach to the ENm008 domain on human chromosome 16, containing the α-globin locus, which is expressed in K562 cells and silenced in lymphoblastoid cells (GM12878). The models accurately reproduce the known looping interactions between the α-globin genes and their distal regulatory elements. Further, we find using our approach that the domain folds into a single globular conformation in GM12878 cells, whereas two globules are formed in K562 cells. The central cores of these globules are enriched for transcribed genes, whereas nontranscribed chromatin is more peripheral. We propose that globule formation represents a higher-order folding state related to clustering of transcribed genes around shared transcription machineries, as previously observed by microscopy. PMID:21131981

  19. Dissection of the wheat transcription factor HBP-1a(17) reveals a modular structure for the activation domain.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Okanami, M; Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1997-02-20

    The wheat bZIP protein HBP-1a(17) is a putative transcription factor regulating histone gene expression. To delineate the functional domain(s) of this factor, we made a series of effector constructs expressing fusion proteins, in which various portions of HBP-1a(17) are fused to the DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GAL4, in plant cells. When the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene, driven by the wheat histone H3 core promoter harboring the GAL4-binding sequence, was co-transfected with such effector genes into tobacco protoplasts, several portions of HBP-1a(17) influenced reporter gene expression. The N-terminal one-third of HBP-1a(17), termed the P region (residues 1-118) due to its Pro content, did not activate the reporter gene, in contrast to the corresponding Pro-rich region of Arabidopsis GBF1 (residues 1-110), which functions as an activation domain. When the P region was divided into two, however, both its N-terminal (1-56; termed NP) and C-terminal (58-118; termed PC) halves were able to enhance expression of the reporter gene. When the NP region was further divided into NP(5-30) and NP(30-56), both regions still retained activating ability. These results suggest that the P region of HBP-1a(17) is composed of several modules each having activating function, and modification and/or conformational changes of the P region might influence its function. PMID:9065688

  20. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes. PMID:26861908

  1. Idiosyncratically tuned switching behavior of riboswitch aptamer domains revealed by comparative small-angle X-ray scattering analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Nathan J.; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.

    2010-05-25

    Riboswitches are structured mRNA elements that regulate gene expression upon binding specific cellular metabolites. It is thought that the highly conserved metabolite-binding domains of riboswitches undergo conformational change upon binding their cognate ligands. To investigate the generality of such a mechanism, we employed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We probed the nature of the global metabolite-induced response of the metabolite-binding domains of four different riboswitches that bind, respectively, thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), flavin mononucleotide (FMN), lysine, and S-adenosyl methionine (SAM). We find that each RNA is unique in its global structural response to metabolite. Whereas some RNAs exhibit distinct free and bound conformations, others are globally insensitive to the presence of metabolite. Thus, a global conformational change of the metabolite-binding domain is not a requirement for riboswitch function. It is possible that the range of behaviors observed by SAXS, rather than being a biophysical idiosyncrasy, reflects adaptation of riboswitches to the regulatory requirements of their individual genomic context.

  2. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes. PMID:26861908

  3. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  4. Study of the Individual Cytochrome b[subscript 5] and Cytochrome b[subscript 5] Reductase Domains of Ncb5or Reveals a Unique Heme Pocket and a Possible Role of the CS Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Bin; Parthasarathy, Sudharsan; Wang, WenFang; Gibney, Brian R.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Lovell, Scott; Benson, David R.; Zhu, Hao

    2010-09-22

    NADH cytochrome b{sub 5} oxidoreductase (Ncb5or) is found in animals and contains three domains similar to cytochrome b{sub 5} (b{sub 5}), CHORD-SGT1 (CS), and cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase (b{sub 5}R). Ncb5or has an important function, as suggested by the diabetes and lipoatrophy phenotypes in Ncb5or null mice. To elucidate the structural and functional properties of human Ncb5or, we generated its individual b{sub 5} and b{sub 5}R domains (Ncb5or-b{sub 5} and Ncb5or-b{sub 5}R, respectively) and compared them with human microsomal b{sub 5} (Cyb5A) and b{sub 5}R (Cyb5R3). A 1.25 {angstrom} x-ray crystal structure of Ncb5or-b{sub 5} reveals nearly orthogonal planes of the imidazolyl rings of heme-ligating residues His{sup 89} and His{sup 112}, consistent with a highly anisotropic low spin EPR spectrum. Ncb5or is the first member of the cytochrome b{sub 5} family shown to have such a heme environment. Like other b{sub 5} family members, Ncb5or-b{sub 5} has two helix-loop-helix motifs surrounding heme. However, Ncb5or-b{sub 5} differs from Cyb5A with respect to location of the second heme ligand (His{sup 112}) and of polypeptide conformation in its vicinity. Electron transfer from Ncb5or-b{sub 5}R to Ncb5or-b{sub 5} is much less efficient than from Cyb5R3 to Cyb5A, possibly as a consequence of weaker electrostatic interactions. The CS linkage probably obviates the need for strong interactions between b{sub 5} and b{sub 5}R domains in Ncb5or. Studies with a construct combining the Ncb5or CS and b{sub 5}R domains suggest that the CS domain facilitates docking of the b{sub 5} and b{sub 5}R domains. Trp{sup 114} is an invariant surface residue in all known Ncb5or orthologs but appears not to contribute to electron transfer from the b{sub 5}R domain to the b{sub 5} domain.

  5. Study of the individual cytochrome b5 and cytochrome b5 reductase domains of Ncb5or reveals a unique heme pocket and a possible role of the CS domain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bin; Parthasarathy, Sudharsan; Wang, WenFang; Gibney, Brian R; Battaile, Kevin P; Lovell, Scott; Benson, David R; Zhu, Hao

    2010-09-24

    NADH cytochrome b(5) oxidoreductase (Ncb5or) is found in animals and contains three domains similar to cytochrome b(5) (b(5)), CHORD-SGT1 (CS), and cytochrome b(5) reductase (b(5)R). Ncb5or has an important function, as suggested by the diabetes and lipoatrophy phenotypes in Ncb5or null mice. To elucidate the structural and functional properties of human Ncb5or, we generated its individual b(5) and b(5)R domains (Ncb5or-b(5) and Ncb5or-b(5)R, respectively) and compared them with human microsomal b(5) (Cyb5A) and b(5)R (Cyb5R3). A 1.25 Å x-ray crystal structure of Ncb5or-b(5) reveals nearly orthogonal planes of the imidazolyl rings of heme-ligating residues His(89) and His(112), consistent with a highly anisotropic low spin EPR spectrum. Ncb5or is the first member of the cytochrome b(5) family shown to have such a heme environment. Like other b(5) family members, Ncb5or-b(5) has two helix-loop-helix motifs surrounding heme. However, Ncb5or-b(5) differs from Cyb5A with respect to location of the second heme ligand (His(112)) and of polypeptide conformation in its vicinity. Electron transfer from Ncb5or-b(5)R to Ncb5or-b(5) is much less efficient than from Cyb5R3 to Cyb5A, possibly as a consequence of weaker electrostatic interactions. The CS linkage probably obviates the need for strong interactions between b(5) and b(5)R domains in Ncb5or. Studies with a construct combining the Ncb5or CS and b(5)R domains suggest that the CS domain facilitates docking of the b(5) and b(5)R domains. Trp(114) is an invariant surface residue in all known Ncb5or orthologs but appears not to contribute to electron transfer from the b(5)R domain to the b(5) domain. PMID:20630863

  6. Identification of a novel cell death-inducing domain reveals that fungal amyloid-controlled programmed cell death is related to necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Daskalov, Asen; Habenstein, Birgit; Sabaté, Raimon; Berbon, Mélanie; Martinez, Denis; Chaignepain, Stéphane; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Hofmann, Kay; Loquet, Antoine; Saupe, Sven J

    2016-03-01

    Recent findings have revealed the role of prion-like mechanisms in the control of host defense and programmed cell death cascades. In fungi, HET-S, a cell death-inducing protein containing a HeLo pore-forming domain, is activated through amyloid templating by a Nod-like receptor (NLR). Here we characterize the HELLP protein behaving analogously to HET-S and bearing a new type of N-terminal cell death-inducing domain termed HeLo-like (HELL) and a C-terminal regulatory amyloid motif known as PP. The gene encoding HELLP is part of a three-gene cluster also encoding a lipase (SBP) and a Nod-like receptor, both of which display the PP motif. The PP motif is similar to the RHIM amyloid motif directing formation of the RIP1/RIP3 necrosome in humans. The C-terminal region of HELLP, HELLP(215-278), encompassing the motif, allows prion propagation and assembles into amyloid fibrils, as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction and FTIR analyses. Solid-state NMR studies reveal a well-ordered local structure of the amyloid core residues and a primary sequence that is almost entirely arranged in a rigid conformation, and confirm a β-sheet structure in an assigned stretch of three amino acids. HELLP is activated by amyloid templating and displays membrane-targeting and cell death-inducing activity. HELLP targets the SBP lipase to the membrane, suggesting a synergy between HELLP and SBP in membrane dismantling. Remarkably, the HeLo-like domain of HELLP is homologous to the pore-forming domain of MLKL, the cell death-execution protein in necroptosis, revealing a transkingdom evolutionary relationship between amyloid-controlled fungal programmed cell death and mammalian necroptosis. PMID:26903619

  7. KINETIC INTERMEDIATE REVEALS STAGGERED PH-DEPENDENT TRANSITIONS ALONG THE MEMBRANE INSERTION PATHWAY OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN T-DOMAIN

    PubMed Central

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Posokhov, Yevgen O.; Rodnin, Mykola V.; Ladokhin, Alexey S.

    2009-01-01

    The pH-triggered membrane insertion pathway of the T-domain of diphtheria toxin was studied using site-selective fluorescence labeling with subsequent application of several spectroscopic techniques (e.g., fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, FRET, lifetime quenching and kinetic fluorescence). FCS measurements indicate that pH-dependent formation of the membrane-competent form depends only slightly on the amount of anionic lipids in the membrane. The subsequent transbilayer insertion, however, is strongly favored by anionic lipids. Kinetic FRET measurements between donor-labeled T-domain and acceptor-labeled lipid vesicles demonstrate rapid membrane association at all pH values for which binding occurs. In contrast, the transmembrane insertion kinetics is significantly slower, and is also both pH- and lipid-dependent. Analysis of kinetic behavior of binding and insertion indicates the presence of several interfacial intermediates on the insertion pathway of the T-domain, from soluble W-state to transmembrane T-state. Intermediate interfacial I-state can be trapped in membranes with low content of anionic lipids (10%). In membranes of greater anionic lipid content, another pH-dependent transition results in the formation of the insertion-competent state and subsequent transmembrane insertion. Comparison of the results of various kinetic and equilibrium experiments suggests that the pH-dependences determining membrane association and transbilayer insertion transitions are different, but staggered. Anionic lipids not only assist in formation of the insertion competent form, but also lower the kinetic barrier for the final insertion. PMID:19588969

  8. Cloning and analysis of human gastric mucin cDNA reveals two types of conserved cysteine-rich domains.

    PubMed Central

    Klomp, L W; Van Rens, L; Strous, G J

    1995-01-01

    Human gastric mucin was isolated by successive CsCl-gradient ultracentrifugation in the presence of guanidinium hydrochloride to prevent degradation of the polypeptide moieties of the molecules. The amino acid sequence of a tryptic fragment of this molecule was identical to that of a tryptic fragment of tracheobronchial mucin. An oligonucleotide based on this sequence hybridized specifically to human stomach mRNA and was subsequently used to screen a human stomach lambda ZAPII cDNA library. The largest of 10 positive clones encoded 850 amino acid residues, including the tryptic fragment, with high amounts of threonine, serine and proline residues. Interestingly, cysteine accounted for almost 8% of the amino acid residues. The 3' part of the sequence was very similar but not identical to the 3' region of human tracheobronchial cDNA. No tandem repeated sequences were present and the deduced polypeptide sequence contained two potential N-linked glycosylation sites. Four cysteine-rich clusters were detected, one of which was apparently homologous to the D-domains present in other mucins and in von Willebrand factor. The arrangement of the cysteines in three other cysteine-rich clusters was conserved in the human gastric mucin cDNA in a similar fashion as in two domains in the MUC2 gene product. The cysteine-rich domains were separated by short stretches of non-repetitive amino acid residues with a very high content of threonine and serine residues. These data suggest that the encoded polypeptide of this clone may be involved in disulphide-bond-mediated oligomerization of the mucin, and provide new insights into the molecular organization of mammalian apomucins. Images Figure 1 PMID:8948439

  9. Structural investigations of the p53/p73 homologs from the tunicate species Ciona intestinalis reveal the sequence requirements for the formation of a tetramerization domain.

    PubMed

    Heering, Jan; Jonker, Hendrik R A; Löhr, Frank; Schwalbe, Harald; Dötsch, Volker

    2016-02-01

    Most members of the p53 family of transcription factors form tetramers. Responsible for determining the oligomeric state is a short oligomerization domain consisting of one β-strand and one α-helix. With the exception of human p53 all other family members investigated so far contain a second α-helix as part of their tetramerization domain. Here we have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize the oligomerization domains of the two p53-like proteins from the tunicate Ciona intestinalis, representing the closest living relative of vertebrates. Structure determination reveals for one of the two proteins a new type of packing of this second α-helix on the core domain that was not predicted based on the sequence, while the other protein does not form a second helix despite the presence of crucial residues that are conserved in all other family members that form a second helix. By mutational analysis, we identify a proline as well as large hydrophobic residues in the hinge region between both helices as the crucial determinant for the formation of a second helix. PMID:26473758

  10. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Brandon L.; Larue, Ross C.; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein–protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins. PMID:26858406

  11. Structure of the Staphylococcus aureus AgrA LytTR Domain Bound to DNA Reveals a Beta Fold with an Unusual Mode of Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sidote,D.; Barbieri, C.; Wu, T.; Stock, A.

    2008-01-01

    The LytTR domain is a DNA-binding motif found within the AlgR/AgrA/LytR family of transcription factors that regulate virulence factor and toxin gene expression in pathogenic bacteria. This previously uncharacterized domain lacks sequence similarity with proteins of known structure. The crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of Staphylococcus aureus AgrA complexed with a DNA pentadecamer duplex has been determined at 1.6 Angstroms resolution. The structure establishes a 10-stranded {beta} fold for the LytTR domain and reveals its mode of interaction with DNA. Residues within loop regions of AgrA contact two successive major grooves and the intervening minor groove on one face of the oligonucleotide duplex, inducing a substantial bend in the DNA. Loss of DNA binding upon substitution of key interacting residues in AgrA supports the observed binding mode. This mode of protein-DNA interaction provides a potential target for future antimicrobial drug design.

  12. Structure of the N-terminal oligomerization domain of DnaD reveals a unique tetramerization motif and provides insights into scaffold formation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S; Zhang, W; Soultanas, P; Paoli, M

    2008-03-01

    DnaD is a primosomal protein that remodels supercoiled plasmids. It binds to supercoiled forms and converts them to open forms without nicking. During this remodeling process, all the writhe is converted to twist and the plasmids are held around the periphery of large scaffolds made up of DnaD molecules. This DNA-remodeling function is the sum of a scaffold-forming activity on the N-terminal domain and a DNA-dependent oligomerization activity on the C-terminal domain. We have determined the crystal structure of the scaffold-forming N-terminal domain, which reveals a winged-helix architecture, with additional structural elements extending from both N- and C-termini. Four monomers form dimers that join into a tetramer. The N-terminal extension mediates dimerization and tetramerization, with extensive interactions and distinct interfaces. The wings and helices of the winged-helix domains remain exposed on the surface of the tetramer. Structure-guided mutagenesis and atomic force microscopy imaging indicate that these elements, together with the C-terminal extension, are involved in scaffold formation. Based upon our data, we propose a model for the DnaD-mediated scaffold formation. PMID:18206906

  13. Human-Mouse Chimeras with Normal Expression and Function Reveal That Major Domain Swapping Is Tolerated by P-Glycoprotein (ABCB1).

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Kristen M; Hall, Matthew D; Moen, Janna K; Chufan, Eduardo E; Fetsch, Patricia A; Shukla, Suneet; Gill, Deborah R; Hyde, Stephen C; Xia, Di; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-02-23

    The efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a vital role in the transport of molecules across cell membranes and has been shown to interact with a panoply of functionally and structurally unrelated compounds. How human P-gp interacts with this large number of drugs has not been well understood, although structural flexibility has been implicated. To gain insight into this transporter's broad substrate specificity and to assess its ability to accommodate a variety of molecular and structural changes, we generated human-mouse P-gp chimeras by the exchange of homologous transmembrane and nucleotide-binding domains. High-level expression of these chimeras by BacMam- and baculovirus-mediated transduction in mammalian (HeLa) and insect cells, respectively, was achieved. There were no detectable differences between wild-type and chimeric P-gp in terms of cell surface expression, ability to efflux the P-gp substrates rhodamine 123, calcein-AM, and JC-1, or to be inhibited by the substrate cyclosporine A and the inhibitors tariquidar and elacridar. Additionally, expression of chimeric P-gp was able to confer a paclitaxel-resistant phenotype to HeLa cells characteristic of P-gp-mediated drug resistance. P-gp ATPase assays and photo-cross-linking with [(125)I]iodoarylazidoprazosin confirmed that transport and biochemical properties of P-gp chimeras were similar to those of wild-type P-gp, although differences in drug binding were detected when human and mouse transmembrane domains were combined. Overall, chimeras with one or two mouse P-gp domains were deemed functionally equivalent to human wild-type P-gp, demonstrating the ability of human P-gp to tolerate major structural changes. PMID:26820614

  14. Topologically associated domains enriched for lineage-specific genes reveal expression-dependent nuclear topologies during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Neems, Daniel S.; Garza-Gongora, Arturo G.; Smith, Erica D.; Kosak, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    The linear distribution of genes across chromosomes and the spatial localization of genes within the nucleus are related to their transcriptional regulation. The mechanistic consequences of linear gene order, and how it may relate to the functional output of genome organization, remain to be fully resolved, however. Here we tested the relationship between linear and 3D organization of gene regulation during myogenesis. Our analysis has identified a subset of topologically associated domains (TADs) that are significantly enriched for muscle-specific genes. These lineage-enriched TADs demonstrate an expression-dependent pattern of nuclear organization that influences the positioning of adjacent nonenriched TADs. Therefore, lineage-enriched TADs inform cell-specific genome organization during myogenesis. The reduction of allelic spatial distance of one of these domains, which contains Myogenin, correlates with reduced transcriptional variability, identifying a potential role for lineage-specific nuclear topology. Using a fusion-based strategy to decouple mitosis and myotube formation, we demonstrate that the cell-specific topology of syncytial nuclei is dependent on cell division. We propose that the effects of linear and spatial organization of gene loci on gene regulation are linked through TAD architecture, and that mitosis is critical for establishing nuclear topologies during cellular differentiation. PMID:26957603

  15. The FasFADD death domain complex structure reveals the basis of DISC assembly and disease mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liwei; Yang, Jin Kuk; Kabaleeswaran, Venkataraman; Rice, Amanda J.; Cruz, Anthony C.; Park, Ah Young; Yin, Qian; Damko, Ermelinda; Jang, Se Bok; Raunser, Stefan; Robinson, Carol V.; Siegel, Richard M.; Walz, Thomas; Wu, Hao

    2010-10-10

    The death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) formed by the death receptor Fas, the adaptor protein FADD and caspase-8 mediates the extrinsic apoptotic program. Mutations in Fas that disrupt the DISC cause autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Here we show that the Fas-FADD death domain (DD) complex forms an asymmetric oligomeric structure composed of 5-7 Fas DD and 5 FADD DD, whose interfaces harbor ALPS-associated mutations. Structure-based mutations disrupt the Fas-FADD interaction in vitro and in living cells; the severity of a mutation correlates with the number of occurrences of a particular interaction in the structure. The highly oligomeric structure explains the requirement for hexameric or membrane-bound FasL in Fas signaling. It also predicts strong dominant negative effects from Fas mutations, which are confirmed by signaling assays. The structure optimally positions the FADD death effector domain (DED) to interact with the caspase-8 DED for caspase recruitment and higher-order aggregation.

  16. Structural and Functional Dissection of the Abp1 ADFH Actin-binding Domain Reveals Versatile In Vivo Adapter Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Quintero-Monzon,O.; Rodal, A.; Strokopytov, B.; Almo, S.; Goode, B.

    2005-01-01

    Abp1 is a multidomain protein that regulates the Arp2/3 complex and links proteins involved in endocytosis to the actin cytoskeleton. All of the proposed cellular functions of Abp1 involve actin filament binding, yet the actin binding site(s) on Abp1 have not been identified, nor has the importance of actin binding for Abp1 localization and function in vivo been tested. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Abp1 actin-binding actin depolymerizing factor homology (ADFH) domain and dissect its activities by mutagenesis. Abp1-ADFH domain and ADF/cofilin structures are similar, and they use conserved surfaces to bind actin; however, there are also key differences that help explain their differential effects on actin dynamics. Using point mutations, we demonstrate that actin binding is required for localization of Abp1 in vivo, the lethality caused by Abp1 overexpression, and the ability of Abp1 to activate Arp2/3 complex. Furthermore, we genetically uncouple ABP1 functions that overlap with SAC6, SLA1, and SLA2, showing they require distinct combinations of activities and interactions. Together, our data provide the first structural and functional view of the Abp1-actin interaction and show that Abp1 has distinct cellular roles as an adapter, linking different sets of ligands for each function.

  17. Cancer-associated p53 tetramerization domain mutants: quantitative analysis reveals a low threshold for tumor suppressor inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, R.; Anderson, C.; Nomura, T.; Sakaguchi, K.

    2011-01-07

    The tumor suppressor p53, a 393-amino acid transcription factor, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. Its inactivation via the mutation of its gene is a key step in tumor progression, and tetramer formation is critical for p53 post-translational modification and its ability to activate or repress the transcription of target genes vital in inhibiting tumor growth. About 50% of human tumors have TP53 gene mutations; most are missense ones that presumably lower the tumor suppressor activity of p53. In this study, we explored the effects of known tumor-derived missense mutations on the stability and oligomeric structure of p53; our comprehensive, quantitative analyses encompassed the tetramerization domain peptides representing 49 such substitutions in humans. Their effects on tetrameric structure were broad, and the stability of the mutant peptides varied widely ({Delta}T{sub m} = 4.8 {approx} -46.8 C). Because formation of a tetrameric structure is critical for protein-protein interactions, DNA binding, and the post-translational modification of p53, a small destabilization of the tetrameric structure could result in dysfunction of tumor suppressor activity. We suggest that the threshold for loss of tumor suppressor activity in terms of the disruption of the tetrameric structure of p53 could be extremely low. However, other properties of the tetramerization domain, such as electrostatic surface potential and its ability to bind partner proteins, also may be important.

  18. Next-Generation Sequencing of a Single Domain Antibody Repertoire Reveals Quality of Phage Display Selected Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kendrick B.; Naciri, Jennifer; Liu, Jinny L.; Anderson, George P.; Goldman, Ellen R.; Zabetakis, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing and bioinformatics are powerful tools for analyzing the large number of DNA sequences present in an immune library. In this work, we constructed a cDNA library of single domain antibodies from a llama immunized with staphylococcal enterotoxin B. The resulting library was sequenced, resulting in approximately 8.5 million sequences with 5.4 million representing intact, useful sequences. The sequenced library was interrogated using sequences of known SEB-binding single domain antibodies from the library obtained through phage display panning methods in a previous study. New antibodies were identified, produced, and characterized, and were shown to have affinities and melting temperatures comparable to those obtained by traditional panning methods. This demonstrates the utility of using NGS as a complementary tool to phage-displayed biopanning as a means for rapidly obtaining additional antibodies from an immune library. It also shows that phage display, using a library of high diversity, is able to select high quality antibodies even when they are low in frequency. PMID:26895405

  19. Simulations of DNA topoisomerase 1B bound to supercoiled DNA reveal changes in the flexibility pattern of the enzyme and a secondary protein–DNA binding site

    PubMed Central

    D'Annessa, Ilda; Coletta, Andrea; Sutthibutpong, Thana; Mitchell, Jonathan; Chillemi, Giovanni; Harris, Sarah; Desideri, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Human topoisomerase 1B has been simulated covalently bound to a negatively supercoiled DNA minicircle, and its behavior compared to the enzyme bound to a simple linear DNA duplex. The presence of the more realistic supercoiled substrate facilitates the formation of larger number of protein–DNA interactions when compared to a simple linear duplex fragment. The number of protein–DNA hydrogen bonds doubles in proximity to the active site, affecting all of the residues in the catalytic pentad. The clamp over the DNA, characterized by the salt bridge between Lys369 and Glu497, undergoes reduced fluctuations when bound to the supercoiled minicircle. The linker domain of the enzyme, which is implicated in the controlled relaxation of superhelical stress, also displays an increased number of contacts with the minicircle compared to linear DNA. Finally, the more complex topology of the supercoiled DNA minicircle gives rise to a secondary DNA binding site involving four residues located on subdomain III. The simulation trajectories reveal significant changes in the interactions between the enzyme and the DNA for the more complex DNA topology, which are consistent with the experimental observation that the protein has a preference for binding to supercoiled DNA. PMID:25056319

  20. Structure of the Toxoplasma gondii ROP18 Kinase Domain Reveals a Second Ligand Binding Pocket Required for Acute Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daniel; Gold, Daniel A.; Julien, Lindsay; Rosowski, Emily E.; Niedelman, Wendy; Yaffe, Michael B.; Saeij, Jeroen P. J.

