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Sample records for reveal in-situ time-resolved

  1. In situ time-resolved FRET reveals effects of sarcomere length on cardiac thin-filament activation.

    PubMed

    Li, King-Lun; Rieck, Daniel; Solaro, R John; Dong, Wenji

    2014-08-01

    During cardiac thin-filament activation, the N-domain of cardiac troponin C (N-cTnC) binds to Ca(2+) and interacts with the actomyosin inhibitory troponin I (cTnI). The interaction between N-cTnC and cTnI stabilizes the Ca(2+)-induced opening of N-cTnC and is presumed to also destabilize cTnI-actin interactions that work together with steric effects of tropomyosin to inhibit force generation. Recently, our in situ steady-state FRET measurements based on N-cTnC opening suggested that at long sarcomere length, strongly bound cross-bridges indirectly stabilize this Ca(2+)-sensitizing N-cTnC-cTnI interaction through structural effects on tropomyosin and cTnI. However, the method previously used was unable to determine whether N-cTnC opening depends on sarcomere length. In this study, we used time-resolved FRET to monitor the effects of cross-bridge state and sarcomere length on the Ca(2+)-dependent conformational behavior of N-cTnC in skinned cardiac muscle fibers. FRET donor (AEDANS) and acceptor (DDPM)-labeled double-cysteine mutant cTnC(T13C/N51C)AEDANS-DDPM was incorporated into skinned muscle fibers to monitor N-cTnC opening. To study the structural effects of sarcomere length on N-cTnC, we monitored N-cTnC opening at relaxing and saturating levels of Ca(2+) and 1.80 and 2.2-μm sarcomere length. Mg(2+)-ADP and orthovanadate were used to examine the structural effects of noncycling strong-binding and weak-binding cross-bridges, respectively. We found that the stabilizing effect of strongly bound cross-bridges on N-cTnC opening (which we interpret as transmitted through related changes in cTnI and tropomyosin) become diminished by decreases in sarcomere length. Additionally, orthovanadate blunted the effect of sarcomere length on N-cTnC conformational behavior such that weak-binding cross-bridges had no effect on N-cTnC opening at any tested [Ca(2+)] or sarcomere length. Based on our findings, we conclude that the observed sarcomere length-dependent positive

  2. In Situ Time-Resolved FRET Reveals Effects of Sarcomere Length on Cardiac Thin-Filament Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, King-Lun; Rieck, Daniel; Solaro, R. John; Dong, Wenji

    2014-01-01

    During cardiac thin-filament activation, the N-domain of cardiac troponin C (N-cTnC) binds to Ca2+ and interacts with the actomyosin inhibitory troponin I (cTnI). The interaction between N-cTnC and cTnI stabilizes the Ca2+-induced opening of N-cTnC and is presumed to also destabilize cTnI–actin interactions that work together with steric effects of tropomyosin to inhibit force generation. Recently, our in situ steady-state FRET measurements based on N-cTnC opening suggested that at long sarcomere length, strongly bound cross-bridges indirectly stabilize this Ca2+-sensitizing N-cTnC–cTnI interaction through structural effects on tropomyosin and cTnI. However, the method previously used was unable to determine whether N-cTnC opening depends on sarcomere length. In this study, we used time-resolved FRET to monitor the effects of cross-bridge state and sarcomere length on the Ca2+-dependent conformational behavior of N-cTnC in skinned cardiac muscle fibers. FRET donor (AEDANS) and acceptor (DDPM)-labeled double-cysteine mutant cTnC(T13C/N51C)AEDANS-DDPM was incorporated into skinned muscle fibers to monitor N-cTnC opening. To study the structural effects of sarcomere length on N-cTnC, we monitored N-cTnC opening at relaxing and saturating levels of Ca2+ and 1.80 and 2.2-μm sarcomere length. Mg2+-ADP and orthovanadate were used to examine the structural effects of noncycling strong-binding and weak-binding cross-bridges, respectively. We found that the stabilizing effect of strongly bound cross-bridges on N-cTnC opening (which we interpret as transmitted through related changes in cTnI and tropomyosin) become diminished by decreases in sarcomere length. Additionally, orthovanadate blunted the effect of sarcomere length on N-cTnC conformational behavior such that weak-binding cross-bridges had no effect on N-cTnC opening at any tested [Ca2+] or sarcomere length. Based on our findings, we conclude that the observed sarcomere length-dependent positive feedback

  3. Time resolved electron microscopy for in situ experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey H. McKeown, Joseph T.; Santala, Melissa K.

    2014-12-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has functioned for decades as a platform for in situ observation of materials and processes with high spatial resolution. Yet, the dynamics often remain elusive, as they unfold too fast to discern at these small spatial scales under traditional imaging conditions. Simply shortening the exposure time in hopes of capturing the action has limitations, as the number of electrons will eventually be reduced to the point where noise overtakes the signal in the image. Pulsed electron sources with high instantaneous current have successfully shortened exposure times (thus increasing the temporal resolution) by about six orders of magnitude over conventional sources while providing the necessary signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic imaging. We describe here the development of this new class of microscope and the principles of its operation, with examples of its application to problems in materials science.

  4. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  5. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology in both research and industrial environments, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid-liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. The observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid-liquid interface in the Al-4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  6. In situ time-resolved measurements of carbon nanotube and nanohorn growth

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, David B; Puretzky, Alexander A; Styers-Barnett, David J; Hu, Hui; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Hongtao; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Jackson, Jeremy Joseph; Wood, Richard F; Pannala, Sreekanth; Wells, Jack C

    2007-01-01

    Growth mechanisms of carbon nanotubes are investigated and compared for both high- and low-temperature synthesis methods through experiments utilizing time-resolved, in situ imaging and spectros-copy. High-speed videography and pyrometry measured the timeframes for growth for single-wall car-bon nanotubes (SWNTs) and nanohorns (SWNHs) by laser vaporization (LV) at 1150 C, revealing that C can self-assemble at high temperatures preferentially into SWNH structures without catalyst assistance at rates comparable to catalyst-assisted SWNT growth by either laser vaporization or chemical vapor depo-sition (CVD). Laser interferometry and videography reveal the coordinated growth of vertically-aligned nanotube arrays (VANTAs) by CVD at 550-900 C.

  7. Kinetic Control of Metal–Organic Framework Crystallization Investigated by Time-Resolved In Situ X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Stavitski E.; Goesten M; Juan-Alcaniz J.; Martinez-Joaristi A.; Serra-Crespo P.; Petukhov A.; Gascon J.; Kapteijn F.

    2011-07-14

    The mechanism behind the multistep synthesis of two metal-organic frameworks sharing the same metal and organic precursors was revealed by in-situ time-resolved small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. Key factors governing the crystal assembly could be established (see picture: C gray, H white, N blue, O red, Al yellow, Cl green), including solvent, temperature, and precursor concentration.

  8. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography.

    PubMed

    Mueller, C; Marx, A; Epp, S W; Zhong, Y; Kuo, A; Balo, A R; Soman, J; Schotte, F; Lemke, H T; Owen, R L; Pai, E F; Pearson, A R; Olson, J S; Anfinrud, P A; Ernst, O P; Dwayne Miller, R J

    2015-09-01

    We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA). The chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs. PMID:26798825

  9. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, C.; Marx, A.; Epp, S. W.; Zhong, Y.; Kuo, A.; Balo, A. R.; Soman, J.; Schotte, F.; Lemke, H. T.; Owen, R. L.; Pai, E. F.; Pearson, A. R.; Olson, J. S.; Anfinrud, P. A.; Ernst, O. P.; Dwayne Miller, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA). The chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs. PMID:26798825

  10. Melting of geomaterials under high-pressure using in-situ time-resolved XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezouar, M.; Dewaele, A.; Loubeyre, P.; Nicolas, G.; Garbarino, G.; Salamat, A.; Petitgirard, S.; Fiquet, G.

    2011-12-01

    Detailed knowledge of the high pressure melting relations is essential for constructing and validating models of materials behavior under extreme conditions for fields ranging from geophysics and planetary sciences to fundamental and applied physics. In the present work, melting and solid-solid phase transitions of several materials have been precisely followed using an original in-situ synchrotron time-resolved x-ray diffraction method. The real-time detection of the x-ray signal scattered by the liquid is used as an objective criterion for melting. The principle and potential of this method will be illustrated in three important cases, i.e. lead, and tantalum melting curves (physics) and the melting of peridotite (geophysics).

  11. Time-resolved in situ Studies of Apatite Formation in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Borkiewicz, O.; Rakovan, J; Cahill, C

    2010-01-01

    Formation of hydroxylapatite through the precipitation and evolution of calcium phosphate precursor phases under varying conditions of temperature (25-90 C), pH (6.5-9.0), and calcium to phosphorus ratio (1.0, 1.33, 1.5, and 1.67) comparable to those found in many sediments and soils were studied. The products of low-temperature precipitation were analyzed by ex situ X-ray diffraction and SEM, as well as time-resolved in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Rietveld refinement was used for quantitative evaluation of relative abundances during phase evolution. The results of ex situ investigations conducted at ambient temperature and near-neutral pH indicate formation of amorphous calcium phosphate, which over the course of experiments transforms to brushite and ultimately hydroxylapatite. The results of in situ X-ray diffraction experiments suggest a more complex pathway of phase development under the same conditions. Some of the initially formed amorphous calcium phosphate and/or crystalline brushite transformed to octacalcium phosphate. In the later stage of the reactions, octacalcium phosphate transforms quite rapidly to hydroxylapatite. This is accompanied or followed by the transformation of the remaining brushite to monetite. Hydroxylapatite and monetite coexist in the sample throughout the remainder of the experiments. In contrast to the near-neutral pH experiments, the results from ex situ and in situ diffraction investigations performed at higher pH yield similar results. The precipitate formed in the initial stages in both types of experiments was identified as amorphous calcium phosphate, which over the course of the reaction quite rapidly transformed to hydroxylapatite without any apparent intermediate phases. This is the first application of time-resolved in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to precipitation reactions in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O system. The results indicate that precursors are likely to occur during the natural or

  12. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mueller, C.; Marx, A.; Epp, S. W.; Zhong, Y.; Kuo, A.; Balo, A. R.; Soman, J.; Schotte, F.; Lemke, H. T.; Owen, R. L.; et al

    2015-08-18

    We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linacmore » Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA). As a result, the chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs.« less

  13. In situ multipurpose time-resolved spectrometer for monitoring nanoparticle generation in a high-pressure fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shaoyu; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2012-07-15

    We developed a multipurpose time-resolved spectrometer for studying the dynamics of nanoparticles generated by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) in a high-pressure fluid. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure optical cell and three spectrometers for in situ measurements. The optical cell was designed for experiments at temperatures up to 400 K and pressures up to 30 MPa with fluctuations within {+-}0.1% h{sup -1}. The three spectrometers were used for the following in situ measurements at high pressures: (i) transient absorption spectrum measurements from 350 to 850 nm to investigate the dynamics of nanoparticle generation from nanoseconds to milliseconds after laser irradiation, (ii) absorption spectrum measurements from 220 to 900 nm to observe the time evolution of nanoparticles from seconds to hours after laser ablation, and (iii) dynamic light scattering measurements to track nanoparticles with sizes from 10 nm to 10 {mu}m in the time range from seconds to hours after laser ablation. By combining these three spectrometers, we demonstrate in situ measurements of gold nanoparticles generated by PLA in supercritical fluids. This is the first report of in situ time-resolved measurements of the dynamics of nanoparticles generated in a supercritical fluid.

  14. In situ, time-resolved normal incidence reflectance spectroscopy of polycrystalline platinum microelectrodes in aqueous electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Fromondi, Iosif; Shi, Ping; Mineshige, Atsushi; Scherson, Daniel A

    2005-01-13

    In situ normal incidence reflectance spectra of polycrystalline Pt microelectrodes have been monitored as a function of the applied potential in aqueous 0.5 M H(2)SO(4) using a He-Ne laser source (633 nm) and a beam splitter/microscope objective arrangement. Data recorded during voltammetric cycles in Ar-purged solutions revealed a linear correlation between the normalized change in reflectance, DeltaR/R = (R(s) - R(ref))/R(ref) (where R(s) and R(ref) are the light intensities measured by the detector at the sampling, s, and reference potentials, ref, respectively), and the extent of oxidation of the Pt surface over a wide coverage range. Reflectance spectra were also collected in CO-saturated 0.5 M H(2)SO(4) during chronocoulometric measurements involving judiciously selected limits for both the potential step and duty cycle parameters. Analysis of these results made it possible to extract contributions to the current derived from oxide formation during oxidation of adsorbed and bulk CO, based strictly on the optical response. PMID:16850980

  15. In Situ Planetary Mineralogy Using Simultaneous Time Resolved Fluorescence and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman , G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is one of the primary methods of mineralogical analysis in the laboratory, and more recently in the field. Because of its versatility and ability to interrogate rocks in their natural form it is one of the front runners for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to explore adverse set of solar system bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, the Moon, and other primitive bodies such as asteroids and the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos), as well as for pre-selection of rock and soil samples for potential cache and return missions.

  16. Time-Resolved Data Acquisition for In Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, Julia Gates; Burger, Dan M.; Burger, Arnold; Evans, Larry G.; Parsons, Ann M.; Starr, Richard D.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2012-01-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface geochemistry of planetary bodies in situ. All previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on a constant neutron source produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  17. Time-resolved Neutron-gamma-ray Data Acquisition for in Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, Julie G.; Burger, Dan Michael; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  18. Time-resolved neutron/gamma-ray data acquisition for in situ subsurface planetary geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnarik, J. G.; Burger, D. M.; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr, R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-04-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  19. In situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction system for time-resolved thin-film growth studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellmer, K.; Mientus, R.; Weiß, V.; Rossner, H.

    2003-03-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) with synchrotron light can be used for in situ-structural analysis during polycrystalline thin-film growth, due to its fast data collection and the fixed diffraction angle. An in situ deposition and analysis set-up for the investigation of nucleation and growth of thin films during magnetron sputtering was constructed and installed at the synchrotron radiation source Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungs Labor (Hamburg). The polychromatic synchrotron beam passes the sputtering chamber through Kapton windows and hits the substrate with the growing film. The diffracted beam, observed under a fixed diffraction angle of between 1° and 10° was energy-analysed by a high-purity germanium detector. The measurement time for a single XRD spectrum can be as short as 10 s for a beam line at a bending magnet, which allows a time-resolved monitoring of film growth. The performance of the in situ EDXRD set-up is demonstrated for the growth of zinc oxide and tin-doped indium oxide films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering from ceramic and metallic targets. From the position and the width of the diffraction lines the internal mechanical strain and the grain size of the growing films can be derived. The prospects for thin-film growth investigations using such an instrument are assessed.

  20. In-SITU, Time-resolved Raman Spectro-micro-topography of an Operating Lithium Ion Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Yu; Cai, Wen-Bin; Xing, Xue-Kun; Scherson, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    A Raman microscope has been coupled to a computer-controlled, two-dimensional linear translator attached to a custom-designed, sealed optical chamber to allow in situ acquisition of space-, and time-resolved spectra of an operating thin graphite/LiCoO2 Li-ion battery. This unique arrangement made it possible to collect continuously series of Raman spectra from a sharply defined edge of the battery exposing the anode (A), separator (S), and cathode (C), during charge and discharge, while the device was moved back and forth under the fixed focused laser beam along an axis normal to the layered A/S/C plane. Clear spectral evidence was obtained for changes in the amount of Li(+) within particles of graphite in the anode, and, to a lesser extent, of LiCoO2 in the cathode, during battery discharge both as a function of position and time. Analysis of time-resolved Raman spectro-micro-topography (SMT) measurements of the type described in this work are expected to open new prospects for assessing the validity of theoretical models aimed at simulating the flow of Li(+) within Li-ion batteries under operating conditions.

  1. Fixed target matrix for femtosecond time-resolved and in situ serial micro-crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Marx, A.; Epp, S. W.; Zhong, Y.; Kuo, A.; Balo, A. R.; Soman, J.; Schotte, F.; Lemke, H. T.; Owen, R. L.; Pai, E. F.; Pearson, A. R.; Olson, J. S.; Anfinrud, P. A.; Ernst, O. P.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-08-18

    We present a crystallography chip enabling in situ room temperature crystallography at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron laser (X-FEL) sources. Compared to other in situ approaches, we observe extremely low background and high diffraction data quality. The chip design is robust and allows fast and efficient loading of thousands of small crystals. The ability to load a large number of protein crystals, at room temperature and with high efficiency, into prescribed positions enables high throughput automated serial crystallography with microfocus synchrotron beamlines. In addition, we demonstrate the application of this chip for femtosecond time-resolved serial crystallography at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Menlo Park, California, USA). As a result, the chip concept enables multiple images to be acquired from each crystal, allowing differential detection of changes in diffraction intensities in order to obtain high signal-to-noise and fully exploit the time resolution capabilities of XFELs.

  2. Time-Resolved Imaging Reveals Heterogeneous Landscapes of Nanomolar Ca(2+) in Neurons and Astroglia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kaiyu; Bard, Lucie; Reynolds, James P; King, Claire; Jensen, Thomas P; Gourine, Alexander V; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2015-10-21

    Maintaining low intracellular calcium is essential to the functioning of brain cells, yet the phenomenology and mechanisms involved remain an enigma. We have advanced a two-photon excitation time-resolved imaging technique, which exploits high sensitivity of the OGB-1 fluorescence lifetime to nanomolar Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) and enables a high data acquisition rate in situ. The [Ca(2+)] readout is not affected by dye concentration, light scattering, photobleaching, micro-viscosity, temperature, or the main known concomitants of cellular activity. In quiescent tissue, standard whole-cell configuration has little effect on resting [Ca(2+)] inside neuronal dendrites or inside astroglia dye-filled via gap junctions. Mapping basal [Ca(2+)] in neurons and astrocytes with submicron resolution unveils heterogeneous concentration landscapes that depend on age and preceding activity. The rich information content represented by such landscapes in acute slices and in vivo promises to unveil the hitherto unexplored, potentially fundamental aspects of brain cell physiology. PMID:26494277

  3. Wall current probe: A non-invasive in situ plasma diagnostic for space and time resolved current density distribution measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Baude, R.; Gaboriau, F.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2013-08-15

    In the context of low temperature plasma research, we propose a wall current probe to determine the local charged particle fluxes flowing to the chamber walls. This non-intrusive planar probe consists of an array of electrode elements which can be individually biased and for which the current can be measured separately. We detail the probe properties and present the ability of the diagnostic to be used as a space and time resolved measurement of the ion and electron current density at the chamber walls. This diagnostic will be relevant to study the electron transport in magnetized low-pressure plasmas.

  4. Laser lithotripsy with the Ho:YAG laser: fragmentation process revealed by time-resolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, Franz R.; Beghuin, Didier; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Venzi, Giordano; Jichlinski, Patrice; Rink, Klaus; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Graber, Peter

    1998-07-01

    Improvements of endoscopic techniques have renewed the interest of urologists in laser lithotripsy in recent years. Laser energy can be easily transmitted through flexible fibers thereby enabling different surgical procedures such as cutting, coagulating and lithotripsy. The Ho:YAG laser offers multiple medical applications in Urology, among them stone fragmentation. However, the present knowledge of its fragmentation mechanism is incomplete. The objective was therefore to analyze the fragmentation process and to discuss the clinical implications related to the underlying fragmentation mechanism. The stone fragmentation process during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy was observed by time resolved flash video imaging. Possible acoustic transient occurrence was simultaneously monitored with a PVDF-needle hydrophone. Fragmentation was performed on artificial and cystine kidney stones in water. We observed that though the fragmentation process is accompanied with the formation of a cavitation bubble, cavitation has only a minimal effect on stone fragmentation. Fragment ejection is mainly due to direct laser stone heating leading to vaporization of organic stone constituents and interstitial water. The minimal effect of the cavitation bubble is confirmed by acoustic transients measurements, which reveal weak pressure transients. Stone fragmentation with the Holmium laser is the result of vaporization of interstitial (stone) water and organic stone constituents. It is not due to the acoustic effects of a cavitation bubble or plasma formation. The fragmentation process is strongly related with heat production thereby harboring the risk of undesired thermal damage. Therefore, a solid comprehension of the fragmentation process is needed when using the different clinically available laser types of lithotripsy.

  5. In Vivo Time-Resolved Microtomography Reveals the Mechanics of the Blowfly Flight Motor

    PubMed Central

    Mokso, Rajmund; Wicklein, Martina; Müller, Tonya; Doube, Michael; Stampanoni, Marco; Krapp, Holger G.; Taylor, Graham K.

    2014-01-01

    Dipteran flies are amongst the smallest and most agile of flying animals. Their wings are driven indirectly by large power muscles, which cause cyclical deformations of the thorax that are amplified through the intricate wing hinge. Asymmetric flight manoeuvres are controlled by 13 pairs of steering muscles acting directly on the wing articulations. Collectively the steering muscles account for <3% of total flight muscle mass, raising the question of how they can modulate the vastly greater output of the power muscles during manoeuvres. Here we present the results of a synchrotron-based study performing micrometre-resolution, time-resolved microtomography on the 145 Hz wingbeat of blowflies. These data represent the first four-dimensional visualizations of an organism's internal movements on sub-millisecond and micrometre scales. This technique allows us to visualize and measure the three-dimensional movements of five of the largest steering muscles, and to place these in the context of the deforming thoracic mechanism that the muscles actuate. Our visualizations show that the steering muscles operate through a diverse range of nonlinear mechanisms, revealing several unexpected features that could not have been identified using any other technique. The tendons of some steering muscles buckle on every wingbeat to accommodate high amplitude movements of the wing hinge. Other steering muscles absorb kinetic energy from an oscillating control linkage, which rotates at low wingbeat amplitude but translates at high wingbeat amplitude. Kinetic energy is distributed differently in these two modes of oscillation, which may play a role in asymmetric power management during flight control. Structural flexibility is known to be important to the aerodynamic efficiency of insect wings, and to the function of their indirect power muscles. We show that it is integral also to the operation of the steering muscles, and so to the functional flexibility of the insect flight motor

  6. Dynamics of confined cavity modes in a phononic crystal slab investigated by in situ time-resolved experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, R.; Boyko, O.; Bonello, B.; Zhao, J.; Belliard, L.; Oudich, M.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-12-01

    The confinement of elastic waves within a single defect in a phononic crystal slab is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The structure is formed by a honeycomb lattice of air holes in a silicon plate with one hole missing in its center. The frequencies and polarizations of the localized modes in the first band gap are computed with a finite element method. A noncontact laser ultrasonic technique is used both to excite flexural Lamb waves and to monitor in situ the displacement field within the cavity. We report on the time evolution of confinement, which is distinct according to the symmetry of the eigenmode.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime heterogeneity in aggregates of LHCII revealed by time-resolved microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Barzda, V; de Grauw, C J; Vroom, J; Kleima, F J; van Grondelle, R; van Amerongen, H; Gerritsen, H C

    2001-01-01

    Two-photon excitation, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy was used to investigate the fluorescence quenching mechanisms in aggregates of light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b pigment protein complexes of photosystem II from green plants (LHCII). Time-gated microscopy images show the presence of large heterogeneity in fluorescence lifetimes not only for different LHCII aggregates, but also within a single aggregate. Thus, the fluorescence decay traces obtained from macroscopic measurements reflect an average over a large distribution of local fluorescence kinetics. This opens the possibility to resolve spatially different structural/functional units in chloroplasts and other heterogeneous photosynthetic systems in vivo, and gives the opportunity to investigate individually the excited states dynamics of each unit. We show that the lifetime distribution is sensitive to the concentration of quenchers contained in the system. Triplets, which are generated at high pulse repetition rates of excitation (>1 MHz), preferentially quench domains with initially shorter fluorescence lifetimes. This proves our previous prediction from singlet-singlet annihilation investigations (Barzda, V., V. Gulbinas, R. Kananavicius, V. Cervinskas, H. van Amerongen, R. van Grondelle, and L. Valkunas. 2001. Biophys. J. 80:2409-2421) that shorter fluorescence lifetimes originate from larger domains in LHCII aggregates. We found that singlet-singlet annihilation has a strong effect in time-resolved fluorescence microscopy of connective systems and has to be taken into consideration. Despite that, clear differences in fluorescence decays can be detected that can also qualitatively be understood. PMID:11423435

  8. Cooperative macromolecular device revealed by meta-analysis of static and time-resolved structures

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhong; Šrajer, Vukica; Knapp, James E.; Royer, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present a meta-analysis of a large collection of static structures of a protein in the Protein Data Bank in order to extract the progression of structural events during protein function. We apply this strategy to the homodimeric hemoglobin HbI from Scapharca inaequivalvis. We derive a simple dynamic model describing how binding of the first ligand in one of the two chemically identical subunits facilitates a second binding event in the other partner subunit. The results of our ultrafast time-resolved crystallographic studies support this model. We demonstrate that HbI functions like a homodimeric mechanical device, such as pliers or scissors. Ligand-induced motion originating in one subunit is transmitted to the other via conserved pivot points, where the E and F′ helices from two partner subunits are “bolted” together to form a stable dimer interface permitting slight relative rotation but preventing sliding. PMID:22171006

  9. Cooperative macromolecular device revealed by meta-analysis of static and time-resolved structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zhong; Šrajer, Vukica; Knapp, James E.; Royer, Jr., William E.

    2013-04-08

    Here we present a meta-analysis of a large collection of static structures of a protein in the Protein Data Bank in order to extract the progression of structural events during protein function. We apply this strategy to the homodimeric hemoglobin HbI from Scapharca inaequivalvis. We derive a simple dynamic model describing how binding of the first ligand in one of the two chemically identical subunits facilitates a second binding event in the other partner subunit. The results of our ultrafast time-resolved crystallographic studies support this model. We demonstrate that HbI functions like a homodimeric mechanical device, such as pliers or scissors. Ligand-induced motion originating in one subunit is transmitted to the other via conserved pivot points, where the E and F' helices from two partner subunits are 'bolted' together to form a stable dimer interface permitting slight relative rotation but preventing sliding.

  10. Revealing the photophysics of gold-nanobeacons via time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guoke; Simionesie, Dorin; Sefcik, Jan; Sutter, Jens U; Xue, Qingjiang; Yu, Jun; Wang, Jinliang; Birch, David J S; Chen, Yu

    2015-12-15

    We demonstrate that time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the conformation states of hairpin DNA on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and energy transfer processes in Au-nanobeacons. Long-range fluorescence quenching of Cy5 by AuNPs has been found to be in good agreement with electrodynamics modeling. Moreover, time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) is shown to be promising for real-time monitoring of the hybridization kinetics of Au-nanobeacons, with up to 60% increase in decay time component and 300% increase in component fluorescence fraction observed. Our results also indicate the importance of the stem and spacer designs for the performance of Au-nanobeacons. PMID:26670500

  11. Isothermal nucleation and growth kinetics of Pd/Ag alloy phase via in-situ time-resolved high-temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ayturk, Mahmut Engin; Payzant, E Andrew; Speakman, Scott A; Ma, Yi Hua

    2008-01-01

    Among several different approaches to form Pd/Ag alloys for hydrogen separation applications, ex-situ studies carried by conventional X-ray point scanning detectors might fail to reveal the key aspects of the phase transformation between Pd and Ag metals. In this respect, in-situ time-resolved high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) was employed to study the Pd/Ag alloy phase nucleation and growth kinetics. By the use of linear position sensitive detectors, advanced optics and profile fitting with the use of JADE-6.5 software, isothermal phase evolution of the Pd/Ag alloy at 500 C, 550 C and 600 C under hydrogen atmosphere were quantified to elucidate the mechanistic details of the Pd/Ag alloy phase nucleation and growth pattern. Analysis of the HTXRD data by the Avrami model indicated that the nucleation of the Pd/Ag alloy phase was instantaneous where the growth mechanism was through diffusion-controlled one-dimensional thickening of the Pd/Ag alloy layer. The value of the Avrami exponent, n, was found to increase with temperature with the values of 0.34, 0.39 and 0.67 at 500oC, 550oC and 600oC, respectively. In addition, parabolic rate law analysis suggested that the nucleation of the Pd/Ag alloy phase was through a heterogeneous nucleation mode, in which the nucleation sites were defined as the non-equilibrium defects. The cross-sectional SEI micrographs indicated that the Pd/Ag alloy phase growth was strongly dependent upon the deposition morphology of the as-synthesized Pd and Ag layers formed by the electroless plating. Based on the Avrami model and the parabolic rate law, the estimated activation energies for the phase transformation were 236.5 and 185.6 kJ/mol and in excellent agreement with the literature values (183-239.5 kJ/mol).

  12. Structural changes and thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO2 cathode materials studied by combined in situ time-resolved XRD and mass spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bak, Seong -Min; Hu, Enyuan; Zhou, Yongning; Yu, Xiqian; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Cho, Sung -Jin; Kim, Kwang -Bum; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Nam, Kyung -Wan

    2014-11-24

    Thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO2 (NMC, with x + y + z = 1, x:y:z = 4:3:3 (NMC433), 5:3:2 (NMC532), 6:2:2 (NMC622), and 8:1:1 (NMC811)) cathode materials is systematically studied using combined in situ time- resolved X-ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy (TR-XRD/MS) techniques upon heating up to 600 °C. The TR-XRD/MS results indicate that the content of Ni, Co, and Mn significantly affects both the structural changes and the oxygen release features during heating: the more Ni and less Co and Mn, the lower the onset temperature of the phase transition (i.e., thermal decomposition) and the larger amount of oxygenmore » release. Interestingly, the NMC532 seems to be the optimized composition to maintain a reasonably good thermal stability, comparable to the low-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC333 and NMC433), while having a high capacity close to the high-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC811 and NMC622). The origin of the thermal decomposition of NMC cathode materials was elucidated by the changes in the oxidation states of each transition metal (TM) cations (i.e., Ni, Co, and Mn) and their site preferences during thermal decomposition. It is revealed that Mn ions mainly occupy the 3a octahedral sites of a layered structure (R3¯m) but Co ions prefer to migrate to the 8a tetrahedral sites of a spinel structure (Fd3¯m) during the thermal decomposition. Such element-dependent cation migration plays a very important role in the thermal stability of NMC cathode materials. The reasonably good thermal stability and high capacity characteristics of the NMC532 composition is originated from the well-balanced ratio of nickel content to manganese and cobalt contents. As a result, this systematic study provides insight into the rational design of NMC-based cathode materials with a desired balance between thermal stability and high energy density.« less

  13. Revisited. Decomposition or Melting? Formation Mechanism Investigation of LiCoO2 via In-Situ Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, Scott A.; Edwin H. Walker Jr.

    2013-01-31

    Here, we report the first in-situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction investigation in conjunction with a non-isothermal kinetic study using the model-free isoconversional kinetic method to determine the formation mechanism for the solid-state synthesis of electrochemically active LiCoO2 from Li2CO3 and Co3O4. The detailed information on the phase evolution as well as thermal events during the heating process was clearly observed, explained, and supported. This investigation provides structural as well as kinetic evidence for a multistep reaction and proposes the first plausible formation mechanism for the solid-state synthesis of LiCoO2.

  14. Lattice-level observation of the elastic-to-plastic relaxation process with subnanosecond resolution in shock-compressed Ta using time-resolved in situ Laue diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; Comley, A. J.; Barton, N. R.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D.; Huntington, C. M.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. -S.; Plechaty, C.; Prisbrey, S. T.; et al

    2015-09-29

    We report direct lattice level measurements of plastic relaxation kinetics through time-resolved, in-situ Laue diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal [001] Ta at pressures of 27-210 GPa. For a 50 GPa shock, a range of shear strains is observed extending up to the uniaxial limit for early data points (<0.6 ns) and the average shear strain relaxes to a near steady state over ~1 ns. For 80 and 125 GPa shocks, the measured shear strains are fully relaxed already at 200 ps, consistent with rapid relaxation associated with the predicted threshold for homogeneous nucleation of dislocations occurring at shock pressure ~65 GPa.more » The relaxation rate and shear stresses are used to estimate the dislocation density and these quantities are compared to the Livermore Multiscale Strength model as well as various molecular dynamics simulations.« less

  15. In situ, time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy in the microsecond domain: oxidation of adsorbed carbon monoxide on polycrystalline pt microelectrodes in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Fromondi, Iosif; Scherson, Daniel A

    2006-12-01

    The dynamics of the electrooxidation of adsorbed CO, COads, on polycrystalline Pt microelectrodes has been examined in CO-saturated 0.5 M H2SO4 and 0.5 M HClO4 aqueous solutions, using in situ, time-resolved, normalized differential reflectance spectroscopy lambda = 633 nm). Attention was focused on the unique dependence of COads oxidation on the potential at which the adsorbed full CO monolayer is assembled (i.e., hydrogen adsorption/desorption vs the double-layer region) using both fast linear scan voltammetry and potential step techniques. As evidenced from the data collected, COads oxidation at a fixed potential proceeds at slower rates when the monolayer is formed in the double- layer region compared to when it is formed in the hydrogen adsorption/desorption region. Possible explanations for this effect are discussed. PMID:17129007

  16. In-situ characterization of femtosecond laser-induced crystallization in borosilicate glass using time-resolved surface third-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weimin; Wang, Liang; Han, Fangyuan; Fang, Chong

    2013-11-01

    Coherent phonon dynamics in condensed-phase medium are responsible for important material properties including thermal and electrical conductivities. We report a structural dynamics technique, time-resolved surface third-harmonic generation (TRSTHG) spectroscopy, to capture transient phonon propagation near the surface of polycrystalline CaF2 and amorphous borosilicate (BK7) glass. Our approach time-resolves the background-free, high-sensitivity third harmonic generation (THG) signal in between the two crossing near-IR pulses. Pronounced intensity quantum beats reveal the impulsively excited low-frequency Raman mode evolution on the femtosecond to picosecond timescale. After amplified laser irradiation, danburite-crystal-like structure units form at the glass surface. This versatile TRSTHG setup paves the way to mechanistically study and design advanced thermoelectrics and photovoltaics.

  17. Time-Resolved Imaging Reveals Heterogeneous Landscapes of Nanomolar Ca2+ in Neurons and Astroglia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Kaiyu; Bard, Lucie; Reynolds, James P.; King, Claire; Jensen, Thomas P.; Gourine, Alexander V.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Maintaining low intracellular calcium is essential to the functioning of brain cells, yet the phenomenology and mechanisms involved remain an enigma. We have advanced a two-photon excitation time-resolved imaging technique, which exploits high sensitivity of the OGB-1 fluorescence lifetime to nanomolar Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) and enables a high data acquisition rate in situ. The [Ca2+] readout is not affected by dye concentration, light scattering, photobleaching, micro-viscosity, temperature, or the main known concomitants of cellular activity. In quiescent tissue, standard whole-cell configuration has little effect on resting [Ca2+] inside neuronal dendrites or inside astroglia dye-filled via gap junctions. Mapping basal [Ca2+] in neurons and astrocytes with submicron resolution unveils heterogeneous concentration landscapes that depend on age and preceding activity. The rich information content represented by such landscapes in acute slices and in vivo promises to unveil the hitherto unexplored, potentially fundamental aspects of brain cell physiology. Video Abstract PMID:26494277

  18. High Resolution Time-resolved UCLES Spectroscopy of AE Aqr: I. The Secondary Star Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria, J.; Diego, F.; Mills, D.; Connon Smith, R.

    2006-06-01

    High-dispersion time-resolved spectroscopy of the cataclysmic variable AE Aqr has been obtained. The emission lines have a complex structure that make difficult to measure the motion of the white dwarf. The cross correlation for the absorption lines shows a clear asymmetric profile as expected from a heated side of the red star. The spectral type for the secondary star varies from K2 to K5; there are clear indications that the temperature varies as a function of star longitude. The radial velocity analysis yield Kab = 165.2 ± 0.6 Km s-1 for the cross-correlated secondary star. The rotational velocity of the red star has been measured as a function of orbital period. It shows ellipsoidal variations with a period half the orbital period. The rotational velocities vary within the range Vrot sin i = 105 ± 3 Km s-1 and Vrot sin i = 130 ± 3 Km s-1. The former can be used to constrain the white dwarf semi-amplitude value to yield Kem = 139 ± 4 Km s-1 consistent with derived values from published radial velocity measurements. From a variation in the absorption line strength of 30%, we constrain the inclination angle to i = 58° ± 3. The estimated masses of the binary are: Mw = 1.07 ± 0.07 M? and Mr = 0.90 ± 0.05 M?. If this is correct we should expect a spectral type of G5 if the secondary star is a main sequence star. We suggest that the discrepancy is explained if the star has a radius 40% greater than a main sequence star for a mass of 0.90 M?.

  19. Effects of quartz particle size and water-to-solid ratio on hydrothermal synthesis of tobermorite studied by in-situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuma, J.; Tsunashima, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Matsuno, S.; Ogawa, A.; Matsui, K.; Sato, M.

    2011-08-15

    Hydrothermal synthesis process of tobermorite (5CaO.6SiO{sub 2}.5H{sub 2}O) has been investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction using high-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a purpose-build autoclave cell. Dissolution rates of quartz were largely affected by its particle size distribution in the starting mixtures. However, the composition (Ca/Si) of non-crystalline C-S-H at the start of tobermorite formation was identical regardless of the quartz dissolution rate. An effect of water-to-solid ratio (w/s) was investigated for samples using fine particle quartz. Tobermorite did not occur with w/s of 1.7 but occurred with w/s higher than 3.0. Surprisingly, however, the dissolution curves of quartz were nearly identical for all samples with w/s from 1.7 to 9, indicating that the dissolution rate is predominated by surface area. Possible reaction mechanism for tobermorite formation will be discussed in terms of Ca and/or silicate ion concentration in the liquid phase and distribution of Ca/Si in non-crystalline C-S-H. - Graphical abstract: Time-resolved XRD data set was obtained at up to 190 deg. C under a saturated steam pressure. Tobermorite (5CaO.6SiO{sub 2}.5H{sub 2}O) formation reaction was investigated in detail for several different starting materials. Highlights: > Hydrothermal formation of tobermorite was monitored by in-situ XRD. > Ca/Si of C-S-H at the start time of tobermorite formation was determined. > The Ca/Si value was identical regardless of the quartz particle size in the starting mixture.

  20. Time-Resolved, In Situ DRIFTS/EDE/MS Studies on Alumina-Supported Rhodium Catalysts: Effects of Ceriation and Zirconiation on Rhodium–CO Interactions**

    PubMed Central

    Kroner, Anna B; Newton, Mark A; Tromp, Moniek; Roscioni, Otello M; Russell, Andrea E; Dent, Andrew J; Prestipino, Carmelo; Evans, John

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ceria and zirconia on the structure–function properties of supported rhodium catalysts (1.6 and 4 wt % Rh/γ-Al2O3) during CO exposure are described. Ceria and zirconia are introduced through two preparation methods: 1) ceria is deposited on γ-Al2O3 from [Ce(acac)3] and rhodium metal is subsequently added, and 2) through the controlled surface modification (CSM) technique, which involves the decomposition of [M(acac)x] (M=Ce, x=3; M=Zr, x=4) on Rh/γ-Al2O3. The structure–function correlations of ceria and/or zirconia-doped rhodium catalysts are investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy/energy-dispersive extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy/mass spectrometry (DRIFTS/EDE/MS) under time-resolved, in situ conditions. CeOx and ZrO2 facilitate the protection of Rh particles against extensive oxidation in air and CO. Larger Rh core particles of ceriated and zirconiated Rh catalysts prepared by CSM are observed and compared with Rh/γ-Al2O3 samples, whereas supported Rh particles are easily disrupted by CO forming mononuclear Rh geminal dicarbonyl species. DRIFTS results indicate that, through the interaction of CO with ceriated Rh particles, a significantly larger amount of linear CO species form; this suggests the predominance of a metallic Rh phase. PMID:25044889

  1. Time-resolved in situ ATR-IR observations of the process of sorption of water into a poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) film.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shigeaki; Tanaka, Masaru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2007-03-27

    A process of water sorption into a biocompatible polymer, poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA), was investigated by time-resolved, in situ, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. Evidence for three different types of hydrated water in PMEA, that is, nonfreezing water, freezing bound water, and freezing water, were found. Each hydration structure was elucidated at the functional group level. Nonfreezing water, which never crystallizes, even at -100 degrees C, has a C=O...H-O type of hydrogen bonding interaction with the carbonyl group of PMEA. Freezing bound water, which crystallizes in a heating process below 0 degrees C, interacts with the methoxy moiety in the PMEA side chain terminal. Freezing water, which crystallizes approximately 0 degrees C, has bulk-water-like structure with an O-H...O-H hydrogen bonds network. It has been concluded from the present study that the methoxy moiety in the PMEA side chain terminal plays an important role for the excellent biocompatibility of PMEA. PMID:17335251

  2. In-Situ Observations of Phase Transformations During Welding of 1045 Steel using Spatially Resolved and Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; DebRoy, T

    2005-10-28

    Synchrotron-based methods have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the direct observation of microstructure evolution during welding. These techniques, known as spatially resolved (SRXRD) and time resolved (TRXRD) x-ray diffraction, allow in-situ experiments to be performed during welding and provide direct observations of high temperature phases that form under the intense thermal cycles that occur. This paper presents observations of microstructural evolution that occur during the welding of a medium carbon AISI 1045 steel, using SRXRD to map the phases that are present during welding, and TRXRD to dynamically observe transformations during rapid heating and cooling. SRXRD was further used to determine the influence of welding heat input on the size of the high temperature austenite region, and the time required to completely homogenize this region during welding. These data can be used to determine the kinetics of phase transformations under the steep thermal gradients of welds, as well as benchmark and verify phase transformation models.

  3. In-situ Time-Resolved Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Microstructure Variations during Friction Stir Welding in a 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Wang, Xun-Li; Ungar, Prof Tomas; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A; Clausen, B; Hubbard, Camden R

    2008-01-01

    The microstructure change is one of the most important research areas in the friction stir welding (FSW). However, direct observation of microstructure changes during FSW has been extremely challenging because many measurement techniques are inapplicable. Recently developed in-situ time-resolved neutron diffraction methodology, which drastically improves the temporal resolution of neutron diffraction, enables to observe the transient microstructure changes during FSW. We installed a portable FSW system in the Spectrometer for MAterials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and the FSW was made on 6.35mm-thickness 6061-T6 Al alloy plate. At the same time, the neutron beam was centered on the mid-plane of the Al plate at 8 mm from the tool center (underneath the tool shoulder) and the diffraction peak was continuously measured during welding. The peak broadening analysis has been performed using the Williamson-Hall Method. The result shows that the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10^15 m-2 duing FSW, which is the significant increse compared to the before (4.5 x 10^14 m-2) and after (4.0 x 10^14 m-2) the FSW. The quantitatively analysis of the grain structure can provide an insight to understand the transient variation of the microstructure during FSW.

  4. The hydrolytic water molecule in trypsin, revealed by time-resolved Laue crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, P.T. ); Smalaas, A. ); Carty, R.P. ); Mangel, W.F.; Sweet, R.M. )

    1993-01-29

    Crystals of bovine trypsin were acylated at the reactive residue, serine 195, to form the transiently stable p-guanidinobenzoate. Hydrolysis of this species was triggered in the crystals by a jump in pH. The hydrolysis was monitored by three-dimensional Laue crystallography, resulting in three x-ray diffraction structures, all from the same crystal and each representing approximately 5 seconds of x-ray exposure. The structures were analyzed at a nominal resolution of 1.8 angstroms and were of sufficient quality to reproduce subtle features in the electron-density maps for each of the structures. Comparison of the structures before and after the pH jump reveals that a water molecule has positioned itself to attack the acyl group in the initial step of the hydrolysis of this transient intermediate. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Localized domain wall nucleation dynamics in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings revealed by direct time-resolved magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We report time-resolved observations of field-induced domain wall nucleation in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings using single direction field pulses and rotating fields. We show that the asymmetric geometry of a ring allows for controlling the position of nucleation events, when a domain wall is nucleated by a rotating magnetic field. Direct observation by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) reveals that the nucleation of domain walls occurs through the creation of transient ripplelike structures. This magnetization state is found to exhibit a surprisingly high reproducibility even at room temperature and we determine the combinations of field strengths and field directions that allow for reliable nucleation of domain walls and directly quantify the stability of the magnetic states. Our analysis of the processes occurring during field induced domain wall nucleation shows how the effective fields determine the nucleation location reproducibly, which is a key prerequisite toward using domain walls for spintronic devices.

  6. Cation Movements during Dehydration and NO2 Desorption in a Ba-Y,FAU zeolite: an in situ Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianqin; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-02-28

    Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis were used to probe the interactions between BaY, FAU zeolite frameworks and H2O or NO2 molecules. These results provided information about the migration of the Ba2+ cations in the zeolite framework during dehydration and during NO2 adsorption/desorption processes in a water free zeolite. In the hydrated structure water molecules form four double rings of hexagonal ice-like clusters [(H2O)6] in the 12-ring openings of the super-cage. These water rings interacted with the cations and the zeolite framework through four cation/water clusters centered over the four 6-membered rings of the super-cage (site II). Interpenetrating tetrahedral water clusters [(H2O)4] and tetrahedral Ba+2 cation clusters were observed in the sodalite cage. Consistent with the reported FT-IR results, three different ionic NOx species (NO+, NO+-NO2, and NO3-) were observed following NO2 adsorption by the dehydrated Ba-Y,FAU zeolite. The structure of the water and the NOx species were correlated with the interactions between the adsorbates, the cations, and the framework. The population of Ba2+ ions at different cationic positions strongly depended on the amount of bound water or NOx species. Both dehydration and NO2 adsorption/desorption resulted in facile migration of Ba2+ ions among the different cationic positions. Data obtained in this work have provided direct evidence for the Ba2+ cation migration to accommodate the binding of gas molecules. This important feature may play a pivotal role in the strong binding of NO2 to Ba-Y,FAU zeolite, a prerequisite for high catalytic activity in lean NOx reduction catalysis.

  7. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  8. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-06-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases.

  9. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample

    PubMed Central

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases. PMID:27357449

  10. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems. PMID:26915398

  11. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, II Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jaewoo, Jeong; Samant, Mahesh G.; et al

    2016-02-26

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase seperated regions. The ability to simultanousely track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of- the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiatedmore » at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, which is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. Lastly, the direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.« less

  12. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample.

    PubMed

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases. PMID:27357449

  13. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction of the photochromic alpha-styrylpyrylium trifluoromethanesulfonate crystal films reveals ultrafast structural switching.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Jörg; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Paulmann, Carsten; Davaasambuu, Jav; Kong, Qingyu; Wulff, Michael; Techert, Simone

    2009-10-21

    The ultrafast structural dynamics of the [2+2] photocycloaddition of alpha-styrylpyrylium trifluoromethanesulfonate (TFMS) has been studied in great detail. During the photoreaction, optical and infrared spectroscopy confirms that crystals of alpha-styrylpyrylium change color. Since the reaction is reversible, it has been suggested to be used as an organic holographic storage device. The present photocrystallographic studies (with high spatial resolution) allow for an electron density analysis of the overall reaction kinetics, revealing the mechanism of bond-breaking and bond-formation. It could furthermore be proved how the reaction is influenced by the rearrangement of the surrounding moieties. Picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies allow for the monitoring the photoreaction in crystalline thin films under experimental conditions where the transformation times are greatly enhanced. These investigations are discussed in the context of the photocrystallographic results. It has been found that alpha-styrylpyrylium TFMS undergoes an ultrafast photoreaction to the dimer product state and back-reaction to the monomer reactant state which is temperature driven. The present experiments indicate that TFMS reacts on time scales which are the fundamental limiting ones of two-quantum systems and therefore has the potential to be used as an ultrafast organic molecular switcher. PMID:19824735

  14. Direct Observation of Phase Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds Using In-situ Spatially Resolved and Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.; Wong, J.; Ressler, T.

    1999-09-23

    Spatially resolved x-ray diffraction (SRXRD) and time resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD) were used to investigate real time solid state phase transformations and solidification in AISI type 304 stainless steel gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds. These experiments were conducted at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux beam line. Spatially resolved observations of {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {delta} solid state phase transformations were performed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of moving welds and time-resolved observations of the solidification sequence were performed in the fusion zone (FZ) of stationary welds after the arc had been terminated. Results of the moving weld experiments showed that the kinetics of the {gamma}{yields}{delta} phase transformation on heating in the HAZ were sufficiently rapid to transform a narrow region surrounding the liquid weld pool to the {delta} ferrite phase. Results of the stationary weld experiments showed, for the first time, that solidification can occur directly to the {delta} ferrite phase, which persisted as a single phase for 0.5s. Upon solidification to {delta}, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation followed and completed in 0.2s as the weld cooled further to room temperature.

  15. Functional Stability of the Human Kappa Opioid Receptor Reconstituted in Nanodiscs Revealed by a Time-Resolved Scintillation Proximity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Randi Westh; Wang, Xiaole; Golab, Agnieszka; Bornert, Olivier; Oswald, Christine; Wagner, Renaud; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Long-term functional stability of isolated membrane proteins is crucial for many in vitro applications used to elucidate molecular mechanisms, and used for drug screening platforms in modern pharmaceutical industry. Compared to soluble proteins, the understanding at the molecular level of membrane proteins remains a challenge. This is partly due to the difficulty to isolate and simultaneously maintain their structural and functional stability, because of their hydrophobic nature. Here we show, how scintillation proximity assay can be used to analyze time-resolved high-affinity ligand binding to membrane proteins solubilized in various environments. The assay was used to establish conditions that preserved the biological function of isolated human kappa opioid receptor. In detergent solution the receptor lost high-affinity ligand binding to a radiolabelled ligand within minutes at room temperature. After reconstitution in Nanodiscs made of phospholipid bilayer the half-life of high-affinity ligand binding to the majority of receptors increased 70-fold compared to detergent solubilized receptors—a level of stability that is appropriate for further downstream applications. Time-resolved scintillation proximity assay has the potential to screen numerous conditions in parallel to obtain high levels of stable and active membrane proteins, which are intrinsically unstable in detergent solution, and with minimum material consumption. PMID:27035823

  16. Functional Stability of the Human Kappa Opioid Receptor Reconstituted in Nanodiscs Revealed by a Time-Resolved Scintillation Proximity Assay.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Randi Westh; Wang, Xiaole; Golab, Agnieszka; Bornert, Olivier; Oswald, Christine; Wagner, Renaud; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Long-term functional stability of isolated membrane proteins is crucial for many in vitro applications used to elucidate molecular mechanisms, and used for drug screening platforms in modern pharmaceutical industry. Compared to soluble proteins, the understanding at the molecular level of membrane proteins remains a challenge. This is partly due to the difficulty to isolate and simultaneously maintain their structural and functional stability, because of their hydrophobic nature. Here we show, how scintillation proximity assay can be used to analyze time-resolved high-affinity ligand binding to membrane proteins solubilized in various environments. The assay was used to establish conditions that preserved the biological function of isolated human kappa opioid receptor. In detergent solution the receptor lost high-affinity ligand binding to a radiolabelled ligand within minutes at room temperature. After reconstitution in Nanodiscs made of phospholipid bilayer the half-life of high-affinity ligand binding to the majority of receptors increased 70-fold compared to detergent solubilized receptors-a level of stability that is appropriate for further downstream applications. Time-resolved scintillation proximity assay has the potential to screen numerous conditions in parallel to obtain high levels of stable and active membrane proteins, which are intrinsically unstable in detergent solution, and with minimum material consumption. PMID:27035823

  17. Ultrafast potential energy surface softening of one-dimensional organic conductors revealed by picosecond time-resolved Laue crystallography.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Marc; Tschentscher, Thomas; Cammarata, Marco; Meents, Alke; Sager, Christian; Davaasambuu, Jav; Busse, Gerhard; Techert, Simone

    2010-07-29

    Time-resolved Laue crystallography has been employed to study the structural dynamics of a one-dimensional organic conductor (tetrathiafulvalene-p-chloranil) during photoexcitation in the regime of the neutral to ionic phase transition. Exciting this crystalline system with 800 nm 100 fs long optical pulses leads to ultrafast population of a structural intermediate as early as 50 ps after excitation with a lifetime of at least 10 ns. Starting from the neutral phase, this intermediate has been assigned as a precursor state toward the photoinduced population of the ionic phase. The observed intensity changes are significantly different from comparable equilibrium structures. The interpretation of this structural data is that the potential of this intermediate is being softened during its population in a dynamical process. The depopulation proceeds through thermal processes. PMID:20597517

  18. Network theory inspired analysis of time-resolved expression data reveals key players guiding P. patens stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Bao, Jie; Hanke, Sebastian T; Hiss, Manuel; Tiko, Theodhor; Rensing, Stefan A

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) often trigger developmental decisions, yet, their transcripts are often only moderately regulated and thus not easily detected by conventional statistics on expression data. Here we present a method that allows to determine such genes based on trajectory analysis of time-resolved transcriptome data. As a proof of principle, we have analysed apical stem cells of filamentous moss (P. patens) protonemata that develop from leaflets upon their detachment from the plant. By our novel correlation analysis of the post detachment transcriptome kinetics we predict five out of 1,058 TFs to be involved in the signaling leading to the establishment of pluripotency. Among the predicted regulators is the basic helix loop helix TF PpRSL1, which we show to be involved in the establishment of apical stem cells in P. patens. Our methodology is expected to aid analysis of key players of developmental decisions in complex plant and animal systems. PMID:23637751

  19. Ultrafast terahertz modulation characteristic of tungsten doped vanadium dioxide nanogranular film revealed by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Yang; Zhai, Zhao-Hui; Zhu, Li-Guo E-mail: huangwanxia@scu.edu.cn; Li, Jun; Peng, Qi-Xian; Li, Ze-Ren; Shi, Qi-Wu; Huang, Wan-Xia E-mail: huangwanxia@scu.edu.cn; Yue, Fang; Hu, Yan-Yan

    2015-07-20

    The ultrafast terahertz (THz) modulation characteristic during photo-induced insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) of undoped and tungsten (W)-doped VO{sub 2} film was investigated at picoseconds time scale using time-resolved THz spectroscopy. W-doping slows down the photo-induced IMT dynamic processes (both the fast non-thermal process and the slow metallic phase propagation process) in VO{sub 2} film and also reduces the pump fluence threshold of photo-induced IMT in VO{sub 2} film. Along with the observed broadening of phase transition temperature window of IMT in W-doped VO{sub 2}, we conclude that W-doping prevents metallic phase domains from percolation. By further extracting carrier properties from photo-induced THz conductivity at several phase transition times, we found that the electron-electron correlation during IMT is enhanced in W-doped VO{sub 2}.

  20. Ultrafast terahertz modulation characteristic of tungsten doped vanadium dioxide nanogranular film revealed by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yang; Zhai, Zhao-Hui; Shi, Qi-Wu; Zhu, Li-Guo; Li, Jun; Huang, Wan-Xia; Yue, Fang; Hu, Yan-Yan; Peng, Qi-Xian; Li, Ze-Ren

    2015-07-01

    The ultrafast terahertz (THz) modulation characteristic during photo-induced insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) of undoped and tungsten (W)-doped VO2 film was investigated at picoseconds time scale using time-resolved THz spectroscopy. W-doping slows down the photo-induced IMT dynamic processes (both the fast non-thermal process and the slow metallic phase propagation process) in VO2 film and also reduces the pump fluence threshold of photo-induced IMT in VO2 film. Along with the observed broadening of phase transition temperature window of IMT in W-doped VO2, we conclude that W-doping prevents metallic phase domains from percolation. By further extracting carrier properties from photo-induced THz conductivity at several phase transition times, we found that the electron-electron correlation during IMT is enhanced in W-doped VO2.

  1. Revealing the ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in organo metal halide perovskite solar cell materials using time resolved THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponseca, C. S., Jr.; Sundström, V.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in organo metal halide perovskite has been probed using time resolved terahertz (THz) spectroscopy (TRTS). Current literature on its early time characteristics is unanimous: sub-ps charge carrier generation, highly mobile charges and very slow recombination rationalizing the exceptionally high power conversion efficiency for a solution processed solar cell material. Electron injection from MAPbI3 to nanoparticles (NP) of TiO2 is found to be sub-ps while Al2O3 NPs do not alter charge dynamics. Charge transfer to organic electrodes, Spiro-OMeTAD and PCBM, is sub-ps and few hundreds of ps respectively, which is influenced by the alignment of energy bands. It is surmised that minimizing defects/trap states is key in optimizing charge carrier extraction from these materials.

  2. Network Theory Inspired Analysis of Time-Resolved Expression Data Reveals Key Players Guiding P. patens Stem Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Rensing, Stefan A.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) often trigger developmental decisions, yet, their transcripts are often only moderately regulated and thus not easily detected by conventional statistics on expression data. Here we present a method that allows to determine such genes based on trajectory analysis of time-resolved transcriptome data. As a proof of principle, we have analysed apical stem cells of filamentous moss (P. patens) protonemata that develop from leaflets upon their detachment from the plant. By our novel correlation analysis of the post detachment transcriptome kinetics we predict five out of 1,058 TFs to be involved in the signaling leading to the establishment of pluripotency. Among the predicted regulators is the basic helix loop helix TF PpRSL1, which we show to be involved in the establishment of apical stem cells in P. patens. Our methodology is expected to aid analysis of key players of developmental decisions in complex plant and animal systems. PMID:23637751

  3. Dislocation-mediated relaxation in nanograined columnar palladium films revealed by on-chip time-resolved HRTEM testing

    PubMed Central

    Colla, M. -S.; Amin-Ahmadi, B.; Idrissi, H.; Malet, L.; Godet, S.; Raskin, J. -P.; Schryvers, D.; Pardoen, T.

    2015-01-01

    The high-rate sensitivity of nanostructured metallic materials demonstrated in the recent literature is related to the predominance of thermally activated deformation mechanisms favoured by a large density of internal interfaces. Here we report time-resolved high-resolution electron transmission microscopy creep tests on thin nanograined films using on-chip nanomechanical testing. Tests are performed on palladium, which exhibited unexpectedly large creep rates at room temperature. Despite the small 30-nm grain size, relaxation is found to be mediated by dislocation mechanisms. The dislocations interact with the growth nanotwins present in the grains, leading to a loss of coherency of twin boundaries. The density of stored dislocations first increases with applied deformation, and then decreases with time to drive additional deformation while no grain boundary mechanism is observed. This fast relaxation constitutes a key issue in the development of various micro- and nanotechnologies such as palladium membranes for hydrogen applications. PMID:25557273

  4. Mechanism of the nucleotidyl-transfer reaction in DNA polymerase revealed by time-resolved protein crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Teruya; Zhao, Ye; Yamagata, Yuriko; Hua, Yue-jin; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotidyl-transfer reaction catalyzed by DNA polymerase is a fundamental enzymatic reaction for DNA synthesis. Until now, a number of structural and kinetic studies on DNA polymerases have proposed a two-metalion mechanism of the nucleotidyl-transfer reaction. However, the actual reaction process has never been visualized. Recently, we have followed the nucleotidyl-transfer reaction process by human DNA polymerase η using time-resolved protein crystallography. In sequence, two Mg2+ ions bind to the active site, the nucleophile 3′-OH is deprotonated, the deoxyribose at the primer end converts from C2′-endo to C3′-endo, and the nucleophile and the α-phosphate of the substrate dATP approach each other to form the new bond. In this process, we observed transient elements, which are a water molecule to deprotonate the 3′-OH and an additional Mg2+ ion to stabilize the intermediate state. Particularly, the third Mg2+ ion observed in this study may be a general feature of the two-metalion mechanism.