    2013-01-01

    At least a third of the human population is infected with the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which contributes significantly to the disease burden in immunocompromised and neutropenic hosts and causes serious congenital complications when vertically transmitted to the fetus. Genetic analyses have identified the Toxoplasma ROP18 Ser/Thr protein kinase as a major factor mediating acute virulence in mice. ROP18 is secreted into the host cell during the invasion process, and its catalytic activity is required for the acute virulence phenotype. However, its precise molecular function and regulation are not fully understood. We have determined the crystal structure of the ROP18 kinase domain, which is inconsistent with a previously proposed autoinhibitory mechanism of regulation. Furthermore, a sucrose molecule bound to our structure identifies an additional ligand-binding pocket outside of the active site cleft. Mutational analysis confirms an important role for this pocket in virulence. PMID:24129568

  1. The Structure of the Dead ringer-DNA complex reveals how AT-rich interaction domains (ARIDs) recognize DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Iwahara, Junji; Iwahara, Mizuho; Daughdrill, Gary W.; Ford, Joe J.; Clubb, Robert T.

    2002-03-01

    The AT-rich interaction domain (ARID) is a DNA-binding module found in many eukaryotic transcription factors. Using NMR Spectroscopy, we have determined the first ever three-dimensional structure of an ARID-DNA complex (mol.wt 25.7 kDa) formed by Dead ringer from Drosophila melanogaster, ARIDs recognize DNA through a novel mechanism involving major groove immobilization of a large loop that connects the helices of a non-canonical helix-turn-helix motif, and through a concomitant structural rearrangement. that produces stabilizing contacts from a B-hairpin. Dead ringer's preference for a AT-rich DNA originates from three positions within the ARID fold that form energetically significant contacts to an adenine thymine base step.

  2. Local domains of motor cortical activity revealed by fiber-optic calcium recordings in behaving nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Adelsberger, Helmuth; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Romo, Ranulfo; Konnerth, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Brain mapping experiments involving electrical microstimulation indicate that the primary motor cortex (M1) directly regulates muscle contraction and thereby controls specific movements. Possibly, M1 contains a small circuit "map" of the body that is formed by discrete local networks that code for specific movements. Alternatively, movements may be controlled by distributed, larger-scale overlapping circuits. Because of technical limitations, it remained unclear how movement-determining circuits are organized in M1. Here we introduce a method that allows the functional mapping of small local neuronal circuits in awake behaving nonhuman primates. For this purpose, we combined optic-fiber-based calcium recordings of neuronal activity and cortical microstimulation. The method requires targeted bulk loading of synthetic calcium indicators (e.g., OGB-1 AM) for the staining of neuronal microdomains. The tip of a thin (200 µm) optical fiber can detect the coherent activity of a small cluster of neurons, but is insensitive to the asynchronous activity of individual cells. By combining such optical recordings with microstimulation at two well-separated sites of M1, we demonstrate that local cortical activity was tightly associated with distinct and stereotypical simple movements. Increasing stimulation intensity increased both the amplitude of the movements and the level of neuronal activity. Importantly, the activity remained local, without invading the recording domain of the second optical fiber. Furthermore, there was clear response specificity at the two recording sites in a trained behavioral task. Thus, the results provide support for movement control in M1 by local neuronal clusters that are organized in discrete cortical domains. PMID:24344287

  3. Crystal structure of cardiac troponin C regulatory domain in complex with cadmium and deoxycholic acid reveals novel conformation.

    PubMed

    Li, Alison Yueh; Lee, Jaeyong; Borek, Dominika; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Tibbits, Glen F; Paetzel, Mark

    2011-10-28

    The amino-terminal regulatory domain of cardiac troponin C (cNTnC) plays an important role as the calcium sensor for the troponin complex. Calcium binding to cNTnC results in conformational changes that trigger a cascade of events that lead to cardiac muscle contraction. The cardiac N-terminal domain of TnC consists of two EF-hand calcium binding motifs, one of which is dysfunctional in binding calcium. Nevertheless, the defunct EF-hand still maintains a role in cNTnC function. For its structural analysis by X-ray crystallography, human cNTnC with the wild-type primary sequence was crystallized under a novel crystallization condition. The crystal structure was solved by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method and refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure displays several novel features. Firstly, both EF-hand motifs coordinate cadmium ions derived from the crystallization milieu. Secondly, the ion coordination in the defunct EF-hand motif accompanies unusual changes in the protein conformation. Thirdly, deoxycholic acid, also derived from the crystallization milieu, is bound in the central hydrophobic cavity. This is reminiscent of the interactions observed for cardiac calcium sensitizer drugs that bind to the same core region and maintain the "open" conformational state of calcium-bound cNTnC. The cadmium ion coordination in the defunct EF-hand indicates that this vestigial calcium binding site retains the structural and functional elements that allow it to coordinate a cadmium ion. However, it is a result of, or concomitant with, large and unusual structural changes in cNTnC. PMID:21920370

  4. Crystal structure of EML1 reveals the basis for Hsp90 dependence of oncogenic EML4-ALK by disruption of an atypical β-propeller domain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Mark W.; Law, Edward W. P.; Rennalls, La’Verne P.; Busacca, Sara; O’Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M.; Fennell, Dean A.; Bayliss, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Proteins of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein (EMAP)-like (EML) family contribute to formation of the mitotic spindle and interphase microtubule network. They contain a unique hydrophobic EML protein (HELP) motif and a variable number of WD40 repeats. Recurrent gene rearrangements in nonsmall cell lung cancer fuse EML4 to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), causing expression of several fusion oncoprotein variants. We have determined a 2.6-Å crystal structure of the representative ∼70-kDa core of EML1, revealing an intimately associated pair of β-propellers, which we term a TAPE (tandem atypical propeller in EMLs) domain. One propeller is highly atypical, having a discontinuous subdomain unrelated to a WD40 motif in place of one of its blades. This unexpected feature shows how a propeller structure can be assembled from subdomains with distinct folds. The HELP motif is not an independent domain but forms part of the hydrophobic core that joins the two β-propellers. The TAPE domain binds α/β-tubulin via its conserved, concave surface, including part of the atypical blade. Mapping the characteristic breakpoints of each EML4-ALK variant onto our structure indicates that the EML4 TAPE domain is truncated in many variants in a manner likely to make the fusion protein structurally unstable. We found that the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor ganetespib induced degradation of these variants whereas others lacking a partial TAPE domain were resistant in both overexpression models and patient-derived cell lines. The Hsp90-sensitive EML4-ALK variants are exceptions to the rule that oncogenic fusion proteins involve breakpoints in disordered regions of both partners. PMID:24706829

  5. Structure of the Legionella Virulence Factor, SidC Reveals a Unique PI(4)P-Specific Binding Domain Essential for Its Targeting to the Bacterial Phagosome

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xi; Wasilko, David J.; Liu, Yao; Sun, Jiayi; Wu, Xiaochun; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Mao, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila delivers nearly 300 effector proteins into host cells for the establishment of a replication-permissive compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). SidC and its paralog SdcA are two effectors that have been shown to anchor on the LCV via binding to phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate [PI(4)P] to facilitate the recruitment of ER proteins to the LCV. We recently reported that the N-terminal SNL (SidC N-terminal E3 Ligase) domain of SidC is a ubiquitin E3 ligase, and its activity is required for the recruitment of ER proteins to the LCV. Here we report the crystal structure of SidC (1-871). The structure reveals that SidC contains four domains that are packed into an arch-like shape. The P4C domain (PI(4)P binding of SidC) comprises a four α-helix bundle and covers the ubiquitin ligase catalytic site of the SNL domain. Strikingly, a pocket with characteristic positive electrostatic potentials is formed at one end of this bundle. Liposome binding assays of the P4C domain further identified the determinants of phosphoinositide recognition and membrane interaction. Interestingly, we also found that binding with PI(4)P stimulates the E3 ligase activity, presumably due to a conformational switch induced by PI(4)P from a closed form to an open active form. Mutations of key residues involved in PI(4)P binding significantly reduced the association of SidC with the LCV and abolished its activity in the recruitment of ER proteins and ubiquitin signals, highlighting that PI(4)P-mediated targeting of SidC is critical to its function in the remodeling of the bacterial phagosome membrane. Finally, a GFP-fusion with the P4C domain was demonstrated to be specifically localized to PI(4)P-enriched compartments in mammalian cells. This domain shows the potential to be developed into a sensitive and accurate PI(4)P probe in living cells. PMID

  6. Apo- and Antagonist-Binding Structures of Vitamin D Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain Revealed by Hybrid Approach Combining Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Anami, Yasuaki; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Ekimoto, Toru; Egawa, Daichi; Itoh, Toshimasa; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Yamamoto, Keiko

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) controls the expression of numerous genes through the conformational change caused by binding 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Helix 12 in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) is key to regulating VDR activation. The structures of apo VDR-LBD and the VDR-LBD/antagonist complex are unclear. Here, we reveal their unprecedented structures in solution using a hybrid method combining small-angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. In apo rat VDR-LBD, helix 12 is partially unraveled, and it is positioned around the canonical active position and fluctuates. Helix 11 greatly bends toward the outside at Q396, creating a kink. In the rat VDR-LBD/antagonist complex, helix 12 does not generate the activation function 2 surface, and loop 11-12 is remarkably flexible compared to that in the apo rat VDR-LBD. On the basis of these structural insights, we propose a "folding-door model" to describe the mechanism of agonism/antagonism of VDR-LBD. PMID:27535484

  7. Crystal structure of the magnetobacterial protein MtxA C-terminal domain reveals a new sequence-structure relationship

    PubMed Central

    Davidov, Geula; Müller, Frank D.; Baumgartner, Jens; Bitton, Ronit; Faivre, Damien; Schüler, Dirk; Zarivach, Raz

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a diverse group of aquatic bacteria that have the magnetotaxis ability to align themselves along the geomagnetic field lines and to navigate to a microoxic zone at the bottom of chemically stratified natural water. This special navigation is the result of a unique linear assembly of a specialized organelle, the magnetosome, which contains a biomineralized magnetic nanocrystal enveloped by a cytoplasmic membrane. The Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MtxA protein (MGR_0208) was suggested to play a role in bacterial magnetotaxis due to its gene location in an operon together with putative signal transduction genes. Since no homology is found for MtxA, and to better understand the role and function of MtxA in MTBés magnetotaxis, we initiated structural and functional studies of MtxA via X-ray crystallography and deletion mutagenesis. Here, we present the crystal structure of the MtxA C-terminal domain and provide new insights into its sequence-structure relationship. PMID:26052516

  8. Looking, seeing and believing in autism: Eye movements reveal how subtle cognitive processing differences impact in the social domain.

    PubMed

    Benson, Valerie; Castelhano, Monica S; Howard, Philippa L; Latif, Nida; Rayner, Keith

    2016-08-01

    Adults with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) viewed scenes with people in them, while having their eye movements recorded. The task was to indicate, using a button press, whether the pictures were normal, or in some way weird or odd. Oddities in the pictures were categorized as violations of either perceptual or social norms. Compared to a Typically Developed (TD) control group, the ASD participants were equally able to categorize the scenes as odd or normal, but they took longer to respond. The eye movement patterns showed that the ASD group made more fixations and revisits to the target areas in the odd scenes compared with the TD group. Additionally, when the ASD group first fixated the target areas in the scenes, they failed to initially detect the social oddities. These two findings have clear implications for processing difficulties in ASD for the social domain, where it is important to detect social cues on-line, and where there is little opportunity to go back and recheck possible cues in fast dynamic interactions. Autism Res 2016, 9: 879-887. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26614312

  9. High-Resolution Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals That Specific Chromatin Domains from Most Human Chromosomes Associate with Nucleoli

    PubMed Central

    van Koningsbruggen, Silvana; Gierliński, Marek; Schofield, Pietá; Martin, David; Barton, Geoffey J.; Ariyurek, Yavuz; den Dunnen, Johan T.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear space is mostly occupied by chromosome territories and nuclear bodies. Although this organization of chromosomes affects gene function, relatively little is known about the role of nuclear bodies in the organization of chromosomal regions. The nucleolus is the best-studied subnuclear structure and forms around the rRNA repeat gene clusters on the acrocentric chromosomes. In addition to rDNA, other chromatin sequences also surround the nucleolar surface and may even loop into the nucleolus. These additional nucleolar-associated domains (NADs) have not been well characterized. We present here a whole-genome, high-resolution analysis of chromatin endogenously associated with nucleoli. We have used a combination of three complementary approaches, namely fluorescence comparative genome hybridization, high-throughput deep DNA sequencing and photoactivation combined with time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The data show that specific sequences from most human chromosomes, in addition to the rDNA repeat units, associate with nucleoli in a reproducible and heritable manner. NADs have in common a high density of AT-rich sequence elements, low gene density and a statistically significant enrichment in transcriptionally repressed genes. Unexpectedly, both the direct DNA sequencing and fluorescence photoactivation data show that certain chromatin loci can specifically associate with either the nucleolus, or the nuclear envelope. PMID:20826608

  10. Structure of N-Terminal Domain of NPC1 Reveals Distinct Subdomains for Binding and Transfer of Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Wang, Michael L.; Deisenhofer, Johann; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Infante, Rodney E.

    2010-09-21

    LDL delivers cholesterol to lysosomes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Exit of cholesterol from lysosomes requires two proteins, membrane-bound Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) and soluble NPC2. NPC2 binds cholesterol with its isooctyl side chain buried and its 3{beta}-hydroxyl exposed. Here, we describe high-resolution structures of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1 and complexes with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. NPC1(NTD) binds cholesterol in an orientation opposite to NPC2: 3{beta}-hydroxyl buried and isooctyl side chain exposed. Cholesterol transfer from NPC2 to NPC1(NTD) requires reorientation of a helical subdomain in NPC1(NTD), enlarging the opening for cholesterol entry. NPC1 with point mutations in this subdomain (distinct from the binding subdomain) cannot accept cholesterol from NPC2 and cannot restore cholesterol exit from lysosomes in NPC1-deficient cells. We propose a working model wherein after lysosomal hydrolysis of LDL-cholesteryl esters, cholesterol binds NPC2, which transfers it to NPC1(NTD), reversing its orientation and allowing insertion of its isooctyl side chain into the outer lysosomal membranes.

  11. Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-Like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Stroehlein, Andreas J; Young, Neil D; Korhonen, Pasi K; Chang, Bill C H; Sternberg, Paul W; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Pozio, Edoardo; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worms of the genus Trichinella (phylum Nematoda; class Enoplea) represent a complex of at least twelve taxa that infect a range of different host animals, including humans, around the world. They are foodborne, intracellular nematodes, and their life cycles differ substantially from those of other nematodes. The recent characterization of the genomes and transcriptomes of all twelve recognized taxa of Trichinella now allows, for the first time, detailed studies of their molecular biology. In the present study, we defined, curated, and compared the protein kinase complements (kinomes) of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis using an integrated bioinformatic workflow employing transcriptomic and genomic data sets. We examined how variation in the kinome might link to unique aspects of Trichinella morphology, biology, and evolution. Furthermore, we utilized in silico structural modeling to discover and characterize a novel, MOS-like kinase with an unusual, previously undescribed N-terminal domain. Taken together, the present findings provide a basis for comparative investigations of nematode kinomes, and might facilitate the identification of Enoplea-specific intervention and diagnostic targets. Importantly, the in silico modeling approach assessed here provides an exciting prospect of being able to identify and classify currently unknown (orphan) kinases, as a foundation for their subsequent structural and functional investigation. PMID:27412987

  12. Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-Like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Stroehlein, Andreas J.; Young, Neil D.; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Chang, Bill C. H.; Sternberg, Paul W.; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Pozio, Edoardo; Gasser, Robin B.

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worms of the genus Trichinella (phylum Nematoda; class Enoplea) represent a complex of at least twelve taxa that infect a range of different host animals, including humans, around the world. They are foodborne, intracellular nematodes, and their life cycles differ substantially from those of other nematodes. The recent characterization of the genomes and transcriptomes of all twelve recognized taxa of Trichinella now allows, for the first time, detailed studies of their molecular biology. In the present study, we defined, curated, and compared the protein kinase complements (kinomes) of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis using an integrated bioinformatic workflow employing transcriptomic and genomic data sets. We examined how variation in the kinome might link to unique aspects of Trichinella morphology, biology, and evolution. Furthermore, we utilized in silico structural modeling to discover and characterize a novel, MOS-like kinase with an unusual, previously undescribed N-terminal domain. Taken together, the present findings provide a basis for comparative investigations of nematode kinomes, and might facilitate the identification of Enoplea-specific intervention and diagnostic targets. Importantly, the in silico modeling approach assessed here provides an exciting prospect of being able to identify and classify currently unknown (orphan) kinases, as a foundation for their subsequent structural and functional investigation. PMID:27412987

  13. Analysis of Usp DNA binding domain targeting reveals critical determinants of the ecdysone receptor complex interaction with the response element.

    PubMed

    Grad, I; Niedziela-Majka, A; Kochman, M; Ozyhar, A

    2001-07-01

    The steroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), directs Drosophila metamorphosis via a heterodimeric receptor formed by two members of the nuclear hormone receptors superfamily, the product of the EcR (EcR) and of the ultraspiracle (Usp) genes. Our previous study [Niedziela-Majka, A., Kochman, M., Ozyhar, A. (2000) Eur. J. Biochem. 267, 507-519] on EcR and Usp DNA-binding domains (EcRDBD and UspDBD, respectively) suggested that UspDBD may act as a specific anchor that preferentially binds the 5' half-site of the pseudo-palindromic response element from the hsp27 gene promoter and thus locates the heterocomplex in the defined orientation. Here, we analyzed in detail the determinants of the UspDBD interaction with the hsp27 element. The roles of individual amino acids in the putative DNA recognition alpha helix and the roles of the base pairs of the UspDBD target sequence have been probed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show how the hsp27 element specifies UspDBD binding and thus the polar assembly of the UspDBD/EcRDBD heterocomplex. It is suggested how possible nucleotide deviations within the 5' half-site of the element may be used for the fine-tuning of the 20E-response element specificity and consequently the physiological response. PMID:11432742

  14. Structure of Aquifex aeolicus argonaute highlights conformational flexibility of the PAZ domain as a potential regulator of RNA-induced silencing complex function.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Umar Jan; Paterok, Dirk; Koglin, Alexander; Gohlke, Holger; Piehler, Jacob; Chen, Julian C-H

    2007-05-01

    Gene silencing mediated by RNA interference requires the sequence-specific recognition of target mRNA by the endonuclease Argonaute, the primary enzymatic component of the RNA-induced silencing complex. We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute, refined at 3.2A resolution. Relative to recent Argonaute structures, a 24 degrees reorientation of the PAZ domain in our structure opens a basic cleft between the N-terminal and PAZ domains, exposing the guide strand binding pocket of PAZ. This rearrangement leads to a branched, Y-shaped system of grooves that extends through the molecule and merges in a central channel containing the catalytic residues. A 5.5-ns molecular dynamics simulation of Argonaute shows a strong tendency of the PAZ and N-terminal domains to be mobile. Binding of single-stranded DNA to Argonaute monitored by total internal reflection fluorescence spectroscopy shows biphasic kinetics, also indicative of domain rearrangement upon DNA binding. Conformational rearrangement of the PAZ domain may therefore be critical for the catalytic cycle of Argonaute and the RNA-induced silencing complex. PMID:17130125

  15. Interactions between Metal-binding Domains Modulate Intracellular Targeting of Cu(I)-ATPase ATP7B, as Revealed by Nanobody Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yiping; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Yu, Corey H.; Yang, Haojun; Barry, Amanda N.; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L.; Muyldermans, Serge; Dmitriev, Oleg Y.; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    The biologically and clinically important membrane transporters are challenging proteins to study because of their low level of expression, multidomain structure, and complex molecular dynamics that underlies their activity. ATP7B is a copper transporter that traffics between the intracellular compartments in response to copper elevation. The N-terminal domain of ATP7B (N-ATP7B) is involved in binding copper, but the role of this domain in trafficking is controversial. To clarify the role of N-ATP7B, we generated nanobodies that interact with ATP7B in vitro and in cells. In solution NMR studies, nanobodies revealed the spatial organization of N-ATP7B by detecting transient functionally relevant interactions between metal-binding domains 1–3. Modulation of these interactions by nanobodies in cells enhanced relocalization of the endogenous ATP7B toward the plasma membrane linking molecular and cellular dynamics of the transporter. Stimulation of ATP7B trafficking by nanobodies in the absence of elevated copper provides direct evidence for the important role of N-ATP7B structural dynamics in regulation of ATP7B localization in a cell. PMID:25253690

  16. Roles for SH2 and SH3 Domains in Lyn Kinase Association with Activated FcεRI in RBL Mast Cells Revealed by Patterned Surface Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Stephanie; Wagenknecht-Wiesner, Alice; Veatch, Sarah L.; Holowka, David; Baird, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In mast cells, antigen-mediated cross-linking of IgE bound to its high affinity surface receptor, FcεRI, initiates a signaling cascade that culminates in degranulation and release of allergic mediators. Antigen-patterned surfaces, in which the antigen is deposited in micron-sized features on a silicon substrate, were used to examine the spatial relationship between clustered IgE-FcεRI complexes and Lyn, the signal-initiating tyrosine kinase. RBL mast cells expressing wild-type Lyn-EGFP showed co-redistribution of this protein with clustered IgE receptors on antigen-patterned surfaces, whereas Lyn-EGFP containing an inhibitory point mutation in its SH2 domain did not significantly accumulate with the patterned antigen, and Lyn-EGFP with an inhibitory point mutation in its SH3 domain exhibited reduced interactions. Our results using antigen-patterned surfaces and quantitative cross-correlation image analysis reveal that both the SH2 and SH3 domains contribute to interactions between Lyn kinase and cross-linked IgE receptors in stimulated mast cells. PMID:19427382

  17. Crystal Structures of the p21-Activated Kinases PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 Reveal Catalytic Domain Plasticity of Active Group II PAKs

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Lee, Wen Hwa; Debreczeni, Judit É.; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Turnbull, Andrew; Fedorov, Oleg; Deacon, Sean W.; Peterson, Jeffrey R.; Knapp, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Summary p21-activated kinases have been classified into two groups based on their domain architecture. Group II PAKs (PAK4–6) regulate a wide variety of cellular functions, and PAK deregulation has been linked to tumor development. Structural comparison of five high-resolution structures comprising all active, monophosphorylated group II catalytic domains revealed a surprising degree of domain plasticity, including a number of catalytically productive and nonproductive conformers. Rearrangements of helix αC, a key regulatory element of kinase function, resulted in an additional helical turn at the αC N terminus and a distortion of its C terminus, a movement hitherto unseen in protein kinases. The observed structural changes led to the formation of interactions between conserved residues that structurally link the glycine-rich loop, αC, and the activation segment and firmly anchor αC in an active conformation. Inhibitor screening identified six potent PAK inhibitors from which a tri-substituted purine inhibitor was cocrystallized with PAK4 and PAK5. PMID:17292838

  18. Structure-function analysis of the human TFIIB-related factor II protein reveals an essential role for the C-terminal domain in RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashish; Ma, Beicong; Schramm, Laura; Hernandez, Nouria

    2005-11-01

    The transcription factors TFIIB, Brf1, and Brf2 share related N-terminal zinc ribbon and core domains. TFIIB bridges RNA polymerase II (Pol II) with the promoter-bound preinitiation complex, whereas Brf1 and Brf2 are involved, as part of activities also containing TBP and Bdp1 and referred to here as Brf1-TFIIIB and Brf2-TFIIIB, in the recruitment of Pol III. Brf1-TFIIIB recruits Pol III to type 1 and 2 promoters and Brf2-TFIIIB to type 3 promoters such as the human U6 promoter. Brf1 and Brf2 both have a C-terminal extension absent in TFIIB, but their C-terminal extensions are unrelated. In yeast Brf1, the C-terminal extension interacts with the TBP/TATA box complex and contributes to the recruitment of Bdp1. Here we have tested truncated Brf2, as well as Brf2/TFIIB chimeric proteins for U6 transcription and for assembly of U6 preinitiation complexes. Our results characterize functions of various human Brf2 domains and reveal that the C-terminal domain is required for efficient association of the protein with U6 promoter-bound TBP and SNAP(c), a type 3 promoter-specific transcription factor, and for efficient recruitment of Bdp1. This in turn suggests that the C-terminal extensions in Brf1 and Brf2 are crucial to specific recruitment of Pol III over Pol II. PMID:16227591

  19. Structure-Function Analysis of the Human TFIIB-Related Factor II Protein Reveals an Essential Role for the C-Terminal Domain in RNA Polymerase III Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ashish; Ma, Beicong; Schramm, Laura; Hernandez, Nouria

    2005-01-01

    The transcription factors TFIIB, Brf1, and Brf2 share related N-terminal zinc ribbon and core domains. TFIIB bridges RNA polymerase II (Pol II) with the promoter-bound preinitiation complex, whereas Brf1 and Brf2 are involved, as part of activities also containing TBP and Bdp1 and referred to here as Brf1-TFIIIB and Brf2-TFIIIB, in the recruitment of Pol III. Brf1-TFIIIB recruits Pol III to type 1 and 2 promoters and Brf2-TFIIIB to type 3 promoters such as the human U6 promoter. Brf1 and Brf2 both have a C-terminal extension absent in TFIIB, but their C-terminal extensions are unrelated. In yeast Brf1, the C-terminal extension interacts with the TBP/TATA box complex and contributes to the recruitment of Bdp1. Here we have tested truncated Brf2, as well as Brf2/TFIIB chimeric proteins for U6 transcription and for assembly of U6 preinitiation complexes. Our results characterize functions of various human Brf2 domains and reveal that the C-terminal domain is required for efficient association of the protein with U6 promoter-bound TBP and SNAPc, a type 3 promoter-specific transcription factor, and for efficient recruitment of Bdp1. This in turn suggests that the C-terminal extensions in Brf1 and Brf2 are crucial to specific recruitment of Pol III over Pol II. PMID:16227591

  20. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of UCHL5, a proteasome-associated human deubiquitinating enzyme, reveals an unproductive form of the enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Tushar K.; Permaul, Michelle; Boudreaux, David A.; Mahanic, Christina; Mauney, Sarah; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-10-25

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L5 (UCHL5) is a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, which, along with RPN11 and USP14, is known to carry out deubiquitination on proteasome. As a member of the ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCH) family, UCHL5 is unusual because, unlike UCHL1 and UCHL3, it can process polyubiquitin chain. However, it does so only when it is bound to the proteasome; in its free form, it is capable of releasing only relatively small leaving groups from the C-terminus of ubiquitin. Such a behavior might suggest at least two catalytically distinct forms of the enzyme, an apo form incapable of chain processing activity, and a proteasome-induced activated form capable of cleaving polyubiquitin chain. Through the crystal structure analysis of two truncated constructs representing the catalytic domain (UCH domain) of this enzyme, we were able to visualize a state of this enzyme that we interpret as its inactive form, because the catalytic cysteine appears to be in an unproductive orientation. While this work was in progress, the structure of a different construct representing the UCH domain was reported; however, in that work the structure reported was that of an inactive mutant [catalytic Cys to Ala; Nishio K et al. (2009) Biochem Biophys Res Commun390, 855-860], which precluded the observation that we are reporting here. Additionally, our structures reveal conformationally dynamic parts of the enzyme that may play a role in the structural transition to the more active form.