  5. Cy3 in AOT reverse micelles I. Dimer formation revealed through steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Jeffrey T; Scott, Eric; Levinger, Nancy E; Van Orden, Alan

    2011-08-11

    Cyanine-3 (Cy3) fluorescent dye molecules confined in sodium di-2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles were examined using steady-state absorption and emission as well as time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to understand the effect of confinement on the spectroscopic properties of the dye. This study explored a wide range of reverse micelle sizes, with hydrodynamic radii ranging from ∼1.7 to ∼5 nm. The relative concentrations of Cy3 and AOT reverse micelles were such that, on average, one dye molecule was present for every 2 × 10(4) to 9 × 10(5) reverse micelles. In the smallest reverse micelles examined, observed changes in the absorption and emission spectra and fluorescence lifetime of the dye molecules indicated H-aggregation of Cy3 into side-by-side dimers. It is hypothesized that this dimerization is governed by the high local concentrations that result from the confinement of the Cy3 in the reverse micelles. What is notable about this study is that this dimer occurs even at overall dye concentrations in the nanomolar range. Such concentrations are too low for aggregation to occur in bulk solution. Hence, the reverse micelles serve as nanocatalysts for this aggregation process. PMID:21761942

  6. Single water solvation dynamics in the 4-aminobenzonitrile-water cluster cation revealed by picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi; Wohlgemuth, Matthias; Mitrić, Roland; Dopfer, Otto; Fujii, Masaaki

    2015-11-28

    The dynamics of a solvent is important for many chemical and biological processes. Here, the migration dynamics of a single water molecule is triggered by the photoionization of the 4-aminobenzonitrile-water (4ABN-W) cluster and monitored in real time by picosecond time-resolved IR (ps TRIR) spectroscopy. In the neutral cluster, water is hydrogen-bonded to the CN group. When this CN-bound cluster is selectively ionized with an excess energy of 1238 cm(-1), water migrates with a lifetime of τ = 17 ps from the CN to the NH2 group, forming a more stable 4ABN(+)-W(NH) isomer with a yield of unity. By decreasing the ionization excess energy, the yield of the CN → NH2 reaction is reduced. The relatively slow migration in comparison to the ionization-induced solvent dynamics in the related acetanilide-water cluster cation (τ = 5 ps) is discussed in terms of the internal excess energy after photoionization and the shape of the potential energy surface. PMID:26490096

  7. Photocarrier dynamics in undoped and Na-doped Cu2ZnSnS4 single crystals revealed by ultrafast time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang Phuong, Le; Okano, Makoto; Yamashita, Genki; Nagai, Masaya; Ashida, Masaaki; Nagaoka, Akira; Yoshino, Kenji; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effects of sodium doping on the photocarrier dynamics in Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) single crystals using optical pump-THz probe transient reflectivity (THz-TR) and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The THz-TR and PL decay dynamics are influenced by sodium doping, and their sodium-induced changes are consistent with each other. These time-resolved measurements revealed that the lifetime of photocarriers increases with sodium doping. This result indicates that a part of defects is suppressed by doping sodium into CZTS and implies that sodium doping improves the charge transport properties of CZTS, leading to an improvement in the performance of CZTS-based solar cells.

  8. Nanoprobes for two-photon excitation time-resolved imaging of living animals: In situ analysis of tumor-targeting dynamics of nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Fu, Li-Min; Wen, Xue; Liu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Liu, Yu-Chen; Han, Rong-Cheng; Gao, Zhi-Yue; Wang, Tian-En; Sha, Yin-Lin; Jiang, Yu-Qiang; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Great challenges remain in the noninvasive luminescence imaging analysis of tumor-targeting dynamics of nanocarriers in living animals which is of significance for the development of anti-cancer nanomedicine. In this work, luminescent nanoparticles Eu(tta)3bpt@SMA (dav = 15 nm), which exhibited good water dispersion stability and high yields of red Eu-luminescence under near-infrared two-photon excitation, were prepared by a modified microfluidic mixing method in the absence of surfactants. Tumor-targeting agents, Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys (cRGD) polypeptide or transferrin (Tf), were then anchored on the nanoparticle surfaces to form the desired nanocarriers Eu@SMA-RGD or Eu@SMA-Tf. The tumor-targeting processes of the prepared nanocarriers in intact living mice were analyzed on a home-built two-photon excitation time-resolved (TPE-TR) imaging apparatus having a wide view filed. The TPE-TR strategy could effectively suppress the interference from biological autofluorescence, which allowed the targeted domains to be visualized with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It was found that the tumor-tissue trapping efficacy of Eu@SMA-RGD was much higher than that of Eu@SMA-Tf, and the desorption process from the tumor tissues of Eu@SMA-RGD was slower than that of Eu@SMA-Tf. The methods developed in this work pave a way to investigate the in vivo tumor-targeting dynamics of nanocarriers by noninvasive luminescence imaging of living animals. PMID:27258485

  9. In situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction of tobermorite formation in autoclaved aerated concrete: Influence of silica source reactivity and Al addition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kunio; Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Sato, Masugu

    2011-05-15

    The hydrothermal formation of tobermorite during the processing of autoclaved aerated concrete was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. High-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly developed autoclave cell and a photon-counting pixel array detector were used. To investigate the effects of the silica source, reactive quartz from chert and less-reactive quartz from quartz sand were used as starting materials. The effect of Al addition on tobermorite formation was also studied. In all cases, C-S-H, hydroxylellestadite and katoite were clearly observed as intermediates. Acceleration of tobermorite formation by Al addition was clearly observed. However, Al addition did not affect the dissolution rate of quartz. Two pathways, via C-S-H and katoite, were also observed in the Al-containing system. These results suggest that the structure of initially formed C-S-H is important for the subsequent tobermorite formation reactions.

  10. In situ, Time Resolved Small Angle Solution Scattering: A Synchrotron-Based Study of the First Minute in the Life of Iron Sulphide and Iron Oxihydroxide Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benning, L. G.; Shaw, S.; Terrill, N. J.; Panine, P.

    2001-12-01

    Environmental remediation programs rely on the understanding of the formation mechanisms and kinetic rates of iron sulphide and oxyhydroxide colloids because they control the mobility and bioavailability of toxic compounds in contaminated aqueous systems. Such iron-based colloids form ubiquitously as ultra-fine particles suspended in the anoxic or oxic water, or as coatings on mineral grains and their high specific areas and very reactive surfaces regulate the removal of toxic trace elements (e.g., As, Cd, Cr) from a contaminant plume. However, the formation mechanisms and the kinetic growth rates for such reactive iron colloids are not well established and the rates at which such colloids remove toxic metals from solutions is poorly understood. The dearth of data on the mechanism controlling the first steps in the nucleation and growth of Fe-S and FeOOH phases from an aqueous solution is mainly a consequence of the fact that the nucleation reactions are extremely fast and, in both systems, strongly pH, redox and temperature dependent. Here we present data from synchrotron-based, in situ, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments that were carried out with the goal to characterize the first stages (20 milliseconds to 60 seconds) in the nucleation and growth of ferrous sulphides and hydrated ferric oxides in aqueous solutions. The experiments were carried out using a stopped flow system equipped with a quartz sample capillary, 3 reservoir syringes and 2 mixers with a dead volume of 10 μ L and a dead time of 10 milliseconds. This set up warranted fast and precise mixing of two solutions with the capability for data acquisition at speeds of 20 to 500 millisecond per scan. From the obtained scattering data, information on rates of nucleation, changes in size and shape of the colloids during growth, as well as the growth kinetics and fractal dimension of FeS and FeOOH phases during their precipitation from solution could be derived.

  11. In Situ X-ray Diffraction of Forsterite Under Shock Compression to 52 GPa: Time Resolved Observation of Changes in Crystal Structure and Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, M. C.; Maddox, B.; Teruya, A.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's mantle is composed primarily of ferromagnesian silicates, of which Forsterite (Fo) is the magnesium-rich end member of the dominant upper mantle phase, olivine. Fo is thought to undergo a chemical decomposition associated with a structural phase transition when dynamically loaded to 40-71 GPa, but previous inferences about such decomposition have been based only on pressure-density data with no direct phase identification. To obtain direct data on the phase evolution of shocked Fo, synthetic single crystal samples of Mg2SiO4 Fo were loaded to pressures of 52 GPa using a two stage light gas gun. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were collected on the static and the loaded samples in situ using a single pulse Mo Kα anode to provide a 17 keV X-ray source. X-ray polycapillary optics were used to couple the source to the sample. Clear Laue spots were observed in the static images, while the dynamic images show the appearance of new spots at early times and powder-like rings at late times. The angles of the dynamically driven spots and rings overlap with each other and indicate the change in phase of forsterite under pressure through a process that begins with the formation of single crystals and ends with polycrystalline material. Efforts are underway to identify the high-pressure phases from among the library of dense magnesium silicates, and further experiments covering a larger pressure range will be completed shortly. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Time-resolved in situ detection of CO in a shock tube using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a quantum-cascade laser near 4.6 µm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Shengkai; Sur, Ritobrata; Chao, Xing; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-10-01

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using a mid-infrared DFB quantum-cascade laser is reported for sensitive time-resolved (10 μs) in situ CO measurements in a shock tube. Off-axis alignment and fast scanning of the laser wavelength were used to minimize coupling noise in a low-finesse cavity. An absorption gain factor of 91 was demonstrated, which enabled sub-ppm detection sensitivity for gas temperatures of 1000-2100K in a 15 cm diameter shock tube. This substantial improvement in detection sensitivity compared to conventional single-pass absorption measurements, shows great potential for the study of reaction pathways of high-temperature combustion kinetics mechanisms in shock tubes. PMID:25322031

  13. Lattice-level observation of the elastic-to-plastic relaxation process with subnanosecond resolution in shock-compressed Ta using time-resolved in situ Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; Comley, A. J.; Barton, N. R.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D.; Huntington, C. M.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. -S.; Plechaty, C.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Remington, B. A.; Rudd, R. E.

    2015-09-29

    We report direct lattice level measurements of plastic relaxation kinetics through time-resolved, in-situ Laue diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal [001] Ta at pressures of 27-210 GPa. For a 50 GPa shock, a range of shear strains is observed extending up to the uniaxial limit for early data points (<0.6 ns) and the average shear strain relaxes to a near steady state over ~1 ns. For 80 and 125 GPa shocks, the measured shear strains are fully relaxed already at 200 ps, consistent with rapid relaxation associated with the predicted threshold for homogeneous nucleation of dislocations occurring at shock pressure ~65 GPa. The relaxation rate and shear stresses are used to estimate the dislocation density and these quantities are compared to the Livermore Multiscale Strength model as well as various molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Nanophase evolution at semiconductor/electrolyte interface in situ probed by time-resolved high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Ren, Y.; Haeffner, D. R.; Almer, J. D.; Wang, L.; Yang, W.; Truong, T. T.

    2010-09-01

    Real-time evolution of nanoparticles grown at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface formed between a single crystalline n-type GaAs wafer and an aqueous solution of AgNO{sub 3} has been studied by using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results reveal the distinct nucleation and growth steps involved in the growth of anisotropic Ag nanoplates on the surface of the GaAs wafer. For the first time, a quick transit stage is observed to be responsible for the structural transformation of the nuclei to form structurally stable seeds that are critical for guiding their anisotropic growth into nanoplates. Reaction between a GaAs wafer and AgNO{sub 3} solution at room temperature primarily produces Ag nanoplates on the surface of the GaAs wafer in the dark and at room temperature. In contrast, X-ray irradiation can induce charge separation in the GaAs wafer to drive the growth of nanoparticles made of silver oxy salt (Ag{sub 7}NO{sub 11}) and silver arsenate (Ag{sub 3}AsO{sub 4}) at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface if the GaAs wafer is illuminated by the X-ray and reaction time is long enough.

  15. Efficient Spectral Diffusion at the Air/Water Interface Revealed by Femtosecond Time-Resolved Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-05-19

    Femtosecond vibrational dynamics at the air/water interface is investigated by time-resolved heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (TR-HD-VSFG) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The low- and high-frequency sides of the hydrogen-bonded (HB) OH stretch band at the interface are selectively excited with special attention to the bandwidth and energy of the pump pulses. Narrow bleach is observed immediately after excitation of the high-frequency side of the HB OH band at ∼3500 cm(-1), compared to the broad bleach observed with excitation of the low-frequency side at ∼3300 cm(-1). However, the time-resolved spectra observed with the two different excitations become very similar at 0.5 ps and almost indistinguishable by 1.0 ps. This reveals that efficient spectral diffusion occurs regardless of the difference of the pump frequency. The experimental observations are well-reproduced by complementary MD simulation. There is no experimental and theoretical evidence that supports extraordinary slow dynamics in the high-frequency side of the HB OH band, which was reported before. PMID:27120559

  16. Time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering methods beyond photoactivation: Utilizing high-flux X-ray sources for the study of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohit; Techert, Simone

    2016-01-01

    X-ray scattering technique, comprising of small-angle/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques is increasingly used to characterize the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution. It is a method of choice to characterize the flexible, partially folded and unfolded protein systems. X-ray scattering is the last resort for proteins that cannot be investigated by crystallography or NMR and acts as a complementary technique with different biophysical techniques to answer challenging scientific questions. The marriage of the X-ray scattering technique with the fourth dimension "time" yields structural dynamics and kinetics information for protein motions in hierarchical timescales from picoseconds to days. The arrival of the high-flux X-ray beam at third generation synchrotron sources, exceptional X-ray optics, state-of-the-art detectors, upgradation of X-ray scattering beamlines with microfluidics devices and advanced X-ray scattering data analysis procedures are the important reasons behind the shining years of X-ray scattering technique. The best days of the X-ray scattering technique are on the horizon with the advent of the nanofocus X-ray scattering beamlines and fourth generation X-ray lightsources, i.e., free electron lasers (XFELs). Complementary to the photon-triggered time-resolved X-ray scattering techniques, we will present an overview of the time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering techniques for structural dynamics of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins. PMID:26732244

  17. Evidence of transient species occurring in the reduction process of trivalent lanthanides under 2.5 MeV electron irradiation by in situ cathodoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ollier, N.; Boizot, B.; L'Henoret, P.; Guillous, S.; Petite, G.

    2009-06-01

    In situ cathodoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were carried out on Sm-doped glasses during a 2.5 MeV electron irradiation. These experiments allow characterizing more precisely the mechanisms operating under irradiation and more specifically the reduction processes of Sm{sup 3+} to Sm{sup 2+} ions. Sm{sup 2+} emission lines appear in the first steps of the irradiation, however, the {sup 5}D{sub 0}->{sup 7}F{sub 0-2} emission lines of Sm{sup 2+} were not observed on the cathodoluminescence spectrum. Moreover, two sites of Sm{sup 2+} have been evidenced in the glasses; the formation of each species is clearly different. Relaxation processes of Sm{sup 3+} and Sm{sup 2+} leads to consider the existence of different transient states of Sm{sup 3+} and Sm{sup 2+} species which are annealed after irradiation. We propose some synthetic schemes of the reduction mechanisms produced during the irradiation.

  18. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Zhang, Lulu; Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of λ-MnO2 transforming to β-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumptionmore » by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.« less

  19. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide - Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Zhang, Lulu; Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4 (LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25 °C-580 °C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250 °C. Formation of MnO with rock-salt structure started at 520 °C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiated LMO in air, in which a process of λ-MnO2 transforming to β-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumption by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.

  20. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Zhang, Lulu; Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of λ-MnO2 transforming to β-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumption by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.

  1. Anomalous lattice expansion in yttria stabilized zirconia under simultaneous applied electric and thermal fields: A time-resolved in situ energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry study with an ultrahigh energy synchrotron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Akdogan, E. K.; Savkl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ld Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I z, I.; Bicer, H.; Paxton, W.; Toksoy, F.; Tsakalakos, T.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-06-21

    Nonisothermal densification in 8% yttria doped zirconia (8YSZ) particulate matter of 250 nm median particle size was studied under 215 V/cm dc electric field and 9 Degree-Sign C/min heating rate, using time-resolved in-situ high temperature energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry with a polychromatic 200 keV synchrotron probe. Densification occurred in the 876-905 Degree-Sign C range, which resulted in 97% of the theoretical density. No local melting at particle-particle contacts was observed in scanning electron micrographs, implying densification was due to solid state mass transport processes. The maximum current draw at 905 Degree-Sign C was 3 A, corresponding to instantaneous absorbed power density of 570 W/cm{sup 3}. Densification of 8YSZ was accompanied by anomalous elastic volume expansions of the unit cell by 0.45% and 2.80% at 847 Degree-Sign C and 905 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The anomalous expansion at 905 Degree-Sign C at which maximum densification was observed is characterized by three stages: (I) linear stage, (II) anomalous stage, and (III) anelastic recovery stage. The densification in stage I (184 s) and II (15 s) was completed in 199 s, while anelastic relaxation in stage III lasted 130 s. The residual strains ({epsilon}) at room temperature, as computed from tetragonal (112) and (211) reflections, are {epsilon}{sub (112)} = 0.05% and {epsilon}{sub (211)} = 0.13%, respectively. Time dependence of (211) and (112) peak widths ({beta}) show a decrease with both exhibiting a singularity at 905 Degree-Sign C. An anisotropy in (112) and (211) peak widths of {l_brace} {beta}{sub (112)}/{beta}{sub (211)}{r_brace} = (3:1) magnitude was observed. No phase transformation occurred at 905 Degree-Sign C as verified from diffraction spectra on both sides of the singularity, i.e., the unit cell symmetry remains tetragonal. We attribute the reduction in densification temperature and time to ultrafast ambipolar diffusion of species arising from the

  2. Cooperative protein structural dynamics of homodimeric hemoglobin linked to water cluster at subunit interface revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Goo; Muniyappan, Srinivasan; Oang, Key Young; Kim, Tae Wu; Yang, Cheolhee; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Jeongho; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2016-01-01

    Homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI) consisting of two subunits is a good model system for investigating the allosteric structural transition as it exhibits cooperativity in ligand binding. In this work, as an effort to extend our previous study on wild-type and F97Y mutant HbI, we investigate structural dynamics of a mutant HbI in solution to examine the role of well-organized interfacial water cluster, which has been known to mediate intersubunit communication in HbI. In the T72V mutant of HbI, the interfacial water cluster in the T state is perturbed due to the lack of Thr72, resulting in two less interfacial water molecules than in wild-type HbI. By performing picosecond time-resolved X-ray solution scattering experiment and kinetic analysis on the T72V mutant, we identify three structurally distinct intermediates (I1, I2, and I3) and show that the kinetics of the T72V mutant are well described by the same kinetic model used for wild-type and F97Y HbI, which involves biphasic kinetics, geminate recombination, and bimolecular CO recombination. The optimized kinetic model shows that the R-T transition and bimolecular CO recombination are faster in the T72V mutant than in the wild type. From structural analysis using species-associated difference scattering curves for the intermediates, we find that the T-like deoxy I3 intermediate in solution has a different structure from deoxy HbI in crystal. In addition, we extract detailed structural parameters of the intermediates such as E-F distance, intersubunit rotation angle, and heme-heme distance. By comparing the structures of protein intermediates in wild-type HbI and the T72V mutant, we reveal how the perturbation in the interfacial water cluster affects the kinetics and structures of reaction intermediates of HbI. PMID:27158635

  3. Structural changes in single membranes in response to an applied transmembrane electric potential revealed by time-resolved neutron/X-ray interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Tronin, A.; Chen, C-H.; Gupta, S.; Worcester, D.; Lauter, V.; Strzalka, J.; Kuzmenko, I.; Blasie, J. K.

    2013-01-01

    The profile structure of a hybrid lipid bilayer, tethered to the surface of an inorganic substrate and fully hydrated with a bulk aqueous medium in an electrochemical cell, was investigated as a function of the applied transbilayer electric potential via time-resolved neutron reflectivity, enhanced by interferometry. Significant, and fully reversible structural changes were observed in the distal half (with respect to the substrate surface) of the hybrid bilayer comprised of a zwitterionic phospholipid in response to a +100mV potential with respect to 0mV. These arise presumably due to reorientation of the electric dipole present in the polar headgroup of the phospholipid and its resulting effect on the thickness of the phospholipid’s hydrocarbon chain layer within the hybrid bilayer’s profile structure. The profile structure of the voltage-sensor domain from a voltage-gated ion channel protein within a phospholipid bilayer membrane, tethered to the surface of an inorganic substrate and fully hydrated with a bulk aqueous medium in an electrochemical cell, was also investigated as a function of the applied transmembrane electric potential via time-resolved X-ray reflectivity, enhanced by interferometry. Significant, fully-reversible, and different structural changes in the protein were detected in response to ±100mV potentials with respect to 0mV. The approach employed is that typical of transient spectroscopy, shown here to be applicable to both neutron and X-ray reflectivity of thin films. PMID:24222930

  4. Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Gavrilova, Anna; Rapp, Stephan; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Joerg; Huber, Heinz P.

    2015-07-01

    In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles.

  5. Time-Resolved Crystallography of the Reaction Intermediate of Nitrile Hydratase: Revealing a Role for the Cysteinesulfenic Acid Ligand as a Catalytic Nucleophile.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Kato, Yuki; Hashimoto, Koichi; Iida, Keisuke; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Noguchi, Keiichi; Noguchi, Takumi; Yohda, Masafumi; Odaka, Masafumi

    2015-09-01

    The reaction mechanism of nitrile hydratase (NHase) was investigated using time-resolved crystallography of the mutant NHase, in which βArg56, strictly conserved and hydrogen bonded to the two post-translationally oxidized cysteine ligands, was replaced by lysine, and pivalonitrile was the substrate. The crystal structures of the reaction intermediates were determined at high resolution (1.2-1.3 Å). In combination with FTIR analyses of NHase following hydration in H2 (18) O, we propose that the metal-coordinated substrate is nucleophilically attacked by the O(SO(-) ) atom of αCys114-SO(-) , followed by nucleophilic attack of the S(SO(-) ) atom by a βArg56-activated water molecule to release the product amide and regenerate αCys114-SO(-) . PMID:26333053

  6. Time-resolved microscopy reveals the driving mechanism of particle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dentin-like ivory.

    PubMed

    Domke, Matthias; Gavrilova, Anna; Rapp, Stephan; Frentzen, Matthias; Meister, Joerg; Huber, Heinz P

    2015-07-01

    In dental health care, the application of ultrashort laser pulses enables dental tissue ablation free from thermal side effects, such as melting and cracking. However, these laser types create undesired micro- and nanoparticles, which might cause a health risk for the patient or surgeon. The aim of this study was to investigate the driving mechanisms of micro- and nanoparticle formation during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue. Time-resolved microscopy was chosen to observe the ablation dynamics of mammoth ivory after irradiation with 660 fs laser pulses. The results suggest that nanoparticles might arise in the excited region. The thermal expansion of the excited material induces high pressure in the surrounding bulk tissue, generating a pressure wave. The rarefaction wave behind this pressure wave causes spallation, leading to ejection of microparticles. PMID:26172613

  7. Ultrafast time-resolved electron diffraction revealing the nonthermal dynamics of near-UV photoexcitation-induced amorphization in Ge2Sb2Te5.

    PubMed

    Hada, Masaki; Oba, Wataru; Kuwahara, Masashi; Katayama, Ikufumi; Saiki, Toshiharu; Takeda, Jun; Nakamura, Kazutaka G

    2015-01-01

    Because of their robust switching capability, chalcogenide glass materials have been used for a wide range of applications, including optical storages devices. These phase transitions are achieved by laser irradiation via thermal processes. Recent studies have suggested the potential of nonthermal phase transitions in the chalcogenide glass material Ge2Sb2Te5 triggered by ultrashort optical pulses; however, a detailed understanding of the amorphization and damage mechanisms governed by nonthermal processes is still lacking. Here we performed ultrafast time-resolved electron diffraction and single-shot optical pump-probe measurements followed by femtosecond near-ultraviolet pulse irradiation to study the structural dynamics of polycrystalline Ge2Sb2Te5. The experimental results present a nonthermal crystal-to-amorphous phase transition of Ge2Sb2Te5 initiated by the displacements of Ge atoms. Above the fluence threshold, we found that the permanent amorphization caused by multi-displacement effects is accompanied by a partial hexagonal crystallization. PMID:26314613

  8. Ultrafast time-resolved electron diffraction revealing the nonthermal dynamics of near-UV photoexcitation-induced amorphization in Ge2Sb2Te5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Masaki; Oba, Wataru; Kuwahara, Masashi; Katayama, Ikufumi; Saiki, Toshiharu; Takeda, Jun; Nakamura, Kazutaka G.

    2015-08-01

    Because of their robust switching capability, chalcogenide glass materials have been used for a wide range of applications, including optical storages devices. These phase transitions are achieved by laser irradiation via thermal processes. Recent studies have suggested the potential of nonthermal phase transitions in the chalcogenide glass material Ge2Sb2Te5 triggered by ultrashort optical pulses; however, a detailed understanding of the amorphization and damage mechanisms governed by nonthermal processes is still lacking. Here we performed ultrafast time-resolved electron diffraction and single-shot optical pump-probe measurements followed by femtosecond near-ultraviolet pulse irradiation to study the structural dynamics of polycrystalline Ge2Sb2Te5. The experimental results present a nonthermal crystal-to-amorphous phase transition of Ge2Sb2Te5 initiated by the displacements of Ge atoms. Above the fluence threshold, we found that the permanent amorphization caused by multi-displacement effects is accompanied by a partial hexagonal crystallization.

  9. Ultrafast time-resolved electron diffraction revealing the nonthermal dynamics of near-UV photoexcitation-induced amorphization in Ge2Sb2Te5

    PubMed Central

    Hada, Masaki; Oba, Wataru; Kuwahara, Masashi; Katayama, Ikufumi; Saiki, Toshiharu; Takeda, Jun; Nakamura, Kazutaka G.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their robust switching capability, chalcogenide glass materials have been used for a wide range of applications, including optical storages devices. These phase transitions are achieved by laser irradiation via thermal processes. Recent studies have suggested the potential of nonthermal phase transitions in the chalcogenide glass material Ge2Sb2Te5 triggered by ultrashort optical pulses; however, a detailed understanding of the amorphization and damage mechanisms governed by nonthermal processes is still lacking. Here we performed ultrafast time-resolved electron diffraction and single-shot optical pump-probe measurements followed by femtosecond near-ultraviolet pulse irradiation to study the structural dynamics of polycrystalline Ge2Sb2Te5. The experimental results present a nonthermal crystal-to-amorphous phase transition of Ge2Sb2Te5 initiated by the displacements of Ge atoms. Above the fluence threshold, we found that the permanent amorphization caused by multi-displacement effects is accompanied by a partial hexagonal crystallization. PMID:26314613

  10. Millifluidics for Chemical Synthesis and Time-resolved Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Biswas, Sanchita; Navin, Chelliah V.; Yamane, Dawit G.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Procedures utilizing millifluidic devices for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies are described by taking three examples. In the first, synthesis of ultra-small copper nanoclusters is described. The second example provides their utility for investigating time resolved kinetics of chemical reactions by analyzing gold nanoparticle formation using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The final example demonstrates continuous flow catalysis of reactions inside millifluidic channel coated with nanostructured catalyst. PMID:24327099

  11. Millifluidics for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Biswas, Sanchita; Navin, Chelliah V; Yamane, Dawit G; Miller, Jeffrey T; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2013-01-01

    Procedures utilizing millifluidic devices for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies are described by taking three examples. In the first, synthesis of ultra-small copper nanoclusters is described. The second example provides their utility for investigating time resolved kinetics of chemical reactions by analyzing gold nanoparticle formation using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The final example demonstrates continuous flow catalysis of reactions inside millifluidic channel coated with nanostructured catalyst. PMID:24327099

  12. The time course of non-photochemical quenching in phycobilisomes of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 as revealed by picosecond time-resolved fluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Maksimov, E G; Schmitt, F-J; Shirshin, E A; Svirin, M D; Elanskaya, I V; Friedrich, T; Fadeev, V V; Paschenko, V Z; Rubin, A B

    2014-09-01

    As high-intensity solar radiation can lead to extensive damage of the photosynthetic apparatus, cyanobacteria have developed various protection mechanisms to reduce the effective excitation energy transfer (EET) from the antenna complexes to the reaction center. One of them is non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of the phycobilisome (PB) fluorescence. In Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 this role is carried by the orange carotenoid protein (OCP), which reacts to high-intensity light by a series of conformational changes, enabling the binding of OCP to the PBs reducing the flow of energy into the photosystems. In this paper the mechanisms of energy migration in two mutant PB complexes of Synechocystis sp. were investigated and compared. The mutant CK is lacking phycocyanin in the PBs while the mutant ΔPSI/PSII does not contain both photosystems. Fluorescence decay spectra with picosecond time resolution were registered using a single photon counting technique. The studies were performed in a wide range of temperatures - from 4 to 300 K. The time course of NPQ and fluorescence recovery in darkness was studied at room temperature using both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The OCP induced NPQ has been shown to be due to EET from PB cores to the red form of OCP under photon flux densities up to 1000 μmolphotonsm⁻²s⁻¹. The gradual changes of the energy transfer rate from allophycocyanin to OCP were observed during the irradiation of the sample with blue light and consequent adaptation to darkness. This fact was interpreted as the revelation of intermolecular interaction between OCP and PB binding site. At low temperatures a significantly enhanced EET from allophycocyanin to terminal emitters has been shown, due to the decreased back transfer from terminal emitter to APC. The activation of OCP not only leads to fluorescence quenching, but also affects the rate constants of energy transfer as shown by model based analysis of the decay associated

  13. Profiles of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone in the Japanese flounder as revealed by a newly developed time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Amiya, Noriko; Amano, Masafumi; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Yamanome, Takeshi; Yamamori, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Profiles of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) in the Japanese flounder were examined by a newly developed time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA) and immunohistochemistry. A TR-FIA for alpha-MSH was newly developed, and its levels in the pituitary gland and plasma of Japanese flounder reared in a white or black tank for 5 months were compared. A competitive assay using two antibodies was performed among secondary antibodies in the solid phase, alpha-MSH antibodies, samples, and europium-labeled Des-Ac-alpha-MSH. The sensitivity of the assay, defined as twice the standard deviation at a zero dose, was 0.98 ng/ml (49 pg/well). The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of the assay were 8.8% (n=8) and 17.3% (n=5), respectively, at about 50% binding. Cross-reactivities of Des-Ac-alpha-MSH and Di-Ac-alpha-MSH were about 100%. Cross-reactivities of adrenocorticotropic hormone, salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), and chicken GnRH-II were less than 0.2%, and that of melanin-concentrating hormone was less than 2.0% at 50% binding. Displacement curves of serially twofold-diluted hypothalamus extract, pituitary gland extract, and plasma extract of Japanese flounder with the assay buffer were parallel to the alpha-MSH standard curve. Moreover, displacement curves of serially twofold-diluted hypothalamus and/or pituitary gland extract of masu salmon, goldfish, red seabream, Japanese eel, tiger puffer, and barfin flounder with the assay buffer were also parallel to the alpha-MSH standard. In Japanese flounder, total immunoreactive (ir)-alpha-MSH levels in the pituitary gland were lower in the black tank, whereas those in the plasma tended to be higher in the black tank, suggesting that the synthesis and release of alpha-MSH are higher in the black tank. alpha-MSH-ir cells were detected in the pars intermedia and a small part of the pars distalis of the pituitary gland. alpha-MSH-ir cell bodies were located in the basal hypothalamus and alpha

  14. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  15. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Franziska; Lübcke, Andrea; Heine, Nadja; Schultz, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel setup for the investigation of ultrafast dynamic processes in a liquid jet using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A magnetic-bottle type spectrometer with a high collection efficiency allows the very sensitive detection of photoelectrons emitted from a 10 μm thick liquid jet. This translates into good signal/noise ratio and rapid data acquisition making femtosecond time-resolved experiments feasible. We describe the experimental setup, a detailed spectrometer characterization based on the spectroscopy of nitric oxide in the gas phase, and results from femtosecond time-resolved experiments on sodium iodide solutions. The latter experiments reveal the formation and evolution of the solvated electron and we characterize two distinct spectral components corresponding to initially thermalized and unthermalized solvated electrons. The absence of dark states in photoionization, the direct measurement of electron binding energies, and the ability to resolve dynamic processes on the femtosecond time scale make time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from the liquid jet a very promising method for the characterization of photochemical processes in liquids.