  1. Electrophoretic behavior of DNA-methyl-CpG-binding domain protein complexes revealed by capillary electrophoreses laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shangwei; Zou, Dandan; Zhao, Bailin; Zhang, Dapeng; Li, Xiangjun; Wang, Hailin

    2015-12-01

    The free solution electrophoretic behavior of DNA-protein complexes depends on their charge and mass in a certain experimental condition, which are two fundamental properties of DNA-protein complexes in free solution. Here, we used CE LIF to study the free solution behavior of DNA-methyl-CpG-binding domain protein (MBD2b) complexes through exploring the relationship between the mobilities, charge, and mass of DNA-protein complexes. This method is based on the effective separation of free DNA and DNA-protein complexes because of their different electrophoretic mobility in a certain electric field. In order to avoid protein adsorption, a polyacrylamide-coated capillary was used. Based on the evaluation of the electrophoretic behavior of formed DNA-MBD2b complexes, we found that the values of (μ0 /μ)-1 were directly proportional to the charge-to-mass ratios of formed complexes, where the μ0 and μ are the mobility of free DNA probe and DNA-protein complex, respectively. The models were further validated by the complex mobilities of protein with various lengths of DNA probes. The deviation of experimental and calculated charge-to-mass ratios of formed complexes from the theoretical data was less than 10%, suggesting that our models are useful to analyze the DNA-binding properties of the purified MBD2b protein and help to analyze other DNA-protein complexes. Additionally, this study enhances the understanding of the influence of the charge-to-mass ratios of formed DNA-protein complexes on their separation and electrophoretic behaviors. PMID:26377303

  2. Partial Loss of Genomic Imprinting Reveals Important Roles for Kcnq1 and Peg10 Imprinted Domains in Placental Development

    PubMed Central

    Koppes, Erik; Himes, Katherine P.; Chaillet, J. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in imprinted genes or their imprint control regions (ICRs) produce changes in imprinted gene expression and distinct abnormalities in placental structure, indicating the importance of genomic imprinting to placental development. We have recently shown that a very broad spectrum of placental abnormalities associated with altered imprinted gene expression occurs in the absence of the oocyte–derived DNMT1o cytosine methyltransferase, which normally maintains parent-specific imprinted methylation during preimplantation. The absence of DNMT1o partially reduces inherited imprinted methylation while retaining the genetic integrity of imprinted genes and their ICRs. Using this novel system, we undertook a broad and inclusive approach to identifying key ICRs involved in placental development by correlating loss of imprinted DNA methylation with abnormal placental phenotypes in a mid-gestation window (E12.5-E15.5). To these ends we measured DNA CpG methylation at 15 imprinted gametic differentially methylated domains (gDMDs) that overlap known ICRs using EpiTYPER-mass array technology, and linked these epigenetic measurements to histomorphological defects. Methylation of some imprinted gDMDs, most notably Dlk1, was nearly normal in mid-gestation DNMT1o-deficient placentas, consistent with the notion that cells having lost methylation on these DMDs do not contribute significantly to placental development. Most imprinted gDMDs however showed a wide range of methylation loss among DNMT1o-deficient placentas. Two striking associations were observed. First, loss of DNA methylation at the Peg10 imprinted gDMD associated with decreased embryonic viability and decreased labyrinthine volume. Second, loss of methylation at the Kcnq1 imprinted gDMD was strongly associated with trophoblast giant cell (TGC) expansion. We conclude that the Peg10 and Kcnq1 ICRs are key regulators of mid-gestation placental function. PMID:26241757

  3. An In Vivo Photo-Cross-Linking Approach Reveals a Homodimerization Domain of Aha1 in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Michael; Michalowski, Annette; Palzer, Silke; Rupp, Steffen; Sohn, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in almost any biological processes. Therefore, there is a particular need for methods which describe the interactions of a defined target protein in its physiological context. Here we report a method to photo-cross-link interacting proteins in S. cerevisiae by using the non-canonical amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine (pAzpa). Based on the expanded genetic code the photoreactive non-canonical amino acid pAzpa was site-specifically incorporated at eight positions into a domain of Aha1 that was previously described to bind Hsp90 in vitro to function as a cochaperone of Hsp90 and activates its ATPase activity. In vivo photo-cross-linking to the cognate binding partner of Aha1 was carried out by irradiation of mutant strains with UV light (365 nm) to induce covalent intermolecular bonds. Surprisingly, an interaction between Aha1 and Hsp90 was not detected, although, we could confirm binding of suppressed pAzpa containing Aha1 to Hsp90 by native co-immunoprecipitation. However, a homodimer consisting of two covalently crosslinked Aha1 monomers was identified by mass spectrometry. This homodimer could also be confirmed using p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine, another photoreactive non-canonical amino acid. Crosslinking was highly specific as it was dependent on irradiation using UV light, the exact position of the non-canonical amino acid in the protein sequence as well as on the addition of the non-canonical amino acid to the growth medium. Therefore it seems possible that an interaction of Aha1 with Hsp90 takes place at different positions than previously described in vitro highlighting the importance of in vivo techniques to study protein-protein interactions. Accordingly, the expanded genetic code can easily be applied to other S. cerevisiae proteins to study their interaction under physiological relevant conditions in vivo. PMID:24614167

  4. Structural and Dynamics Studies of Pax5 Reveal Asymmetry in Stability and DNA Binding by the Paired Domain.

    PubMed

    Perez-Borrajero, Cecilia; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2016-06-01

    The eukaryotic transcription factor Pax5 or B-cell specific activator protein (BSAP) is central to B-cell development and has been implicated in a large number of cellular malignancies resulting from loss- or gain-of-function mutations. In this study, we characterized the DNA-binding Paired domain (PD) of Pax5 in its free and DNA-bound forms using NMR spectroscopy. In isolation, the PD folds as two independent helical bundle subdomains separated by a conformationally disordered linker. The two subdomains differ in stability, with the C-terminal subdomain (CTD) being ~10-fold more protected from amide hydrogen exchange (HX) than the N-terminal subdomain (NTD). Upon binding DNA, the linker and an induced N-terminal β-hairpin become ordered with significantly dampened motions and increased HX protection. Both subdomains of the PD contribute to specific DNA binding, resulting in an equilibrium dissociation constant more than three orders of magnitude lower than exhibited by the separate subdomains for their respective half-sites (nM versus μM). The isolated CTD binds non-specific DNA sequences with only ~10-fold weaker affinity than cognate sequences. In contrast, the NTD associates very poorly with non-specific DNA. We propose that the more stable CTD has evolved to provide relatively low affinity non-specific contacts with DNA. In contrast, the more dynamic NTD discriminates between cognate and non-specific sites. The distinct roles of the PD subdomains may enable efficient searching of genomic DNA by Pax5 while retaining specificity for functional regulatory sites. PMID:27067111

  5. Crystal structure of cardiac troponin C regulatory domain in complex with cadmium and deoxycholic acid reveals novel conformation

    PubMed Central

    Borek, Dominika; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Tibbits, Glen F.; Paetzel, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Summary The amino-terminal regulatory domain of cardiac troponin C (cNTnC) plays an important role as the calcium sensor for the troponin complex. Calcium binding to cNTnC results in conformational changes that trigger a cascade of events that leads to cardiac muscle contraction. Cardiac NTnC consists of two EF-hand calcium binding motifs, one of which is dysfunctional in binding calcium. Nevertheless, the defunct EF-hand still maintains a role in cNTnC function. For its structural analysis by X-ray crystallography, human cNTnC with wild-type primary sequence was crystallized in a novel crystallization condition. The crystal structure was solved from single wavelength anomalous dispersion method and refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure displays several novel features. Firstly, both EF-hand motifs coordinate cadmium ions derived from the crystallization milieu. Secondly, the ion coordination in the defunct EF-hand motif accompanies unusual changes in the protein conformation. Thirdly, deoxycholic acid, also derived from the crystallization milieu, is bound in the central hydrophobic cavity. This is reminiscent of the interactions observed for cardiac calcium sensitizer drugs that bind to the same core region and maintain the ‘open’ conformational state of calcium bound cNTnC. The cadmium ion coordination in the defunct EF-hand indicates that this vestigial calcium binding site retains the structural and functional elements that allow it to coordinate a cadmium ion. However, it is a result of, or concomitant with, large and unusual structural changes in cNTnC. PMID:21920370

  6. Pressure dissociation of integration host factor–DNA complexes reveals flexibility-dependent structural variation at the protein–DNA interface

    PubMed Central

    Senear, Donald F.; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Opel, Michael L.; Aeling, Kimberly A.; Wesley Hatfield, G.; Franklin, Laurie M.; Darlington, Reuben C.

    2007-01-01

    E. coli Integration host factor (IHF) condenses the bacterial nucleoid by wrapping DNA. Previously, we showed that DNA flexibility compensates for structural characteristics of the four consensus recognition elements associated with specific binding (Aeling et al., J. Biol. Chem. 281, 39236–39248, 2006). If elements are missing, high-affinity binding occurs only if DNA deformation energy is low. In contrast, if all elements are present, net binding energy is unaffected by deformation energy. We tested two hypotheses for this observation: in complexes containing all elements, (1) stiff DNA sequences are less bent upon binding IHF than flexible ones; or (2) DNA sequences with differing flexibility have interactions with IHF that compensate for unfavorable deformation energy. Time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) shows that global topologies are indistinguishable for three complexes with oligonucleotides of different flexibility. However, pressure perturbation shows that the volume change upon binding is smaller with increasing flexibility. We interpret these results in the context of Record and coworker's model for IHF binding (J. Mol. Biol. 310, 379–401, 2001). We propose that the volume changes reflect differences in hydration that arise from structural variation at IHF–DNA interfaces while the resulting energetic compensation maintains the same net binding energy. PMID:17324943

  7. Crystal Structure of Marburg Virus VP40 Reveals a Broad, Basic Patch for Matrix Assembly and a Requirement of the N-Terminal Domain for Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Shun-ichiro; Noda, Takeshi; Wijesinghe, Kaveesha J.; Halfmann, Peter; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Armbrust, Tammy; Stahelin, Robert V.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marburg virus (MARV), a member of the filovirus family, causes severe hemorrhagic fever with up to 90% lethality. MARV matrix protein VP40 is essential for assembly and release of newly copied viruses and also suppresses immune signaling in the infected cell. Here we report the crystal structure of MARV VP40. We found that MARV VP40 forms a dimer in solution, mediated by N-terminal domains, and that formation of this dimer is essential for budding of virus-like particles. We also found the N-terminal domain to be necessary and sufficient for immune antagonism. The C-terminal domains of MARV VP40 are dispensable for immunosuppression but are required for virus assembly. The C-terminal domains are only 16% identical to those of Ebola virus, differ in structure from those of Ebola virus, and form a distinct broad and flat cationic surface that likely interacts with the cell membrane during virus assembly. IMPORTANCE Marburg virus, a cousin of Ebola virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever, with up to 90% lethality seen in recent outbreaks. Molecular structures and visual images of the proteins of Marburg virus are essential for the development of antiviral drugs. One key protein in the Marburg virus life cycle is VP40, which both assembles the virus and suppresses the immune system. Here we provide the molecular structure of Marburg virus VP40, illustrate differences from VP40 of Ebola virus, and reveal surfaces by which Marburg VP40 assembles progeny and suppresses immune function. PMID:26656687

  8. A comparison of phosphospecific affinity reagents reveals the utility of recombinant Forkhead-associated domains in recognizing phosphothreonine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Leon A; Pershad, Kritika; Bankole, Oluwadamilola; Shah, Noman; Kay, Brian K

    2016-09-25

    Phosphorylation is an important post-translational event that has a wide array of functional consequences. With advances in the ability of various technologies in revealing and mapping new phosphosites in proteins, it is equally important to develop affinity reagents that can monitor such post-translational modifications in eukaryotic cells. While monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies have been shown to be useful in assessing the phosphoproteome, we have expanded our efforts to exploit the Forkhead-associated 1 (FHA1) domain as scaffold for generating recombinant affinity reagents that recognize phosphothreonine-containing peptides. A phage display library of FHA1 variants was screened by affinity selection with 15 phosphothreonine-containing peptides corresponding to various human transcription factors and kinases, including human Myc, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), and extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). The library yielded binding variants against 10 targets (66% success rate); success was largely determined by what residue occurred at the +3 position (C-terminal) to the pThr moiety (i.e., pT+3). The FHA domains binding Myc, CaMKII, and ERK1/2 were characterized and compared against commercially available antibodies. All FHA domains were shown to be phosphorylation-dependent and phosphothreonine-specific in their binding, unlike several commercial monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Both the pThr and the residue at the pT+3 position were major factors in defining the specificity of the FHA domains. PMID:26772725

  9. Functional Analysis of the Leading Malaria Vaccine Candidate AMA-1 Reveals an Essential Role for the Cytoplasmic Domain in the Invasion Process

    PubMed Central

    Treeck, Moritz; Zacherl, Sonja; Herrmann, Susann; Cabrera, Ana; Kono, Maya; Struck, Nicole S.; Engelberg, Klemens; Haase, Silvia; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Miura, Kota; Spielmann, Tobias; Gilberger, Tim W.

    2009-01-01

    A key process in the lifecycle of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is the fast invasion of human erythrocytes. Entry into the host cell requires the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1), a type I transmembrane protein located in the micronemes of the merozoite. Although AMA-1 is evolving into the leading blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate, its precise role in invasion is still unclear. We investigate AMA-1 function using live video microscopy in the absence and presence of an AMA-1 inhibitory peptide. This data reveals a crucial function of AMA-1 during the primary contact period upstream of the entry process at around the time of moving junction formation. We generate a Plasmodium falciparum cell line that expresses a functional GFP-tagged AMA-1. This allows the visualization of the dynamics of AMA-1 in live parasites. We functionally validate the ectopically expressed AMA-1 by establishing a complementation assay based on strain-specific inhibition. This method provides the basis for the functional analysis of essential genes that are refractory to any genetic manipulation. Using the complementation assay, we show that the cytoplasmic domain of AMA-1 is not required for correct trafficking and surface translocation but is essential for AMA-1 function. Although this function can be mimicked by the highly conserved cytoplasmic domains of P. vivax and P. berghei, the exchange with the heterologous domain of the microneme protein EBA-175 or the rhoptry protein Rh2b leads to a loss of function. We identify several residues in the cytoplasmic tail that are essential for AMA-1 function. We validate this data using additional transgenic parasite lines expressing AMA-1 mutants with TY1 epitopes. We show that the cytoplasmic domain of AMA-1 is phosphorylated. Mutational analysis suggests an important role for the phosphorylation in the invasion process, which might translate into novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:19283086

  10. Novel Disulfide Bond-Mediated Dimerization of the CARD Domain Was Revealed by the Crystal Structure of CARMA1 CARD

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Ho

    2013-01-01

    CARMA1, BCL10 and MALT1 form a large molecular complex known as the CARMA1 signalosome during lymphocyte activation. Lymphocyte activation via the CARMA1 signalosome is critical to immune response and linked to many immune diseases. Despite the important role of the CARMA1 signalosome during lymphocyte activation and proliferation, limited structural information is available. Here, we report the dimeric structure of CARMA1 CARD at a resolution of 3.2 Å. Interestingly, although CARMA1 CARD has a canonical six helical-bundles structural fold similar to other CARDs, CARMA1 CARD shows the first homo-dimeric structure of CARD formed by a disulfide bond and reveals a possible biologically important homo-dimerization mechanism. PMID:24224005

  11. Interaction of a putative BH3 domain of clusterin with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins as revealed by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hwa; Ha, Ji-Hyang; Kim, Yul; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Park, Jae-Yong; Choi, Wan Sung; Yoon, Ho Sup; Park, Sung Goo; Park, Byoung Chul; Yi, Gwan-Su; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Identification of a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil region of nCLU. {yields} The nCLU BH3 domain binds to BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-X{sub L} and Bcl-2. {yields} A conserved binding mechanism of nCLU BH3 and the other pro-apoptotic BH3 peptides with Bcl-X{sub L}. {yields} The absolutely conserved Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain are critical for binding to Bcl-X{sub L.} {yields} Molecular understanding of the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU as a novel BH3-only protein. -- Abstract: Clusterin (CLU) is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is overexpressed in prostate and breast cancers. Although CLU is known to be involved in the regulation of apoptosis and cell survival, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic function of nuclear CLU (nCLU) remains unclear. In this study, we identified a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil (CC2) region of nCLU by sequence analysis and characterized the molecular interaction of the putative nCLU BH3 domain with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The chemical shift perturbation data demonstrated that the nCLU BH3 domain binds to pro-apoptotic BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-X{sub L} and Bcl-2. A structural model of the Bcl-X{sub L}/nCLU BH3 peptide complex reveals that the binding mode is remarkably similar to those of other Bcl-X{sub L}/BH3 peptide complexes. In addition, mutational analysis confirmed that Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain, absolutely conserved in the BH3 motifs of BH3-only protein family, are critical for binding to Bcl-X{sub L}. Taken altogether, our results suggest a molecular basis for the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU by elucidating the residue specific interactions of the BH3 motif in nCLU with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  12. Crystal structure of CobK reveals strand-swapping between Rossmann-fold domains and molecular basis of the reduced precorrin product trap

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shuang; Sushko, Oleksandr; Deery, Evelyne; Warren, Martin J.; Pickersgill, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    CobK catalyzes the essential reduction of the precorrin ring in the cobalamin biosynthetic pathway. The crystal structure of CobK reveals that the enzyme, despite not having the signature sequence, comprises two Rossmann fold domains which bind coenzyme and substrate respectively. The two parallel β-sheets have swapped their last β-strands giving a novel sheet topology which is an interesting variation on the Rossmann-fold. The trapped ternary complex with coenzyme and product reveals five conserved basic residues that bind the carboxylates of the tetrapyrrole tightly anchoring the product. A loop, disordered in both the apoenzyme and holoenzyme structures, closes around the product further tightening binding. The structure is consistent with a mechanism involving protonation of C18 and pro-R hydride transfer from NADPH to C19 of precorrin-6A and reveals the interactions responsible for the specificity of CobK. The almost complete burial of the reduced precorrin product suggests a remarkable form of metabolite channeling where the next enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway triggers product release. PMID:26616290

  13. Crystal structure of CobK reveals strand-swapping between Rossmann-fold domains and molecular basis of the reduced precorrin product trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shuang; Sushko, Oleksandr; Deery, Evelyne; Warren, Martin J.; Pickersgill, Richard W.

    2015-11-01

    CobK catalyzes the essential reduction of the precorrin ring in the cobalamin biosynthetic pathway. The crystal structure of CobK reveals that the enzyme, despite not having the signature sequence, comprises two Rossmann fold domains which bind coenzyme and substrate respectively. The two parallel β-sheets have swapped their last β-strands giving a novel sheet topology which is an interesting variation on the Rossmann-fold. The trapped ternary complex with coenzyme and product reveals five conserved basic residues that bind the carboxylates of the tetrapyrrole tightly anchoring the product. A loop, disordered in both the apoenzyme and holoenzyme structures, closes around the product further tightening binding. The structure is consistent with a mechanism involving protonation of C18 and pro-R hydride transfer from NADPH to C19 of precorrin-6A and reveals the interactions responsible for the specificity of CobK. The almost complete burial of the reduced precorrin product suggests a remarkable form of metabolite channeling where the next enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway triggers product release.

  14. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of UCHL5, a proteasome-associated human deubiquitinating enzyme, reveals an unproductive form of the enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Tushar K.; Permaul, Michelle; Boudreaux, David A.; Mahanic, Christina; Mauney, Sarah; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L5 (UCHL5) is a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, which, along with RPN11 and USP14, is known to carry out deubiquitination on proteasome. As a member of UCH family, UCHL5 is unusual because, unlike UCHL1 and UCHL3, it can process polyubiquitin chain. However, it does so only when it is bound to the proteasome; in its free form, it is capable of releasing only relatively small leaving groups from the C-terminus of ubiquitin. Such a behavior might suggest at least two catalytically distinct forms of the enzyme, an apo form incapable of chain processing activity, and a proteasome-induced activated form capable of cleaving polyubiquitin chain. Through the crystal structure analysis of two truncated constructs representing the catalytic domain (UCH domain) of this enzyme, we are able to visualize a state of this enzyme that we interpret as its inactive form, because the catalytic cysteine appears to be in an unproductive orientation. While this work was in progress, the structure of a different construct representing the UCH domain was reported; however, in that work the structure reported was that of an inactive mutant (catalytic Cys to Ala, Nishio K, Kim SW, Kawai K, Mizushima T, Yamane T, Hamazaki J, Murata S, Tanaka K and Morimoto Y (2009) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 390, 855-860), which precluded the observation that we are reporting here. Additionally, our structures reveal conformationally dynamic parts of the enzyme that may play a role in the structural transition to the more active form. PMID:21995438

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Revealed that the Human Polyomavirus JC Virus Agnoprotein Contains an α-Helix Encompassing the Leu/Ile/Phe-Rich Domain

    PubMed Central

    Coric, Pascale; Saribas, A. Sami; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Childers, Wayne; White, Martyn K.

    2014-01-01

    highly stable dimers and oligomers through its hydrophobic (Leu/Ile/Phe-rich) domain, which has been shown to play essential roles in the stability and function of the protein. In this work, the Leu/Ile/Phe-rich domain has been further characterized by NMR studies using an agnoprotein peptide spanning amino acids T17 to Q54. Those studies revealed that the dimerization domain of the protein forms an amphipathic α-helix. Subsequent NMR structure-based mutational analysis of the region highlighted the critical importance of certain amino acids within the α-helix for the stability and function of agnoprotein. In conclusion, this study provides a solid foundation for developing effective therapeutic approaches against the dimerization domain of the protein to inhibit its critical roles in JCV infection. PMID:24672035

  16. Mapping the Interaction Sites between AMPA Receptors and TARPs Reveals a Role for the Receptor N-Terminal Domain in Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Cais, Ondrej; Herguedas, Beatriz; Krol, Karolina; Cull-Candy, Stuart G.; Farrant, Mark; Greger, Ingo H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast neurotransmission at excitatory synapses. The extent and fidelity of postsynaptic depolarization triggered by AMPAR activation are shaped by AMPAR auxiliary subunits, including the transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). TARPs profoundly influence gating, an effect thought to be mediated by an interaction with the AMPAR ion channel and ligand binding domain (LBD). Here, we show that the distal N-terminal domain (NTD) contributes to TARP modulation. Alterations in the NTD-LBD linker result in TARP-dependent and TARP-selective changes in AMPAR gating. Using peptide arrays, we identify a TARP interaction region on the NTD and define the path of TARP contacts along the LBD surface. Moreover, we map key binding sites on the TARP itself and show that mutation of these residues mediates gating modulation. Our data reveal a TARP-dependent allosteric role for the AMPAR NTD and suggest that TARP binding triggers a drastic reorganization of the AMPAR complex. PMID:25373908

  17. The structure of Jann_2411 (DUF1470) from Jannaschia sp. at 1.45 Å resolution reveals a new fold (the ABATE domain) and suggests its possible role as a transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Bateman, Alex; Jin, Kevin K.; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry; Trame, Christine B.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of Jann_2411 from Jannaschia sp. strain CCS1, a member of the Pfam PF07336 family classified as a domain of unknown function (DUF1470), was solved to a resolution of 1.45 Å by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD). This protein is the first structural representative of the DUF1470 Pfam family. Structural analysis revealed a two-domain organization, with the N-terminal domain presenting a new fold called the ABATE domain that may bind an as yet unknown ligand. The C-terminal domain forms a treble-clef zinc finger that is likely to be involved in DNA binding. Analysis of the Jann_2411 protein and the broader ABATE-domain family suggests a role as stress-induced transcriptional regulators. PMID:20944211

  18. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    SciTech Connect

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallas, Vicente . E-mail: vpallas@ibmcp.upv.es

    2005-08-15

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed.

  19. Extensive browsing by a conventional grazer? Stable carbon isotope analysis reveals extraordinary dietary flexibility among Sanga cattle of North Central Namibia.

    PubMed

    Radloff, Frans G T; Van der Waal, Cornelis; Bond, Alexander L

    2013-01-01

    Intraspecies dietary flexibility, such as variable consumption of graze vs. browse in herbivores, has received scant attention on a spatial scale despite growing evidence of substantial variability within and among populations, especially in bovids. Here, we report on extraordinary differences in cattle diet among two communal pasture areas across seasons in northern Namibia: King Nehale (KN, open grassland) and Okongo (OK, dense woodland). Percentage C3 browse and C4 grass consumption was determined from δ(13)C values of dung samples, using a Bayesian stable-isotope mixing model (SIAR - stable isotope analysis in R). During the wet and early dry season, KN cattle consumed 11 and 19% browse, respectively, and the OK cattle consumed 84% browse. At the end of the dry season, the browse intake of KN cattle increased to 33% while that of OK cattle decreased to 55%. Vegetation structure influenced the graze/browse consumption strongly in both areas. A better understanding of this extraordinary dietary flexibility is imperative as anthropogenically driven habitat change is projected to lead to the extinction of perceived grazing specialists. PMID:23859529

  20. Folding of the RNA Recognition Motif (RRM) Domains of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)-linked Protein TDP-43 Reveals an Intermediate State*

    PubMed Central

    Mackness, Brian C.; Tran, Meme T.; McClain, Shannan P.; Matthews, C. Robert; Zitzewitz, Jill A.