  16. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Franziska; Lübcke, Andrea; Heine, Nadja; Schultz, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel setup for the investigation of ultrafast dynamic processes in a liquid jet using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A magnetic-bottle type spectrometer with a high collection efficiency allows the very sensitive detection of photoelectrons emitted from a 10 μm thick liquid jet. This translates into good signal/noise ratio and rapid data acquisition making femtosecond time-resolved experiments feasible. We describe the experimental setup, a detailed spectrometer characterization based on the spectroscopy of nitric oxide in the gas phase, and results from femtosecond time-resolved experiments on sodium iodide solutions. The latter experiments reveal the formation and evolution of the solvated electron and we characterize two distinct spectral components corresponding to initially thermalized and unthermalized solvated electrons. The absence of dark states in photoionization, the direct measurement of electron binding energies, and the ability to resolve dynamic processes on the femtosecond time scale make time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from the liquid jet a very promising method for the characterization of photochemical processes in liquids. PMID:21133461

  17. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  18. Nano-scaled TiO(OD)2: a time resolved 1H/2D isotope exchange study observed in situ with neutron scattering at 20 °C and 40 °C.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Vincent; Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile; Paulus, Werner

    2013-03-21

    In situ neutron diffraction measurements of the nanocrystalline deuterated oxyhydroxide TiO(OD)(2) compound were performed as a function of time and temperature under NH(3) gas flow in order to study the hydrogen-deuterium exchange mechanism. Data were collected on the instrument D20 at the ILL (France) and the analysis of the kinetics was directly based on the contrast variation of the incoherent neutron cross section of hydrogen and deuterium. The time evolution of the hydrogenated phase fraction was described using the well-known Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) expression. The H/D exchange reaction is complete within 140 s at 20 °C and within 120 s at 40 °C. The activation energy for the H/D exchange reaction is estimated to be 37 kJ mol(-1). PMID:23328794

  19. Structural changes and thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO2 cathode materials studied by combined in situ time-resolved XRD and mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, Seong -Min; Hu, Enyuan; Zhou, Yongning; Yu, Xiqian; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Cho, Sung -Jin; Kim, Kwang -Bum; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Nam, Kyung -Wan

    2014-11-24

    Thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO2 (NMC, with x + y + z = 1, x:y:z = 4:3:3 (NMC433), 5:3:2 (NMC532), 6:2:2 (NMC622), and 8:1:1 (NMC811)) cathode materials is systematically studied using combined in situ time- resolved X-ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy (TR-XRD/MS) techniques upon heating up to 600 °C. The TR-XRD/MS results indicate that the content of Ni, Co, and Mn significantly affects both the structural changes and the oxygen release features during heating: the more Ni and less Co and Mn, the lower the onset temperature of the phase transition (i.e., thermal decomposition) and the larger amount of oxygen release. Interestingly, the NMC532 seems to be the optimized composition to maintain a reasonably good thermal stability, comparable to the low-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC333 and NMC433), while having a high capacity close to the high-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC811 and NMC622). The origin of the thermal decomposition of NMC cathode materials was elucidated by the changes in the oxidation states of each transition metal (TM) cations (i.e., Ni, Co, and Mn) and their site preferences during thermal decomposition. It is revealed that Mn ions mainly occupy the 3a octahedral sites of a layered structure (R3¯m) but Co ions prefer to migrate to the 8a tetrahedral sites of a spinel structure (Fd3¯m) during the thermal decomposition. Such element-dependent cation migration plays a very important role in the thermal stability of NMC cathode materials. The reasonably good thermal stability and high capacity characteristics of the NMC532 composition is originated from the well-balanced ratio of nickel content to manganese and cobalt contents. As a result, this systematic study provides insight into the rational design of NMC-based cathode materials with a desired balance between thermal stability and high energy density.

  20. Revealing the radiative and non-radiative relaxation rates of the fluorescent dye Atto488 in a λ/2 Fabry-Pérot-resonator by spectral and time resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Alexander; Metzger, Michael; Kern, Andreas M.; Brecht, Marc; Meixner, Alfred J.

    2016-07-01

    Using a Fabry-Pérot-microresonator with controllable cavity lengths in the λ/2-regime, we show the controlled modification of the vibronic relaxation dynamics of a fluorescent dye molecule in the spectral and time domain. By altering the photonic mode density around the fluorophores we are able to shape the fluorescence spectrum and enhance specifically the probability of the radiative transitions from the electronic excited state to distinct vibronic excited states of the electronic ground state. Analysis and correlation of the spectral and time resolved measurements by a theoretical model and a global fitting procedure allows us to reveal quantitatively the spectrally distributed radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics of the respective dye molecule under ambient conditions at the ensemble level.Using a Fabry-Pérot-microresonator with controllable cavity lengths in the λ/2-regime, we show the controlled modification of the vibronic relaxation dynamics of a fluorescent dye molecule in the spectral and time domain. By altering the photonic mode density around the fluorophores we are able to shape the fluorescence spectrum and enhance specifically the probability of the radiative transitions from the electronic excited state to distinct vibronic excited states of the electronic ground state. Analysis and correlation of the spectral and time resolved measurements by a theoretical model and a global fitting procedure allows us to reveal quantitatively the spectrally distributed radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics of the respective dye molecule under ambient conditions at the ensemble level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR02380K

  1. Thymine Dimer Formation probed by Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Roller, Florian O.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Kohler, Bern

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts formed when DNA is exposed to UV light. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy reveals that thymine dimers are formed in thymidine oligonucleotides in an ultrafast photoreaction.

  2. Structural and Electronic Transformations of Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C and Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C Cathode Catalysts in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells during Potential-step Operating Processes Characterized by In-situ Time-resolved XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Takao, Shinobu; Samjeské, Gabor; Nagasawa, Kensaku; Sekizawa, Oki; Kaneko, Takuma; Higashi, Kotaro; Uruga, Tomoya; Gayen, Sirshendu; Velaga, Srihari; Saniyal, Milan K.; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic structural and electronic transformations of Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C, Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C cathode catalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) during the potential-step operating processes between 0.4 and 1.4 VRHE (potential vs RHE) were characterized by in-situ (operando) time-resolved Pt LIII-edge quick-XAFS at 100 ms time-resolution. Potential-dependent surface structures and oxidation states of Pt, Pd@Pt(1 ML) and Pd@Pt(2 ML) nanoparticles on carbon at 0.4 and 1.4 VRHE were also analyzed by in-situ Pt LIII-edge and Pd K-edge quick-XAFS. The Pt, Pd@Pt(1 ML) and Pd@Pt(2 ML) nanoparticle surfaces were restructured and disordered at 1.4 VRHE, which were induced by strong Pt-O bonds as well as alloying effects. The rate constants for the changes of Pt valence, CN(Pt-Pt), CN(Pt-Pd) and CN(Pt-O) (CN: coordination number) in the potential-step operating processes were also determined and discussed in relation to the origin of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities of the Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C and Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C cathode catalysts.

  3. Revealing cyclic hardening mechanism of a TRIP steel by real-time in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dunji; An, Ke; Chen, Yan; Chen, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Real-time in situ neutron diffraction was performed on a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel under cyclic loading at room temperature. By Rietveld refinement and single peak analysis, the volume fraction and average stress estimates as well as dislocation density of individual phases (austenite and martensite phase) were derived. The results reveal that the volume fraction of martensite phase, instead of individual phase strengthening, should be accounted for the remarkable secondary cyclic hardening.

  4. In situ TEM straining of nanograined free-standing thin films reveals various unexpected deformation mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, David Martin; Knapp, James Arthur; Clark, Blythe G.; Hattar, Khalid M.; Robertson, Ian M.

    2010-04-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) straining experiments provide direct detailed observation of the deformation and failure mechanisms active at a length scale relevant to nanomaterials. This presentation will detail continued investigations into the active mechanisms governing high purity nanograined pulsed-laser deposited (PLD) nickel, as well as recent work into dislocation-particle interactions in nanostructured PLD aluminum-alumina alloys. Straining experiments performed on nanograined PLD free-standing nanograined Ni films with an engineered grain size distribution revealed that the addition of ductility with limited decrease in strength, reported in such metals, can be attributed to the simultaneous activity of three deformation mechanisms in front of the crack tip. At the crack tip, a grain agglomeration mechanism occurs where several nanograins appear to rotate, resulting in a very thin, larger grain immediately prior to failure. In the classical plastic zone in front of the crack tip, a multitude of mechanisms were found to operate in the larger grains including: dislocation pile-up, twinning, and stress-assisted grain growth. The region outside of the plastic zone showed signs of elasticity with limited indications of dislocation activity. The insight gained from in-situ TEM straining experiments of nanograined PLD Ni provides feedback for models of the deformation and failure in nanograined FCC metals, and suggests a greater complexity in the active mechanisms. The investigation into the deformation and failure mechanisms of FCC metals via in-situ TEM straining experiments has been expanded to the effect of hard particles on the active mechanisms in nanograined aluminum with alumina particles. The microstructures investigated were developed with varying composition, grain size, and particle distribution via tailoring of the PLD conditions and subsequent annealing. In order to develop microstructures suitable for in-situ deformation testing

  5. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence and Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, W. K.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Dippo, P.; Geisz, J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-01-01

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) technique and its ability to characterize recombination in bulk photovoltaic semiconductor materials are reviewed. Results from a variety of materials and a few recent studies are summarized and compared.

  6. Time-resolved investigations of the non-thermal ablation process of graphite induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalupka, C.; Finger, J.; Reininghaus, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the in-situ analysis of the ablation dynamics of the, so-called, laser induced non-thermal ablation process of graphite. A highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is excited by femtosecond laser pulses with fluences below the classic thermal ablation threshold. The ablation dynamics are investigated by axial pump-probe reflection measurements, transversal pump-probe shadowgraphy, and time-resolved transversal emission photography. The combination of the applied analysis methods allows for a continuous and detailed time-resolved observation of the non-thermal ablation dynamics from several picoseconds up to 180 ns. Formation of large, μm-sized particles takes place within the first 3.5 ns after irradiation. The following propagation of ablation products and the shock wave front are tracked by transversal shadowgraphy up to 16 ns. The comparison of ablation dynamics of different fluences by emission photography reveals thermal ablation products even for non-thermal fluences.

  7. Transport into the Northern Hemisphere lowermost stratosphere revealed by in situ tracer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Eric A.; Moore, Fred L.; Elkins, James W.; Dutton, Geoffrey S.; Fahey, David W.; VöMel, Holger; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Rosenlof, Karen H.

    1999-11-01

    The Lightweight Airborne Chromatograph Experiment (LACE) has made in situ measurements of several long-lived trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower to middle stratosphere as part of the Observations of the Middle Stratosphere (OMS) balloon program. The tracers measured by LACE include several photolytic species (CFC-11, CFC-12, and halon-1211) as well as SF6. LACE measurements of these long-lived tracers as well as nearly simultaneous measurements of water vapor and CO2 are used to investigate transport into the lowermost stratosphere, a region where few in situ measurements exist. The measured photolytic species and water vapor are used in a simple mass balance calculation to estimate the mixture of tropospheric and overworld (θ>380 K) air in the lowermost stratosphere. In the northern midlatitudes during September 1996, most of the air in the lowermost stratosphere sampled at the flight location (34.5°N) was transported quasi-isentropically from the troposphere. Measurements from both a May 1998 midlatitude flight and a June 1997 high-latitude flight (64.5°N) revealed the air sampled in the lowermost stratosphere to be dominated by downward advection from the overworld. Atmospheric SF6 and CO2 can uniquely reveal timescales and spatial scales of transport due to these species' large growth rates and subsequent latitudinal surface and free tropospheric gradients. Measurements in the lowermost stratosphere from the September northern midlatitude flight coupled with surface measurements of these species revealed a transport timescale of no more than 1.5 months from the surface to the lowermost stratosphere. The SF6 and CO2 mixing ratios were also consistent with mostly Northern Hemisphere tropospheric air in the lowermost stratosphere. These results point out the usefulness of high-resolution in situ measurements of long-lived tracers to help determine timescales and spatial scales of transport in the region of the upper troposphere and lowermost

  8. Time-resolved transillumination and optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haller, Emmanuel B.

    1996-01-01

    In response to an invitation by the editor-in-chief, I would like to present the current status of time-domain imaging. With exciting new photon diffusion techniques being developed in the frequency domain and promising optical coherence tomography, time-resolved transillumination is in constant evolution and the subject of passionate discussions during the numerous conferences dedicated to this subject. The purpose of time-resolved optical tomography is to provide noninvasive, high-resolution imaging of the interior of living bodies by the use of nonionizing radiation. Moreover, the use of visible to near-infrared wavelength yields metabolic information. Breast cancer screening is the primary potential application for time-resolved imaging. Neurology and tissue characterization are also possible fields of applications. Time- resolved transillumination and optical tomography should not only improve diagnoses, but the welfare of the patient. As no overview of this technique has yet been presented to my knowledge, this paper briefly describes the various methods enabling time-resolved transillumination and optical tomography. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods, as well as the clinical challenges they face are discussed. Although an analytic and computable model of light transport through tissues is essential for a meaningful interpretation of the transillumination process, this paper will not dwell on the mathematics of photon propagation.

  9. Oxidation Induced Doping of Nanoparticles Revealed by in Situ X-ray Absorption Studies.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Gu; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Koo, Bonil; Dos Santos Claro, Paula Cecilia; Shibata, Tomohiro; Requejo, Félix G; Giovanetti, Lisandro J; Liu, Yuzi; Johnson, Christopher; Prakapenka, Vitali; Lee, Byeongdu; Shevchenko, Elena V

    2016-06-01

    Doping is a well-known approach to modulate the electronic and optical properties of nanoparticles (NPs). However, doping at nanoscale is still very challenging, and the reasons for that are not well understood. We studied the formation and doping process of iron and iron oxide NPs in real time by in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study revealed that the mass flow of the iron triggered by oxidation is responsible for the internalization of the dopant (molybdenum) adsorbed at the surface of the host iron NPs. The oxidation induced doping allows controlling the doping levels by varying the amount of dopant precursor. Our in situ studies also revealed that the dopant precursor substantially changes the reaction kinetics of formation of iron and iron oxide NPs. Thus, in the presence of dopant precursor we observed significantly faster decomposition rate of iron precursors and substantially higher stability of iron NPs against oxidation. The same doping mechanism and higher stability of host metal NPs against oxidation was observed for cobalt-based systems. Since the internalization of the adsorbed dopant at the surface of the host NPs is driven by the mass transport of the host, this mechanism can be potentially applied to introduce dopants into different oxidized forms of metal and metal alloy NPs providing the extra degree of compositional control in material design. PMID:27152970

  10. Time resolved thermal lens in edible oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, T. A. S.; Pedreira, P. R. B.; Medina, A. N.; Pereira, J. R. D.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    In this work time resolved thermal lens spectrometry is applied to investigate the optical properties of the following edible oils: soya, sunflower, canola, and corn oils. The experiments were performed at room temperature using the mode mismatched thermal lens configuration. The results showed that when the time resolved procedure is adopted the technique can be applied to investigate the photosensitivity of edible oils. Soya oil presented a stronger photochemical reaction as compared to the other investigated samples. This observation may be relevant for future studies evaluating edible oils storage conditions and also may contribute to a better understanding of the physical and chemical properties of this important foodstuff.

  11. Dengue virus surveillance in Singapore reveals high viral diversity through multiple introductions and in situ evolution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim-Sung; Lo, Sharon; Tan, Sharon Siok-Yin; Chua, Rachel; Tan, Li-Kiang; Xu, Helen; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever, a vector-borne disease, has caused tremendous burden to countries in the tropics and sub tropics. Over the past 20 years, dengue epidemics have become more widespread, severe and frequent. This study aims to understand the dynamics of dengue viruses in cosmopolitan Singapore. Envelope protein gene sequences of all four dengue serotypes (DENV-1-DENV-4) obtained from human sera in Singapore (2008-2010) revealed that constant viral introductions and in situ evolution contribute to viral diversity in Singapore and play important roles in shaping the epidemiology of dengue in the island state. The diversity of dengue viruses reported here could be a reflection of the on-going dengue situation in the region given Singapore's location in a dengue hyperendemic region and its role as the regional hub for travels and trade. Though cosmopolitan genotype of DENV-2 has remained as the predominant strain circulating in Singapore, we uncovered evidence of in situ evolution which could possibly result in viruses with improved fitness. While we have previously shown that a switch in the predominant dengue serotype could serve as a warning for an impending outbreak, our current data shows that a replacement of a predominant viral clade, even in the absence of a switch in predominant serotype, could signal a possible increase in dengue transmission. The circulating dengue viruses in Singapore are highly diverse, a situation which could offer ample opportunities for selection of strains of higher fitness, thus increasing the risk of outbreaks despite a low Aedes population. PMID:22036707

  12. Metatranscriptomics reveal differences in in situ energy and nitrogen metabolism among hydrothermal vent snail symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, J G; Beinart, R A; Stewart, F J; Delong, E F; Girguis, P R

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of chemoautotrophic symbioses at hydrothermal vents, our understanding of the influence of environmental chemistry on symbiont metabolism is limited. Transcriptomic analyses are useful for linking physiological poise to environmental conditions, but recovering samples from the deep sea is challenging, as the long recovery times can change expression profiles before preservation. Here, we present a novel, in situ RNA sampling and preservation device, which we used to compare the symbiont metatranscriptomes associated with Alviniconcha, a genus of vent snail, in which specific host–symbiont combinations are predictably distributed across a regional geochemical gradient. Metatranscriptomes of these symbionts reveal key differences in energy and nitrogen metabolism relating to both environmental chemistry (that is, the relative expression of genes) and symbiont phylogeny (that is, the specific pathways employed). Unexpectedly, dramatic differences in expression of transposases and flagellar genes suggest that different symbiont types may also have distinct life histories. These data further our understanding of these symbionts' metabolic capabilities and their expression in situ, and suggest an important role for symbionts in mediating their hosts' interaction with regional-scale differences in geochemistry. PMID:23619306

  13. Asymmetric cryo-EM reconstruction of phage MS2 reveals genome structure in situ.

    PubMed

    Koning, Roman I; Gomez-Blanco, Josue; Akopjana, Inara; Vargas, Javier; Kazaks, Andris; Tars, Kaspars; Carazo, José María; Koster, Abraham J

    2016-01-01

    In single-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses, virus capsid assembly and genome packaging are intertwined processes. Using cryo-electron microscopy and single particle analysis we determined the asymmetric virion structure of bacteriophage MS2, which includes 178 copies of the coat protein, a single copy of the A-protein and the RNA genome. This reveals that in situ, the viral RNA genome can adopt a defined conformation. The RNA forms a branched network of stem-loops that almost all allocate near the capsid inner surface, while predominantly binding to coat protein dimers that are located in one-half of the capsid. This suggests that genomic RNA is highly involved in genome packaging and virion assembly. PMID:27561669

  14. Asymmetric cryo-EM reconstruction of phage MS2 reveals genome structure in situ

    PubMed Central

    Koning, Roman I; Gomez-Blanco, Josue; Akopjana, Inara; Vargas, Javier; Kazaks, Andris; Tars, Kaspars; Carazo, José María; Koster, Abraham J.

    2016-01-01

    In single-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses, virus capsid assembly and genome packaging are intertwined processes. Using cryo-electron microscopy and single particle analysis we determined the asymmetric virion structure of bacteriophage MS2, which includes 178 copies of the coat protein, a single copy of the A-protein and the RNA genome. This reveals that in situ, the viral RNA genome can adopt a defined conformation. The RNA forms a branched network of stem-loops that almost all allocate near the capsid inner surface, while predominantly binding to coat protein dimers that are located in one-half of the capsid. This suggests that genomic RNA is highly involved in genome packaging and virion assembly. PMID:27561669

  15. Time resolved astronomy with the SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Crawford, S.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; McPhate, J.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Potter, S. B.; O'Donoghue, D.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Schellart, P.; Spark, M.; Welsh, B. Y.; Zietsman, E.

    2010-07-01

    While time resolved astronomical observations are not new, the extension of such studies to sub-second time resolution is and has resulted in the opening of a new observational frontier, High Time Resolution Astronomy (HTRA). HTRA studies are well suited to objects like compact binary stars (CVs and X-ray binaries) and pulsars, while asteroseismology of pulsating stars, occultations, transits and the study of transients, will all benefit from such HTRA studies. HTRA has been a SALT science driver from the outset and the first-light instruments, namely the UV-VIS imager, SALTICAM, and the multi-purpose Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS), both have high time resolution modes. These are described, together with some observational examples. We also discuss the commissioning observations with the photon counting Berkeley Visible Image Tube camera (BVIT) on SALT. Finally we describe the software tools, developed in Python, to reduce SALT time resolved observations.

  16. Deflection evaluation using time-resolved radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.A.; Lucero, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved radiography is the creation of an x-ray image for which both the start-exposure and stop-exposure times are known with respect to the event under study. The combination of image and timing are used to derive information about the event. We have applied time-resolved radiography to evaluate motions of explosive-driven events. In the particular application discussed here, our intent is to measure maximum deflections of the components involved. Exposures are made during the time just before to just after the event of interest occurs. A smear or blur of motion out to its furthest extent is recorded on the image. Comparison of the dynamic images with static images allows deflection measurements to be made. 2 figs.

  17. Time-resolved multiple probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Greetham, G. M.; Sole, D.; Clark, I. P.; Parker, A. W.; Pollard, M. R.; Towrie, M.

    2012-10-15

    Time-resolved multiple probe spectroscopy combines optical, electronic, and data acquisition capabilities to enable measurement of picosecond to millisecond time-resolved spectra within a single experiment, using a single activation pulse. This technology enables a wide range of dynamic processes to be studied on a single laser and sample system. The technique includes a 1 kHz pump, 10 kHz probe flash photolysis-like mode of acquisition (pump-probe-probe-probe, etc.), increasing the amount of information from each experiment. We demonstrate the capability of the instrument by measuring the photolysis of tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO){sub 6}) monitored by IR absorption spectroscopy, following picosecond vibrational cooling of product formation through to slower bimolecular diffusion reactions on the microsecond time scale.

  18. Effects of tank color on melanin-concentrating hormone levels in the brain, pituitary gland, and plasma of the barfin flounder as revealed by a newly developed time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Amiya, Noriko; Amano, Masafumi; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Yamanome, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Hiroshi; Yamamori, Kunio

    2005-09-15

    A pleuronectiform fish, the barfin flounder Verasper moseri, reared in a white tank had a smaller ratio of pigmented area of the skin on non-eyed side, grew faster, and had greater melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-immunoreactive cell bodies and MCH gene expression in the brain than in the black tank, indicating that synthesis and release of MCH are higher in fish from a white tank. In the present study, a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for MCH was developed. MCH levels were assessed in the brain, pituitary gland, and plasma of barfin flounders reared in a white or black tank. A competitive assay using two antibodies was performed among secondary antibodies in the solid phase, MCH antibodies, samples, and europium-labeled MCH. Displacement curves of serially diluted extracts (brain, pituitary gland, and plasma) of the barfin flounder paralleled that of the MCH standard. MCH levels in the brain and plasma were higher in fish reared in the white tank for 5 months than in the black tank. These results suggest that synthesis and secretion of MCH are enhanced with the white background and that MCH is involved in both somatic growth and the skin pigmentation in the barfin flounder. PMID:15979616

  19. Time-resolved air monitoring using Fourier absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, H.W.

    1995-12-31

    Two categories where spectroscopic techniques excel are the capabilities to perform air analyses in situ and to obtain data at very high time resolutions. Because of these features, the Department of Pesticide Regulation augmented its extensive air monitoring capabilities with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer using open-path optical systems for time resolved ambient air monitoring. A description of the instrumentation and the data analysis procedures will be presented based on two data sets obtained with this FTIR system. In one case, a 100 m folded optical path was used to measure methyl bromide concentrations after fumigation in a warehouse with a time resolution of 15 min and a detection limit of 0.2 ppm. And trying to assess the capability of this FTIR spectrometer to determine flux, water vapor concentrations were measured with a four-meter path length at a time resolution of 0.6 seconds.

  20. Time resolved optical tomography of the human forearm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Schweiger, Martin; Dehghani, Hamid; Schmidt, Florian E. W.; Delpy, David T.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2001-04-01

    A 32-channel time-resolved optical imaging instrument has been developed principally to study functional parameters of the new-born infant brain. As a prelude to studies on infants, the device and image reconstruction methodology have been evaluated on the adult human forearm. Cross-sectional images were generated using time-resolved measurements of transmitted light at two wavelengths. All data were acquired using a fully automated computer-controlled protocol. Images representing the internal scattering and absorbing properties of the arm are presented, as well as images that reveal physiological changes during a simple finger flexion exercise. The results presented in this paper represent the first simultaneous tomographic reconstruction of the internal scattering and absorbing properties of a clinical subject using purely temporal data, with additional co-registered difference images showing repeatable absorption changes at two wavelengths in response to exercise.