    2014-01-01

    Pathological alteration of TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein-43), a protein involved in various RNA-mediated processes, is a hallmark feature of the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Fragments of TDP-43, composed of the second RNA recognition motif (RRM2) and the disordered C terminus, have been observed in cytoplasmic inclusions in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases, suggesting that conformational changes involving RRM2 together with the disordered C terminus play a role in aggregation and toxicity. The biophysical data collected by CD and fluorescence spectroscopies reveal a three-state equilibrium unfolding model for RRM2, with a partially folded intermediate state that is not observed in RRM1. Strikingly, a portion of RRM2 beginning at position 208, which mimics a cleavage site observed in patient tissues, increases the population of this intermediate state. Mutually stabilizing interactions between the domains in the tethered RRM1 and RRM2 construct reduce the population of the intermediate state and enhance DNA/RNA binding. Despite the high sequence homology of the two domains, a network of large hydrophobic residues in RRM2 provides a possible explanation for the increased stability of RRM2 compared with RRM1. The cluster analysis suggests that the intermediate state may play a functional role by enhancing access to the nuclear export signal contained within its sequence. The intermediate state may also serve as a molecular hazard linking productive folding and function with pathological misfolding and aggregation that may contribute to disease. PMID:24497641

  1. Structure and Mutagenesis of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Stalk Domain Reveals a Four-Helix Bundle and the Role of the Stalk in Fusion Promotion

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sayantan; Welch, Brett D.; Kors, Christopher A.; Yuan, Ping; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2014-10-02

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires the fusion protein (F) and a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], H, or G). The multifunctional HN protein of some paramyxoviruses, besides functioning as the receptor (sialic acid) binding protein (hemagglutinin activity) and the receptor-destroying protein (neuraminidase activity), enhances F activity, presumably by lowering the activation energy required for F to mediate fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Before or upon receptor binding by the HN globular head, F is believed to interact with the HN stalk. Unfortunately, until recently none of the receptor binding protein crystal structures have shown electron density for the stalk domain. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN exists as a noncovalent dimer-of-dimers on the surface of cells, linked by a single disulfide bond in the stalk. Here we present the crystal structure of the PIV5-HN stalk domain at a resolution of 2.65 {angstrom}, revealing a four-helix bundle (4HB) with an upper (N-terminal) straight region and a lower (C-terminal) supercoiled part. The hydrophobic core residues are a mix of an 11-mer repeat and a 3- to 4-heptad repeat. To functionally characterize the role of the HN stalk in F interactions and fusion, we designed mutants along the PIV5-HN stalk that are N-glycosylated to physically disrupt F-HN interactions. By extensive study of receptor binding, neuraminidase activity, oligomerization, and fusion-promoting functions of the mutant proteins, we found a correlation between the position of the N-glycosylation mutants on the stalk structure and their neuraminidase activities as well as their abilities to promote fusion.

  2. The conformationally flexible S9-S10 linker region in the core domain of p53 contains a novel MDM2 binding site whose mutation increases ubiquitination of p53 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Harumi; Burch, Lindsay R; Smith, Amanda J; Dornan, David; Wallace, Maura; Ball, Kathryn L; Hupp, Ted R

    2002-08-01

    Although the N-terminal BOX-I domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53 contains the primary docking site for MDM2, previous studies demonstrated that RNA stabilizes the MDM2.p53 complex using a p53 mutant lacking the BOX-I motif. In vitro assays measuring the specific activity of MDM2 in the ligand-free and RNA-bound state identified a novel MDM2 interaction site in the core domain of p53. As defined using phage-peptide display, the RNA.MDM2 isoform exhibited a notable switch in peptide binding specificity, with enhanced affinity for novel peptide sequences in either p53 or small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-U (snRNP-U) and substantially reduced affinity for the primary p53 binding site in the BOX-I domain. The consensus binding site for the RNA.MDM2 complex within p53 is SGXLLGESXF, which links the S9-S10 beta-sheets flanking the BOX-IV and BOX-V motifs in the core domain and which is a site of reversible conformational flexibility in p53. Mutation of conserved amino acids in the linker at Ser(261) and Leu(264), which bridges the S9-S10 beta-sheets, stimulated p53 activity from reporter templates and increased MDM2-dependent ubiquitination of p53. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved Phe(270) within the S10 beta-sheet resulted in a mutant p53, which binds more stably to RNA.MDM2 complexes in vitro and which is strikingly hyper-ubiquitinated in vivo. Introducing an Ala(19) mutation into the p53(F270A) protein abolished both RNA.MDM2 complex binding and hyper-ubiquitination in vivo, thus indicating that p53(F270A) protein hyper-ubiquitination depends upon MDM2 binding to its primary site in the BOX-I domain. Together, these data identify a novel MDM2 binding interface within the S9-S10 beta-sheet region of p53 that plays a regulatory role in modulating the rate of MDM2-dependent ubiquitination of p53 in cells. PMID:11925449

  3. Mutations in Mtr4 Structural Domains Reveal Their Important Role in Regulating tRNAiMet Turnover in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mtr4p Enzymatic Activities In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Burclaff, Joseph; Anderson, James T.

    2016-01-01

    RNA processing and turnover play important roles in the maturation, metabolism and quality control of a large variety of RNAs thereby contributing to gene expression and cellular health. The TRAMP complex, composed of Air2p, Trf4p and Mtr4p, stimulates nuclear exosome-dependent RNA processing and degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mtr4 protein structure is composed of a helicase core and a novel so-called arch domain, which protrudes from the core. The helicase core contains highly conserved helicase domains RecA-1 and 2, and two structural domains of unclear functions, winged helix domain (WH) and ratchet domain. How the structural domains (arch, WH and ratchet domain) coordinate with the helicase domains and what roles they are playing in regulating Mtr4p helicase activity are unknown. We created a library of Mtr4p structural domain mutants for the first time and screened for those defective in the turnover of TRAMP and exosome substrate, hypomodified tRNAiMet. We found these domains regulate Mtr4p enzymatic activities differently through characterizing the arch domain mutants K700N and P731S, WH mutant K904N, and ratchet domain mutant R1030G. Arch domain mutants greatly reduced Mtr4p RNA binding, which surprisingly did not lead to significant defects on either in vivo tRNAiMet turnover, or in vitro unwinding activities. WH mutant K904N and Ratchet domain mutant R1030G showed decreased tRNAiMet turnover in vivo, as well as reduced RNA binding, ATPase and unwinding activities of Mtr4p in vitro. Particularly, K904 was found to be very important for steady protein levels in vivo. Overall, we conclude that arch domain plays a role in RNA binding but is largely dispensable for Mtr4p enzymatic activities, however the structural domains in the helicase core significantly contribute to Mtr4p ATPase and unwinding activities. PMID:26820724

  4. Mutations in Mtr4 Structural Domains Reveal Their Important Role in Regulating tRNAiMet Turnover in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mtr4p Enzymatic Activities In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Burclaff, Joseph; Anderson, James T

    2016-01-01

    RNA processing and turnover play important roles in the maturation, metabolism and quality control of a large variety of RNAs thereby contributing to gene expression and cellular health. The TRAMP complex, composed of Air2p, Trf4p and Mtr4p, stimulates nuclear exosome-dependent RNA processing and degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mtr4 protein structure is composed of a helicase core and a novel so-called arch domain, which protrudes from the core. The helicase core contains highly conserved helicase domains RecA-1 and 2, and two structural domains of unclear functions, winged helix domain (WH) and ratchet domain. How the structural domains (arch, WH and ratchet domain) coordinate with the helicase domains and what roles they are playing in regulating Mtr4p helicase activity are unknown. We created a library of Mtr4p structural domain mutants for the first time and screened for those defective in the turnover of TRAMP and exosome substrate, hypomodified tRNAiMet. We found these domains regulate Mtr4p enzymatic activities differently through characterizing the arch domain mutants K700N and P731S, WH mutant K904N, and ratchet domain mutant R1030G. Arch domain mutants greatly reduced Mtr4p RNA binding, which surprisingly did not lead to significant defects on either in vivo tRNAiMet turnover, or in vitro unwinding activities. WH mutant K904N and Ratchet domain mutant R1030G showed decreased tRNAiMet turnover in vivo, as well as reduced RNA binding, ATPase and unwinding activities of Mtr4p in vitro. Particularly, K904 was found to be very important for steady protein levels in vivo. Overall, we conclude that arch domain plays a role in RNA binding but is largely dispensable for Mtr4p enzymatic activities, however the structural domains in the helicase core significantly contribute to Mtr4p ATPase and unwinding activities. PMID:26820724

  5. Flexibility in the site of exon junction complex deposition revealed by functional group and RNA secondary structure alterations in the splicing substrate

    PubMed Central

    Mishler, Dennis M.; Christ, Alexander B.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2008-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is critical for mammalian nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and translational regulation, but the mechanism of its stable deposition on mRNA is unknown. To examine requirements for EJC deposition, we created splicing substrates containing either DNA nucleotides or RNA secondary structure in the 5′ exon. Using RNase H protection, toeprinting, and coimmunoprecipitation assays, we found that EJC location shifts upstream when a stretch of DNA or RNA secondary structure appears at the canonical deposition site. These upstream shifts occur prior to exon ligation and are often accompanied by decreases in deposition efficiency. Although the EJC core protein eIF4AIII contacts four ribose 2′OH groups in crystal structures, we demonstrate that three 2′OH groups are sufficient for deposition. Thus, the site of EJC deposition is more flexible than previously appreciated and efficient deposition appears spatially limited. PMID:18952819

  6. Flexibility Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    These brief guidelines for a muscular flexibility program state that the purpose of such a program is to increase the range of motion in order to avoid injuries and eliminate awkwardness in physical activities. A flexibility program is described as an extension of the warm-up period and should be an ongoing, permanent effort to lengthen muscles. A…

  7. Flexible Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Harold S.; Bechard, Joseph E.

    A flexible schedule allows teachers to change group size, group composition, and class length according to the purpose of the lesson. This pamphlet presents various "master" schedules for flexible scheduling: (1) Simple block schedules, (2) back-to-back schedules, (3) interdisciplinary schedules, (4) school-wide block schedules, (5) open-lab…

  8. Conditional Deletion of Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-Containing Protein 2 (Phd2) Gene Reveals Its Essential Role in Chondrocyte Function and Endochondral Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaohong; Xing, Weirong; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Schulte, Jan; Mohan, Subburaman

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic growth plate cartilage requires hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-mediated pathways to maintain chondrocyte survival and differentiation. HIF proteins are tightly regulated by prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (Phd2)-mediated proteosomal degradation. We conditionally disrupted the Phd2 gene in chondrocytes by crossing Phd2 floxed mice with type 2 collagen-α1-Cre transgenic mice and found massive increases (>50%) in the trabecular bone mass of long bones and lumbar vertebra of the Phd2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice caused by significant increases in trabecular number and thickness and reductions in trabecular separation. Cortical thickness and tissue mineral density at the femoral middiaphysis of the cKO mice were also significantly increased. Dynamic histomorphometric analyses revealed increased longitudinal length and osteoid surface per bone surface in the primary spongiosa of the cKO mice, suggesting elevated conversion rate from hypertrophic chondrocytes to mineralized bone matrix as well as increased bone formation in the primary spongiosa. In the secondary spongiosa, bone formation measured by mineralizing surface per bone surface and mineral apposition rate were not changed, but resorption was slightly reduced. Increases in the mRNA levels of SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9, osterix (Osx), type 2 collagen, aggrecan, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, vascular endothelial growth factor, erythropoietin, and glycolytic enzymes in the growth plate of cKO mice were detected by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increased HIF-1α protein level in the hypertrophic chondrocytes of cKO mice. Infection of chondrocytes isolated from Phd2 floxed mice with adenoviral Cre resulted in similar gene expression patterns as observed in the cKO growth plate chondrocytes. Our findings indicate that Phd2 suppresses endochondral bone formation, in part, via HIF-dependent mechanisms in mice. PMID:26562260

  9. Genome-wide identification of BURP domain-containing genes in rice reveals a gene family with diverse structures and responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xipeng; Hou, Xin; Xie, Kabin; Xiong, Lizhong

    2009-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that a gene family encoding proteins containing BURP domains have diverse functions in plants, but systematic characterization of this gene family have not been reported. In this study, 17 BURP family genes (OsBURP01-17) were identified and analyzed in rice (Oryza sativa L.). These genes have diverse exon-intron structures and distinct organization of putative motifs. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of BURP protein sequences from rice and other plant species, the BURP family was classified into seven subfamilies, including two subfamilies (BURP V and BURP VI) with members from rice only and one subfamily (BURP VII) with members from monocotyledons only. Two BURP gene clusters, belonging to BURP V and BURP VI, were located in the duplicated region on chromosome 5 and 6 of rice, respectively. Transcript level analysis of BURP genes of rice in various tissues and organs revealed different tempo-spatial expression patterns, suggesting that these genes may function at different stages of plant growth and development. Interestingly, all the genes of the BURP VII subfamily were predominantly expressed in flower organs. We also investigated the expression patterns of BURP genes of rice under different stress conditions. The results suggested that, except for two genes (OsBURP01 and OsBURP13), all other members were induced by at least one of the stresses including drought, salt, cold, and abscisic acid treatment. Two genes (OsBURP05 and OsBURP16) were responsive to all the stress treatments and most of the OsBURP genes were responsive to salt stress. Promoter sequence analysis revealed an over-abundance of stress-related cis-elements in the stress-responsive genes. The data presented here provide important clues for elucidating the functions of genes of this family. PMID:19363683

  10. Crystal Structures of GII.10 and GII.12 Norovirus Protruding Domains in Complex with Histo-Blood Group Antigens Reveal Details for a Potential Site of Vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Hansman, Grant S.; Biertümpfel, Christian; Georgiev, Ivelin; McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Tongqing; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-10-10

    Noroviruses are the dominant cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide, and interactions with human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are thought to play a critical role in their entry mechanism. Structures of noroviruses from genogroups GI and GII in complex with HBGAs, however, reveal different modes of interaction. To gain insight into norovirus recognition of HBGAs, we determined crystal structures of norovirus protruding domains from two rarely detected GII genotypes, GII.10 and GII.12, alone and in complex with a panel of HBGAs, and analyzed structure-function implications related to conservation of the HBGA binding pocket. The GII.10- and GII.12-apo structures as well as the previously solved GII.4-apo structure resembled each other more closely than the GI.1-derived structure, and all three GII structures showed similar modes of HBGA recognition. The primary GII norovirus-HBGA interaction involved six hydrogen bonds between a terminal {alpha}fucose1-2 of the HBGAs and a dimeric capsid interface, which was composed of elements from two protruding subdomains. Norovirus interactions with other saccharide units of the HBGAs were variable and involved fewer hydrogen bonds. Sequence analysis revealed a site of GII norovirus sequence conservation to reside under the critical {alpha}fucose1-2 and to be one of the few patches of conserved residues on the outer virion-capsid surface. The site was smaller than that involved in full HBGA recognition, a consequence of variable recognition of peripheral saccharides. Despite this evasion tactic, the HBGA site of viral vulnerability may provide a viable target for small molecule- and antibody-mediated neutralization of GII norovirus.

  11. Generalized flexibility-rigidity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc Duy; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) has been developed as a robust, accurate, and efficient method for macromolecular thermal fluctuation analysis and B-factor prediction. The performance of FRI depends on its formulations of rigidity index and flexibility index. In this work, we introduce alternative rigidity and flexibility formulations. The structure of the classic Gaussian surface is utilized to construct a new type of rigidity index, which leads to a new class of rigidity densities with the classic Gaussian surface as a special case. Additionally, we introduce a new type of flexibility index based on the domain indicator property of normalized rigidity density. These generalized FRI (gFRI) methods have been extensively validated by the B-factor predictions of 364 proteins. Significantly outperforming the classic Gaussian network model, gFRI is a new generation of methodologies for accurate, robust, and efficient analysis of protein flexibility and fluctuation. Finally, gFRI based molecular surface generation and flexibility visualization are demonstrated.

  12. Complex Regulation by Apetala2 Domain-Containing Transcription Factors Revealed through Analysis of the Stress-Responsive TdCor410b Promoter from Durum Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Eini, Omid; Yang, Nannan; Pyvovarenko, Tatiana; Pillman, Katherine; Bazanova, Natalia; Tikhomirov, Natalia; Eliby, Serik; Shirley, Neil; Sivasankar, Shoba; Tingey, Scott; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the wheat dehydrin gene Cor410b is induced several fold above its non-stressed levels upon exposure to stresses such as cold, drought and wounding. Deletion analysis of the TdCor410b promoter revealed a single functional C-repeat (CRT) element. Seven transcription factors (TFs) were shown to bind to this CRT element using yeast one-hybrid screens of wheat and barley cDNA libraries, of which only one belonged to the DREB class of TFs. The remaining six encoded ethylene response factors (ERFs) belong to three separate subfamilies. Analysis of binding selectivity of these TFs indicated that all seven could bind to the CRT element (GCCGAC), and that three of the six ERFs could bind both to the CRT element and the ethylene-responsive GCC-box (GCCGCC). The TaERF4 subfamily members specifically bound the CRT element, and did not bind either the GCC-box or DRE element (ACCGAC). Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis identified a single residue Pro42 in the Apetala2 (AP2) domain of TaERF4-like proteins that is conserved in monocotyledonous plants and is responsible for the recognition selectivity of this subfamily. We suggest that both DREB and ERF proteins regulate expression of the Cor410b gene through a single, critical CRT element. Members of the TaERF4 subfamily are specific, positive regulators of Cor410b gene expression. PMID:23527011

  13. The structures of the SNM1A and SNM1B/Apollo nuclease domains reveal a potential basis for their distinct DNA processing activities.

    PubMed

    Allerston, Charles K; Lee, Sook Y; Newman, Joseph A; Schofield, Christopher J; McHugh, Peter J; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-12-15

    The human SNM1A and SNM1B/Apollo proteins are members of an extended family of eukaryotic nuclease containing a motif related to the prokaryotic metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) fold. SNM1A is a key exonuclease during replication-dependent and transcription-coupled interstrand crosslink repair, while SNM1B/Apollo is required for maintaining telomeric overhangs. Here, we report the crystal structures of SNM1A and SNM1B at 2.16 Å. While both proteins contain a typical MBL-β-CASP domain, a region of positive charge surrounds the active site of SNM1A, which is absent in SNM1B and explains the greater apparent processivity of SNM1A. The structures of both proteins also reveal a putative, wide DNA-binding groove. Extensive mutagenesis of this groove, coupled with detailed biochemical analysis, identified residues that did not impact on SNM1A catalytic activity, but drastically reduced its processivity. Moreover, we identified a key role for this groove for efficient digestion past DNA interstrand crosslinks, facilitating the key DNA repair reaction catalysed by SNM1A. Together, the architecture and dimensions of this groove, coupled to the surrounding region of high positive charge, explain the remarkable ability of SNM1A to accommodate and efficiently digest highly distorted DNA substrates, such as those containing DNA lesions. PMID:26582912

  14. The structures of the SNM1A and SNM1B/Apollo nuclease domains reveal a potential basis for their distinct DNA processing activities

    PubMed Central

    Allerston, Charles K.; Lee, Sook Y.; Newman, Joseph A.; Schofield, Christopher J.; McHugh, Peter J.; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    The human SNM1A and SNM1B/Apollo proteins are members of an extended family of eukaryotic nuclease containing a motif related to the prokaryotic metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) fold. SNM1A is a key exonuclease during replication-dependent and transcription-coupled interstrand crosslink repair, while SNM1B/Apollo is required for maintaining telomeric overhangs. Here, we report the crystal structures of SNM1A and SNM1B at 2.16 Å. While both proteins contain a typical MBL-β-CASP domain, a region of positive charge surrounds the active site of SNM1A, which is absent in SNM1B and explains the greater apparent processivity of SNM1A. The structures of both proteins also reveal a putative, wide DNA-binding groove. Extensive mutagenesis of this groove, coupled with detailed biochemical analysis, identified residues that did not impact on SNM1A catalytic activity, but drastically reduced its processivity. Moreover, we identified a key role for this groove for efficient digestion past DNA interstrand crosslinks, facilitating the key DNA repair reaction catalysed by SNM1A. Together, the architecture and dimensions of this groove, coupled to the surrounding region of high positive charge, explain the remarkable ability of SNM1A to accommodate and efficiently digest highly distorted DNA substrates, such as those containing DNA lesions. PMID:26582912

  15. Identification of a human ABCC10 orthologue in Catharanthus roseus reveals a U12-type intron determinant for the N-terminal domain feature.

    PubMed

    El-Guizani, Taissir; Guibert, Clotilde; Triki, Saida; St-Pierre, Benoit; Ducos, Eric

    2014-04-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters are members of a large superfamily of proteins that utilize ATP hydrolysis to translocate a wide range of substrates across biological membranes. In general, members of C subfamily (ABCC) are structurally characterized by an additional (N-terminal) transmembrane domain (TMD0). Phylogenetic analysis of plant ABCCs separates their protein sequences into three distinct clusters: I and II are plant specific whereas cluster III contains both human and plant ABCCs. Screening of the Plant Medicinal Genomics Resource database allowed us to identify 16 ABCCs partial sequences in Catharanthus roseus; two of which belong to the unique CrABCC1 transcript that we identified in cluster III. Genomic organization of CrABCC1 TMD0 coding sequence displays an AT-AC U12-type intron that is conserved in higher plant orthologues. We showed that CrABCC1, like its human orthologue ABCC10, produces alternative transcripts that encode protein sequences with a truncated form of TMD0 without the first transmembrane span (TM1). Subcellular localization of CrABCC1 TMD0 variants using yellow fluorescent protein fusions reveals that the TM1 is required for a correct routing of the TMD0 to the tonoplast. Finally, the specific repartition of CrABCC1 orthologues in some species suggests that this gene was lost several times during evolution and that its physiological function may, rely on a common feature of multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:24840820

  16. Crystal Structure of the Nephila clavipes Major Ampullate Spidroin 1A N-terminal Domain Reveals Plasticity at the Dimer Interface.

    PubMed

    Atkison, James H; Parnham, Stuart; Marcotte, William R; Olsen, Shaun K

    2016-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is a natural polymer harboring unique physical and biochemical properties that make it an ideal biomaterial. Artificial silk production requires an understanding of the in vivo mechanisms spiders use to convert soluble proteins, called spidroins, into insoluble fibers. Controlled dimerization of the spidroin N-terminal domain (NTD) is crucial to this process. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Nephila clavipes major ampullate spidroin NTD dimer. Comparison of our N. clavipes NTD structure with previously determined Euprosthenops australis NTD structures reveals subtle conformational alterations that lead to differences in how the subunits are arranged at the dimer interface. We observe a subset of contacts that are specific to each ortholog, as well as a substantial increase in asymmetry in the interactions observed at the N. clavipes NTD dimer interface. These asymmetric interactions include novel intermolecular salt bridges that provide new insights into the mechanism of NTD dimerization. We also observe a unique intramolecular "handshake" interaction between two conserved acidic residues that our data suggest adds an additional layer of complexity to the pH-sensitive relay mechanism for NTD dimerization. The results of a panel of tryptophan fluorescence dimerization assays probing the importance of these interactions support our structural observations. Based on our findings, we propose that conformational selectivity and plasticity at the NTD dimer interface play a role in the pH-dependent transition of the NTD from monomer to stably associated dimer as the spidroin progresses through the silk extrusion duct. PMID:27445329

  17. Epitope Structure of the Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of Asialoglycoprotein Receptor to a Monoclonal Antibody Revealed by High-Resolution Proteolytic Excision Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanescu, Raluca; Born, Rita; Moise, Adrian; Ernst, Beat; Przybylski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the H1 subunit of the carbohydrate recognition domain (H1CRD) of the asialoglycoprotein receptor is used as an entry site into hepatocytes by hepatitis A and B viruses and Marburg virus. Thus, molecules binding specifically to the CRD might exert inhibition towards these diseases by blocking the virus entry site. We report here the identification of the epitope structure of H1CRD to a monoclonal antibody by proteolytic epitope excision of the immune complex and high-resolution MALDI-FTICR mass spectrometry. As a prerequisite of the epitope determination, the primary structure of the H1CRD antigen was characterised by ESI-FTICR-MS of the intact protein and by LC-MS/MS of tryptic digest mixtures. Molecular mass determination and proteolytic fragments provided the identification of two intramolecular disulfide bridges (seven Cys residues), and a Cys-mercaptoethanol adduct formed by treatment with β-mercaptoethanol during protein extraction. The H1CRD antigen binds to the monoclonal antibody in both native and Cys-alkylated form. For identification of the epitope, the antibody was immobilized on N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose. Epitope excision and epitope extraction with trypsin and FTICR-MS of affinity-bound peptides provided the identification of two specific epitope peptides (5-16) and (17-23) that showed high affinity to the antibody. Affinity studies of the synthetic epitope peptides revealed independent binding of each peptide to the antibody.

  18. Structures of the APC–ARM domain in complexes with discrete Amer1/WTX fragments reveal that it uses a consensus mode to recognize its binding partners

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyi; Akyildiz, Senem; Xiao, Yafei; Gai, Zhongchao; An, Ying; Behrens, Jürgen; Wu, Geng

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor APC employs its conserved armadillo repeat (ARM) domain to recognize many of its binding partners, including Amer1/WTX, which is mutated in Wilms' tumor and bone overgrowth syndrome. The APC–Amer1 complex has important roles in regulating Wnt signaling and cell adhesion. Three sites A1, A2, and A3 of Amer1 have been reported to mediate its interaction with APC-ARM. In this study, crystal structures of APC–ARM in complexes with Amer1-A1, -A2, and -A4, which is newly identified in this work, were determined. Combined with our GST pull-down, yeast two-hybrid, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assay results using mutants of APC and Amer1 interface residues, our structures demonstrate that Amer1-A1, -A2, and -A4, as well as other APC-binding proteins such as Asef and Sam68, all employ a common recognition pattern to associate with APC–ARM. In contrast, Amer1-A3 binds to the C-terminal side of APC–ARM through a bipartite interaction mode. Composite mutations on either APC or Amer1 disrupting all four interfaces abrogated their association in cultured cells and impaired the membrane recruitment of APC by Amer1. Our study thus comprehensively elucidated the recognition mechanism between APC and Amer1, and revealed a consensus recognition sequence employed by various APC–ARM binding partners.