  1. A Direct Interaction between the Sigma-1 Receptor and the hERG Voltage-gated K+ Channel Revealed by Atomic Force Microscopy and Homogeneous Time-resolved Fluorescence (HTRF®)*

    PubMed Central

    Balasuriya, Dilshan; D'Sa, Lauren; Talker, Ronel; Dupuis, Elodie; Maurin, Fabrice; Martin, Patrick; Borgese, Franck; Soriani, Olivier; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein, widely expressed in central and peripheral tissues, which can translocate to the plasma membrane and modulate the function of various ion channels. The human ether-à-go-go-related gene encodes hERG, a cardiac voltage-gated K+ channel that is abnormally expressed in many human cancers and is known to interact functionally with the sigma-1 receptor. Our aim was to investigate the nature of the interaction between the sigma-1 receptor and hERG. We show that the two proteins can be co-isolated from a detergent extract of stably transfected HEK-293 cells, consistent with a direct interaction between them. Atomic force microscopy imaging of the isolated protein confirmed the direct binding of the sigma-1 receptor to hERG monomers, dimers, and tetramers. hERG dimers and tetramers became both singly and doubly decorated by sigma-1 receptors; however, hERG monomers were only singly decorated. The distribution of angles between pairs of sigma-1 receptors bound to hERG tetramers had two peaks, at ∼90 and ∼180° in a ratio of ∼2:1, indicating that the sigma-1 receptor interacts with hERG with 4-fold symmetry. Homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®) allowed the detection of the interaction between the sigma-1 receptor and hERG within the plane of the plasma membrane. This interaction was resistant to sigma ligands, but was decreased in response to cholesterol depletion of the membrane. We suggest that the sigma-1 receptor may bind to hERG in the endoplasmic reticulum, aiding its assembly and trafficking to the plasma membrane. PMID:25266722

  2. In situ Expression of Functional Genes Reveals Nitrogen Cycling at High Temperatures in Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiacono, S. T.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    An essential element for life, nitrogen occurs in all living organisms and is critical for the synthesis of amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, and other forms of biomass. Thus, nitrogen cycling likely plays a vital role in microbial metabolic processes as well as nutrient availability. For microorganisms in "extreme" environments, this means developing adaptations that allow them to survive in harsh conditions and still perform the metabolisms essential to sustain life. Recent studies have screened biofilms and thermal sediments of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) thermal features for the presence of nifH genes, which code for a key enzyme in the nitrogen fixation process [1-4]. Furthermore, analysis of nitrogen isotopes in biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient revealed that nitrogen fixation likely varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [5]. Although research has evaluated and confirmed the presence of nifH genes in various thermophilic microbial communities, the existence of a gene in the DNA of an organism does not verify its use. Instead, other methods, such as culturing, isotope tracer assays, and gene expression studies are required to provide direct evidence of biological nitrogen fixation. Culturing and isotope tracer approaches have successfully revealed high-temperature biological nitrogen fixation in both marine hydrothermal vent microbial communities [6] and in acidic, terrestrial hydrothermal sediment [3]. Transcriptomics-based techniques (using mRNA extracted from samples to confirm in situ expression of targeted genes) have been much more limited in number, and only a few studies have, to date, investigated in situ expression of the nifH gene in thermophilic microbial communities [2, 7]. This study explores the presence and expression of nifH genes in several features of the Lower Geyser Basin (LGB) of YNP. Nucleic acids from chemosynthetic and photosynthetic microbial communities were extracted and then amplified

  3. Time-resolved circularly polarized protein phosphorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Schauerte, J A; Steel, D G; Gafni, A

    1992-01-01

    The existence of circular polarization in room-temperature protein phosphorescence is demonstrated, and time-resolved circularly polarized phosphorescence (TR-CPP) is used to characterize unique tryptophan environments in multitryptophan proteins. Circularly polarized luminescence studies provide information regarding the excited state chirality of a lumiphore which can be used to extract sensitive structural information. It is shown by time resolving the circular polarization that it is possible to correlate the excited state chirality with unique decay components in a multiexponential phosphorescence decay profile. The present study presents a concurrent analysis of room-temperature time-resolved phosphorescence and TR-CPP of bacterial glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase as well as those of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase. Only one of the two tryptophan residues per subunit of dimeric alcohol dehydrogenase is believed to phosphorescence, while the dimeric glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase has eight tryptophan residues per subunit and shows a corresponding complexity in its phosphorescence decay profile. The anisotropy factor [g(em) = delta I/(Itotal/2); delta I = Ileft circular-Iright circular] for alcohol dehydrogenase is time independent, suggesting a unique excited state chirality. The phosphorescence decay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can be well fitted with four exponential terms of 4, 23, 76, and 142 msec, and the TR-CPP of this enzyme shows a strong time dependence that can be resolved into four individual time-independent anisotropy factors of -4.0, -2.1, +6.5, and +6.9 (x10(-3)), each respectively associated with one of the four lifetime components. These results demonstrate how the use of TR-CPP can facilitate the study of proteins with multiple lumiphores. PMID:1438204

  4. Time Resolved Raman and Fluorescence Spectrometer for Planetary Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Rossman, George

    2010-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a prime candidate for the next generation of planetary instruments, as it addresses the primary goal of mineralogical analysis which is structure and composition. It does not require sample preparation and provides unique mineral fingerprints, even for mixed phase samples. However, large fluorescence return from many mineral samples under visible light excitation can seriously compromise the quality of the spectra or even render Raman spectra unattainable. Fluorescence interference is likely to be a problem on Mars and is evident in Raman spectra of Martian Meteorites[1]. Our approach uses time resolution for elimination of fluorescence from Raman spectra, allowing for traditional visible laser excitation (532 nm). Since Raman occurs instantaneously with the laser pulse and fluorescence lifetimes vary from nsec to msec depending on the mineral, it is possible to separate them out in time. Complementary information can also be obtained simultaneously using the time resolved fluorescence data. The Simultaneous Spectral Temporal Adaptive Raman Spectrometer (SSTARS) is a planetary instrument under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, capable of time-resolved in situ Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. A streak camera and pulsed miniature microchip laser provide psec scale time resolution. Our ability to observe the complete time evolution of Raman and fluorescence in minerals provides a foundation for design of pulsed Raman and fluorescence spectrometers in diverse planetary environments. We will discuss the SSTARS instrument design and performance capability. We will also present time-resolved pulsed Raman spectra collected from a relevant set of minerals selected using available data on Mars mineralogy[2]. Of particular interest are minerals resulting from aqueous alteration on Mars. For comparison, we will present Raman spectra obtained using a commercial continuous wave (CW) green (514 nm) Raman system. In many cases using a CW laser

  5. Ultrahigh-resolution imaging reveals formation of neuronal SNARE/Munc18 complexes in situ

    PubMed Central

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Mukherjee, Konark; Sharma, Manu; Pang, Zhiping P.; Park, Sang Ryul; Zhang, Yunxiang; Brunger, Axel T.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Chu, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion is mediated by complexes formed by SNAP-receptor (SNARE) and Secretory 1 (Sec1)/mammalian uncoordinated-18 (Munc18)-like (SM) proteins, but it is unclear when and how these complexes assemble. Here we describe an improved two-color fluorescence nanoscopy technique that can achieve effective resolutions of up to 7.5-nm full width at half maximum (3.2-nm localization precision), limited only by stochastic photon emission from single molecules. We use this technique to dissect the spatial relationships between the neuronal SM protein Munc18-1 and SNARE proteins syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25 (25 kDa synaptosome-associated protein). Strikingly, we observed nanoscale clusters consisting of syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25 that contained associated Munc18-1. Rescue experiments with syntaxin-1 mutants revealed that Munc18-1 recruitment to the plasma membrane depends on the Munc18-1 binding to the N-terminal peptide of syntaxin-1. Our results suggest that in a primary neuron, SNARE/SM protein complexes containing syntaxin-1, SNAP-25, and Munc18-1 are preassembled in microdomains on the presynaptic plasma membrane. Our superresolution imaging method provides a framework for investigating interactions between the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery and other subcellular systems in situ. PMID:23821748

  6. Time Resolved Deposition Measurements in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; H. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore; J. Hogan; W.R. Wampler; the NSTX team

    2004-08-03

    Time-resolved measurements of deposition in current tokamaks are crucial to gain a predictive understanding of deposition with a view to mitigating tritium retention and deposition on diagnostic mirrors expected in next-step devices. Two quartz crystal microbalances have been installed on NSTX at a location 0.77m outside the last closed flux surface. This configuration mimics a typical diagnostic window or mirror. The deposits were analyzed ex-situ and found to be dominantly carbon, oxygen, and deuterium. A rear facing quartz crystal recorded deposition of lower sticking probability molecules at 10% of the rate of the front facing one. Time resolved measurements over a 4-week period with 497 discharges, recorded 29.2 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of deposition, however surprisingly, 15.9 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of material loss occurred at 7 discharges. The net deposited mass of 13.3 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} matched the mass of 13.5 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} measured independently by ion beam analysis. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that transient processes are likely to dominate the deposition.

  7. Time-Resolved Imaging Of Transient Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, L. S.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.; Singh, J.; Ahmad, Z.

    2009-07-07

    Pulsed capillary discharge is a compact device that is used to perform fast electrical discharge that is used to produce transient plasma. In this work, a more economical imaging technique is developed in order to study the dynamics of the plasma that is formed in a capillary tube. The imaging system consists of two main devices, a four-frame gated micro-channel plate and a Nikon Coolpix5000 camera. The time-resolved imaging that we have performed in order to study the dynamics of the plasma that is formed in a 10 mm long and 1 mm diameter low pressure capillary tube is reported. The images obtained portrayed that the plasma is heated up when the magnitude of the current is around the maximum and cools down when the current magnitude is around the minimum.

  8. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δmore » > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.« less

  9. Time-Resolved Conformational Dynamics in Hydrocarbon Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Michael P.; Weber, Peter M.

    2007-06-22

    Internal rotation about carbon-carbon bonds allows N,N-dimethyl-2-butanamine (DM2BA) and N,N-dimethyl-3-hexanamine (DM3HA) to assume multiple conformeric structures. We explore the equilibrium composition and dynamics between such conformeric structures using Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy. Time constants for conformeric interconversion of DM2BA (at 1.79 eV of internal energy) are 19 and 66 ps, and for DM3HA (1.78 eV) 23 and 41 ps. For the first time, a time-resolved and quantitative view of conformational dynamics of flexible hydrocarbon molecules at high temperatures is revealed.

  10. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhitao; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Xiao, Pan; Christensen, James; Zhou, Min; Summers, Christopher J.; Dlott, Dana D.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2016-07-01

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  11. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.

  12. Evolution of Chromosome 6 of Solanum Species Revealed by Comparative Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genome mapping is an important tool in evolutionary research. Here we demonstrate a comparative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping strategy. A set of 13 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones derived from potato chromosome 6 was used for FISH mapping in seven differen...

  13. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  14. Diagnosis of meningioma by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Butte, Pramod V; Pikul, Brian K; Hever, Aviv; Yong, William H; Black, Keith L; Marcu, Laura

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the use of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as an adjunctive tool for the intraoperative rapid evaluation of tumor specimens and delineation of tumor from surrounding normal tissue. Tissue autofluorescence is induced with a pulsed nitrogen laser (337 nm, 1.2 ns) and the intensity decay profiles are recorded in the 370 to 500 nm spectral range with a fast digitizer (0.2 ns resolution). Experiments are conducted on excised specimens (meningioma, dura mater, cerebral cortex) from 26 patients (97 sites). Spectral intensities and time-dependent parameters derived from the time-resolved spectra of each site are used for tissue characterization. A linear discriminant analysis algorithm is used for tissue classification. Our results reveal that meningioma is characterized by unique fluorescence characteristics that enable discrimination of tumor from normal tissue with high sensitivity (>89%) and specificity (100%). The accuracy of classification is found to increase (92.8% cases in the training set and 91.8% in the cross-validated set correctly classified) when parameters from both the spectral and the time domain are used for discrimination. Our findings establish the feasibility of using TR-LIFS as a tool for the identification of meningiomas and enables further development of real-time diagnostic tools for analyzing surgical tissue specimens of meningioma or other brain tumors. PMID:16409091

  15. The origin of molecular mobility during biomass pyrolysis as revealed by in situ (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Anthony; Castro-Diaz, Miguel; Brosse, Nicolas; Bouroukba, Mohamed; Snape, Colin

    2012-07-01

    The thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks offers an important potential route for the production of biofuels and value-added green chemicals. Pyrolysis is the first phenomenon involved in all biomass thermochemical processes and it controls to a major extent the product composition. The composition of pyrolysis products can be affected markedly by the extent of softening that occurs. In spite of extensive work on biomass pyrolysis, the development of fluidity during the pyrolysis of biomass has not been quantified. This paper provides the first experimental investigation of proton mobility during biomass pyrolysis by in situ (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The origin of mobility is discussed for cellulose, lignin and xylan. The effect of minerals on cellulose mobility is also investigated. Interactions between polymers in the native biomass network are revealed by in situ (1)H NMR analysis. PMID:22573541

  16. In situ X-ray diffraction monitoring of a mechanochemical reaction reveals a unique topology metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsenis, Athanassios D.; Puškarić, Andreas; Štrukil, Vjekoslav; Mottillo, Cristina; Julien, Patrick A.; Užarević, Krunoslav; Pham, Minh-Hao; Do, Trong-On; Kimber, Simon A. J.; Lazić, Predrag; Magdysyuk, Oxana; Dinnebier, Robert E.; Halasz, Ivan; Friščić, Tomislav

    2015-03-01

    Chemical and physical transformations by milling are attracting enormous interest for their ability to access new materials and clean reactivity, and are central to a number of core industries, from mineral processing to pharmaceutical manufacturing. While continuous mechanical stress during milling is thought to create an environment supporting nonconventional reactivity and exotic intermediates, such speculations have remained without proof. Here we use in situ, real-time powder X-ray diffraction monitoring to discover and capture a metastable, novel-topology intermediate of a mechanochemical transformation. Monitoring the mechanochemical synthesis of an archetypal metal-organic framework ZIF-8 by in situ powder X-ray diffraction reveals unexpected amorphization, and on further milling recrystallization into a non-porous material via a metastable intermediate based on a previously unreported topology, herein named katsenite (kat). The discovery of this phase and topology provides direct evidence that milling transformations can involve short-lived, structurally unusual phases not yet accessed by conventional chemistry.

  17. Photosensing performance of branched CdS/ZnO heterostructures as revealed by in situ TEM and photodetector tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Tian, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Xi; Liu, Jiangwei; Li, Song-Lin; Tang, Dai-Ming; Liu, Dequan; Liao, Meiyong; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-06-01

    CdS/ZnO branched heterostructures have been successfully synthesized by combining thermal vapour deposition and a hydrothermal method. Drastic optoelectronic performance enhancement of such heterostructures was revealed, compared to plain CdS nanobelts, as documented by comparative in situ optoelectronic studies on corresponding individual nanostructures using an originally designed laser-compatible transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. Furthermore, flexible thin-film based photodetectors based on standard CdS nanobelts and newly prepared CdS/ZnO heterostructures were fabricated on PET substrates, and comparative photocurrent and photo-responsivity measurements thoroughly verified the in situ TEM results. The CdS/ZnO branched heterostructures were found to have better performance than standard CdS nanobelts for optoelectronic applications with respect to the photocurrent to dark current ratio and responsivity.CdS/ZnO branched heterostructures have been successfully synthesized by combining thermal vapour deposition and a hydrothermal method. Drastic optoelectronic performance enhancement of such heterostructures was revealed, compared to plain CdS nanobelts, as documented by comparative in situ optoelectronic studies on corresponding individual nanostructures using an originally designed laser-compatible transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. Furthermore, flexible thin-film based photodetectors based on standard CdS nanobelts and newly prepared CdS/ZnO heterostructures were fabricated on PET substrates, and comparative photocurrent and photo-responsivity measurements thoroughly verified the in situ TEM results. The CdS/ZnO branched heterostructures were found to have better performance than standard CdS nanobelts for optoelectronic applications with respect to the photocurrent to dark current ratio and responsivity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00963k

  18. Time-resolved spin-dependent processes in magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qiming; Li, Xianjie; Li, Feng

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the time-resolved magnetic field effects (MFEs) in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum (Alq3) based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) through the transient electroluminescence (EL) method. The values of magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) decrease with the time, and the decreasing slope is proportional to the driving voltage. Specifically, negative MELs are seen when the driving voltage is high enough (V > 11 V). We propose a model to elucidate the spin-dependent processes and theoretically simulate the time-resolved MELs. In particular, this dynamic analysis of time-resolved MELs reveals that the intersystem crossing between singlet and triplet electron-hole pairs and the triplet-triplet annihilation are responsible for the time-resolved MELs at the beginning and enduring periods of the pulse, respectively.

  19. An inexpensive technique for the time resolved laser induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rizwan; Ahmed, Nasar; Iqbal, J.; Aslam Baig, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present an efficient and inexpensive method for calculating the time resolved emission spectrum from the time integrated spectrum by monitoring the time evolution of neutral and singly ionized species in the laser produced plasma. To validate our assertion of extracting time resolved information from the time integrated spectrum, the time evolution data of the Cu II line at 481.29 nm and the molecular bands of AlO in the wavelength region (450-550 nm) have been studied. The plasma parameters were also estimated from the time resolved and time integrated spectra. A comparison of the results clearly reveals that the time resolved information about the plasma parameters can be extracted from the spectra registered with a time integrated spectrograph. Our proposed method will make the laser induced plasma spectroscopy robust and a low cost technique which is attractive for industry and environmental monitoring.

  20. Gene expression profiling reveals sequential changes in gastric tubular adenoma and carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Bang, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Koo; Song, Kyu-Young; Lee, In-Chul

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the expression profiles of premalignant and/or preclinical lesions of gastric cancers. METHODS: We analyzed the expression profiles of normal gastric pit, tubular adenoma and carcinoma in situ using microdissected cells from routine gastric biopsies. For the DNA microarray analysis of formalin-fixed samples, we developed a simple and reproducible RNA extraction and linear amplification procedure applying two polymerase-binding sites. The amplification procedure took only 8 h and yielded comparable DNA microarray data between formalin-fixed tissues and unfixed controls. RESULTS: In comparison with normal pit, adenoma/carcinoma showed 504 up-regulated and 29 down-regulated genes at the expected false significance rate 0.15%. The differential expression between adenoma and carcinoma in situ was subtle: 50 and 22 genes were up-, and down-regulated in carcinomas at the expected false significance rate of 0.61%, respectively. Differentially expressed genes were grouped according to patterns of the sequential changes for the the ‘tendency analysis’ in the gastric mucosa-adenoma-carcinoma sequence. CONCLUSION: Groups of genes are shown to reflect the sequential expression changes in the early carcinogenic steps of stomach cancer. It is suggested that molecular carcinogenic pathways could be analyzed using routinely processed biopsies. PMID:15800983

  1. High-resolution telomere fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals intriguing anomalies in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Shekhani, Mohammed Talha; Barber, John R; Bezerra, Stephania M; Heaphy, Christopher M; Gonzalez Roibon, Nilda Diana; Taheri, Diana; Reis, Leonardo O; Guner, Gunes; Joshu, Corinne E; Netto, George J; Meeker, Alan K

    2016-08-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common malignancy of young men. Most patients are completely cured, which distinguishes these from most other malignancies. Orchiectomy specimens (n=76) were evaluated using high-resolution (single-cell discriminative) telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with simultaneous Oct4 immunofluorescence to describe telomere length phenotype in TGCT neoplastic cells. For the first time, the TGCT precursor lesion, germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS) is also evaluated in depth. The intensity of the signals from cancerous cells was compared to the same patient's reference cells-namely, healthy germ cells (defined as "medium" length) and interstitial/somatic cells (defined as "short" telomere length). We observed short telomeres in most GCNIS and pure seminomas (P=.006 and P=.0005, respectively). In contrast, nonseminomas displayed longer telomeres. Lesion-specific telomere lengths were documented in mixed tumor cases. Embryonal carcinoma (EC) demonstrated the longest telomeres. A fraction of EC displays the telomerase-independent alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) phenotype (24% of cases). Loss of ATRX or DAXX nuclear expression was strongly associated with ALT; however, nuclear expression of both proteins was retained in half of ALT-positive ECs. The particular distribution of telomere lengths among TGCT and GCNIS precursors implicate telomeres anomalies in pathogenesis. These results may advise management decisions as well. PMID:27085557

  2. Revealing Correlation of Valence State with Nanoporous Structure in Cobalt Catalyst Nanoparticles by In situ Environmental TEM

    SciTech Connect

    Xin H. L.; Diaz R.; Pach, E.A.; Stach, E.A.; Salmeron, M.; Zheng, H.

    2012-05-01

    Simultaneously probing the electronic structure and morphology of materials at the nanometer or atomic scale while a chemical reaction proceeds is significant for understanding the underlying reaction mechanisms and optimizing a materials design. This is especially important in the study of nanoparticle catalysts, yet such experiments have rarely been achieved. Utilizing an environmental transmission electron microscope equipped with a differentially pumped gas cell, we are able to conduct nanoscopic imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy in situ for cobalt catalysts under reaction conditions. Studies reveal quantitative correlation of the cobalt valence states with the particles' nanoporous structures. The in situ experiments were performed on nanoporous cobalt particles coated with silica, while a 15 mTorr hydrogen environment was maintained at various temperatures (300-600 C). When the nanoporous particles were reduced, the valence state changed from cobalt oxide to metallic cobalt and concurrent structural coarsening was observed. In situ mapping of the valence state and the corresponding nanoporous structures allows quantitative analysis necessary for understanding and improving the mass activity and lifetime of cobalt-based catalysts, for example, for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis that converts carbon monoxide and hydrogen into fuels, and uncovering the catalyst optimization mechanisms.

  3. Strain-induced growth of oriented graphene layers revealed by in situ transmission electron microscopy observation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Neng; Pan, Wei; Lin, Tao

    2016-06-22

    We report on the observation of the strain-induced oriented alignment of graphene layers during the in situ 80 keV e-beam irradiation of an amorphous carbon structure using an aberration corrected (Cs-corrected) electron transmission microscope. E-beam irradiation promoted the amorphous-to-ordered structure transformation and contributed to the formation of small sized graphene flakes by local structure reconstruction. In the mean time, graphene flakes were driven to rotate and re-orient along the strain direction under the uni-axial stress conditions, which finally connected with each other and produced a high oriented structure. Our observations suggest that strain engineering could be an effective method in tuning the microstructure and properties especially in layer-structured materials. PMID:27150490

  4. In Situ X-Ray Probing Reveals Fingerprints of Surface Platinum Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Friebel, Daniel

    2011-08-24

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Pt L{sub 3} edge is a useful probe for Pt-O interactions at polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathodes. We show that XAS using the high energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD) mode, applied to a well-defined monolayer Pt/Rh(111) sample where the bulk penetrating hard x-rays probe only surface Pt atoms, provides a unique sensitivity to structure and chemical bonding at the Pt-electrolyte interface. Ab initio multiple-scattering calculations using the FEFF8 code and complementary extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results indicate that the commonly observed large increase of the white-line at high electrochemical potentials on PEMFC cathodes originates from platinum oxide formation, whereas previously proposed chemisorbed oxygen-containing species merely give rise to subtle spectral changes.

  5. Mechanisms of antiwear tribofilm growth revealed in situ by single-asperity sliding contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosvami, N. N.; Bares, J. A.; Mangolini, F.; Konicek, A. R.; Yablon, D. G.; Carpick, R. W.

    2015-04-01

    Zinc dialkyldithiophosphates (ZDDPs) form antiwear tribofilms at sliding interfaces and are widely used as additives in automotive lubricants. The mechanisms governing the tribofilm growth are not well understood, which limits the development of replacements that offer better performance and are less likely to degrade automobile catalytic converters over time. Using atomic force microscopy in ZDDP-containing lubricant base stock at elevated temperatures, we monitored the growth and properties of the tribofilms in situ in well-defined single-asperity sliding nanocontacts. Surface-based nucleation, growth, and thickness saturation of patchy tribofilms were observed. The growth rate increased exponentially with either applied compressive stress or temperature, consistent with a thermally activated, stress-assisted reaction rate model. Although some models rely on the presence of iron to catalyze tribofilm growth, the films grew regardless of the presence of iron on either the tip or substrate, highlighting the critical role of stress and thermal activation.

  6. European flint landraces grown in situ reveal adaptive introgression from modern maize.

    PubMed

    Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Rau, Domenico; Albertini, Emidio; Rodriguez, Monica; Veronesi, Fabio; Attene, Giovanna; Nanni, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the role of selection in the determination of the detected levels of introgression from modern maize hybrid varieties into maize landraces still cultivated in situ in Italy. We exploited the availability of a historical collection of landraces undertaken before the introduction and widespread use of modern maize, to analyse genomic changes that have occurred in these maize landraces over 50 years of co-existence with hybrid varieties. We have combined a previously published SSR dataset (n=21) with an AFLP loci dataset (n=168) to provide higher resolution power and to obtain a more detailed picture. We show that selection pressures for adaptation have favoured new alleles introduced by migration from hybrids. This shows the potential for analysis of historical introgression even over this short period of 50 years, for an understanding of the evolution of the genome and for the identification of its functionally important regions. Moreover, this demonstrates that landraces grown in situ represent almost unique populations for use for such studies when the focus is on the domesticated plant. This is due to their adaptation, which has arisen from their dynamic evolution under a continuously changing agro-ecological environment, and their capture of new alleles from hybridisation. We have also identified loci for which selection has inhibited introgression from modern germplasm and has enhanced the distinction between landraces and modern maize. These loci indicate that selection acted in the past, during the formation of the flint and dent gene pools. In particular, the locus showing the strongest signals of selection is a Misfit transposable element. Finally, molecular characterisation of the same samples with two different molecular markers has allowed us to compare their performances. Although the genetic-diversity and population-structure analyses provide the same global qualitative pattern, which thus provides the same inferences, there are

  7. European Flint Landraces Grown In Situ Reveal Adaptive Introgression from Modern Maize

    PubMed Central

    Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Rau, Domenico; Albertini, Emidio; Rodriguez, Monica; Veronesi, Fabio; Attene, Giovanna; Nanni, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the role of selection in the determination of the detected levels of introgression from modern maize hybrid varieties into maize landraces still cultivated in situ in Italy. We exploited the availability of a historical collection of landraces undertaken before the introduction and widespread use of modern maize, to analyse genomic changes that have occurred in these maize landraces over 50 years of co-existence with hybrid varieties. We have combined a previously published SSR dataset (n=21) with an AFLP loci dataset (n=168) to provide higher resolution power and to obtain a more detailed picture. We show that selection pressures for adaptation have favoured new alleles introduced by migration from hybrids. This shows the potential for analysis of historical introgression even over this short period of 50 years, for an understanding of the evolution of the genome and for the identification of its functionally important regions. Moreover, this demonstrates that landraces grown in situ represent almost unique populations for use for such studies when the focus is on the domesticated plant. This is due to their adaptation, which has arisen from their dynamic evolution under a continuously changing agro-ecological environment, and their capture of new alleles from hybridisation. We have also identified loci for which selection has inhibited introgression from modern germplasm and has enhanced the distinction between landraces and modern maize. These loci indicate that selection acted in the past, during the formation of the flint and dent gene pools. In particular, the locus showing the strongest signals of selection is a Misfit transposable element. Finally, molecular characterisation of the same samples with two different molecular markers has allowed us to compare their performances. Although the genetic-diversity and population-structure analyses provide the same global qualitative pattern, which thus provides the same inferences, there are

  8. Millifluidics for time-resolved mapping of the growth of gold nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Sai Krishna, Katla; Navin, Chelliah; Biswas, Sanchita; Singh, Varshni; Ham, Kyungmin; Bovencamp, L. S.; Theegala, Chandra; Miller, Jeffrey T; Spivey, James J.; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.

    2013-04-10

    Innovative in situ characterization tools are essential for understanding the reaction mechanisms leading to the growth of nanoscale materials. Though techniques, such as in situ transmission X-ray microscopy, fast single-particle spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, etc., are currently being developed, these tools are complex, not easily accessible, and do not necessarily provide the temporal resolution required to follow the formation of nanomaterials in real time. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the utility of a simple millifluidic chip for an in situ real time analysis of morphology and dimension-controlled growth of gold nano- and microstructures with a time resolution of 5 ms. The structures formed were characterized using synchrotron radiation-based in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, 3-D X-ray tomography, and high-resolution electron microscopy. These gold nanostructures were found to be catalytically active for conversion of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, providing an example of the potential opportunities for time-resolved analysis of catalytic reactions. While the investigations reported here are focused on gold nanostructures, the technique can be applied to analyze the time-resolved growth of other types of nanostructured metals and metal oxides. With the ability to probe at least a 10-fold higher concentrations, in comparison with traditional microfluidics, the tool has potential to revolutionize a broad range of fields from catalysis, molecular analysis, biodefense, and molecular biology.

  9. Legitimate intermediates of oxygen evolution on iridium oxide revealed by in situ electrochemical evanescent wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Hideshi; Wang, Yuanqing; Yamaguchi, Akira; Hatakeyama, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how the four-electron oxidation of water to dioxygen proceeds in different materials is critical to the rational design of efficient catalysts towards artificial photosynthetic systems. Here, using in situ electrochemical evanescent wave spectroscopy under oxygen-evolving conditions, we report two intermediates of iridium oxide (IrOx), which is the most active and stable catalyst characterized to date in acidic medium. The observed potential dependence of the two intermediates indicated that they were associated with different surface sites, and intermediate scavenging experiments using H2O2 provided insight into their role during catalysis. Notably, an Ir(V) species with an absorption maximum at 450 nm was found to mediate the initial two-electron oxidation of water. Inhibition of the Ir(V) species by H2O2, combined with computational modeling, indicates that the accumulation and concurrent spin-state change of the Ir(V) species is a prerequisite for efficient water oxidation by IrOx electrodes. PMID:27197557

  10. Intermediate stages of electrochemical oxidation of single-crystalline platinum revealed by in situ Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Fan; Kooyman, Patricia J; Koper, Marc T M

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the atomistic details of how platinum surfaces are oxidized under electrochemical conditions is of importance for many electrochemical devices such as fuel cells and electrolysers. Here we use in situ shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to identify the intermediate stages of the electrochemical oxidation of Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals in perchloric acid. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to assist in assigning the experimental Raman bands by simulating the vibrational frequencies of possible intermediates and products. The perchlorate anion is suggested to interact with hydroxyl phase formed on the surface. Peroxo-like and superoxo-like two-dimensional (2D) surface oxides and amorphous 3D α-PtO2 are sequentially formed during the anodic polarization. Our measurements elucidate the process of the electrochemical oxidation of platinum single crystals by providing evidence for the structure-sensitive formation of a 2D platinum-(su)peroxide phase. These results may contribute towards a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of degradation of platinum electrocatalysts. PMID:27514695

  11. In situ imaging reveals the biomass of giant protists in the global ocean.

    PubMed

    Biard, Tristan; Stemmann, Lars; Picheral, Marc; Mayot, Nicolas; Vandromme, Pieter; Hauss, Helena; Gorsky, Gabriel; Guidi, Lionel; Kiko, Rainer; Not, Fabrice

    2016-04-28

    Planktonic organisms play crucial roles in oceanic food webs and global biogeochemical cycles. Most of our knowledge about the ecological impact of large zooplankton stems from research on abundant and robust crustaceans, and in particular copepods. A number of the other organisms that comprise planktonic communities are fragile, and therefore hard to sample and quantify, meaning that their abundances and effects on oceanic ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, using data from a worldwide in situ imaging survey of plankton larger than 600 μm, we show that a substantial part of the biomass of this size fraction consists of giant protists belonging to the Rhizaria, a super-group of mostly fragile unicellular marine organisms that includes the taxa Phaeodaria and Radiolaria (for example, orders Collodaria and Acantharia). Globally, we estimate that rhizarians in the top 200 m of world oceans represent a standing stock of 0.089 Pg carbon, equivalent to 5.2% of the total oceanic biota carbon reservoir. In the vast oligotrophic intertropical open oceans, rhizarian biomass is estimated to be equivalent to that of all other mesozooplankton (plankton in the size range 0.2-20 mm). The photosymbiotic association of many rhizarians with microalgae may be an important factor in explaining their distribution. The previously overlooked importance of these giant protists across the widest ecosystem on the planet changes our understanding of marine planktonic ecosystems. PMID:27096373

  12. Environmental controls of frost cracking revealed through in situ acoustic emission measurements in steep bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Lucas; Gruber, Stephan; Weber, Samuel; Beutel, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Frost cracking, the breakdown of rock by freezing, is one of the most important mechanical weathering processes acting on Earth's surface. Insights on the mechanisms driving frost cracking stem mainly from laboratory and theoretical studies. Transferring insights from such studies to natural conditions, involving jointed bedrock and heterogeneous thermal and hydrological properties, is a major challenge. We address this problem with simultaneous in situ measurements of acoustic emissions, used as proxy of rock damage, and rock temperature/moisture content. The 1 year data set acquired in an Alpine rock wall shows that (1) liquid water content has an important impact on freezing-induced rock damage, (2) sustained freezing can yield much stronger damage than repeated freeze-thaw cycling, and (3) that frost cracking occurs over the full range of temperatures measured extending from 0 down to -15°C. These new measurements yield a slightly different picture than previous field studies where ice segregation appears to play an important role.