  19. Functional phosphoproteomic analysis reveals cold-shock domain protein A to be a Bcr-Abl effector-regulating proliferation and transformation in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sears, D; Luong, P; Yuan, M; Nteliopoulos, G; Man, Y K S; Melo, J V; Basu, S

    2010-01-01

    One proposed strategy to suppress the proliferation of imatinib-resistant cells in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is to inhibit key proteins downstream of Bcr-Abl. The PI3K/Akt pathway is activated by Bcr-Abl and is specifically required for the growth of CML cells. To identify targets of this pathway, we undertook a proteomic screen and identified several proteins that differentially bind 14-3-3, dependent on Bcr-Abl kinase activity. An siRNA screen of candidates selected by bioinformatics analysis reveals cold-shock domain protein A (CSDA), shown previously to regulate cell cycle progression in epithelial cells, to be a positive regulator of proliferation in a CML cell line. We show that Akt can phosphorylate the serine 134 residue of CSDA but, downstream of Bcr-Abl activity, this modification is mediated through the activation of MEK/p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) signaling. Inhibition of RSK, similarly to treatment with imatinib, blocked proliferation specifically in Bcr-Abl-positive leukemia cell lines, as well as cells from CML patients. Furthermore, these primary CML cells showed an increase in CSDA phosphorylation. Expression of a CSDA phospho-deficient mutant resulted in the decrease of Bcr-Abl-dependent transformation in Rat1 cells. Our results support a model whereby phosphorylation of CSDA downstream of Bcr-Abl enhances proliferation in CML cells to drive leukemogenesis. PMID:21368869

  20. Multiple functional roles of the accessory I-domain of bacteriophage P22 coat protein revealed by NMR structure and cryoEM modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Alessandro A.; Suhanovsky, Margaret M.; Baker, Matthew L.; Fraser, LaTasha C.R.; Jones, Lisa M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.; Chiu, Wah; Alexandrescu, Andrei T.; Teschke, Carolyn M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Some capsid proteins built on the ubiquitous HK97-fold have accessory domains that impart specific functions. Bacteriophage P22 coat protein has a unique inserted I-domain. Two prior I-domain models from sub-nanometer cryoEM reconstructions differed substantially. Therefore, the NMR structure of the I-domain was determined, which also was used to improve cryoEM models of coat protein. The I-domain has an anti-parallel 6-stranded β-barrel fold, previously not observed in HK97-fold accessory domains. The D-loop, which is dynamic both in the isolated I-domain and intact monomeric coat protein, forms stabilizing salt bridges between adjacent capsomers in procapsids. A newly described S-loop is important for capsid size determination, likely through intra-subunit interactions. Ten of eighteen coat protein temperature-sensitive-folding substitutions are in the I-domain, indicating its importance in folding and stability. Several are found on a positively charged face of the β-barrel that anchors the I-domain to a negatively charged surface of the coat protein HK97-core. PMID:24836025

  1. Crystal Structure of the Mp1p Ligand Binding Domain 2 Reveals Its Function as a Fatty Acid-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shuang; Tung, Edward T. K.; Zheng, Wei; Chong, Ken; Xu, Yuanyuan; Dai, Peng; Guo, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Rao, Zihe

    2010-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei is a dimorphic, pathogenic fungus in Southeast Asia that mostly afflicts immunocompromised individuals. As the only dimorphic member of the genus, it goes through a phase transition from a mold to yeast form, which is believed to be a requisite for its pathogenicity. Mp1p, a cell wall antigenic mannoprotein existing widely in yeast, hyphae, and conidia of the fungus, plays a vital role in host immune response during infection. To understand the function of Mp1p, we have determined the x-ray crystal structure of its ligand binding domain 2 (LBD2) to 1.3 Å. The structure reveals a dimer between the two molecules. The dimer interface forms a ligand binding cavity, in which electron density was observed for a palmitic acid molecule interacting with LBD2 indirectly through hydrogen bonding networks via two structural water molecules. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments measured the ligand binding affinity (Kd) of Mp1p at the micromolar level. Mutations of ligand-binding residues, namely S313A and S332A, resulted in a 9-fold suppression of ligand binding affinity. Analytical ultracentrifugation assays demonstrated that both LBD2 and Mp1p are mostly monomeric in vitro, no matter with or without ligand, and our dimeric crystal structure of LBD2 might be the result of crystal packing. Based on the conformation of the ligand-binding pocket in the dimer structure, a model for the closed, monomeric form of LBD2 is proposed. Further structural analysis indicated the biological importance of fatty acid binding of Mp1p for the survival and pathogenicity of the conditional pathogen. PMID:20053994

  2. N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) from oxygenic phototrophs: P(II) signal transduction across domains of life reveals novel insights in NAGK control.

    PubMed

    Beez, Sabine; Fokina, Oleksandra; Herrmann, Christina; Forchhammer, Karl

    2009-06-19

    N-Acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) catalyzes the first committed step in arginine biosynthesis in organisms that perform the cyclic pathway of ornithine synthesis. In eukaryotic and bacterial oxygenic phototrophs, the activity of NAGK is controlled by the P(II) signal transduction protein. Recent X-ray analysis of NAGK-P(II) complexes from a higher plant (Arabidopsis thaliana) and a cyanobacterium (Synechococcus elongatus) revealed that despite several differences, the overall structure of the complex is highly similar. The present study analyzes the functional conservation of P(II)-mediated NAGK regulation in plants and cyanobacteria to distinguish between universal properties and those that are specific for the different phylogenetic lineages. This study shows that plant and cyanobacterial P(II) proteins can mutually regulate the NAGK enzymes across the domains of life, implying a high selective pressure to conserve P(II)-NAGK interaction over more than 1.2 billion years of separate evolution. The non-conserved C-terminus of S. elongatus NAGK was identified as an element, which strongly enhances arginine inhibition and is responsible for most of the differences between S. elongatus and A. thaliana NAGK with respect to arginine sensitivity. Both P(II) proteins relieve arginine inhibition of NAGK, and in both lineages, P(II)-mediated relief from arginine inhibition is antagonized by 2-oxoglutarate. Together, these properties highlight the conserved role of P(II) as a signal integrator of the C/N balance sensed as 2-oxoglutarate to regulate arginine synthesis in oxygenic phototrophs. PMID:19409905

  3. The Crystal Structure of the Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR2E3/PNR Ligand Binding Domain Reveals a Dimeric Auto-Repressed Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. H. Eileen; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Li, Xiaodan; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor (PNR, NR2E3) is a key transcriptional regulator of human photoreceptor differentiation and maintenance. Mutations in the NR2E3-encoding gene cause various retinal degenerations, including Enhanced S-cone syndrome, retinitis pigmentosa, and Goldman-Favre disease. Although physiological ligands have not been identified, it is believed that binding of small molecule agonists, receptor desumoylation, and receptor heterodimerization may switch NR2E3 from a transcriptional repressor to an activator. While these features make NR2E3 a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of retinal diseases, there has been a clear lack of structural information for the receptor. Here, we report the crystal structure of the apo NR2E3 ligand binding domain (LBD) at 2.8 Å resolution. Apo NR2E3 functions as transcriptional repressor in cells and the structure of its LBD is in a dimeric auto-repressed conformation. In this conformation, the putative ligand binding pocket is filled with bulky hydrophobic residues and the activation-function-2 (AF2) helix occupies the canonical cofactor binding site. Mutations designed to disrupt either the AF2/cofactor-binding site interface or the dimer interface compromised the transcriptional repressor activity of this receptor. Together, these results reveal several conserved structural features shared by related orphan nuclear receptors, suggest that most disease-causing mutations affect the receptor’s structural integrity, and allowed us to model a putative active conformation that can accommodate small ligands in its pocket. PMID:24069298

  4. High-resolution crystal structure reveals a HEPN domain at the C-terminal region of S. cerevisiae RNA endonuclease Swt1

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Shuxia Zhou, Ke; Wang, Wenjia; Gao, Zengqiang; Dong, Yuhui; Liu, Quansheng

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 was determined at 2.3 Å. • Structure of the CT domain was identified as HEPN domain superfamily member. • Low-resolution envelope of Swt1 full-length in solution was analyzed by SAXS. • The middle and CT domains gave good fit to SAXS structural model. - Abstract: Swt1 is an RNA endonuclease that plays an important role in quality control of nuclear messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in eukaryotes; however, its structural details remain to be elucidated. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal (CT) domain of Swt1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which shares common characteristics of higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide binding (HEPN) domain superfamily. To study in detail the full-length protein structure, we analyzed the low-resolution architecture of Swt1 in solution using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. Both the CT domain and middle domain exhibited a good fit upon superimposing onto the molecular envelope of Swt1. Our study provides the necessary structural information for detailed analysis of the functional role of Swt1, and its importance in the process of nuclear mRNP surveillance.

  5. SRC Homology 2 Domain Binding Sites in Insulin, IGF-1 and FGF receptor mediated signaling networks reveal an extensive potential interactome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Specific peptide ligand recognition by modular interaction domains is essential for the fidelity of information flow through the signal transduction networks that control cell behavior in response to extrinsic and intrinsic stimuli. Src homology 2 (SH2) domains recognize distinct phosphotyrosine peptide motifs, but the specific sites that are phosphorylated and the complement of available SH2 domains varies considerably in individual cell types. Such differences are the basis for a wide range of available protein interaction microstates from which signaling can evolve in highly divergent ways. This underlying complexity suggests the need to broadly map the signaling potential of systems as a prerequisite for understanding signaling in specific cell types as well as various pathologies that involve signal transduction such as cancer, developmental defects and metabolic disorders. This report describes interactions between SH2 domains and potential binding partners that comprise initial signaling downstream of activated fibroblast growth factor (FGF), insulin (Ins), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptors. A panel of 50 SH2 domains screened against a set of 192 phosphotyrosine peptides defines an extensive potential interactome while demonstrating the selectivity of individual SH2 domains. The interactions described confirm virtually all previously reported associations while describing a large set of potential novel interactions that imply additional complexity in the signaling networks initiated from activated receptors. This study of pTyr ligand binding by SH2 domains provides valuable insight into the selectivity that underpins complex signaling networks that are assembled using modular protein interaction domains. PMID:22974441

  6. High muscle mitochondrial volume and aerobic capacity in a small marsupial (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) reveals flexible links between energy-use levels in mammals.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Terence J; Webster, Koa N; Lee, Enhua; Buttemer, William A

    2013-04-01

    comparably sized placentals, with the reverse applying for larger marsupials. The flexibility of energy output in marsupials provides explanations for this pattern. Overall, our data refute widely held notions of mechanistically closely linked relationships between body mass, BMR, FMR and MMR in mammals generally. PMID:23239895

  7. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of Bacillus cereus Nif3-family protein YqfO reveals a conserved dimetal-binding motif and a regulatory domain

    PubMed Central

    Godsey, Michael H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Vorontsov, Ivan I.; Collart, Frank R.; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2007-01-01

    YqfO of Bacillus cereus is a member of the widespread Nif3 family of proteins, which has been highlighted as an important target for structural genomics. The N- and C-terminal domains are conserved across the family and contain a dimetal-binding motif in a putative active site. YqfO contains an insert in the middle of the protein, present in a minority of bacterial family members. The structure of YqfO was determined at a resolution of 2.2 Å and reveals conservation of the putative active site. It also reveals the previously unknown structure of the insert, which despite extremely limited sequence conservation, bears great similarity to PII, CutA, and a number of other trimeric regulatory proteins. Our results suggest that this domain acts as a signal sensor to regulate the still-unknown catalytic activity of the more-conserved domains. PMID:17586767

  8. Flexible cystoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, T J; Preminger, G M

    1988-08-01

    Flexible fiberoptic technology was first applied to cystoscopy in 1973, with greatly increased usage since 1982. Most procedures formerly performed with rigid cystoscopes can be done using flexible cystoscopes with minimal or no anesthesia. Patient positioning and precystocopy preparation and draping are simplified with the flexible fiberoptic instruments. Complete examination of the urethra and bladder can be performed with a single-lens system and with the patient in a variety of positions. Fiberoptic cystoscopy is limited in patients who are bleeding or have blood clots in their bladders. Withdrawal of irrigant or bladder drainage is cumbersome, and the fiberoptic image is currently not of the same caliber as that of the rigid-lens systems. Fiberoptic cystoscopy has become the procedure of choice for many urologists for ureteral stenting prior to extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy. With the advent of lithotripters that require no anesthesia, this application is likely to broaden. Future applications of flexible cystoscopy may include a flexible videocystoscope for use in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. PMID:3407042

  9. Receiver domains control the active state stoichiometry of Aquifex aeolicus σ54 activator NtrC4, as revealed by electrospray mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Joseph D.; Sterling, Harry J.; Hong, Eunmi; Williams, Evan R.; Wemmer, David E.

    2009-01-01

    A common challenge with studies of proteins in vitro is determining which constructs and conditions are most physiologically relevant. σ54 activators are proteins that undergo regulated assembly to form an active ATPase ring that enables transcription by σ54-polymerase. Previous studies of the AAA+ ATPase domains from σ54 activators have shown that some are heptamers, while others are hexamers. Because the active oligomers assemble from off-state dimers, it was thought that even-numbered oligomers should dominate, and that heptamer formation might occur when individual domains of the activators were studied rather than the intact proteins. Here we present results from electrospray mass spectrometry experiments that characterize the assembly states of intact NtrC4 (a σ54 activator from Aquifex aeolicus, an extreme thermophile) as well as its ATPase domain alone, and regulatory-ATPase and ATPase-DNA binding domain combinations. We show that the full-length and activated regulatory-ATPase proteins form hexamers, whereas the isolated ATPase domain, unactivated regulatory-ATPase and ATPase-DNA binding domain form heptamers. Activation of the N-terminal regulatory domain is the key factor stabilizing the hexamer form of the ATPase, relative to the heptamer. PMID:19699748

  10. The solution structure of the C-terminal domain of NfeD reveals a novel membrane-anchored OB-fold.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yohta; Ohno, Ayako; Morii, Taichi; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Ikuo; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-11-01

    Nodulation formation efficiency D (NfeD) is a member of a class of membrane-anchored ClpP-class proteases. There is a second class of NfeD homologs that lack the ClpP domain. The genes of both NfeD classes usually are part of an operon that also contains a gene for a prokaryotic homolog of stomatin. (Stomatin is a major integral-membrane protein of mammalian erythrocytes.) Such NfeD/stomatin homolog gene pairs are present in more than 290 bacterial and archaeal genomes, and their protein products may be part of the machinery used for quality control of membrane proteins. Herein, we report the structure of the isolated C-terminal domain of PH0471, a Pyrococcus horikoshii NfeD homolog, which lacks the ClpP domain. This C-terminal domain (termed NfeDC) contains a five-strand beta-barrel, which is structurally very similar to the OB-fold (oligosaccharide/oligonucleotide-binding fold) domain. However, there is little sequence similarity between it and previously characterized OB-fold domains. The NfeDC domain lacks the conserved surface residues that are necessary for the binding of an OB-fold domain to DNA/RNA, an ion. Instead, its surface is composed of residues that are uniquely conserved in NfeD homologs and that form the structurally conserved surface turns and beta-bulges. There is also a conserved tryptophan present on the surface. We propose that, in general, NfeDC domains may interact with other spatially proximal membrane proteins and thereby regulate their activities. PMID:18687870

  11. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of tear lipocalin determined in space group P2{sub 1} revealed large structural deviations from the previously solved X-ray structure in space group C2, especially in the loop region and adjoining parts of the β-barrel which give rise to the ligand-binding site. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition by the lipocalin protein family. Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1} with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P2{sub 1} crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family.

  12. Piping Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A NASA computer program aids Hudson Engineering Corporation, Houston, Texas, in the design and construction of huge petrochemical processing plants like the one shown, which is located at Ju'aymah, Saudi Arabia. The pipes handling the flow of chemicals are subject to a variety of stresses, such as weight and variations in pressure and temperature. Hudson Engineering uses a COSMIC piping flexibility analysis computer program to analyze stresses and unsure the necessary strength and flexibility of the pipes. This program helps the company realize substantial savings in reduced engineering time.

  13. High-resolution in situ hybridization analysis on the chromosomal interval 61C7-61C8 of Drosophila melanogaster reveals interbands as open chromatin domains.

    PubMed

    Zielke, Thomas; Glotov, Alexander; Saumweber, Harald

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is organized in contiguous domains that differ in protein binding, histone modifications, transcriptional activity, and in their degree of compaction. Genome-wide comparisons suggest that, overall, the chromatin organization is similar in different cells within an organism. Here, we compare the structure and activity of the 61C7-61C8 interval in polytene and diploid cells of Drosophila. By in situ hybridization on polytene chromosomes combined with high-resolution microscopy, we mapped the boundaries of the 61C7-8 interband and of the 61C7 and C8 band regions, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the 61C7-8 interband is significantly larger than estimated previously. This interband extends over 20 kbp and is in the range of the flanking band domains. It contains several active genes and therefore can be considered as an open chromatin domain. Comparing the 61C7-8 structure of Drosophila S2 cells and polytene salivary gland cells by ChIP for chromatin protein binding and histone modifications, we observe a highly consistent domain structure for the proximal 13 kbp of the domain in both cell types. However, the distal 7 kbp of the open domain differs in protein binding and histone modification between both tissues. The domain contains four protein-coding genes in the proximal part and two noncoding transcripts in the distal part. The differential transcriptional activity of one of the noncoding transcripts correlates with the observed differences in the chromatin structure between both tissues. The significance of our findings for the organization and structure of open chromatin domains will be discussed. PMID:26520107

  14. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna; Miyagi, Masaru; Lodowski, David T.

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity.

  15. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    PubMed Central

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P21 with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P21 crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-­barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-­barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family. PMID:19770509

  16. Synergetic action of domain II and IV underlies persistent current generation in Nav1.3 as revealed by a tarantula toxin.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Zhang, Yunxiao; Xiao, Zhaohua; Hu, Zhaotun; Zhang, Changxin; Huang, Ying; Chen, Bo; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2015-01-01

    The persistent current (INaP) through voltage-gated sodium channels enhances neuronal excitability by causing prolonged depolarization of membranes. Nav1.3 intrinsically generates a small INaP, although the mechanism underlying its generation remains unclear. In this study, the involvement of the four domains of Nav1.3 in INaP generation was investigated using the tarantula toxin α-hexatoxin-MrVII (RTX-VII). RTX-VII activated Nav1.3 and induced a large INaP. A pre-activated state binding model was proposed to explain the kinetics of toxin-channel interaction. Of the four domains of Nav1.3, both domain II and IV might play important roles in the toxin-induced INaP. Domain IV constructed the binding site for RTX-VII, while domain II might not participate in interacting with RTX-VII but could determine the efficacy of RTX-VII. Our results based on the use of RTX-VII as a probe suggest that domain II and IV cooperatively contribute to the generation of INaP in Nav1.3. PMID:25784299

  17. Synergetic Action of Domain II and IV Underlies Persistent Current Generation in Nav1.3 as revealed by a tarantula toxin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Zhang, Yunxiao; xiao, Zhaohua; Hu, Zhaotun; Zhang, Changxin; Huang, Ying; Chen, Bo; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2015-01-01

    The persistent current (INaP) through voltage-gated sodium channels enhances neuronal excitability by causing prolonged depolarization of membranes. Nav1.3 intrinsically generates a small INaP, although the mechanism underlying its generation remains unclear. In this study, the involvement of the four domains of Nav1.3 in INaP generation was investigated using the tarantula toxin α-hexatoxin-MrVII (RTX-VII). RTX-VII activated Nav1.3 and induced a large INaP. A pre-activated state binding model was proposed to explain the kinetics of toxin-channel interaction. Of the four domains of Nav1.3, both domain II and IV might play important roles in the toxin-induced INaP. Domain IV constructed the binding site for RTX-VII, while domain II might not participate in interacting with RTX-VII but could determine the efficacy of RTX-VII. Our results based on the use of RTX-VII as a probe suggest that domain II and IV cooperatively contribute to the generation of INaP in Nav1.3. PMID:25784299

  18. Three-dimensional reconstruction of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel revealed an ellipsoidal structure with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Toshihiko; Mio, Muneyo; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sato, Chikara; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2008-10-31

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a membrane-integral protein that belongs to an ATP-binding cassette superfamily. Mutations in the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis in which salt, water, and protein transports are defective in various tissues. Here we expressed wild-type human CFTR as a FLAG-fused protein in HEK293 cells heterologously and purified it in three steps: anti-FLAG and wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatographies and size exclusion chromatography. The stoichiometry of the protein was analyzed using various biochemical approaches, including chemical cross-linking, blue-native PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and electron microscopy (EM) observation of antibody-decorated CFTR. All these data support a dimeric assembly of CFTR. Using 5,039 automatically selected particles from negatively stained EM images, the three-dimensional structure of CFTR was reconstructed at 2-nm resolution assuming a 2-fold symmetry. CFTR, presumably in a closed state, was shown to be an ellipsoidal particle with dimensions of 120 x 106 x 162 A. It comprises a small dome-shaped extracellular and membrane-spanning domain and a large cytoplasmic domain with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain. EM observation of CFTR.anti-regulatory domain antibody complex confirmed that two regulatory domains are located around the bottom end of the larger oval cytoplasmic domain. PMID:18723516

  19. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Revealed an Ellipsoidal Structure with Orifices beneath the Putative Transmembrane Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Toshihiko; Mio, Muneyo; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sato, Chikara; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2008-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a membrane-integral protein that belongs to an ATP-binding cassette superfamily. Mutations in the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis in which salt, water, and protein transports are defective in various tissues. Here we expressed wild-type human CFTR as a FLAG-fused protein in HEK293 cells heterologously and purified it in three steps: anti-FLAG and wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatographies and size exclusion chromatography. The stoichiometry of the protein was analyzed using various biochemical approaches, including chemical cross-linking, blue-native PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and electron microscopy (EM) observation of antibody-decorated CFTR. All these data support a dimeric assembly of CFTR. Using 5,039 automatically selected particles from negatively stained EM images, the three-dimensional structure of CFTR was reconstructed at 2-nm resolution assuming a 2-fold symmetry. CFTR, presumably in a closed state, was shown to be an ellipsoidal particle with dimensions of 120 × 106 × 162Å. It comprises a small dome-shaped extracellular and membrane-spanning domain and a large cytoplasmic domain with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain. EM observation of CFTR·anti-regulatory domain antibody complex confirmed that two regulatory domains are located around the bottom end of the larger oval cytoplasmic domain. PMID:18723516

  20. CW-EPR studies revealed different motional properties and oligomeric states of the integrin β1a transmembrane domain in detergent micelles or liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu; Wang, Wei; Ling, Shenglong; Liu, Sanling; Xiao, Liang; Xin, Yanlong; Lai, Chaohua; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric membrane proteins that regulate essential processes: cell migration, cell growth, extracellular matrix assembly and tumor metastasis. Each integrin α or β subunit contains a large extracellular domain, a single transmembrane (TM) domain, and a short cytoplasmic tail. The integrin TM domains are important for heterodimeric association and dissociation during the conversion from inactive to active states. Moreover, integrin clustering occurs by homo-oligomeric interactions between the TM helices. Here, the transmembrane and cytoplasmic (TMC) domains of integrin β1a were overexpressed, and the protein was purified in detergent micelles and/or reconstituted in liposomes. To investigate the TM domain conformational properties of integrin β1a, 26 consecutive single cysteine mutants were generated for site-directed spin labeling and continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) mobility and accessibility analyses. The mobility analysis identified two integrin β1a-TM regions with different motional properties in micelles and a non-continuous integrin β1a-TM helix with high immobility in liposomes. The accessibility analysis verified the TM range (Val737-Lys752) of the integrin β1a-TMC in micelles. Further mobility and accessibility comparisons of the integrin β1a-TMC domains in micelles or liposomes identified distinctively different oligomeric states of integrin β1a-TM, namely a monomer embedded in detergent micelles and leucine-zipper-like homo-oligomeric clusters in liposomes. PMID:25597475

  1. Mutation of Walker-A lysine 464 in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator reveals functional interaction between its nucleotide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Powe, Allan C; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2002-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel bears two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) that control its ATP-dependent gating. Exactly how these NBDs control gating is controversial. To address this issue, we examined channels with a Walker-A lysine mutation in NBD1 (K464A) using the patch clamp technique. K464A mutants have an ATP dependence (EC(50) approximate 60 microM) and opening rate at 2.75 mM ATP (approximately 2.1 s(-1)) similar to wild type (EC(50) approximate 97 microM; approximately 2.0 s(-1)). However, K464A's closing rate at 2.75 mM ATP (approximately 3.6 s(-1)) is faster than that of wild type (approximately 2.1 s(-1)), suggesting involvement of NBD1 in nucleotide-dependent closing. Delay of closing in wild type by adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, is markedly diminished in K464A mutants due to reduction in AMP-PNP's apparent on-rate and acceleration of its apparent off-rate (approximately 2- and approximately 10-fold, respectively). Since the delay of closing by AMP-PNP is thought to occur via NBD2, K464A's effect on the NBD2 mutant K1250A was examined. In sharp contrast to K464A, K1250A single mutants exhibit reduced opening (approximately 0.055 s(-1)) and closing (approximately 0.006 s(-1)) rates at millimolar [ATP], suggesting a role for K1250 in both opening and closing. At millimolar [ATP], K464A-K1250A double mutants close approximately 5-fold faster (approximately 0.029 s(-1)) than K1250A but open with a similar rate (approximately 0.059 s(-1)), indicating an effect of K464A on NBD2 function. In summary, our results reveal that both of CFTR's functionally asymmetric NBDs participate in nucleotide-dependent closing, which provides important constraints for NBD-mediated gating models. PMID:11882668

  2. Mutation of Walker-A lysine 464 in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator reveals functional interaction between its nucleotide-binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Powe, Allan C; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2002-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel bears two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) that control its ATP-dependent gating. Exactly how these NBDs control gating is controversial. To address this issue, we examined channels with a Walker-A lysine mutation in NBD1 (K464A) using the patch clamp technique. K464A mutants have an ATP dependence (EC50 ≈ 60 μm) and opening rate at 2.75 mm ATP (∼ 2.1 s−1) similar to wild type (EC50 ≈ 97 μm; ∼ 2.0 s−1). However, K464A's closing rate at 2.75 mm ATP (∼ 3.6 s−1) is faster than that of wild type (∼ 2.1 s−1), suggesting involvement of NBD1 in nucleotide-dependent closing. Delay of closing in wild type by adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, is markedly diminished in K464A mutants due to reduction in AMP-PNP's apparent on-rate and acceleration of its apparent off-rate (∼ 2- and ∼ 10-fold, respectively). Since the delay of closing by AMP-PNP is thought to occur via NBD2, K464A's effect on the NBD2 mutant K1250A was examined. In sharp contrast to K464A, K1250A single mutants exhibit reduced opening (∼ 0.055 s−1) and closing (∼ 0.006 s−1) rates at millimolar [ATP], suggesting a role for K1250 in both opening and closing. At millimolar [ATP], K464A-K1250A double mutants close ∼ 5-fold faster (∼ 0.029 s−1) than K1250A but open with a similar rate (∼ 0.059 s−1), indicating an effect of K464A on NBD2 function. In summary, our results reveal that both of CFTR's functionally asymmetric NBDs participate in nucleotide-dependent closing, which provides important constraints for NBD-mediated gating models. PMID:11882668

  3. Conserved intron positions in FGFR genes reflect the modular structure of FGFR and reveal stepwise addition of domains to an already complex ancestral FGFR.

    PubMed

    Rebscher, Nicole; Deichmann, Christina; Sudhop, Stefanie; Fritzenwanker, Jens Holger; Green, Stephen; Hassel, Monika

    2009-10-01

    We have analyzed the evolution of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase genes throughout a wide range of animal phyla. No evidence for an FGFR gene was found in Porifera, but we tentatively identified an FGFR gene in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The gene encodes a protein with three immunoglobulin-like domains, a single-pass transmembrane, and a split tyrosine kinase domain. By superimposing intron positions of 20 FGFR genes from Placozoa, Cnidaria, Protostomia, and Deuterostomia over the respective protein domain structure, we identified ten ancestral introns and three conserved intron groups. Our analysis shows (1) that the position of ancestral introns correlates to the modular structure of FGFRs, (2) that the acidic domain very likely evolved in the last common ancestor of triploblasts, (3) that splicing of IgIII was enabled by a triploblast-specific insertion, and (4) that IgI is subject to substantial loss or duplication particularly in quickly evolving genomes. Moreover, intron positions in the catalytic domain of FGFRs map to the borders of protein subdomains highly conserved in other serine/threonine kinases. Nevertheless, these introns were introduced in metazoan receptor tyrosine kinases exclusively. Our data support the view that protein evolution dating back to the Cambrian explosion took place in such a short time window that only subtle changes in the domain structure are detectable in extant representatives of animal phyla. We propose that the first multidomain FGFR originated in the last common ancestor of Placozoa, Cnidaria, and Bilateria. Additional domains were introduced mainly in the ancestor of triploblasts and in the Ecdysozoa. PMID:20016912

  4. Spatial and temporal variability of biomarkers and microbial diversity reveal metabolic and community flexibility in Streamer Biofilm Communities in the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Schubotz, F; Meyer-Dombard, D R; Bradley, A S; Fredricks, H F; Hinrichs, K-U; Shock, E L; Summons, R E

    2013-11-01

    Detailed analysis of 16S rRNA and intact polar lipids (IPLs) from streamer biofilm communities (SBCs), collected from geochemically similar hot springs in the Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, shows good agreement and affirm that IPLs can be used as reliable markers for the microbial constituents of SBCs. Uncultured Crenarchaea are prominent in SBS, and their IPLs contain both glycosidic and mixed glyco-phospho head groups with tetraether cores, having 0-4 rings. Archaeal IPL contributions increase with increasing temperature and comprise up to one-fourth of the total IPL inventory at >84 °C. At elevated temperatures, bacterial IPLs contain abundant glycosidic glycerol diether lipids. Diether and diacylglycerol (DAG) lipids with aminopentanetetrol and phosphatidylinositol head groups were identified as lipids diagnostic of Aquificales, while DAG glycolipids and glyco-phospholipids containing N-acetylgycosamine as head group were assigned to members of the Thermales. With decreasing temperature and concomitant changes in water chemistry, IPLs typical of phototrophic bacteria, such as mono-, diglycosyl, and sulfoquinovosyl DAG, which are specific for cyanobacteria, increase in abundance, consistent with genomic data from the same samples. Compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of IPL breakdown products reveals a large isotopic diversity among SBCs in different hot springs. At two of the hot springs, 'Bison Pool' and Flat Cone, lipids derived from Aquificales are enriched in (13) C relative to biomass and approach values close to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (approximately 0‰), consistent with fractionation during autotrophic carbon fixation via the reversed tricarboxylic acid pathway. At a third site, Octopus Spring, the same Aquificales-diagnostic lipids are 10‰ depleted relative to biomass and resemble stable carbon isotope values of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), indicative of heterotrophy. Other bacterial and archaeal lipids show

  5. Structure of a Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 rosetting domain reveals a role for the N-terminal segment in heparin-mediated rosette inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Lewit-Bentley, Anita; Guillotte, Micheline; Gangnard, Stéphane; Hessel, Audrey; Baron, Bruno; Vigan-Womas, Inès; England, Patrick; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Bentley, Graham A.

    2011-01-01

    The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum can cause infected red blood cells (iRBC) to form rosettes with uninfected RBC, a phenotype associated with severe malaria. Rosetting is mediated by a subset of the Plasmodium falciparum membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) variant adhesins expressed on the infected host-cell surface. Heparin and other sulfated oligosaccharides, however, can disrupt rosettes, suggesting that therapeutic approaches to this form of severe malaria are feasible. We present a structural and functional study of the N-terminal domain of PfEMP1 from the VarO variant comprising the N-terminal segment (NTS) and the first DBL domain (DBL1α1), which is directly implicated in rosetting. We demonstrate that NTS-DBL1α1-VarO binds to RBC and that heparin inhibits this interaction in a dose-dependent manner, thus mimicking heparin-mediated rosette disruption. We have determined the crystal structure of NTS-DBL1α1, showing that NTS, previously thought to be a structurally independent component of PfEMP1, forms an integral part of the DBL1α domain. Using mutagenesis and docking studies, we have located the heparin-binding site, which includes NTS. NTS, unique to the DBL α-class domain, is thus an intrinsic structural and functional component of the N-terminal VarO domain. The specific interaction observed with heparin opens the way for developing antirosetting therapeutic strategies. PMID:21402930

  6. A novel RNA-binding mode of the YTH domain reveals the mechanism for recognition of determinant of selective removal by Mmi1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chongyuan; Zhu, Yuwei; Bao, Hongyu; Jiang, Yiyang; Xu, Chao; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2016-01-01

    The YTH domain-containing protein Mmi1, together with other factors, constitutes the machinery used to selectively remove meiosis-specific mRNA during the vegetative growth of fission yeast. Mmi1 directs meiotic mRNAs to the nuclear exosome for degradation by recognizing their DSR (determinant of selective removal) motif. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain in the apo state and in complex with a DSR motif, demonstrating that the Mmi1 YTH domain selectively recognizes the DSR motif. Intriguingly, Mmi1 also contains a potential m6A (N6-methyladenine)-binding pocket, but its binding of the DSR motif is dependent on a long groove opposite the m6A pocket. The DSR-binding mode is distinct from the m6A RNA-binding mode utilized by other YTH domains. Furthermore, the m6A pocket cannot bind m6A RNA. Our structural and biochemical experiments uncover the mechanism of the YTH domain in binding the DSR motif and help to elucidate the function of Mmi1. PMID:26673708

  7. The Ensemble Folding Kinetics of the FBP28 WW Domain Revealed by an All-atom Monte Carlo Simulation in a Knowledge-based Potential

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiabin; Huang, Lei; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we apply a detailed all-atom model with a transferable knowledge-based potential to study the folding kinetics of Formin-Binding protein, FBP28, which is a canonical three-stranded β-sheet WW domain. Replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) simulations starting from random coils find native-like (C α RMSD of 2.68Å) lowest energy structure. We also study the folding kinetics of FBP28 WW domain by performing a large number of ab initio Monte Carlo folding simulations. Using these trajectories, we examine the order of formation of two β –hairpins, the folding mechanism of each individual β– hairpin, and transition state ensemble (TSE) of FBP28 WW domain and compare our results with experimental data and previous computational studies. To obtain detailed structural information on the folding dynamics viewed as an ensemble process, we perform a clustering analysis procedure based on graph theory. Further, a rigorous Pfold analysis is used to obtain representative samples of the TSEs showing good quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated Φ values. Our analysis shows that the turn structure between first and second β strands is a partially stable structural motif that gets formed before entering the TSE in FBP28 WW domain and there exist two major pathways for the folding of FBP28 WW domain, which differ in the order and mechanism of hairpin formation. PMID:21365688

  8. Analysis of multi-domain hypothetical proteins containing iron-sulphur clusters and fad ligands reveal rieske dioxygenase activity suggesting their plausible roles in bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayanan, Nitish; Nagendra, Holenarasipur Gundurao

    2012-01-01

    ‘Conserved hypothetical’ proteins pose a challenge not just for functional genomics, but also to biology in general. As long as there are hundreds of conserved proteins with unknown function in model organisms such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, any discussion towards a ‘complete’ understanding of these biological systems will remain a wishful thinking. Insilico approaches exhibit great promise towards attempts that enable appreciating the plausible roles of these hypothetical proteins. Among the majority of genomic proteins, two-thirds in unicellular organisms and more than 80% in metazoa, are multi-domain proteins, created as a result of gene duplication events. Aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases, also called Rieske dioxygenases (RDOs), are class of multi-domain proteins that catalyze the initial step in microbial aerobic degradation of many aromatic compounds. Investigations here address the computational characterization of hypothetical proteins containing Ferredoxin and Flavodoxin signatures. Consensus sequence of each class of oxidoreductase was obtained by a phylogenetic analysis, involving clustering methods based on evolutionary relationship. A synthetic sequence was developed by combining the consensus, which was used as the basis to search for their homologs via BLAST. The exercise yielded 129 multidomain hypothetical proteins containing both 2Fe-2S (Ferredoxin) and FNR (Flavodoxin) domains. In the current study, 40 proteins with N-terminus 2Fe-2S domain and C-terminus FNR domain are characterized, through homology modelling and docking exercises which suggest dioxygenase activity indicating their plausible roles in degradation of aromatic moieties. PMID:23275712

  9. Structures of the HIN Domain:DNA Complexes Reveal Ligand Binding and Activation Mechanisms of the AIM2 Inflammasome and IFI16 Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tengchuan; Perry, Andrew; Jiang, Jiansheng; Smith, Patrick; Curry, James A.; Unterholzner, Leonie; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Horvath, Gabor; Rathinam, Vijay A.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Hornung, Veit; Latz, Eicke; Bowie, Andrew G.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Xiao, T. Sam

    2012-05-21

    Recognition of DNA by the innate immune system is central to antiviral and antibacterial defenses, as well as an important contributor to autoimmune diseases involving self DNA. AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2) and IFI16 (interferon-inducible protein 16) have been identified as DNA receptors that induce inflammasome formation and interferon production, respectively. Here we present the crystal structures of their HIN domains in complex with double-stranded (ds) DNA. Non-sequence-specific DNA recognition is accomplished through electrostatic attraction between the positively charged HIN domain residues and the dsDNA sugar-phosphate backbone. An intramolecular complex of the AIM2 Pyrin and HIN domains in an autoinhibited state is liberated by DNA binding, which may facilitate the assembly of inflammasomes along the DNA staircase. These findings provide mechanistic insights into dsDNA as the activation trigger and oligomerization platform for the assembly of large innate signaling complexes such as the inflammasomes.

  10. Substitutional Analysis of the C-Terminal Domain of AbrB Revealed Its Essential Role in DNA-Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Svetlana; Dolgova, Olga; Präg, Gregory; Borriss, Rainer; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2014-01-01

    The global transition state regulator AbrB controls more than 100 genes of the Bacillus relatives and is known to interact with varying DNA-sequences. The DNA-binding domain of the AbrB-like proteins was proposed to be located exclusively within the amino-terminal ends. However, the recognition of DNA, and specificity of the binding mechanism, remains elusive still in view of highly differing recognition sites. Here we present a substitutional analysis to examine the role of the carboxy-terminal domain of AbrB from Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Our results demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domains of AbrB affect the DNA-binding properties of the tetrameric AbrB. Most likely, the C-termini are responsible for the cooperative character observed for AbrB interaction with some DNA targets like tycA and phyC. PMID:24832089

  11. Substituted cysteine accessibility reveals a novel transmembrane 2-3 reentrant loop and functional role for transmembrane domain 2 in the human proton-coupled folate transporter.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mike R; Hou, Zhanjun; Matherly, Larry H

    2014-09-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) is a folate-proton symporter highly expressed in solid tumors that can selectively target cytotoxic antifolates to tumors under acidic microenvironment conditions. Predicted topology models for PCFT suggest that the loop domain between transmembrane domains (TMDs) 2 and 3 resides in the cytosol. Mutations involving Asp-109 or Arg-113 in the TMD2-3 loop result in loss of activity. By structural homology to other solute carriers, TMD2 may form part of the PCFT substrate binding domain. In this study we mutated the seven cysteine (Cys) residues of human PCFT to serine, creating Cys-less PCFT. Thirty-three single-Cys mutants spanning TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop in a Cys-less PCFT background were transfected into PCFT-null HeLa cells. All 33 mutants were detected by Western blotting, and 28 were active for [(3)H]methotrexate uptake at pH 5.5. For the active residues, we performed pulldown assays with membrane-impermeable 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin and streptavidin beads to determine their aqueous-accessibilities. Multiple residues in TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop domain reacted with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin, establishing aqueous accessibilities. Pemetrexed pretreatment inhibited biotinylation of TMD2 mutants G93C and F94C, and biotinylation of these residues inhibited methotrexate transport activity. Our results suggest that the TMD 2-3 loop domain is aqueous-accessible and forms a novel reentrant loop structure. Residues in TMD2 form an aqueous transmembrane pathway for folate substrates, and Gly-93 and Phe-94 may contribute to a substrate binding domain. Characterization of PCFT structure is essential to understanding the transport mechanism including the critical determinants of substrate binding. PMID:25053408

  12. Chimeras of sperm PLCζ reveal disparate protein domain functions in the generation of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations in mammalian eggs at fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Theodoridou, Maria; Nomikos, Michail; Parthimos, Dimitris; Gonzalez-Garcia, J. Raul; Elgmati, Khalil; Calver, Brian L.; Sideratou, Zili; Nounesis, George; Swann, Karl; Lai, F. Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLCζ) is a sperm-specific protein believed to cause Ca2+ oscillations and egg activation during mammalian fertilization. PLCζ is very similar to the somatic PLCδ1 isoform but is far more potent in mobilizing Ca2+ in eggs. To investigate how discrete protein domains contribute to Ca2+ release, we assessed the function of a series of PLCζ/PLCδ1 chimeras. We examined their ability to cause Ca2+ oscillations in mouse eggs, enzymatic properties using in vitro phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) hydrolysis and their binding to PIP2 and PI(3)P with a liposome interaction assay. Most chimeras hydrolyzed PIP2 with no major differences in Ca2+ sensitivity and enzyme kinetics. Insertion of a PH domain or replacement of the PLCζ EF hands domain had no deleterious effect on Ca2+ oscillations. In contrast, replacement of either XY-linker or C2 domain of PLCζ completely abolished Ca2+ releasing activity. Notably, chimeras containing the PLCζ XY-linker bound to PIP2-containing liposomes, while chimeras containing the PLCζ C2 domain exhibited PI(3)P binding. Our data suggest that the EF hands are not solely responsible for the nanomolar Ca2+ sensitivity of PLCζ and that membrane PIP2 binding involves the C2 domain and XY-linker of PLCζ. To investigate the relationship between PLC enzymatic properties and Ca2+ oscillations in eggs, we have developed a mathematical model that incorporates Ca2+-dependent InsP3 generation by the PLC chimeras and their levels of intracellular expression. These numerical simulations can for the first time predict the empirical variability in onset and frequency of Ca2+ oscillatory activity associated with specific PLC variants. PMID:24152875

  13. Analysis of combinatorial variability reveals selective accumulation of the fibronectin type III domains B and D of tenascin-C in injured brain.

    PubMed

    Dobbertin, Alexandre; Czvitkovich, Stefan; Theocharidis, Ursula; Garwood, Jeremy; Andrews, Melissa R; Properzi, Francesca; Lin, Rachel; Fawcett, James W; Faissner, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Tenascin-C (Tnc) is a multimodular extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is markedly upregulated in CNS injuries where it is primarily secreted by reactive astrocytes. Different Tnc isoforms can be generated by the insertion of variable combinations of one to seven (in rats) alternatively spliced distinct fibronectin type III (FnIII) domains to the smallest variant. Each spliced FnIII repeat mediates specific actions on neurite outgrowth, neuron migration or adhesion. Hence, different Tnc isoforms might differentially influence CNS repair. We explored the expression pattern of Tnc variants after cortical lesions and after treatment of astrocytes with various cytokines. Using RT-PCR, we observed a strong upregulation of Tnc transcripts containing the spliced FnIII domains B or D in injured tissue at 2-4 days post-lesion (dpl). Looking at specific combinations, we showed a dramatic increase of Tnc isoforms harboring the neurite outgrowth-promoting BD repeat with both the B and D domains being adjacent to each other. Isoforms containing only the axon growth-stimulating spliced domain D were also dramatically enhanced after injury. Injury-induced increase of Tnc proteins comprising the domain D was confirmed by Western Blotting and immunostaining of cortical lesions. In contrast, the FnIII modules C and AD1 were weakly modulated after injury. The growth cone repulsive A1A2A4 domains were poorly expressed in normal and injured tissue but the smallest isoform, which is also repellant, was highly expressed after injury. Expression of the shortest Tnc isoform and of variants containing B, D or BD, was strongly upregulated in cultured astrocytes after TGFbeta1 treatment, suggesting that TGFbeta1 could mediate, at least in part, the injury-induced upregulation of these isoforms. We identified complex injury-induced differential regulations of Tnc isoforms that may well influence axonal regeneration and repair processes in the damaged CNS. PMID:20451518

  14. Molecular dissection of Phaseolus vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein 2 reveals the presence of hold/release domains affecting protein trafficking toward the cell wall

    PubMed Central

    De Caroli, Monica; Lenucci, Marcello S.; Manualdi, Francesca; Dalessandro, Giuseppe; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Piro, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The plant endomembrane system is massively involved in the synthesis, transport and secretion of cell wall polysaccharides and proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying trafficking toward the apoplast are largely unknown. Besides constitutive, the existence of a regulated secretory pathway has been proposed. A polygalacturonase inhibitor protein (PGIP2), known to move as soluble cargo and reach the cell wall through a mechanism distinguishable from default, was dissected in its main functional domains (A, B, C, D), and C sub-fragments (C1–10), to identify signals essential for its regulated targeting. The secretion patterns of the fluorescent chimeras obtained by fusing different PGIP2 domains to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) were analyzed. PGIP2 N-terminal and leucine-rich repeat domains (B and C, respectively) seem to operate as holding/releasing signals, respectively, during PGIP2 transit through the Golgi. The B domain slows down PGIP2 secretion by transiently interacting with Golgi membranes. Its depletion leads, in fact, to the secretion via default (Sp2-susceptible) of the ACD-GFP chimera faster than PGIP2. Depending on its length (at least the first 5 leucine-rich repeats are required), the C domain modulates B interaction with Golgi membranes allowing the release of chimeras and their extracellular secretion through a Sp2 independent pathway. The addition of the vacuolar sorting determinant Chi to PGIP2 diverts the path of the protein from cell wall to vacuole, suggesting that C domain is a releasing rather than a cell wall sorting signal. PMID:26379688

  15. Substituted Cysteine Accessibility Reveals a Novel Transmembrane 2–3 Reentrant Loop and Functional Role for Transmembrane Domain 2 in the Human Proton-coupled Folate Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mike R.; Hou, Zhanjun; Matherly, Larry H.

    2014-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) is a folate-proton symporter highly expressed in solid tumors that can selectively target cytotoxic antifolates to tumors under acidic microenvironment conditions. Predicted topology models for PCFT suggest that the loop domain between transmembrane domains (TMDs) 2 and 3 resides in the cytosol. Mutations involving Asp-109 or Arg-113 in the TMD2-3 loop result in loss of activity. By structural homology to other solute carriers, TMD2 may form part of the PCFT substrate binding domain. In this study we mutated the seven cysteine (Cys) residues of human PCFT to serine, creating Cys-less PCFT. Thirty-three single-Cys mutants spanning TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop in a Cys-less PCFT background were transfected into PCFT-null HeLa cells. All 33 mutants were detected by Western blotting, and 28 were active for [3H]methotrexate uptake at pH 5.5. For the active residues, we performed pulldown assays with membrane-impermeable 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin and streptavidin beads to determine their aqueous-accessibilities. Multiple residues in TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop domain reacted with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin, establishing aqueous accessibilities. Pemetrexed pretreatment inhibited biotinylation of TMD2 mutants G93C and F94C, and biotinylation of these residues inhibited methotrexate transport activity. Our results suggest that the TMD 2–3 loop domain is aqueous-accessible and forms a novel reentrant loop structure. Residues in TMD2 form an aqueous transmembrane pathway for folate substrates, and Gly-93 and Phe-94 may contribute to a substrate binding domain. Characterization of PCFT structure is essential to understanding the transport mechanism including the critical determinants of substrate binding. PMID:25053408

  16. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  17. Structural and Functional Studies of gpX of Escherichia coli Phage P2 Reveal a Widespread Role for LysM Domains in the Baseplates of Contractile-Tailed Phages

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi Hassanabad, Mostafa; Chang, Tom; Pirani, Nawaz; Bona, Diane; Edwards, Aled M.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of bacterial pathogenicity determinants, including the type VI secretion system and the virulence cassettes from Photorhabdus and Serratia, share an evolutionary origin with contractile-tailed myophages. The well-characterized Escherichia coli phage P2 provides an excellent system for studies related to these systems, as its protein composition appears to represent the “minimal” myophage tail. In this study, we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the solution structure of gpX, a 68-residue tail baseplate protein. Although the sequence and structure of gpX are similar to those of LysM domains, which are a large family associated with peptidoglycan binding, we did not detect a peptidoglycan-binding activity for gpX. However, bioinformatic analysis revealed that half of all myophages, including all that possess phage T4-like baseplates, encode a tail protein with a LysM-like domain, emphasizing a widespread role for this domain in baseplate function. While phage P2 gpX comprises only a single LysM domain, many myophages display LysM domain fusions with other tail proteins, such as the DNA circulation protein found in Mu-like phages and gp53 of T4-like phages. Electron microscopy of P2 phage particles with an incorporated gpX-maltose binding protein fusion revealed that gpX is located at the top of the baseplate, near the junction of the baseplate and tail tube. gpW, the orthologue of phage T4 gp25, was also found to localize to this region. A general colocalization of LysM-like domains and gpW homologues in diverse phages is supported by our bioinformatic analysis. PMID:24097944

  18. Crystal structures of the BsPif1 helicase reveal that a major movement of the 2B SH3 domain is required for DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Fei; Dai, Yang-Xue; Duan, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Na-Nv; Shi, Wei; Li, Na; Li, Ming; Dou, Shou-Xing; Dong, Yu-Hui; Rety, Stephane; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2016-04-01

    Pif1 helicases are ubiquitous members of the SF1B family and are essential for maintaining genome stability. It was speculated that Pif1-specific motifs may fold in specific structures, conferring distinct activities upon it. Here, we report the crystal structures of the Pif1 helicase from Bacteroides spp with and without adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analog/ssDNA. BsPif1 shares structural similarities with RecD2 and Dda helicases but has specific features in the 1B and 2B domains. The highly conserved Pif1 family specific sequence motif interacts with and constraints a putative pin-loop in domain 1B in a precise conformation. More importantly, we found that the 2B domain which contains a specific extended hairpin undergoes a significant rotation and/or movement upon ATP and DNA binding, which is absolutely required for DNA unwinding. We therefore propose a mechanism for DNA unwinding in which the 2B domain plays a predominant role. The fact that the conformational change regulates Pif1 activity may provide insight into the puzzling observation that Pif1 becomes highly processive during break-induced replication in association with Polδ, while the isolated Pif1 has low processivity. PMID:26809678

  19. Crystal structures of the BsPif1 helicase reveal that a major movement of the 2B SH3 domain is required for DNA unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Fei; Dai, Yang-Xue; Duan, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Na-Nv; Shi, Wei; Li, Na; Li, Ming; Dou, Shou-Xing; Dong, Yu-Hui; Rety, Stephane; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Pif1 helicases are ubiquitous members of the SF1B family and are essential for maintaining genome stability. It was speculated that Pif1-specific motifs may fold in specific structures, conferring distinct activities upon it. Here, we report the crystal structures of the Pif1 helicase from Bacteroides spp with and without adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analog/ssDNA. BsPif1 shares structural similarities with RecD2 and Dda helicases but has specific features in the 1B and 2B domains. The highly conserved Pif1 family specific sequence motif interacts with and constraints a putative pin-loop in domain 1B in a precise conformation. More importantly, we found that the 2B domain which contains a specific extended hairpin undergoes a significant rotation and/or movement upon ATP and DNA binding, which is absolutely required for DNA unwinding. We therefore propose a mechanism for DNA unwinding in which the 2B domain plays a predominant role. The fact that the conformational change regulates Pif1 activity may provide insight into the puzzling observation that Pif1 becomes highly processive during break-induced replication in association with Polδ, while the isolated Pif1 has low processivity. PMID:26809678

  20. Structure of the Helicase Domain of DNA Polymerase Theta Reveals a Possible Role in the Microhomology-Mediated End-Joining Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Joseph A.; Cooper, Christopher D.O.; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA polymerase theta (Polθ) has been identified as a crucial alternative non-homologous end-joining factor in mammalian cells. Polθ is upregulated in a range of cancer cell types defective in homologous recombination, and knockdown has been shown to inhibit cell survival in a subset of these, making it an attractive target for cancer treatment. We present crystal structures of the helicase domain of human Polθ in the presence and absence of bound nucleotides, and a characterization of its DNA-binding and DNA-stimulated ATPase activities. Comparisons with related helicases from the Hel308 family identify several unique features. Polθ exists as a tetramer both in the crystals and in solution. We propose a model for DNA binding to the Polθ helicase domain in the context of the Polθ tetramer, which suggests a role for the helicase domain in strand annealing of DNA templates for subsequent processing by the polymerase domain. PMID:26636256

  1. The structure of the folded domain from the signature multifunctional protein ICP27 from herpes simplex virus-1 reveals an intertwined dimer

    PubMed Central

    Tunnicliffe, Richard B.; Schacht, Mitchell; Levy, Colin; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses cause life-long infections by evading the host immune system and establishing latent infections. All mammalian herpesviruses express an essential multifunctional protein that is typified by ICP27 encoded by Herpes Simplex Virus 1. The only region that is conserved among the diverse members of the ICP27 family is a predicted globular domain that has been termed the ICP27 homology domain. Here we present the first crystal structure of the ICP27 homology domain, solved to 1.9 Å resolution. The protein is a homo-dimer, adopting a novel intertwined fold with one CHCC zinc-binding site per monomer. The dimerization, which was independently confirmed by SEC-MALS and AUC, is stabilized by an extensive network of intermolecular contacts, and a domain-swap involving the two N-terminal helices and C-terminal tails. Each monomer contains a lid motif that can clamp the C-terminal tail of its dimeric binding partner against its globular core, without forming any distinct secondary structure elements. The binding interface was probed with point mutations, none of which had a noticeable effect on dimer formation; however deletion of the C-terminal tail region prevented dimer formation in vivo. The structure provides a template for future biochemical studies and modelling of ICP27 homologs from other herpesviruses. PMID:26062451

  2. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals possible common ancestors of nucleotide-binding sites domain containing genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementina genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified and re-annotated candidate disease resistance (R) genes with nucleotide-binding sites (NBS) domain from a Citrus clementina genome and two complete Citrus sinensis genome sequences (one from the USA and one from China). We found similar numbers of NBS genes from three citrus genomes, r...