  13. Intermediate stages of electrochemical oxidation of single-crystalline platinum revealed by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Fan; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the atomistic details of how platinum surfaces are oxidized under electrochemical conditions is of importance for many electrochemical devices such as fuel cells and electrolysers. Here we use in situ shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to identify the intermediate stages of the electrochemical oxidation of Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals in perchloric acid. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to assist in assigning the experimental Raman bands by simulating the vibrational frequencies of possible intermediates and products. The perchlorate anion is suggested to interact with hydroxyl phase formed on the surface. Peroxo-like and superoxo-like two-dimensional (2D) surface oxides and amorphous 3D α-PtO2 are sequentially formed during the anodic polarization. Our measurements elucidate the process of the electrochemical oxidation of platinum single crystals by providing evidence for the structure-sensitive formation of a 2D platinum-(su)peroxide phase. These results may contribute towards a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of degradation of platinum electrocatalysts. PMID:27514695

  14. Proteome-wide analysis reveals an age-associated cellular phenotype of in situ aged human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Kalfalah, Faiza; Florea, Ana-Maria; Sass, Steffen; Kruse, Fabian; Rieder, Vera; Tigges, Julia; Fritsche, Ellen; Krutmann, Jean; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Meyer, Helmut E.; Boege, Fritz; Theis, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed an ex vivo model of in situ aged human dermal fibroblasts, obtained from 15 adult healthy donors from three different age groups using an unbiased quantitative proteome-wide approach applying label-free mass spectrometry. Thereby, we identified 2409 proteins, including 43 proteins with an age-associated abundance change. Most of the differentially abundant proteins have not been described in the context of fibroblasts’ aging before, but the deduced biological processes confirmed known hallmarks of aging and led to a consistent picture of eight biological categories involved in fibroblast aging, namely proteostasis, cell cycle and proliferation, development and differentiation, cell death, cell organization and cytoskeleton, response to stress, cell communication and signal transduction, as well as RNA metabolism and translation. The exhaustive analysis of protein and mRNA data revealed that 77% of the age-associated proteins were not linked to expression changes of the corresponding transcripts. This is in line with an associated miRNA study and led us to the conclusion that most of the age-associated alterations detected at the proteome level are likely caused post-transcriptionally rather than by differential gene expression. In summary, our findings led to the characterization of novel proteins potentially associated with fibroblast aging and revealed that primary cultures of in situ aged fibroblasts are characterized by moderate age-related proteomic changes comprising the multifactorial process of aging. PMID:25411231

  15. Interactions of arsenic with calcite surfaces revealed by in situ nanoscale imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, François; Putnis, Christine V.; Montes-Hernandez, German; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Hovelmann, Jörn; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-06-01

    Arsenic dissolved in water represents a key environmental and health challenge because several million people are under the threat of contamination. In calcareous environments calcite may play an important role in arsenic solubility and transfer in water. Arsenic-calcite interactions remain controversial, especially for As(III) which was proposed to be either incorporated as such, or as As(V) after oxidation. Here, we provide the first time-lapse in situ study of the evolution of the (10-14) calcite cleavage surface morphology during dissolution and growth in the presence of solutions with various amounts of As(III) or As(V) at room temperature and pH range 6-11 using a flow-through cell connected to an atomic force microscope (AFM). Reaction products were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy. In parallel, co-precipitation experiments with either As(III) or As(V) were performed in batch reactors, and the speciation of arsenic in the resulting solids was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). For As(V), AFM results showed that it interacts strongly with the calcite surface, and XAS results showed that As(V) was mostly incorporated in the calcite structure. For As(III), AFM results showed much less impact on calcite growth and dissolution and less incorporation was observed. This was confirmed by XAS results that indicate that As(III) was partly oxidized into As(V) before being incorporated into calcite and the resulting calcite contained 36% As(III) and 64% As(V). All these experimental results confirm that As(V) has a much stronger interaction with calcite than As(III) and that calcite may represent an important reservoir for arsenic in various geological environments.

  16. Interactions of arsenic with calcite surfaces revealed by in-situ nanoscale imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Francois; Putnis, Christine; Montes-Hernandez, German; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Hövelmann, Jörn; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic dissolved in water represents a key environmental and health challenge because several million people are under the threat of contamination. In calcareous environments calcite may play an important role in arsenic solubility and transfer in water. Arsenic-calcite interactions remain controversial, especially for As(III) which was proposed to be either incorporated as such, or as As(V) after oxidation. Here, we provide the first time-lapse in-situ study of calcite dissolution and growth in the presence of solutions with various amounts of As(III) or As(V). This was performed at room temperature and pH range 6-9 using a flow through cell connected to an atomic force microscope (AFM), to study the evolution of the (10-14) calcite cleavage surface morphology. Reaction products were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy. In parallel, co-precipitation experiments with either As(III) or As(V) were performed in batch reactors, and the speciation of arsenic in the resulting solids was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). For As(V), AFM results showed that it interacts strongly with the calcite surface, and XAS results showed that As(V) was mostly incorporated in the calcite structure. For As(III), AFM results showed much less impact on calcite growth and dissolution and less incorporation was observed. This was confirmed by XAS results that indicate that As(III) was partly oxidized into As(V) before being incorporated into calcite and the resulting calcite contained 36% As(III) and 64% As(V). All these experimental results confirm that As(V) has a much stronger interaction with calcite than As(III) and that calcite may represent an important reservoir for arsenic in various geological environments.

  17. In situ cardiac perfusion reveals interspecific variation of intraventricular flow separation in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Joyce, William; Axelsson, Michael; Altimiras, Jordi; Wang, Tobias

    2016-07-15

    The ventricles of non-crocodilian reptiles are incompletely divided and provide an opportunity for mixing of oxygen-poor blood and oxygen-rich blood (intracardiac shunting). However, both cardiac morphology and in vivo shunting patterns exhibit considerable interspecific variation within reptiles. In the present study, we develop an in situ double-perfused heart approach to characterise the propensity and capacity for shunting in five reptile species: the turtle Trachemys scripta, the rock python Python sebae, the yellow anaconda Eunectes notaeus, the varanid lizard Varanus exanthematicus and the bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps To simulate changes in vascular bed resistance, pulmonary and systemic afterloads were independently manipulated and changes in blood flow distribution amongst the central outflow tracts were monitored. As previously demonstrated in Burmese pythons, rock pythons and varanid lizards exhibited pronounced intraventricular flow separation. As pulmonary or systemic afterload was raised, flow in the respective circulation decreased. However, flow in the other circulation, where afterload was constant, remained stable. This correlates with the convergent evolution of intraventricular pressure separation and the large intraventricular muscular ridge, which compartmentalises the ventricle, in these species. Conversely, in the three other species, the pulmonary and systemic flows were strongly mutually dependent, such that the decrease in pulmonary flow in response to elevated pulmonary afterload resulted in redistribution of perfusate to the systemic circuit (and vice versa). Thus, in these species, the muscular ridge appeared labile and blood could readily transverse the intraventricular cava. We conclude that relatively minor structural differences between non-crocodilian reptiles result in the fundamental changes in cardiac function. Further, our study emphasises that functionally similar intracardiac flow separation evolved independently in

  18. Hydration effects on gypsum dissolution revealed by in situ nanoscale atomic force microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, A.; Putnis, C. V.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has suggested that the rates of mineral dissolution in aqueous solutions are dependent on the kinetics of dehydration of the ions building the crystal. Dehydration kinetics will be ultimately determined by the competition between ion-water and water-water interactions, which can be significantly modified by the presence of background ions in solution. At low ionic strength, the effect of electrolytes on ion-water (electrostatic) interactions will dominate (Kowacz et al., 2007). By performing macroscopic and in situ, microscopic (atomic force microscopy) dissolution experiments, the effect of background electrolytes on the dissolution kinetics of gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) {0 1 0} cleavage surfaces is tested at constant, low ionic strength (IS = 0.05) and undersaturation (saturation index, SI = -0.045). Dissolution rates are systematically lower in the presence of 1:1 background electrolytes than in an electrolyte-free solution, regardless of the nature of the electrolyte tested. We hypothesize that stabilization of the hydration shell of calcium by the presence of background ions can explain this result, based on the observed correlations in dissolution rates with the ionic surface tension increment of the background ion in solution. Stabilization of the cation hydration shell should favor dissolution. However, in the case of strongly hydrated ions such as Ca2+, this has a direct entropic effect that reduces the overall ΔG of the system, so that dissolution is energetically less favorable. Overall, these results provide new evidence that supports cation dehydration being the rate-controlling step for gypsum dissolution, as proposed for other minerals such as barite, dolomite and calcite.

  19. Attosecond Time-Resolved Autoionization of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang He; Chini, Michael; Chen Shouyuan; Zhang Changhua; Cheng Yan; Wu Yi; Thumm, Uwe; He Feng; Chang Zenghu

    2010-10-01

    Autoionization of argon atoms was studied experimentally by transient absorption spectroscopy with isolated attosecond pulses. The peak position, intensity, linewidth, and shape of the 3s3p{sup 6}np {sup 1}P Fano resonance series (26.6-29.2 eV) were modified by intense few-cycle near infrared laser pulses, while the delay between the attosecond pulse and the laser pulse was changed by a few femtoseconds. Numerical simulations revealed that the experimentally observed splitting of the 3s3p{sup 6}4p {sup 1}P line is caused by the coupling between two short-lived highly excited states in the strong laser field.

  20. Advances in ultrafast time resolved fluorescence physics for cancer detection in optical biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, R. R.

    2012-03-01

    We discuss the use of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to extract fundamental kinetic information on molecular species in tissues. The temporal profiles reveal the lifetime and amplitudes associated with key active molecules distinguishing the local spectral environment of tissues. The femtosecond laser pulses at 310 nm excite the tissue. The emission profile at 340 nm from tryptophan is non-exponential due to the micro-environment. The slow and fast amplitudes and lifetimes of emission profiles reveal that cancer and normal states can be distinguished. Time resolved optical methods offer a new cancer diagnostic modality for the medical community.

  1. In situ measures of foraging success and prey encounter reveal marine habitat-dependent search strategies.

    PubMed

    Thums, Michele; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Hindelli, Mark A

    2011-06-01

    Predators are thought to reduce travel speed and increase turning rate in areas where resources are relatively more abundant, a behavior termed "area-restricted search." However, evidence for this is rare, and few empirical data exist for large predators. Animals exhibiting foraging site fidelity could also be spatially aware of suitable feeding areas based on prior experience; changes in movement patterns might therefore arise from the anticipation of higher prey density. We tested the hypothesis that regions of area-restricted search were associated with a higher number of daily speed spikes (a proxy for potential prey encounter rate) and foraging success in southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina), a species exhibiting both area-restricted searches and high interannual foraging site fidelity. We used onshore morphological measurements and diving data from archival tags deployed during winter foraging trips. Foraging success was inferred from in situ changes in relative lipid content derived from measured changes in buoyancy, and first-passage time analysis was used to identify area-restricted search behavior. Seals exhibited relatively direct southerly movement on average, with intensive search behavior predominantly located at the distal end of tracks. The probability of being in search mode was positively related to changes in relative lipid content; thus, intensively searched areas were associated with the highest foraging success. However, there was high foraging success during the outward transit even though seals moved through quickly without slowing down and increasing turning rate to exploit these areas. In addition, the probability of being in search mode was negatively related to the number of daily speed spikes. These results suggest that movement patterns represent a response to prior expectation of the location of predictable and profitable resources. Shelf habitat was 4-9 times more profitable than the other habitats, emphasizing the importance

  2. Contrasting behavior of oxygen and iron isotopes in banded iron formation revealed by in situ analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, B.; Li, W.; Kita, N.; Valley, J. W.; Johnson, C.

    2012-12-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) record a period of dramatic secular change in Earth's geologic history, when abundant aqueous Fe(II) was removed from Archean and Proterozoic oceans by oxidation. BIFs are characterized by co-existing of quartz and iron minerals, including oxides and carbonates, and alternating iron-rich and iron-poor layers range from m to in situ measurement of O and Fe isotope ratios in minerals in BIFs provide valuable information about the origin of BIFs, as well as diagenetic and metamorphic effects that were superimposed on primary layering. We analyzed O and Fe isotope compositions of magnetite and hematite in BIFs from the 2.5 Ga Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation, Hamersley Group, Western Australia. Oxygen isotope ratios were measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Fe isotope ratios were measured by femtosecond Laser ablation Multi-Collector ICP-MS (fs-LA-MC-ICP-MS), with spatial resolutions of 15 mm (O) and 30-50 mm (Fe), and external precisions (2s) of +0.7 ‰ for δ18O and +0.2 ‰ for δ56Fe, respectively. Analysis of δ18O in iron oxides by SIMS employed special tuning with a 3kV primary beam to minimize orientation effects (Huberty et al. 2010 ). For hematite, δ18O values range from -7.1 ‰ to -0.6 ‰, with the majority of data clustering around -4.5 ‰, and δ56Fe values range from -0.50 ‰ to +1.53‰. Magnetite has a δ18O range of -5.6 ‰ to +5.6 ‰ and a δ56Fe range of -0.76 ‰ to +1.33 ‰. Notably, magnetite shows significant O isotope heterogeneity at a mineral grain scale, and the highest δ18O values were commonly measured from Si-rich (1-3 wt% SiO2) magnetite overgrowths or magnetite grains that have a recrystallization texture. In contrast, lowest δ18O values were measured from magnetite that contains less than 1 wt% SiO2. Individual magnetite grains can have up to 6 ‰ variation in δ18O values between low-Si core and Si-rich overgrowth. Iron

  3. Sensing cell metabolism by time-resolved autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yicong; Zheng, Wei; Qu, Jianan Y

    2006-11-01

    We built a time-resolved confocal fluorescence spectroscopy system equipped with the multichannel time-correlated single-photon-counting technique. The instrument provides a unique approach to study the fluorescence sensing of cell metabolism via analysis of the wavelength- and time-resolved intracellular autofluorescence. The experiments on monolayered cell cultures show that with UV excitation at 365 nm the time-resolved autofluorescence decays, dominated by free-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide signals, are sensitive indicators for cell metabolism. However, the sensitivity decreases with the increase of excitation wavelength possibly due to the interference from free-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide fluorescence. The results demonstrate that time-resolved autofluorescence can be potentially used as an important contrast mechanism to detect epithelial precancer. PMID:17041655

  4. Sensing cell metabolism by time-resolved autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Zheng, Wei; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2006-11-01

    We built a time-resolved confocal fluorescence spectroscopy system equipped with the multichannel time-correlated single-photon-counting technique. The instrument provides a unique approach to study the fluorescence sensing of cell metabolism via analysis of the wavelength- and time-resolved intracellular autofluorescence. The experiments on monolayered cell cultures show that with UV excitation at 365 nm the time-resolved autofluorescence decays, dominated by free-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide signals, are sensitive indicators for cell metabolism. However, the sensitivity decreases with the increase of excitation wavelength possibly due to the interference from free-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide fluorescence. The results demonstrate that time-resolved autofluorescence can be potentially used as an important contrast mechanism to detect epithelial precancer.

  5. PREFACE: Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lin, Nian

    2010-07-01

    out the potential landscape of the system (often a molecule or an atom) under study [4, 5]. However, the dynamical processes might also be induced by the tunnelling process itself [6, 7]. In the field of molecular science, excited single molecule experiments have been especially performed [8]. As a nice example, we refer to the work of Sykes' group [9] on thioether molecular rotors. In addition, several groups explore the possibility of combining time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy with optical techniques [10, 11]. Although the majority of studies that have been performed so far focus on rather simple systems under nearly ideal and well-defined conditions, we anticipate that time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy can also be applied in other research areas, such as biology and soft condensed matter, where the experimental conditions are often less ideal. We hope that readers will enjoy this collection of papers and that it will trigger them to further explore the possibilities of this simple, but powerful technique. References [1] Besenbacher F, Laegsgaard E and Stengaard I 2005 Mater. Today 8 26 [2] van Houselt A and Zandvliet H J W 2010 Rev. Mod. Phys. 82 1593 [3] Tringides M C and Hupalo M 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264002 [4] Ronci F, Colonna S, Cricenti A and Le Lay G 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264003 [5] van Houselt A, Poelsema B and Zandvliet H J W 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264004 [6] Sprodowski C, Mehlhorn M and Morgenstern K 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264005 [7] Saedi A, Poelsema B and Zandvliet H J W 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264007 [8] Sloan P A 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264001 [9] Jewell A D, Tierney H L, Baber A E, Iski E V, Laha M M and Sykes E C H 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264006 [10] Riedel D 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264009 [11] Terada Y, Yoshida S, Takeuchi O and Shigekawa H 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264008

  6. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  7. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Dangendorf, V.; Tittelmeier, K.; Schillinger, B.; Schulz, M.; Lerche, M.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and integrated over multiple cycles. A fast MCP/Timepix neutron counting detector was used to image the water distribution within a model steam engine operating at 10 Hz frequency. Within <10 minutes integration the amount of water was measured as a function of cycle time with a sub-mm spatial resolution, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of time-resolved neutron radiography for the future applications. The neutron spectrum of the ANTARES beamline as well as transmission spectra of a Fe sample were also measured with the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique in combination with a high resolution beam chopper. The energy resolution of our setup was found to be ~ 0.8% at 5 meV and ~ 1.7% at 25 meV. The background level (most likely gammas and epithermal/fast neutrons) of the ANTARES beamline was also measured in our experiments and found to be on the scale of 3% when no filters are installed in the beam. Online supplementary data available from stacks.iop.org/jinst/10

  8. Time-resolved photoluminescence properties of semiconductor quantum dot superlattices of different microcrystal shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Weon-Sik Choi, Eunjin; Ku Jung, Yun; Jung, Jin-Seung; Lee, Jin-Kyu

    2014-04-14

    We report time-resolved photoluminescence properties on semiconductor quantum dot (QD) superlattices (SLs) using PL lifetime imaging microscopy at a single particle level. PL lifetime imaging technique clearly reveals that different shaped QD SL microcrystals have different time-resolved PL characteristics. The faceted SL microcrystals consisted of well-organized QDs showed faster recombination rates than those of the spherical microparticles including randomly organized QDs, which can be explained by the different degree of energetic couplings among component QDs due to different packing fraction.

  9. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  10. Time-resolved neurite mechanics by thermal fluctuation assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gárate, Fernanda; Betz, Timo; Pertusa, María; Bernal, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of simple noninvasive measurements, the knowledge of temporal and spatial variations of axons mechanics remains scarce. By extending thermal fluctuation spectroscopy (TFS) to long protrusions, we determine the transverse amplitude thermal fluctuation spectra that allow direct and simultaneous access to three key mechanics parameters: axial tension, bending flexural rigidity and plasma membrane tension. To test our model, we use PC12 cell protrusions—a well-know biophysical model of axons—in order to simplify the biological system under scope. For instance, axial and plasma membrane tension are found in the range of nano Newton and tens of pico Newtons per micron respectively. Furthermore, our results shows that the TFS technique is capable to distinguish quasi-identical protrusions. Another advantage of our approach is the time resolved nature of the measurements. Indeed, in the case of long term experiments on PC12 protrusions, TFS has revealed large temporal, correlated variations of the protrusion mechanics, displaying extraordinary feedback control over the axial tension in order to maintain a constant tension value.

  11. Time-resolved photoluminescence of SiOx encapsulated Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalem, Seref; Hannas, Amal; Österman, Tomas; Sundström, Villy

    Silicon and its oxide SiOx offer a number of exciting electrical and optical properties originating from defects and size reduction enabling engineering new electronic devices including resistive switching memories. Here we present the results of photoluminescence dynamics relevant to defects and quantum confinement effects. Time-resolved luminescence at room temperature exhibits an ultrafast decay component of less than 10 ps at around 480 nm and a slower component of around 60 ps as measured by streak camera. Red shift at the initial stages of the blue luminescence decay confirms the presence of a charge transfer to long lived states. Time-correlated single photon counting measurements revealed a life-time of about 5 ns for these states. The same quantum structures emit in near infrared close to optical communication wavelengths. Nature of the emission is described and modeling is provided for the luminescence dynamics. The electrical characteristics of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices were correlated with the optical and vibrational measurement results in order to have better insight into the switching mechanisms in such resistive devices as possible next generation RAM memory elements. ``This work was supported by ENIAC Joint Undertaking and Laser-Lab Europe''.

  12. Native architecture of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast revealed by in situ cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Benjamin D; Schaffer, Miroslava; Kuhn Cuellar, Luis; Villa, Elizabeth; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast function is orchestrated by the organelle's intricate architecture. By combining cryo-focused ion beam milling of vitreous Chlamydomonas cells with cryo-electron tomography, we acquired three-dimensional structures of the chloroplast in its native state within the cell. Chloroplast envelope inner membrane invaginations were frequently found in close association with thylakoid tips, and the tips of multiple thylakoid stacks converged at dynamic sites on the chloroplast envelope, implicating lipid transport in thylakoid biogenesis. Subtomogram averaging and nearest neighbor analysis revealed that RuBisCO complexes were hexagonally packed within the pyrenoid, with ∼15 nm between their centers. Thylakoid stacks and the pyrenoid were connected by cylindrical pyrenoid tubules, physically bridging the sites of light-dependent photosynthesis and light-independent carbon fixation. Multiple parallel minitubules were bundled within each pyrenoid tubule, possibly serving as conduits for the targeted one-dimensional diffusion of small molecules such as ATP and sugars between the chloroplast stroma and the pyrenoid matrix. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04889.001 PMID:25584625

  13. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization reveal molecular events in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hua; Gao, Wen; Wu, Yu-jie; Qiu, Hai-rong; Shu, Yong-qian

    2009-07-01

    We have used the molecular cytogenetic techniques of multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to analyze two established lung cancer cell lines (A549, H520), 80 primary lung adenocarcinoma samples and 80 squamous cell lung carcinoma samples in order to identify common chromosomal aberrations. M-FISH revealed numerous complex chromosomal rearrangements. Chromosomes 5, 6, 11, 12, and 17 were most frequently involved in interchromosomal translocations. CGH revealed regions on 1q, 2p, 3q, 5p, 5q, 7p, 8q, 11q, 12q, 14q, 16p, 17p, 19q, 20q, 21q and 22q to be commonly over-represented and regions on 2q, 3p, 4p, 5q, 7q, 8p, 9p, 13q, 14q, and 17p to be under-represented. In lung adenocarcinomas the most common gains were found in 16p13 (50%); while in squamous cell lung carcinomas the common gains were found in 17q21 (45%) and these alterations were observed to be associated with their specific pathological subtype. In conclusion, the present study contributes to the molecular biological characterization in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell lung carcinomas and through evaluation of molecular events to the recently emergent focus on novel markers for lung cancer treatment. PMID:18848758

  14. Sequential electrochemical unzipping of single-walled carbon nanotubes to graphene ribbons revealed by in situ Raman spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    John, Robin; Shinde, Dhanraj B; Liu, Lili; Ding, Feng; Xu, Zhiping; Vijayan, Cherianath; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-01-28

    We report an in situ Raman spectroscopic and microscopic investigation of the electrochemical unzipping of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Observations of the radial breathing modes (RBMs) using Raman spectral mapping reveal that metallic SWNTs are opened up rapidly followed by gradual unzipping of semiconducting SWNTs. Consideration of the resonant Raman scattering theory suggests that two metallic SWNTs with chiralities (10, 4) and (12, 0) get unzipped first at a lower electrode potential (0.36 V) followed by the gradual unzipping of another two metallic tubes, (9, 3) and (10, 1), at a relatively higher potential (1.16 V). The semiconducting SWNTs with chiralities (11, 7) and (12, 5), however, get open up gradually at ±1.66 V. A rapid decrease followed by a subsequent gradual decrease in the metallicity of the SWNT ensemble as revealed from a remarkable variation of the peak width of the G band complies well with the variations of RBM. Cyclic voltammetry also gives direct evidence for unzipping in terms of improved capacitance after oxidation followed by more important removal of oxygen functionalities during the reduction step, as reflected in subtle changes of the morphology confirming the formation of graphene nanoribbons. The density functional-based tight binding calculations show additional dependence of chirality and diameter of nanotubes on the epoxide binding energies, which is in agreement with the Raman spectroscopic results and suggests a possible mechanism of unzipping determined by combined effects of the structural characteristics of SWNTs and applied field. PMID:24308315

  15. Revealing the surface and bulk regimes of isothermal graphene growth on Ni with in situ kinetic measurements and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Merkulov, Igor A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Geohegan, David B

    2014-01-01

    In situ optical diagnostics are used to reveal the isothermal nucleation and growth mechanisms of graphene on Ni across a wide temperature range (560 C < T < 840 C) by chemical vapor deposition from single, sub-second pulses of acetylene. An abrupt, two-orders of magnitude change in growth times (~ 100s to 1s) is revealed at T = 680 C. Below and above this temperature, similar sigmoidal kinetics are measured and attributed to autocatalytic growth reactions but by two different mechanisms, surface assembly and dissolution/precipitation, respectively. These data are used to develop a simple and general kinetic model for graphene growth that includes the nucleation phase and includes the effects of carbon solubility in metals, describes delayed nucleation, and allows the interpretation of the competition between surface and bulk growth modes. The sharp transition in growth kinetics at T = 680 C is explained by a change in defect site density required for nucleation due to a transition in the carbon-induced mobility of the Ni surface. The easily-implemented optical reflectivity diagnostics and the simple kinetic model described here allow a pathway to optimize the growth of graphene on metals with arbitrary carbon solubility.

  16. Deactivation processes of homogeneous Pd catalysts using in situ time resolved spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Tromp, Moniek; Sietsma, Jelle R A; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; van Strijdonck, Gino P F; van Haaren, Richard J; van der Eerden, Ad M J; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M; Koningsberger, Diek C

    2003-01-01

    UV-Vis, combined with ED-XAFS shows, for the first time, the evolution of inactive Pd dimers and trimers, that are a possible first stage in the deactivation process of important palladium catalysed reactions, leading to larger palladium clusters and eventually palladium black. PMID:12610999

  17. In-situ time resolved synchrotron powder diffraction studies of synthesis and chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, P.

    1995-09-01

    Equipment for time and temperature dependent powder diffraction has been developed, especially in order to be able to study hydrothermal syntheses of zeolites. The system is very versatile and has so far been used to study e.g. hydrothermal syntheses of zeolites and aluminophosphates, syntheses of layered phosphates, formation of Sorel cements, dehydration and phase transformations of zeolites, solid state synthesis of lanthanum manganites, ion exchange of zeolites using molten salt, and oxidation/reduction of lanthanum manganites at high temperatures. The sample is contained in quartz capillaries and is heated using a stream of hot air. External pressure can be applied allowing hydrothermal syntheses at temperatures up to 200 C to be performed. Controlled atmosphere is obtained by flowing gas or a mixture of gases through the capillary.