  3. Structures of the PIN domains of SMG6 and SMG5 reveal a nuclease within the mRNA surveillance complex

    PubMed Central

    Glavan, Filip; Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle; Izaurralde, Elisa; Conti, Elena

    2006-01-01

    SMG6 and SMG5 are essential factors in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, a conserved pathway that degrades mRNAs with premature translation termination codons. Both SMG5 and SMG6 have been predicted to contain a C-terminal PIN (PilT N-terminus) domain, present in proteins with ribonuclease activity. We have determined the structures of human SMG5 and SMG6 PIN domains. Although they share a similar overall fold related to ribonucleases of the RNase H family, they have local differences at the putative active site. SMG6 has the canonical triad of acidic residues that are crucial in RNase H for nuclease activity, while SMG5 lacks key catalytic residues. The structural differences are reflected at the functional level. Only the PIN domain of SMG6 has degradation activity on single-stranded RNA in vitro. This difference in catalytic activity is conserved in Drosophila, where an SMG6 with an inactive PIN domain inhibits NMD in a dominant-negative manner. Our findings suggest that the NMD machinery has intrinsic nuclease activity that is likely to contribute to the rapid decay of mRNAs that terminate translation prematurely. PMID:17053788

  4. Mutational analysis of dimeric linkers in peri- and cytoplasmic domains of histidine kinase DctB reveals their functional roles in signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiwei; Yang, Jianguo; Wen, Jin; Yang, Yun; Wei, Xiaolu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-associated histidine kinases (HKs) in two-component systems respond to environmental stimuli by autophosphorylation and phospho-transfer. HK typically contains a periplasmic sensor domain that regulates the cytoplasmic kinase domain through a conserved cytoplasmic linker. How signal is transduced from the ligand-binding site across the membrane barrier remains unclear. Here, we analyse two linker regions of a typical HK, DctB. One region connects the first transmembrane helix with the periplasmic Per-ARNT-Sim domains, while the other one connects the second transmembrane helix with the cytoplasmic kinase domains. We identify a leucine residue in the first linker region to be essential for the signal transduction and for maintaining the delicate balance of the dimeric interface, which is key to its activities. We also show that the other linker, belonging to the S-helix coiled-coil family, plays essential roles in signal transduction inside the cell. Furthermore, by combining mutations with opposing activities in the two regions, we show that these two signalling transduction elements are integrated to produce a combined effect on the final activity of DctB. PMID:24898140

  5. The S40 residue in HIV-1 Gag p6 impacts local and distal budding determinants, revealing additional late domain activities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 budding is directed primarily by two motifs in Gag p6 designated as late domain-1 and −2 that recruit ESCRT machinery by binding Tsg101 and Alix, respectively, and by poorly characterized determinants in the capsid (CA) domain. Here, we report that a conserved Gag p6 residue, S40, impacts budding mediated by all of these determinants. Results Whereas budding normally results in formation of single spherical particles ~100 nm in diameter and containing a characteristic electron-dense conical core, the substitution of Phe for S40, a change that does not alter the amino acids encoded in the overlapping pol reading frame, resulted in defective CA-SP1 cleavage, formation of strings of tethered particles or filopodia-like membrane protrusions containing Gag, and diminished infectious particle formation. The S40F-mediated release defects were exacerbated when the viral-encoded protease (PR) was inactivated or when L domain-1 function was disrupted or when budding was almost completely obliterated by the disruption of both L domain-1 and −2. S40F mutation also resulted in stronger Gag-Alix interaction, as detected by yeast 2-hybrid assay. Reducing Alix binding by mutational disruption of contact residues restored single particle release, implicating the perturbed Gag-Alix interaction in the aberrant budding events. Interestingly, introduction of S40F partially rescued the negative effects on budding of CA NTD mutations EE75,76AA and P99A, which both prevent membrane curvature and therefore block budding at an early stage. Conclusions The results indicate that the S40 residue is a novel determinant of HIV-1 egress that is most likely involved in regulation of a critical assembly event required for budding in the Tsg101-, Alix-, Nedd4- and CA N-terminal domain affected pathways. PMID:24257210

  6. The crystal structure of the mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3019c-Rv3020c ESX complex reveals a domain-swapped heterotetramer

    SciTech Connect

    Arbing, Mark A.; Kaufmann, Markus; Phan, Tung; Chan, Sum; Cascio, Duilio; Eisenberg, David

    2010-11-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes five gene clusters (ESX-1 to ESX-5) for Type VII protein secretion systems that are implicated in mycobacterial pathogenicity. Substrates for the secretion apparatus are encoded within the gene clusters and in additional loci that lack the components of the secretion apparatus. The best characterized substrates are the ESX complexes, 1:1 heterodimers of ESAT-6 and CFP-10, the prototypical member that has been shown to be essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis. We have determined the structure of EsxRS, a homolog of EsxGH of the ESX-3 gene cluster, at 1.91 {angstrom} resolution. The EsxRS structure is composed of two four-helix bundles resulting from the 3D domain swapping of the C-terminal domain of EsxS, the CFP-10 homolog. The four-helix bundles at the extremities of the complex have a similar architecture to the structure of ESAT-6 {center_dot} CFP-10 (EsxAB) of ESX-1, but in EsxRS a hinge loop linking the {alpha}-helical domains of EsxS undergoes a loop-to-helix transition that creates the domain swapped EsxRS tetramer. Based on the atomic structure of EsxRS and existing biochemical data on ESX complexes, we propose that higher order ESX oligomers may increase avidity of ESX binding to host receptor molecules or, alternatively, the conformational change that creates the domain swapped structure may be the basis of ESX complex dissociation that would free ESAT-6 to exert a cytotoxic effect.

  7. Transcriptome analyses reveal protein and domain families that delineate stage-related development in the economically important parasitic nematodes, Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi are among the most important gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle worldwide. The economic losses caused by these parasites are on the order of hundreds of millions of dollars per year. Conventional treatment of these parasites is through anthelmintic drugs; however, as resistance to anthelmintics increases, overall effectiveness has begun decreasing. New methods of control and alternative drug targets are necessary. In-depth analysis of transcriptomic data can help provide these targets. Results The assembly of 8.7 million and 11 million sequences from C. oncophora and O. ostertagi, respectively, resulted in 29,900 and 34,792 transcripts. Among these, 69% and 73% of the predicted peptides encoded by C. oncophora and O. ostertagi had homologues in other nematodes. Approximately 21% and 24% were constitutively expressed in both species, respectively; however, the numbers of transcripts that were stage specific were much smaller (~1% of the transcripts expressed in a stage). Approximately 21% of the transcripts in C. oncophora and 22% in O. ostertagi were up-regulated in a particular stage. Functional molecular signatures were detected for 46% and 35% of the transcripts in C. oncophora and O. ostertagi, respectively. More in-depth examinations of the most prevalent domains led to knowledge of gene expression changes between the free-living (egg, L1, L2 and L3 sheathed) and parasitic (L3 exsheathed, L4, and adult) stages. Domains previously implicated in growth and development such as chromo domains and the MADF domain tended to dominate in the free-living stages. In contrast, domains potentially involved in feeding such as the zinc finger and CAP domains dominated in the parasitic stages. Pathway analyses showed significant associations between life-cycle stages and peptides involved in energy metabolism in O. ostertagi whereas metabolism of cofactors and vitamins were specifically up-regulated in the parasitic

  8. The structure of barley alpha-amylase isozyme 1 reveals a novel role of domain C in substrate recognition and binding: a pair of sugar tongs.

    PubMed

    Robert, Xavier; Haser, Richard; Gottschalk, Tine E; Ratajczak, Fabien; Driguez, Hugues; Svensson, Birte; Aghajari, Nushin

    2003-08-01

    Though the three-dimensional structures of barley alpha-amylase isozymes AMY1 and AMY2 are very similar, they differ remarkably from each other in their affinity for Ca(2+) and when interacting with substrate analogs. A surface site recognizing maltooligosaccharides, not earlier reported for other alpha-amylases and probably associated with the different activity of AMY1 and AMY2 toward starch granules, has been identified. It is located in the C-terminal part of the enzyme and, thus, highlights a potential role of domain C. In order to scrutinize the possible biological significance of this domain in alpha-amylases, a thorough comparison of their three-dimensional structures was conducted. An additional role for an earlier-identified starch granule binding surface site is proposed, and a new calcium ion is reported. PMID:12906828

  9. A novel mode of DNA recognition by a beta-sheet revealed by the solution structure of the GCC-box binding domain in complex with DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, M D; Yamasaki, K; Ohme-Takagi, M; Tateno, M; Suzuki, M

    1998-01-01

    The 3D solution structure of the GCC-box binding domain of a protein from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with its target DNA fragment has been determined by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR in combination with simulated annealing and restrained molecular dynamic calculation. The domain consists of a three-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet and an alpha-helix packed approximately parallel to the beta-sheet. Arginine and tryptophan residues in the beta-sheet are identified to contact eight of the nine consecutive base pairs in the major groove, and at the same time bind to the sugar phosphate backbones. The target DNA bends slightly at the central CG step, thereby allowing the DNA to follow the curvature of the beta-sheet. PMID:9736626

  10. Full-length Gα(q)-phospholipase C-β3 structure reveals interfaces of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Angeline M; Dutta, Somnath; Boguth, Cassandra A; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tesmer, John J G

    2013-03-01

    Phospholipase C-β (PLCβ) is directly activated by Gαq, but the molecular basis for how its distal C-terminal domain (CTD) contributes to maximal activity is poorly understood. Herein we present both the crystal structure and cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstructions of human full-length PLCβ3 in complex with mouse Gαq. The distal CTD forms an extended monomeric helical bundle consisting of three antiparallel segments with structural similarity to membrane-binding bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains. Sequence conservation of the distal CTD suggests putative membrane and protein interaction sites, the latter of which bind the N-terminal helix of Gαq in both the crystal structure and cryo-EM reconstructions. Functional analysis suggests that the distal CTD has roles in membrane targeting and in optimizing the orientation of the catalytic core at the membrane for maximal rates of lipid hydrolysis. PMID:23377541

  11. Full-length Gαq-phospholipase C-β3 structure reveals interfaces of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Angeline M.; Dutta, Somnath; Boguth, Cassandra A.; Skiniotis, Georgios; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2014-08-21

    Phospholipase C-β (PLCβ) is directly activated by Gαq, but the molecular basis for how its distal C-terminal domain (CTD) contributes to maximal activity is poorly understood. Herein we present both the crystal structure and cryo-EM three-dimensional reconstructions of human full-length PLCβ3 in complex with mouse Gαq. The distal CTD forms an extended monomeric helical bundle consisting of three antiparallel segments with structural similarity to membrane-binding bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domains. Sequence conservation of the distal CTD suggests putative membrane and protein interaction sites, the latter of which bind the N-terminal helix of Gαq in both the crystal structure and cryo-EM reconstructions. Functional analysis suggests that the distal CTD has roles in membrane targeting and in optimizing the orientation of the catalytic core at the membrane for maximal rates of lipid hydrolysis.

  12. tRNomics: analysis of tRNA genes from 50 genomes of Eukarya, Archaea, and Bacteria reveals anticodon-sparing strategies and domain-specific features.

    PubMed Central

    Marck, Christian; Grosjean, Henri

    2002-01-01

    From 50 genomes of the three domains of life (7 eukarya, 13 archaea, and 30 bacteria), we extracted, analyzed, and compared over 4,000 sequences corresponding to cytoplasmic, nonorganellar tRNAs. For each genome, the complete set of tRNAs required to read the 61 sense codons was identified, which permitted revelation of three major anticodon-sparing strategies. Other features and sequence peculiarities analyzed are the following: (1) fit to the standard cloverleaf structure, (2) characteristic consensus sequences for elongator and initiator tDNAs, (3) frequencies of bases at each sequence position, (4) type and frequencies of conserved 2D and 3D base pairs, (5) anticodon/tDNA usages and anticodon-sparing strategies, (6) identification of the tRNA-Ile with anticodon CAU reading AUA, (7) size of variable arm, (8) occurrence and location of introns, (9) occurrence of 3'-CCA and 5'-extra G encoded at the tDNA level, and (10) distribution of the tRNA genes in genomes and their mode of transcription. Among all tRNA isoacceptors, we found that initiator tDNA-iMet is the most conserved across the three domains, yet domain-specific signatures exist. Also, according to which tRNA feature is considered (5'-extra G encoded in tDNAs-His, AUA codon read by tRNA-Ile with anticodon CAU, presence of intron, absence of "two-out-of-three" reading mode and short V-arm in tDNA-Tyr) Archaea sequester either with Bacteria or Eukarya. No common features between Eukarya and Bacteria not shared with Archaea could be unveiled. Thus, from the tRNomic point of view, Archaea appears as an "intermediate domain" between Eukarya and Bacteria. PMID:12403461

  13. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli group 4 capsule protein GfcC reveals a domain organization resembling that of Wza.

    PubMed

    Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Mills, Erez; Franzmann, Titus M; Rosenshine, Ilan; Saper, Mark A

    2011-06-21

    We report the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli GfcC, a periplasmic protein encoded by the gfc operon, which is essential for assembly of group 4 polysaccharide capsule (O-antigen capsule). Presumed gene orthologs of gfcC are present in capsule-encoding regions of at least 29 genera of Gram-negative bacteria. GfcC, a member of the DUF1017 family, is comprised of tandem β-grasp (ubiquitin-like) domains (D2 and D3) and a carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix, a domain arrangement reminiscent of that of Wza that forms an exit pore for group 1 capsule export. Unlike the membrane-spanning C-terminal helix from Wza, the GfcC C-terminal helix packs against D3. Previously unobserved in a β-grasp domain structure is a 48-residue helical hairpin insert in D2 that binds to D3, constraining its position and sequestering the carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix. A centrally located and invariant Arg115 not only is essential for proper localization but also forms one of two mostly conserved pockets. Finally, we draw analogies between a GfcC protein fused to an outer membrane β-barrel pore in some species and fusion proteins necessary for secreting biofilm-forming exopolysaccharides. PMID:21449614

  14. A Plasma Survey Using 38 PfEMP1 Domains Reveals Frequent Recognition of the Plasmodium falciparum Antigen VAR2CSA among Young Tanzanian Children

    PubMed Central

    Oleinikov, Andrew V.; Voronkova, Valentina V.; Frye, Isaac Tyler; Amos, Emily; Morrison, Robert; Fried, Michal; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2012-01-01

    PfEMP1 proteins comprise a family of variant antigens that appear on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes and bind to multiple host receptors. Using a mammalian expression system and BioPlex technology, we developed an array of 24 protein constructs representing 38 PfEMP1 domains for high throughput analyses of receptor binding as well as total and functional antibody responses. We analyzed the reactivity of 561 plasma samples from 378 young Tanzanian children followed up to maximum 192 weeks of life in a longitudinal birth cohort. Surprisingly, reactivity to the DBL5 domain of VAR2CSA, a pregnancy malaria vaccine candidate, was most common, and the prevalence of reactivity was stable throughout early childhood. Reactivity to all other PfEMP1 constructs increased with age. Antibodies to the DBL2βC2PF11_0521 domain, measured as plasma reactivity or plasma inhibition of ICAM1 binding, predicted reduced risk of hospitalization for severe or moderately severe malaria. These data suggest a role for VAR2CSA in childhood malaria and implicate DBL2βC2PF11_0521 in protective immunity. PMID:22295123

  15. The crystal structure of human IRE1 luminal domain reveals a conserved dimerization interface required for activation of the unfolded protein response

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jiahai; Liu, Chuan Yin; Back, Sung Hoon; Clark, Robert L.; Peisach, Daniel; Xu, Zhaohui; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2010-03-08

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which all eukaryotic cells adapt to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Inositol-requiring kinase 1 (IRE1) and PKR-related ER kinase (PERK) are two type I transmembrane ER-localized protein kinase receptors that signal the UPR through a process that involves homodimerization and autophosphorylation. To elucidate the molecular basis of the ER transmembrane signaling event, we determined the x-ray crystal structure of the luminal domain of human IRE1{alpha}. The monomer of the luminal domain comprises a unique fold of a triangular assembly of {beta}-sheet clusters. Structural analysis identified an extensive dimerization interface stabilized by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Dimerization creates an MHC-like groove at the interface. However, because this groove is too narrow for peptide binding and the purified luminal domain forms high-affinity dimers in vitro, peptide binding to this groove is not required for dimerization. Consistent with our structural observations, mutations that disrupt the dimerization interface produced IRE1{alpha} molecules that failed to either dimerize or activate the UPR upon ER stress. In addition, mutations in a structurally homologous region within PERK also prevented dimerization. Our structural, biochemical, and functional studies in vivo altogether demonstrate that IRE1 and PERK have conserved a common molecular interface necessary and sufficient for dimerization and UPR signaling.

  16. The Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli Group 4 Capsule Protein GfcC Reveals a Domain Organization Resembling That of Wza

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Mills, Erez; Franzmann, Titus M.; Rosenshine, Ilan; Saper, Mark A.

    2012-03-15

    We report the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli GfcC, a periplasmic protein encoded by the gfc operon, which is essential for assembly of group 4 polysaccharide capsule (O-antigen capsule). Presumed gene orthologs of gfcC are present in capsule-encoding regions of at least 29 genera of Gram-negative bacteria. GfcC, a member of the DUF1017 family, is comprised of tandem {beta}-grasp (ubiquitin-like) domains (D2 and D3) and a carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix, a domain arrangement reminiscent of that of Wza that forms an exit pore for group 1 capsule export. Unlike the membrane-spanning C-terminal helix from Wza, the GfcC C-terminal helix packs against D3. Previously unobserved in a {beta}-grasp domain structure is a 48-residue helical hairpin insert in D2 that binds to D3, constraining its position and sequestering the carboxyl-terminal amphipathic helix. A centrally located and invariant Arg115 not only is essential for proper localization but also forms one of two mostly conserved pockets. Finally, we draw analogies between a GfcC protein fused to an outer membrane {beta}-barrel pore in some species and fusion proteins necessary for secreting biofilm-forming exopolysaccharides.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Human Fatty Acid Synthase Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein-Reductase Domain Complexed with Triclosan Reveals Allosteric Protein-Protein Interface Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Sippel, Katherine H.; Vyas, Nand K.; Zhang, Wei; Sankaran, Banumathi; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2014-01-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a large, multidomain protein that synthesizes long chain fatty acids. Because these fatty acids are primarily provided by diet, FAS is normally expressed at low levels; however, it is highly up-regulated in many cancers. Human enoyl-acyl carrier protein-reductase (hER) is one of the FAS catalytic domains, and its inhibition by drugs like triclosan (TCL) can increase cytotoxicity and decrease drug resistance in cancer cells. We have determined the structure of hER in the presence and absence of TCL. TCL was not bound in the active site, as predicted, but rather at the protein-protein interface (PPI). TCL binding induces a dimer orientation change that causes downstream structural rearrangement in critical active site residues. Kinetics studies indicate that TCL is capable of inhibiting the isolated hER domain with an IC50 of ∼55 μm. Given the hER-TCL structure and the inhibition observed in the hER domain, it seems likely that TCL is observed in the physiologically relevant binding site and that it acts as an allosteric PPI inhibitor. TCL may be a viable scaffold for the development of anti-cancer PPI FAS inhibitors. PMID:25301948

  18. High-definition NMR structure of PED/PEA-15 death effector domain reveals details of key polar side chain interactions.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Edward C; Wei, Yufeng

    2012-07-20

    Death effector domain (DED) proteins constitute a subfamily of the large death domain superfamily that is primarily involved in apoptosis pathways. DED structures have characteristic side chain-side chain interactions among polar residues on the protein surface, forming a network of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. The polar interaction network is functionally important in promoting protein-protein interactions by maintaining optimal side chain orientations. We have refined the solution DED structure of the PED/PEA-15 protein, a representative member of DED subfamily, using traditional NMR restraints with the addition of residual dipolar coupling (RDC) restraints from two independent alignment media, and employed the explicit solvent refinement protocol. The newly refined DED structure of PED/PEA-15 possesses higher structural quality as indicated by WHAT IF Z-scores, with most significant improvement in the backbone conformation normality quality factor. This higher quality DED structure of PED/PEA-15 leads to the identification of a number of key polar side chain interactions, which are not typically observed in NMR protein structures. The elucidation of polar side chain interactions is a key step towards the understanding of protein-protein interactions involving the death domain superfamily. The NMR structures with extensive details of protein structural features are thereby termed high-definition (HD) NMR structures. PMID:22732408

  19. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Results Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Conclusions Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational

  20. Interactions of an Arabidopsis RanBPM homologue with LisH-CTLH domain proteins revealed high conservation of CTLH complexes in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RanBPM (Ran-binding protein in the microtubule-organizing centre) was originally reported as a centrosome-associated protein in human cells. However, RanBPM protein containing highly conserved SPRY, LisH, CTLH and CRA domains is currently considered as a scaffolding protein with multiple cellular functions. A plant homologue of RanBPM has not yet been characterized. Results Based on sequence similarity, we identified a homologue of the human RanBPM in Arabidopsis thaliana. AtRanBPM protein has highly conserved SPRY, LisH, CTLH and CRA domains. Cell fractionation showed that endogenous AtRanBPM or expressed GFP-AtRanBPM are mainly cytoplasmic proteins with only a minor portion detectable in microsomal fractions. AtRanBPM was identified predominantly in the form of soluble cytoplasmic complexes ~230 – 500 kDa in size. Immunopurification of AtRanBPM followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified proteins containing LisH and CRA domains; LisH, CRA, RING-U-box domains and a transducin/WD40 repeats in a complex with AtRanBPM. Homologues of identified proteins are known to be components of the C-terminal to the LisH motif (CTLH) complexes in humans and budding yeast. Microscopic analysis of GFP-AtRanBPM in vivo and immunofluorescence localization of endogenous AtRanBPM protein in cultured cells and seedlings of Arabidopsis showed mainly cytoplasmic and nuclear localization. Absence of colocalization with γ-tubulin was consistent with the biochemical data and suggests another than a centrosomal role of the AtRanBPM protein. Conclusion We showed that as yet uncharacterized Arabidopsis RanBPM protein physically interacts with LisH-CTLH domain-containing proteins. The newly identified high molecular weight cytoplasmic protein complexes of AtRanBPM showed homology with CTLH types of complexes described in mammals and budding yeast. Although the exact functions of the CTLH complexes in scaffolding of protein degradation, in protein interactions and in

  1. The Catalytic Activity of Protein-Disulfide Isomerase Requires a Conformationally Flexible Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, G.; Kober, F; Lewandrowski, U; Sickmann, A; Lennarz, W; Schindelin, H

    2008-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the formation of the correct pattern of disulfide bonds in secretory proteins. A low resolution crystal structure of yeast PDI described here reveals large scale conformational changes compared with the initially reported structure, indicating that PDI is a highly flexible molecule with its catalytic domains, a and a?, representing two mobile arms connected to a more rigid core composed of the b and b? domains. Limited proteolysis revealed that the linker between the a domain and the core is more susceptible to degradation than that connecting the a? domain to the core. By restricting the two arms with inter-domain disulfide bonds, the molecular flexibility of PDI, especially that of its a domain, was demonstrated to be essential for the enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo. The crystal structure also featured a PDI dimer, and a propensity to dimerize in solution and in the ER was confirmed by cross-linking experiments and the split green fluorescent protein system. Although sedimentation studies suggested that the self-association of PDI is weak, we hypothesize that PDI exists as an interconvertible mixture of monomers and dimers in the endoplasmic reticulum due to its high abundance in this compartment.

  2. The joys and perils of flexible fitting.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Niels

    2014-01-01

    While performing their functions, biological macromolecules often form large, dynamically changing macromolecular assemblies. Only a relatively small number of such assemblies have been accessible to the atomic-resolution techniques X-ray crystallography and NMR. Electron microscopy in conjunction with image reconstruction has become the preferred alternative for revealing the structures of such macromolecular complexes. However, for most assemblies the achievable resolution is too low to allow accurate atomic modeling directly from the data. Yet, useful models often can be obtained by fitting atomic models of individual components into a low-resolution reconstruction of the entire assembly. Several algorithms for achieving optimal fits in this context were developed recently, many allowing considerable degrees of flexibility to account for binding-induced conformational changes of the assembly components. This chapter describes the advantages and potential pitfalls of these methods and puts them into perspective with alternative approaches such as iterative modular fitting of rigid-body domains. PMID:24446360

  3. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  4. Analysis of the HD-GYP Domain Cyclic Dimeric GMP Phosphodiesterase Reveals a Role in Motility and the Enzootic Life Cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Syed Z.; Pitzer, Joshua E.; Boquoi, Tristan; Hobbs, Gerry; Miller, Michael R.; Motaleb, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    HD-GYP domain cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) phosphodiesterases are implicated in motility and virulence in bacteria. Borrelia burgdorferi possesses a single set of c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes, including a putative HD-GYP domain protein, BB0374. Recently, we characterized the EAL domain phosphodiesterase PdeA. A mutation in pdeA resulted in cells that were defective in motility and virulence. Here we demonstrate that BB0374/PdeB specifically hydrolyzed c-di-GMP with a Km of 2.9 nM, confirming that it is a functional phosphodiesterase. Furthermore, by measuring phosphodiesterase enzyme activity in extracts from cells containing the pdeA pdeB double mutant, we demonstrate that no additional phosphodiesterases are present in B. burgdorferi. pdeB single mutant cells exhibit significantly increased flexing, indicating a role for c-di-GMP in motility. Constructing and analyzing a pilZ pdeB double mutant suggests that PilZ likely interacts with chemotaxis signaling. While virulence in needle-inoculated C3H/HeN mice did not appear to be altered significantly in pdeB mutant cells, these cells exhibited a reduced ability to survive in Ixodes scapularis ticks. Consequently, those ticks were unable to transmit the infection to naïve mice. All of these phenotypes were restored when the mutant was complemented. Identification of this role of pdeB increases our understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling network in motility regulation and the life cycle of B. burgdorferi. PMID:21670168

  5. Thermal unfolding simulations of NBD1 domain variants reveal structural motifs associated with the impaired folding of F508del-CFTR.

    PubMed

    Estácio, Sílvia G; Martiniano, Hugo F M C; Faísca, Patrícia F N

    2016-08-16

    We employed high-temperature classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the unfolding process of the wild-type (WT) and F508del-NBD1 domains of CFTR protein, with and without second-site mutations. To rationalize the in vitro behavior of F508del-NBD1, namely its lower folding yield and higher aggregation propensity, we focused our analysis of the MD data on the existence of intermediate states with aggregation potential and/or stabilized by a significant number of non-native interactions (i.e. misfolded states). We find that the deletion of phenylalanine 508 is able to forcefully reshape the conformational space of the NBD1 domain to the extent that it uniquely populates intermediate states whose structural traits provide important insights into the molecular events that underlie the impaired folding of F508del-NBD1. In particular, our simulations predict the formation of a misfolded intermediate whose population is highly enhanced by deletion of residue 508. The stabilization of this intermediate is a direct consequence of the enhanced non-native coupling between various key regions of the α-helical subdomain and ATP-binding subdomain; it is singularly characterized by a set of non-native interactions within the ATP-binding subdomain and between that domain and the α-helical subdomain region. The formation of this intermediate is not blocked by second-site suppressor mutations which indicates a limited role of the latter in correcting the rather complex folding process of the CFTR protein missing residue 508. PMID:27354240

  6. Truncation mutagenesis of the non-alpha-helical carboxyterminal tail domain of vimentin reveals contributions to cellular localization but not to filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Rogers, K R; Eckelt, A; Nimmrich, V; Janssen, K P; Schliwa, M; Herrmann, H; Franke, W W

    1995-02-01

    We have investigated the effect of stepwise truncating the carboxyterminal domain ("tail") of the intermediate filament (IF) protein vimentin of the clawed toad, Xenopus laevis, on filament assembly in vitro and, using cell transfection, in vivo and also on the cellular topology of the structures formed. All truncations examined, except the minimal one missing the last 11 amino acids which made the protein more sensitive to changes of ionic strength, did not significantly alter IF assembly in vitro, as judged by electron microscopy, viscometry and determination of viscoelastic properties with a laser-operated torsion pendulum. Stable transfections of vimentin-free mammalian cells with cDNAs encoding these mutations resulted at 28 degrees C, i.e. the permissive temperature for assembly of Xenopus vimentin, in the formation of extended IF bundle arrays. At 37 degrees C, however, the mutants lacking more than the last 35 amino acids could leave the cytoplasm and accumulated in the nucleus, indicating a certain topogenic element is located in the tail and directs cytoplasmic restriction in the wild-type protein although this does not form IFs under these conditions. Transfer to the nucleus is, however, abolished if the IF-consensus motif at the end of the rod domain is removed, suggesting that this part of the molecule also contributes to nuclear location. Similar results were obtained with human vimentin: While the rod entered the nucleus, headless vimentin, unable to form IFs, remained restricted to the cytoplasm owing to its tail domain. In contrast, tailless human vimentin and tailless mouse desmin, which are fully assembly-competent in vitro, both formed extensive IF arrays in the cytoplasm but did not accumulate in the nucleus. We conclude that in class III IF proteins stepwise deletions in the tail, while not considerably altering IF assembly in vitro, can change the topogenesis of IF proteins and structures in the living cell. PMID:7774600

  7. Structural insight and flexible features of NS5 proteins from all four serotypes of Dengue virus in solution.

    PubMed

    Saw, Wuan Geok; Tria, Giancarlo; Grüber, Ardina; Subramanian Manimekalai, Malathy Sony; Zhao, Yongqian; Chandramohan, Arun; Srinivasan Anand, Ganesh; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    Infection by the four serotypes of Dengue virus (DENV-1 to DENV-4) causes an important arthropod-borne viral disease in humans. The multifunctional DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) is essential for capping and replication of the viral RNA and harbours a methyltransferase (MTase) domain and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain. In this study, insights into the overall structure and flexibility of the entire NS5 of all four Dengue virus serotypes in solution are presented for the first time. The solution models derived revealed an arrangement of the full-length NS5 (NS5FL) proteins with the MTase domain positioned at the top of the RdRP domain. The DENV-1 to DENV-4 NS5 forms are elongated and flexible in solution, with DENV-4 NS5 being more compact relative to NS5 from DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-3. Solution studies of the individual MTase and RdRp domains show the compactness of the RdRp domain as well as the contribution of the MTase domain and the ten-residue linker region to the flexibility of the entire NS5. Swapping the ten-residue linker between DENV-4 NS5FL and DENV-3 NS5FL demonstrated its importance in MTase-RdRp communication and in concerted interaction with viral and host proteins, as probed by amide hydrogen/deuterium mass spectrometry. Conformational alterations owing to RNA binding are presented. PMID:26527147

  8. The amino-acid sequence of the glucose/mannose-specific lectin isolated from Parkia platycephala seeds reveals three tandemly arranged jacalin-related domains.

    PubMed

    Mann, K; Farias, C M; Del Sol, F G; Santos, C F; Grangeiro, T B; Nagano, C S; Cavada, B S; Calvete, J J

    2001-08-01

    A mannose/glucose-specific lectin was isolated from seeds of Parkia platycephala, the most primitive subfamily of Leguminosae plants. The molecular mass of the purified lectin determined by mass spectrometry was 47 946 +/- 6 Da (by electrospray ionization) and 47 951 +/- 9 Da (by matrix-assisted laser-desoption ionization). The apparent molecular mass of the lectin in solutions of pH in the range 4.5-8.5 determined by analytical ultracentrifugation equilibrium sedimentation was 94 +/- 3 kDa, showing that the protein behaved as a non-pH-dependent dimer. The amino-acid sequence of the Parkia lectin was determined by Edman degradation of overlapping peptides. This is the first report of the primary structure of a Mimosoideae lectin. The protein contained a blocked N-terminus and a single, nonglycosylated polypeptide chain composed of three tandemly arranged homologous domains. Each of these domains shares sequence similarity with jacalin-related lectin monomers from Asteraceae, Convolvulaceae, Moraceae, Musaceae, Gramineae, and Fagaceae plant families. Based on this homology, we predict that each Parkia lectin repeat may display a beta prism fold similar to that observed in the crystal structure of the lectin from Helianthus tuberosus. The P. platycephala lectin also shows sequence similarity with stress- and pathogen-upregulated defence genes of a number of different plants, suggesting a common ancestry for jacalin-related lectins and inducible defence proteins. PMID:11502201

  9. Structural analysis of a dengue cross-reactive antibody complexed with envelope domain III reveals the molecular basis of cross-reactivity1

    PubMed Central

    Midgley, Claire M.; Flanagan, Aleksandra; Tran, Hai Bac; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Chawansuntati, Kriangkrai; Jumnainsong, Amonrat; Wongwiwat, Wiyada; Duangchinda, Thaneeya; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Screaton, Gavin R.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus infections are still increasing at an alarming rate in tropical and subtropical countries underlying the need for a dengue vaccine. Although it is relatively easy to generate antibody responses to dengue virus, low avidity or low concentrations of antibody may enhance infection of Fc receptor-bearing cells with clinical impact, posing a challenge to vaccine production. In this paper we report the characterization of a monoclonal antibody, 2H12, which is cross-reactive to all four serotypes in the dengue virus group. Crystal structures of 2H12-Fab in complex with domain III of the envelope protein from three dengue serotypes have been determined. 2H12 binds to the highly conserved AB loop of domain III of the envelope protein that is poorly accessible in the mature virion. 2H12 neutralization varied between dengue serotypes and strains; in particular, dengue serotype 2 was not neutralized. As the 2H12 binding epitope was conserved, this variation in neutralization highlights differences between dengue serotypes and suggests that significant conformational changes in the virus must take place for antibody binding. Surprisingly, 2H12 facilitated little or no enhancement of infection. These data provide a structural basis for understanding antibody neutralization and enhancement of infection, which is crucial for the development of future dengue vaccines. PMID:22491255

  10. Structure of the Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A (MHCK-A) α-kinase domain apoenzyme reveals a novel autoinhibited conformation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qilu; Yang, Yidai; van Staalduinen, Laura; Crawley, Scott William; Liu, Linda; Brennan, Stephanie; Côté, Graham P; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    The α-kinases are a family of a typical protein kinases present in organisms ranging from protozoa to mammals. Here we report an autoinhibited conformation for the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase A (MHCK-A) in which nucleotide binding to the catalytic cleft, located at the interface between an N-terminal and C-terminal lobe, is sterically blocked by the side chain of a conserved arginine residue (Arg592). Previous α-kinase structures have shown that an invariant catalytic aspartic acid residue (Asp766) is phosphorylated. Unexpectedly, in the autoinhibited conformation the phosphoryl group is transferred to the adjacent Asp663, creating an interaction network that stabilizes the autoinhibited state. The results suggest that Asp766 phosphorylation may play both catalytic and regulatory roles. The autoinhibited structure also provides the first view of a phosphothreonine residue docked into the phospho-specific allosteric binding site (Pi-pocket) in the C-lobe of the α-kinase domain. PMID:27211275

  11. Structure of the Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A (MHCK-A) α-kinase domain apoenzyme reveals a novel autoinhibited conformation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qilu; Yang, Yidai; van Staalduinen, Laura; Crawley, Scott William; Liu, Linda; Brennan, Stephanie; Côté, Graham P.; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    The α-kinases are a family of a typical protein kinases present in organisms ranging from protozoa to mammals. Here we report an autoinhibited conformation for the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase A (MHCK-A) in which nucleotide binding to the catalytic cleft, located at the interface between an N-terminal and C-terminal lobe, is sterically blocked by the side chain of a conserved arginine residue (Arg592). Previous α-kinase structures have shown that an invariant catalytic aspartic acid residue (Asp766) is phosphorylated. Unexpectedly, in the autoinhibited conformation the phosphoryl group is transferred to the adjacent Asp663, creating an interaction network that stabilizes the autoinhibited state. The results suggest that Asp766 phosphorylation may play both catalytic and regulatory roles. The autoinhibited structure also provides the first view of a phosphothreonine residue docked into the phospho-specific allosteric binding site (Pi-pocket) in the C-lobe of the α-kinase domain. PMID:27211275

  12. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  13. Structural Basis of Functional Diversification of the HD-GYP Domain Revealed by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA4781 Protein, Which Displays an Unselective Bimetallic Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Serena; Paiardini, Alessandro; Stelitano, Valentina; Brunotti, Paolo; Cervoni, Laura; Fernicola, Silvia; Protano, Carmela; Vitali, Matteo; Giardina, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intracellular level of the bacterial secondary messenger cyclic di-3′,5′-GMP (c-di-GMP) is determined by a balance between its biosynthesis and degradation, the latter achieved via dedicated phosphodiesterases (PDEs) bearing a characteristic EAL or HD-GYP domain. We here report the crystal structure of PA4781, one of the three Pseudomonas aeruginosa HD-GYP proteins, which we have previously characterized in vitro. The structure shows a bimetallic active site whose metal binding mode is different from those of both HD-GYP PDEs characterized so far. Purified PA4781 does not contain iron in the active site as for other HD-GYPs, and we show that it binds to a wide range of transition metals with similar affinities. Moreover, the structural features of PA4781 indicate that this is preferentially a pGpG binding protein, as we previously suggested. Our results point out that the structural features of HD-GYPs are more complex than predicted so far and identify the HD-GYP domain as a conserved scaffold which has evolved to preferentially interact with a partner GGDEF but which harbors different functions obtained through diversification of the active site. IMPORTANCE In bacteria, the capability to form biofilms, responsible for increased pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance, is almost universally stimulated by the second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). To design successful strategies for targeting biofilm formation, a detailed characterization of the enzymes involved in c-di-GMP metabolism is crucial. We solved the structure of the HD-GYP domain of PA4781 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, involved in c-di-GMP degradation. This is the third structure of this class of phosphodiesterases to be solved, and with respect to its homologues, it shows significant differences both in the nature and in the binding mode of the coordinated metals, indicating that HD-GYP proteins are able to fine-tune their function, thereby increasing the chances of the microorganism

  14. Structure and conformational dynamics of the domain 5 RNA hairpin of a bacterial group II intron revealed by solution nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pechlaner, Maria; Sigel, Roland K O; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Dolenc, Jožica

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) data obtained for a 35-nucleotide RNA segment of a bacterial group II intron indicate a helical hairpin structure in which three parts, a terminal pentaloop, a bulge, and a G-A mismatch, display no Watson-Crick base pairing. The 668 NOE upper distance bounds for atom pairs are insufficient to uniquely determine the conformation of these segments. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations including time-averaged distance restraints have been used to obtain a conformational ensemble compatible with the observed NMR data. The ensemble shows alternating hydrogen bonding patterns for the mentioned segments. In particular, in the pentaloop and in the bulge, the hydrogen bonding networks correspond to distinct conformational clusters that could not be captured by using conventional single-structure refinement techniques. This implies that, to obtain a realistic picture of the conformational ensemble of such flexible biomolecules, it is necessary to properly account for the conformational variability in the structure refinement of RNA fragments. PMID:24001362

  15. Profiling of the Early Nitrogen Stress Response in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Reveals a Novel Family of RING-Domain Transcription Factors1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Matthijs, Michiel; Fabris, Michele; Broos, Stefan; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms often inhabit highly variable habitats where they are confronted with a wide variety of stresses, frequently including starvation of nutrients such as nitrogen. In this study, the transcriptome of the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was profiled during the onset of nitrogen starvation by RNA sequencing, and overrepresented motifs were determined in promoters of genes that were early and strongly up-regulated during the nitrogen stress response. One of these motifs could be bound by a nitrogen starvation-inducible RING-domain protein termed RING-GAF-Gln-containing protein (RGQ1), which was shown to act as a transcription factor and belongs to a previously uncharacterized family that is conserved in heterokont algae. PMID:26582725

  16. Crystal structure of type I ryanodine receptor amino-terminal beta-trefoil domain reveals a disease-associated mutation "hot spot" loop.

    PubMed

    Amador, Fernando J; Liu, Shuang; Ishiyama, Noboru; Plevin, Michael J; Wilson, Aaron; MacLennan, David H; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2009-07-01

    Muscle contraction and relaxation is regulated by transient elevations of myoplasmic Ca(2+). Ca(2+) is released from stores in the lumen of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) to initiate formation of the Ca(2+) transient by activation of a class of Ca(2+) release channels referred to as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is pumped back into the SER lumen by Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCAs) to terminate the Ca(2+) transient. Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are associated with 2 skeletal muscle disorders, malignant hyperthermia (MH), and central core disease (CCD). The evaluation of proposed mechanisms by which RyR1 mutations cause MH and CCD is hindered by the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal 210 residues of RyR1 (RyR(NTD)) at 2.5 A. The RyR(NTD) structure is similar to that of the suppressor domain of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)Rsup), but lacks most of the long helix-turn-helix segment of the "arm" domain in IP(3)Rsup. The N-terminal beta-trefoil fold, found in both RyR and IP(3)R, is likely to play a critical role in regulatory mechanisms in this channel family. A disease-associated mutation "hot spot" loop was identified between strands 8 and 9 in a highly basic region of RyR1. Biophysical studies showed that 3 MH-associated mutations (C36R, R164C, and R178C) do not adversely affect the global stability or fold of RyR(NTD), supporting previously described mechanisms whereby mutations perturb protein-protein interactions. PMID:19541610

  17. Mutational and Haplotype Analyses of Families with Familial Partial Lipodystrophy (Dunnigan Variety) Reveal Recurrent Missense Mutations in the Globular C-Terminal Domain of Lamin A/C

    PubMed Central

    Speckman, Rebecca A.; Garg, Abhimanyu; Du, Fenghe; Bennett, Lynda; Veile, Rose; Arioglu, Elif; Taylor, Simeon I.; Lovett, Michael; Bowcock, Anne M.

    2000-01-01

    Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), Dunnigan variety, is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by marked loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue from the extremities and trunk but by excess fat deposition in the head and neck. The disease is frequently associated with profound insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. We have localized a gene for FPLD to chromosome 1q21-q23, and it has recently been proposed that nuclear lamin A/C is altered in FPLD, on the basis of a novel missense mutation (R482Q) in five Canadian probands. This gene had previously been shown to be altered in autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD-AD) and in dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction-system disease. We examined 15 families with FPLD for mutations in lamin A/C. Five families harbored the R482Q alteration that segregated with the disease phenotype. Seven families harbored an R482W alteration, and one family harbored a G465D alteration. All these mutations lie within exon 8 of the lamin A/C gene—an exon that has also been shown to harbor different missense mutations that are responsible for EDMD-AD. Mutations could not be detected in lamin A/C in one FPLD family in which there was linkage to chromosome 1q21-q23. One family with atypical FPLD harbored an R582H alteration in exon 11 of lamin A. This exon does not comprise part of the lamin C coding region. All mutations in FPLD affect the globular C-terminal domain of the lamin A/C protein. In contrast, mutations responsible for dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction-system disease are observed in the rod domain of the protein. The FPLD mutations R482Q and R482W occurred on different haplotypes, indicating that they are likely to have arisen more than once. PMID:10739751

  18. Structure of FitAB from Neisseria gonorrhoeae bound to DNA reveals a tetramer of toxin-antitoxin heterodimers containing pin domains and ribbon-helix-helix motifs.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Kirsten; Wilbur, J Scott; So, Magdalene; Brennan, Richard G

    2006-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a sexually transmitted pathogen that initiates infections in humans by adhering to the mucosal epithelium of the urogenital tract. The bacterium then enters the apical region of the cell and traffics across the cell to exit into the subepithelial matrix. Mutations in the fast intracellular trafficking (fitAB) locus cause the bacteria to transit a polarized epithelial monolayer more quickly than the wild-type parent and to replicate within cells at an accelerated rate. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the toxin-antitoxin heterodimer, FitAB, bound to a high affinity 36-bp DNA fragment from the fitAB promoter. FitA, the antitoxin, binds DNA through its ribbon-helix-helix motif and is tethered to FitB, the toxin, to form a heterodimer by the insertion of a four turn alpha-helix into an extensive FitB hydrophobic pocket. FitB is composed of a PIN (PilT N terminus) domain, with a central, twisted, 5-stranded parallel beta-sheet that is open on one side and flanked by five alpha-helices. FitB in the context of the FitAB complex does not display nuclease activity against tested PIN substrates. The FitAB complex points to the mechanism by which antitoxins with RHH motifs can block the activity of toxins with PIN domains. Interactions between two FitB molecules result in the formation of a tetramer of FitAB heterodimers, which binds to the 36-bp DNA fragment and provides an explanation for how FitB enhances the DNA binding affinity of FitA. PMID:16982615

  19. Crystal Structure of USP7 Ubiquitin-like Domains with an ICP0 Peptide Reveals a Novel Mechanism Used by Viral and Cellular Proteins to Target USP7

    PubMed Central

    Capar, Adam; Zheng, Hong; Frappier, Lori; Saridakis, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 immediate-early protein ICP0 activates viral genes during early stages of infection, affects cellular levels of multiple host proteins and is crucial for effective lytic infection. Being a RING-type E3 ligase prone to auto-ubiquitination, ICP0 relies on human deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 for protection against 26S proteasomal mediated degradation. USP7 is involved in apoptosis, epigenetics, cell proliferation and is targeted by several herpesviruses. Several USP7 partners, including ICP0, GMPS, and UHRF1, interact through its C-terminal domain (CTD), which contains five ubiquitin-like (Ubl) structures. Despite the fact that USP7 has emerged as a drug target for cancer therapy, structural details of USP7 regulation and the molecular mechanism of interaction at its CTD have remained elusive. Here, we mapped the binding site between an ICP0 peptide and USP7 and determined the crystal structure of the first three Ubl domains bound to the ICP0 peptide, which showed that ICP0 binds to a loop on Ubl2. Sequences similar to the USP7-binding site in ICP0 were identified in GMPS and UHRF1 and shown to bind USP7-CTD through Ubl2. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation assays in human cells comparing binding to USP7 with and without a Ubl2 mutation, confirmed the importance of the Ubl2 binding pocket for binding ICP0, GMPS and UHRF1. Therefore we have identified a novel mechanism of USP7 recognition that is used by both viral and cellular proteins. Our structural information was used to generate a model of near full-length USP7, showing the relative position of the ICP0/GMPS/UHRF1 binding pocket and the structural basis by which it could regulate enzymatic activity. PMID:26046769

  20. Crystal structure of type I ryanodine receptor amino-terminal [beta]-trefoil domain reveals a disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, Fernando J.; Liu, Shuang; Ishiyama, Noboru; Plevin, Michael J.; Wilson, Aaron; MacLennan, David H.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2009-12-01

    Muscle contraction and relaxation is regulated by transient elevations of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+}. Ca{sup 2+} is released from stores in the lumen of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) to initiate formation of the Ca{sup 2+} transient by activation of a class of Ca{sup 2+} release channels referred to as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is pumped back into the SER lumen by Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases (SERCAs) to terminate the Ca{sup 2+} transient. Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are associated with 2 skeletal muscle disorders, malignant hyperthermia (MH), and central core disease (CCD). The evaluation of proposed mechanisms by which RyR1 mutations cause MH and CCD is hindered by the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal 210 residues of RyR1 (RyR{sub NTD}) at 2.5 {angstrom}. The RyR{sub NTD} structure is similar to that of the suppressor domain of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3Rsup), but lacks most of the long helix-turn-helix segment of the 'arm' domain in IP3Rsup. The N-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold, found in both RyR and IP{sub 3}R, is likely to play a critical role in regulatory mechanisms in this channel family. A disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop was identified between strands 8 and 9 in a highly basic region of RyR1. Biophysical studies showed that 3 MH-associated mutations (C36R, R164C, and R178C) do not adversely affect the global stability or fold of RyRNTD, supporting previously described mechanisms whereby mutations perturb protein-protein interactions.

  1. Genome-wide Analysis Reveals New Roles for the Activation Domains of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Heat Shock Transcription Factor (Hsf1) during the Transient Heat Shock Response*S

    PubMed Central

    Eastmond, Dawn L.; Nelson, Hillary C. M.

    2008-01-01

    In response to elevated temperatures, cells from many organisms rapidly transcribe a number of mRNAs. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this protective response involves two regulatory systems: the heat shock transcription factor (Hsf1) and the Msn2 and Msn4 (Msn2/4) transcription factors. Both systems modulate the induction of specific heat shock genes. However, the contribution of Hsf1, independent of Msn2/4, is only beginning to emerge. To address this question, we constructed an msn2/4 double mutant and used microarrays to elucidate the genome-wide expression program of Hsf1. The data showed that 7.6% of the genome was heat-induced. The up-regulated genes belong to a wide range of functional categories, with a significant increase in the chaperone and metabolism genes. We then focused on the contribution of the activati