  18. Time-resolved crystallography and protein design: signalling photoreceptors and optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Keith

    2014-07-17

    Time-resolved X-ray crystallography and solution scattering have been successfully conducted on proteins on time-scales down to around 100 ps, set by the duration of the hard X-ray pulses emitted by synchrotron sources. The advent of hard X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), which emit extremely intense, very brief, coherent X-ray pulses, opens the exciting possibility of time-resolved experiments with femtosecond time resolution on macromolecular structure, in both single crystals and solution. The X-ray pulses emitted by an FEL differ greatly in many properties from those emitted by a synchrotron, in ways that at first glance make time-resolved measurements of X-ray scattering with the required accuracy extremely challenging. This opens up several questions which I consider in this brief overview. Are there likely to be chemically and biologically interesting structural changes to be revealed on the femtosecond time-scale? How shall time-resolved experiments best be designed and conducted to exploit the properties of FELs and overcome challenges that they pose? To date, fast time-resolved reactions have been initiated by a brief laser pulse, which obviously requires that the system under study be light-sensitive. Although this is true for proteins of the visual system and for signalling photoreceptors, it is not naturally the case for most interesting biological systems. To generate more biological targets for time-resolved study, can this limitation be overcome by optogenetic, chemical or other means? PMID:24914168

  19. Time-resolved crystallography and protein design: signalling photoreceptors and optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved X-ray crystallography and solution scattering have been successfully conducted on proteins on time-scales down to around 100 ps, set by the duration of the hard X-ray pulses emitted by synchrotron sources. The advent of hard X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), which emit extremely intense, very brief, coherent X-ray pulses, opens the exciting possibility of time-resolved experiments with femtosecond time resolution on macromolecular structure, in both single crystals and solution. The X-ray pulses emitted by an FEL differ greatly in many properties from those emitted by a synchrotron, in ways that at first glance make time-resolved measurements of X-ray scattering with the required accuracy extremely challenging. This opens up several questions which I consider in this brief overview. Are there likely to be chemically and biologically interesting structural changes to be revealed on the femtosecond time-scale? How shall time-resolved experiments best be designed and conducted to exploit the properties of FELs and overcome challenges that they pose? To date, fast time-resolved reactions have been initiated by a brief laser pulse, which obviously requires that the system under study be light-sensitive. Although this is true for proteins of the visual system and for signalling photoreceptors, it is not naturally the case for most interesting biological systems. To generate more biological targets for time-resolved study, can this limitation be overcome by optogenetic, chemical or other means? PMID:24914168

  20. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, Chelliah V.; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S.; Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors.Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06752a

  1. A time-resolved image sensor for tubeless streak cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Han, SangMan; Seo, Min-Woong; Takasawa, Taishi; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with draining-only modulation (DOM) pixels for tube-less streak cameras. Although the conventional streak camera has high time resolution, the device requires high voltage and bulky system due to the structure with a vacuum tube. The proposed time-resolved imager with a simple optics realize a streak camera without any vacuum tubes. The proposed image sensor has DOM pixels, a delay-based pulse generator, and a readout circuitry. The delay-based pulse generator in combination with an in-pixel logic allows us to create and to provide a short gating clock to the pixel array. A prototype time-resolved CMOS image sensor with the proposed pixel is designed and implemented using 0.11um CMOS image sensor technology. The image array has 30(Vertical) x 128(Memory length) pixels with the pixel pitch of 22.4um. .

  2. Protein-ligand interactions probed by time-resolved crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, M.; Ihee, H.; Pahl, R.; Srajer, V.

    2005-03-09

    Time-resolved (TR) crystallography is a unique method for determining the structures of intermediates in biomolecular reactions. The technique reached its mature stage with the development of the powerful third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, and the advances in data processing and analysis of time-resolved Laue crystallographic data. A time resolution of 100 ps has been achieved and relatively small structural changes can be detected even from only partial reaction initiation. The remaining challenge facing the application of this technique to a broad range of biological systems is to find an efficient and rapid, system-specific method for the reaction initiation in the crystal. Other frontiers for the technique involve the continued improvement in time resolution and further advances in methods for determining intermediate structures and reaction mechanisms. The time-resolved technique, combined with trapping methods and computational approaches, holds the promise for a complete structure-based description of biomolecular reactions.

  3. Examination of laser microbeam cell lysis in a PDMS microfluidic channel using time-resolved imaging.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A; Lai, Hsuan-Hong; Yoon, Helen H; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2008-03-01

    We use time-resolved imaging to examine the lysis dynamics of non-adherent BAF-3 cells within a microfluidic channel produced by the delivery of single highly-focused 540 ps duration laser pulses at lambda = 532 nm. Time-resolved bright-field images reveal that the delivery of the pulsed laser microbeam results in the formation of a laser-induced plasma followed by shock wave emission and cavitation bubble formation. The confinement offered by the microfluidic channel constrains substantially the cavitation bubble expansion and results in significant deformation of the PDMS channel walls. To examine the cell lysis and dispersal of the cellular contents, we acquire time-resolved fluorescence images of the process in which the cells were loaded with a fluorescent dye. These fluorescence images reveal cell lysis to occur on the nanosecond to microsecond time scale by the plasma formation and cavitation bubble dynamics. Moreover, the time-resolved fluorescence images show that while the cellular contents are dispersed by the expansion of the laser-induced cavitation bubble, the flow associated with the bubble collapse subsequently re-localizes the cellular contents to a small region. This capacity of pulsed laser microbeam irradiation to achieve rapid cell lysis in microfluidic channels with minimal dilution of the cellular contents has important implications for their use in lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:18305858

  4. Examination of laser microbeam cell lysis in a PDMS microfluidic channel using time-resolved imaging

    PubMed Central

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A.; Lai, Hsuan-Hong; Yoon, Helen H.; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2008-01-01

    We use time-resolved imaging to examine the lysis dynamics of non-adherent BAF-3 cells within a microfluidic channel produced by the delivery of single highly-focused 540 ps duration laser pulses at λ = 532 nm. Time-resolved bright-field images reveal that the delivery of the pulsed laser microbeam results in the formation of a laser-induced plasma followed by shock wave emission and cavitation bubble formation. The confinement offered by the microfluidic channel constrains substantially the cavitation bubble expansion and results in significant deformation of the PDMS channel walls. To examine the cell lysis and dispersal of the cellular contents, we acquire time-resolved fluorescence images of the process in which the cells were loaded with a fluorescent dye. These fluorescence images reveal cell lysis to occur on the nanosecond to microsecond time scale by the plasma formation and cavitation bubble dynamics. Moreover, the time-resolved fluorescence images show that while the cellular contents are dispersed by the expansion of the laser-induced cavitation bubble, the flow associated with the bubble collapse subsequently re-localizes the cellular contents to a small region. This capacity of pulsed laser microbeam irradiation to achieve rapid cell lysis in microfluidic channels with minimal dilution of the cellular contents has important implications for their use in lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:18305858

  5. Time-resolved microrheology of actively remodeling actomyosin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Marina Soares e.; Stuhrmann, Björn; Betz, Timo; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2014-07-01

    Living cells constitute an extraordinary state of matter since they are inherently out of thermal equilibrium due to internal metabolic processes. Indeed, measurements of particle motion in the cytoplasm of animal cells have revealed clear signatures of nonthermal fluctuations superposed on passive thermal motion. However, it has been difficult to pinpoint the exact molecular origin of this activity. Here, we employ time-resolved microrheology based on particle tracking to measure nonequilibrium fluctuations produced by myosin motor proteins in a minimal model system composed of purified actin filaments and myosin motors. We show that the motors generate spatially heterogeneous contractile fluctuations, which become less frequent with time as a consequence of motor-driven network remodeling. We analyze the particle tracking data on different length scales, combining particle image velocimetry, an ensemble analysis of the particle trajectories, and finally a kymograph analysis of individual particle trajectories to quantify the length and time scales associated with active particle displacements. All analyses show clear signatures of nonequilibrium activity: the particles exhibit random motion with an enhanced amplitude compared to passive samples, and they exhibit sporadic contractile fluctuations with ballistic motion over large (up to 30 μm) distances. This nonequilibrium activity diminishes with sample age, even though the adenosine triphosphate level is held constant. We propose that network coarsening concentrates motors in large clusters and depletes them from the network, thus reducing the occurrence of contractile fluctuations. Our data provide valuable insight into the physical processes underlying stress generation within motor-driven actin networks and the analysis framework may prove useful for future microrheology studies in cells and model organisms.

  6. Time-Resolved X-Ray Crystallography of Heme Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Srajer, Vukica; Royer, Jr., William E.

    2008-04-29

    Heme proteins, with their natural photosensitivity, are excellent systems for the application of time-resolved crystallographic methods. Ligand dissociation can be readily initiated by a short laser pulse with global structural changes probed at the atomic level by X-rays in real time. Third-generation synchrotrons provide 100-ps X-ray pulses of sufficient intensity for monitoring very fast processes. Successful application of such time-resolved crystallographic experiments requires that the structural changes being monitored are compatible with the crystal lattice. These techniques have recently permitted observing for the first time allosteric transitions in real time for a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin.

  7. Time-resolved x-ray crystallography of heme proteins

    PubMed Central

    Royer, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Heme proteins, with their natural photosensitivity, are excellent systems for the application of time-resolved crystallographic methods. Ligand dissociation can be readily initiated by a short laser pulse with global structural changes probed at the atomic level by X-rays in real time. Third generation synchrotrons provide 100ps X-ray pulses of sufficient intensity for monitoring very fast processes. Successful application of such time-resolved crystallographic experiments requires that the structural changes being monitored are compatible with the crystal lattice. These techniques have permitted observing allosteric transitions in real time for a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin. PMID:18433638

  8. In situ hybridization and sequence analysis reveal an association of Plasmodium spp. with mortalities in wild passerine birds in Austria.

    PubMed

    Dinhopl, Nora; Nedorost, Nora; Mostegl, Meike M; Weissenbacher-Lang, Christiane; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    Native European passerine birds are frequently clinically inapparent carriers of haemosporidian parasites of the genus Plasmodium. Clinical disease and death are only exceptionally reported. In the present study, tissue samples of 233 wild passerine birds found dead in Eastern Austria were examined by in situ hybridization (ISH) and partial cytochrome B gene sequence analysis for the presence, abundance and taxonomic assignment of Plasmodium spp. In 34 cases (14.6%), ISH yielded a positive result with large numbers of developmental stages in different cell types of the spleen, liver, brain and lung. The abundance of the tissue stages, which was comparable to fatal cases of avian malaria in penguins, suggested a major contribution to the cause of death. Genetic analysis revealed infections with representatives of three different valid species of Plasmodium, Plasmodium elongatum, Plasmodium lutzi and Plasmodium vaughani. Genetically identical parasite lineages had been found in a previous study in penguins kept in the Vienna zoo, providing evidence for the role of wild birds as reservoir hosts. Further, this study provides evidence that several species of Plasmodium are able to abundantly proliferate in endemic wild birds ultimately resulting in mortalities. PMID:25636246

  9. Kinetic and Conformational Insights of Protein Adsorption onto Montmorillonite Revealed Using in Situ ATR-FTIR/2D-COS.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael P; Martínez, Carmen Enid

    2016-08-01

    Protein adsorption onto clay minerals is a process with wide-ranging impacts on the environmental cycling of nutrients and contaminants. This process is influenced by kinetic and conformational factors that are often challenging to probe in situ. This study represents an in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic investigation of the adsorption of a model protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) onto a clay mineral (montmorillonite) at four concentrations (1.50, 3.75, 7.50, and 15.0 μM) under environmentally relevant conditions. At all concentrations probed, FTIR spectra show that BSA readily adsorbs onto montmorillonite. Adsorption kinetics follow an Elovich model, suggesting that primary limitations on adsorption rates are surface-related heterogeneous energetic restrictions associated with protein rearrangement and lateral protein-protein interaction. BSA adsorption onto montmorillonite fits the Langmuir model, yielding K = 5.97 × 10(5) M(-1). Deconvolution and curve fitting of the amide I band at the end of the adsorption process (∼120 min) shows a large extent of BSA unfolding upon adsorption at 1.50 μM, with extended chains and turns increasing at the expense of α-helices. At higher concentrations/surface coverages, BSA unfolding is less pronounced and a more compact structure is assumed. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopic (2D-COS) analysis reveals three different pathways corresponding to adsorbed conformations. At 1.50 μM, adsorption increases extended chains, followed by a loss in α-helices and a subsequent increase in turns. At 3.75 μM, extended chains decrease and then aggregated strands increase and side chains decrease, followed by a decrease in turns. With 7.50 and 15.0 μM BSA, the loss of side-chain vibrations is followed by an increase in aggregated strands and a subsequent decrease in turns and extended chains. Overall, the BSA concentration and resultant surface coverage have a profound

  10. Time-resolved spectroscopic techniques in laser medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Martínez, Roberto; Román-Moreno, Carlos J.; Rodríguez-Rosales, Antonio A.

    2000-10-01

    Spectroscopic lasers techniques are very useful for the detection and treatment of cancer and removing atherosclerotic plaque. Photobiology and photochemical studies, with the new generation of lasers high resolution time-resolved optical tomography is mentioned. A brief review of some of these applications is discussed and a partial list of recent references is given.

  11. Plasticity mechanisms in ultrafine grained freestanding aluminum thin films revealed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy nanomechanical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Idrissi, Hosni; Kobler, Aaron; Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Schryvers, Dominique; Coulombier, Michael; Pardoen, Thomas; Galceran, Montserrat; Godet, Stéphane; Kübel, Christian

    2014-03-10

    In-situ bright field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nanomechanical tensile testing and in-situ automated crystallographic orientation mapping in TEM were combined to unravel the elementary mechanisms controlling the plasticity of ultrafine grained Aluminum freestanding thin films. The characterizations demonstrate that deformation proceeds with a transition from grain rotation to intragranular dislocation glide and starvation plasticity mechanism at about 1% deformation. The grain rotation is not affected by the character of the grain boundaries. No grain growth or twinning is detected.

  12. Numerical simulations of time-resolved quantum electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaury, Benoit; Weston, Joseph; Santin, Matthieu; Houzet, Manuel; Groth, Christoph; Waintal, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation has become a major tool in quantum electronics both for fundamental and applied purposes. While for a long time those simulations focused on stationary properties (e.g. DC currents), the recent experimental trend toward GHz frequencies and beyond has triggered a new interest for handling time-dependent perturbations. As the experimental frequencies get higher, it becomes possible to conceive experiments which are both time-resolved and fast enough to probe the internal quantum dynamics of the system. This paper discusses the technical aspects-mathematical and numerical-associated with the numerical simulations of such a setup in the time domain (i.e. beyond the single-frequency AC limit). After a short review of the state of the art, we develop a theoretical framework for the calculation of time-resolved observables in a general multiterminal system subject to an arbitrary time-dependent perturbation (oscillating electrostatic gates, voltage pulses, time-varying magnetic fields, etc.) The approach is mathematically equivalent to (i) the time-dependent scattering formalism, (ii) the time-resolved non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism and (iii) the partition-free approach. The central object of our theory is a wave function that obeys a simple Schrödinger equation with an additional source term that accounts for the electrons injected from the electrodes. The time-resolved observables (current, density, etc.) and the (inelastic) scattering matrix are simply expressed in terms of this wave function. We use our approach to develop a numerical technique for simulating time-resolved quantum transport. We find that the use of this wave function is advantageous for numerical simulations resulting in a speed up of many orders of magnitude with respect to the direct integration of NEGF equations. Our technique allows one to simulate realistic situations beyond simple models, a subject that was until now beyond the simulation capabilities

  13. Elucidating low-frequency vibrational dynamics in calcite and water with time-resolved third-harmonic generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2015-07-14

    Low-frequency vibrations are foundational for material properties including thermal conductivity and chemical reactivity. To resolve the intrinsic molecular conformational dynamics in condensed phase, we implement time-resolved third-harmonic generation (TRTHG) spectroscopy to unravel collective skeletal motions in calcite, water, and aqueous salt solution in situ. The lifetime of three Raman-active modes in polycrystalline calcite at 155, 282 and 703 cm(-1) is found to be ca. 1.6 ps, 1.3 ps and 250 fs, respectively. The lifetime difference is due to crystallographic defects and anharmonic effects. By incorporating a home-built wire-guided liquid jet, we apply TRTHG to investigate pure water and ZnCl2 aqueous solution, revealing ultrafast dynamics of water intermolecular stretching and librational bands below 500 cm(-1) and a characteristic 280 cm(-1) vibrational mode in the ZnCl4(H2O)2(2-) complex. TRTHG proves to be a compact and versatile technique that directly uses the 800 nm fundamental laser pulse output to capture ultrafast low-frequency vibrational motion snapshots in condensed-phase materials including the omnipresent water, which provides the important time dimension to spectral characterization of molecular structure-function relationships. PMID:26062639

  14. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of xanthophylls at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hong; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Frank, Harry A

    2008-03-20

    Many of the spectroscopic features and photophysical properties of xanthophylls and their role in energy transfer to chlorophyll can be accounted for on the basis of a three-state model. The characteristically strong visible absorption of xanthophylls is associated with a transition from the ground state S0 (1(1)Ag-) to the S2 (1(1)Bu+) excited state. The lowest lying singlet state denoted S1 (2(1)Ag-), is a state into which absorption from the ground state is symmetry forbidden. Ultrafast optical spectroscopic studies and quantum computations have suggested the presence of additional excited singlet states in the vicinity of S1 (2(1)Ag-) and S2 (1(1)Bu+). One of these is denoted S* and has been suggested in previous work to be associated with a twisted molecular conformation of the molecule in the S1 (2(1)Ag-) state. In this work, we present the results of a spectroscopic investigation of three major xanthophylls from higher plants: violaxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. These molecules have systematically increasing extents of pi-electron conjugation from nine to eleven conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. All-trans isomers of the molecules were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and studied by steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy at 77 K. Analysis of the data using global fitting techniques has revealed the inherent spectral properties and ultrafast dynamics of the excited singlet states of each of the molecules. Five different global fitting models were tested, and it was found that the data are best explained using a kinetic model whereby photoexcitation results in the promotion of the molecule into the S2 (1(1)Bu+) state that subsequently undergoes decay to a vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state and with the exception of violaxanthin also to the S* state. The vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state then cools to a vibrationally relaxed S1 (2(1)Ag-) state in less than a picosecond. It was also found that a portion

  15. Benchtop time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Barman, Anjan; Kimura, T; Otani, Y; Fukuma, Y; Akahane, K; Meguro, S

    2008-12-01

    We present here the construction and application of a compact benchtop time-resolved Kerr magnetometer to measure the magnetization precession in magnetic thin films and lithographically patterned elements. As opposed to very expensive femtosecond lasers this system is built upon a picosecond pulsed injection diode laser and electronic pulse and delay generators. The precession is triggered by the electronic pulses of controlled duration and shape, which is launched onto the sample by a microstrip line. We used polarized optical pulses synchronous to the electronic pulses to measure the magneto-optical Kerr rotation. The system is integrated in a conventional upright microscope configuration with separate illumination, imaging, and magneto-optical probe paths. The system offers high stability, relative ease of alignment, sample changing, and a long range of time delay. We demonstrate the measurements of time-resolved dynamics of a Permalloy microwire and microdot using this system, which showed dynamics at two different time scales. PMID:19123577

  16. Time-Resolved Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2008-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded gas flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultipler tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. Mean and rms velocity and temperature fluctuation measurements in both an electrically-heated jet facility with a 10-mm diameter nozzle and also in a hydrogen-combustor heated jet facility with a 50.8-mm diameter nozzle at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented.

  17. Time-resolved crystallography using the Hadamard Transform

    PubMed Central

    Yorke, Briony A.; Beddard, Godfrey S.; Owen, Robin L.; Pearson, Arwen R.

    2014-01-01

    A new method for performing time-resolved X-ray crystallographic experiments based on the Hadamard Transform is proposed and demonstrated. The time-resolution is defined by the underlying periodicity of the probe pulse sequence and the signal to noise is greatly improved compared to the fastest experiments depending on a single pulse. This approach is general and equally applicable to any spectroscopic or imaging measurement where the probe can be encoded. PMID:25282611

  18. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Rudakov, F.M.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; Cardoza, J.D.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  19. The RATIO method for time-resolved Laue crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Coppens, Philip; Pitak, Mateusz; Gembicky, Milan; Messerschmidt, Marc; Scheins, Stephan; Benedict, Jason; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei; Chollet, Matthieu; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-01-01

    A RATIO method for analysis of intensity changes in time-resolved pump–probe Laue diffraction experiments is described. The method eliminates the need for scaling the data with a wavelength curve representing the spectral distribution of the source and removes the effect of possible anisotropic absorption. It does not require relative scaling of series of frames and removes errors due to all but very short term fluctuations in the synchrotron beam. PMID:19240334

  20. [System of ns time-resolved spectroscopy diagnosis and radioprotection].

    PubMed

    Yao, Wei-Bo; Guo, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Yong-min; Tang, Jun-Ping; Cheng, Liang; Xu, Qi-fuo

    2014-06-01

    Cathode plasma of high current electron beam diode is an important research on high power microwave and strong pulsed radio accelerator. It is a reliable method to study cathode plasma by diagnosing the cathode plasma parameters with non-contact spectroscopy measurement system. The present paper introduced the work principle, system composition and performance of the nanosecond (ns) time-resolved spectroscopy diagnosis system. Furthermore, it introduced the implementing method and the temporal relation of lower jitter synchronous trigger system. Simultaneously, the authors designed electromagnetic and radio shield room to protect the diagnosis system due to the high electromagnetic and high X-ray and γ-ray radiation, which seriously interferes with the system. Time-resolved spectroscopy experiment on brass (H62) cathode shows that, the element and matter composition of cathode plasma is clearly increase with the increase in the diode pulsed voltage and current magnitude. The spectroscopy diagnosis system could be of up to 10 ns time resolve capability. It's least is 2 ns. Synchronous trigger system's jitter is less than 4 ns. The spectroscopy diagnosis system will open a new way to study the cathode emission mechanism in depth. PMID:25358142

  1. A low cost time-resolved Raman spectroscopic sensing system enabling fluorescence rejection.

    PubMed

    Sinfield, Joseph V; Colic, Oliver; Fagerman, Daniel; Monwuba, Chike

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a novel, compact, fiber-coupled, time-resolved Raman spectroscopy system that takes advantage of recent developments in diode laser and data acquisition technology to exploit the natural temporal separation between Raman and fluorescence phenomena and thereby limits the influence of fluorescence on Raman observations. The unit has been designed to be particularly low cost and is intended to provide the foundation for a wide range of in-line or fieldable sensing devices that can enhance the potential and affordability of in situ chemical analyses. The system operating principles, design, and performance are discussed along with its advantages and tradeoffs relative to traditional continuous wave (CW) Raman techniques. The system relies on a 6.4 kHz repetition rate 900 ps pulsed diode laser operating in the visible wavelength range (532 nm) to enhance the quality of Raman observations relative to CW and infrared systems, particularly for analytes examined in the presence of fluorophores. Time-resolved photon counting, achieved through a combination of off-the-shelf and custom hardware and software, limits the influence of fluorescence on Raman observations under pulsed excitation. The paper presents examples of the quality of Raman signatures that can be obtained with the system for a variety of compounds such as trichloroethylene, benzene, an aqueous nitrate solution, and olive oil. Further, the paper demonstrates an approximately 15-fold improvement in signal-to-noise ratio when comparing long- and short-gated time-resolved photon counting acquisition scenarios for a neat benzene sample doped with rhodamine 6G at a concentration of 1 x 10(-4) M. The system's versatility and effectiveness in the assessment of complex mixtures representative of industrial or field settings is demonstrated through analysis of a gasoline sample. Additional discussion outlines how efficient signal averaging over extended observation periods can enable low

  2. Combining SAXS and DLS for simultaneous measurements and time-resolved monitoring of nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamberger, A.; De Roo, B.; Jacob, D.; Dillemans, L.; Bruegemann, L.; Seo, J. W.; Locquet, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved characterization of nano-particle (NP) synthesis is a promising mean to produce NPs under controlled conditions. Here, an innovative experimental demonstration of a NP characterization tool which combines a laboratory Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) instrument, a new Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) device and a microflow reactor is shown. The complementary SAXS and DLS techniques were designed and optimized to meet the ambitious requirements of time-resolved monitoring of NP suspensions while ongoing synthesis. For this purpose, SAXS instrument performance was enhanced by the implementation and optimization of a unique X-ray metal jet source. In parallel, an innovative DLS fiber remote probe head was developed specifically for in situ measurements. DLS measurements were performed directly inside a 2.0 mm diameter glass capillary located inside the SAXS vacuum sample chamber. The combined SAXS and DLS devices were tested separately on commercially available gold NP suspensions of known size. Furthermore, simultaneous SAXS and DLS measurements were performed during the synthesis of silica NPs.

  3. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Navin, Chelliah V; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. PMID:26888331

  4. Lucas–Kanade fluid trajectories for time-resolved PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegavian, Robin; Leclaire, Benjamin; Champagnat, Frédéric; Illoul, Cédric; Losfeld, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new method for estimating fluid trajectories in time-resolved PIV. It relies on a Lucas–Kanade paradigm and consists in a simple and direct extension of a two-frame estimation with FOLKI-PIV (Champagnat et al 2011 Exp. Fluids 50 1169–82). The so-called Lucas–Kanade Fluid Trajectories (LKFT) are assumed to be polynomial in time, and are found as the minimizer of a global functional, in which displacements are sought so as to match the intensities of a series of images pairs in the sequence, in the least-squares sense. All pairs involve the central image, similar to other recent time-resolved approaches (FTC (Lynch and Scarano 2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 035305) and FTEE (Jeon et al 2014 Exp. Fluids 55 1–16)). As switching from a two-frame to a time-resolved objective simply amounts to adding terms in a functional, no significant additional algorithmic element is required. Similar to FOLKI-PIV the method is very well suited for GPU acceleration, which is an important feature as computational complexity increases with the image sequence size. Tests on synthetic data exhibiting peak-locking show that increasing the image sequence size strongly reduces both associated bias and random error, and that LKFT has a remaining total error comparable to that of FTEE on this case. Results on case B of the third PIV challenge (Stanislas et al 2008 Exp. Fluids 45 27–71) also show its ability to drastically reduce the error in situations with low signal-to-noise ratio. These results are finally confirmed on experimental images acquired in the near-field of a low Reynolds number jet. Strong reductions in peak-locking, spatial and temporal noise compared to two-frame estimation are also observed, on the displacement components themselves, as well as on spatial or temporal derivatives, such as vorticity and material acceleration.

  5. Dynamic structural evolution of supported palladium–ceria core–shell catalysts revealed by in situ electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Chen, Chen; Cargnello, Matteo; Fornasiero, Paolo; Gorte, Raymond J.; Graham, George W.; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    The exceptional activity for methane combustion of modular palladium–ceria core–shell subunits on silicon-functionalized alumina that was recently reported has created renewed interest in the potential of core–shell structures as catalysts. Here we report on our use of advanced ex situ and in situ electron microscopy with atomic resolution to show that the modular palladium–ceria core–shell subunits undergo structural evolution over a wide temperature range. In situ observations performed in an atmospheric gas cell within this temperature range provide real-time evidence that the palladium and ceria nanoparticle constituents of the palladium–ceria core–shell participate in a dynamical process that leads to the formation of an unanticipated structure comprised of an intimate mixture of palladium, cerium, silicon and oxygen, with very high dispersion. This finding may open new perspectives about the origin of the activity of this catalyst. PMID:26160065

  6. A compact electron gun for time-resolved electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel compact time-resolved electron diffractometer has been built with the primary goal of studying the ultrafast molecular dynamics of photoexcited gas-phase molecules. Here, we discuss the design of the electron gun, which is triggered by a Ti:Sapphire laser, before detailing a series of calibration experiments relating to the electron-beam properties. As a further test of the apparatus, initial diffraction patterns have been collected for thin, polycrystalline platinum samples, which have been shown to match theoretical patterns. The data collected demonstrate the focusing effects of the magnetic lens on the electron beam, and how this relates to the spatial resolution of the diffraction pattern.

  7. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Mason, Keith O.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    CCD time-resolved photometry in V, B, and near-IR for 17 faint cataclysmic variables (CVs) is presented and analyzed. The data are obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Perkins reflector, Lowell Observatory, and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos from April-June 1989. The degree of variability and periodicities for the CVs are examined. It is observed that the variability of most of the stars is consistent with CV class behavior. Orbital periods for five CVs are determined, and three potential eclipsing systems are detected.

  8. Femtosecond time-resolved electronic relaxation dynamics in tetrathiafulvalene

    SciTech Connect

    Staedter, D.; Polizzi, L.; Thiré, N.; Mairesse, Y.; Mayer, P.; Blanchet, V.

    2015-05-21

    In the present paper, the ultrafast electronic relaxation of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) initiated around 4 eV is studied by femtosecond time-resolved velocity-map imaging. The goal is to investigate the broad double structure observed in the absorption spectrum at this energy. By monitoring the transients of the parent cation and its fragments and by varying the pump and the probe wavelengths, two internal conversions and intramolecular vibrational relaxation are detected both on the order of a few hundred of femtoseconds. Photoelectron images permit the assignment of a dark electronic state involved in the relaxation. In addition, the formation of the dimer of TTF has been observed.

  9. A 3-dimensional time-resolved photothermal deflection ``Mirage'' method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, N. G. C.; Malacarne, L. C.; Lukasievicz, G. V. B.; Bernabe, H. S.; Rohling, J. H.; Baesso, M. L.; Shen, J.; Bialkowski, S. E.

    2012-02-01

    A three-dimensional time-resolved theory and experiment for photothermal deflection spectroscopy is developed. The heat conduction equations for two semi-infinite media consisting of an opaque sample and a fluid are solved considering temperature and energy flux balance conditions for a Gaussian heat source. The time dependent perpendicular deflection signal is calculated and compared to experimental measurements on glassy carbon and copper samples. Excellent agreement with literature values for thermal diffusivity of the samples is found. The transient behavior is analyzed for different coupling fluids.

  10. Nonequilibrium Green's Function approach to time-resolved photoabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanucci, Gianluca; Perfetto, Enrico; Uimonen, Anna-Maija; van Leeuwen, Robert

    We propose a nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) approach to calculate the time-resolved absorption spectrum of nanoscale systems. We can deal with arbitrary shape, intensity, duration and relative delay of the pump and probe fields and include ionization processes as well as hybridization effects due to surfaces. We present numerical simulations of atomic systems using different approximate self-energies and show that electron correlations are pivotal to reproduce important qualitative features. E.P. and G.S. acknowledge funding by MIUR FIRB Grant No. RBFR12SW0J. R.v.L. thanks the Academy of Finland for support.

  11. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of lead halide perovskite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idowu, Mopelola A.; Yau, Sung H.; Varnavski, Oleg; Goodson, Theodore

    2015-09-01

    Recently, lead halide perovskites which are organic-inorganic hybrid structures, have been discovered to be highly efficient as light absorbers. Herein, we show the investigation of the excited state dynamics and emission properties of non-stoichiometric precursor formed lead halide perovskites grown by interdiffusion method using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. The influence of the different ratios of the non-stoichiometric precursor solution was examined. The observed photoluminescence properties were correlated with the femtosecond transient absorption measurements.

  12. Sensitive, time-resolved, broadband spectroscopy of single transient processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Baev, Ivan; Hellmig, Ortwin; Sengstock, Klaus; Baev, Valery M.

    2015-09-01

    Intracavity absorption spectroscopy with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of transient gain and absorption in electrically excited Xe and Kr plasmas. The achieved time resolution for broadband spectral recording of a single process is 25 µs. For pulsed-periodic processes, the time resolution is limited by the laser pulse duration, which is set here to 3 µs. This pulse duration also predefines the effective absorption path length, which amounts to 900 m. The presented technique can be applied to multicomponent analysis of single transient processes such as shock tube experiments, pulse detonation engines, or explosives.

  13. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  15. Time-resolved Hyperspectral Fluorescence Spectroscopy using Frequency Modulated Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    ,; Neill, M

    2012-07-01

    An intensity-modulated excitation light source is used together with a micro channel plate intensified CCD (ICCD) detector gated at a slightly different frequency to generate a beat frequency from a fluorescent sample. The addition of a spectrograph produces a hyperspectral time-resolved data product where the resulting beat frequency is detected with a low frame rate camera. Measuring the beat frequency of the spectrum as a function of time allows separation of the excited fluorescence from ambient constant light sources. The excitation and detector repetition rates are varied over a range of discrete frequencies, and the phase shift of the beat wave maps out the emission decay rate(s).

  16. Time resolved structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Franco V. A.; Hall, Christopher R.; Anderson, Harry L.; Meech, Stephen R.; Heisler, Ismael A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the timescales and mechanisms associated with the structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers are investigated through time resolved narrowband pump/broadband probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Our results confirm previous findings that the broadening is partly due to a distribution of structures with different (dihedral) angular conformations. Comparison of measurements with excitations on the red and blue sides of the Q-band unravel the ground and excited state conformational re-equilibration timescales. Further comparison to a planarized dimer, through the addition of a ligand, provides conclusive evidence for the twisting motion performed by the porphyrin dimer in solution. PMID:26798839

  17. A compact electron gun for time-resolved electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2015-01-15

    A novel compact time-resolved electron diffractometer has been built with the primary goal of studying the ultrafast molecular dynamics of photoexcited gas-phase molecules. Here, we discuss the design of the electron gun, which is triggered by a Ti:Sapphire laser, before detailing a series of calibration experiments relating to the electron-beam properties. As a further test of the apparatus, initial diffraction patterns have been collected for thin, polycrystalline platinum samples, which have been shown to match theoretical patterns. The data collected demonstrate the focusing effects of the magnetic lens on the electron beam, and how this relates to the spatial resolution of the diffraction pattern.

  18. Time-resolved measurement of quadrupole wakefields in corrugated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chao; Fu, Feichao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Shi, Libin; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Lingrong; Zhu, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhen; Xiang, Dao

    2016-02-01

    Corrugated structures have recently been widely used for manipulating electron beam longitudinal phase space and for producing THz radiation. Here we report on time-resolved measurements of the quadrupole wakefields in planar corrugated structures. It is shown that while the time-dependent quadrupole wakefield produced by a planar corrugated structure causes significant growth in beam transverse emittance, it can be effectively canceled with a second corrugated structure with orthogonal orientation. The strengths of the time-dependent quadrupole wakefields for various corrugated structure gaps are also measured and found to be in good agreement with theories. Our work should forward the applications of corrugated structures in many accelerator based scientific facilities.

  19. Lateral-Looking Time-Resolved Thermal Wave Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    David H Hurley; Subhash Shinde; Vitalyi Gusev

    2010-08-01

    Time-resolved thermal wave microscopy was used to measure lateral thermal transport in a thin metallic film on an insulating substrate. The basis of this approach is to decompose the reflectivity signal into a component that varies with delay time and a steady state component that varies with pump modulation frequency. The transient component is a summation of thermal waves at integral multiples of the pulse repetition frequency (76 MHz). The steady state component depends only on thermal waves at the pump chopping frequency (10-100 kHz). It is shown that for long delays, the steady state component is dominant and can be used to measure the thermal diffusivity.

  20. Distinct charge dynamics in battery electrodes revealed by in situ and operando soft X-ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaosong; Wang, Dongdong; Liu, Gao; Srinivasan, Venkat; Liu, Zhi; Hussain, Zahid; Yang, Wanli

    2013-01-01

    Developing high-performance batteries relies on material breakthroughs. During the past few years, various in situ characterization tools have been developed and have become indispensible in studying and the eventual optimization of battery materials. However, soft X-ray spectroscopy, one of the most sensitive probes of electronic states, has been mainly limited to ex situ experiments for battery research. Here we achieve in situ and operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of lithium-ion battery cathodes. Taking advantage of the elemental, chemical and surface sensitivities of soft X-rays, we discover distinct lithium-ion and electron dynamics in Li(Co1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3)O2 and LiFePO4 cathodes in polymer electrolytes. The contrast between the two systems and the relaxation effect in LiFePO4 is attributed to a phase transformation mechanism, and the mesoscale morphology and charge conductivity of the electrodes. These discoveries demonstrate feasibility and power of in situ soft X-ray spectroscopy for studying integrated and dynamic effects in batteries. PMID:24100759

  1. Distinct charge dynamics in battery electrodes revealed by in situ and operando soft X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaosong; Wang, Dongdong; Liu, Gao; Srinivasan, Venkat; Liu, Zhi; Hussain, Zahid; Yang, Wanli

    2013-10-01

    Developing high-performance batteries relies on material breakthroughs. During the past few years, various in situ characterization tools have been developed and have become indispensible in studying and the eventual optimization of battery materials. However, soft X-ray spectroscopy, one of the most sensitive probes of electronic states, has been mainly limited to ex situ experiments for battery research. Here we achieve in situ and operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of lithium-ion battery cathodes. Taking advantage of the elemental, chemical and surface sensitivities of soft X-rays, we discover distinct lithium-ion and electron dynamics in Li(Co1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3)O2 and LiFePO4 cathodes in polymer electrolytes. The contrast between the two systems and the relaxation effect in LiFePO4 is attributed to a phase transformation mechanism, and the mesoscale morphology and charge conductivity of the electrodes. These discoveries demonstrate feasibility and power of in situ soft X-ray spectroscopy for studying integrated and dynamic effects in batteries.

  2. Miniaturized time-resolved Raman spectrometer for planetary science based on a fast single photon avalanche diode detector array.

    PubMed

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Alerstam, Erik; Maruyama, Yuki; Cochrane, Corey J; Rossman, George R

    2016-02-01

    We present recent developments in time-resolved Raman spectroscopy instrumentation and measurement techniques for in situ planetary surface exploration, leading to improved performance and identification of minerals and organics. The time-resolved Raman spectrometer uses a 532 nm pulsed microchip laser source synchronized with a single photon avalanche diode array to achieve sub-nanosecond time resolution. This instrument can detect Raman spectral signatures from a wide variety of minerals and organics relevant to planetary science while eliminating pervasive background interference caused by fluorescence. We present an overview of the instrument design and operation and demonstrate high signal-to-noise ratio Raman spectra for several relevant samples of sulfates, clays, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Finally, we present an instrument design suitable for operation on a rover or lander and discuss future directions that promise great advancement in capability. PMID:26836075

  3. Examination of laser-induced cell lysis by time resolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Kaustubh R.; Guerra, Arnold, III; Vogel, Alfred; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2004-07-01

    Highly focused laser microbeams are being used with increasing regularity for targeted cell lysis, cellular microsurgery and molecular delivery via transient cell membrane permeabilization. To examine the mechanisms of laser induced cell lysis, we performed time-resolved imaging of confluent PtK2 cell cultures following the delivery of a single 6 ns, 532 nm Nd:YAG laser pulse. The laser pulse energies employed correspond to 1x and 3x threshold for plasma formation. The resulting plasma formation, pressure wave propagation and cavitation bubble dynamics were imaged over a temporal range spanning 5 orders of magnitude (0.5 ns - 50 microsec.). Time-resolved imaging enabled determination of process characteristics including pressure wave speed and amplitude and cavitation bubble energies. The time-resolved images also revealed the onset of cellular damage to occur on nano-second time scales and complete within 1 microsecond. Moreover, the size of the damage zone was larger than the plasma but smaller than the maximum cavitation bubble size. This indicated that mechanisms apart from plasma vaporization namely pressure wave propagation and cavitation bubble expansion are contributors to cellular damage. Dye exclusion assays showed that the majority of cells experiencing considerable deformation due to fluid flow generated by the cavitation bubble expansion remain viable over 24 hours.

  4. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2015-10-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. These allow to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge of spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using a Telops MS-IR MW camera, which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profiles derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  5. Time-resolved NMR studies of RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Fürtig, Boris; Buck, Janina; Manoharan, Vijayalaxmi; Bermel, Wolfgang; Jäschke, Andres; Wenter, Philipp; Pitsch, Stefan; Schwalbe, Harald

    The application of real-time NMR experiments to the study of RNA folding, as reviewed in this article, is relatively new. For many RNA folding events, current investigations suggest that the time scales are in the second to minute regime. In addition, the initial investigations suggest that different folding rates are observed for one structural transition may be due to the hierarchical folding units of RNA. Many of the experiments developed in the field of NMR of protein folding cannot directly be transferred to RNA: hydrogen exchange experiments outside the spectrometer cannot be applied since the intrinsic exchange rates are too fast in RNA, relaxation dispersion experiments on the other require faster structural transitions than those observed in RNA. On the other hand, information derived from time-resolved NMR experiments, namely the acquisition of native chemical shifts, can be readily interpreted in light of formation of a single long-range hydrogen bonding interaction. Together with mutational data that can readily be obtained for RNA and new ligation technologies that enhance site resolution even further, time-resolved NMR may become a powerful tool to decipher RNA folding. Such understanding will be of importance to understand the functions of coding and non-coding RNAs in cells. PMID:17595685

  6. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Fréderick

    2015-05-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. This allows to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge about spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using Telops MS-IR MW camera which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profile derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  7. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Tailpipe Exhaust for Several Automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Allen R.; Allen, James; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2011-06-01

    The automotive catalytic converter reduces or eliminates the emission of various chemical species (e.g. CO, hydrocarbons, etc.) that are the products of combustion from automobile exhaust. However, these units are only effective once they have reached operating temperature. The design and placement of catalytic converters has changed in order to reduce both the quantity of emissions and the time that is required for the converter to be effective. In order to compare the effectiveness of catalytic converters, time-resolved measurements were performed on several vehicles, including a 2010 Toyota Prius, a 2010 Honda Fit, a 1994 Honda Civic, and a 1967 Oldsmobile 442 (which is not equipped with a catalytic converter but is used as a baseline). The newer vehicles demonstrate bot a reduced overall level of CO and hydrocarbon emissions but are also effective more quickly than older units. The time-resolved emissions will be discussed along with the impact of catalytic converter design and location on the measured emissions.

  8. Approaches to time-resolved diffraction using an XFEL.

    PubMed

    Spence, John C H

    2014-01-01

    We describe several schemes for time-resolved imaging of molecular motion using a free-electron laser (XFEL), in response to the many challenges and opportunities which XFEL radiation has created for accurate time-resolved measurement of structure. For pump-probe experiments using crystals, the problem of recording full Bragg reflections (not partials) in each shot arises. Two solutions, the use of the large bandwith which necesarily results from using attosecond pulses, and the use the coherent convergent beam mode are suggested. We also show that with attosecond recording times shorter than the temporal coherence time, Bragg reflections excited by different wavelengths from different reflections can interfere, providing structure factor phase information. For slower processes, a mixing jet sample-delivery device is described to allow snapshot solution scattering during molecular reactions on the microsecond scale. For optically excited membrane proteins, we suggest the use of the lipid cubic phase sample delivery device operating at atmospheric pressure. The use of two-color and split-and-delay schemes is suggested for improved accuracy in the Monte-Carlo method of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX). PMID:25415269

  9. Time resolved imaging microscopy. Phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, G; Clegg, R M; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    1991-01-01

    An optical microscope capable of measuring time resolved luminescence (phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence) images has been developed. The technique employs two phase-locked mechanical choppers and a slow-scan scientific CCD camera attached to a normal fluorescence microscope. The sample is illuminated by a periodic train of light pulses and the image is recorded within a defined time interval after the end of each excitation period. The time resolution discriminates completely against light scattering, reflection, autofluorescence, and extraneous prompt fluorescence, which ordinarily decrease contrast in normal fluorescence microscopy measurements. Time resolved image microscopy produces a high contrast image and particular structures can be emphasized by displaying a new parameter, the ratio of the phosphorescence to fluorescence. Objects differing in luminescence decay rates are easily resolved. The lifetime of the long lived luminescence can be measured at each pixel of the microscope image by analyzing a series of images that differ by a variable time delay. The distribution of luminescence decay rates is displayed directly as an image. Several examples demonstrate the utility of the instrument and the complementarity it offers to conventional fluorescence microscopy. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1723311

  10. Time-resolved XAS (Bonn-SUT-SLRI) beamline at SLRI.

    PubMed

    Poo-arporn, Yingyot; Chirawatkul, Prae; Saengsui, Worasarit; Chotiwan, Siwarak; Kityakarn, Sutasinee; Klinkhieo, Supat; Hormes, Josef; Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon

    2012-11-01

    An energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline has been constructed at the Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Thailand. The beamline was designed to utilize the synchrotron radiation with photon energies between 2400 and 8000 eV. The horizontal focusing of the bent crystal in the energy-dispersive monochromator offers a small polychromatic focal spot of 1 mm at the sample position. By employing an energy-dispersive scheme, the whole X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) can be obtained simultaneously using a position-sensitive detector with a fastest readout speed of 25 ms. The short data collection time opens a new opportunity for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments such as studies of changes of the electronic structures or the local coordination environments of an atom during a change in thermodynamic conditions. For this purpose, an in situ cell was designed and fabricated for the beamline. Thermal oxidation of TiO(2) was chosen as an in situ experiment example. The structural change of TiO(2) as a function of temperatures was monitored from the change in the measured XAS spectra. The obtained Ti K-edge XANES spectra clearly show the formation of an anatase phase when the temperature was raised to 673 K. PMID:23093752

  11. Synthesis and time-resolved structural characterization of framework and mineral sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Christopher Langley

    A new class of open-framework organic/inorganic hybrid materials based on In-S chemistry has been discovered. The compounds therein exhibit unprecedented structural diversity compared to known porous sulfides, primarily due to variation in framework building units. Further, large increases in pore dimensions (vs. zeolites, for example) are observed as these materials consist of comer and edge linked clusters, e.g. In10S20, In9S17, In4S10 and In6S 15. Choice of organic structure directing agents (templates) and careful control of reaction conditions (temperature, pH) both in the In-S and Ge-S systems is shown not only to dictate which building unit will form, but also to direct the resulting framework topology. Several of the compounds described herein crystallize either as powders, or as crystals too small for standard in-house X-ray structural analysis. Diffraction experiments have thus required synchrotron based single crystal techniques for structure determination. Further, certain reaction mixture compositions result in multi-phase end products, the formation pathways of which have been studied with time resolved, in situ synchrotron powder diffraction. An extension of the applicability of the in situ techniques investigated the role of oxygen in hydrothermal systems. Oxidation state is proposed to dictate speciation in the Ni-Ge-S system and to promote phase transformations in the Fe-S mineral system.

  12. Singlet internal conversion processes in the order of 1Bu+→3Ag-→1Bu-→2Ag-→1Ag- in all- trans-spheroidene and lycopene as revealed by subpicosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondonuwu, Ferdy S.; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Tamura, Hiroshi; Koyama, Yasushi

    2006-09-01

    Key Raman lines ascribable to the 1Bu+, 3Ag-, 1Bu- and 2Ag- states were identified in the subpicosecond time-resolved Raman spectra of spheroidene and lycopene having 10 and 11 conjugated double bonds, respectively. The sequential rise-and-decay of the key Raman lines showed the internal conversion processes of 1Bu+→3Ag-→1Bu-→2Ag-→1Ag- (ground). The time constant in each step of internal conversion reflects the energy gap between the relevant states that had been determined by measurement of resonance - Raman excitation profiles [K. Furuichi, T. Sashima, Y. Koyama, Chem. Phys. Lett. 356 (2002) 547].

  13. Highly sensitive detection of human papillomavirus type 16 DNA using time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and long lifetime probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue F.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Wodnicki, Pawel; Siadat-Pajouh, M.; Herman, Brian

    1995-04-01

    We have been interested in the role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical cancer and its diagnosis; to that end we have been developing microscopic imaging and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques to genotype and quantitate the amount of HPV present at a single cell level in cervical PAP smears. However, we have found that low levels of HPV DNA are difficult to detect accurately because theoretically obtainable sensitivity is never achieved due to nonspecific autofluorescence, fixative induced fluorescence of cells and tissues, and autofluorescence of the optical components in the microscopic system. In addition, the absorption stains used for PAP smears are intensely autofluorescent. Autofluorescence is a rapidly decaying process with lifetimes in the range of 1-100 nsec, whereas phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence have lifetimes in the range of 1 microsecond(s) ec-10 msec. The ability to discriminate between specific fluorescence and autofluorescence in the time-domain has improved the sensitivity of diagnostic test such that they perform comparably to, or even more sensitive than radioisotopic assays. We have developed a novel time-resolved fluorescence microscope to improve the sensitivity of detection of specific molecules of interest in slide based specimens. This time-resolved fluorescence microscope is based on our recently developed fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FILM) in conjunction with the use of long lifetime fluorescent labels. By using fluorescence in situ hybridization and the long lifetime probe (europium), we have demonstrated the utility of this technique for detection of HPV DNA in cervicovaginal cells. Our results indicate that the use of time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and long lifetime probes increases the sensitivity of detection by removing autofluorescence and will thus lead to improved early diagnosis of cervical cancer. Since the highly sensitive detection of DNA in clinical samples using

  14. In situ NMR and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance techniques reveal the structure of the electrical double layer in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, John M.; Forse, Alexander C.; Tsai, Wan-Yu; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P.

    2015-08-01

    Supercapacitors store charge through the electrosorption of ions on microporous electrodes. Despite major efforts to understand this phenomenon, a molecular-level picture of the electrical double layer in working devices is still lacking as few techniques can selectively observe the ionic species at the electrode/electrolyte interface. Here, we use in situ NMR to directly quantify the populations of anionic and cationic species within a working microporous carbon supercapacitor electrode. Our results show that charge storage mechanisms are different for positively and negatively polarized electrodes for the electrolyte tetraethylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile; for positive polarization charging proceeds by exchange of the cations for anions, whereas for negative polarization, cation adsorption dominates. In situ electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements support the NMR results and indicate that adsorbed ions are only partially solvated. These results provide new molecular-level insight, with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the study of pore/ion size, desolvation and other effects on charge storage in supercapacitors.

  15. In situ NMR and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance techniques reveal the structure of the electrical double layer in supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Tsai, Wan-Yu; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2015-08-01

    Supercapacitors store charge through the electrosorption of ions on microporous electrodes. Despite major efforts to understand this phenomenon, a molecular-level picture of the electrical double layer in working devices is still lacking as few techniques can selectively observe the ionic species at the electrode/electrolyte interface. Here, we use in situ NMR to directly quantify the populations of anionic and cationic species within a working microporous carbon supercapacitor electrode. Our results show that charge storage mechanisms are different for positively and negatively polarized electrodes for the electrolyte tetraethylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile; for positive polarization charging proceeds by exchange of the cations for anions, whereas for negative polarization, cation adsorption dominates. In situ electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance measurements support the NMR results and indicate that adsorbed ions are only partially solvated. These results provide new molecular-level insight, with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the study of pore/ion size, desolvation and other effects on charge storage in supercapacitors. PMID:26099110

  16. A compact electron gun for time-resolved electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew S; Lane, Paul D; Wann, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    A novel compact time-resolved electron diffractometer has been built with the primary goal of studying the ultrafast molecular dynamics of photoexcited gas-phase molecules. Here, we discuss the design of the electron gun, which is triggered by a Ti:Sapphire laser, before detailing a series of calibration experiments relating to the electron-beam properties. As a further test of the apparatus, initial diffraction patterns have been collected for thin, polycrystalline platinum samples, which have been shown to match theoretical patterns. The data collected demonstrate the focusing effects of the magnetic lens on the electron beam, and how this relates to the spatial resolution of the diffraction pattern. PMID:25638074

  17. Time-resolved photoluminescence of undoped InP

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.M.; Dunlavy, D.J.; Ahrenkiel, R.K. ); Shaw, G.; Summers, G.P. ); Tzafaras, N.; Lentz, C. )

    1994-04-15

    Energy and time-resolved photoluminescence data have been obtained for nominally undoped ([ital n] 4.5[times]10[sup 15] cm[sup [minus]3]) bulk InP grown by the vertical-gradient freeze method. The data were taken as a function of temperature, from 80 to 290 K, and analyzed using a solution to the continuity equation. The resulting lifetime values range from 300 ns to 3.2 [mu]s, and surface recombination velocities were fund to be on the order of 10[sup 3] cm/s. The temperature dependence can be explained by assuming a radiatively limited recombination with a resulting [ital B] coefficient [ge]5.9[times]10[sup [minus]11] cm[sup 3]/s at 300 K.

  18. Multidimensional Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Vibrational Coherence in Biopolyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckup, Tiago; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Multidimensional femtosecond time-resolved vibrational coherence spectroscopy allows one to investigate the evolution of vibrational coherence in electronic excited states. Methods such as pump-degenerate four-wave mixing and pump-impulsive vibrational spectroscopy combine an initial ultrashort laser pulse with a nonlinear probing sequence to reinduce vibrational coherence exclusively in the excited states. By carefully exploiting specific electronic resonances, one can detect vibrational coherence from 0 cm-1 to over 2,000 cm-1 and map its evolution. This review focuses on the observation and mapping of high-frequency vibrational coherence for all-trans biological polyenes such as β-carotene, lycopene, retinal, and retinal Schiff base. We discuss the role of molecular symmetry in vibrational coherence activity in the S1 electronic state and the interplay of coupling between electronic states and vibrational coherence.

  19. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  20. Protein chip analysis by probing time-resolved UV fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigaravicius, Paulius; Dietrich, Rüdiger; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Greulich, Karl Otto; Horn, Uwe; Knoll, Dietmar; Peters, Sven; Striebel, Hans-Martin; Schellenberg, Peter

    2007-07-01

    We describe a novel label-free method to analyse protein interactions on microarrays as well as in solution. By this technique the time resolved native protein fluorescence in the UV is probed. The method is based on alterations of the protein upon ligand binding, and, as a consequence, of alterations of the environment of the proteins' aromatic amino acids. These amino acids act as internal probes, and as a result, the fluorescence lifetime of the proteins change due to binding to a ligand partner such as another protein. We were able to demonstrate the feasibility of the method with many compounds, including protein-protein, protein-antibody, protein-nucleic acid and protein-small ligand pairs. Unlike to many other label-free techniques, the sensitivity of the method does not depend on the size of the counterbinding ligand and therefore is particularly suitable for drug monitoring, when small molecules are involved.

  1. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-09-01

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  2. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  3. Time-resolved tomographic images of a relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, H.A.; Jacoby, B.A.; Nelson, M.

    1984-07-01

    We obtained a sequential series of time-resolved tomographic two-dimensional images of a 4.5-MeV, 6-kA, 30-ns electron beam. Three linear fiber-optic arrays of 30 or 60 fibers each were positioned around the beam axis at 0/sup 0/, 61/sup 0/, and 117/sup 0/. The beam interacting with nitrogen at 20 Torr emitted light that was focused onto the fiber arrays and transmitted to a streak camera where the data were recorded on film. The film was digitized, and two-dimensional images were reconstructed using the maximum-entropy tomographic technique. These images were then combined to produce an ultra-high-speed movie of the electron-beam pulse.

  4. Time-resolved spectroscopy of low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Joseph R.

    This dissertation is a survey of ultrafast time-resolved optical measurements conducted on a variety of low-dimensional semiconductor systems to further the understanding of the dynamic behavior in the following systems: ZnMnTe/ZnSe quantum dots, ZnTe/ZnMnSe quantum dots, InGaAs quantum wells, CdMnSe colloidal quantum dots, multi-shell CdSe/CdMnS/CdS colloidal nanoplatelets, and graphene and graphene-related solutions and films. Using time-resolved photoluminescence to study epitaxially-grown ZnTe and ZnMnTe quantum dots in corresponding ZnMnSe and ZnSe matrices, the location dependence of manganese ions in respect to magnetic polaron formation is shown. The structure with manganese ions located in the matrix exhibited magnetic polaron behavior consistent with previous literature, whereas the structure with the magnetic ions located within the quantum dots exhibited unconventional magnetic polaron properties. These properties, including temperature and magnetic field insensitivity, were explained through the use of a model that predicted an increased internal magnetic field due to a decreased effective volume of the magnetic polaron and a higher effective temperature due to laser heating. Magneto-time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on a system of colloidal CdMnSe quantum dots show that the magnetic polaron properties differ significantly from the epitaxially grown quantum dots. First the timescales at which the magnetic polaron forms and the polarization saturates are different by more than an order of magnitude, and second, the magnetic polaron energy exhibited step-like behavior as the strength of the externally applied magnetic field is increased. The field dependent MP formation energy that is observed experimentally is explained as due to the breaking of the antiferromagnetic coupling of Mn dimers within the QDs. This model is further verified by the observation of quantized behavior in the Zeeman energy splitting. Through the use of magneto

  5. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging.

    PubMed

    Antolovic, I Michel; Burri, Samuel; Hoebe, Ron A; Maruyama, Yuki; Bruschini, Claudio; Charbon, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach. PMID:27367697

  6. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Antolovic, I. Michel; Burri, Samuel; Hoebe, Ron A.; Maruyama, Yuki; Bruschini, Claudio; Charbon, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach. PMID:27367697

  7. Time-resolved phase-sensitive second harmonic generation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Paweł J.; Woods, David A.; Bain, Colin D.; Verlet, Jan R. R.

    2015-02-01

    A methodology based on time-resolved, phase-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) for probing the excited state dynamics of species at interfaces is presented. It is based on an interference measurement between the SHG from the sample and a local oscillator generated at a reference together with a lock-in measurement to remove the large constant offset from the interference. The technique is characterized by measuring the phase and excited state dynamics of the dye malachite green at the water/air interface. The key attributes of the technique are that the observed signal is directly proportional to sample concentration, in contrast to the quadratic dependence from non-phase sensitive SHG, and that the real and imaginary parts of the 2nd order non-linear susceptibility can be determined independently. We show that the method is highly sensitive and can provide high quality excited state dynamics in short data acquisition times.

  8. Time-resolved temperature measurements in hypervelocity dust impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, A.; Drake, K.; Mocker, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Munsat, T.; Horanyi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present time-resolved temperature measurements of the debris cloud generated by hypervelocity dust impact. Micron- and submicron-sized iron grains were accelerated to speeds of 1-32 km/s using the 3 MV electrostatic dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, and impacted on a tungsten target. The resulting light flashes were analyzed by an array of photomultiplier tubes equipped with narrowband interference filters to determine the blackbody temperature and radiant power of the impact-generated cloud as a function of time. We find time-averaged temperatures in the range of 2500-5000 K, increasing with velocity over the range studied; initial temperatures up to approximately twice the time averaged temperature persisting on short timescales (<1μs) compared to the 20μs duration of the flash; and that the temperature falls in a manner consistent with radiative cooling.

  9. Time-resolved doubly bent crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Wilke, M.D.; Blake, R.L.; Vaninetti, J.; Gray, N.T.; Nedrow, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is an essential tool in high-temperature plasma research. We describe a time-resolved x-ray spectrometer suitable for measuring spectra in harsh environments common to many very high-energy density laboratory plasma sources. The spectrometer consisted of a doubly curved Si(111) crystal diffraction element, a WL-1201 (ZnO:Ga) phosphor, a coherent fiber-optic array, and two visible streak cameras. The spectrometer design described here has a minimum time resolution of 1.3 ns with 2.8-eV spectral resolution over a 200-eV-wide bandpass in the 6--7-keV region of the spectrum. Complete system spectral throughput calibrations were done at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron (CHESS). Details of the design and calibration results are presented.

  10. Time-resolved doubly bent crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Wilke, M.D.; Blake, R.L.; Vaninetti, J.; Gray, N.T.; Nedrow, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is an essential tool in high temperature plasma research. We describe a time-resolved x-ray spectrometer suitable for measuring spectra in harsh environments common to many very high energy density laboratory plasma sources. The spectrometer consisted of a doubly curved Si(111) crystal diffraction element, a WL-1201 (ZnO:Ga) phosphor, a coherent fiber optic array, and two visible streak cameras. The spectrometer design described here has a minimum time resolution of 1.3 ns with 2.8 eV spectral resolution over a 200 eV wide bandpass in the 6-7 keV region of the spectrum. Complete system spectral throughput calibrations were done at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron (CHESS). Details of the design and calibration results are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs.