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Sample records for reveals dramatic mhc-linked

  1. Dramatic Outburst Reveals Nearest Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Scientists have discovered the closest black hole yet, a mere 1,600 light years from Earth. Its discovery was heralded by four of the most dramatic rapid X-ray intensity changes ever seen from one star. Astronomers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Atlanta. The black hole in the constellation Sagittarius, along with a normal star dubbed V4641 Sgr, form a violent system that briefly flooded part of our Milky Way Galaxy with X-rays and ejected subatomic particles moving at nearly the speed of light one day last September. At the peak of its X-ray output, V4641 Sgr was the brightest X-ray emitter in the sky. Astronomers call this type of system an X-ray nova because it suddenly becomes a bright source of X-rays, but this object shows characteristics never seen in an X-ray nova. "V4641 Sgr turns on and off so fast that it seems to represent a new subclass of X-ray novae," said Donald A. Smith, postdoctoral associate in MIT's Center for Space Research. Smith worked on data from this object with MIT principal research scientist Ronald Remillard and NRAO astronomer Robert Hjellming. "In X-rays, the intensity rose by a factor of more than 1,000 in seven hours, then dropped by a factor of 100 in two hours," Remillard said. The radio emission was seen as an image of an expanding "jet" of particles shooting out from the binary system. After reaching a maximum, the radio intensity dropped by a factor of nearly 40 within two days. "Radio telescopes give us a quick glimpse of something moving at a fantastically high velocity," Hjellming said. Black holes harbor enormous gravitational force that can literally rip the gas away from a nearby star. This transfer of gas is visible in many forms of radiation. Both orbiting X-ray telescopes and ground-based radio and optical telescopes saw the outburst of V4641

  2. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  3. Genomic architecture of MHC-linked odorant receptor gene repertoires among 16 vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Santos, Pablo Sandro Carvalho; Kellermann, Thomas; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    The recent sequencing and assembly of the genomes of different organisms have shown that almost all vertebrates studied in detail so far have one or more clusters of genes encoding odorant receptors (OR) in close physical linkage to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). It has been postulated that MHC-linked OR genes could be involved in MHC-influenced mate choice, comprising both pre- as well as post-copulatory mechanisms. We have therefore carried out a systematic comparison of protein sequences of these receptors from the genomes of man, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, mouse, rat, dog, cat, cow, pig, horse, elephant, opossum, frog and zebra fish (amounting to a total of 559 protein sequences) in order to identify OR families exhibiting evolutionarily conserved MHC linkage. In addition, we compared the genomic structure of this region within these 16 species, accounting for presence or absence of OR gene families, gene order, transcriptional orientation and linkage to the MHC or framework genes. The results are presented in the form of gene maps and phylogenetic analyses that reveal largely concordant repertoires of gene families, at least among tetrapods, although each of the eight taxa studied (primates, rodents, ungulates, carnivores, proboscids, marsupials, amphibians and teleosts) exhibits a typical architecture of MHC (or MHC framework loci)-linked OR genes. Furthermore, the comparison of the genomic organization of this region has implications for phylogenetic relationships between closely related taxa, especially in disputed cases such as the evolutionary history of even- and odd-toed ungulates and carnivores. Finally, the largely conserved linkage between distinct OR genes and the MHC supports the concept that particular alleles within a given haplotype function in a concerted fashion during self-/non-self-discrimination processes in reproduction. PMID:20680261

  4. Non-MHC-linked Th2 cell development induced by soluble protein administration predicts susceptibility to Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Guéry, J C; Galbiati, F; Smiroldo, S; Adorini, L

    1997-09-01

    Continuous administration of soluble protein Ag followed by immunization with the same Ag in adjuvant results in the selective development of Ag-specific CD4+ Th2 cells in both normal and beta2-microglobulin-deficient BALB/c mice. In addition to chronic administration by mini-osmotic pump, single bolus i.p., but not i.v., injection of protein Ag induces Th2 cell expansion. Strong Th2 cell priming depends on a non-MHC-linked genetic polymorphism. It is observed in all congenic strains on BALB background tested, BALB/c, BALB/b, and BALB/k, but not in MHC-matched strains on disparate genetic background, B10.D2, C57BL/6, and C3H. DBA/2 mice appear to have an intermediate phenotype, as shown by their weaker capacity to mount Th2 responses as compared with BALB/c mice after soluble Ag administered by either mini-osmotic pumps or single bolus i.p. Conversely, induction of Th1 cell unresponsiveness by soluble protein is observed in any mouse strain tested, following any mode of Ag administration. These data demonstrate that non-MHC-linked genetic polymorphism controls the priming of Th2 but not the inhibition of Th1 cells induced by administration of soluble protein. The pattern of Th2 responses in these different strains is predictive of disease outcome following Leishmania major infection and supports the hypothesis that systemic Ag presentation in the absence of strong inflammatory signals may represent an important stimulus leading to selective Th2 cell development in susceptible mouse strains. PMID:9278301

  5. Development of MHC-Linked Microsatellite Markers in the Domestic Cat and Their Use to Evaluate MHC Diversity in Domestic Cats, Cheetahs, and Gir Lions

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Katrina M.; Kirby, Katherine; Beatty, Julia A.; Barrs, Vanessa R.; Cattley, Sonia; David, Victor; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Diversity within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) reflects the immunological fitness of a population. MHC-linked microsatellite markers provide a simple and an inexpensive method for studying MHC diversity in large-scale studies. We have developed 6 MHC-linked microsatellite markers in the domestic cat and used these, in conjunction with 5 neutral microsatellites, to assess MHC diversity in domestic mixed breed (n = 129) and purebred Burmese (n = 61) cat populations in Australia. The MHC of outbred Australian cats is polymorphic (average allelic richness = 8.52), whereas the Burmese population has significantly lower MHC diversity (average allelic richness = 6.81; P < 0.01). The MHC-linked microsatellites along with MHC cloning and sequencing demonstrated moderate MHC diversity in cheetahs (n = 13) and extremely low diversity in Gir lions (n = 13). Our MHC-linked microsatellite markers have potential future use in diversity and disease studies in other populations and breeds of cats as well as in wild felid species. PMID:24620003

  6. Genetic variability of ten Chinese indigenous goats using MHC-linked microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    E, Guang-Xin; Huang, Yong-Fu; Zhao, Yong-Ju; Ma, Yue-Hui; Na, Ri-Su; Zhang, Jia-Hua; Gao, Hui-Jiang; Wu, Xin

    2015-10-15

    In this study, the genetic variability of Chinese indigenous goat breeds (Capra hircus) was analyzed using the MHC-associated microsatellite markers BF1, BM1818, BM1258, and DYMS1. To examine genetic variability, the levels of heterozigosity, degrees of inbreeding, and genetic differences among the breeds were analyzed. The mean number of alleles ranged from 5.50±3.70 in Enshi black goats (EB) to 11.50±3.70 in the Jianyang big ear (JE) breed. The mean observed heterozygosity and mean expected heterozygosity varied from 0.25±0.04 in Jining Qing goats (JQ) to 0.54±0.05 in Chuannan black goats (CN) and from 0.49±0.18 in Hechuan white goats (HW) to 0.78±0.05 in JE, respectively. The mean FIS values ranged from 0.23 in HW to 0.51 in JQ. In addition, the genetic variation among populations and geographic location did indicate a correlation of genetic differences with geographic distance, which was revealed by the phylogenetic network. In conclusion, the high variability and population structure among Chinese native goats in the Major Histocompatibility Complex would be caused by co-evolution between MHC alleles and the epidemic history or pathogens in different agro-ecological zones. PMID:26257111

  7. MHC-linked and un-linked class I genes in the wallaby

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V; Deakin, Janine E; Coggill, Penny; Hart, Elizabeth; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Wong, Emily SW; Harrow, Jennifer; Beck, Stephan; Belov, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Background MHC class I antigens are encoded by a rapidly evolving gene family comprising classical and non-classical genes that are found in all vertebrates and involved in diverse immune functions. However, there is a fundamental difference between the organization of class I genes in mammals and non-mammals. Non-mammals have a single classical gene responsible for antigen presentation, which is linked to the antigen processing genes, including TAP. This organization allows co-evolution of advantageous class Ia/TAP haplotypes. In contrast, mammals have multiple classical genes within the MHC, which are separated from the antigen processing genes by class III genes. It has been hypothesized that separation of classical class I genes from antigen processing genes in mammals allowed them to duplicate. We investigated this hypothesis by characterizing the class I genes of the tammar wallaby, a model marsupial that has a novel MHC organization, with class I genes located within the MHC and 10 other chromosomal locations. Results Sequence analysis of 14 BACs containing 15 class I genes revealed that nine class I genes, including one to three classical class I, are not linked to the MHC but are scattered throughout the genome. Kangaroo Endogenous Retroviruses (KERVs) were identified flanking the MHC un-linked class I. The wallaby MHC contains four non-classical class I, interspersed with antigen processing genes. Clear orthologs of non-classical class I are conserved in distant marsupial lineages. Conclusion We demonstrate that classical class I genes are not linked to antigen processing genes in the wallaby and provide evidence that retroviral elements were involved in their movement. The presence of retroviral elements most likely facilitated the formation of recombination hotspots and subsequent diversification of class I genes. The classical class I have moved away from antigen processing genes in eutherian mammals and the wallaby independently, but both lineages

  8. Dramatic Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Debbie; Precious, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The setting: the science classroom. The characters: you and your students. The scene: Your students acting out scientific discoveries, modeling a frog's life cycle, mimicking the transition from liquid to solid. This is "dramatic science", a teaching approach that uses acting techniques to explore and develop young children's ideas about science.…

  9. Dramatic Teaching for Dramatic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Ressler's "Dramatic Changes" is a powerful guide for anyone brave enough to create a space for young people to discuss sexual orientation and gender identity. Her accessible style and tangible suggestions describe a creative and educationally sound approach to supporting youth in thoughtfully wrestling with one of the most controversial social…

  10. Creative Dramatics. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Julia; Sidlovskaya, Olga; Stotter, Ruth; Haugen, Kirsten; Leithold, Naomi

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on using creative dramatics in early childhood education: (1) "Drama: A Rehearsal for Life" (Julia Gabriel); (2) "Fairy Tales Enhance Imagination and Creative Thinking" (Olga Sidlovskaya); (3) "Starting with a Story" (Ruth Stotter); (4) "Using Creative Dramatics to Include All Children" (Kirsten Haugen); and (5) "Helping…

  11. Creative Dramatics Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia School District, PA. Office of Early Childhood Programs.

    This handbook on creative dramatics at the elementary school level is primarily intended to assist the teacher who already has some training in creative dramatics. The handbook contains sections on (1) the philosophy and objectives of the program, including a discussion of an affective curriculum; (2) definitions of key concepts, including general…

  12. Transcriptional profiling of interleukin-2-primed human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells revealed dramatic changes in stem cells response imposed by replicative senescence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Sadvakas, Aiman; Sha, Ying; Pérez, Laura M.; Nussupbekova, Aliya; Amirbekov, Aday; Akanov, Akan A.; Gálvez, Beatriz G.; Jordan, I. King; Lunyak, Victoria V.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a double-edged sword with both detrimental and beneficial consequences. Understanding of the mechanisms of crosstalk between the inflammatory milieu and human adult mesenchymal stem cells is an important basis for clinical efforts. Here, we investigate changes in the transcriptional response of human adipose-derived stem cells to physiologically relevant levels of IL-2 (IL-2 priming) upon replicative senescence. Our data suggest that replicative senescence might dramatically impede human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function via global transcriptional deregulation in response to IL-2. We uncovered a novel senescence-associated transcriptional signature in human adipose-derived MSCs hADSCs after exposure to pro-inflammatory environment: significant enhancement of the expression of the genes encoding potent growth factors and cytokines with anti-inflammatory and migration-promoting properties, as well as genes encoding angiogenic and anti-apoptotic promoting factors, all of which could participate in the establishment of a unique microenvironment. We observed transcriptional up-regulation of critical components of the nitric oxide synthase pathway (iNOS) in hADSCs upon replicative senescence suggesting, that senescent stem cells can acquire metastasis-promoting properties via stem cell-mediated immunosuppression. Our study highlights the importance of age as a factor when designing cell-based or pharmacological therapies for older patients and predicts measurable biomarkers characteristic of an environment that is conducive to cancer cells invasiveness and metastasis. PMID:26255627

  13. A novel type of class I gene organization in vertebrates: a large family of non-MHC-linked class I genes is expressed at the RNA level in the amphibian Xenopus.

    PubMed Central

    Flajnik, M F; Kasahara, M; Shum, B P; Salter-Cid, L; Taylor, E; Du Pasquier, L

    1993-01-01

    A Xenopus class I cDNA clone, isolated from a cDNA expression library using antisera, is a member of a large family of non-classical class I genes (class Ib) composed of at least nine subfamilies, all of which are expressed at the RNA level. The subfamilies are well conserved in their immunoglobulin-like alpha 3 domains, but their peptide-binding regions (PBRs) and cytoplasmic domains are very divergent. In contrast to the great allelic diversity found in the PBR of classical class I genes, the alleles of one of the Xenopus non-classical subfamilies are extremely well conserved in all regions. Several of the invariant amino acids essential for the anchoring of peptides in the classical class I groove are not conserved in some subfamilies, but the class Ib genes are nevertheless more closely related in the PBR to classical and non-classical genes linked to the MHC in mammals and birds than to any other described class I genes like CD1 and the neonatal rat intestinal Fc receptor. Comparison with the Xenopus MHC-linked class Ia protein indicate that amino acids presumed to interact with beta 2-microglobulin are identical or conservatively changed in the two major class I families. Genomic analyses of Xenopus species suggest that the classical and non-classical families diverged from a common ancestor before the emergence of the genus Xenopus over 100 million years ago; all of the non-classical genes appear to be linked on a chromosome distinct from the one harboring the MHC. We hypothesize that this class Ib gene family is under very different selection pressures from the classical MHC genes, and that each subfamily may have evolved for a particular function. Images PMID:8223448

  14. Creative Dramatics in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandelbaum, Jean

    1975-01-01

    Offers suggestions as to how teachers of nursery through second grade children might develop a creative dramatics program from elements that are already in the curriculum and in the children themselves. (Author/SDH)

  15. Children's Voices through Dramatic Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra, Zayda

    Dramatic play provides children an excellent way to express their feelings and perceptions of the world that surrounds them. It is also an alternative way for researchers and teachers to capture, understand, and interpret children's voices because of the difficulties that children have in expressing ideas through oral and written language. While…

  16. Dramatic Techniques in ESL Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radin, Barbara

    Three techniques have been found to be helpful in using dramatic techniques to provide motivation, self-confidence, and self-esteem to students of English as a second language at Hostos Community College. Strategic interaction is a technique based on the open-ended scenario, in which students are free to respond to the problem presented in the…

  17. Kenneth Burke's Discovery of Dramatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feehan, Michael

    1979-01-01

    Discusses how "Twelve Propositions by Kenneth Burke on the Relation between Economics and Psychology" generates a new synthesis of Marx and Freud and foreshadows Burke's system of dramatism. His conception of self, the community, and communication come together in a serious argument for drama as a model of human relations. (JMF)

  18. Learning through Dramatic Story Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindall, Evie

    2012-01-01

    The use of story with dramatic presentation approaches produces an engaging and powerful instructional choice for today's adult ESL educators. Two engaging and timed-tested approaches are Reader's Theater and Tableau Vivant. Both provide English language learners with content tailored to their abilities in addition to numerable opportunities to…

  19. The Dramatic Methods of Hans van Dam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Water, Manon

    1994-01-01

    Interprets for the American reader the untranslated dramatic methods of Hans van Dam, a leading drama theorist in the Netherlands. Discusses the functions of drama as a method, closed dramatic methods, open dramatic methods, and applying van Dam's methods. (SR)

  20. Dramatic Play in Childhood: Rehearsal for Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koste, Virginia Glasgow

    The purpose of this book is to help parents and teachers recognize and understand dramatic play in childhood as a process whereby the child acts out human experience in an attempt to order, clarify, and understand it. Written by a person experienced in theatre and drama, the book considers the following aspects of dramatic play: the importance of…

  1. Fifth Graders' Story Dramatizations during Literature Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddall, Jeffery L.

    Dramatizations as a response activity during literature study provide a vehicle for students to use language, both verbal and nonverbal, in an educational context. A study focused on a group of five students who chose to use story dramatizations as one way to create their interpretations of the book, "The Slave Dancer" (Fox, 1973). The study,…

  2. Dramatic Developments in the Neurosciences Challenge Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Recent dramatic developments in brain research and technology suggest that a comprehensive understanding of how the human brain works may soon be within reach. Just as the ability of the medical profession to treat patients improved dramatically with the advent of effective research skills and technology concerning the structure, biochemistry, and…

  3. Creative Drama: More Than Story Dramatization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewig, John Warren

    1977-01-01

    Suggests that creative drama, including story dramatization, must include components such as rhythmic movement, pantomime, story improvisation, minimal situations, and teaching-in-role in order to produce educational benefits from a cohesive learning sequence. (MH)

  4. Dramatic Cataplexy Improvement Following Right Parietal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fam, David J.; Shammi, Prathiba; Mainprize, Todd G.; Murray, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    This is the case of a 34-year-old woman with severe narcolepsy with cataplexy who experienced a dramatic reduction in cataplexy symptoms after resection of a right parietal astrocytoma. The patient underwent detailed neurological exam, neuropsychological testing, polysomnography and multiple sleep latency testing following surgery. Citation: Fam DJ, Shammi P, Mainprize TG, Murray BJ. Dramatic cataplexy improvement following right parietal surgery. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):829–830. PMID:25902819

  5. Dramatizing Poetry in the Second Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elting, Stephen; Firkins, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Poetry performance is an approach to learning where students can use theatrical techniques to develop a response to the poem. This paper argues that ELL students can explore the aesthetic function of language and, more widely, develop confidence in using English as a communicative tool through the dramatization of poetry. We describe the process…

  6. Nietzsche contra Burke: The Melodrama in Dramatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desilet, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Examines Kenneth Burke's and Friedrich Nietzsche's similar understanding of the hortatory nature of language-using, weighed against their radically differing conceptions of the negative, which allows a distinction between two genres of dramatism, and illustrates contrasting orientations toward symbolic activity in general. (SR)

  7. The Psychodrama-Social Dramatics Separation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klepac, Richard L.

    Social dramatics is a therapeutic and educational program that can act as a mirror to reflect images of the self in action with others. It is the modality for experiential learning to correct social dysfunction by providing models for imitation, opportunities to practice and develop individual forms from that model, and risk free environments for…

  8. Introductory Dramatics Guide for Grade 9. (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Board of Education, Rockville, MD.

    Based on the experiences of classroom teachers of theatre, the elective dramatics course described in this guide is designed to enhance ninth grade students' aesthetic awareness, social development, intellectual growth, and technical knowledge. Following a brief course description and overview, the guide presents complete instructions for seven…

  9. Dramatic Ways to Engage Every Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Edmond J.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of all teaching should be to help students make neural connections--the basis for all learning. To do that, however, the student has to have engagement and cognition around the material to be learned. At its core, dramatic activities, even when they have nothing to do with performance, have a tremendous ability to foster these…

  10. Back to Basics through Creative Dramatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Janet E.

    In the back to basics era, creative dramatics should still be used in the English classroom because it helps to develop the entire child. For some time, teaching strategies have been directed at the left brain, the hemisphere that deals with logical and linear functions. Recently, however, attention has been given to the right side of the brain,…

  11. Care initiation area yields dramatic results.

    PubMed

    2009-03-01

    The ED at Gaston Memorial Hospital in Gastonia, NC, has achieved dramatic results in key department metrics with a Care Initiation Area (CIA) and a physician in triage. Here's how the ED arrived at this winning solution: Leadership was trained in and implemented the Kaizen method, which eliminates redundant or inefficient process steps. Simulation software helped determine additional space needed by analyzing arrival patterns and other key data. After only two days of meetings, new ideas were implemented and tested. PMID:19275059

  12. Dramatic Improvements to Feature Based Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyansky, V. N.; Morris, R. D.; Kuehnel, F. O.; Maluf, D. A.; Cheeseman, P.

    2004-01-01

    The camera registration extracted from feature based stereo is usually considered sufficient to accurately localize the 3D points. However, for natural scenes the feature localization is not as precise as in man-made environments. This results in small camera registration errors. We show that even very small registration errors result in large errors in dense surface reconstruction. We describe a method for registering entire images to the inaccurate surface model. This gives small, but crucially important improvements to the camera parameters. The new registration gives dramatically better dense surface reconstruction.

  13. Maverick Comet Splits during Dramatic Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    New ESO Observations of P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 A few months ago, Periodic Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 underwent a dramatic and completely unexpected, thousand-fold brightening. At that time, the cause for this interesting event was unknown. However, observations with the two largest ESO telescopes have now shown that the ``dirty snowball'' nucleus of this comet has recently split into at least four individual pieces [1]. There is little doubt that the outburst and the splitting event(s) are closely related and that the greatly increased dust and gas production is due to ``fresh'' material of the icy cometary nucleus becoming exposed to the surrounding space for the first time. A Comet with a Troubled History Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 was discovered on May 2, 1930, on a photographic plate obtained at the Hamburg Observatory (Germany) by two astronomers at this institution, Arnold Schwassmann and Arthur Arno Wachmann. The subsequent observations showed that the comet moved in an elliptical orbit with a revolution period of somewhat more than 5 years. Great efforts were expended to observe the comet during the next returns, but it was not recovered until nearly 50 years and eight revolutions later, when its faint image was found of a plate obtained in August 1979 with a telescope at the Perth Observatory in Western Australia. It was missed in 1984, but was sighted again in 1989 and most recently in 1994. Thus this comet has only been observed during four out of thirteen approaches since 1930. While this may be partly due to a less advantageous location in the sky at some returns, it is also a strong indication that the comet behaves unpredictably and must have a quite variable brightness. For the sake of convenience this comet is often referred to as ``SW-3'' by professional astronomers. Recent orbital calculations have shown that it was inserted into the present, short-period orbit by the strong gravitational pull of Jupiter during several, relatively close

  14. "Play for Real": Understanding Middle School Children's Dramatic Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra, Zayda

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes a dissertation that examines the theory and practice of dramatic play among middle school children. Finds that they are still adept and interested in dramatic play. Discusses four components describing the nature and product of the dramatic process (social interactions, metacognitive strategies, ideational processes, and content of…

  15. How To Use Creative Dramatics in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Andrew P.

    1998-01-01

    Provides specific steps and techniques for teaching and using creative dramatics in elementary school classrooms. Notes that creative dramatics address children's powerful emotions and imaginations, which children rely on to explore and understand the world. Discusses four necessary components of creative dramatics--structure, open-endedness, a…

  16. Creative Dramatics: The Perfect Tool for Gifted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Andrew P.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of the use of creative dramatics with gifted students considers the value of creative dramatics; components of creative dramatics (structure, open-endedness, a safe environment, and feedback); the actor's elements (voice, body, character or imagination, and group work). Specific exercises to develop the actor's elements are described.…

  17. Perceptual stability during dramatic changes in olfactory bulb activation maps and dramatic declines in activation amplitudes

    PubMed Central

    Homma, R.; Cohen, L. B.; Kosmidis, E. K.; Youngentob, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the concentration dependence of the ability of rats to identify odorants with the calcium signals in the nerve terminals of the olfactory receptor neurons. Although identification performance decreased with concentrations both above and below the training stimuli it remained well above random at all concentrations tested (between 0.0006% and 35% of saturated vapor). In contrast, the calcium signals in the same awake animals were much smaller than their maximum values at odorant concentrations less than 1% of saturated vapor. In addition, maps of activated glomeruli changed dramatically as odorant concentration was reduced. Thus perceptual stability exists in the face of dramatic changes in both the amplitude and the maps of the input to the olfactory bulb. The data for the concentration dependence of the response of the most sensitive glomeruli for each of five odorants was fitted with a Michaelis-Menten (Hill) equation. The fitted curves were extrapolated to odorant concentrations several orders of magnitude lower the smallest observed signals and suggest that the calcium response at low odorant concentrations is more than 1000 times smaller than the response at saturating odorant concentrations. We speculate that only a few spikes in olfactory sensory neurons may be sufficient for correct odorant identification. PMID:19291227

  18. Using Dramatic Events and Visualization Technology to Teach About Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, A. K.; Hall, M. K.

    2008-12-01

    We developed a GIS-based, two-unit module about dynamic watersheds that uses spatial visualization tools, inquiry-based questioning, and eyewitness accounts of historical, dramatic events to teach students about the natural phenomenon of watershed evolution. The module puts into context the relationship between watersheds and human behavior. The centerpiece of Unit 1 is the Big Thompson watershed in Colorado and the flash flood that killed 145 people in 1976. Unit 2 is a case history of the Sabino Canyon watershed in Arizona, which was ravaged by wildfires in 2002 and 2003, as well as destructive debris flows in 2006. Students examine the causes and magnitude of each of these events, and how they changed landscapes and people. Both units use MyWorld GIS and Google Earth visualization software tools. A teacher workshop in summer 2008 revealed an increased understanding of watersheds and an improved comfort level using spatial visualization software after working with the module. Prior to the workshop, a survey demonstrated that fewer than 50 percent of the workshop participants knew the name of the watershed in which they lived. After the workshop, all teachers were able to conceptually define a watershed, identify the watershed in which they live, and describe hazards that would put a watershed and its communities at risk for dramatic changes. They also showed an increased awareness of seasonal variations in streamflow and made connections between these variations and the sources that generate streamflow in different watersheds. We expect similar results among high-school students who will field test these materials during the Fall 2008 semester.

  19. [A mixed germ cell tumor that underwent dramatic size changes].

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kazuyuki; Takai, Hiroki; Nishiyama, Akira; Hirai, Satoshi; Yokosuka, Kimihiko; Toi, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Kazuhiro; Matsubara, Shunji; Uno, Masaaki; Nishimura, Hirotake

    2014-09-01

    This report describes a mixed germ cell tumor that underwent dramatic size changes. A 12-year-old boy presented to our hospital with a headache that had persisted for two months. Initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a pineal tumor and hydrocephalus. The patient required external ventricular drainage and underwent two endoscopic biopsies. His evaluation involved a total of nine computed tomography (CT) scans prior to the second biopsy;the tumor size had decreased before the second endoscopic biopsy. The tumor consisted of both a germinoma and a teratoma component. The patient was treated with three courses of carboplatin-etoposide (CBDCA-VP) chemotherapy and whole-ventricle radiotherapy (32.1 Gy). However, during the adjuvant therapy, the tumor size increased, necessitating total tumor resection. We speculate that the tumor's initial size reduction was caused by leakage of the cyst component and exposure to the brain CT irradiation. The tumor's subsequent increase in size was due to the recollection of the cystic components and intracranial growing teratoma syndrome (iGTS). Therefore, frequent brain CTs and angiography should be avoided before definitive pathological diagnosis is achieved. Further, the tumor size should be considered, with surgical resection being performed at the optimal time. PMID:25179200

  20. Making History Come Alive: Dramatization in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Frederick D.; Corbin, Denee

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that people of all ages love a story that involves heroes and villains and that a teacher can bridge the gap between political and social history through dramatization. Describes procedures for identifying appropriate topics for dramatization and encouraging student involvement. (CFR)

  1. Cognitive Psychology and Audience-Oriented Dramatic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, David

    Cognitive psychology's most useful contribution to dramatic theory is the concept of schemata, or the mental structures that make up part of the perceptual cycle. In regard to an audience-oriented dramatic theory, this suggests that analysis of a script ought to identify the sorts of schemata that are to be aroused in the audience's minds and the…

  2. Dramatic Activities in Language Arts Classrooms: Resource Summary. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Sibel

    This digest reviews some of the related literature about the benefits of classroom drama activities and introduces a variety of resources to help educators incorporate dramatic activities in their language arts classrooms. The digest notes that although several terms have been used to refer to "classroom drama" such as creative dramatics,…

  3. Dramatic Arts in the Secondary School, MSA Curriculum Guide 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Deldee M., Ed.; Ratliffe, Sharon A., Ed.

    This volume of the Michigan Speech Association curriculum guide is a revision of the 1968 edition (ED 026 389). The first eight units comprise a first semester course that emphasizes theatre history, dramatic structure, and dramatic criticism and theory. There are also units on presenting a one-act play, music in the theatre, and children's…

  4. Dorsal Raphe Neuroinflammation Promotes Dramatic Behavioral Stress Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Howerton, Alexis R.; Roland, Alison V.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity, risk-taking behavior, and elevated stress responsivity are prominent symptoms of mania, a behavioral state common to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Though inflammatory processes activated within the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of both disorders, the specific mechanisms by which neuroinflammation drives manic behavior are not well understood. Serotonin cell bodies originating within the dorsal raphe (DR) play a major role in the regulation of behavioral features characteristic of mania. Therefore, we hypothesized that the link between neuroinflammation and manic behavior may be mediated by actions on serotonergic neurocircuitry. To examine this, we induced local neuroinflammation in the DR by viral delivery of Cre recombinase into interleukin (IL)-1βXAT transgenic male and female mice, resulting in overexpressing of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β. For assertion of brain-region specificity of these outcomes, the prefrontal cortex (PFC), as a downstream target of DR serotonergic projections, was also infused. Inflammation within the DR, but not the PFC, resulted in a profound display of manic-like behavior, characterized by increased stress-induced locomotion and responsivity, and reduced risk-aversion/fearfulness. Microarray analysis of the DR revealed a dramatic increase in immune-related genes, and dysregulation of genes important in GABAergic, glutamatergic, and serotonergic neurotransmission. Behavioral and physiological changes were driven by a loss of serotonergic neurons and reduced output as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, demonstrating inflammation-induced serotonergic hypofunction. Behavioral changes were rescued by acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment, supporting the hypothesis that serotonin dysregulation stemming from neuroinflammation in the DR underlies manic-like behaviors. PMID:24849347

  5. Video Taping and Abnormal Psychology: Dramatized Clinical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in an abnormal psychology course worked in teams to produce dramatizations of diagnostic interviews and then presented them in class. Positive and negative aspects of the activity are discussed. (RM)

  6. Writing a Book about Dorothy Heathcote's Dramatic Approach to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Gavin

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the development of a book about Dorothy Heathcote's dramatic approach to education. Describes a lesson on "bullying" that illustrates an attempt to implement Heathcote's "Mantle of the Expert" method. (RS)

  7. Cotton domestication: Dramatic changes in a single cell

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the nature of genetic changes underpinning plant domestication is critical for untangling the evolutionary history of crops and for improving modern cultivars. A recent study in cotton provides information about the effects of domestication, showing that dramatic genome-wide changes i...

  8. Use of Dramatic Enquiry to Explore Controversies in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Neil; Poad, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing prominence of "How science works" in science courses in England and the imperative of equipping students to engage with the controversies thrown up by the advance of science, science departments need new teaching strategies. Here we describe the application of "Dramatic Enquiry" to GCSE science. The project, developed by…

  9. Dramatic Play: Root Meaning of Drama/Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koste, Virginia Glasgow

    The processes involved in drama and the dramatic play of children are essentially the same in that they rely on an imitation of nature, involve a transformation of reality through imagination, connect seemingly irrelevant elements creatively, and bring a temporary, limited order to an emotional experience. When child's play is used as a basis for…

  10. Dramatically Improve How and Where Academic Content Is Taught

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyslop, Alisha

    2007-01-01

    The fourth recommendation in ACTE's high school reform position statement is to dramatically improve how and where academic content is taught. Even as advanced academic course-taking and high school graduation requirements have increased, student achievement on national benchmarks has remained flat, and college remediation rates continue to…

  11. Assessment to Make "Dramatic Advance;" Coherency, Comprehensiveness Key

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armistead, Lew

    2010-01-01

    Assessment in America's high schools is about to undergo its most dramatic advance in decades, according to a policy brief released in February by the Alliance for Excellent Education (AEE), a Washington, DC, based organization devoted to promoting high school transformation. "There is widespread concern that the most prominent assessments…

  12. Piaget in Performance: The Role of "Games" in Creative Dramatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Gerald Lee

    Jean Piaget's theories of child development and the nature of intelligence are adapted to creative dramatics in this description of two games for children aged 6 through 12. The first game discussed incorporates a "touchy-feely box," a cardboard construction with openings on two sides so that a child may reach inside, select, and describe an…

  13. Building Family and Community Demand for Dramatic Change in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinson, Dana; Steiner, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    District-led, dramatic change efforts in failing schools--including turnarounds and school closures--often face strong resistance from families and communities. Resistance may be based on years of tension and distrust between districts and communities, failed past school improvement efforts, or a lack of understanding about the chasm between a…

  14. Burke Bingo: Using Active Learning to Introduce Dramatism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Kenneth Burke is typically regarded as the single most significant figure in 20th-century rhetorical studies. Undergraduate textbooks in rhetorical criticism, rhetorical theory, and communication theory typically include coverage of Burke's theory of dramatism. In this article, the author describes a classroom activity dubbed "Burke Bingo" that…

  15. Celebrating Diversity through Northeastern Asian Children's Literature and Dramatic Productions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Maurine V.; And Others

    At the University of South Dakota, as part of a campus-wide celebration of diversity focused on northeastern Asia (China, Japan, Korea), undergraduate and graduate Children's Literature classes participated by locating relevant literature and presenting them dramatically. Students were divided into six small cooperative groups. Each group chose a…

  16. Astronaut to Zoologist: Changing the Dramatic Play Area!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouette, Scott J.

    Changing the dramatic play area in a child care setting promotes creativity and gives children the chance to experience a place they may never experience in real life. Whenever possible, the children should be involved in the process of changing the area, by moving furniture and exchanging props, as well as brainstorming ideas for changes. The…

  17. Frost Bite: A Dramatic Tale of Research in Aesthetic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    This article follows the author's research on the integration of an aesthetic arts initiative in a private elementary school with an established traditional arts program. The narrative describes the sequence of events, interpersonal interactions, and learning experiences in the format of a full-length dramatic performance. Informed by Ben Peretz's…

  18. Soaps and Suspicious Activity: Dramatic Experiences in British Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferree, Angela M.

    2001-01-01

    Offers examples of dramatic experiences (student produced soap operas) in two classrooms in British comprehensive secondary schools. Concludes that students in other countries would find such experiences as meaningful and enjoyable as their British counterparts. Notes that the two teachers managed to be flexible, appropriating effective…

  19. Windows into Children's Thinking: A Guide to Storytelling and Dramatization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Cheryl; Bacigalupa, Chiara; Black, Tyler; Burton, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Telling and dramatizing stories is an increasingly popular addition to the preschool curriculum, largely due to the attention this activity has received through the writings of Vivian Paley (Bad guys don't have birthdays: fantasy play at four. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1988; The boy who would be a helicopter: the uses of…

  20. Dramatic reduction of culture time of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, a critical technique for routine diagnosis of tuberculosis, takes more than two weeks. Here, step-by-step improvements in the protocol including a new medium, microaerophlic atmosphere or ascorbic-acid supplement and autofluorescence detection dramatically shortened this delay. In the best case, primary culture and rifampicin susceptibility testing were achieved in 72 hours when specimens were inoculated directly on the medium supplemented by antibiotic at the beginning of the culture.

  1. Multiple nontuberculous scrofulodermas showing dramatic response to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Parimalam, Kumar; Senthil, G; Vinnarasan, M; Arumugakani, V; Amutha, B M; Lalitha, S; Swarna, S

    2015-01-01

    Atypical mycobacteria are distinct from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium chelonae, a non-pigment producing rapid grower, can be found in many cutaneous sites; infection occurs most commonly after skin trauma from surgery, injections, or minor injuries. In immune competent patients, the infection is more frequently localized as a cellulitis or a nodule, whereas, in the immunocompromised patient, dissemination (more than five lesions) can occur. Because the organism is resistant to antituberculous therapy, abscess can develop and follow a chronic, indolent course. We report a case of multiple scrofuloderma due to nontuberculous infection caused by M. chelonae showing dramatic response to clarithromycin. PMID:25657914

  2. World-Wide Effort Produces Dramatic "Movie" of Cosmic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    Astronomers using a world-wide collection of radio telescopes, including the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), have made a dramatic "movie" of a voracious, superdense neutron star repeatedly spitting out subatomic particles at nearly the speed of light into two narrow jets as it pulls material from a companion star. The movie shows these jets ejecting clouds of hot plasma that are then "zapped" by pulses of energy in the jets as they move away from the neutron star. Frame from Radio-Telescope 'Movie' of Scorpius X-1 "We have directly measured the speed of energy flow in a cosmic jet for the first time," said Ed Fomalont, an astronomer at the NRAO in Charlottesville, Virginia. Fomalont worked with Barry Geldzahler and Charles Bradshaw of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. The astronomers used the VLBA, the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) and the Green Bank 140-foot telescope, along with radio telescopes from the European VLBI Network, Australia, Japan and South Africa to record the double-star system's eruptions continuously for 56 hours. "This study is going to be extremely valuable in helping us understand a phenomenon that we see throughout the universe," Fomalont said. Cosmic jets of superfast particles are ejected from the cores of numerous galaxies. On a smaller scale, similar jets are ejected from binary-star systems closer to home, in our own Milky Way Galaxy. While the jets from galaxy cores are thought to be powered by supermassive black holes millions of times more massive than the Sun, the closer "microquasars" are powered by much smaller black holes or by neutron stars only a few times more massive than the sun. "Studying one of the closer, smaller examples will help us understand how they all work, including the bigger ones," Geldzahler said. "The jets coming from distant galaxies are harder to study because of their much greater distance and the slowness of their

  3. Dramatic rigidification of a peptide-decorated lamellar phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsapis, N.; Urbach, W.; Ober, R.

    2001-04-01

    We have performed small-angle x-ray scattering on a lamellar (Lα) phase made of a nonionic surfactant (C12E4), decane, and water, after the insertion of a triblock peptide. The hydrophilic part of the peptide is rigid and organized in an α helix in the presence of membranes. Surface tension measurements and spectrofluorometry show that the peptide lies on the membrane surface. The Caillé parameter η and the smectic compressibility modulus B¯ decrease with peptide concentration, whereas the membrane bending rigidity κ increases threefold for mole ratio of peptide to surfactant as low as 5.2×10-4. The published models for rigid inclusions in membranes cannot account for this dramatic rigidification. However, experimental results are well fitted by a Heuristic renormalization of the membrane thickness.

  4. R4 regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) identify an ancient MHC-linked synteny group

    PubMed Central

    Suurväli, Jaanus; Robert, Jacques; Boudinot, Pierre; Boudinot, Sirje Rüütel

    2012-01-01

    Regulators of G Protein Signaling (RGS) are key regulators of G protein signaling. RGS proteins of the R4 RGS group are composed of a mere RGS domain and are mainly involved in immune response modulation. In both human and mouse, most genes encoding the R4 RGS proteins are located in the same region of chromosome 1. We show here that the RGS1/RGS16 neighborhood constitutes a synteny group well conserved across tetrapods, and closely linked to the MHC paralogon of chromosome 1. Genes located in the RGS1/RGS16 region have paralogs close to the MHC on chromosome 6 or close to the other MHC paralogons. In amphioxus, a cephalochordate, these genes possess orthologs that are located in the same scaffolds as a number of markers defining the proto-MHC in this species (Abi-Rached et al. 2002). We therefore propose that the RGS1/RGS16 region provides useful markers to investigate the origins and the evolution of the MHC. In addition, we show that some genes of the region appear to have immune functions not only in human, but also in Xenopus. PMID:23129146

  5. The Relationship between Dramatic Play and Self-Concept in Middle Class Kindergarten Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gootman, Marilyn Eisenstadt

    This study attempted to determine the relationships between the dramatic play of children aged three to seven and their self-concept; between dramatic play and two components of self-concept--self-esteem and identification with friends; between dramatic play ability and self-concept; and between dramatic play and the teacher's attitude toward…

  6. Anions dramatically enhance proton transfer through aqueous interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Himanshu; Enami, Shinichi; Nielsen, Robert J.; Hoffmann, Michael R.; Goddard, William A.; Colussi, Agustín J.

    2012-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) through and across aqueous interfaces is a fundamental process in chemistry and biology. Notwithstanding its importance, it is not generally realized that interfacial PT is quite different from conventional PT in bulk water. Here we show that, in contrast with the behavior of strong nitric acid in aqueous solution, gas-phase HNO3 does not dissociate upon collision with the surface of water unless a few ions (> 1 per 106 H2O) are present. By applying online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor in situ the surface of aqueous jets exposed to HNO3(g) beams we found that production increases dramatically on > 30-μM inert electrolyte solutions. We also performed quantum mechanical calculations confirming that the sizable barrier hindering HNO3 dissociation on the surface of small water clusters is drastically lowered in the presence of anions. Anions electrostatically assist in drawing the proton away from lingering outside the cluster, whose incorporation is hampered by the energetic cost of opening a cavity therein. Present results provide both direct experimental evidence and mechanistic insights on the counterintuitive slowness of PT at water-hydrophobe boundaries and its remarkable sensitivity to electrostatic effects. PMID:22689964

  7. Unusual Dramatic Surface Restructuring of Silicon Substrate during Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Tanya; Steingart, Daniel; Hannon, James; Princeton University Collaboration; IBM Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Interfacial strain is unavoidable in heteroepitaxial growth and can have a profound impact on the morphology and properties of thin films. In fact, ``engineering'' thin-film strain is a critical component in many advanced technologies. For example, straining the silicon in advanced CMOS devices can increase the device speed by as much as 90 percent.order to control interfacial strain, its effects on growth must be understood. The common picture is that the growth substrate is essentially passive: its role is to provide the lattice mismatch that the growing film must respond to. As the film grows thicker, the stress in the film evolves, which can lead to morphological changes in the film, e.g. dislocations, or a change in growth mode from 2D, planar growth to 3D, quantum dot growth., in both of these examples, the action is in the growing film. In this work we describe a growth system that behaves in a completely unexpected manner that does not fit into this conventional picture. Interfacial strain that accompanies the growth of SiC nanoparticles is relieved by a dramatic restructuring of the *substrate* rather than the nanoparticles. The growth of nanoparticles induces a massive change in the substrate. In situ measurements of the Si mound formation was done with the use of LEEM. Using a simple, illustrative model with parameters taken from the literature, we show that the shapes and heights of the mounds are consistent with a strain-driven formation mechanism.

  8. Loop chiller plant design dramatically lowers chilled water costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, T.

    1999-07-01

    Recent improvements in HVAC networking and speed control technologies, together with an improved understanding of the nature of cooling loads in buildings offer exciting opportunities for improving the energy efficiency of chiller plants. A new Loop chiller plant design has been developed that incorporates variable speed control on all plant components. Operation of this cooling plant is coordinated with the load it serves through a control network. This new approach has enormous advantages over traditional optimized plants. The two key advantages of these new Loop design chiller plants designs are: (1) Annual operating energy requirements are reduced by as much as 50% or more when compared to present state-of-the-art optimized chiller plants, and (2) A smaller sized and therefore less costly chiller plant can be designed to serve HVAC loads. The term Loop is employed to describe the technologies employed because the concept employs closed loop control by providing operational feedback from each point of use to the plant. The Loop concept also employs a single, series coupled chilled water loop for higher pumping and distribution efficiencies. This paper presents background and design theory and follows with a case study to introduce the new Loop design and operations concept. Specifics of an actual design are presented along with an explanation of how the principles can be applied economically to all new or existing chiller plant designs to achieve dramatic reductions in both construction costs and energy costs.

  9. Polyanhydride Nanoparticle Delivery Platform Dramatically Enhances Killing of Filarial Worms

    PubMed Central

    Binnebose, Andrea M.; Haughney, Shannon L.; Martin, Richard; Imerman, Paula M.; Narasimhan, Balaji; Bellaire, Bryan H.

    2015-01-01

    Filarial diseases represent a significant social and economic burden to over 120 million people worldwide and are caused by endoparasites that require the presence of symbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia for fertility and viability of the host parasite. Targeting Wolbachia for elimination is a therapeutic approach that shows promise in the treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Here we demonstrate the use of a biodegradable polyanhydride nanoparticle-based platform for the co-delivery of the antibiotic doxycycline with the antiparasitic drug, ivermectin, to reduce microfilarial burden and rapidly kill adult worms. When doxycycline and ivermectin were co-delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles, effective killing of adult female Brugia malayi filarial worms was achieved with approximately 4,000-fold reduction in the amount of drug used. Additionally the time to death of the macrofilaria was also significantly reduced (five-fold) when the anti-filarial drug cocktail was delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles. We hypothesize that the mechanism behind this dramatically enhanced killing of the macrofilaria is the ability of the polyanhydride nanoparticles to behave as a Trojan horse and penetrate the cuticle, bypassing excretory pumps of B. malayi, and effectively deliver drug directly to both the worm and Wolbachia at high enough microenvironmental concentrations to cause death. These provocative findings may have significant consequences for the reduction in the amount of drug and the length of treatment required for filarial infections in terms of patient compliance and reduced cost of treatment. PMID:26496201

  10. Polyanhydride Nanoparticle Delivery Platform Dramatically Enhances Killing of Filarial Worms.

    PubMed

    Binnebose, Andrea M; Haughney, Shannon L; Martin, Richard; Imerman, Paula M; Narasimhan, Balaji; Bellaire, Bryan H

    2015-01-01

    Filarial diseases represent a significant social and economic burden to over 120 million people worldwide and are caused by endoparasites that require the presence of symbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia for fertility and viability of the host parasite. Targeting Wolbachia for elimination is a therapeutic approach that shows promise in the treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. Here we demonstrate the use of a biodegradable polyanhydride nanoparticle-based platform for the co-delivery of the antibiotic doxycycline with the antiparasitic drug, ivermectin, to reduce microfilarial burden and rapidly kill adult worms. When doxycycline and ivermectin were co-delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles, effective killing of adult female Brugia malayi filarial worms was achieved with approximately 4,000-fold reduction in the amount of drug used. Additionally the time to death of the macrofilaria was also significantly reduced (five-fold) when the anti-filarial drug cocktail was delivered within polyanhydride nanoparticles. We hypothesize that the mechanism behind this dramatically enhanced killing of the macrofilaria is the ability of the polyanhydride nanoparticles to behave as a Trojan horse and penetrate the cuticle, bypassing excretory pumps of B. malayi, and effectively deliver drug directly to both the worm and Wolbachia at high enough microenvironmental concentrations to cause death. These provocative findings may have significant consequences for the reduction in the amount of drug and the length of treatment required for filarial infections in terms of patient compliance and reduced cost of treatment. PMID:26496201

  11. Pretreatment of amphiphilic comb polymer surfaces dramatically affects protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanping; Ma, Hongwei; Hausner, Douglas B; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Beebe, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    New applications in regenerative biotechnology require the ability to understand and control protein-surface interactions on micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Evidence presented here shows that micropatterned amphiphilic comb polymer films exhibit a pretreatment-dependent behavior with respect to protein adsorption for the proteins fibronectin, laminin, and for serum. A micropatterned surface, consisting of protein-reactive regions, separated by comb polymer, was created and tested for protein adsorption using the surface-sensitive imaging tool TOF-SIMS. Immersion of micropatterned surfaces in solutions of fibronectin or laminin resulted in uniform protein coverage on both the comb polymer and protein-reactive regions. However, preimmersion of similarly patterned surfaces in water for 2 h prior to protein incubation was found to dramatically improve the protein-resistant properties of the comb polymer regions. These results are consistent with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chain reorientation and/or hydration and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) backbone segregation away from the interface region. PMID:16283770

  12. Dramatic long-term X-ray variability in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Edward C.

    2016-04-01

    Dramatic X-ray and optical variability on ˜ 10 year timescales has been discovered recently in a handful of quasars, which may provide important new insight into the issue of how luminous AGNs are fueled. We have assembled a new sample of extremely variable X-ray sources from archival Einstein and ROSAT data that could increase substantially the number of such objects known. The sources in our sample varied in X-ray flux by at least a factor of 7-8 over a 10-year span, and most exhibited significantly larger variability amplitudes (10 to over 100). We present the details of how our sample was assembled and preliminary results regarding the identifications, properties, and X-ray histories of the objects. Although a heterogeneous population is expected, some sources in the sample are associated with broad-line AGNs, including a radio-quiet quasar at z = 1.3 that decreased in X-ray luminosity by a factor of 40.

  13. New therapies for hereditary angioedema: disease outlook changes dramatically.

    PubMed

    Frank, Michael M; Jiang, Haixiang

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease associated with episodic attacks of nonpitting edema that may affect any external or mucosal body surface. Attacks most often affect the extremities, causing local swelling, the GI tract, leading to severe abdominal pain, and the mouth and throat, at times causing asphyxiation. Most patients with HAE have low levels of the plasma serine protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor. The edema in these patients is caused by unregulated generation of bradykinin. Effective chronic therapy of patients with impeded androgens or plasmin inhibitors has been available for decades, but in the United States, we do not have therapy for acute attacks. Five companies have completed or are in the process of conducting phase 3 clinical trials, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of products designed to terminate acute attacks or to be used in prophylaxis. Two companies, Lev Pharmaceuticals and CSL Behring, have preparations of C1 inhibitor purified from plasma that have been used in Europe for decades (trade names Cinryze and Berinert P, respectively). One company, Pharming, has developed a recombinant C1 inhibitor preparation. One company, Dyax, is testing a kallikrein inhibitor (ecallantide), and one company, Jerini, is completing testing of a bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist (Icatibant). Although little has been published thus far, all of these products may prove effective. It is likely that HAE treatment will change dramatically within the next few years. PMID:18206518

  14. A Dramatic Change in the Polarization of V Hya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. J.

    1993-12-01

    The unusual carbon star, V Hydrae, is a semiregular variable with a period of 530 days superimposed on a longer, large amplitude period of 6500 days. It has been observed to have bipolar CO outflow (Kahane et al., 1988), and is believed to be an early precursor of a bipolar planetary nebula (Tsuji et al., 1988). In an earlier program (Johnson and Jones, 1991), we observed V Hya with a broad-band polarimeter. We found that it was intrinsically polarized with P on the order of 0.7% at V. We re-observed V Hya at the University of Wisconsin's Pine Bluff Observatory using a spectropolarimeter, and found that the polarization has increased dramatically to 10% at V, with a near 90 degree rotation in position angle from the earlier observation. Near the epoch when we observed V Hya for the second time, it was reported by T. L. Evans that V Hya was experiencing a decline in visible light. The infrared colors have also become redder, suggesting a possible dust ejection episode. V Hya is expected to reach a deep minimum sometime in 1994. We combine our polarimetric observations with our infrared and optical photometry and optical spectroscopy to propose a possible explanation for the polarimetric variations.

  15. Taming Self-Organization Dynamics to Dramatically Control Porous Architectures.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ronan; Sader, John E; Boland, John J

    2016-03-22

    We demonstrate templating of functional materials with unexpected and intricate micro- and nanostructures by controlling the condensation, packing, and evaporation of water droplets on a polymer solution. Spontaneous evaporation of a polymer solution induces cooling of the liquid surface and water microdroplet condensation from the ambient vapor. These droplets pack together and act as a template to imprint an entangled polymer film. This breath figure (BF) phenomenon is an example of self-organization that involves the long-range ordering of droplets. Equilibrium-based analysis provides many insights into contact angles and drop stability of individual drops, but the BF phenomenon remains poorly understood thus far, preventing translation to real applications. Here we investigate the dynamics of this phenomenon to separate out the competing influences and then introduce a modulation scheme to ultimately manipulate the water vapor-liquid equilibrium independently from the solvent evaporation. This approach to BF control provides insights into the mechanism, a rationale for microstructure design, and evidence for the benefits of dynamical control of self-organization systems. We finally present dramatically different porous architectures from this approach reminiscent of microscale Petri dishes, conical flasks, and test tubes. PMID:26828573

  16. Anions dramatically enhance proton transfer through aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Himanshu; Enami, Shinichi; Nielsen, Robert J; Hoffmann, Michael R; Goddard, William A; Colussi, Agustín J

    2012-06-26

    Proton transfer (PT) through and across aqueous interfaces is a fundamental process in chemistry and biology. Notwithstanding its importance, it is not generally realized that interfacial PT is quite different from conventional PT in bulk water. Here we show that, in contrast with the behavior of strong nitric acid in aqueous solution, gas-phase HNO(3) does not dissociate upon collision with the surface of water unless a few ions (> 1 per 10(6) H(2)O) are present. By applying online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor in situ the surface of aqueous jets exposed to HNO(3(g)) beams we found that NO(3)(-) production increases dramatically on > 30-μM inert electrolyte solutions. We also performed quantum mechanical calculations confirming that the sizable barrier hindering HNO(3) dissociation on the surface of small water clusters is drastically lowered in the presence of anions. Anions electrostatically assist in drawing the proton away from NO(3)(-) lingering outside the cluster, whose incorporation is hampered by the energetic cost of opening a cavity therein. Present results provide both direct experimental evidence and mechanistic insights on the counterintuitive slowness of PT at water-hydrophobe boundaries and its remarkable sensitivity to electrostatic effects. PMID:22689964

  17. Impacts on Coralligenous Outcrop Biodiversity of a Dramatic Coastal Storm

    PubMed Central

    Teixidó, Núria; Casas, Edgar; Cebrián, Emma; Linares, Cristina; Garrabou, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Extreme events are rare, stochastic perturbations that can cause abrupt and dramatic ecological change within a short period of time relative to the lifespan of organisms. Studies over time provide exceptional opportunities to detect the effects of extreme climatic events and to measure their impacts by quantifying rates of change at population and community levels. In this study, we show how an extreme storm event affected the dynamics of benthic coralligenous outcrops in the NW Mediterranean Sea using data acquired before (2006–2008) and after the impact (2009–2010) at four different sites. Storms of comparable severity have been documented to occur occasionally within periods of 50 years in the Mediterranean Sea. We assessed the effects derived from the storm comparing changes in benthic community composition at sites exposed to and sheltered from this extreme event. The sites analyzed showed different damage from severe to negligible. The most exposed and impacted site experienced a major shift immediately after the storm, represented by changes in the species richness and beta diversity of benthic species. This site also showed higher compositional variability immediately after the storm and over the following year. The loss of cover of benthic species resulted between 22% and 58%. The damage across these species (e.g. calcareous algae, sponges, anthozoans, bryozoans, tunicates) was uneven, and those with fragile forms were the most impacted, showing cover losses up to 50 to 100%. Interestingly, small patches survived after the storm and began to grow slightly during the following year. In contrast, sheltered sites showed no significant changes in all the studied parameters, indicating no variations due to the storm. This study provides new insights into the responses to large and rare extreme events of Mediterranean communities with low dynamics and long-lived species, which are among the most threatened by the effects of global change. PMID:23326496

  18. Dramatic inhibition of amiodarone metabolism induced by grapefruit juice

    PubMed Central

    Libersa, Christian C; Brique, Serge A; Motte, Kokou B; Caron, Jacques F; Guédon-Moreau, Laurence M; Humbert, Luc; Vincent, A; Devos, Patrick; Lhermitte, Michel A

    2000-01-01

    Aims Grapefruit juice increases blood concentrations of many drugs metabolized by CYP3A. Amiodarone is metabolized by CYP3A to N-desethylamiodarone (N-DEA). The aim of this study was to determine amiodarone kinetics when administrated with and without grapefruit juice. Methods Eleven healthy adult volunteers took part in a single sequence, repeated-measures design study. Each subject, who had been evaluated 6 months previously for amiodarone pharmacokinetics, was given a single oral dose of amiodarone (17 mg kg−1) with three glasses of 300 ml of grapefruit juice on the same day. Results Grapefruit juice completely inhibited the production of N-DEA, the major metabolite of amiodarone, in all subjects and increased the area-under-the-curve (AUC) and maximum concentration of amiodarone (Cmax) by 50% and 84%, respectively, as compared with the control period during which water had been administrated instead of grapefruit juice (AUC: 35.9 ± 14.3 vs 23.9 ± 11.2 µg ml−1 h, P < 0.005 and Cmax: 3.45 ± 1.7 vs 1.87 ± 0.6 µg ml−1, P < 0. 02, respectively) (means ± s.d.). This inhibition of N-DEA production led to a decrease in the alterations caused by amiodarone on PR and QTc intervals. Conclusions Grapefruit juice dramatically alters the metabolism of amiodarone with complete inhibition of N-DEA production. These results are in agreement with in vitro data pointing to the involvement of CYP3 A in the metabolism of amiodarone and suggests that this interaction should be taken into account when prescribing this antiarrhythmic drug. PMID:10759694

  19. Dancing Crystals: A Dramatic Illustration of Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundell, Donald W.

    2007-01-01

    Crystals of naphthalene form on the surface of an acetone solution and dance about in an animated fashion illustrating surface tension, crystallization, and intermolecular forces. Additional experiments reveal the properties of the solution. Flows within the solutions can be visualized by various means. Previous demonstrations of surface motion…

  20. Parahydrogen and Synthesis Allow Dramatically Enhanced Nuclear Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Clifford Russell

    The PASADENA effect is a method for transient high-sensitivity proton spin-labelling by molecular addition of dihydrogen. When the parahydrogen mole fraction differs from the high-temperature limit of 1/4, this population difference constitutes a form of spin order which can be converted to magnetization observable by NMR. Large NMR signals are observed, if subsequent to the hydrogen addition, the two protons experience magnetic inequivalence and spin -spin coupling and if observation is made before spin-lattice relaxation restores the equilibrium spin order. The analogous effect for D_2 is also possible. The kinetic mechanisms of the homogeneous hydrogenation catalysts which permit the realization of the PASADENA effect have been the target of the experimental applications. Rates determined in PASADENA studies pertain to the active catalytic species, since only these molecules can contribute to the enhanced signals from which all kinetic inferences are made. The sensitivity enhancement has also led to the identification of a novel intermediate in the mechanism for the Rh(DIPHOS)^+ catalyzed hydrogenation of styrene. The rate of conversion of this species into product and starting material has been studied using two -dimensional NMR. The dramatically improved sensitivity should make it possible to observe key catalytic intermediates which do not build up in sufficient quantity to allow detection by conventional NMR arising from Curie-Law magnetization. The study of surface sites which bind pairwise with H_2 is also a potentially fruitful area for future experimental work. The ambient temperature NMR spectroscopy of surfaces is not often feasible due to sensitivity limitations. Simulations have been performed using typical shift and coupling parameters in an effort to characterize the enhanced lineshapes which can be expected. The inverse of the PASADENA effect has also been proposed, whereby the spin order of a molecule containing hydrogen is probed by measuring

  1. Metallurgy. Origin of dramatic oxygen solute strengthening effect in titanium.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Qi, Liang; Tsuru, Tomohito; Traylor, Rachel; Rugg, David; Morris, J W; Asta, Mark; Chrzan, D C; Minor, Andrew M

    2015-02-01

    Structural alloys are often strengthened through the addition of solute atoms. However, given that solute atoms interact weakly with the elastic fields of screw dislocations, it has long been accepted that solution hardening is only marginally effective in materials with mobile screw dislocations. By using transmission electron microscopy and nanomechanical characterization, we report that the intense hardening effect of dilute oxygen solutes in pure α-Ti is due to the interaction between oxygen and the core of screw dislocations that mainly glide on prismatic planes. First-principles calculations reveal that distortion of the interstitial sites at the screw dislocation core creates a very strong but short-range repulsion for oxygen that is consistent with experimental observations. These results establish a highly effective mechanism for strengthening by interstitial solutes. PMID:25657243

  2. Dramatic Transcriptional Changes in an Intracellular Parasite Enable Host Switching between Plant and Insect

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kenro; Ishii, Yoshiko; Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Sugawara, Kyoko; Neriya, Yutaro; Himeno, Misako; Minato, Nami; Miura, Chihiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are bacterial plant pathogens that have devastating effects on the yields of crops and plants worldwide. They are intracellular parasites of both plants and insects, and are spread among plants by insects. How phytoplasmas can adapt to two diverse environments is of considerable interest; however, the mechanisms enabling the “host switching” between plant and insect hosts are poorly understood. Here, we report that phytoplasmas dramatically alter their gene expression in response to “host switching” between plant and insect. We performed a detailed characterization of the dramatic change that occurs in the gene expression profile of Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris OY-M strain (approximately 33% of the genes change) upon host switching between plant and insect. The phytoplasma may use transporters, secreted proteins, and metabolic enzymes in a host-specific manner. As phytoplasmas reside within the host cell, the proteins secreted from phytoplasmas are thought to play crucial roles in the interplay between phytoplasmas and host cells. Our microarray analysis revealed that the expression of the gene encoding the secreted protein PAM486 was highly upregulated in the plant host, which is also observed by immunohistochemical analysis, suggesting that this protein functions mainly when the phytoplasma grows in the plant host. Additionally, phytoplasma growth in planta was partially suppressed by an inhibitor of the MscL osmotic channel that is highly expressed in the plant host, suggesting that the osmotic channel might play an important role in survival in the plant host. These results also suggest that the elucidation of “host switching” mechanism may contribute to the development of novel pest controls. PMID:21858041

  3. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F; Weber, William J

    2016-01-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV (208)Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology. PMID:27250764

  4. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-06-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV 208Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1‑x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology.

  5. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    PubMed Central

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV 208Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1−x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology. PMID:27250764

  6. Multiple region whole-exome sequencing reveals dramatically evolving intratumor genomic heterogeneity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cao, W; Wu, W; Yan, M; Tian, F; Ma, C; Zhang, Q; Li, X; Han, P; Liu, Z; Gu, J; Biddle, F G

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of genome instability and genomic alterations; now, genomic heterogeneity is rapidly emerging as a defining feature of cancer, both within and between tumors. Motivation for our pilot study of tumor heterogeneity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is that it is not well studied, but the highest incidences of esophageal cancers are found in China and ESCC is the most common type. We profiled the mutations and changes in copy number that were identified by whole-exome sequencing and array-based comparative genomic hybridization in multiple regions within an ESCC from two patients. The average mutational heterogeneity rate was 90% in all regions of the individual tumors in each patient; most somatic point mutations were nonsynonymous substitutions, small Indels occurred in untranslated regions of genes, and copy number alterations varied among multiple regions of a tumor. Independent Sanger sequencing technology confirmed selected gene mutations with more than 88% concordance. Phylogenetic analysis of the somatic mutation frequency demonstrated that multiple, genomically heterogeneous divergent clones evolve and co-exist within a primary ESCC and metastatic subclones result from the dispersal and adaptation of an initially non-metastatic parental clone. Therefore, a single-region sampling will not reflect the evolving architecture of a genomically heterogeneous landscape of mutations in ESCC tumors and the divergent complexity of this genomic heterogeneity among patients will complicate any promise of a simple genetic or epigenetic diagnostic signature in ESCC. We conclude that any potential for informative biomarker discovery in ESCC and targeted personalized therapies will require a deeper understanding of the functional biology of the ontogeny and phylogeny of the tumor heterogeneity. PMID:26619400

  7. Dramatic Photosynthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Britta

    2003-01-01

    Presents a creative way to teach photosynthesis. Revolves around the growth of a lily planted and stored in the classroom. Combines the concepts of particle theory, transformation, and changes of phase and mass in a holistic approach. The six-step teaching sequence is founded on the notions of challenge, variation, and drama. (Author/NB)

  8. Dramatic improvement of crystals of large RNAs by cation replacement and dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinwei; Ferré-D’Amare, Adrian R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Compared to globular proteins, RNAs with complex three-dimensional folds are characterized by poorly differentiated molecular surfaces dominated by backbone phosphates, sparse tertiary contacts stabilizing global architecture, and conformational flexibility. The resulting generally poor order of crystals of large RNAs and their complexes frequently hampers crystallographic structure determination. We describe and rationalize a post-crystallization treatment strategy that exploits the importance of solvation and counterions for RNA folding. Replacement of Li+ and Mg2+ needed for growth of crystals of a tRNA-riboswitch-protein co-crystal with Sr2+, coupled with dehydration, dramatically improved the resolution limit (8.5 to 3.2 Å) and data quality, enabling structure determination. The soft Sr2+ ion forms numerous stabilizing intermolecular contacts. Comparison of pre- and post-treatment structures reveals how RNA assemblies redistribute as quasi-rigid bodies to yield improved crystal packing. Cation exchange complements previously reported post-crystallization dehydration of protein crystals, and represents a potentially general strategy for improving crystals of large RNAs. PMID:25185828

  9. Dramatic improvement of crystals of large RNAs by cation replacement and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinwei; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-09-01

    Compared to globular proteins, RNAs with complex 3D folds are characterized by poorly differentiated molecular surfaces dominated by backbone phosphates, sparse tertiary contacts stabilizing global architecture, and conformational flexibility. The resulting generally poor order of crystals of large RNAs and their complexes frequently hampers crystallographic structure determination. We describe and rationalize a postcrystallization treatment strategy that exploits the importance of solvation and counterions for RNA folding. Replacement of Li(+) and Mg(2+) needed for growth of crystals of a tRNA-riboswitch-protein complex with Sr(2+), coupled with dehydration, dramatically improved the resolution limit (8.5-3.2 Å) and data quality, enabling structure determination. The soft Sr(2+) ion forms numerous stabilizing intermolecular contacts. Comparison of pre- and posttreatment structures reveals how RNA assemblies redistribute as quasi-rigid bodies to yield improved crystal packing. Cation exchange complements previously reported postcrystallization dehydration of protein crystals and represents a potentially general strategy for improving crystals of large RNAs. PMID:25185828

  10. Dramatic regression and bleeding of a duodenal GIST during preoperative imatinib therapy: case report and review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. The majority of GISTs is located in the stomach. Only 3-5% of GISTs are located in the duodenum associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding as primary manifestation. With response rates of up to 90%, but complications like bleeding due to tumor necrosis in 3%, imatinib mesylate dramatically altered the pre- and postoperative therapy for GIST patients. Case presentation A 58-year-old female patient presented with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding 2 weeks after a giant GIST of the duodenum had been diagnosed. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy had been initiated to achieve a tumor downsizing prior to surgery. During emergency laparotomy a partial duodenopancreatectomy was performed to achieve a complete resection of the mass. Histology revealed a high-malignancy GIST infiltrating the duodenal wall. Adjuvant imatinib therapy was initiated. At follow-up (19 months) the patient is still alive and healthy. Conclusion Giant GISTs of the duodenum are rare and - in contrast to other localizations - harbour a higher risk of serious bleeding as primary manifestation. Tumor necrosis and tumor bleeding are rare but typical adverse effects of imatinib therapy especially during treatment of high-malignancy GIST. In GIST patients with increased risk of tumor bleeding neoadjuvant imatinib therapy should thoroughly be performed during hospitalization. In cases of duodenal GIST primary surgery should be considered as treatment alternative. PMID:20515511

  11. Regulated Breathing Effect of Silicon Negative Electrode for Dramatically Enhanced Performance of Li-Ion Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Xingcheng; Zhou, Weidong; Kim, Youngnam; Ryu, Ill; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Gao; Liu, Zhongyi; Gao, Huajian

    2015-03-01

    Si is an attractive negative electrode material for lithium ion batteries due to its high specifi c capacity (≈3600 mAh g –1 ). However, the huge volume swelling and shrinking during cycling, which mimics a breathing effect at the material/electrode/cell level, leads to several coupled issues including fracture of Si particles, unstable solid electrolyte interphase, and low Coulombic effi ciency. In this work, the regulation of the breathing effect is reported by using Si–C yolk–shell nanocomposite which has been well-developed by other researchers. The focus is on understanding how the nanoscaled materials design impacts the mechanical and electrochemical response at electrode level. For the fi rst time, it is possible to observe one order of magnitude of reduction on breathing effect at the electrode level during cycling: the electrode thickness variation reduced down to 10%, comparing with 100% in the electrode with Si nanoparticles as active materials. The Si–C yolk–shell nanocomposite electrode exhibits excellent capacity retention and high cycle effi ciency. In situ transmission electron microscopy and fi nite element simulations consistently reveals that the dramatically enhanced performance is associated with the regulated breathing of the Si in the new composite, therefore the suppression of the overall electrode expansion.

  12. RAPID DOPAMINE TRANSMISSION WITHIN THE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS DRAMATICALLY DIFFERS FOLLOWING MORPHINE AND OXYCODONE DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Omar S.; Lovic, Vedran; Singer, Bryan F.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Aragona, Brandon J.

    2014-01-01

    While most drugs of abuse increase dopamine neurotransmission, rapid neurochemical measurements show that different drugs evoke distinct dopamine release patterns within the nucleus accumbens. Rapid changes in dopamine concentration following psychostimulant administration have been well studied; however, such changes have never been examined following opioid delivery. Here, we provide novel measures of rapid dopamine release following intravenous infusion of two opioids, morphine and oxycodone, in drug naïve rats using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and rapid (1 min) microdialysis coupled with mass spectrometry. In addition to measuring rapid dopamine transmission, microdialysis HPLC-MS measures changes in GABA, glutamate, monoamines, monoamine metabolites, and several other neurotransmitters. Although both opioids increased dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, their patterns of drug-evoked dopamine transmission differed dramatically. Oxycodone evoked a robust and stable increase in dopamine concentration and a robust increase in the frequency and amplitude of phasic dopamine release events. Conversely, morphine evoked a brief (~ 1 min) increase in dopamine that was coincident with a surge in GABA concentration and then both transmitters returned to baseline levels. Thus, by providing rapid measures of neurotransmission, this study reveals previously unknown differences in opioid-induced neurotransmitter signaling. Investigating these differences may be essential for understanding how these two drugs of abuse could differentially usurp motivational circuitry and powerfully influence behavior. PMID:25208732

  13. A Poorly Known High-Latitude Parasitoid Wasp Community: Unexpected Diversity and Dramatic Changes through Time

    PubMed Central

    Boudreault, Caroline; Goulet, Henri; Hebert, Paul D. N.; Smith, Adam C.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change will have profound and unanticipated effects on species distributions. The pace and nature of this change is largely unstudied, especially for the most diverse elements of terrestrial communities – the arthropods – here we have only limited knowledge concerning the taxonomy and the ecology of these groups. Because Arctic ecosystems have already experienced significant increases in temperature over the past half century, shifts in community structure may already be in progress. Here we utilise collections of a particularly hyperdiverse insect group – parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera; Braconidae; Microgastrinae) – at Churchill, Manitoba, Canada in the early and mid-twentieth century to compare the composition of the contemporary community to that present 50–70 years ago. Morphological and DNA barcoding results revealed the presence of 79 species of microgastrine wasps in collections from Churchill, but we estimate that 20% of the local fauna awaits detection. Species composition and diversity between the two time periods differ significantly; species that were most common in historic collections were not found in contemporary collections and vice versa. Using barcodes we compared these collections to others from across North America; contemporary Churchill species are most affiliated with more south-western collections, while historic collections were more affiliated with eastern collections. The past five decades has clearly seen a dramatic change of species composition within the area studied coincident with rising temperature. PMID:21897854

  14. Effect of dramatic land use change on gaseous pollutant emissions from biomass burning in Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongmei; Tong, Daniel Q.; Gao, Chuanyu; Wang, Guoping

    2015-02-01

    Biomass burning contributes a substantial amount of gas and particle emissions to the atmosphere. As China's breadbasket, northeast China has experienced dramatic land use change in the past century, converting approximately 55 × 104 ha of wetland into farmland to feed a rapidly growing population. This study combines measured emission factors of dominant crops (rice and soybean) and wetland plants (Calamagrostis angu-stifolia, Carex lasiocarpa, Carex pseudo-curaica) and remote sensing land use data to estimate the effect of the unprecedented land use change on gaseous pollutants emissions from biomass burning. Our biomass burning emission estimates resulting from land use changes have increased because of increased post-harvest crop residue burning and decreased burning of wetland plants. From 1986 to 2005, the total emissions of CO2, CO, CXHY, SO2 and NO have increased by 18.6%, 35.7%, 26.8%, 66.2% and 33.2%, respectively. We have found two trends in agricultural burning: increased dryland crop residue burning and decreased wetland (rice paddy) burning. Our results revealed that the large scale land use change in northeastern China has induced more active biomass-burning emissions. The regional emission inventory of gaseous pollutants derived from this work may be used to support further examination of the subsequent effects on regional climate and air quality simulations with numerical atmospheric models.

  15. Guiding the Noticing: Using a Dramatic Performance Experience to Promote Tellability in Narrative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Shanetia

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes her use of dramatic performance to promote tellability in narrative writing within a seventh and eighth grade English and language arts classroom. By experiencing dramatic performance, the students were able to actively and physically perform the writing process: brainstorming, drafting, revising, and editing.…

  16. Using Creative Dramatics to Teach Conflict Resolution: Exploiting the Drama/Conflict Dialectic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipkin, Will; DiMenna, Stephen

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the dialectic between creative dramatics and conflict resolution and its exploration by the Conflict Resolution Project (CRP). Outlines the CRP's perspectives and general approach as a prelude to a more indepth review about how creative dramatics are used by the CRP. (Author/NB)

  17. "I Did Not Wash My Feet with that Woman": Using Dramatic Performance to Teach Biblical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbett, David

    2010-01-01

    The student dramatic performance is an effective way for undergraduates to learn biblical studies. In this article I will give an example of a dramatic performance assignment that I developed over a number of courses and used most recently and most successfully in an undergraduate course in the Hebrew Bible at a small liberal arts college in the…

  18. The Influence of the Physical Design of the Dramatic Play Center on Children's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrakos, Harriet; Howe, Nina

    1996-01-01

    Observed the effects of dramatic play center variations on children's social and cognitive play behaviors. Found that solitary-designed centers facilitated more solitary play than group-designed centers; dramatic play increased in the intervention and follow-up housekeeping centers compared to the baseline housekeeping center; and thematic centers…

  19. The Ecology of Dramatic Play Centers and Children's Social and Cognitive Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Nina; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used traditional housekeeping and novel dramatic play centers to compare the effects of theme, novelty, and duration on the social and cognitive play of two- to five-year olds. More dramatic play was observed in centers that used familiar rather than unfamiliar themes. Girls preferred traditional to novel centers; boys preferred novel to…

  20. Use of Dramatization to Teach Cardiac Cycle Physiology to Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowlati, Ehsan; Musick, David W.; Zhang, Lin; Thornton, Katherine; Carvalho, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Part of the educator's mission is to develop new methodologies that promote active learning. This study examines the use of dramatization of the cardiac cycle in medical school. Two groups (n = 42, 21 each) of first-year medical students participated. Group A was initially taught through dramatization alone, while Group B was taught through…

  1. Enhancing Creative Dramatic Play and Story Reenactments in a Primary Grade Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schierholt, Carla G.

    A classroom research project in Alaska explored what role dramatic play and story reenactments have as a teaching/learning method for young childrens' development. A review of the literature identified several common elements that helped teachers elicit successful dramatic story reenactments: choosing a familiar book or story; encouraging…

  2. New Radar Altimeter Missions are Providing a Dramatically Sharper Image of Global Marine Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwell, D. T.; Müller, D.; Garcia, E.; Matthews, K. J.; Smith, W. H. F.; Zaron, E.; Zhang, S.; Bassett, D.; Francis, R.

    2015-12-01

    Marine gravity, derived from satellite radar altimetry, is a powerful tool for mapping tectonic structures, especially in the deep ocean basins where the topography remains unmapped by ships or is buried by thick sediment. The ability to infer seafloor tectonics from space was first demonstrated in 1978 using Seasat altimeter data but the spatial coverage was incomplete because of the short three-month lifetime of the satellite. Most ocean altimeters have repeat ground tracks with spacings of hundreds of kilometers so they do not resolve tectonic structures. Adequate altimeter coverage became available in 1995 when the United States Navy declassified the Geosat radar altimeter data and the ERS-1 altimeter completed a 1-year mapping phase. These mid-1990's altimeter-derived images of the ocean basins remained static for 15 years because there were no new non-repeat altimeter missions. This situation changed dramatically in 2010 when CryoSat-2, with its advanced radar altimeter, was launched into a non-repeat orbit and continues to collect data until perhaps 2020. In addition the Jason-1 altimeter was placed into a 14-month geodetic phase at the end of its lifetime. More recently the 1.5 times higher precision measurements from the AltiKa altimeter aboard the SARAL spacecraft began to drift away from its 35-day repeat trackline. The Chinese HY-2 altimeter is scheduled to begin a dense mapping phase in early 2016. Moreover in 2020 we may enjoy significantly higher resolution maps of the ocean basins from the planned SWOT altimeter mission with its advanced swath mapping ability. All of this new data will provide a much sharper image of the tectonics of the deep ocean basins and continental margins. During this talk we will tour of the new tectonic structures revealed by CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 and speculate on the tectonic views of the ocean basins in 2020 and beyond.

  3. [A case of progressive supranuclear palsy dramatically improved with L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, T; Tamaru, F; Yamagisawa, N

    1992-06-01

    We report a 67-year-old female with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) who dramatically improved when given L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (L-DOPS). This patient developed dysarthria, lack of facial expression, and slowness at age 64. She was admitted to a local hospital, diagnosed as having parkinsonism and treated with antiparkinsonian drugs. Despite this treatment, she had difficulty in turning over in bed and standing up from a seat, and began to fall backward at age 65. One year later, she had trouble in walking due to frequent falls and became bedridden. The patient was admitted to our hospital in July 1991 under treatment with 20 mg/200 mg of carbidopa/L-dopa and 4 mg of trihexyphenydyl hydrochloride per day. Neurological examination revealed masked face, pseudobulbar palsy, and dystonic rigidity of the neck and upper trunk. Eye movements were normal except for impaired vertical saccades and convergence inability. Deep tendon reflexes were generally brisk and the plantar responses were flexor bilaterally. Tests of pulsion showed that her postural reflex was markedly disturbed, especially in retropulsion. Her gait showed severe unsteadiness. Neuropsychological tests showed intellectual impairment, frontal lobe dysfunction, and memory disturbance. Computed tomography showed an atrophic midbrain with prominent enlargement of ambient and quadrigeminal plate cisterns. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using 123-I-isopropyl-iodoamphetamine demonstrated marked frontal hypoperfusion. L-DOPS was administered at a dose of 100 mg per day and gradually increased up to 600 mg per day over a period of five weeks, while carbidopa/L-dopa and trihexyphenidyl hydrochloride were continued as on admission.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1424339

  4. Comment and Response: A Relation of Agency to Act in Dramatism: A Comment on "Burke's Act."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College English, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a criticism of Clayton W. Lewis's analysis of Burke's "A Rhetoric of Motives" arguing that Lewis risks overstressing act and neglecting the necessary connection between agency and act in Burke's theory of dramatism. Includes Lewis's response. (HTH)

  5. The Interview: Dramatization Techniques in Dance--A New Approach to Teaching Modern Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Gwendolyn Croom; Snygg, Fran

    1979-01-01

    The use of the interview dramatization as a teaching technique for presenting historical and chronological background information in the field of modern dance is described. Samples of the interviews are included. (JMF)

  6. Trends in nutrient concentrations in Latvian rivers and the response to the dramatic change in agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stålnacke, P.; Grimvall, A.; Libiseller, C.; Laznik, M.; Kokorite, I.

    2003-12-01

    In recent years, the use of fertilisers in the Baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania) has decreased at an unprecedented rate. The import of mineral fertilisers and feed stuff became almost non-existent, and extensive slaughtering of livestock reduced the amount of manure. In Latvia, the purchase of mineral fertilisers decreased by a factor of 15 between 1987 and 1996 and the number of livestock decreased with a factor of almost 4 during the same time period. Such abrupt and comprehensive changes in land use have never before occurred in the history of modern European agriculture. Here, the impact that this dramatic reduction has had on concentrations of nutrients in Latvian rivers is examined. To discern temporal changes, statistical analyses were undertaken on time series of nutrient concentrations and relationships between concentrations and runoff at 12 sampling sites in ten Latvian rivers covering drainage areas from 334 to 64,000 km 2. Considering the study period 1987-1998, only four of the 12 sites showed statistically significant downward trends (one-sided test at the 5% level) in the dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN=NO 3-N+NO 2-N+NH 4-N) data. There are probably two main explanations for the weak DIN trends. Firstly, long water-transit times in the soilwater and groundwater may have caused substantial time lag between changes in input and output of nitrate in the studied catchments. Secondly, the loss of DIN might have been dominated by mineralisation of large pools of organic nitrogen that have accumulated over several years. These inferences are supported by (i) a hydrograph recession analysis and (ii) indications of DIN transformation processes, presumably denitrification, in smaller streams and channels, based on measurements in small agricultural catchments (1-4 km 2) in Estonia and Latvia. Formal testing of trends in phosphorus data revealed that marked drops occurred in riverine concentrations at six sites in 1987-1998. A joint analysis

  7. Social insect genomes exhibit dramatic evolution in gene composition and regulation while preserving regulatory features linked to sociality.

    PubMed

    Simola, Daniel F; Wissler, Lothar; Donahue, Greg; Waterhouse, Robert M; Helmkampf, Martin; Roux, Julien; Nygaard, Sanne; Glastad, Karl M; Hagen, Darren E; Viljakainen, Lumi; Reese, Justin T; Hunt, Brendan G; Graur, Dan; Elhaik, Eran; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Wen, Jiayu; Parker, Brian J; Cash, Elizabeth; Privman, Eyal; Childers, Christopher P; Muñoz-Torres, Monica C; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Currie, Cameron R; Elsik, Christine G; Suen, Garret; Goodisman, Michael A D; Keller, Laurent; Liebig, Jürgen; Rawls, Alan; Reinberg, Danny; Smith, Chris D; Smith, Chris R; Tsutsui, Neil; Wurm, Yannick; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Berger, Shelley L; Gadau, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    Genomes of eusocial insects code for dramatic examples of phenotypic plasticity and social organization. We compared the genomes of seven ants, the honeybee, and various solitary insects to examine whether eusocial lineages share distinct features of genomic organization. Each ant lineage contains ∼4000 novel genes, but only 64 of these genes are conserved among all seven ants. Many gene families have been expanded in ants, notably those involved in chemical communication (e.g., desaturases and odorant receptors). Alignment of the ant genomes revealed reduced purifying selection compared with Drosophila without significantly reduced synteny. Correspondingly, ant genomes exhibit dramatic divergence of noncoding regulatory elements; however, extant conserved regions are enriched for novel noncoding RNAs and transcription factor-binding sites. Comparison of orthologous gene promoters between eusocial and solitary species revealed significant regulatory evolution in both cis (e.g., Creb) and trans (e.g., fork head) for nearly 2000 genes, many of which exhibit phenotypic plasticity. Our results emphasize that genomic changes can occur remarkably fast in ants, because two recently diverged leaf-cutter ant species exhibit faster accumulation of species-specific genes and greater divergence in regulatory elements compared with other ants or Drosophila. Thus, while the "socio-genomes" of ants and the honeybee are broadly characterized by a pervasive pattern of divergence in gene composition and regulation, they preserve lineage-specific regulatory features linked to eusociality. We propose that changes in gene regulation played a key role in the origins of insect eusociality, whereas changes in gene composition were more relevant for lineage-specific eusocial adaptations. PMID:23636946

  8. Social insect genomes exhibit dramatic evolution in gene composition and regulation while preserving regulatory features linked to sociality

    PubMed Central

    Simola, Daniel F.; Wissler, Lothar; Donahue, Greg; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Helmkampf, Martin; Roux, Julien; Nygaard, Sanne; Glastad, Karl M.; Hagen, Darren E.; Viljakainen, Lumi; Reese, Justin T.; Hunt, Brendan G.; Graur, Dan; Elhaik, Eran; Kriventseva, Evgenia V.; Wen, Jiayu; Parker, Brian J.; Cash, Elizabeth; Privman, Eyal; Childers, Christopher P.; Muñoz-Torres, Monica C.; Boomsma, Jacobus J.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Currie, Cameron R.; Elsik, Christine G.; Suen, Garret; Goodisman, Michael A.D.; Keller, Laurent; Liebig, Jürgen; Rawls, Alan; Reinberg, Danny; Smith, Chris D.; Smith, Chris R.; Tsutsui, Neil; Wurm, Yannick; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Berger, Shelley L.; Gadau, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Genomes of eusocial insects code for dramatic examples of phenotypic plasticity and social organization. We compared the genomes of seven ants, the honeybee, and various solitary insects to examine whether eusocial lineages share distinct features of genomic organization. Each ant lineage contains ∼4000 novel genes, but only 64 of these genes are conserved among all seven ants. Many gene families have been expanded in ants, notably those involved in chemical communication (e.g., desaturases and odorant receptors). Alignment of the ant genomes revealed reduced purifying selection compared with Drosophila without significantly reduced synteny. Correspondingly, ant genomes exhibit dramatic divergence of noncoding regulatory elements; however, extant conserved regions are enriched for novel noncoding RNAs and transcription factor–binding sites. Comparison of orthologous gene promoters between eusocial and solitary species revealed significant regulatory evolution in both cis (e.g., Creb) and trans (e.g., fork head) for nearly 2000 genes, many of which exhibit phenotypic plasticity. Our results emphasize that genomic changes can occur remarkably fast in ants, because two recently diverged leaf-cutter ant species exhibit faster accumulation of species-specific genes and greater divergence in regulatory elements compared with other ants or Drosophila. Thus, while the “socio-genomes” of ants and the honeybee are broadly characterized by a pervasive pattern of divergence in gene composition and regulation, they preserve lineage-specific regulatory features linked to eusociality. We propose that changes in gene regulation played a key role in the origins of insect eusociality, whereas changes in gene composition were more relevant for lineage-specific eusocial adaptations. PMID:23636946

  9. Role of MHC-Linked Genes in Autoantigen Selection and Renal Disease in a Murine Model of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously described a renal protective effect of factor B deficiency in MRL/lpr mice. Factor B is in the MHC cluster; thus, the deficient mice were H2b, the haplotype on which the knockout was derived, whereas the wild-type littermates were H2k, the H2 of MRL/lpr mice. To determine which protect...

  10. The Impact of Presence Versus Absence of Negative Consequences in Dramatic Portrayals of Alcohol Drinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahk, C. Mo.

    1997-01-01

    Using dramatic media presentations, explores issues surrounding the absence of negative consequences in alcohol consumption. Results based on 211 participants indicate that exposure to portrayals of alcohol drinking with negative consequences elicits the least favorable attitudes toward drinking. Exposure to the same presentation, without the…

  11. Occupational Awareness through Dramatic Play: A Curriculum Guide for Primary Grades: Parts 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Loretta

    Designed for grades K-3, the career education curriculum guide focuses on dramatic play to create an environment which will stimulate children to explore various occupations within the community. At the beginning of the program, the community includes only a few structures. As the students realize the need for more buildings and services, the…

  12. Examining Young Children's Perception toward Augmented Reality-Infused Dramatic Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Jeonghye; Jo, Miheon; Hyun, Eunja; So, Hyo-jeong

    2015-01-01

    Amid the increasing interest in applying augmented reality (AR) in educational settings, this study explores the design and enactment of an AR-infused robot system to enhance children's satisfaction and sensory engagement with dramatic play activities. In particular, we conducted an exploratory study to empirically examine children's perceptions…

  13. Playing around with Improvisation: An Analysis of the Text Creation Processes Used within Preadolescent Dramatic Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Julie

    2008-01-01

    When children come together to play dramatically they are involved in the creation of an improvised text. This text emerges spontaneously via the moment-by-moment contributions of individual players who must operate in a highly collaborative way in order to achieve cohesion. This paper reports on a research project involving several groups of 11-…

  14. Athenian and Shakespearean Tragedies in Oceania: Teaching Dramatic Literatures in Fiji

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anae, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a theorised classroom-based narrative discussing the author's interdisciplinary approach to the teaching of English dramatic literatures--in particular, Sophocles' "Oedipus the King" and Shakespeare's "Macbeth"--to i-Taukei, Indo-Fijian and Pacific Islander tertiary students at a South Pacific…

  15. Collaborative College Playwriting and Performance: A Core Course "Trespassing" onto the Dramatic Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedetti, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Arts integration is relevant in the context of the increased demand for creative thinkers in a global economy. However, reaching across disciplinary boundaries is less common in higher education. Arts integration is one way that a literature class can "trespass" onto the dramatic arts. This paper reports on a study of integrating the…

  16. Art-House Cinema, Avant-Garde Film, and Dramatic Modernism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardullo, Bert

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about art-house cinema, avant-garde film, and dramatic modernism. He believes that the most important modes of film practice are art-house cinema and the avant-garde, both of which contrast with the classical Hollywood mode of film practice. While the latter is characterized by its commercial imperative, corporate…

  17. Teenagers' Significant Experiences in Aesthetic Areas: Some Empirical Observations Regarding the Role of Dramatic Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnas, Leif

    2008-01-01

    Fifteen sixteen-year-old Fenno-Swedish compulsory school pupils' descriptions and evaluations of significant, i.e. more or less "strong", experiences relating to dramatic art (film, theatre) were analysed and compared with reported experiences in other aesthetic areas (music, nature etc.). The drama area was represented in many experiences, but…

  18. Effects of Dramatized Depictions of Accidents on Grade School Children's Reception of Safety Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omdahl, Becky L.; Cantor, Joanne

    A study examined a format for fear appeal messages that introduced a threat through one medium (i.e., a segment of dramatic television programming) and the recommended action through another medium (i.e., the verbal presentation of safety guidelines by an adult to a child). Subjects, 138 elementary school children from a middle-class elementary…

  19. "Welcome to Philadelphia": An Original Dramatization of Life in the 1780s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stakes, Mary E.

    Teachers can create an interest in the founding period of U.S. history and present students with an authentic view of this time period through the presentation of this play. The dramatic pretense of the play is that the audience, by their presence, is part of the drama. The audience plays the part of travelers visiting a Philadelphia home in the…

  20. "Emergent Literacy and Dramatic Play in Early Education" by Jane Davidson. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Marilyn L.

    2000-01-01

    Notes that Davidson's book provides an in-depth exploration of the contribution of dramatic play to emergent literacy and ways that teachers can implement play-based literacy learning. Maintains that the book has a balanced theoretical orientation, provides a sensitive treatment of intervention, presents a thoughtful treatment of oral and written…

  1. Some Therapeutic Uses of Dramatic Play with the Aggressive Child in the Preschool Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginnane, Patrick

    The primary purpose of this master's thesis is to describe some therapeutic uses of dramatic play with the mildly aggressive preschool child. The child for whom the suggested play interventions are considered appropriate is characterized by sociality and attachment to both peers and adults, and is not chronically aggressive. After the first…

  2. Engaging in Dramatic Activities in English as a Foreign Language Classes at the University Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algarra Carrasco, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss how, through dramatic activities, fiction and reality can work together to help the English as a Foreign language learner communicate in a more personal and meaningful way. The kind of activities proposed are designed to help engender a space where students can personally engage with each other in an atmosphere that is…

  3. Architectural Images through the Dual Lens of Picture Books and Creative Dramatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Betty P.; And Others

    Introducing architectural concepts to children is a relatively new area of the curriculum for schools, whether elementary schools or high schools. The use of picture books and creative dramatics to encourage children to think about architecture is explored. In a few hours, a fourth-grade class considered the destruction and rebuilding of a…

  4. Erotic Language as Dramatic Action in Plays by Lyly and Shakespeare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    This study closely examines the language of desire in the dramatic works of John Lyly and William Shakespeare, and argues that contemplative and analytical speeches about desire function as modes of action in their plays. Erotic speeches do more than express desire in a purely descriptive or perlocutionary capacity distinct from the action of the…

  5. Mantle of the Expert: Integrating Dramatic Inquiry and Visual Arts in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Edric C.; Liu, Katrina; Goble, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the social studies field to Dorothy Heatchote's Mantle of Expert (MOE). MOE is a dramatic inquiry approach used in several subject areas and can work at all levels in the social studies curriculum. The authors go into the development of using this approach in an elementary and middle teacher education program. After sharing…

  6. Dramatic Science at Key Stage 1: Modelling Ideas within an Olympics Theme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Deb; Precious, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic Science is an approach to teaching science that purposely places the children in thought-provoking situations where they need to apply their scientific understanding to decide how to act. Teachers can then apply drama techniques to help children develop and communicate their ideas. In this article, the authors share how modelling through…

  7. How to Know when Dramatic Change Is on Track: Leading Indicators of School Turnarounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, Julie; Ableidinger, Joe

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, national policymakers have placed new emphasis on "school turnarounds" as a strategy for rapid, dramatic improvement in chronically failing schools, calling on education leaders to turn around performance in the 5,000 lowest-achieving schools nationwide. This goal may seem daunting, given the dismal success rates of school…

  8. Lord Kelvin and the Age-of-the-Earth Debate: A Dramatization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinner, Art; Tecihman, Jurgen

    2003-01-01

    Presents a dramatization of a fictitious debate about the age of the earth that takes place at the Royal Institution, London, England, in the year 1872 among Sir William Thomson, T.H. Huxley, Sir Charles Lyell, and Hermann von Helmholtz. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/YDS)

  9. National Lighting Bureau Reports Dramatic Energy Savings Possible through Minor Lighting Modifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Store Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Dramatic savings are possible by implementing minor modifications including: energy efficient light bulbs and tubes, ballasts, luminaires (fixtures), controls, operating practices, and revised maintenance. Many different changes can be made without affecting productivity, safety and security, visual comfort, aesthetic appeal, consumer discretion,…

  10. DRAMATIC IMPROVEMENTS IN CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF CESIUM THROUGH MORE EFFICIENT STRIPPING

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Bazelaire, Eve; Bonnesen, Peter V; Engle, Nancy L; Gorbunova, Maryna; Haverlock, Tamara; Moyer, Bruce A; Ensor, Dale; Meadors, Viola M; Harmon, Ben; Bartsch, Richard A.; Surowiec, Malgorzata A.; Zhou, Hui

    2008-01-01

    Dramatic potential improvements to the chemistry of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process are presented as related to enhancement of cesium stripping. The current process for removing cesium from the alkaline high-level waste (HLW) at the USDOE Savannah River Site employs acidic scrub and strip stages and shows remarkable extraction and selectivity properties for cesium. It was determined that cesium stripping can be greatly improved with caustic or near-neutral stages using sodium hydroxide and boric acid as scrub and strip solutions, respectively. Improvements can also be achieved by appending pH-sensitive functional groups to the calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant. Addition of a proton-ionizable group to the calixarene frame leads to a dramatic "pH swing" of up to 6 orders of magnitude change in cesium distribution ratio.

  11. [I was born a woman, the life of Mame: the dramatization of intergenerational inclusion].

    PubMed

    Lasheras Amat, M del Pilar; Muriel Fernández, Rafael; Llamas Martínez, M Victoria; Hallaga Messari, Asmaa; Bitoden Yaka, Albert; Ndour, Mame Awa; Dieng, Ousseynou; Márquez Bernal, Victoriano; Sevillano, Manuel Garrido

    2010-01-01

    I was born a woman, the life of Mame is the dramatization a fictitious intergenerational story. However, the story is based on true events and the feelings of real immigrant women. The dramatization narrates the life of a woman, from the time her parents-who had recently emigrated from Senegal-settled in Andalusia, up to the adolescence of Mame's own daughter. The story is told with one person on stage who, through the use of three costume changes, plays three different generations of women: mother, daughter and granddaughter, with the video-recorded testimonies of other characters (a teacher and a midwife), who express their views of the host society against a background of African music and pictures of their native country. The present article describes their goals, such as communication in conferences, and includes a concise summary of the script, reflections on the process of integrating, and the evaluation made after a performance. PMID:20022142

  12. "Shadows of the heart": a dramatic video for the treatment resistance of spouse abusers.

    PubMed

    Stosny, S

    1994-11-01

    Successful intervention with spouse abusers, most of whom are ordered into treatment by the courts, must overcome formidable anger and resistance, often expressed by high attrition and scant participation in the group treatment process. The dramatic video "Shadows of the Heart" dissipates client resistance by providing internal motivation to control violent behavior. The video dramatizes spouse abuse from the viewpoint of a young boy, who as a man has become a spouse abuser. As clients experience compassion for the child witness to family violence, they learn to convert their habitual anger response into nonviolent actions. Developed to combat treatment resistance, the video presentation was tested in a randomized experiment with 106 male spouse abusers drawn from seven public and private agencies. Results indicate that the video presentation significantly increased attendance and participation in the group treatment process. PMID:7992138

  13. [A case of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with dramatic improvement in consciousness immediately after intravenous infusion of thiamine].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, A; Chida, K; Misu, T; Okita, N; Nomura, H; Konno, H; Takase, S; Takeda, A; Itoyama, Y

    2000-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was hospitalized on March 4, 1998 for disturbances in consciousness. In 1995, he had received proximal subtotal gastrectomy and reconstructive surgery of the jejunal interposition for gastric cancer. Thereafter he had been taking enough food without the habit of taking liquor. In October 1997, his short term memory was becoming gradually worse. On February 12, 1998, he suffered from numbness in the feet, and then dysphagia, unsteady gait, and diplopia developed gradually. On February 26, brain MRI showed no abnormalities. On March 3, he had a fever of 38.5 degrees C and his consciousness became unclear. Neurological examination revealed semi-coma, total ophthalmoplegia, and absence of doll's eye movement. Deep tendon reflexes were absent. The serum thiamine level was 9 ng/ml (normal range: 20-50). Brain MRI demonstrated symmetrical high intensity lesions in the periaqueductal area of the midbrain, dorsomedial nuclei of bilateral thalami, and vestibular nuclei. About 30 seconds after intravenous infusion of thiamine, his consciousness improved dramatically, but returned to semi-coma after about two minutes. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome usually occurs acutely. In the present case, however, the disease showed slow onset, chronic progression, and then rapid worsening after fever. Reconstructive surgery of the jejunal interposition might have caused the slow onset of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, and fever might have facilitated the rapid progression of the disease. An immediate high concentration of thiamine modifies the kinetics of acetylcholine receptor ion channels, thereby maintaining wakefulness, and the level of consciousness may change dramatically. PMID:10689693

  14. Dramatic decline of unionid bivalves in offshore waters of western Lake Erie after infestation by the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Don W.; Nalepa, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    Unionid bivalves and attached epizoic zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were collected at one index station in 1989, 1990, and 1991 and at 17 stations in 1991 in offshore waters of western Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Sampling at the index station revealed that the proportion of live unionids declined from 53% in September 1989 to 17% in May–June 1990 and to 0% in September 1990: this 100% mortality coincided with heavy infestation by zebra mussels. Quantitative sampling with a Ponar grab at the 17 stations in 1991 revealed a widespread and dramatic reduction in unionid populations. In 1982, five unionid species occurred at 35% of the stations at a density of 4/m2, whereas in 1991, no live unionid species were found. Qualitative sampling with an epibenthic sled at the 17 stations in 1991 yielded only 4 live specimens of 2 species (Amblema plicata plicata and Fusconaia flava) and 187 dead specimens of 10 species. These and other results indicate that unionid populations are being negatively affected by zebra mussels in the Great Lakes. Similar impacts on unionids are expected to occur where zebra mussels become abundant throughout North America.

  15. Dramatic reduction of read disturb through pulse width control in spin torque random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zihui; Wang, Xiaobin; Gan, Huadong; Jung, Dongha; Satoh, Kimihiro; Lin, Tsann; Zhou, Yuchen; Zhang, Jing; Huai, Yiming; Chang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Te-ho

    2013-09-01

    Magnetizations dynamic effect in low current read disturb region is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Dramatic read error rate reduction through read pulse width control is theoretically predicted and experimentally observed. The strong dependence of read error rate upon pulse width contrasts conventional energy barrier approach and can only be obtained considering detailed magnetization dynamics at long time thermal magnetization reversal region. Our study provides a design possibility for ultra-fast low current spin torque random access memory.

  16. Discrimination, developmental science, and the law: addressing dramatic shifts in civil rights jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Roger J R

    2014-01-01

    The civil rights movement fostered dramatic shifts in legal responses to discrimination based on race, gender, and a host of other group characteristics. The legal system now evinces yet another dramatic shift, as it moves from considering difference to focusing on neutrality, from efforts that seek to counter subjugation to those that adopt a "color-blind" approach. The shifting approach already has reached laws regulating responses to the group that spurred massive civil rights reform: minority youth. The shift requires a different body of empirical evidence to address it and a new look at equality jurisprudence. This article notes the need to turn to the current understanding of prejudice and discrimination for guidance, and uses, as illustration, developmental science to shed light on the development, manifestation, and alleviation of invidious discrimination. Using that understanding, the analysis details how the legal system can benefit from that research and better address discrimination in light of dramatic changes in law. The article articulates the need to address discrimination by recognizing and enlisting the law's inculcative powers through multiple sites of inculcation, ranging from families, schools, health and justice systems to religious and community groups. The discussion concludes with brief suggestions for reform benefiting from understandings of prejudice and its expression. PMID:24826823

  17. Dramatic decrease of carnitine esters after interruption of exogenous carnitine supply in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Bene, Judit; Csiky, Botond; Wittmann, Istvan; Sulyok, Endre; Melegh, Bela

    2012-01-01

    L-carnitine supplementation is extensively used in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) to improve dialysis-related clinical symptoms. In a series of studies, we investigated the dynamics of carnitine pool in carnitine-supplemented HD patients; here we report dramatic decrease with special changes of the ester profile due to interruption of the exogenous intake after the last HD session. Serum samples were collected from 18 L-carnitine-repleted end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients before the L-carnitine supplementation, after completion of a carnitine supplementation period treatment (12 weeks, 1 g/IV/HD), right before the HD session, and 44 h after the dialysis. Levels of free carnitine (FC) and the individual esters were determined using electrospray MS/MS technique. Normally, L-carnitine supplementation causes significant elevation of all carnitine compounds to supraphysiological levels, which reaches a standard steady-state-like profile. In this study we found a dramatic decrease in the level of FC, and in short- and medium-chain acylcarnitines (ACs) 44 h after the last dialysis. At the end of this interdialytic period, FC levels increased to only 65% of the predialysis level, whereas the amounts of C2 and C3 esters recovered to only 50%. The level of C6 was 65% of the predialysis level, whereas the amount of C8 chain length ACs returned to 72% of the predialysis level. No significant change was seen in AC concentrations above C10 chain length. Omission of one single dosage of supplemental carnitine in long-term administration schemes results in dramatic decrease and reprofiling of carnitine esters even after the usual 44 h of interdialytic period. PMID:22417076

  18. Photographer : JPL Range : 1 million kilometers Voyager 2 completed a dramatic 10 hour time lapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Photographer : JPL Range : 1 million kilometers Voyager 2 completed a dramatic 10 hour time lapse photo sequence to monitor the active volcanos on Jupiter's moon Io following the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. This picture is one of about 200 images that will be used to generate a time lapse motion picture to illustrate Io's volcanic activity. On the bright limb, two of the plumes (P-5 & P-6) discovered in March by Voyager 1 are again visible. The plumes are spewing materials to a height of about 100 kilometers.

  19. Dramatic effect of superfluidity on the collapse of 4He vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, An; Trimeche, A.; Jacquier, Ph.; Grucker, J.

    2016-05-01

    The lifetime of cavitation bubbles produced by an acoustic wave focused in liquid helium-4 is investigated. This lifetime is found to be different by orders of magnitude depending on whether the liquid is superfluid or not. We show that if the liquid is in the superfluid state, the bubble lifetime is well explained by a purely mechanical model, corresponding to the so-called Rayleigh regime. In the normal state, the Rayleigh-Plesset regime applies, in which heat diffusion plays a crucial role and dramatically increases the bubble lifetime.

  20. Unexpected, dramatic improvement in atrioventricular conduction during pacemaker implantation for apparent complete heart block.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Jose'; Wang, Huijian; Biviano, Angelo; Garan, Hasan

    2007-09-01

    We describe the case of a 29-year-old man with complete heart block after aortic and mitral valve surgery for bacterial endocarditis. Prior to pacemaker implantation, the patient had sinus bradycardia with third degree atrioventricular (AV) block. During testing of the atrial lead, the patient manifested intact AV conduction with a constant PR interval, which was robust up to 120 beats/min. This case represents a dramatic example of unexpected, improved AV conduction, perhaps a result of loss of Phase IV block. PMID:17725759

  1. A dramatic effect of oxygen on protection of human cells against γ-radiation by lycopene.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Fritz; Edge, Ruth; Truscott, Terence George; Witt, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Reducing radiation damage is important and dietary antioxidants that can protect cells from such damage are of value. Dietary lycopene, a carotenoid found in tomatoes, protects human lymphoid cell membranes from damage by γ-radiation. We report that such protective effects are remarkably reduced as the oxygen concentration increases - near zero at 100% oxygen from fivefold protection at 20% oxygen and, dramatically, from 50-fold protection at 0% oxygen. Such huge differences imply that under higher oxygen concentrations lycopene could lead to improved cancer therapy using γ-radiation. The cells are not efficiently protected from the superoxide radical by lycopene. Noncellular studies suggest molecular mechanisms for the oxygen effect. PMID:26991327

  2. Gorham-Stout Disease of the Skull Base With Hearing Loss: Dramatic Recovery and Antiangiogenic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Akifumi; Ozeki, Michio; Kuze, Bunya; Asano, Takahiko; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology. We present a 6-year-old male with GSD involving the skull base who presented with recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea, severe hearing loss, and facial palsy secondary to cerebellar herniation into the internal auditory canal. After 2 months of treatment with pegylated interferon (IFN) α-2b (50 μg/week), his hearing recovered dramatically. Two years later, new bone formation appeared radiologically and IFN was switched to sirolimus. One year after the switch, CSF rhinorrhea disappeared. Antiangiogenic therapy might inhibit proliferation of vascular endothelial cells in osteolytic lesions and lead to new bone formation. PMID:26713883

  3. Shoshin Beriberi With Low Cardiac Output and Hemodynamic Deterioration Treated Dramatically by Thiamine Administration.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    "Shoshin beriberi", which is a fulminant form of cardiovascular beriberi accompanied by hemodynamic deterioration with high cardiac output and decreased systemic blood pressure, caused by thiamine deficiency due to alcoholic abuse or malnutrition, is often difficult to address because of its rarity and non-specific symptoms. We here present a patient with a history of alcoholic abuse who had suffered hemodynamic deterioration with extremely low cardiac output refractory to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and intravenous catecholamine support, which was improved dramatically by bolus intravenous thiamine administration. Such a type with low cardiac output would be the most severe form of Shoshin beriberi, and cannot be rescued without diagnostic administration of thiamine. PMID:26346515

  4. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  5. Dramatic improvements in toughness in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Raychowdhury, Subhendu; Jiang, David D; Retsos, Haris; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2008-05-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG), a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, is dramatically toughened by adding small amounts of surface modified clay nanoparticles. The elongation during tensile tests increases from 7% for the pure polymer to 210% for the nanocomposite, accompanied with a modest increase in modulus. In contrast, PLG nanocomposites based on fumed silica treated with hexamethyldisilazane show only modest improvements in toughness. Electron microscopy, X-ray scattering, rheometry, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy are used to investigate the toughening mechanism. Multiple crazing occurs in the clay nanocomposite after yielding. Small angle X-ray scattering studies show significant orientation of the clay nanoparticles along the tensile stress direction during deformation. The clay nanocomposites show a new, slow relaxation mode, most likely due to interfacial adsorbption of PLG chains on the surface of the clay nanoparticles. The dramatic increase in toughness is attributed to physical crosslinks introduced by the clay nanoparticles, a mechanism absent in the PLG/silica nanocomposites. The physical crosslinks increase the brittle fracture strength of the polymer and, consequently, trigger a toughening mechanism via multiple crazing and shear yielding. PMID:18398925

  6. Dramatic Intracerebral Hemorrhagic Presentations of Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: Three Cases and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Stary, Joel M.; Wang, Bonnie H.; Moon, Seong-Jin; Wang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) refers to a number of disorders characterized by severe and sudden-onset (“thunderclap”) headaches and angiographic features of reversible, segmental, multifocal vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. Although RCVS generally resolves without significant sequelae, a rare and possibly underrecognized hemorrhagic presentation has a worse potential course. We report three cases of hemorrhagic RCVS and review the literature. Three females (42, 54, and 33 years old, resp.) presented with severe headache, neurological deficits, and dramatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patient 1 presented comatose with a 9 × 4 × 6.6 cm left deep intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH) and 1 cm midline shift. She underwent emergent surgical intervention. Patient 2 had a 3.3 × 1.5 cm left superior frontal IPH that enlarged to 4 × 2.5 cm within 12 hours with worsening headache and neurological deficits. She was successfully managed nonoperatively. Patient 3, after uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery, presented with a 1.5 cm left superior parietal IPH on postpartum day 7. Two days later, she acutely developed right hemiplegia. Repeat CT demonstrated a new 3.3 × 1.7 cm left frontal IPH. She was also successfully managed nonoperatively. Many diverse conditions are grouped within the category of RCVS. Dramatic ICH remains a rare and possibly underrecognized presenting feature. Prompt diagnosis and management are essential for obtaining the best outcome. PMID:24707417

  7. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  8. Dramatic reduction of dislocations on a GaN point seed crystal by coalescence of bunched steps during Na-flux growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Masayuki; Todoroki, Yuma; Murakami, Kosuke; Matsuo, Daisuke; Imabayashi, Hiroki; Takazawa, Hideo; Maruyama, Mihoko; Imade, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke

    2015-10-01

    In our study, we found that threading dislocation density (TDD) in GaN crystals naturally reduced from ~109 cm-2 in a seed to less than ~103 cm-2, just by using the small-sized seed called a "point seed". However, the mechanism of the dramatic reduction was unclear. In order to reveal the mechanism of this substantial reduction of TDD, we investigated the relationship between TDD and the crystal habit during the growth. Cathodoluminescence (CL) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that TDD was dramatically reduced after the c face became small (<50×50 μm2) in the habit-change process caused by changes of supersaturation during growth, in which bunched steps growing from the edge of the c face coalesced at the center. It is thought that the shrinking of the c face in the growth process enabled the coalescence of bunched steps, which led to the gathering of threading dislocations (TDs), and resulted in the dramatic reduction of TDD. We concluded that the natural reduction of TDs was caused by coalescence of bunched steps, which easily occurs in during the Na-flux growth on small-sized "point seeds", and which allowed fabrication of low-dislocation-density GaN wafers.

  9. Socio-Dramatic Affective-Relational Intervention for Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome & High Functioning Autism: Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Matthew D.; Mikami, Amori Yee; Levine, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a novel intervention called "socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention" (SDARI), intended to improve social skills among adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high functioning autism diagnoses. SDARI adapts dramatic training activities to focus on in vivo practice of areas of social skill deficit…

  10. Dramatic Changes in Sediment Discharge and Runoff From a Rapidly Urbanizing Coastal Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrick, J. A.; Orzech, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    The southern California landscape has undergone dramatic urbanization and population growth during the past 60 years and currently supports almost 20 million inhabitants. Here we show that these landscape changes have imparted significant decreases in suspended sediment concentrations for the region's largest river, the Santa Ana (over 10 fold decreases in sediment rating curves between 1967 and 2001). These decreases do not, however, represent alteration of the total sediment flux to the ocean (a common interpretation of sediment rating curves), but rather a dilution of sediment by increases in runoff from the urban impervious surfaces. We hypothesize that the observed decreases in sediment concentrations have changed the buoyancy of river discharge into the ocean from negative (i.e. hyperpycnal) to positive (i.e. hypopycnal). Thus, not only is landscape urbanization responsible for altering runoff patterns, but it may have also been responsible for changing the dispersal mechanisms and fate of sediment on the continental shelf.

  11. Dramatic remission of anemia after thymectomy in a patient of idiopathic myelofibrosis with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Yih; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Yang, Ching-Fen; Wu, Yu-Chung; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is one of the characteristics of idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF), and malignant thymoma is usually associated with various hematologic disorders, including anemia, pancytopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia. However, the relationship between IMF and malignant thymoma has not been published before. Here, we report a 48-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed of IMF with severe anemia and transfusion dependent. Five years later, malignant thymoma was found when she was examined for chronic cough. After performing extended thymectomy, her anemia dramatically recovered to normal and sustained for 2 years till last follow-up. Her splenomegaly and myelofibrosis were also improved. We hypothesized that her malignant thymoma induced the progression of IMF, especially in anemia. PMID:18224414

  12. Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species

    PubMed Central

    Alström, Per; Jønsson, Knud A.; Fjeldså, Jon; Ödeen, Anders; Ericson, Per G. P.; Irestedt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest that Amaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage. PMID:26064613

  13. Emulating a crowded intracellular environment in vitro dramatically improves RT-PCR performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lareu, Ricky R.; Harve, Karthik S.; Raghunath, Michael

    2007-11-09

    The polymerase chain reaction's (PCR) phenomenal success in advancing fields as diverse as Medicine, Agriculture, Conservation, or Paleontology is based on the ability of using isolated prokaryotic thermostable DNA polymerases in vitro to copy DNA irrespective of origin. This process occurs intracellularly and has evolved to function efficiently under crowded conditions, namely in an environment packed with macromolecules. However, current in vitro practice ignores this important biophysical parameter of life. In order to more closely emulate conditions of intracellular biochemistry in vitro we added inert macromolecules into reverse transcription (RT) and PCR. We show dramatic improvements in all parameters of RT-PCR including 8- to 10-fold greater sensitivity, enhanced polymerase processivity, higher specific amplicon yield, greater primer annealing and specificity, and enhanced DNA polymerase thermal stability. The faster and more efficient reaction kinetics was a consequence of the cumulative molecular and thermodynamic effects of the excluded volume effect created by macromolecular crowding.

  14. A Dramatic Increase of C1q Protein in the CNS during Normal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Daniel V.; Mateos, José María; Fraser, Deborah A.; Lovelett, Emilie A.; Coutellier, Laurence; Kim, Leo; Tsai, Hui-Hsin; Huang, Eric J.; Rowitch, David H.; Berns, Dominic S.; Tenner, Andrea J.; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Barres, Ben A.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of cognitive function has emerged as one of the greatest health threats of old age. Age-related cognitive decline is caused by an impacted neuronal circuitry, yet the molecular mechanisms responsible are unknown. C1q, the initiating protein of the classical complement cascade and powerful effector of the peripheral immune response, mediates synapse elimination in the developing CNS. Here we show that C1q protein levels dramatically increase in the normal aging mouse and human brain, by as much as 300-fold. This increase was predominantly localized in close proximity to synapses and occurred earliest and most dramatically in certain regions of the brain, including some but not all regions known to be selectively vulnerable in neurodegenerative diseases, i.e., the hippocampus, substantia nigra, and piriform cortex. C1q-deficient mice exhibited enhanced synaptic plasticity in the adult and reorganization of the circuitry in the aging hippocampal dentate gyrus. Moreover, aged C1q-deficient mice exhibited significantly less cognitive and memory decline in certain hippocampus-dependent behavior tests compared with their wild-type littermates. Unlike in the developing CNS, the complement cascade effector C3 was only present at very low levels in the adult and aging brain. In addition, the aging-dependent effect of C1q on the hippocampal circuitry was independent of C3 and unaccompanied by detectable synapse loss, providing evidence for a novel, complement- and synapse elimination-independent role for C1q in CNS aging. PMID:23946404

  15. Polypeptone induces dramatic cell lysis in ura4 deletion mutants of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yuzy; Nishino, Kouhei; Mizuno, Kouhei; Akihiro, Takashi; Toda, Takashi; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Kaino, Tomohiro; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Polypeptone is widely excluded from Schizosaccharomyces pombe growth medium. However, the reasons why polypeptone should be avoided have not been documented. Polypeptone dramatically induced cell lysis in the ura4 deletion mutant when cells approached the stationary growth phase, and this phenotype was suppressed by supplementation of uracil. To determine the specificity of this cell lysis phenotype, we created deletion mutants of other genes involved in de novo biosynthesis of uridine monophosphate (ura1, ura2, ura3, and ura5). Cell lysis was not observed in these gene deletion mutants. In addition, concomitant disruption of ura1, ura2, ura3, or ura5 in the ura4 deletion mutant suppressed cell lysis, indicating that cell lysis induced by polypeptone is specific to the ura4 deletion mutant. Furthermore, cell lysis was also suppressed when the gene involved in coenzyme Q biosynthesis was deleted. This is likely because Ura3 requires coenzyme Q for its activity. The ura4 deletion mutant was sensitive to zymolyase, which mainly degrades (1,3)-beta-D glucan, when grown in the presence of polypeptone, and cell lysis was suppressed by the osmotic stabiliser, sorbitol. Finally, the induction of cell lysis in the ura4 deletion mutant was due to the accumulation of orotidine-5-monophosphate. Cell wall integrity was dramatically impaired in the ura4 deletion mutant when grown in the presence of polypeptone. Because ura4 is widely used as a selection marker in S. pombe, caution needs to be taken when evaluating phenotypes of ura4 mutants. PMID:23555823

  16. Dramatic frictional-viscous slip fluctuations within an exhumed multi-strand fault; evidence of fluid- with velocity-sensitivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M. A.; Ratschbacher, L.; Grasemann, B.

    2004-12-01

    Detailed field surveying of exhumed fault strand domains on the pull-apart basin flanks of a still active transtensional fault zone reveal intriguing fault rocks that are highly informative of the relationships between aseismic creep and co-seismic accelerated slip. We examine part of the 100's km Damxung-Jiali Shear Zone (DJSZ) in eastern Tibet, a crustal-escape-tectonics lithospheric failure zone whose locally exceptional width (5-15 km) incorporates a range of protoliths. This wide, multi-lithology fault architecture is associated with extensive pseudotachylite and cataclasite development, co-located with a range fault rocks that failed with plastic bulk-rheology. Highly unusual S-C fabrics in cataclasites are identified as well as spectacular subsequent re-brecciation indicating dramatic temporal fluctuations in viscous and frictional failure processes. Their co-location across a broad (original) depth interval together with numerous pseudotachylite generations (from co-existence with quartz flowing at 300-350 deg.C to low-cohesion cataclasites) indicates repeated excursions into velocity weakening exploited instabilities as displacement has continued. Extensive fluid-involvement in both frictional and viscous processes in all the fault strand lithologies is taken as evidence of "fluid sensitivity" as well as velocity sensitivity. Pseudotachylite-coated brittle localisation surfaces that short-cut stronger domains between creeping (i.e. metavolcanics versus carbonates) indicate the interplay of stable creep versus co-seismic slip acceleration with velocity weakening amongst the strand domains. We propose that the multiple strand and multi lithology nature of the fault zone allowed unstable stress/slip values to be preferentially enhanced in key fault strands (i.e. restricted cross-fault permeability "compartments") while other compartment were reciprocally undergoing stable creep. This provides a view of the potentially very complex nature of co-seismic slip

  17. Dramatic Resolution of an Unresectable Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma Treated with Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wandrey, Narine; Chen, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with an unresectable bulky giant basal cell carcinoma on his upper back. A trial of chemotherapy did not help relieve his symptoms or reduce the tumor. He was referred for and received definitive radiation therapy via IMRT with dramatic regression. The patient had been unable to lie on his back for many years but currently can sleep comfortably on his back without pain, which has dramatically improved his quality of life. PMID:26848409

  18. Patterns and potential drivers of dramatic changes in Tibetan lakes, 1972-2010.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingkui; Liao, Jingjuan; Guo, Huadong; Liu, Zewen; Shen, Guozhuang

    2014-01-01

    Most glaciers in the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau are retreating, and glacier melt has been emphasized as the dominant driver for recent lake expansions on the Tibetan Plateau. By investigating detailed changes in lake extents and levels across the Tibetan Plateau from Landsat/ICESat data, we found a pattern of dramatic lake changes from 1970 to 2010 (especially after 2000) with a southwest-northeast transition from shrinking, to stable, to rapidly expanding. This pattern is in distinct contrast to the spatial characteristics of glacier retreat, suggesting limited influence of glacier melt on lake dynamics. The plateau-wide pattern of lake change is related to precipitation variation and consistent with the pattern of permafrost degradation induced by rising temperature. More than 79% of lakes we observed on the central-northern plateau (with continuous permafrost) are rapidly expanding, even without glacial contributions, while lakes fed by retreating glaciers in southern regions (with isolated permafrost) are relatively stable or shrinking. Our study shows the limited role of glacier melt and highlights the potentially important contribution of permafrost degradation in predicting future water availability in this region, where understanding these processes is of critical importance to drinking water, agriculture, and hydropower supply of densely populated areas in South and East Asia. PMID:25372787

  19. SAFETY IMPROVES DRAMATICALLY IN FLUOR HANFORD SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    GERBER MS

    2007-12-05

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walkdowns, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site.

  20. Platinum and Palladium Overlayers Dramatically Enhance the Activity of Ruthenium Nanotubes for Alkaline Hydrogen Oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    St. John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Papandrew, Alexander B.

    2015-10-18

    Templated vapor synthesis and thermal annealing were used to synthesize unsupported metallic Ru nanotubes with Pt or Pd overlayers. By controlling the elemental composition and thickness of these overlayers, we obtain nanostructures with very high alkaline hydrogen oxidation activity. For nanotubes with a nominal atomic composition of Ru0.90Pt0.10 display a surface-specific activity (2.4 mA/cm2) that is 35 times greater than that of pure Ru nanotubes at a 50 mV overpotential and 2.5 times greater than that of pure Pt nanotubes (0.98 mA/cm2). The surface-segregated structure also confers dramatically increased Pt utilization efficiency. We find a platinum-mass-specific activity of 1240 A/gPtmore » for the optimized nanotube versus 280 A/gPt for carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles and 109 A/gPt for monometallic Pt nanotubes. Here, we attribute the enhancement of both area- and platinum-mass-specific activity to the atomic-scale homeomorphism of the nanotube form factor with adlayer-modified polycrystals. Subsurface ligand and bifunctional effects previously observed on segregated, adlayer-modified polycrystals are translated to nanoscale catalysts.« less

  1. 25OHD analogues and vacuum blood collection tubes dramatically affect the accuracy of automated immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Songlin; Cheng, Xinqi; Fang, Huiling; Zhang, Ruiping; Han, Jianhua; Qin, Xuzhen; Cheng, Qian; Su, Wei; Hou, Li'an; Xia, Liangyu; Qiu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Variations in vitamin D quantification methods are large, and influences of vitamin D analogues and blood collection methods have not been systematically examined. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D analogues 25OHD2 and 3-epi 25OHD3 and blood collection methods on vitamin D measurement, using five immunoassay systems and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Serum samples (332) were selected from routine vitamin D assay requests, including samples with or without 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, and analysed using various immunoassay systems. In samples with no 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, all immunoassays correlated well with LC-MS/MS. However, the Siemens system produced a large positive mean bias of 12.5 ng/mL and a poor Kappa value when using tubes with clot activator and gel separator. When 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3 was present, correlations and clinical agreement decreased for all immunoassays. Serum 25OHD in VACUETTE tubes with gel and clot activator, as measured by the Siemens system, produced significantly higher values than did samples collected in VACUETTE tubes with no additives. Bias decreased and clinical agreement improved significantly when using tubes with no additives. In conclusion, most automated immunoassays showed acceptable correlation and agreement with LC-MS/MS; however, 25OHD analogues and blood collection tubes dramatically affected accuracy. PMID:26420221

  2. Patterns and Potential Drivers of Dramatic Changes in Tibetan Lakes, 1972–2010

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingkui; Liao, Jingjuan; Guo, Huadong; Liu, Zewen; Shen, Guozhuang

    2014-01-01

    Most glaciers in the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau are retreating, and glacier melt has been emphasized as the dominant driver for recent lake expansions on the Tibetan Plateau. By investigating detailed changes in lake extents and levels across the Tibetan Plateau from Landsat/ICESat data, we found a pattern of dramatic lake changes from 1970 to 2010 (especially after 2000) with a southwest-northeast transition from shrinking, to stable, to rapidly expanding. This pattern is in distinct contrast to the spatial characteristics of glacier retreat, suggesting limited influence of glacier melt on lake dynamics. The plateau-wide pattern of lake change is related to precipitation variation and consistent with the pattern of permafrost degradation induced by rising temperature. More than 79% of lakes we observed on the central-northern plateau (with continuous permafrost) are rapidly expanding, even without glacial contributions, while lakes fed by retreating glaciers in southern regions (with isolated permafrost) are relatively stable or shrinking. Our study shows the limited role of glacier melt and highlights the potentially important contribution of permafrost degradation in predicting future water availability in this region, where understanding these processes is of critical importance to drinking water, agriculture, and hydropower supply of densely populated areas in South and East Asia. PMID:25372787

  3. Dramatic improvement of anti-SS-A/Ro-associated interstitial lung disease after immunosuppressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Paola, Caramaschi; Giuliana, Festi; Giovanni, Orsolini; Cristian, Caimmi; Domenico, Biasi

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to report three patients affected by interstitial lung disease associated with positive anti-SS-A/Ro autoantibody who showed a dramatic improvement after immunosuppressive treatment. Medical charts were reviewed to obtain clinical data, laboratory parameters, lung function tests, high-resolution computed tomography results and response to immunosuppressive treatment. The three patients showed a clinical picture of a lung-dominant connective tissue disease characterized by a sudden onset with dyspnea, cough and subtle extrathoracic features together with positive anti-SS-A/Ro antibody and weak titer antinuclear antibodies. All three patients responded favorably to immunosuppressive therapy: Two cases were treated with a combination of corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide followed by mycophenolate mofetil; in the third patient, clinical benefit was obtained after rituximab was added to corticosteroid and immunosuppressant drug. In spite of an abrupt onset with significant lung function impairment, all three patients had a favorable clinical response to immunosuppressive therapy. This report may be useful in making therapeutic decisions in case of interstitial lung disease associated with anti-SS-A antibody. PMID:27021338

  4. Safety Improves Dramatically In Fluor Hanford Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, A.L.; Gerber, M.S.; VonBargen, B.H.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walk-downs, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site. (authors)

  5. Dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in single-crystalline nanowire arrays of Sn.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wong, Chi Ho; Shen, Junying; Sze, Sin Ting; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Haijing; Dong, Yan; Xu, Hui; Yan, Zifeng; Li, Yingying; Hu, Xijun; Lortz, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Sn is a classical superconductor on the border between type I and type II with critical temperature of 3.7 K. We show that its critical parameters can be dramatically increased if it is brought in the form of loosely bound bundles of thin nanowires. The specific heat displays a pronounced double phase transition at 3.7 K and 5.5 K, which we attribute to the inner 'bulk' contribution of the nanowires and to the surface contribution, respectively. The latter is visible only because of the large volume fraction of the surface layer in relation to the bulk volume. The upper transition coincides with the onset of the resistive transition, while zero resistance is gradually approached below the lower transition. In contrast to the low critical field Hc = 0.03 T of Sn in its bulk form, a magnetic field of more than 3 T is required to fully restore the normal state. PMID:27595646

  6. Atmospheric drying as the main driver of dramatic glacier wastage in the southern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Favier, V; Verfaillie, D; Berthier, E; Menegoz, M; Jomelli, V; Kay, J E; Ducret, L; Malbéteau, Y; Brunstein, D; Gallée, H; Park, Y-H; Rinterknecht, V

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers at southern sub-polar latitudes is particularly rapid and widespread. Akin to northern sub-polar latitudes, this retreat is generally assumed to be linked to warming. However, no long-term and well-constrained glacier modeling has ever been performed to confirm this hypothesis. Here, we model the Cook Ice Cap mass balance on the Kerguelen Islands (Southern Indian Ocean, 49°S) since the 1850s. We show that glacier wastage during the 2000s in the Kerguelen was among the most dramatic on Earth. We attribute 77% of the increasingly negative mass balance since the 1960s to atmospheric drying associated with a poleward shift of the mid-latitude storm track. Because precipitation modeling is very challenging for the current generation of climate models over the study area, models incorrectly simulate the climate drivers behind the recent glacier wastage in the Kerguelen. This suggests that future glacier wastage projections should be considered cautiously where changes in atmospheric circulation are expected. PMID:27580801

  7. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sachan, Ritesh; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.; Zarkadoula, Eva

    2016-06-02

    We discuss the insights on the unexpected dramatic radial variations in the ion tracks formed by energetic ion (2.3 GeV 208Pb) irradiation at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements, this work brings further clarity on why quantitative analysis of ion track formation in Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 systems can be more complicated than the currently accepted behavior for ion tracks. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform at constant values of the electronic energy-loss. This study shows the diameter variations to be asmore » large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to (i) the stochastic nature of inelastic energy loss along the track and (ii) the random substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms on the B-site in the pyrochlore lattice. Furthermore, the partial substitution of Ti by Zr increases the favorability of the defect-fluorite structure formation over amorphous phase stochastically, by introducing localized inhomogeneity in atomic structure, density and strain.« less

  8. STABILIZING CLOUD FEEDBACK DRAMATICALLY EXPANDS THE HABITABLE ZONE OF TIDALLY LOCKED PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2013-07-10

    The habitable zone (HZ) is the circumstellar region where a planet can sustain surface liquid water. Searching for terrestrial planets in the HZ of nearby stars is the stated goal of ongoing and planned extrasolar planet surveys. Previous estimates of the inner edge of the HZ were based on one-dimensional radiative-convective models. The most serious limitation of these models is the inability to predict cloud behavior. Here we use global climate models with sophisticated cloud schemes to show that due to a stabilizing cloud feedback, tidally locked planets can be habitable at twice the stellar flux found by previous studies. This dramatically expands the HZ and roughly doubles the frequency of habitable planets orbiting red dwarf stars. At high stellar flux, strong convection produces thick water clouds near the substellar location that greatly increase the planetary albedo and reduce surface temperatures. Higher insolation produces stronger substellar convection and therefore higher albedo, making this phenomenon a stabilizing climate feedback. Substellar clouds also effectively block outgoing radiation from the surface, reducing or even completely reversing the thermal emission contrast between dayside and nightside. The presence of substellar water clouds and the resulting clement surface conditions will therefore be detectable with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  9. SWIFT J195509+261406: Dramatic Flaring Activity from a New Galactic Magnetar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Fatkhullin, T. A.; Sokolov, V. V.; Jelínek, M.; Sluse, D.; Ferrero, P.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Bremer, M.; Winters, J. M.; Nurenberger, D.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Guerrero, M. A.; French, J.; Melady, G.; Hanlon, L.; McBreen, B.; Aceituno, F. J.; Cunniffe, R.; Kubánek, P.; Vitek, S.; Schulze, S.; Wilson, A. C.; Hudec, R.; González-Pérez, J. M.; Shahbaz, T.; Guziy, S.; Pavlenko, L.; Sonbas, E.; Trushkin, S.; Bursov, N.; Nizhelskij, N. A.; Sabau-Graziati, L.

    Most of the transient sources that are detected in the gamma-ray sky are produced by extragalactic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, it is known that there are some other astronomical objects that can produce high-energy bursts within the Milky Way. SWIFT J195509+261406, just one degree off the Galactic plane, is one of them. It was discovered on the 10th July 2007 by the Swift satellite and was since then observable for a period of a fortnight. During this time SWIFT J195509+261406 experimented dramatic flaring activity that could be observed in near infrared, optical and X-rays. We gathered multi-wavelength observations of SWIFT J195509+261406 including optical, near infrared, millimeter and radio observations. Our dataset covers the time from 1 min after the burst onset to more than 4 months later. Following the initial burst in the gamma-ray band, we recorded more than 40 flaring episodes in the optical bands (reaching up to I c ˜ 15) over a time span of 3 days, plus a faint infrared flare that was observed at late times. After this time, the source slowly faded away until it became undetectable. Using the observations compiled in this work we propose that this source is part of the magnetar family, linking soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars to dim isolated neutron stars.

  10. 25OHD analogues and vacuum blood collection tubes dramatically affect the accuracy of automated immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songlin; Cheng, Xinqi; Fang, Huiling; Zhang, Ruiping; Han, Jianhua; Qin, Xuzhen; Cheng, Qian; Su, Wei; Hou, Li’an; Xia, Liangyu; Qiu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Variations in vitamin D quantification methods are large, and influences of vitamin D analogues and blood collection methods have not been systematically examined. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D analogues 25OHD2 and 3-epi 25OHD3 and blood collection methods on vitamin D measurement, using five immunoassay systems and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Serum samples (332) were selected from routine vitamin D assay requests, including samples with or without 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, and analysed using various immunoassay systems. In samples with no 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, all immunoassays correlated well with LC-MS/MS. However, the Siemens system produced a large positive mean bias of 12.5 ng/mL and a poor Kappa value when using tubes with clot activator and gel separator. When 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3 was present, correlations and clinical agreement decreased for all immunoassays. Serum 25OHD in VACUETTE tubes with gel and clot activator, as measured by the Siemens system, produced significantly higher values than did samples collected in VACUETTE tubes with no additives. Bias decreased and clinical agreement improved significantly when using tubes with no additives. In conclusion, most automated immunoassays showed acceptable correlation and agreement with LC-MS/MS; however, 25OHD analogues and blood collection tubes dramatically affected accuracy. PMID:26420221

  11. Platinum and Palladium Overlayers Dramatically Enhance the Activity of Ruthenium Nanotubes for Alkaline Hydrogen Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    St. John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Papandrew, Alexander B.

    2015-10-18

    Templated vapor synthesis and thermal annealing were used to synthesize unsupported metallic Ru nanotubes with Pt or Pd overlayers. By controlling the elemental composition and thickness of these overlayers, we obtain nanostructures with very high alkaline hydrogen oxidation activity. For nanotubes with a nominal atomic composition of Ru0.90Pt0.10 display a surface-specific activity (2.4 mA/cm2) that is 35 times greater than that of pure Ru nanotubes at a 50 mV overpotential and 2.5 times greater than that of pure Pt nanotubes (0.98 mA/cm2). The surface-segregated structure also confers dramatically increased Pt utilization efficiency. We find a platinum-mass-specific activity of 1240 A/gPt for the optimized nanotube versus 280 A/gPt for carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles and 109 A/gPt for monometallic Pt nanotubes. Here, we attribute the enhancement of both area- and platinum-mass-specific activity to the atomic-scale homeomorphism of the nanotube form factor with adlayer-modified polycrystals. Subsurface ligand and bifunctional effects previously observed on segregated, adlayer-modified polycrystals are translated to nanoscale catalysts.

  12. Dramatically Enhanced Flux Pinning Properties of Cation Composition Controlled Bi(Pb)2212 Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Satoshi; Shimoyama, Jun-Ichi; Makise, Takanori; Horii, Shigeru; Kishio, Kohji

    2006-06-01

    Single crystals of Bi2212 and Bi(Pb)2212 having various cation compositions were grown by the floating zone method and evaluated their Jc characteristics after control of oxygen content by post-annealing. Jc characteristics of Bi2212 and Bi(Pb)2212 were found to be improved by control of cation compositions towards stoichiometric, Bi:Sr:Ca:Cu = 2:2:1:2. This means that nonstoichiometric cation composition in these systems suppresses inherent superconductivity possibly due to considerably disordered crystal lattice, resulting in poor Jc characteristics. Dramatically enhanced Jc were achieved for cation stoichiometric and small amount of Y or Lu-doped Bi(Pb)2212 single crystals. The highest Jc at 20 K observed were ~0.85 MAcm-2 in self-field and ~0.1 MAcm-2 under 5 T with H // c. The dilute Y and Ludoping is considered to introduce locally lattice-distorted regions acting as effective pinning sites up to high fields.

  13. Publications on Peripheral Nerve Injuries during World War I: A Dramatic Increase in Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Publications from French (Jules Tinel and Chiriachitza Athanassio-Bénisty), English (James Purves-Stewart, Arthur Henry Evans and Hartley Sidney Carter), German (Otfrid Foerster and Hermann Oppenheim) and American (Charles Harrison Frazier and Byron Stookey) physicians from both sides of the front during World War I (WWI) contributed to a dramatic increase in knowledge about peripheral nerve injuries. Silas Weir Mitchell's original experience with respect to these injuries, and particularly causalgia, during the American Civil War was further expanded in Europe during WWI. Following the translation of one of his books, he was referred to mainly by French physicians. During WWI, several French books were in turn translated into English, which influenced American physicians, as was observed in the case of Byron Stookey. The establishment of neurological centres played an important role in the concentration of experience and knowledge. Several eponyms originated during this period (including the Hoffmann-Tinel sign and the Froment sign). Electrodiagnostic tools were increasingly used. PMID:27035152

  14. Leaks can dramatically decrease FiO2 on home ventilators: a bench study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Long term oxygen therapy improves survival in hypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because pressure support ventilation with a home care ventilator is largely unsupervised, there is considerable risk of leakage occurring, which could affect delivered FiO2. We have therefore conducted a bench study in order to measure the effect of different levels of O2 supply and degrees of leakage on delivered FiO2. Ventilator tested: Legendair® (Airox™, Pau, France). Thirty-six measures were performed in each four ventilators with zero, 5 and 10 l.min-1 leakage and 1,2,4 and 8 l O2 flow. Findings FiO2 decreased significantly with 5 l.min-1 leakage for all O2 flow rates, and with 10 l.min-1 at 4 and 8 l.min-1 O2. Conclusion During application of NIV on home ventilators, leakage can dramatically decrease inspired FiO2 making it less effective. It is important to know the FiO2 dispensed when NIV is used for COPD at home. We would encourage industry to develop methods for FiO2 regulation Chronic use of NIV for COPD with controlled FiO2 or SpO2 requires further studys. PMID:23870165

  15. Atmospheric drying as the main driver of dramatic glacier wastage in the southern Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Favier, V.; Verfaillie, D.; Berthier, E.; Menegoz, M.; Jomelli, V.; Kay, J. E.; Ducret, L.; Malbéteau, Y.; Brunstein, D.; Gallée, H.; Park, Y.-H.; Rinterknecht, V.

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers at southern sub-polar latitudes is particularly rapid and widespread. Akin to northern sub-polar latitudes, this retreat is generally assumed to be linked to warming. However, no long-term and well-constrained glacier modeling has ever been performed to confirm this hypothesis. Here, we model the Cook Ice Cap mass balance on the Kerguelen Islands (Southern Indian Ocean, 49°S) since the 1850s. We show that glacier wastage during the 2000s in the Kerguelen was among the most dramatic on Earth. We attribute 77% of the increasingly negative mass balance since the 1960s to atmospheric drying associated with a poleward shift of the mid-latitude storm track. Because precipitation modeling is very challenging for the current generation of climate models over the study area, models incorrectly simulate the climate drivers behind the recent glacier wastage in the Kerguelen. This suggests that future glacier wastage projections should be considered cautiously where changes in atmospheric circulation are expected. PMID:27580801

  16. Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Zucchini, F.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hamann, F.; Maury, P.; Georges, A.; Bedoch, J. P.; Morell, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Sphinx machine [F. Lassalle et al., "Status on the SPHINX machine based on the 1microsecond LTD technology"] based on microsecond linear transformer driver (LTD) technology is used to implode an aluminium wire array with an outer diameter up to 140mm and maximum current from 3.5to5MA. 700to800ns implosion Z-pinch experiments are performed on this driver essentially with aluminium. Best results obtained before the improvement described in this paper were 1-3TW radial total power, 100-300kJ total yield, and 20-30kJ energy above 1keV. An auxiliary generator was added to the Sphinx machine in order to allow a multi microsecond current to be injected through the wire array load before the start of the main current. Amplitude and duration of this current prepulse are adjustable, with maxima ˜10kA and 50μs. This prepulse dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of the axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. Total power was multiplied by a factor of 6, total yield by a factor of 2.5 with a reproducible behavior. This paper presents experimental results, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and analysis of the effect of such a long current prepulse.

  17. Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Zucchini, F.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hamann, F.; Maury, P.; Georges, A.; Bedoch, J. P.; Morell, A.

    2008-01-15

    The Sphinx machine [F. Lassalle et al., 'Status on the SPHINX machine based on the 1microsecond LTD technology'] based on microsecond linear transformer driver (LTD) technology is used to implode an aluminium wire array with an outer diameter up to 140 mm and maximum current from 3.5 to 5 MA. 700 to 800 ns implosion Z-pinch experiments are performed on this driver essentially with aluminium. Best results obtained before the improvement described in this paper were 1-3 TW radial total power, 100-300 kJ total yield, and 20-30 kJ energy above 1 keV. An auxiliary generator was added to the Sphinx machine in order to allow a multi microsecond current to be injected through the wire array load before the start of the main current. Amplitude and duration of this current prepulse are adjustable, with maxima {approx}10 kA and 50 {mu}s. This prepulse dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of the axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. Total power was multiplied by a factor of 6, total yield by a factor of 2.5 with a reproducible behavior. This paper presents experimental results, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and analysis of the effect of such a long current prepulse.

  18. Dramatic Expression in Opera, and Its Implications for Conversational Agents. Chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Lewis

    2007-01-01

    This article has discussed principles, techniques, and methods of dramatic portrayal in opera, and their application to the development of embodied conversational agents. Investigations such as this complement studies of natural human behavior, and offer insights as to how to make such behavior understandable and interesting when adapted for use by embodied conversational agents. However, one should use caution in applying such lessons. The unique characteristics of computer-based media are still being identified and explored. In any case, one must always be careful about applying principles blindly to any artistic form. Such principles are post-hoc analysis of the intuitive skill of great artists; this was as true in Aristotle's day as it is today. We should not let structural principles stand in the way of injecting creativity into the design of ECAs. Opera at its best possesses an element of magic that is difficult to describe, much less analytically reconstruct. We can only hope to achieve a similar result with conversational agents.

  19. Dramatic changes in DNA conductance with stretching: structural polymorphism at a critical extension.

    PubMed

    Bag, Saientan; Mogurampelly, Santosh; Goddard Iii, William A; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-09-21

    In order to interpret recent experimental studies of the dependence of conductance of ds-DNA as the DNA is pulled from the 3'end1-3'end2 ends, which find a sharp conductance jump for a very short (4.5%) stretching length, we carried out multiscale modeling to predict the conductance of dsDNA as it is mechanically stretched to promote various structural polymorphisms. We calculate the current along the stretched DNA using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, non-equilibrium pulling simulations, quantum mechanics calculations, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. For 5'end1-5'end2 attachments we find an abrupt jump in the current within a very short stretching length (6 Å or 17%) leading to a melted DNA state. In contrast, for 3'end1-3'end2 pulling it takes almost 32 Å (84%) of stretching to cause a similar jump in the current. Thus, we demonstrate that charge transport in DNA can occur over stretching lengths of several nanometers. We find that this unexpected behaviour in the B to S conformational DNA transition arises from highly inclined base pair geometries that result from this pulling protocol. We found that the dramatically different conductance behaviors for two different pulling protocols arise from how the hydrogen bonds of DNA base pairs break. PMID:27545499

  20. Dramatic enhancement of superconductivity in single-crystalline nanowire arrays of Sn

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wong, Chi Ho; Shen, Junying; Sze, Sin Ting; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Haijing; Dong, Yan; Xu, Hui; Yan, Zifeng; Li, Yingying; Hu, Xijun; Lortz, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Sn is a classical superconductor on the border between type I and type II with critical temperature of 3.7 K. We show that its critical parameters can be dramatically increased if it is brought in the form of loosely bound bundles of thin nanowires. The specific heat displays a pronounced double phase transition at 3.7 K and 5.5 K, which we attribute to the inner ‘bulk’ contribution of the nanowires and to the surface contribution, respectively. The latter is visible only because of the large volume fraction of the surface layer in relation to the bulk volume. The upper transition coincides with the onset of the resistive transition, while zero resistance is gradually approached below the lower transition. In contrast to the low critical field Hc = 0.03 T of Sn in its bulk form, a magnetic field of more than 3 T is required to fully restore the normal state. PMID:27595646

  1. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kay, Katherine; Hodel, Eva Maria; Hastings, Ian M

    2015-10-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 10(12) parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 10(10) parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 10(17) parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  2. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, Eva Maria; Hastings, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 1012 parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 1010 parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 1017 parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  3. Mammalian Brain Development is Accompanied by a Dramatic Increase in Bipolar DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-An; Sun, Zhixiong; Wu, Xiaowei; Rajaram, Veena; Keimig, David; Lim, Jessica; Zhu, Hongxiao; Xie, Hehuang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism critical for tissue development and cell specification. Mammalian brains consist of many different types of cells with assumedly distinct DNA methylation profiles, and thus some genomic loci may demonstrate bipolar DNA methylation pattern, i.e. hypermethylated in one cell subset but hypomethylated in others. Currently, how extensive methylation patterns vary among brain cells is unknown and bipolar methylated genomic loci remain largely unexplored. In this study, we implemented a procedure to infer cell-subset specific methylated (CSM) loci from the methylomes of human and mouse frontal cortices at different developmental stages. With the genome-scale hairpin bisulfite sequencing approach, we demonstrated that the majority of CSM loci predicted likely resulted from the methylation differences among brain cells rather than from asymmetric DNA methylation between DNA double strands. Correlated with enhancer-associated histone modifications, putative CSM loci increased dramatically during early stages of brain development and were enriched for GWAS variants associated with neurological disorder-related diseases/traits. Altogether, this study provides a procedure to identify genomic regions showing methylation differences in a mixed cell population and our results suggest that a set of cis-regulatory elements are primed in early postnatal life whose functions may be compromised in human neurological disorders. PMID:27585862

  4. Mammalian Brain Development is Accompanied by a Dramatic Increase in Bipolar DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming-an; Sun, Zhixiong; Wu, Xiaowei; Rajaram, Veena; Keimig, David; Lim, Jessica; Zhu, Hongxiao; Xie, Hehuang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism critical for tissue development and cell specification. Mammalian brains consist of many different types of cells with assumedly distinct DNA methylation profiles, and thus some genomic loci may demonstrate bipolar DNA methylation pattern, i.e. hypermethylated in one cell subset but hypomethylated in others. Currently, how extensive methylation patterns vary among brain cells is unknown and bipolar methylated genomic loci remain largely unexplored. In this study, we implemented a procedure to infer cell-subset specific methylated (CSM) loci from the methylomes of human and mouse frontal cortices at different developmental stages. With the genome-scale hairpin bisulfite sequencing approach, we demonstrated that the majority of CSM loci predicted likely resulted from the methylation differences among brain cells rather than from asymmetric DNA methylation between DNA double strands. Correlated with enhancer-associated histone modifications, putative CSM loci increased dramatically during early stages of brain development and were enriched for GWAS variants associated with neurological disorder-related diseases/traits. Altogether, this study provides a procedure to identify genomic regions showing methylation differences in a mixed cell population and our results suggest that a set of cis-regulatory elements are primed in early postnatal life whose functions may be compromised in human neurological disorders. PMID:27585862

  5. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500–2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change. PMID:27524983

  6. mTOR inhibition elicits a dramatic response in PI3K-dependent colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Deming, Dustin A; Leystra, Alyssa A; Farhoud, Mohammed; Nettekoven, Laura; Clipson, Linda; Albrecht, Dawn; Washington, Mary Kay; Sullivan, Ruth; Weichert, Jamey P; Halberg, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway is critical for multiple cellular functions including metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, and is the most commonly altered pathway in human cancers. Recently, we developed a novel mouse model of colon cancer in which tumors are initiated by a dominant active PI3K (FC PIK3ca). The cancers in these mice are moderately differentiated invasive mucinous adenocarcinomas of the proximal colon that develop by 50 days of age. Interestingly, these cancers form without a benign intermediary or aberrant WNT signaling, indicating a non-canonical mechanism of tumorigenesis. Since these tumors are dependent upon the PI3K pathway, we investigated the potential for tumor response by the targeting of this pathway with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor. A cohort of FC PIK3ca mice were treated with rapamycin at a dose of 6 mg/kg/day or placebo for 14 days. FDG dual hybrid PET/CT imaging demonstrated a dramatic tumor response in the rapamycin arm and this was confirmed on necropsy. The tumor tissue remaining after treatment with rapamycin demonstrated increased pERK1/2 or persistent phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (pS6), indicating potential resistance mechanisms. This unique model will further our understanding of human disease and facilitate the development of therapeutics through pharmacologic screening and biomarker identification. PMID:23593290

  7. Dramatic colour changes in a bird of paradise caused by uniquely structured breast feather barbules.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Leertouwer, Hein L; Marshall, N Justin; Osorio, Daniel

    2011-07-22

    The breast-plate plumage of male Lawes' parotia (Parotia lawesii) produces dramatic colour changes when this bird of paradise displays on its forest-floor lek. We show that this effect is achieved not solely by the iridescence--that is an angular-dependent spectral shift of the reflected light--which is inherent in structural coloration, but is based on a unique anatomical modification of the breast-feather barbule. The barbules have a segmental structure, and in common with many other iridescent feathers, they contain stacked melanin rodlets surrounded by a keratin film. The unique property of the parotia barbules is their boomerang-like cross section. This allows each barbule to work as three coloured mirrors: a yellow-orange reflector in the plane of the feather, and two symmetrically positioned bluish reflectors at respective angles of about 30°. Movement during the parotia's courtship displays thereby achieves much larger and more abrupt colour changes than is possible with ordinary iridescent plumage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of multiple thin film or multi-layer reflectors incorporated in a single structure (engineered or biological). It nicely illustrates how subtle modification of the basic feather structure can achieve novel visual effects. The fact that the parotia's breast feathers seem to be specifically adapted to give much stronger colour changes than normal structural coloration implies that colour change is important in their courtship display. PMID:21159676

  8. The temperature of flash-cooling has dramatic effects on the diffraction quality of nucleosome crystals.

    PubMed

    Edayathumangalam, Rajeswari S; Luger, Karolin

    2005-07-01

    Nucleosome core-particle crystals are routinely flash-cooled in liquid propane at temperatures of approximately 153 K, followed by transfer into a cold nitrogen-gas stream (approximately 93 K). Analysis of diffraction data from crystals flash-cooled at different temperatures shows that the optimal temperature is approximately 153 K. The data quality worsens, with a concomitant reduction in the diffraction limit, at temperatures both higher and lower than 153 K. With some batches of crystals, significant shrinkage of the unit-cell volume is also observed at temperatures of 138 K and lower. The lattice shrinkage is always restricted to the c axis, concurrent with closer packing of two nucleosomes. Direct plunge-cooling of crystals in liquid nitrogen leads to loss of diffraction quality and resolution limit. Thus, in cases where flash-cooling into liquid nitrogen is detrimental to diffraction, optimizing cooling protocols at higher temperatures using liquid propane or other cryogens with similar properties may lead to dramatically improved results. In a related study, it is shown that a nucleosome crystal transported under 'cryocooled' conditions has higher mosaicity and yields inferior data quality in comparison to a crystal cryocooled at the synchrotron. For fragile crystals, transport in mother liquor and/or cryoprotectant followed by subsequent flash-cooling at the synchrotron may be the best procedure. PMID:15983411

  9. Dramatic vapor-phase modulation of the characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Worley, Barrett C; Kim, Seohee; Park, Saungeun; Rossky, Peter J; Akinwande, Deji; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-07-28

    Here we report on dramatic and favorable changes to the operating characteristics in monolayer graphene field-effect transistors (FETs) exposed to vapor-phase, polar organic molecules in ambient. These changes include significant reduction of the Dirac voltage, accompanied by both an increase in electron and hole mobility, μ, and a decrease in residual carrier density, N0, to < 3 × 10(11) cm(-2). In contrast to graphene FET modulation with various liquid- and solid-phase dielectric media present in the literature, we attribute these changes to screening by polar vapor-phase molecules of fields induced by charged impurities and defects, n(imp), in or near the active layer. The magnitude of the changes produced in the graphene FET parameters scales remarkably well with the dipole moment of the delivered molecules. These effects are reversible, a unique advantage of working in the vapor phase. The changes observed upon polar molecule delivery are analogous to those produced by depositing and annealing fluoropolymer coatings on graphene that have been reported previously, and we attribute these changes to similar charge screening or neutralization phenomena. PMID:26107384

  10. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry; Leprieur, Etienne Giroux

    2016-03-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  11. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  12. Reaction of amines with 8-methylthioBODIPY: dramatic optical and laser response to amine substitution.

    PubMed

    Esnal, Ixone; Urías-Benavides, Arlette; Gómez-Durán, C F Azael; Osorio-Martínez, Carlos A; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; Costela, Angel; Bañuelos, Jorge; Epelde, Nerea; López Arbeloa, Iñigo; Hu, Rongrong; Tang, Ben Zhong; Peña-Cabrera, Eduardo

    2013-11-01

    A thorough study of the photophysical and laser properties of 8-aminoboron dipyrromethene dyes was undertaken to determine the role of amine substitution and spatial disposition on the properties of the dyes. It was found that the fluorescent and laser response varied significantly. Although primary amines give rise to highly fluorescent products at the blue edge of the visible region, secondary amines yield nonfluorescent analogues in polar media. The crystal structures of two analogues are reported and described. Steric hindrance and the higher electron-releasing ability of the amine favor the formation of a quenching intramolecular charge-transfer state. Accordingly, boron dipyrromethene derivatives with primary amines exhibited laser emission with efficiencies of up to 44%. Besides, the more efficient derivative was also the most photostable, leading to a significant improvement in the lasing performance with regard to previously reported 8-aminoboron dipyrromethene derivatives. An increase in the solvent polarity, and mainly the presence of tertiary cyclic amines, led to a dramatic decrease or even the loss of the laser action. PMID:23956141

  13. A DRAMATICALLY REDUCED SIZE IN THE GANTRY DESIGN FOR THE PROTON-CARBON THERAPY.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.; GUPTA, R.; PARKER, B.; KEIL, E.; SESSLER, A.M.

    2006-06-23

    Gantries in the proton/carbon cancer therapy machines represent the major cost and are of the largest size. This report explains a new way to the gantry design. The size and cost of the gantries are reduced and their use is simplified by using the fixed magnetic field. The ''new'' gantry is made of a very large momentum acceptance non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) quarter and half arc beam lines. The gantry is made of combined function magnets with a very strong focusing and small dispersion function. Additional magnets with a fast response are required to allow adjustments of the beam position for different energies at the beginning of the gantry. Additional strong focusing magnets following the gantry have also to be adjustable to provide required spot size and radial scanning above the patients. The fixed field combined function magnets could be made of small permanent magnets for the proton machine, or of the high temperature superconductors or superconductors for the carbon machine, reducing dramatically the size.

  14. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain.

    PubMed

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500-2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change. PMID:27524983

  15. Optimal temperature for malaria transmission is dramatically lower than previously predicted

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mordecai, Erin A.; Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Johnson, Leah R.; Balzer, Christian; Ben-Horin, Tal; de Moor, Emily; McNally, Amy; Pawar, Samraat; Ryan, Sadie J.; Smith, Thomas C.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    The ecology of mosquito vectors and malaria parasites affect the incidence, seasonal transmission and geographical range of malaria. Most malaria models to date assume constant or linear responses of mosquito and parasite life-history traits to temperature, predicting optimal transmission at 31 °C. These models are at odds with field observations of transmission dating back nearly a century. We build a model with more realistic ecological assumptions about the thermal physiology of insects. Our model, which includes empirically derived nonlinear thermal responses, predicts optimal malaria transmission at 25 °C (6 °C lower than previous models). Moreover, the model predicts that transmission decreases dramatically at temperatures > 28 °C, altering predictions about how climate change will affect malaria. A large data set on malaria transmission risk in Africa validates both the 25 °C optimum and the decline above 28 °C. Using these more accurate nonlinear thermal-response models will aid in understanding the effects of current and future temperature regimes on disease transmission.

  16. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F; Weber, William J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the insights on the unexpected dramatic radial variations in the ion tracks formed by energetic ion (2.3 GeV 208Pb) irradiation at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements, this work brings further clarity on why quantitative analysis of ion track formation in Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 systems can be more complicated than the currently accepted behavior for ion tracks. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform at constant values of the electronic energy-loss. This study shows the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to (i) the stochastic nature of inelastic energy loss along the track and (ii) the random substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms on the B-site in the pyrochlore lattice. The partial substitution of Ti by Zr increases the favorability of the defect-fluorite structure formation over amorphous phase stochastically, by introducing localized inhomogeneity in atomic structure, density and strain.

  17. Lord Kelvin and the Age-of-the-Earth Debate: A Dramatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinner, Art; Teichmann, Jürgen

    This is a dramatization of a fictitious debate about the age of the earth that takes place in the Royal Institution, London, England, in the year 1872. The debate is among Sir William Thomson (later Kelvin), T.H. Huxley (Darwin's Bulldog), Sir Charles Lyell, and Hermann von Helmholtz. In 1862 Thomson published his celebrated and widely studied The Secular Cooling of the Earth that raised the post-Darwinian debate of the age of the earth above the level of popular controversy. He entered the debate with all the arrogance of a newly established science of the century, namely the recently drafted laws of thermodynamics. The debate is partly based on a lively exchange of comments and arguments that occurred between T.H. Huxley and William Thomson, starting in 1868, when Thomson addressed the Glasgow Geological Society. This long public discussion also involved the ideas and the work of geologist Charles Lyell and those of the celebrated German physicist Hermann von Helmholtz. The confrontation is between the unyielding physicists and the insecure biologists and geologists who required a much longer time for the age of the earth than the physicists were prepared to give them. However, the debate ends on a conciliatory note, suggesting that perhaps Sir William's storehouse of creation may contain a hereto undiscovered source of energy that is more bountiful than gravitational energy.

  18. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field dominated basin in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-02-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are declining as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of streamflow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River Basin in southern China where massive industrialization has occurred in the region during the past three decades. We found that streamflow increased by 58% and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23% during 1986-2013 as a result of an increase in urban areas of three folds and reduction of rice paddy field by 27%. Both highflows and lowflows increased significantly by about 28% from 2002 to 2013. The increases in streamflow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS data. The reduction in ET and increase in streamflow was attributed to the large cropland conversion that overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from a water-dominated to a human-dominated landscape, and thus was considered as one of the extreme types of contemporary hydrologic disturbances. The ongoing large-scale urbanization in the rice paddy-dominated regions in the humid southern China, and East Asia, will likely elevate stormflow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban heat island effects. Understanding the linkage between land use change and changes in hydrological processes is essential for better management of urbanizing watersheds.

  19. Permeability Enhancers Dramatically Increase Zanamivir Absolute Bioavailability in Rats: Implications for an Orally Bioavailable Influenza Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Eric H.; Devalapally, Harikrishna; Li, Libin; Perdue, Michael L.; Ostrander, Gary K.

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that simple formulations composed of the parent drug in combination with generally regarded as safe (GRAS) permeability enhancers are capable of dramatically increasing the absolute bioavailability of zanamivir. This has the advantage of not requiring modification of the drug structure to promote absorption, thus reducing the regulatory challenges involved in conversion of an inhaled to oral route of administration of an approved drug. Absolute bioavailability increases of up to 24-fold were observed when Capmul MCM L8 (composed of mono- and diglycerides of caprylic/capric acids in glycerol) was mixed with 1.5 mg of zanamivir and administered intraduodenally to rats. Rapid uptake (tmax of 5 min) and a Cmax of over 7200 ng/mL was achieved. Variation of the drug load or amount of enhancer demonstrated a generally linear variation in absorption, indicating an ability to optimize a formulation for a desired outcome such as a targeted Cmax for enzyme saturation. No absorption enhancement was observed when the enhancer was given 2 hr prior to drug administration, indicating, in combination with the observed tmax, that absorption enhancement is temporary. This property is significant and aligns well with therapeutic applications to limit undesirable drug-drug interactions, potentially due to the presence of other poorly absorbed polar drugs. These results suggest that optimal human oral dosage forms of zanamivir should be enteric-coated gelcaps or softgels for intraduodenal release. There continues to be a strong need and market for multiple neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza treatment. Creation of orally available formulations of inhibitor drugs that are currently administered intravenously or by inhalation would provide a significant improvement in treatment of influenza. The very simple GRAS formulation components and anticipated dosage forms would require low manufacturing costs and yield enhanced convenience. These results are being utilized

  20. Forest Thinning Dramatically Enhances Ozone Flux due to Reactions With Elevated Emissions of Biogenic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, A. H.; McKay, M.; Kurpius, M. R.; Schade, G. W.

    2003-12-01

    Forests are routinely managed for timber production and fire suppression by thinning and harvesting. The impact of these activities on biosphere-atmosphere exchange of reactive trace gases is profound, but has rarely been studied in the field. Here we present simultaneous observations of ozone and terpene fluxes before, during, and after pre-commercial thinning of a ponderosa pine plantation at Blodgett Forest (1300 m elevation on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, CA). We previously reported that monoterpene emissions increased by an order of magnitude during and following forest thinning (Schade and Goldstein, GRL 2003). We also previously reported that half the daytime ozone flux to this ecosystem under normal summertime conditions (no disturbance) was due to gas-phase chemical loss, and we suggested that this ozone loss was occurring by reactions with biogenically emitted terpenes whose lifetime was short enough that they reacted before escaping the forest canopy (Kurpius and Goldstein, GRL 2003). Here we report that ozone loss was also dramatically enhanced during and following thinning, and we link these observations to confirm that the chemical ozone loss in the canopy was indeed due to reaction with biogenically emitted compounds whose emission was enhanced by disturbance. Based on the magnitudes of ozone flux due to chemical loss and the measured terpene fluxes, we infer that the emissions of previously undetected short-lived terpenes are approximately 15-20 times those of a-pinene during thinning, and 30-50 times those of a-pinene during summer and fall. Since a-pinene accounts for approximately 25% of the total monoterpenes we routinely measure with our automated in-situ GC instrumentation, we conclude that emissions of highly reactive terpenoid compounds could have been drastically under measured in previous field campaigns and that emissions of unidentified reactive terpenes could be 5-10 times larger than emissions of total terpenes

  1. Investigation of the dramatic changes in lake level of the Bosten Lake in northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mengjing; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Xiaode; Chen, Yongmin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Bosten Lake, located in the arid region of northwest China, is the largest inland freshwater lake in China. Water resources in Bosten Lake are of great importance for the regional drinking water supply, agricultural irrigation, and economic development of Xinjiang province. In this study, the dynamics of the lake level in Bosten Lake were investigated from 1956 to 2010. We found that the lake level experienced three different periods of change due to the combined influences of climate variation and human activities. Generally, the lake level has shown a significant downward trend since the first observation started in 1956 and dropped to its lowest level in 1987. Thereafter, the lake level presented a continuous upward trend and rose to its highest value in 2002. Then, the level decreased dramatically from 2002 to 2010. A water balance model and the climate elasticity method were used to estimate the reasons for the lake level changes of Bosten Lake. The results showed that an increase in lake evaporation led to the continuous decrease in lake level from 1958 to 1987. Then, human-controlled lake outflow and increasing lake inflow together led to the increase in lake level from 1988 to 2002. During 2003 to 2010, the emergency project of transferring water to Tarim River led to the increase in lake outflow, while the lake inflow obviously decreased because of a decrease in precipitation. These factors resulted in a sharp decrease in the lake level from 2003 to 2010. The changes in lake level indicate changes in available water resources from Bosten Lake. This reason for the analysis of the change in lake level in this study is to support the water resources management of Bosten Lake.

  2. Dramatic velocity range changes in the OH spectra of 19566+3423

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. M.

    1999-12-01

    Many color-selected IRAS sources have 1612 MHz masers. That in 19566+3423 was a little unusual, in having the appearance of emanating from a double shell, each with a more or less normal aspect. It was first detected by Galt et al. (AJ 98, 2182), who monitored it for two years as a variable source of circularly polarised emission, though the general morphology of the spectrum was stable. It has mainline masers, and a strong water maser, but no detected SiO or CO. However, new Arecibo 1612, 1665 and 1667 MHz spectra taken in April and September 1999 are dramatically different. The 1612 MHz intensity is about a factor of three larger now. Moreover this is dwarfed by a factor of { }30 increase in its 1665 MHz intensity. But the unprecedented changes are in the velocity range of its emission, which has expanded from 16 to 42 km/s in the 1612 MHz line, and from 28 to 80 km/s in the 1667 MHz. Much of the extra OH emission is reminiscent of the gently rounded morphology seen in the 1667 MHz spectrum of the proto planetary nebula, 18095+2704 (ApJ, 362, 634). But the original range of the 1612 MHz emission is still characterized by 6-10 discrete features, only two of which coincide in velocity with ones from the discovery epoch. These spectra can be found at ftp://www.naic.edu/pub/publications/bml/19566.ps.Z The 1667 MHz velocity range rivals that from the hypergiant, IRC+10420, which has, however, always exhibited the same velocity range throughout the 24 years since it was discovered. 19566+3423 is probably a hypergiant or supergiant too, which may well have lost its present circumstellar shell in a sudden mass ejection event, rather than in a wind.

  3. On the Dramatic Spin-up/Spin-Down Torque Reversals in Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Finger, Mark H.; Koh, Danny T.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rubin, Bradley C.; Scott, D. Mathew; Vaughan, Brian A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    Dramatic torque reversals between spin-up and spin-down have been observed in half of the persistent X-ray pulsars monitored by the Burst and Transient Space Experiment (BATSE) all-sky monitor on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Theoretical models developed to explain early pulsar timing data can explain spin-down torques via a disk-magnetosphere interaction if the star nearly corotates with the inner accretion disk. To produce the observed BATSE torque reversals, however, these equilibrium models require the disk to alternate between two mass accretion rates, with M+/- producing accretion torques of similar magnitude but always of opposite sign. Moreover, in at least one pulsar (GX 1+4) undergoing secular spin-down, the neutron star spins down faster during brief (approximately 20 day) hard X-ray flares-this is opposite the correlation expected from standard theory, assuming that BATSE pulsed flux increases with mass accretion rate. The 10 day to 10 yr intervals between torque reversals in these systems are much longer than any characteristic magnetic or viscous timescale near the inner disk boundary and are more suggestive of a global disk phenomenon. We discuss possible explanations of the observed torque behavior. Despite the preferred sense of rotation defined by the binary orbit, the BATSE observations are surprisingly consistent with an earlier suggestion for GX 1+4: the disks in these systems somehow alternate between episodes of prograde and retrograde rotation. We are unaware of any mechanism that could produce a stable retrograde disk in a binary undergoing Roche lobe overflow, but such flip-flop behavior does occur in numerical simulations of wind-fed systems. One possibility is that the disks in some of these binaries are fed by an X-ray-excited wind.

  4. Learning to Lead against the Grain: Dramatizing the Emotional Toll of Teacher Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston, Jerome; Kusanovich, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Tremendous research on teacher leadership over the last decade has revealed both the prevalence of and the imperatives for a model teaching force that can actively participate in school improvement (Harrison & Killion, 2007; Katzenmeyer & Moller, 2001; Leithwood & Riehl, 2003). The highly participative teacher leader paradigm is so…

  5. Correcting Inadequate Model Snow Process Descriptions Dramatically Improves Mountain Hydrology Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J. W.; Fang, X.

    2014-12-01

    The vast effort in hydrology devoted to parameter calibration as a means to improve model performance assumes that the models concerned are not fundamentally wrong. By focussing on finding optimal parameter sets and ascribing poor model performance to parameter or data uncertainty, these efforts may fail to consider the need to improve models with more intelligent descriptions of hydrological processes. To test this hypothesis, a flexible physically based hydrological model including a full suite of snow hydrology processes as well as warm season, hillslope and groundwater hydrology was applied to Marmot Creek Research Basin, Canadian Rocky Mountains where excellent driving meteorology and basin biophysical descriptions exist. Model parameters were set from values found in the basin or from similar environments; no parameters were calibrated. The model was tested against snow surveys and streamflow observations. The model used algorithms that describe snow redistribution, sublimation and forest canopy effects on snowmelt and evaporative processes that are rarely implemented in hydrological models. To investigate the contribution of these processes to model predictive capability, the model was "falsified" by deleting parameterisations for forest canopy snow mass and energy, blowing snow, intercepted rain evaporation, and sublimation. Model falsification by ignoring forest canopy processes contributed to a large increase in SWE errors for forested portions of the research basin with RMSE increasing from 19 to 55 mm and mean bias (MB) increasing from 0.004 to 0.62. In the alpine tundra portion, removing blowing processes resulted in an increase in model SWE MB from 0.04 to 2.55 on north-facing slopes and -0.006 to -0.48 on south-facing slopes. Eliminating these algorithms degraded streamflow prediction with the Nash Sutcliffe efficiency dropping from 0.58 to 0.22 and MB increasing from 0.01 to 0.09. These results show dramatic model improvements by including snow

  6. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field-dominated basin in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; Zheng, J.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are diminishing as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations, characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of stream flow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River basin in southern China, where massive industrialization has occurred during the past 3 decades. We found that stream flow increased by 58 % and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23 % during 1986-2013 as a result of a three-fold increase in urban areas and a reduction of rice paddy fields by 27 %. Both high flows and low flows increased significantly by about 28 % from 2002 to 2013. The increases in stream flow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. Attribution analysis, based on two empirical models, indicated that land-use/land-cover change contributed about 82-108 % of the observed increase in stream flow from 353 ± 287 mm yr-1 during 1986-2002 to 556 ± 145 during 2003-2013. We concluded that the reduction in ET was largely attributed to the conversion of cropland to urban use. The effects of land-use change overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from an artificial wetland-dominated landscape to an urban land-use- dominated one, and thus was considered an extreme type of contemporary hydrologic disturbance. The ongoing large-scale urbanization of the rice paddy-dominated regions, in humid southern China and East Asia, will likely elevate storm-flow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban

  7. Non-small cell lung cancer is characterized by dramatic changes in phospholipid profiles

    PubMed Central

    Marien, Eyra; Meister, Michael; Muley, Thomas; Fieuws, Steffen; Bordel, Sergio; Derua, Rita; Spraggins, Jeffrey; Van de Plas, Raf; Dehairs, Jonas; Wouters, Jens; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Dienemann, Hendrik; Thomas, Michael; Schnabel, Philipp A; Caprioli, Richard M; Waelkens, Etienne; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2015-01-01

    of phospholipid profiles uncovered dramatic differences between NSCLC and normal lung tissue. The differences were confirmed via 2D-imaging lipidomics in tissue sections. Lipid markers capable of discriminating between tumor and normal tissue and between different NSCLC subtypes were identified. The observed alterations in NSCLC phospholipid profiles may be biologically significant. PMID:25784292

  8. Hypertensive heart failure associated with middle aortic syndrome reversed dramatically by endovascular management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Weon; Park, Chung Su; Kim, Hee Jong; Kim, Kyung Hwan; An, Hye Mi; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Lim, Chur Hoan; Kang, Won Yu; Hwang, Sun Ho; Kim, Wan

    2011-09-01

    A 42-year-old male patient presented with refractory hypertension and congestive heart failure. He had taken hydrochlorthiazide 50 mg, carvedilol 25 mg, diltiazem 180 mg, and losartan 100 mg per day. Aortogram revealed a severe luminal narrowing in the distal thoracic aorta with a peak systolic pressure gradient of 60 mmHg across the lesion. Endovascular management was performed with 22 × 80 mm self-expandable Nitinol-S stent after predilation with 10 × 40 mm balloon. After endovascular management, the patient's blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and dilated LV dimension were remarkably improved. PMID:22073325

  9. A Dramatic Optical Flare and Microvariability in the Blazar 3C 454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balonek, Thomas J.; Boni, Samantha J.; Chapman, Katie J.; Didio, Nicholas A.; Sabyr, Alina; Stahlin, R. William; Weaver, Zachary R.; Zhang, Saiyang

    2016-06-01

    Following up on the report of optical and gamma-ray activity in the blazar 3C 454.3 by Jorstad (ATel# 9150), Lucarelli et al (ATel #9157), and Bulgarelli et al (ATel #9176), we report optical (R) observations which reveal a brightening of over 2 magnitudes in a 10 day interval between 2016 June 10 and 20. The brightness on June 20 (R = 13.7) is 1.2 magnitudes brighter than reported by Jorstad on June 13, and is the brightest 3C 454.3 has been observed in two years.

  10. Amundsen, Nansen, and the question of science: dramatizing historical research on the polar heroic.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Robert Marc

    2011-12-01

    Recent historical research reveals a much greater role than previously assumed for science in the polar activities of Fridtjof Nansen and Roald Amundsen. Science-based polar exploration was what first linked these two men; Amundsen's subsequent turn to sport and sensation dampened their relationship. These insights and other new perspectives about heroic period of polar exploration are being transformed by the author into a drama for stage that will have its world premier in Norway in December 2011. The play attempts to use imaginatively the art and craft of theatre to diffuse insight from historical scholarship. PMID:21962487

  11. Dramatical Impact Of Low Amounts of Swelling Clays On The Rheology Of Alpine Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardou, E.; Bowen, P.; Banfill, P. G.; Boivin, P.

    2004-12-01

    Field observations show that the role and amount of swelling clays in the complex hard suspensions of alpine debris flow type were underestimated (see Boivin et al., this session). This work aims at exploring to which extent the swelling clay content influences the global rheology of a flow of rock grains from which the size spectrum extends from clays to gravel. We made a sample from calibrated materials with a grain size distribution similar to that of a viscoplastic debris flow (Bardou et al., 2003). Four replicates were made with the same grading curve. The clay content of the samples was 2% dry weight only, and different 2:1 swelling clay to 1:1 clay ratio were used. The swelling clay ratio (SCR) was calculated as the percentage of 2:1 clay in the clay fraction of the bulk samples. The 1:1 clay was (industrial) kaolinite and the 2:1 clay was a natural soil smectite. The smectite content in the bulk sample ranged from 0% to 2% dry weight, corresponding to SCR ranging from 0 to 80%. The four prepared samples were sheared in the large-size apparatus fully described in Tattersall and Banfill (1983). This apparatus is based on the measure of the torque necessary to rotate an impeller immersed in the sample. The impeller has the form of an "H" and moves in a plane according to two parallel axes. The observed behaviour were very contrasted. The sample with SCR=0 was poorly sensitive to changes in the solid concentration, in contrast to the three samples with SCR>0. Moreover, a small change in the SCR of the clay fraction induced a dramatic change of the behaviour of the mixture. For SCR=0, only little changes in the rheological parameters of the bulk samples were observed with respect to changes in the solid concentration. On the contrary the rheological parameters of the bulk samples with SCR>0, apparently followed a power law according to solid concentration. These tests carried out in the laboratory accord with observations realised on natural debris flow material

  12. Self-Restricted Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Analogues: Dramatic Emission Enhancement and Remarkable Solvatofluorochromism.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hongping; Yu, Chunyang; Gong, Lidong; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2016-08-01

    The confinement effect of the β-barrel defines the emission profiles of the chromophores of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family. Here, we describe the design strategy and mimicking of confinement effects via the chromophore itself, termed the self-restricted effect. By systematically tailoring the GFP core, a family of 2,5-dialkoxy-substituted GFP chromophore analogues is found to be highly emissive and show remarkable solvatofluorochromism in fluid solvents. Fluorescence quantum yield (QY) and lifetime measurements, in combination with theoretical calculations, illustrate the mechanism relying on inhibition of torsional rotation around the exocyclic CC bond. Meanwhile, theoretical calculations further reveal that the electrostatic interaction between the solvent and the imidazolinone oxygen can contribute to suppress the radiationless decay channel around the exocyclic C═C double bond. Our findings put forward a universal approach toward unlocked highly emissive GFPc analogues, potentially promoting the understanding of the photophysics and biochemical application of GFP chromophore analogues. PMID:27404318

  13. Dramatic effects of speech task on motor and linguistic planning in severely dysfluent parkinsonian speech

    PubMed Central

    Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana; Cameron, Krista; Sidtis, John J.

    2015-01-01

    In motor speech disorders, dysarthric features impacting intelligibility, articulation, fluency, and voice emerge more saliently in conversation than in repetition, reading, or singing. A role of the basal ganglia in these task discrepancies has been identified. Further, more recent studies of naturalistic speech in basal ganglia dysfunction have revealed that formulaic language is more impaired than novel language. This descriptive study extends these observations to a case of severely dysfluent dysarthria due to a parkinsonian syndrome. Dysfluencies were quantified and compared for conversation, two forms of repetition, reading, recited speech, and singing. Other measures examined phonetic inventories, word forms, and formulaic language. Phonetic, syllabic, and lexical dysfluencies were more abundant in conversation than in other task conditions. Formulaic expressions in conversation were reduced compared to normal speakers. A proposed explanation supports the notion that the basal ganglia contribute to formulation of internal models for execution of speech. PMID:22774929

  14. The Development of Evaluation Model for Internal Quality Assurance System of Dramatic Arts College of Bunditpattanasilpa Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinthukhot, Kittisak; Srihamongkol, Yannapat; Luanganggoon, Nuchwana; Suwannoi, Paisan

    2013-01-01

    The research purpose was to develop an evaluation model for the internal quality assurance system of the dramatic arts College of Bunditpattanasilpa Institute. The Research and Development method was used as research methodology which was divided into three phases; "developing the model and its guideline", "trying out the actual…

  15. A Rural School/Community: A Case Study of a Dramatic Turnaround & Its Implications for School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert V.

    This paper presents a case study of a rural community exhibiting a dramatic turnaround in community support for a new school bond issue. Demographic change was partly responsible for the change in community attitudes, with two waves of immigration altering the long-term conservative orientation of this community. After a series of failed…

  16. Performing History: The Effects of a Dramatic Art-Based History Program on Student Achievement and Enjoyment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Mark; Stigler, James W.; Woodward, J. Arthur; Staley, Lisle

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the influence of a dramatic art-based history program for fifth-grade students on both their learning and enjoyment of history. The program, called "Performing History," reflects theories of effective use of drama in the classroom as well as successful ways to teach history. The program presents historical information as part…

  17. TAR (Theatre as Representation) as a Provocative Teaching Tool in School Administration: A Dramatized Inclusive Classroom Scenario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Matthew J.; Young, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The following dramatized classroom scenario depicts a teacher struggling with the nature of an inclusive learning environment, with instructional leadership and supervision of instruction as the theoretical and practical backdrop. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how the use of a TAR (theatre as representation) case study can be used…

  18. Hydrophobic carboxy-terminal residues dramatically reduce protein levels in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Christopher J.; Uthandi, Sivakumar; Puentes, Jose A.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis is important not only to cell physiology but also to the successful development of biocatalysts. While a wide-variety of signals are known to trigger protein degradation in bacteria and eukaryotes, these mechanisms are poorly understood in archaea, known for their ability to withstand harsh conditions. Here we present a systematic study in which single C-terminal amino acid residues were added to a reporter protein and shown to influence its levels in an archaeal cell. All 20 amino acid residues were examined for their impact on protein levels, using the reporter protein soluble modified red-shifted GFP (smRS-GFP) expressed in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Addition of hydrophobic residues, including Leu, Cys, Met, Phe, Ala, Tyr, Ile and Val, gave the most pronounced reduction in smRS-GFP levels compared with the addition of either neutral or charged hydrophilic residues. In contrast to the altered protein levels, the C-terminal alterations had no influence on smRS-GFP-specific transcript levels, thus revealing that the effect is post-transcriptional. PMID:19850616

  19. Adaptation of Lactococcus lactis to high growth temperature leads to a dramatic increase in acidification rate

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Ingvar Hellgren, Lars; Ruhdal Jensen, Peter; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is essential for most cheese making, and this mesophilic bacterium has its growth optimum around 30 °C. We have, through adaptive evolution, isolated a mutant TM29 that grows well up to 39 °C, and continuous growth at 40 °C is possible if pre-incubated at a slightly lower temperature. At the maximal permissive temperature for the wild-type, 38 °C, TM29 grows 33% faster and has a 12% higher specific lactate production rate than its parent MG1363, which results in fast lactate accumulation. Genome sequencing was used to reveal the mutations accumulated, most of which were shown to affect thermal tolerance. Of the mutations with more pronounced effects, two affected expression of single proteins (chaperone; riboflavin transporter), two had pleiotropic effects (RNA polymerase) which changed the gene expression profile, and one resulted in a change in the coding sequence of CDP-diglyceride synthase. A large deletion containing 10 genes was also found to affect thermal tolerance significantly. With this study we demonstrate a simple approach to obtain non-GMO derivatives of the important L. lactis that possess properties desirable by the industry, e.g. thermal robustness and increased rate of acidification. The mutations we have identified provide a genetic basis for further investigation of thermal tolerance. PMID:26388459

  20. Adaptation of Lactococcus lactis to high growth temperature leads to a dramatic increase in acidification rate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Ingvar Hellgren, Lars; Ruhdal Jensen, Peter; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is essential for most cheese making, and this mesophilic bacterium has its growth optimum around 30 °C. We have, through adaptive evolution, isolated a mutant TM29 that grows well up to 39 °C, and continuous growth at 40 °C is possible if pre-incubated at a slightly lower temperature. At the maximal permissive temperature for the wild-type, 38 °C, TM29 grows 33% faster and has a 12% higher specific lactate production rate than its parent MG1363, which results in fast lactate accumulation. Genome sequencing was used to reveal the mutations accumulated, most of which were shown to affect thermal tolerance. Of the mutations with more pronounced effects, two affected expression of single proteins (chaperone; riboflavin transporter), two had pleiotropic effects (RNA polymerase) which changed the gene expression profile, and one resulted in a change in the coding sequence of CDP-diglyceride synthase. A large deletion containing 10 genes was also found to affect thermal tolerance significantly. With this study we demonstrate a simple approach to obtain non-GMO derivatives of the important L. lactis that possess properties desirable by the industry, e.g. thermal robustness and increased rate of acidification. The mutations we have identified provide a genetic basis for further investigation of thermal tolerance. PMID:26388459

  1. Dramatic response to climate change in the Southwest: Robert Whittaker's 1963 Arizona Mountain plant transect revisited

    PubMed Central

    Brusca, Richard C; Wiens, John F; Meyer, Wallace M; Eble, Jeff; Franklin, Kim; Overpeck, Jonathan T; Moore, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Models analyzing how Southwestern plant communities will respond to climate change predict that increases in temperature will lead to upward elevational shifts of montane species. We tested this hypothesis by reexamining Robert Whittaker's 1963 plant transect in the Santa Catalina Mountains of southern Arizona, finding that this process is already well underway. Our survey, five decades after Whittaker's, reveals large changes in the elevational ranges of common montane plants, while mean annual rainfall has decreased over the past 20 years, and mean annual temperatures increased 0.25°C/decade from 1949 to 2011 in the Tucson Basin. Although elevational changes in species are individualistic, significant overall upward movement of the lower elevation boundaries, and elevational range contractions, have occurred. This is the first documentation of significant upward shifts of lower elevation range boundaries in Southwestern montane plant species over decadal time, confirming that previous hypotheses are correct in their prediction that mountain communities in the Southwest will be strongly impacted by warming, and that the Southwest is already experiencing a rapid vegetation change. PMID:24223270

  2. Dramatic Response of S-1 Administration to Chemorefractory Advanced Thymic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaira, Kyoichi; Naruse, Ichiro; Imai, Hisao; Sunaga, Noriaki; Hisada, Takeshi; Motegi, Masahiko; Asao, Takayuki; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Thymic cancer (TC) is a rare malignancy in thoracic tumors, and there has been no standard therapeutics for advanced or relapsed patients. The clinical significance of second-line or beyond chemotherapy for platinum refractory advanced TC remains unclear. Here, we present the experience of a patient with TC showing a complete response to S-1 as third-line chemotherapy. A 54-year-old female with TC was treated with carboplatin plus paclitaxel and thoracic radiotherapy as first-line chemoradiotherapy and amrubicin as second-line chemotherapy. After 3 cycles of amrubicin administration, the metastatic hepatic lesions revealed a markedly progressive disease. A single agent of S-1 was administered as sequencing chemotherapy. After 2 cycles of S-1, the patient achieved a complete remission of multiple metastatic sites. There was evidence of immunohistochemical staining of a low thymidylate synthase (TS) expression. The expression of TS may be closely associated with the efficacy of S-1 in patients with TC. PMID:26389778

  3. Recalcitrant eosinophilic pustular folliculitis of Ofuji with palmoplantar pustulosis: dramatic response to narrowband UVB phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hua Liang; Chong, Wei-Sheng

    2012-08-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis of Ofuji is a recalcitrant disease typified by non-infective eosinophilic spongiosis involving the infundibular region of the hair follicle. We present a case of a 49-year-old Chinese man with known palmoplantar pustulosis and acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau which was promptly resolved with methotrexate therapy. He returned with an erythematous papulopustular eruption with coalescence to annular plaques, occurring over the face, chest and back with active palmoplantar pustulation. Histology from skin biopsy of the palmar lesion was in keeping with palmoplantar psoriasis, while biopsy of the facial and truncal lesions revealed florid perifollicular eosinophilic congregation diagnostic of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis of Ofuji. Indomethacin was initiated with partial improvement of lesions with cyclical flares. A trial of narrowband ultraviolet-B phototherapy at a frequency of thrice weekly achieved sustained clearance of both eosinophilic pustular folliculitis and palmoplantar lesions. Indomethacin was tailed down and eventually discontinued with maintenance of narrowband ultraviolet-B therapy; this achieved successful control of the disease. PMID:23017177

  4. From yellow to black: dramatic changes between cerium(IV) and plutonium(IV) molybdates.

    PubMed

    Cross, Justin N; Duncan, Patrick M; Villa, Eric M; Polinski, Matthew J; Babo, Jean-Marie; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Booth, Corwin H; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2013-02-20

    Hydrothermal reactions of CeCl(3) and PuCl(3) with MoO(3) and Cs(2)CO(3) yield surprisingly different results. Ce(3)Mo(6)O(24)(H(2)O)(4) crystallizes as bright yellow plates (space group C2/c, a = 12.7337(7) Å, b = 22.1309(16) Å, c = 7.8392(4) Å, β = 96.591(4)°, V = 2194.6(2) Å(3)), whereas CsPu(3)Mo(6)O(24)(H(2)O) crystallizes as semiconducting black-red plates (space group C2/c, a = 12.633(5) Å, b = 21.770(8) Å, c = 7.743(7) Å, β = 96.218(2)°, V = 2117(2) Å(3)). The topologies of the two compounds are similar, with channel structures built from disordered Mo(VI) square pyramids and (RE)O(8) square antiprisms (RE = Ce(IV), Pu(IV)). However, the Pu(IV) compound contains Cs(+) in its channels, while the channels in Ce(3)Mo(6)O(24)(H(2)O)(4) contain water molecules. Disorder and an ambiguous oxidation state of Mo lead to the formula CsPu(3)Mo(6)O(24)(H(2)O), where one Mo site is Mo(V) and the rest are Mo(VI). X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) experiments were performed to investigate the source of the black color of CsPu(3)Mo(6)O(24)(H(2)O). These experiments revealed Pu to be tetravalent, while the strong pre-edge absorption from the distorted molybdate anions leaves the oxidation state ambiguous between Mo(V) and Mo(VI). PMID:23360299

  5. Dramatic Declines of Montane Frogs in a Central African Biodiversity Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Mareike; Blackburn, David C.; Doherty-Bone, Thomas M.; Gonwouo, LeGrand Nono; Ghose, Sonia; Rödel, Mark-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Amphibian populations are vanishing worldwide. Declines and extinctions of many populations have been attributed to chytridiomycosis, a disease induced by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). In Africa, however, changes in amphibian assemblages were typically attributed to habitat change. We conducted a retrospective study utilizing field surveys from 2004–2012 of the anuran faunas on two mountains in western Cameroon, a hotspot of African amphibian diversity. The number of species detected was negatively influenced by year, habitat degradation, and elevation, and we detected a decline of certain species. Because another study in this region revealed an emergence of Bd in 2008, we screened additional recent field-collected samples and also pre-decline preserved museum specimens for the presence of Bd supporting emergence before 2008. When comparing the years before and after Bd detection, we found significantly diminished frog species richness and abundance on both mountains after Bd emergence. Our analyses suggest that this may be the first disease-driven community-level decline in anuran biodiversity in Central Africa. The disappearance of several species known to tolerate habitat degradation, and a trend of stronger declines at higher elevations, are consistent with Bd-induced declines in other regions. Not all species decreased; populations of some species remained constant, and others increased after the emergence of Bd. This variation might be explained by species-specific differences in infection probability. Increased habitat protection and Bd-mitigation strategies are needed for sustaining diverse amphibian communities such as those on Mt. Manengouba, which contains nearly half of Cameroon’s frog diversity. PMID:27149624

  6. Dramatic Declines of Montane Frogs in a Central African Biodiversity Hotspot.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Mareike; Blackburn, David C; Doherty-Bone, Thomas M; Gonwouo, LeGrand Nono; Ghose, Sonia; Rödel, Mark-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Amphibian populations are vanishing worldwide. Declines and extinctions of many populations have been attributed to chytridiomycosis, a disease induced by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). In Africa, however, changes in amphibian assemblages were typically attributed to habitat change. We conducted a retrospective study utilizing field surveys from 2004-2012 of the anuran faunas on two mountains in western Cameroon, a hotspot of African amphibian diversity. The number of species detected was negatively influenced by year, habitat degradation, and elevation, and we detected a decline of certain species. Because another study in this region revealed an emergence of Bd in 2008, we screened additional recent field-collected samples and also pre-decline preserved museum specimens for the presence of Bd supporting emergence before 2008. When comparing the years before and after Bd detection, we found significantly diminished frog species richness and abundance on both mountains after Bd emergence. Our analyses suggest that this may be the first disease-driven community-level decline in anuran biodiversity in Central Africa. The disappearance of several species known to tolerate habitat degradation, and a trend of stronger declines at higher elevations, are consistent with Bd-induced declines in other regions. Not all species decreased; populations of some species remained constant, and others increased after the emergence of Bd. This variation might be explained by species-specific differences in infection probability. Increased habitat protection and Bd-mitigation strategies are needed for sustaining diverse amphibian communities such as those on Mt. Manengouba, which contains nearly half of Cameroon's frog diversity. PMID:27149624

  7. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Menger, Katja E; James, Andrew M; Cochemé, Helena M; Harbour, Michael E; Chouchani, Edward T; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-06-30

    Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  8. Dramatically enhanced self-assembly of GeSi quantum dots with superior photoluminescence induced by the substrate misorientation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tong; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2014-02-01

    A dramatically enhanced self-assembly of GeSi quantum dots (QDs) is disclosed on slightly miscut Si (001) substrates, leading to extremely dense QDs and even a growth mode transition. The inherent mechanism is addressed in combination of the thermodynamics and the growth kinetics both affected by steps on the vicinal surface. Moreover, temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra from dense GeSi QDs on the miscut substrate demonstrate a rather strong peak persistent up to 300 K, which is attributed to the well confinement of excitons in the dense GeSi QDs due to the absence of the wetting layer on the miscut substrate.

  9. Dramatic improvement of severe cryptococcosis-induced immune reconstitution syndrome with adalimumab in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Scemla, A; Gerber, S; Duquesne, A; Parize, P; Martinez, F; Anglicheau, D; Snanoudj, R; Zuber, M; Bougnoux, M-E; Legendre, C; Lortholary, O

    2015-02-01

    In solid organ transplant recipients, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a rare complication of cryptococcosis, which may require steroids in its most severe forms. Here, we report the case of a renal transplant recipient who developed severe cryptococcal meningitis-associated IRIS 1 week after immunosuppression reduction. High-dose steroids failed to improve the disease. Finally, a recombinant human monoclonal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) antagonist, adalimumab, was prescribed, and the patient rapidly experienced dramatic neurological improvement. No IRIS relapse occurred within 14 months following adalimumab discontinuation. PMID:25611999

  10. A young-onset frontal dementia with dramatic calcifications due to a novel CSF1R mutation.

    PubMed

    Gore, Ethan; Manley, Andrew; Dees, Daniel; Appleby, Brian S; Lerner, Alan J

    2016-06-01

    Neuroimaging and genomic analysis greatly aid in the identification of young-onset dementia antemortem. We present the case of a 33-year-old female with a 2-year rapid decline to dementia and immobility marked by personality change, executive deficits including compulsions, attention deficit, apraxia, Parkinsonism, and pyramidal signs. She had unique and dramatic calcifications and confluent white matter changes on imaging and was found to have a novel mutation in the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor gene causing adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP). Here, we review ALSP and briefly discuss differential diagnoses. PMID:27092868

  11. Dramatism and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Kennth

    This book contains two lectures delivered in the Heinz Weiner Lecture Series: "Biology, Psychology, Words" and "Archetype and Entelechy." The first lecture summarizes some of the central concepts of the author's thought, beginning with the proposition that "dramatistic terms" can be directly applied to the study of behavior because people…

  12. Dramatic Stained Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prater, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project that is appropriate for students in fifth through twelfth grade in which they create Gothic-style stained-glass windows. Discusses how college students majoring in elementary education created stained-glass windows. Addresses how to adapt this lesson for younger students. (CMK)

  13. Creative Sound Dramatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Rebecca; Eick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sound propagation is not easy for children to understand because of its abstract nature, often best represented by models such as wave drawings and particle dots. Teachers Rebecca Hendrix and Charles Eick wondered how science inquiry, when combined with an unlikely discipline like drama, could produce a better understanding among their…

  14. Dramatizing Short Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zilberwasser, Simona; Dar, Etti; Livny, Michal; Shotts, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a project that dealt with two short stories in a different way. The stories were part of the Oral Bagrut exam for Grade 11 students. The stories were taught in English class and concentrated on theme and vocabulary. (Author/VWL)

  15. A Dramatic Demo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, George; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a program for students or science teachers to integrate demonstrations into the science curriculum. Uses the idea of a chemical genie with numerous demonstrations to illustrate that science can be fun, to learn some indicators of a chemical reaction, and to discover factors that affect reaction rates. (MVL)

  16. Single-point mutation-mediated local amphipathic adjustment dramatically enhances antibacterial activity of a fungal defensin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiajia; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-07-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of multiresistant bacteria has lead to an urgent need for novel antimicrobials. Based on single-point substitutions, we generated a series of mutants of micasin, a dermatophytic defensin, with enhanced activities against multiple clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species, including 4 antibiotic-resistant strains. We first mapped the functional surface of micasin by alanine-scanning mutational analysis of its highly exposed residues, through which we found that substitution of site 8 (acidic Glu) dramatically enhanced bacterial killing of this peptide. Structural analysis indicates that this single point mutation could result in a functional local amphipathic architecture. Four different types of side chains (hydrophobic, cationic polar, neutral polar, and acidic polar) were introduced at site 8 to clarify the role of this local architecture in micasin function. The results show that all mutants displayed increased antibacterial activity with the exception of the acidic replacement. These mutants with enhanced activity exhibited low hemolysis and cytotoxicity and showed high serum stability, indicating their therapeutic potential. Our work represents the first example of structural fine-tuning to largely improve the antibacterial potency of a dermatophytic defensin.-Wu, J., Gao, B., Zhu, S. Single-point mutation-mediated local amphipathic adjustment dramatically enhances antibacterial activity of a fungal defensin. PMID:27084888

  17. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Menger, Katja E.; James, Andrew M.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Harbour, Michael E.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  18. Ultrathin barrier AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors grown at a dramatically reduced growth temperature by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, JunShuai Zhang, JinCheng Hao, Yue

    2015-07-27

    Ultrathin-barrier AlN/GaN heterostructures were grown on sapphire substrates by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PMOCVD) using indium as a surfactant at a dramatically reduced growth temperature of 830 °C. Upon optimization of growth parameters, an electron mobility of 1398 cm{sup 2}/V s together with a two-dimensional-electron-gas density of 1.3 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} was obtained for a 4 nm thick AlN barrier. The grown structures featured well-ordered parallel atomic steps with a root-mean-square roughness of 0.15 nm in a 5 × 5 μm{sup 2} area revealed by atomic-force-microscopic image. Finally, the potential of such structures for device application was demonstrated by fabricating and testing under dc operation AlN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors. These results indicate that this low temperature PMOCVD growth technique is promising for the fabrication of GaN-based electronic devices.

  19. Characterization of OsPM19L1 encoding an AWPM-19-like family protein that is dramatically induced by osmotic stress in rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Lan, H; Huang, P; Zhang, Y; Yuan, X; Huang, X; Huang, J; Zhang, H

    2015-01-01

    The plant-specific AWPM-19-domain proteins play important roles in plant development and stress responses. In the current study, OsPM19L1 encoding Oryza sativa AWPM-19-like protein 1 was isolated from rice. Tissue-specific gene expression analysis revealed that OsPM19L1 was highly expressed in the leaf sheath of rice. Interestingly, expression of OsPM19L1 was high at the early stage of panicle development and decreased thereafter. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that OsPM19L1 was dramatically induced by 20% PEG stress (>600-fold), exogenous abscisic acid (>350-fold), salt and cold stress. Subcellular localization assay suggested that the OsPM19L1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein was localized in the membrane system in rice cells. Moreover, under stress conditions, OsPM19L1 expression was enhanced in an ABI5-Like1 (ABL1) deficiency rice mutant, abl1, suggesting that ABL1 negatively regulates OsPM19L1 gene expression. Thus, OsPM19L1 appears to be closely associated with stress tolerance through ABA-dependent pathway in rice. PMID:26505346

  20. The changes in mycolic acid structures caused by hadC mutation have a dramatic effect on the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Slama, Nawel; Jamet, Stevie; Frigui, Wafa; Pawlik, Alexandre; Bottai, Daria; Laval, Françoise; Constant, Patricia; Lemassu, Anne; Cam, Kaymeuang; Daffé, Mamadou; Brosch, Roland; Eynard, Nathalie; Quémard, Annaïk

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the molecular strategies used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to invade and persist within the host is of paramount importance to tackle the tuberculosis pandemic. Comparative genomic surveys have revealed that hadC, encoding a subunit of the HadBC dehydratase, is mutated in the avirulent M. tuberculosis H37Ra strain. We show here that mutation or deletion of hadC affects the biosynthesis of oxygenated mycolic acids, substantially reducing their production level. Additionally, it causes the loss of atypical extra-long mycolic acids, demonstrating the involvement of HadBC in the late elongation steps of mycolic acid biosynthesis. These events have an impact on the morphotype, cording capacity and biofilm growth of the bacilli as well as on their sensitivity to agents such as rifampicin. Furthermore, deletion of hadC leads to a dramatic loss of virulence: an almost 4-log drop of the bacterial load in the lungs and spleens of infected immunodeficient mice. Both its unique function and importance for M. tuberculosis virulence make HadBC an attractive therapeutic target for tuberculosis drug development. PMID:26538472

  1. Boron-doped bismuth oxybromide microspheres with enhanced surface hydroxyl groups: Synthesis, characterization and dramatic photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, ZhangSheng; Liu, JinLong; Wang, HaiYang; Cao, Gang; Niu, JiNan

    2016-02-01

    B-doped BiOBr photocatalysts were successfully synthesized via a facile solvothermal method with boric acid used as boron source. As-obtained products consist of novel hierarchical microspheres, whose nanosheet building units were formed by nanoparticles splicing. They showed dramatic photocatalytic efficiency toward the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and phenol under the visible-light irradiation and the highest activity was achieved by 0.075B-BiOBr. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the enriched surface hydroxyl groups on B-doped BiOBr samples, which not only improved the adsorption of pollutant on the photocatalyst but also promoted the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. In addition, it was found that the main reactive species responsible for the degradation of organic pollutant were h(+) and O2(-) radicals, instead of OH radicals. PMID:26590875

  2. Dramatic reduction in process temperature of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes by pulsed sputtering growth technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Eiji; Ueno, Kohei; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Oshima, Masaharu

    2014-02-01

    P-type doping of GaN by pulsed sputtering deposition (PSD) at a low growth temperature of 480 °C and dramatic reduction in the growth process temperature for InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were achieved. Mg-doped GaN layers grown on semi-insulating GaN at 480 °C exhibited clear p-type conductivity with a hole concentration and mobility of 3.0 × 1017 cm-3 and 3.1 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. GaN/In0.33Ga0.67N/GaN LEDs fabricated at 480 °C showed clear rectifying characteristics and a bright electroluminescence emission near 640 nm. These results indicate that this low temperature PSD growth technique is quite promising for the production of nitride-based light-emitting devices on large-area glass substrates.

  3. Identity transformation and a changed lifestyle following dramatic weight loss and body-contouring surgery: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Jo; Long, Andrew; Soldin, Mark

    2015-10-01

    This article reports on two major quality-of-life perception changes for patients who had undergone plastic surgery following dramatic weight loss. The exploratory, qualitative study was undertaken with 20 patients from one teaching hospital. In-depth interviews were conducted, and a thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. The results provide unique glimpses of surgical consumption empowering and facilitating 'identity transformation', embracing improved physical function and enhanced self-esteem, confidence and quality of life, and a 'changed lifestyle'. For a minority, identity transformation was sometimes interrupted by 'identity lag', posing the need for additional health-care support throughout the adjustment process. The study provides additional insight into existing quantitative studies, adding to the body of knowledge in this area. PMID:24296742

  4. FGF-21, a novel metabolic regulator, has a robust neuroprotective role and is dramatically elevated in neurons by mood stabilizers

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yan; Wang, Zhifei; Tsai, Li-Kai; Leeds, Peter; Fessler, Emily Bame; Wang, Junyu; Chuang, De-Maw

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) is a new member of the FGF super-family and an important endogenous regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism. It has been proposed as a therapeutic target for diabetes and obesity. Its function in the central nervous system (CNS) remains unknown. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that aging primary neurons are more vulnerable to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, and that co-treatment with the mood stabilizers lithium and valproic acid (VPA) induces synergistic neuroprotective effects. This study sought to identify molecule(s) involved in these synergistic effects. We found that FGF-21 mRNA was selectively and dramatically elevated by co-treatment with lithium and VPA in primary rat brain neurons. FGF-21 protein levels were also robustly increased in neuronal lysates and culture medium following lithium-VPA co-treatment. Combining glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitors with VPA or histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors with lithium synergistically increased FGF-21 mRNA levels, supporting that synergistic effects of lithium and VPA are mediated via GSK-3 and HDAC inhibition, respectively. Exogenous FGF-21 protein completely protected aging neurons from glutamate challenge. This neuroprotection was associated with enhanced Akt-1 activation and GSK-3 inhibition. Lithium-VPA co-treatment dramatically prolonged lithium-induced Akt-1 activation and augmented GSK-3 inhibition. Akt-1 knockdown markedly decreased FGF-21 mRNA levels, and reduced the neuroprotection induced by FGF-21 or lithium-VPA co-treatment. In addition, FGF-21 knockdown reduced lithium-VPA co-treatment-induced Akt-1 activation and neuroprotection against excitotoxicity. Together, our novel results suggest that FGF-21 is a key mediator of the effects of these mood stabilizers, and a potential new therapeutic target for CNS disorders. PMID:24468826

  5. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  6. Papain-templated Cu nanoclusters: assaying and exhibiting dramatic antibacterial activity cooperating with H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hong; Zhong, Dan; Zhou, Zinan; Yang, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    Herein, papain-functionalized Cu nanoclusters (CuNCs@Papain) were originally synthesized in aqueous solution together with a quantum yield of 14.3%, and showed obviously red fluorescence at 620 nm. Meanwhile, their corresponding fluorescence mechanism was fully elucidated by fluorescence spectroscopy, HR-TEM, FTIR spectroscopy, and XPS. Subsequently, the as-prepared CuNCs were employed as probes for detecting H2O2. Using CuNCs as probes, H2O2 was determined in the range from 1 μM to 50 μM based on a linear decrease of fluorescence intensity as well as a detection limit of 0.2 μM with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. More significantly, it has been proved that CuNCs could convert H2O2 to &z.rad;OH, which exhibited dramatic antibacterial activity. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to validate their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive/negative bacteria and actual wound infection, suggesting their potential for serving as one type of promising antibacterial material.Herein, papain-functionalized Cu nanoclusters (CuNCs@Papain) were originally synthesized in aqueous solution together with a quantum yield of 14.3%, and showed obviously red fluorescence at 620 nm. Meanwhile, their corresponding fluorescence mechanism was fully elucidated by fluorescence spectroscopy, HR-TEM, FTIR spectroscopy, and XPS. Subsequently, the as-prepared CuNCs were employed as probes for detecting H2O2. Using CuNCs as probes, H2O2 was determined in the range from 1 μM to 50 μM based on a linear decrease of fluorescence intensity as well as a detection limit of 0.2 μM with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. More significantly, it has been proved that CuNCs could convert H2O2 to &z.rad;OH, which exhibited dramatic antibacterial activity. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to validate their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive/negative bacteria and actual wound infection, suggesting their potential for serving as one type of promising

  7. Oocyte-specific inactivation of Omcg1 leads to DNA damage and c-Abl/TAp63-dependent oocyte death associated with dramatic remodeling of ovarian somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandormael-Pournin, S; Guigon, C J; Ishaq, M; Coudouel, N; Avé, P; Huerre, M; Magre, S; Cohen-Tannoudji, J; Cohen-Tannoudji, M

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant loss of oocytes following cancer treatments or genetic mutations leads to premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) associated with endocrine-related disorders in 1% of women. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms governing oocyte death is crucial for the preservation of female fertility. Here, we report the striking reproductive features of a novel mouse model of POI obtained through oocyte-specific inactivation (ocKO) of Omcg1/Zfp830 encoding a nuclear zinc finger protein involved in pre-mRNA processing. Genetic ablation of OMCG1 in early growing oocytes leads to reduced transcription, accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks and subsequent c-Abl/TAp63-dependent oocyte death, thus uncovering the key role of OMCG1 for oocyte genomic integrity. All adult Omcg1ocKO females displayed complete elimination of early growing oocytes and sterility. Unexpectedly, mutant females exhibited a normal onset of puberty and sexual receptivity. Detailed studies of Omcg1ocKO ovaries revealed that the ovarian somatic compartment underwent a dramatic structural and functional remodeling. This allowed the cooperation between oocyte-depleted follicles and interstitial tissue to produce estradiol. Moreover, despite early folliculogenesis arrest, mutant mice exhibited sexual cyclicity as shown by cyclical changes in estrogen secretion, vaginal epithelium cytology and genital tract weight. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the key role of Omcg1 for oocyte survival and highlight the contribution of p63 pathway in damaged oocyte elimination in adulthood. Moreover, our findings challenge the prevailing view that sexual cyclicity is tightly dependent upon the pace of folliculogenesis and luteal differentiation. PMID:25168238

  8. Dramatic reduction of crop-to-crop gene flow within a short distance from transgenic rice fields.

    PubMed

    Rong, Jun; Lu, Bao-Rong; Song, Zhiping; Su, Jun; Snow, Allison A; Zhang, Xinsheng; Sun, Shuguang; Chen, Rui; Wang, Feng

    2007-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) rice with enhanced agronomic traits and pharmaceutical uses are ready for widespread adoption. Little is known about isolation requirements for achieving stringent transgene confinement in rice. To investigate the extent of pollen-mediated crop-to-crop transgene flow, we conducted a field experiment with four plot-size treatments of adjacent GM and nonGM rice (Oryza sativa) in China. Three insect-resistant GM rice (Bt/CpTI) and nonGM isogenic lines were used in the study. The hygromycin-resistance transgene (hpt) marker was used to screen seeds from the nonGM rice rows at different distance intervals from GM rice plots. Based on the examination of > 2.1 million germinated seeds, we found a dramatic reduction in transgene frequencies with increasing distance from the GM crop, ranging from c. 0.28% at 0.2 m to < 0.01% at 6.2 m. In addition, different plot size did not significantly affect the frequencies of gene flow. In conclusion, pollen-mediated crop-to-crop transgene flow in rice can be maintained at negligible levels with short spatial isolation. The model can also be applied to other crops with self- and wind-pollination. PMID:17204081

  9. Constitutive Expression of GATA4 Dramatically Increases the Cardiogenic Potential of D3 Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laemmle, Lillian L.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4) is a vital regulator of cardiac programming that acts by inducing the expression of many different genes involved in cardiomyogenesis. Here we generated a D3 mouse embryonic stem cell line that constitutively expresses high levels of GATA4 and show that these cells have dramatically increased cardiogenic potential compared to an eGFP-expressing control cell line. Embryoid bodies (EB) derived from the D3-GATA4 line displayed increased levels of cardiac gene expression and showed more abundant cardiomyocyte differentiation than control eGFP EB. These cells and two additional lines expressing lower levels of GATA4 provide a platform to screen previously untested cardiac genes and gene combinations for their ability to further increase the efficiency of cardiomyocyte differentiation beyond that achieved by transgenic GATA4 alone. Non-integrative delivery of identified gene combinations will aid in the production of differentiated cells for the treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27441042

  10. Home in the heat: dramatic seasonal variation in home range of desert golden eagles informs management for renewable energy development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braham, Melissa; Miller, Tricia A.; Duerr, Adam E.; Lanzone, Michael; Fesnock, Amy; LaPre, Larry; Driscoll, Daniel; Katzner, Todd Eli

    2015-01-01

    Renewable energy is expanding quickly with sometimes dramatic impacts to species and ecosystems. To understand the degree to which sensitive species may be impacted by renewable energy projects, it is informative to know how much space individuals use and how that space may overlap with planned development. We used global positioning system–global system for mobile communications (GPS-GSM) telemetry to measure year-round movements of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) from the Mojave Desert of California, USA. We estimated monthly space use with adaptive local convex hulls to identify the temporal and spatial scales at which eagles may encounter renewable energy projects in the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan area. Mean size of home ranges was lowest and least variable from November through January and greatest in February–March and May–August. These monthly home range patterns coincided with seasonal variation in breeding ecology, habitat associations, and temperature. The expanded home ranges in hot summer months included movements to cooler, prey-dense, mountainous areas characterized by forest, grasslands, and scrublands. Breeding-season home ranges (October–May) included more lowland semi-desert and rock vegetation. Overlap of eagle home ranges and focus areas for renewable energy development was greatest when eagle home ranges were smallest, during the breeding season. Golden eagles in the Mojave Desert used more space and a wider range of habitat types than expected and renewable energy projects could affect a larger section of the regional population than was previously thought.

  11. Integration Strategy Is a Key Step in Network-Based Analysis and Dramatically Affects Network Topological Properties and Inferring Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nana; Wu, Deng; Gong, Yonghui; Bi, Xiaoman; Jiang, Hong; Li, Kongning; Wang, Qianghu

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of experiments have been designed to detect intracellular and intercellular molecular interactions. Based on these molecular interactions (especially protein interactions), molecular networks have been built for using in several typical applications, such as the discovery of new disease genes and the identification of drug targets and molecular complexes. Because the data are incomplete and a considerable number of false-positive interactions exist, protein interactions from different sources are commonly integrated in network analyses to build a stable molecular network. Although various types of integration strategies are being applied in current studies, the topological properties of the networks from these different integration strategies, especially typical applications based on these network integration strategies, have not been rigorously evaluated. In this paper, systematic analyses were performed to evaluate 11 frequently used methods using two types of integration strategies: empirical and machine learning methods. The topological properties of the networks of these different integration strategies were found to significantly differ. Moreover, these networks were found to dramatically affect the outcomes of typical applications, such as disease gene predictions, drug target detections, and molecular complex identifications. The analysis presented in this paper could provide an important basis for future network-based biological researches. PMID:25243127

  12. A new technique for lag screw placement in the dynamic hip screw fixation of intertrochanteric fractures: decreasing radiation time dramatically

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wei-Chao; Li, Jia-Zhen; Chen, Sheng-Hua

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to confirm the decrease in radiation time required for a new technique to place dynamic hip screws (DHS) in intertrochanteric fractures. Seventy-six patients were treated with DHS by either the new technique (NT) or the conventional technique (CT). The width of femoral shaft, the length of the hip screw to be implanted into the injured side, and the distance between the tip of the greater trochanter and the entry point of the guide wire were measured at the uninjured side on the anteroposterior pelvic radiograph preoperatively, and the actual width of the injured femoral shaft was measured intra-operatively. Finally, the entry point and the length of hip screw were obtained through an equation. Mean radiation time of the NT patients (24.57 ± 7.80 s) was significantly shorter than the CT patients (54.2 ± 18.26 s) (P  < 0.001). The new technique decreased radiation time dramatically in DHS fixation. PMID:18265981

  13. Linkage between Three Gorges Dam impacts and the dramatic recessions in China’s largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xuefei; Dai, Zhijun; Du, Jinzhou; Chen, Jiyu

    2015-12-01

    Despite comprising a small portion of the earth’s surface, lakes are vitally important for global ecosystem cycling. However, lake systems worldwide are extremely fragile, and many are shrinking due to changing climate and anthropogenic activities. Here, we show that Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, has experienced a dramatic and prolonged recession, which began in late September of 2003. We further demonstrate that abnormally low levels appear during October, 28 days ahead of the normal initiation of the dry season, which greatly imperiled the lake’s wetland areas and function as an ecosystem for wintering waterbirds. An increase in the river-lake water level gradient induced by the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) altered the lake balance by inducing greater discharge into the Changjiang River, which is probably responsible for the current lake shrinkage. Occasional episodes of arid climate, as well as local sand mining, will aggravate the lake recession crisis. Although impacts of TGD on the Poyang Lake recession can be overruled by episodic extreme droughts, we argue that the average contributions of precipitation variation, human activities in the Poyang Lake catchment and TGD regulation to the Poyang Lake recession can be quantified as 39.1%, 4.6% and 56.3%, respectively.

  14. Application of subcutaneous talc in hernia repair and wide subcutaneous dissection dramatically reduces seroma formation and postoperative wound complications.

    PubMed

    Klima, David A; Brintzenhoff, Rita A; Tsirline, Victor B; Belyansky, Igor; Lincourt, Amy E; Getz, Stanley; Heniford, B Todd

    2011-07-01

    Wound complications after large ventral hernia repairs when combined with wide subcutaneous dissection (OVHR/WSD) are common (33 to 66%). We evaluate a novel technique of applying talc to wound subcutaneous tissues to decrease wound complications. We accessed our prospectively collected surgical outcomes database for OVHR/WSD procedures performed. Patients were divided into those that did and did not receive subcutaneous talc (TALC vs NOTALC). Demographics intraoperative and outcomes data were collected and analyzed. The study included 180 patients (n = 74 TALC, n = 106 NOTALC). Demographics were all similar, but hernias were larger in the TALC group. TALC patients had their drains removed earlier (14.6 vs 25.6 days; P < 0.001) with dramatic reduction in postoperative seromas requiring intervention (20.8 to 2.7%; P < 0.001) and cellulitis (39.0 to 20.6%; P = 0.007). Short-term follow-up demonstrates significantly higher recurrence rates in the NOTALC group with each recurrence related to infection. The use of talc in the subcutaneous space of OVHR/WSD results in significantly earlier removal of subcutaneous drains, fewer wound complications, and a decrease in early hernia recurrence. Use of talc in the subcutaneous space at the time of wound closure is an excellent technique to decrease wound complications in large subcutaneous dissections. PMID:21944353

  15. Linkage between Three Gorges Dam impacts and the dramatic recessions in China’s largest freshwater lake, Poyang Lake

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xuefei; Dai, Zhijun; Du, Jinzhou; Chen, Jiyu

    2015-01-01

    Despite comprising a small portion of the earth’s surface, lakes are vitally important for global ecosystem cycling. However, lake systems worldwide are extremely fragile, and many are shrinking due to changing climate and anthropogenic activities. Here, we show that Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, has experienced a dramatic and prolonged recession, which began in late September of 2003. We further demonstrate that abnormally low levels appear during October, 28 days ahead of the normal initiation of the dry season, which greatly imperiled the lake’s wetland areas and function as an ecosystem for wintering waterbirds. An increase in the river-lake water level gradient induced by the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) altered the lake balance by inducing greater discharge into the Changjiang River, which is probably responsible for the current lake shrinkage. Occasional episodes of arid climate, as well as local sand mining, will aggravate the lake recession crisis. Although impacts of TGD on the Poyang Lake recession can be overruled by episodic extreme droughts, we argue that the average contributions of precipitation variation, human activities in the Poyang Lake catchment and TGD regulation to the Poyang Lake recession can be quantified as 39.1%, 4.6% and 56.3%, respectively. PMID:26657816

  16. Satellite monitoring of dramatic changes at Hawai'i's only alpine lake: Lake Waiau on Mauna Kea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Kauahikaua, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Waiau is a small, typically 100-meter-long lake, located near the summit of Mauna Kea volcano, on the Island of Hawaiʻi. It is Hawaiʻi’s only alpine lake and is considered sacred in Hawaiian cultural tradition. Over the past few years, the lake has diminished in size, and, by October 2013, surface water had almost completely disappeared from the lake. In this study, we use high-resolution satellite images and aerial photographs to document recent changes at the lake. Based on our reconstructions covering the past 200 years, the historical lake surface area has typically ranged from 5,000 to 7,000 square meters, but in 2010 a dramatic plunge in lake area ensued. The lake area rebounded significantly in early 2014, following heavy winter storms. This near disappearance of the lake, judging from analysis of visitor photographs and field reports, appears to be highly unusual, if not unprecedented, in the historical record. The unusually low water levels in the lake are consistent with a recent severe drought in Hawaiʻi.

  17. Opioid prescriptions for pain and epidemic of overdose death: can the dramatic reduction in anesthesia mortality serve as an example?

    PubMed Central

    Kissin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The annual number of US deaths from prescription-opioid overdose quadrupled between 1999 and 2010 and in 2010 alone reached 16,651. Deaths from opioid overdose have now surpassed the historic death toll from another drug-related epidemic – anesthesia mortality. In 1954, Beecher and Todd published reliable data on anesthesia-related mortality in the US, estimating the annual number of deaths to be nearly 5,000. Presently anesthesia/anesthetics are reported as the underlying cause in approximately 34 deaths in the US annually. This spectacular decline in anesthesia-related mortality could serve as an example for attempts to curb the epidemic of opioid overdose death. The main reason that led to the dramatic decline in anesthesia-related mortality is the context in which anesthetics are used. It includes training of the anesthesia providers, the introduction of specific standards of patient safety, and anesthesia monitoring. I suggest that the introduction of a similar multifactorial proper context for the use of opioids in the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain might be the same “game changer” it was for safety in anesthesia. PMID:27418852

  18. Intravenous erythromycin dramatically accelerates gastric emptying in gastroparesis diabeticorum and normals and abolishes the emptying discrimination between solids and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Urbain, J.L.; Vantrappen, G.; Janssens, J.; Van Cutsem, E.; Peeters, T.; De Roo, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Erythromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, has recently been shown to have a motilin like effect on gastrointestinal muscle strips. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of erythromycin on patients with delayed gastric emptying and healthy subjects using the dual radionuclide technique. Twelve patients with gastroparesis diabeticorum and ten healthy age- and sex-matched controls were studied. Gastric emptying of solids and liquids was determined using 99mTc-SC scrambled egg and 111In-DTPA in water. Following a baseline study and on a separate day, each patient and control received a 15-min i.v. perfusion of erythromycin starting at meal ingestion. Eleven out of the 12 patients were restudied after a 3-wk oral administration. In patients and controls, i.v. erythromycin dramatically accelerated gastric emptying of both solids and liquids which were emptied at the same rate. After chronic oral administration, solid and liquid emptying remained significantly accelerated. Erythromycin appears to be a very powerful gastrokinetic drug. Derived compounds with the gastrokinetic effect and without the antibiotic activity could be useful in dyspeptic patients with delayed gastric emptying.

  19. Opioid prescriptions for pain and epidemic of overdose death: can the dramatic reduction in anesthesia mortality serve as an example?

    PubMed

    Kissin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The annual number of US deaths from prescription-opioid overdose quadrupled between 1999 and 2010 and in 2010 alone reached 16,651. Deaths from opioid overdose have now surpassed the historic death toll from another drug-related epidemic - anesthesia mortality. In 1954, Beecher and Todd published reliable data on anesthesia-related mortality in the US, estimating the annual number of deaths to be nearly 5,000. Presently anesthesia/anesthetics are reported as the underlying cause in approximately 34 deaths in the US annually. This spectacular decline in anesthesia-related mortality could serve as an example for attempts to curb the epidemic of opioid overdose death. The main reason that led to the dramatic decline in anesthesia-related mortality is the context in which anesthetics are used. It includes training of the anesthesia providers, the introduction of specific standards of patient safety, and anesthesia monitoring. I suggest that the introduction of a similar multifactorial proper context for the use of opioids in the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain might be the same "game changer" it was for safety in anesthesia. PMID:27418852

  20. Revealing Optical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Optical Vector Analyzer (OVA) 1550 significantly reduces the time and cost of testing sophisticated optical components. The technology grew from the research Luna Technologies' Dr. Mark Froggatt conducted on optical fiber strain measurement while working at Langley Research Center. Dr. Froggatt originally developed the technology for non- destructive evaluation testing at Langley. The new technique can provide 10,000 independent strain measurements while adding less than 10 grams to the weight of the vehicle. The OVA is capable of complete linear characterization of single-mode optical components used in high- bit-rate applications. The device can test most components over their full range in less than 30 seconds, compared to the more than 20 minutes required by other testing methods. The dramatically shortened measurement time results in increased efficiency in final acceptance tests of optical devices, and the comprehensive data produced by the instrument adds considerable value for component consumers. The device eliminates manufacturing bottlenecks, while reducing labor costs and wasted materials during production.

  1. Optical properties of high aspect ratio plasma etched silicon nanowires: fabrication-induced variability dramatically reduces reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrnakis, A.; Almpanis, E.; Constantoudis, V.; Papanikolaou, N.; Gogolides, E.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we investigate both experimentally and theoretically the optical properties of aligned, perpendicular to the substrate, high aspect ratio (AR), plasma etched Si nanowires (SiNWs) with controlled variability. We focus on the role of imperfections in fabrication, which manifest themselves as dimensional variability of SiNW, lattice defects or positional randomization. SiNW arrays are fabricated by e-beam lithography (perfectly ordered array) or colloidal particle self-assembly (quasi-ordered array) followed by cryogenic Si plasma etching, which offers fast etch rate (up to 3 μm min-1) combined with clean, smooth, and controllable sidewall profile, but induces some dimensional variability on the diameters of the SiNWs. Sub-200 nm diameter SiNWs having AR as high as 37:1 are demonstrated. The total reflectance of SiNWs is below 2% in a wide range of the optical spectrum. We experimentally demonstrate improved light absorption when moving from a perfectly ordered (after e-beam lithography) to a defective and quasi-ordered (after colloidal self-assembly) SiNW array. In addition our measured reflectivity (for both ordered and quasi-ordered SiNWs) is much lower compared to the one predicted theoretically for a perfect SiNWs array, using full-electrodynamic calculations with the layer-multiple-scattering method. To explain such low reflectivity, we model the influence of disorder using the average T-matrix approximation and show that even small dimensional variability (10-20%) leads to dramatic reduction of the reflectance (matching the experimental results) and increased light trapping inside the SiNW justifying their possible application in photovoltaic devices.

  2. Optical properties of high aspect ratio plasma etched silicon nanowires: fabrication-induced variability dramatically reduces reflectance.

    PubMed

    Smyrnakis, A; Almpanis, E; Constantoudis, V; Papanikolaou, N; Gogolides, E

    2015-02-27

    In this work we investigate both experimentally and theoretically the optical properties of aligned, perpendicular to the substrate, high aspect ratio (AR), plasma etched Si nanowires (SiNWs) with controlled variability. We focus on the role of imperfections in fabrication, which manifest themselves as dimensional variability of SiNW, lattice defects or positional randomization. SiNW arrays are fabricated by e-beam lithography (perfectly ordered array) or colloidal particle self-assembly (quasi-ordered array) followed by cryogenic Si plasma etching, which offers fast etch rate (up to 3 μm min(-1)) combined with clean, smooth, and controllable sidewall profile, but induces some dimensional variability on the diameters of the SiNWs. Sub-200 nm diameter SiNWs having AR as high as 37:1 are demonstrated. The total reflectance of SiNWs is below 2% in a wide range of the optical spectrum. We experimentally demonstrate improved light absorption when moving from a perfectly ordered (after e-beam lithography) to a defective and quasi-ordered (after colloidal self-assembly) SiNW array. In addition our measured reflectivity (for both ordered and quasi-ordered SiNWs) is much lower compared to the one predicted theoretically for a perfect SiNWs array, using full-electrodynamic calculations with the layer-multiple-scattering method. To explain such low reflectivity, we model the influence of disorder using the average T-matrix approximation and show that even small dimensional variability (10-20%) leads to dramatic reduction of the reflectance (matching the experimental results) and increased light trapping inside the SiNW justifying their possible application in photovoltaic devices. PMID:25648611

  3. Dramatic increase in late Cenozoic alpine erosion rates recorded by cave sediment in the southern Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsnider, Kurt A.

    2010-09-01

    Apparent increases in sedimentation rates during the past 5 Ma have been inferred at sites around the globe to document increased terrestrial erosion rates, but direct erosion rate records spanning this period are sparse. Modern and paleo-erosion rates for a small alpine catchment (3108 m above sea level) in the Southern Rocky Mountains are measured using the cosmogenic radionuclides (CRNs) 10Be and 26Al in cave sediment, bedrock on the overlying landscape surface, and coarse bedload in a modern fluvial drainage. The unique setting of the Marble Mountain cave system allows the inherited erosion rates to be interpreted as basin-averaged erosion rates, resulting in the first CRN-based erosion rate record from the Rocky Mountains spanning 5 Myr. Pliocene erosion rates, derived from the oldest cave sample (4.9 ± 0.4 Ma), for the landscape above the cave are 4.9 ± 1.1 m Myr - 1 . Mid Pleistocene erosion rates are nearly an order of magnitude higher (33.1 ± 2.7 to 41.3 ± 3.9 m Myr - 1 ), and modern erosion rates are similar; due to the effects of snow shielding, these erosion rate estimates are likely higher than actual rates by 10-15%. The most likely explanation for this dramatic increase in erosion rates, which likely occurred shortly before 1.2 Ma, is an increase in the effectiveness of periglacial weathering processes at high elevations related to a cooler and wetter climate during the Pleistocene, providing support for the hypothesis that changes in late Cenozoic climate are responsible for increased continental erosion.

  4. Dramatic variability of the carbonate system of the coastal ocean is regulated by physical and biogeochemical processes on multiple timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Z. I.; Hunt, D.

    2013-12-01

    Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from anthropogenic sources is acidifying marine environments with potentially dramatic implications for the physical, chemical and biological functioning of these ecosystems. If current trends continue, mean ocean pH is expected to decrease by ~0.2 units over the next ~50 years. Yet, at the same time there is substantial spatial and temporal variability in pH and other carbon system parameters in the ocean resulting in regions that already exceed long term projected pH changes, suggesting that short-term variability is an important layer of complexity on top of long term acidification. Thus, in order to develop predictions of future climate change impacts including ocean acidification, there is a critical need to characterize the natural range and variability of the marine CO2 system and the mechanisms responsible for this variability. Here we examine pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) variability at time intervals spanning 1 hour to >1 year in a dynamic coastal marine system to quantify variability of the carbon system at multiple time scales. Daily and seasonal variability of the carbon system is largely driven by temperature, alkalinity and the balance between primary production and respiration, but high frequency variability (hours to days) is further influenced by water mass movement (e.g. tides) and stochastic events (e.g. storms). Both annual variability (~0.3 units) and diurnal variability (~0.1 units) in coastal ocean acidity are similar in magnitude to long term projections associated with increasing atmospheric CO2 and their drivers highlight the importance of characterizing the complete carbonate system (and not just pH). Short term variability of ocean carbon parameters may already exert significant pressure on some coastal marine ecosystems with implications for ecology, biogeochemistry and evolution and this shorter term variability layers additive effects and complexity, including extreme values, on

  5. Barremian-Aptian rudist shells record dramatic shallow-water sea-surface temperature changes in the Tethyan Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Stefan; Heimhofer, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The dramatic and stepwise emplacement of large igneous provinces is generally accepted as primary driver of Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs). Although excess output of volcanically induced greenhouse gases should have promoted "super greenhouse phases", several studies provide evidence for transient Cretaceous "cold snaps", particularly during the Barremian-Aptian stage. To date, reconstructions of Cretaceous sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are predominantly based either on δ18O analyses of pristine foraminiferal calcite or on crenarchaeotal membrane lipid distributions (TEX86) in pelagic deposits. Both types of proxies provide at best estimates of mean annual SSTs of open ocean settings. In order to better understand the dynamics of Cretaceous global warmth and the impact of fluctuating SSTs on carbonate platform ecosystems, the current study aims at reconstructing the stratigraphic and spatial evolution of subtropical shallow-marine sea-surface temperatures. Well-preserved low-Mg calcite rudist shells hold a strong potential to act as archives for the reconstruction of Cretaceous palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental conditions, as ontogenetic isotopic and trace element variability of these shells also resolve sub-annual (seasonal) temperature fluctuations (Steuber et al., 2005). In the context of the current study, high-resolution sclerochemistry (δ18O, Mg contents) has been performed on rudists derived from chemostratigraphically (87Sr/86Sr, δ13C) well-constrained Barremian-Aptian carbonate platform settings in the subtropical Tethyan realm (France, Croatia, Spain, Portugal). The outcome of this work will be of significance both for those studying the triggering factors of oceanic anoxic events and the palaeoecology of rudist bivalves. Steuber, T., Rauch, M., Masse, J.-P., Graaf, J., Malkoc, M. (2005) Low-latitude seasonality of Cretaceous temperatures in warm and cold episodes. Nature 437: 1341-1344.

  6. Dramatic mass loss in extreme high-elevation areas of a western Himalayan glacier: observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huabiao; Yang, Wei; Yao, Tandong; Tian, Lide; Xu, Baiqing

    2016-01-01

    Rapid climate change at high elevations has accelerated glacier retreat in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau. However, due to the lack of long-term glaciological measurements, there are still uncertainties regarding when the mass loss began and what the magnitude of mass loss is at such high elevations. Based on in situ glaciological observations during the past 9 years and a temperature-index mass balance model, this study investigates recent mass loss of the Naimona’nyi Glacier in the western Himalayas and reconstructs a 41-year (1973/74–2013/14) equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and glacier-wide mass loss. The result indicates that even at 6000 m above sea level (a.s.l.), the annual mass loss reaches ~0.73 m water equivalent (w.e.) during the past 9 years. Concordant with the abrupt climate shift in the end of 1980s, the ELA has dramatically risen from ~5969 ± 73 m a.s.l. during 1973/74–1988/89 to ~6193 ± 75 m a.s.l. during 1989/90–2013/14, suggesting that future ice cores containing uninterrupted climate records could only be recovered at least above 6200 m a.s.l. in the Naimona’nyi region. The glacier-wide mass balance over the past 41 years is averaged to be approximately −0.40 ± 0.17 m w.e., exhibiting a significant increase in the decadal average from −0.01 ± 0.15 to −0.69 ± 0.21 m w.e. PMID:27561411

  7. New evidence for a dramatic rise in atmosphere oxygen ca. 1,900 m.y. ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, H. D.; Macfarlane, A. W.

    1991-01-01

    Several lines of geologic evidence have pointed to a significant increase in P sub O2 about 2,000 m.y. ago, but the magnitude of P sub O2 before and after that time has been quite uncertain. The data that we have recently accumulated suggest that P sub O2 was approximately less than 2 x 10 (exp -3) atm more than 2,000 m.y. ago, and approximately greater than 0.03 atm more recently than ca. 1,900 m.y. ago. These estimates are based on the behavior of iron in Precambrian weathering horizons. More than ca. 2,000 m.y. ago, Fe(+2), released during the weathering of basalts was not oxidized to Fe(+3), and was removed in ground water from the upper layers of soil horizons. More recently than ca. 1,850 m.y. ago, Fe(+2) was oxidized to Fe(+3) and precipitated as iron oxides and hydroxides in such soil horizons and in the weathering products of a carbonate facies banded iron formation in Griqualand West, South Africa. The O2 content of the atmosphere must have increased dramatically about 1,900 m.y. ago to explain these observations. The reasons for the increase are still obscure, but are probably related to changes in the biologic productivity of the oceans. Eukaryotes appear to have developed shortly after the increase in P sub O2, perhaps in response to the subsequent increase in the supply of nitrate from the atmosphere to the oceans.

  8. Dramatic mass loss in extreme high-elevation areas of a western Himalayan glacier: observations and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huabiao; Yang, Wei; Yao, Tandong; Tian, Lide; Xu, Baiqing

    2016-01-01

    Rapid climate change at high elevations has accelerated glacier retreat in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau. However, due to the lack of long-term glaciological measurements, there are still uncertainties regarding when the mass loss began and what the magnitude of mass loss is at such high elevations. Based on in situ glaciological observations during the past 9 years and a temperature-index mass balance model, this study investigates recent mass loss of the Naimona'nyi Glacier in the western Himalayas and reconstructs a 41-year (1973/74-2013/14) equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and glacier-wide mass loss. The result indicates that even at 6000 m above sea level (a.s.l.), the annual mass loss reaches ~0.73 m water equivalent (w.e.) during the past 9 years. Concordant with the abrupt climate shift in the end of 1980s, the ELA has dramatically risen from ~5969 ± 73 m a.s.l. during 1973/74-1988/89 to ~6193 ± 75 m a.s.l. during 1989/90-2013/14, suggesting that future ice cores containing uninterrupted climate records could only be recovered at least above 6200 m a.s.l. in the Naimona'nyi region. The glacier-wide mass balance over the past 41 years is averaged to be approximately -0.40 ± 0.17 m w.e., exhibiting a significant increase in the decadal average from -0.01 ± 0.15 to -0.69 ± 0.21 m w.e. PMID:27561411

  9. US weapons secrets revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.S.; Arkin, W.M.

    1993-03-01

    Extraordinary details have only recently been revealed about the struggle over the control of early U.S. nuclear weapons and their initial deployments abroad. The information comes from a newly declassified top secret report, part of a larger study, The History of the Strategic Arms Competition, 1945-1972, commissioned by Defense Secretary James R. Schlisinger in summer 1974.

  10. Why did watermills not have a dramatic effect on the Anthropocene sediment record of the Zwalm River, Belgium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notebaert, Bastiaan; D'Haese, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Different studies demonstrated the dramatic effects of watermills on fluvial geomorphology in the Eastern US. Damming of floodplains and milldam lakes increased sediment deposition. Several authors attribute most of the so called post settlement legacy sediment to those milldam lakes. In Europe the role of milldams in the anthropogenic increased floodplain deposition rates during the last 1000 to 2000 years has gotten little attention until now. Therefore we studied the influence of watermills on Holocene floodplain deposition in the Zwalm catchment, Belgium. The Zwalm River is located in western part of the Belgian loess belt in an undulating landscape that had intensive agriculture for most of the last 2000 years. In total 9 watermills were present along the 17 km long main channel during the 19th century, while many were also present on tributaries. Historical records date several of the mills to the 10th century AD, although they might be older, and most of them remain to some degree active today. The influence of watermills on floodplain deposits was tested through coring transects of the Holocene deposits. Detailed transects were performed pairwise upstream and downstream 5 watermills. Samples were taken for grain size analysis using laser diffraction. A possible influence on floodplain topography was tested on a 5 m resolution DTM. Holocene floodplain architecture is similar to other floodplains in the region: a basal early to mid-Holocene peat and gyttja layer is covered by a fine grained sediment layer of more than 5 m thickness. The change between both can be attributed to increased soil erosion due to human land use, and can be considered to be the local legacy sediment. Comparison of transects upstream and downstream mills shows no significant difference in total Holocene or legacy sediment thickness. Texture analysis indicates that floodplain sediments are significant coarser downstream the mills.F Floodplains are not significant steeper around mills

  11. Intravenous application of an anticalin dramatically lowers plasma digoxin levels and reduces its toxic effects in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eyer, Florian; Steimer, Werner; Nitzsche, Thomas; Jung, Nicole; Neuberger, Heidi; Müller, Christine; Schlapschy, Martin; Zilker, Thomas; Skerra, Arne

    2012-09-15

    Lipocalins tailored with high affinity for prescribed ligands, so-called anticalins, constitute promising candidates as antidotes. Here, we present an animal study to investigate both pharmacokinetic and clinical effects of an anticalin specific for the digitalis compound digoxin. Intravenous digoxin (2.5–50 μg/kg/min) was administered to rats until first changes in the ECG occurred (dose finding study) or a priori for 30 min (kinetic study). The anticalin DigA16(H86N), dubbed DigiCal, was administered intravenously at absolute doses of 1, 5, 10 and 20 mg, while the control group received isotonic saline. Hemodynamic changes, several ECG parameters and digoxin concentration in plasma were monitored at given time intervals. After DigiCal administration free digoxin concentration in plasma ultrafiltrate declined dramatically within 1 min to the presumably non-toxic range. There was also a significant and DigiCal dose-dependent effect on longer survival, less ECG alterations, arrhythmia, and improved hemodynamics. Infusion of a lower digoxin dose (2.5 μg/kg/min) resulted in a more sustained reduction of free digoxin in plasma after DigiCal administration compared to a higher digoxin dose (25 μg/kg/min), whereas ECG and hemodynamic parameters did not markedly differ, reflecting the known relative insensitivity of rats towards digoxin toxicity. Notably, we observed a re-increase of free digoxin in plasma some time after bolus administration of DigiCal, which was presumably due to toxin redistribution from tissue in combination with the relatively fast renal clearance of the rather small protein antidote. We conclude that anticalins with appropriately engineered drug-binding activities and, possibly, prolonged plasma half-life offer prospects for next-generation antidotal therapy. -- Highlights: ► We provide an advanced model of digoxin toxicity in rats. ► We report on binding of digoxin to a novel designed anticalin. ► We report on pharmacokinetics of digoxin

  12. Combining BRAF inhibitor and anti PD-L1 antibody dramatically improves tumor regression and anti tumor immunity in an immunocompetent murine model of anaplastic thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borre, Pierre Vanden; Zurakowski, David; Kim, Yon Seon; Dennett, Kate Virginia; Amin, Salma; Freeman, Gordon James; Parangi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand is widely studied in cancer. Monoclonal antibodies blocking these molecules have had great success but little is known about them in thyroid cancer. We investigated the role of PD-L1 in thyroid cancer with respect to BRAF mutation and MAP kinase pathway activity and the effect of anti PD-L1 antibody therapy on tumor regression and intra-tumoral immune response alone or in combination with BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi). BRAFV600E cells showed significantly higher baseline expression of PD-L1 at mRNA and protein levels compared to BRAFWT cells. MEK inhibitor treatment resulted in a decrease of PD-L1 expression across all cell lines. BRAFi treatment decreased PD-L1 expression in BRAFV600E cells, but paradoxically increased its expression in BRAFWT cells. BRAFV600E mutated patients samples had a higher level of PD-L1 mRNA compared to BRAFWT (p=0.015). Immunocompetent mice (B6129SF1/J) implanted with syngeneic 3747 BRAFV600E/WT P53−/− murine tumor cells were randomized to control, PLX4720, anti PD-L1 antibody and their combination. In this model of aggressive thyroid cancer, control tumor volume reached 782.3±174.6mm3 at two weeks. The combination dramatically reduced tumor volume to 147.3±60.8, compared to PLX4720 (439.3±188.4 mm3, P=0.023) or PD-L1 antibody (716.7±62.1, P<0.001) alone. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed intense CD8+ CTL infiltration and cytotoxicity and favorable CD8+:Treg ratio compared to each individual treatment. Our results show anti PD-L1 treatment potentiates the effect of BRAFi on tumor regression and intensifies anti tumor immune response in an immunocompetent model of ATC. Clinical trials of this therapeutic combination may be of benefit in patients with ATC. PMID:26943572

  13. DRAMATIC EVOLUTION OF THE DISK-SHAPED SECONDARY IN THE ORION TRAPEZIUM STAR {theta}{sup 1} Ori B{sub 1} (BM Ori): MOST SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Windemuth, Diana; Herbst, William; Tingle, Evan; Fuechsl, Rachel; Kilgard, Roy; Pinette, Melanie; Templeton, Matthew; Henden, Arne

    2013-05-01

    The eclipsing binary {theta}{sup 1} Orionis B{sub 1}, variable star designation BM Ori, is the faintest of the four well-known Trapezium stars at the heart of the Orion Nebula. The primary is a B3 star ({approx}6 M{sub Sun }) but the nature of the secondary ({approx}2 M{sub Sun }) has long been mysterious, since the duration and shape of primary eclipse are inappropriate for any sort of ordinary star. Here we report nearly continuous photometric observations obtained with the MOST satellite over {approx}4 cycles of the 6.47 d binary period. The light curve is of unprecedented quality, revealing a deep, symmetric primary eclipse as well as a clear reflection effect and secondary eclipse. In addition, there are other small disturbances, some of which repeat at the same phase over the four cycles monitored. The shape of the primary light curve has clearly evolved significantly over the past 40 years. While its overall duration and depth have remained roughly constant, the slopes of the descent and ascent phases are significantly shallower now than in the past and its distinctive flat-bottomed ''pseudo-totality'' is much less obvious or even absent in the most recent data. We further demonstrate that the primary eclipse was detected at X-ray wavelengths during the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) study. The light curve continues to be well modeled by a self-luminous and reflective disk-shaped object seen nearly edge-on orbiting the B3 primary. The dramatic change in shape over four decades is modeled as an opacity variation in a tenuous outer envelope or disk of the secondary object. We presume that the secondary is an extremely young protostar at an earlier evolutionary phase than can be commonly observed elsewhere in the Galaxy and that the opacity variations observed are related to its digestion of some accreted matter over the last 50-100 years. Indeed, this object deserves continued observational and theoretical attention as the youngest known eclipsing

  14. Revealing power in truth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Jeremy Shiffman’s editorial appropriately calls on making all forms of power more apparent and accountable, notably productive power derived from expertise and claims to moral authority. This commentary argues that relationships based on productive power can be especially difficult to reveal in global health policy because of embedded notions about the nature of power and politics. Yet, it is essential to recognize that global health is shot through with power relationships, that they can take many forms, and that their explicit acknowledgement should be part of, rather than factored out of, any reform of global health governance. PMID:25844390

  15. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  16. Optical Variability of the Blazar 3C 454.3: Long-term Behavior and the Dramatic 2005 Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balonek, T. J.; Gadway, B.; Mullan, B.; Wortel, S.; Pierkowski, D.; Forsyth, C.

    2006-06-01

    In May of 2005, observations at R, V, and I with the Foggy Bottom Observatory 16-inch Cassegrain reflecting telescope at Colgate University revealed an unprecedented outburst in the blazar type quasar 3C 454.3. At its peak, R 11.9, the blazar was four times brighter than during any previously observed period in our seventeen-year blazar monitoring program. This object had undergone only relatively mild flaring amid low-level optical meandering in the past. The blazar 3C 454.3 exhibits a variety of variability timescales (from hours to years) in which there is a discernible correlation between the brightness and optical color indices. A two-component model (with distinct variable and non-variable components) to the blazar optical variations can account for the general trends seen in the color (spectral index) and brightness variations.

  17. Graphene oxides prepared by Hummers', Hofmann's, and Staudenmaier's methods: dramatic influences on heavy-metal-ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Moo, James Guo Sheng; Khezri, Bahareh; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), an up-and-coming material rich in oxygenated groups, shows much promise in pollution management. GO is synthesised using several synthetic routes, and the adsorption behaviour of GO is investigated to establish its ability to remove the heavy-metal pollutants of lead and cadmium ions. The GO is synthesised by Hummers' (HU), Hofmann's (HO) and Staudenmaier's (ST) methodologies. Characterisation of GO is performed before and after adsorption experiments to investigate the structure-function relationship by using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with elemental detection spectroscopy is used to investigate morphological changes and heavy-metal content in the adsorbed GO. The filtrate, collected after adsorption, is analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, through which the efficiency and adsorption capacity of each GO for heavy-metal-ion removal is obtained. Spectroscopic analysis and characterisation reveal that the three types of GO have different compositions of oxygenated carbon functionalities. The trend in the affinity towards both Pb(II) and Cd(II) is HU GO>HO GO>ST GO. A direct correlation between the number of carboxyl groups present and the amount of heavy-metal ions adsorbed is established. The highest efficiency and highest adsorption capacity of heavy-metal ions is achieved with HU, in which the relative abundance of carboxyl groups is highest. The embedded systematic study reveals that carboxyl groups are the principal functionality responsible for heavy-metal-ion removal in GO. The choice of synthesis methodology for GO has a profound influence on heavy-metal-ion adsorption. A further enrichment of the carboxyl groups in GO will serve to enhance the role of GO as an adsorbent for environmental clean-up. PMID:25044516

  18. Data Representation with a Dramatic Difference: Negotiating the Methodological Tensions and Contradictions in Qualitative Inquiry. Confessions of a Budding Playwright …

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mifsud, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Based on the need to address the empirical reticence in the leadership literature revolving around networking dynamics in school governance, I conducted a case study of a Maltese multi-site school collaborative, the findings of which are represented in a semi-fictionalized narrative dramatization. This article focuses on the crafting of this…

  19. Pathbreaking CBO Study Shows Dramatic Increases in Income Disparities in 1980s and 1990s: An Analysis of the CBO Data. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Isaac; Greenstein, Robert; Primus, Wendell

    A study by the Congressional Budget Office of income and tax trends since 1979 showed dramatic increases in income disparities, especially between the wealthiest one percent of Americans and the rest of society, in the 1980s and 1990s. The percentage of income Americans paid in federal taxes declined for every income group between 1979-97. The…

  20. Gusev's Rim Revealed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image on sol 91 (April 5, 2004). Spirit is looking to the southeast, and through the martian haze has captured the rim of Gusev Crater approximately 80 kilometers (49.7 miles) away on the horizon.

    The right side of this image reveals the portion of the crater edge that descends into the mouth of Ma'adim Vallis, a channel that opens into Gusev Crater. Spirit is currently traveling toward the informally named 'Columbia Hills,' which lie to the left of the region pictured here.

    This image is similar to a panoramic camera image taken on sol 68, but Gusev's ridge is more visible here because the atmospheric dust caused by winter dust storms has settled. Scientists expect to get even clearer images than this one in upcoming sols.

    This image has been modified to make the crater rim more visible.

  1. Simultaneous targeting of two ligand-binding sites on VEGFR2 using biparatopic Affibody molecules results in dramatically improved affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Klint, Susanne; Hanze, Martin; Gunneriusson, Elin; Frejd, Fredrik Y.; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer and ophthalmic disorders such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family and corresponding receptors are regulators of angiogenesis and have been much investigated as therapeutic targets. The aim of this work was to generate antagonistic VEGFR2-specific affinity proteins having adjustable pharmacokinetic properties allowing for either therapy or molecular imaging. Two antagonistic Affibody molecules that were cross-reactive for human and murine VEGFR2 were selected by phage and bacterial display. Surprisingly, although both binders independently blocked VEGF-A binding, competition assays revealed interaction with non-overlapping epitopes on the receptor. Biparatopic molecules, comprising the two Affibody domains, were hence engineered to potentially increase affinity even further through avidity. Moreover, an albumin-binding domain was included for half-life extension in future in vivo experiments. The best-performing of the biparatopic constructs demonstrated up to 180-fold slower dissociation than the monomers. The new Affibody constructs were also able to specifically target VEGFR2 on human cells, while simultaneously binding to albumin, as well as inhibit VEGF-induced signaling. In summary, we have generated small antagonistic biparatopic Affibody molecules with high affinity for VEGFR2, which have potential for both future therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25515662

  2. Dramatic enhancement of 1.54 μm emission in Er doped GaN quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al tahtamouni, T. M.; Stachowicz, M.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2015-03-01

    Erbium (Er) doped III-nitride materials have attracted much attention due to their capability to provide highly thermal stable optical emission in the technologically important as well as eye-safer 1540 nm wavelength window. There is a continued need to exploring effective mechanisms to further improve the quantum efficiency (QE) of the 1.54 μm emission in Er-doped III-nitrides. GaN/AlN multiple quantum wells (MQWs:Er) have been synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and explored as an effective means to improve the QE of the 1.54 μm emission via carrier confinement and strain engineering. The 1.54 μm emission properties from MQWs:Er were probed by photoluminescence (PL) emission spectroscopy. It was found that the emission intensity from MQWs:Er is 9 times higher than that of GaN:Er epilayers with a comparable Er active layer thickness. The influences of the well and barrier width on the PL emission at 1.54 μm were studied. The results revealed that MQWs:Er consisting of well width between 1 and 1.5 nm and the largest possible barrier width before reaching the critical thickness provide the largest boost in QE of the 1.54 μm emission. These results demonstrate that MQWs:Er provide a basis for efficient photonic devices active at 1.54 μm.

  3. Dramatic enhancement of 1.54 μm emission in Er doped GaN quantum well structures

    SciTech Connect

    Al tahtamouni, T. M.; Stachowicz, M.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2015-03-23

    Erbium (Er) doped III-nitride materials have attracted much attention due to their capability to provide highly thermal stable optical emission in the technologically important as well as eye-safer 1540 nm wavelength window. There is a continued need to exploring effective mechanisms to further improve the quantum efficiency (QE) of the 1.54 μm emission in Er-doped III-nitrides. GaN/AlN multiple quantum wells (MQWs:Er) have been synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and explored as an effective means to improve the QE of the 1.54 μm emission via carrier confinement and strain engineering. The 1.54 μm emission properties from MQWs:Er were probed by photoluminescence (PL) emission spectroscopy. It was found that the emission intensity from MQWs:Er is 9 times higher than that of GaN:Er epilayers with a comparable Er active layer thickness. The influences of the well and barrier width on the PL emission at 1.54 μm were studied. The results revealed that MQWs:Er consisting of well width between 1 and 1.5 nm and the largest possible barrier width before reaching the critical thickness provide the largest boost in QE of the 1.54 μm emission. These results demonstrate that MQWs:Er provide a basis for efficient photonic devices active at 1.54 μm.

  4. Calcium isotope evidence for dramatic increase of continental weathering during the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event (Early Jurassic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Jean-Michel; Suan, Guillaume; Tacail, Théo; Simon, Laurent; Martin, Jeremy E.; Mattioli, Emanuela; Balter, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    The early Toarcian was punctuated by pulses of massive carbon injection that are thought to have triggered, through increased greenhouse conditions, elevated continental discharge and nutrient input, marine anoxia, seawater acidification and species extinctions. Nevertheless, the mode and tempo of changes in continental weathering across this interval remains highly debated, leading to considerable uncertainty about the main causes of these perturbations. In this study we present calcium isotope measurements (δ44/40Ca) of well-preserved brachiopods and bulk rock samples from the hemipelagic strata of Pliensbachian-Toarcian age of Peniche in Portugal in order to constrain changes in the calcium cycle and hence changes in continental weathering during the early Toarcian. The data reveal a similar trend as carbon isotope data from the same section and show negative excursions of about 0.5‰ at the Pliensbachian-Toarcian transition (Pl-To) and at the base of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) interval. The comparison of δ44/40Ca ratios recorded in brachiopods and bulk rock corrected for variable dolomite contribution indicates that these excursions reflect changes in the global isotopic composition of seawater rather than changes in the dominant mineralogy of calcifying organisms or in hydrological budget of the considered basin. Box modeling results suggest that the Pl-To and T-OAE δ44/40Ca excursions can be explained by a transient 90% decrease of carbonate accumulation due to seawater acidification followed by a 500% increase in continental weathering rates. The sharp increases in continental weathering inferred from the δ44/40Ca ratios seem overall consistent with lower Toarcian sedimentological and biotic records that document rapid crises in carbonate production followed by episodes of increased calcium carbonate burial. Nevertheless, the maximum of carbonate burial recorded by most NW European basinal successions occurs several hundreds of kyrs after

  5. Mitochondria Increase Three-Fold and Mitochondrial Proteins and Lipid Change Dramatically in Postmeristematic Cells in Young Wheat Leaves Grown in Elevated CO2.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, E. J.; Williams, M.; Harwood, J. L.; Lindsay, J. G.; Leaver, C. J.; Leech, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    A dramatic stimulation in mitochondrial biogenesis during the very early stages of leaf development was observed in young wheat plants (Triticum aestivum cv Hereward) grown in elevated CO2 (650 [mu]L L-1). An almost 3-fold increase in the number of mitochondria was observed in the very young leaf cells at the base of the first leaf of a 7-d-old wheat plant. In the same cells large increases in the accumulation of a mitochondrial chaperonin protein and the mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex were detected by immunolabeling. Furthermore, the basal segment also shows a large increase in the rate of radiolabeling of diphosphatidylglycerol, a lipid confined to the inner mitochondrial membrane. This dramatic response in very young leaf cells to elevated CO2 suggests that the numerous documented positive effects of elevated CO2 on wheat leaf development are initiated as early as 12 h postmitosis. PMID:12228485

  6. Iron-catalysed propylene epoxidation by nitrous oxide: dramatic shift of allylic oxidation to epoxidation by the modification with alkali metal salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Qinghong; Guo, Qian; Lou, Yinchuan; Yang, Lujuan; Wang, Ye

    2004-06-21

    A dramatic shift of allylic oxidation to epoxidation has been observed during the oxidation of propylene by N(2)O when the FeO(x)/SBA-15 catalyst is modified with alkali metal salts, and the roles of alkali metal salts are to suppress the reactivity of lattice oxygen and to induce an iron coordination structure effective for epoxidation with N(2)O. PMID:15179482

  7. Microstructured fiber@HZSM-5 core-shell catalysts with dramatic selectivity and stability improvement for the methanol-to-propylene process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangyu; Wen, Ming; Wang, Chunzheng; Ding, Jia; Sun, Ying; Liu, Ye; Lu, Yong

    2014-06-18

    We report a macroscopic stainless-steel-fiber@HZSM-5 core-shell catalyst by direct growth of 27 wt% HZSM-5 on a 3D microfibrous structure using 20 μm SS fibers, demonstrating dramatic selectivity and stability improvement in the MTP process. The unprecedented performance is due to the promotion of the olefin methylation/cracking cycle in methanol-to-hydrocarbon catalysis. PMID:24798420

  8. Dramatic water-level fluctuations in lakes under intense human impact: modelling the effect of vegetation, climate and hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainu, M.

    2012-04-01

    Lakes form a highly important ecosystem in the glacial terrain of northern Europe and America, but their hydrology remains understudied. When the water-level of a lake drops significantly and rises again in a time span of half a century and the widespread explanation of the fluctuations seems insufficient, then it raises a question: how do different anthropogenic and natural processes actually affect the formation of a lakes' water body. The abovementioned scenario applies to three small closed-basin Estonian lakes (L. Ahnejärv, L. Kuradijärv and L. Martiska) analysed in the current study. These lakes suffered a major water-level drop (up to 3.8 m) between 1946 and 1987 and a major rise between 1987 and 2010, from 1 m (L. Ahnejärv) to 2.5 m (L. Kuradijärv). Decreasing and increasing groundwater abstraction near the lakes has been widely considered to be the only reason for the fluctuations. It is true that the most severe drop in the lake levels did occur after 1972 when groundwater abstraction for drinking water started in the vicinity of the lakes. However, the lake levels started to fall before the groundwater abstraction began and for the time being the lake levels have risen to a higher level than in the 1970s when the quantity of annually abstracted groundwater was similar to nowadays. Therefore the processes affecting the formation of the lakes' water body prove to be more complex than purely the hydrogeological change caused by groundwater abstraction. A new deterministic water balance model (where the evaporation from the lake surface was calculated by Penman equation and the catchment runoff by Thornthwaite-Mather soil-moisture model), compiled for the study, coupled with LiDAR-based GIS-modelling of the catchments was used to identify the different factors influencing the lakes' water level. The modelling results reveal that the moderate drop in lake water levels before the beginning of groundwater abstraction was probably caused by the growth of a

  9. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  10. Targeted disruption of BMP signaling through type IA receptor (BMPR1A) in osteocyte suppresses SOST and RANKL, leading to dramatic increase in bone mass, bone mineral density and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Shuxian, Lin; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Phipps, Matthew; Aruwajoye, Olumide; Adapala, Naga Suresh; Yuan, Hui; Kim, Harry K W; Feng, Jian Q

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies suggest a critical role of osteocytes in controlling skeletal development and bone remodeling although the molecular mechanism is largely unknown. This study investigated BMP signaling in osteocytes by disrupting Bmpr1a under the Dmp1-promoter. The conditional knockout (cKO) mice displayed a striking osteosclerotic phenotype with increased trabecular bone volume, thickness, number, and mineral density as assessed by X-ray and micro-CT. The bone histomorphometry, H&E, and TRAP staining revealed a dramatic increase in trabecular and cortical bone masses but a sharp reduction in osteoclast number. Moreover, there was an increase in BrdU positive osteocytes (2-5-fold) and osteoid volume (~4-fold) but a decrease in the bone formation rate (~85%) in the cKO bones, indicating a defective mineralization. The SEM analysis revealed poorly formed osteocytes: a sharp increase in cell numbers, a great reduction in cell dendrites, and a remarkable change in the cell distribution pattern. Molecular studies demonstrated a significant decrease in the Sost mRNA levels in bone (>95%), and the SOST protein levels in serum (~85%) and bone matrices. There was a significant increase in the β-catenin (>3-fold) mRNA levels as well as its target genes Tcf1 (>6-fold) and Tcf3 (~2-fold) in the cKO bones. We also showed a significant decrease in the RANKL levels of serum proteins (~65%) and bone mRNA (~57%), and a significant increase in the Opg mRNA levels (>20-fold) together with a significant reduction in the Rankl/Opg ratio (>95%), which are responsible for a sharp reduction in the cKO osteoclasts. The values of mechanical strength were higher in cKO femora (i.e. max force, displacement, and work failure). These results suggest that loss of BMP signaling specifically in osteocytes dramatically increases bone mass presumably through simultaneous inhibition of RANKL and SOST, leading to osteoclast inhibition and Wnt activation together. Finally, a working hypothesis is

  11. Revealing the Beast Within

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Deeply Embedded Massive Stellar Clusters Discovered in Milky Way Powerhouse Summary Peering into a giant molecular cloud in the Milky Way galaxy - known as W49 - astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have discovered a whole new population of very massive newborn stars . This research is being presented today at the International Astronomical Union's 25th General Assembly held in Sydney, Australia, by ESO-scientist João Alves. With the help of infrared images obtained during a period of excellent observing conditions with the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory (Chile), the astronomers looked deep into this molecular cloud and discovered four massive stellar clusters, with hot and energetic stars as massive as 120 solar masses. The exceedingly strong radiation from the stars in the largest of these clusters is "powering" a 20 light-year diameter region of mostly ionized hydrogen gas (a "giant HII region"). W49 is one of the most energetic regions of star formation in the Milky Way. With the present discovery, the true sources of the enormous energy have now been revealed for the first time, finally bringing to an end some decades of astronomical speculations and hypotheses. PR Photo 21a/03 : Colour Composite of W49A (NTT+SOFI). PR Photo 21b/03 : Radio and Near-Infrared Composite of W49A Giant molecular clouds Stars form predominantly inside Giant Molecular Clouds which populate our Galaxy, the Milky Way. One of the most prominent of these is W49 , which has a mass of a million solar masses. It is located some 37,000 light-years away and is the most luminous star-forming region known in our home galaxy: its luminosity is several million times the luminosity of our Sun. A smaller region within this cloud is denoted W49A - this is one of the strongest radio-emitting areas known in the Galaxy . Massive stars are excessive in all ways. Compared to their smaller and ligther brethren, they form at an Olympic speed and

  12. Medical Therapies with Adult Stem/Progenitor Cells (MSCs): A Backward Journey from Dramatic Results in Vivo to the Cellular and Molecular Explanations

    PubMed Central

    Prockop, Darwin J.; Oh, Joo Youn

    2012-01-01

    There is currently great interest in the use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) for the therapy of many diseases of animals and humans. However, we are still left with the serious challenges in explaining the beneficial effects of the cells. Hence, it is essential to work backward from dramatic results obtained in vivo to the cellular and molecular explanations in order to discover the secrets of MSCs. This review will focus on recent data that have changed the paradigms for understanding the therapeutic potentials of MSCs. PMID:22213121

  13. Dramatic effect of furanose C2' substitution on structure and stability: directing the folding of the human telomeric quadruplex with a single fluorine atom.

    PubMed

    Martín-Pintado, Nerea; Yahyaee-Anzahaee, Maryam; Deleavey, Glen F; Portella, Guillem; Orozco, Modesto; Damha, Masad J; González, Carlos

    2013-04-10

    Human telomeric DNA quadruplexes can adopt different conformations in solution. We have found that arabinose, 2'F-arabinose, and ribose substitutions stabilize the propeller parallel G-quadruplex form over competing conformers, allowing NMR structural determination of this particularly significant nucleic acid structure. 2'F-arabinose substitution provides the greatest stabilization as a result of electrostatic (F-CH---O4') and pseudo-hydrogen-bond (F---H8) stabilizing interactions. In contrast, 2'F-rG substitution provokes a dramatic destabilization of the quadruplex structure due to unfavorable electrostatic repulsion between the phosphate and the 2'-F. PMID:23521511

  14. A case of shoshin beriberi presenting as cardiogenic shock with diffuse ST-segment elevation, which dramatically improved after a single dose of thiamine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Park, Sooyun; Kim, Jun-Hyun; Kim, Sun Woong; Kang, Won Chan; Kim, Sun Jong

    2014-01-01

    Shoshin beriberi is a fulminant form of cardiac beriberi caused by thiamine deficiency. We report on a case of an 87-year-old man with shoshin beriberi presenting as cardiogenic shock with diffuse ST-segment elevation, which dramatically improved after thiamine administration. Because of the rarity of the occurrence, lack of diagnostic test and atypical presentation, diagnosing shoshin beriberi is challenging and requires a high index of clinical suspicion. Shoshin beriberi leads to rapid haemodynamic collapse and death. Therefore, clinicians should consider shoshin beriberi (or cardiac beriberi) as one of the differential diagnoses in patients with heart failure or cardiogenic shock. PMID:25625639

  15. A Dramatic Flame Test Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kristin A.; Schreiner, Rodney

    2001-01-01

    Flame tests are used for demonstration of atomic structure. Describes a demonstration that uses spray bottles filled with methanol and a variety of salts to produce a brilliantly colored flame. (Contains 11 references.) (ASK)

  16. Dramatic change at T Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-04-01

    T Plant (221-T) was the first and largest of the early chemical separations plants at the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW), the name for the Hanford Site during World War II. Officially designated as a Cell Building by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) of the Army Corps of Engineers (agency responsible for HEW), T Plant served as the headquarters of chemical processing operations at Hanford from its construction until the opening of the Reduction-Oxidation (REDOX) Plant in January 1952. T Plant performed the third step in plutonium production operations, following the steps of uranium fuel manufacture and then irradiation in defense production reactors. The fissionable core (plutonium) used in the world`s first atomic explosion, the Trinity bomb test held at Alamogordo, New Mexico, on July 16, 1945, was processed in T Plant. Likewise, the fissionable core of the weapon dropped over Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945, was processed in T Plant. Because it formed a crucial link in the first full-scale plutonium production operations in world history, T Plant meets criteria established in the National Historic Preservation Act of 19661 as a Historic Place.

  17. A Package of Dramatic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Paul

    1976-01-01

    Describes a drama game invented by college students for use in the primary school and details the educational goals, instructional materials, and potential uses for such learning activities. Speech and Drama, White College, ALLINGTON, Chippenham, Wilts. Subscription Rates: $6.00 per year. (MH)

  18. Dramatization of Salem Witch Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chorak, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    Presents a lesson which can provide elementary students with an opportunity to compare fair and unfair trials. Stating that the lesson works best if an attorney is used as a resource person, the plan includes a short play about a Salem, Massachusetts witch trial and follow-up questions to stimulate student discussion. (GEA)

  19. Acute and dramatic saxophone penis.

    PubMed

    García-Rodrigo, Carlota Gutiérrez; Maroñas-Jiménez, Lidia; Menis, Diana; Larráin, Hugo; Martínez, Lara Angulo

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of intense genital swelling because of a hereditary angioedema. This rare disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute and asymptomatic genital edema, because it may prevent future potentially life-threatening episodes of visceral angioedema. PMID:26752411

  20. Dramatic School Library Literacy Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Many grade K-12 teachers and teacher-librarians know through first-hand experience that drama provides students with very powerful, often nontextual, context in which to build new meanings and avenues for representing and communicating understandings. Similarly, most school districts' language and literacy standards and curriculum reaffirm these…

  1. Dramatic Booktalks (for the Untheatrical).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Kent W.

    1993-01-01

    A young adult librarian offers tips on book talks which exclude the use of props, costumes, or acting. Using a book's plot point to highlight one portion of a novel to convince teenagers to go to the library, check out, and read the book is explained. A model talk of "Jurassic Park" is included. (EAM)

  2. ZnO Nanocomposites Modified by Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Silanes with Dramatically Enhanced Tunable Fluorescence and Aqueous Ultrastability toward Biological Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuying; Sun, Zongzhao; Li, Rui; Dong, Minmin; Zhang, Liyan; Qi, Wei; Zhang, Xuelin; Wang, Hua

    2015-02-01

    Multicolor ZnO quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized and further modified with hydrophobic hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDS) and then hydrophilic aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) bilayers, resulting in amine-functionalized ZnO@HDS@APS nanocomposites with tunable fluorescence from blue to green yellow. Systematic investigations verify that the resulting ZnO@HDS@APS could display extremely high stability in aqueous media and unexpectedly, dramatically-enhanced fluorescence intensities, which are about 10-fold higher than those of bare ZnO QDs. The feasibility of the as-prepared ZnO nanocomposites for blood, cell, and tissue imaging was preliminarily demonstrated, promising the wide bio-applications for cell or tissue imaging, proteome analysis, drug delivery, and molecular labeling.

  3. Burkitt’s lymphoma-associated c-Myc mutations converge on a dramatically altered target gene response and implicate Nol5a/Nop56 in oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Turner, Scott A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt’s Lymphomas (BLs) acquire consistent point mutations in a conserved domain of Myc, Myc Box I. We report that the enhanced transforming activity of BL-associated Myc mutants can be uncoupled from loss of phosphorylation and increased protein stability. Furthermore, two different BL-associated Myc mutations induced similar gene expression profiles independently of T58 phosphorylation, and these profiles are dramatically different from MycWT. Nol5a/Nop56, which is required for rRNA methylation, was identified as a gene hyperactivated by the BL-associated Myc mutants. We show that Nol5a is necessary for Myc-induced cell transformation, enhances MycWT-induced cell transformation, and increases the size of MycWT induced tumors. Thus, Nol5a expands the link between Myc-induced regulation of nucleolar target genes which are rate-limiting for cell transformation and tumor growth. PMID:24013231

  4. A Dramatic Regime Shift in Rainfall Predictability Related to the Ningaloo Niño/Niña in the Late 1990s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, T.; Behera, S. K.; Yamagata, T.

    2014-12-01

    The global warming and the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) started influencing the coastal ocean off Western Australia, leading to a dramatic change in the regional climate predictability. The warmed ocean started driving rainfall regionally there after the late 1990s. Because of this, rainfall predictability off Western Australia on a seasonal time scale was drastically enhanced in the late 1990s; it is significantly predictable 5 months ahead after the late 1990s. The high prediction skill of the rainfall in recent decades encourages development of an early warning system of Ningaloo Niño/Niña events to mitigate possible societal as well as agricultural impacts in the granary.

  5. Novel diarylpyrimidines and diaryltriazines as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs with dramatically improved solubility: a patent evaluation of US20140378443A1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Boshi; Kang, Dongwei; Yang, Jiapei; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-02-01

    Diarylpyrimidine and diaryltriazine derivatives, two representative structurally related classes of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with robust potencies against wild-type and several mutant strains of HIV-1, have attracted more and more attention in the last decade. However, they have been suffering from poor aqueous solubility. A series of novel diarylpyrimidines and diaryltriazines with solubilizing substituents attached to the central rings were reported as potent NNRTIs in the patent US20140378443A1. Some compounds exhibited potencies against wild-type HIV-1 which were comparable or even superior to those of dapivirine, etravirine and rilpivirine. In addition, dramatically enhanced solubilities were observed for these new compounds. Moreover, some structure optimization strategies for improving aqueous solubility are detailed in this review, providing new insights into development of next-generation NNRTIs endowed with favorable solubility. We anticipate that application of these strategies will ultimately lead to discovery of new anti-HIV drug candidates. PMID:26559996

  6. Dramatic improvement in decompensated right heart failure due to severe tricuspid regurgitation following ligation of arteriovenous fistula in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nitesh; Worthley, Matthew; Disney, Patrick; Faull, Randall

    2014-03-01

    Arteriovenous (AV) fistulas with high blood flow rate are necessary for adequate hemodialysis, but they can also cause significant hemodynamic changes, including raised cardiac output, left ventricular hypertrophy and occasionally overt cardiac failure (Basile et al., Nephrol Dial Transplant, 23, 2008, 282; Unger et al., Am J Transplant, 4, 2004, 2038). We now report a case of rapid and dramatic improvement in symptomatic right heart failure due to severe tricuspid regurgitation following ligation of an arteriovenous fistula. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed before and after the ligation of fistula showed striking improvement in both the tricuspid regurgitation and right ventricular dimensions, with minimal impact on left ventricular mass, size, and function. PMID:24118598

  7. On the Dramatic Increase ofDitrupa arietina O.F. Müller (Annelida: Polychaeta) Along Both the French and the Spanish Catalan Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grémare, A.; Sardá, R.; Medernach, L.; Jordana, E.; Pinedo, S.; Amouroux, J. M.; Martin, D.; Nozais, C.; Charles, F.

    1998-10-01

    The distribution and population structure of the serpulid polychaete Ditrupa arietinawere assessed along the section of the Mediterranean coast between Barcelona and Montpellier. The study combined: (1) the analysis of the existing historical data referring to the period before the 1970s; (2) the results of impact assessment surveys carried out in the late 1980s and the 1990s; and (3) the results of two surveys carried out in the Bay of Blanes and along the coast between Cape Cerbère and Port-la-Nouvelle during 1996. The results of the surveys carried out in the 1990s show the occurrence of high densities (i.e. >1000 ind m -2) of Ditrupa arietinaat all the sites sampled. These results can be compared with the few reports of this species before 1970, leading to the conclusion that D. arietinahas recently increased all along the Catalan coast. Ditrupa arietinais preferentially found between 20 and 30 m depth, which mostly corresponds to well-sorted fine sands and muddy sands. Both the results of population monitoring and the heterogeneity of population structure at small spatial scale show that the dynamics of this species is unstable. The observed distribution pattern is therefore interpreted as resulting from a response to both wide-scale environmental parameters (accounting for the dramatic increase of the species at a wide geographical scale), and to local environmental factors (accounting for small-scale heterogeneity in population structure). Analysis of the relationship between sedimentary data and densities of D. arietinasuggests that this species is highly sensitive to the presence of fine sediments. However, because of the regional importance of the phenomenon, it is concluded that the dramatic increase of D. arietinaalong both the Spanish and the French Catalan coast does not result from sediment instability.

  8. Characterization of Specific Nucleotide Substitutions in DtxR-Specific Operators of Corynebacterium diphtheriae That Dramatically Affect DtxR Binding, Operator Function, and Promoter Strength

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John H.; Holmes, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) of Corynebacterium diphtheriae uses Fe2+ as a corepressor. Holo-DtxR inhibits transcription from the iron-regulated promoters (IRPs) designated IRP1 through IRP5 as well as from the promoters for the tox and hmuO genes. DtxR binds to 19-bp operators with the consensus sequence 5′-TTAGGTTAGCCTAACCTAA-3′, a perfect 9-bp palindrome interrupted by a single C · G base pair. Among the seven known DtxR-specific operators, IRP3 exhibits the weakest binding to DtxR. The message (sense) strand of the IRP3 operator (5′-TTAGGTGAGACGCACCCAT-3′ [nonconsensus nucleotides underlined]) overlaps by 2 nucleotides at its 5′ end with the putative −10 sequence of the IRP3 promoter. The underlined C at position +7 from the center of the IRP3 operator [C(+7)] is unique, because T is conserved at that position in other DtxR-specific operators. The present study examined the effects of nucleotide substitutions at position +7 or −7 in the IRP3 operator. In gel mobility shift assays, only the change of C(+7) to the consensus nucleotide T caused a dramatic increase in the binding of DtxR, whereas other nucleotide substitutions for C(+7) or replacements for A(−7) had only small positive or negative effects on DtxR binding. All substitutions for C(+7) or A(−7) except for A(−7)C dramatically decreased IRP3 promoter strength. In contrast, the A(−7)C variant caused increased promoter strength at the cost of nearly eliminating repressibility by DtxR. The message (sense) strand of the IRP1 operator (5′-TTAGGTTAGCCAAACCTTT-3′) includes the −35 region of the IRP3 promoter. A T(+7)C variant of the IRP1 operator was also constructed, and it was shown to exhibit decreased binding to DtxR, decreased repressibility by DtxR, and increased promoter strength. The nucleotides at positions +7 and −7 in DtxR-specific operators are therefore important determinants of DtxR binding and repressibility of transcription by DtxR, and they also have

  9. Transgenic upregulation of the condensed tannin pathway in poplar leads to a dramatic shift in leaf palatability for two tree-feeding Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Boeckler, G Andreas; Towns, Megan; Unsicker, Sybille B; Mellway, Robin D; Yip, Lynn; Hilke, Ines; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Constabel, C Peter

    2014-02-01

    Transgenic hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides) overexpressing the MYB134 tannin regulatory gene show dramatically enhanced condensed tannin (proanthocyanidin) levels, as well as shifts in other phenolic metabolites. A series of insect bioassays with forest tent caterpillars (Malacosoma disstria) and gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars was carried out to determine how this metabolic shift affects food preference and performance of generalist tree-feeding lepidopterans. Both species showed a distinct preference for the high-tannin MYB134 overexpressor plants, and L. dispar performance was enhanced relative to controls. L. dispar reached greater pupal weight and showed reduced time to pupation when reared on the MYB134 overexpressing poplar. These results were unexpected since enhanced condensed tannin levels were predicted to act as feeding deterrents. However, the data may be explained by the observed decrease in the salicinoids (phenolic glycosides) salicortin and tremulacin that accompanied the upregulation of the condensed tannins in the transgenics. We conclude that for these two lepidopteran species, condensed tannin levels are unlikely to be a major determinant of caterpillar food preference or performance. However, our experiments show that overexpression of a single regulatory gene in transgenic aspen can have a significant impact on herbivorous insects. PMID:24496605

  10. Mice with conditional inactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 signaling in oligodendrocytes have normal myelin but display dramatic hyperactivity when combined with Cnp1 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Y; Shoemaker, W J; Furusho, M; Bryant, M; Rosenbluth, J; Pfeiffer, S E; Oh, L; Rasband, M; Lappe-Siefke, C; Yu, K; Ornitz, D M; Nave, K-A; Bansal, R

    2006-11-22

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (Fgfr) comprise a widely expressed family of developmental regulators implicated in oligodendrocyte (OL) maturation of the CNS. Fgfr2 is expressed by OLs in myelinated fiber tracks. In vitro, Fgfr2 is highly upregulated during OL terminal differentiation, and its activation leads to enhanced growth of OL processes and the formation of myelin-like membranes. To investigate the in vivo function of Fgfr2 signaling by myelinating glial cells, we inactivated the floxed Fgfr2 gene in mice that coexpress Cre recombinase (cre) as a knock-in gene into the OL-specific 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (Cnp1) locus. Surprisingly, no obvious defects were detected in brain development of these conditional mutants, including the number of OLs, the onset and extent of myelination, the ultrastructure of myelin, and the expression level of myelin proteins. However, unexpectedly, a subset of these conditional Fgfr2 knock-out mice that are homozygous for cre and therefore are also Cnp1 null, displayed a dramatic hyperactive behavior starting at approximately 2 weeks of age. This hyperactivity was abolished by treatment with dopamine receptor antagonists or catecholamine biosynthesis inhibitors, suggesting that the symptoms involve a dysregulation of the dopaminergic system. Although the molecular mechanisms are presently unknown, this novel mouse model of hyperactivity demonstrates the potential involvement of OLs in neuropsychiatric disorders, as well as the nonpredictable role of genetic interactions in the behavioral phenotype of mice. PMID:17122059

  11. Evolution and phylogenetic utility of the PHOT gene duplicates in the Verbena complex (Verbenaceae): dramatic intron size variation and footprint of ancestral recombination.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yao-Wu; Olmstead, Richard G

    2008-09-01

    A well-resolved species level phylogeny is critically important in studying organismal evolution (e.g., hybridization, polyploidization, adaptive speciation). Lack of appropriate molecular markers that give sufficient resolution to gene trees is one of the major impediments to inferring species level phylogenies. In addition, sampling multiple independent loci is essential to overcome the lineage sorting problem. The availability of nuclear loci has often been a limiting factor in plant species-level phylogenetic studies. Here the two PHOT loci were developed as new sources of nuclear gene trees. The PHOT1 and PHOT2 gene trees of the Verbena complex (Verbenaceae) are well resolved and have good clade support. These gene trees are consistent with each other and previously generated chloroplast and nuclear waxy gene trees in most of the phylogenetic backbone as well as some terminal relationships, but are incongruent in some other relationships. Locus-specific primers were optimized for amplifying and sequencing these two loci in all Lamiales. Comparing intron size in the context of the gene trees shows dramatic variation within the Verbena complex, particularly at the PHOT1 locus. These variations are largely caused by invasions of short transposable elements and frequent long deletions and insertions of unknown causes. In addition, inspection of DNA sequences and phylogenetic analyses unmask a clear footprint of ancestral recombination in one species. PMID:21632434

  12. Female Listeners’ Autonomic Responses to Dramatic Shifts Between Loud and Soft Music/Sound Passages: A Study of Heavy Metal Songs

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tzu-Han; Tsai, Chen-Gia

    2016-01-01

    Although music and the emotion it conveys unfold over time, little is known about how listeners respond to shifts in musical emotions. A special technique in heavy metal music utilizes dramatic shifts between loud and soft passages. Loud passages are penetrated by distorted sounds conveying aggression, whereas soft passages are often characterized by a clean, calm singing voice and light accompaniment. The present study used heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds to examine how female listeners’ respiration rates and heart rates responded to the arousal changes associated with auditory stimuli. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was used to assess cardiac parasympathetic activity. The results showed that the soft passages of heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds expressed lower arousal and induced significantly higher HF-HRVs than the loud passages of heavy metal songs. Listeners’ respiration rate was determined by the arousal level of the present music passage, whereas the heart rate was dependent on both the present and preceding passages. Compared with soft sea sounds, the loud music passage led to greater deceleration of the heart rate at the beginning of the following soft music passage. The sea sounds delayed the heart rate acceleration evoked by the following loud music passage. The data provide evidence that sound-induced parasympathetic activity affects listeners’ heart rate in response to the following music passage. These findings have potential implications for future research on the temporal dynamics of musical emotions. PMID:26925009

  13. Dramatic Raman Gain Suppression in the Vicinity of the Zero Dispersion Point in a Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerschmidt, S. T.; Novoa, D.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-12-01

    In 1964 Bloembergen and Shen predicted that Raman gain could be suppressed if the rates of phonon creation and annihilation (by inelastic scattering) exactly balance. This is only possible if the momentum required for each process is identical, i.e., phonon coherence waves created by pump-to-Stokes scattering are identical to those annihilated in pump-to-anti-Stokes scattering. In bulk gas cells, this can only be achieved over limited interaction lengths at an oblique angle to the pump axis. Here we report a simple system that provides dramatic Raman gain suppression over long collinear path lengths in hydrogen. It consists of a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber whose zero dispersion point is pressure adjusted to lie close to the pump laser wavelength. At a certain precise pressure, stimulated generation of Stokes light in the fundamental mode is completely suppressed, allowing other much weaker phenomena such as spontaneous Raman scattering to be explored at high pump powers.

  14. Dramatic increase in the relative abundance of large male dungeness crabs Cancer magister following closure of commercial fishing in Glacier Bay, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taggart, S.J.; Shirley, T.C.; O'Clair, C. E.; Mondragon, J.

    2004-01-01

    The size structure of the population of the Dungeness crab Cancer magister was studied at six sites in or near Glacier Bay, Alaska, before and after the closure of commercial fishing. Seven years of preclosure and 4 years of postclosure data are presented. After the closure of Glacier Bay to commercial fishing, the number and size of legal-sized male Dungeness crabs increased dramatically at the experimental sites. Female and sublegal-sized male crabs, the portions of the population not directly targeted by commercial fishing, did not increase in size or abundance following the closure. There was not a large shift in the size-abundance distribution of male crabs at the control site that is still open to commercial fishing. Marine protected areas are being widely promoted as effective tools for managing fisheries while simultaneously meeting marine conservation goals and maintaining marine biodiversity. Our data demonstrate that the size of male Dungeness crabs can markedly increase in a marine reserve, which supports the concept that marine reserves could help maintain genetic diversity in Dungeness crabs and other crab species subjected to size-limit fisheries and possibly increase the fertility of females. ?? 2004 by the American Fisheries Society.

  15. A new treatment protocol using photobiomodulation and muscle/bone/joint recovery techniques having a dramatic effect on a stroke patient's recovery: a new weapon for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Boonswang, N Ab; Chicchi, Mary; Lukachek, Adele; Curtiss, Donna

    2012-01-01

    The subject of this case study is a 29-year-old woman who suffered a brainstem stroke. She remained severely dizzy, had a non-functional left hand secondary to weakness, severe spasticity in the right hand, a right lateral sixth nerve palsy and was unable to ambulate on presentation. The stroke occurred 2 years before presentation. The subject had been treated for 21 months at two different stroke rehabilitation centres before presentation. Our stroke protocol includes photobiomodulation administered with the XR3T-1 device and ‘muscle/bone/joint/soft tissue’ recovery techniques. The patient was seen once a week for 8 weeks and treatment sessions lasted approximately 60 min. The results were dramatic: after 8 weeks of implementation of our protocol, the patient demonstrated positive change in every area of her deficits as determined by improvements in physical examination findings. The gains achieved at 8 weeks have been maintained to this day and she continues to be treated once every 4 weeks. PMID:22967677

  16. Conditioning with rabbit versus horse ATG dramatically alters clinical outcomes in identical twins with severe aplastic anemia transplanted with the same allogeneic donor.

    PubMed

    Vo, P T; Pantin, J; Ramos, C; Cook, L; Cho, E; Kurlander, R; Khuu, H; Barrett, J; Leitman, S; Childs, R W

    2015-01-01

    Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a rare disorder leading to bone marrow failure, which if left untreated, is invariably fatal. Conventional therapies with immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are highly effective. HSCT can offer a greater outcome in younger patients who have an available HLA match-related donor. Recent studies showing the addition of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) to the conditioning regimen improves engraftment and reduces the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).There are currently two ATG preparations in the USA, equine (or horse) and rabbit ATG. These agents are pharmacologically distinct, having significant differences in their pharmacokinetics and in vivo immunosuppressive effects [N Engl J Med 365(5):430-438, 2011]. Here, we report a case of two monozygotic twins with constitutional SAA that evolved to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who both underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSC) from the same single HLA antigen mismatched sibling donor with the only difference in the transplant regimen being the type of ATG used in the preparative regimen; one twin received horse ATG and the other received rabbit ATG during conditioning. This report emphasizes that dramatic differences in donor T cell chimerism and clinical outcomes including GVHD can occur as a consequence of the type of ATG that is utilized in the transplant conditioning regimen. These differences highlight that these agents should not be considered interchangeable drugs when used in this setting. PMID:26113077

  17. The dramatic change of the fossil magnetic field of HD 190073: evidence of the birth of the convective core in a Herbig star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, E.; Neiner, C.; Mathis, S.; Catala, C.; Kochukhov, O.; Landstreet, J.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimetric surveys of Herbig Ae/Be stars, we discovered and then monitored the magnetic field of HD 190073 over more than four years, from 2004 to 2009. Our observations all displayed similar Zeeman signatures in the Stokes V spectra, indicating that HD 190073 hosted an aligned dipole, stable over many years, consistent with a fossil origin. We obtained new observations of the star in 2011 and 2012 and detected clear variations of the Zeeman signature on timescales of days to weeks, indicating that the configuration of its field has changed between 2009 and 2011. Such a sudden change of external structure of a fossil field has never previously been observed in any intermediate or high-mass star. HD 190073 is an almost entirely radiative pre-main sequence star, probably hosting a growing convective core. We propose that this dramatic change is the result of the interaction between the fossil field and the ignition of a dynamo field generated in the newly-born convective core. Based on observations collected at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers (INSU) of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France and the University of Hawaii, at the Observatoire du Pic du Midi (France), operated by INSU, and at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (Program ID 187.D-0917).

  18. Dramatic decrease in prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths and new insights into intestinal protozoa in children living in the Chaco region, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Macchioni, Fabio; Segundo, Higinio; Gabrielli, Simona; Totino, Valentina; Gonzales, Patricia Rojas; Salazar, Esteban; Bozo, Ricardo; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2015-04-01

    We assessed the prevalence of intestinal parasites among 268 2-12-year-old children living in rural areas, small villages, and semi-urban areas of the Chaco region, south-eastern Bolivia. The overall parasitism was 69%. Only protozoa, helminths, or co-infections were observed in 89.2%, 5.9%, or 4.9% of the positive children, respectively. A significant progressive increase in overall parasite prevalence was found when passing from rural areas to small villages and semi-urban areas. The most commonly found species were Entamoeba coli (38.4%), Giardia intestinalis (37.7%), and Blastocystis spp. (16%). Hymenolepis nana was the most prevalent helminth (5.6%), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides and hookworms (1.5% and 0.4%) evidenced only in rural areas and in villages. Molecular diagnostics identified Blastocystis subtypes 9 and 2, and 5 infections by Entamoeba histolytica and 4 by Entamoeba dispar. The dramatic decrease in prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths with respect to that observed about 20 years ago (> 40%) evidences the success of the preventive chemotherapy intervention implemented in 1986. Health education and improved sanitation should be intensified to control protozoan infections. PMID:25711609

  19. Female Listeners' Autonomic Responses to Dramatic Shifts Between Loud and Soft Music/Sound Passages: A Study of Heavy Metal Songs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tzu-Han; Tsai, Chen-Gia

    2016-01-01

    Although music and the emotion it conveys unfold over time, little is known about how listeners respond to shifts in musical emotions. A special technique in heavy metal music utilizes dramatic shifts between loud and soft passages. Loud passages are penetrated by distorted sounds conveying aggression, whereas soft passages are often characterized by a clean, calm singing voice and light accompaniment. The present study used heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds to examine how female listeners' respiration rates and heart rates responded to the arousal changes associated with auditory stimuli. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability (HF-HRV) was used to assess cardiac parasympathetic activity. The results showed that the soft passages of heavy metal songs and soft sea sounds expressed lower arousal and induced significantly higher HF-HRVs than the loud passages of heavy metal songs. Listeners' respiration rate was determined by the arousal level of the present music passage, whereas the heart rate was dependent on both the present and preceding passages. Compared with soft sea sounds, the loud music passage led to greater deceleration of the heart rate at the beginning of the following soft music passage. The sea sounds delayed the heart rate acceleration evoked by the following loud music passage. The data provide evidence that sound-induced parasympathetic activity affects listeners' heart rate in response to the following music passage. These findings have potential implications for future research on the temporal dynamics of musical emotions. PMID:26925009

  20. Dramatic changes in patterning gene expression during metamorphosis are associated with the formation of a feather-like antenna by the silk moth, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Ando, Toshiya; Kojima, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2011-09-01

    Many moths use sex pheromones to find their mates in the dark. Their antennae are well developed with lateral branches to receive the pheromone efficiently. However, how these structures have evolved remains elusive, because the mechanism of development of these antennae has not been studied at a molecular level. To elucidate the developmental mechanism of this type of antenna, we observed morphogenesis, cell proliferation, cell death and antennal patterning gene expression in the branched antenna of the silk moth, Bombyx mori. Region-specific cell proliferation and almost ubiquitous apoptosis occur during early pupal stages and appear to shape the lateral branch cooperatively. Antennal patterning genes are expressed in a pattern largely conserved among insects with branchless antennae until the late 5th larval instar but most of them change their expression dramatically to a pattern prefiguring the lateral branch during metamorphosis. These findings imply that although antennal primordium is patterned by conserved mechanisms before metamorphosis, most of the antennal patterning genes are reused to form the lateral branch during metamorphosis. We propose that the acquisition of a new regulatory circuit of antennal patterning genes may have been an important event during evolution of the sensory antenna with lateral branches in the Lepidoptera. PMID:21664349

  1. OGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137: A DRAMATIC REPEATING EVENT WITH THE SECOND PERTURBATION PREDICTED BY REAL-TIME ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Y.-H.; Han, C.; Hwang, K.-H.; Street, R.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Fukui, A.; Abe, F.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Hearnshaw, J. B.

    2010-11-01

    We report the result of the analysis of a dramatic repeating gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137, for which the light curve is characterized by two distinct peaks with perturbations near both peaks. We find that the event is produced by the passage of the source trajectory over the central perturbation regions associated with the individual components of a wide-separation binary. The event is special in the sense that the second perturbation, occurring {approx}100 days after the first, was predicted by the real-time analysis conducted after the first peak, demonstrating that real-time modeling can be routinely done for binary and planetary events. With the data obtained from follow-up observations covering the second peak, we are able to uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event occurred on a bulge clump giant and it was produced by a binary lens composed of a K- and M-type main-sequence stars. The estimated masses of the binary components are M{sub 1} = 0.69 {+-} 0.11 M{sub sun} and M{sub 2} = 0.36 {+-} 0.06 M{sub sun}, respectively, and they are separated in projection by r{sub perpendicular} = 10.9 {+-} 1.3 AU. The measured distance to the lens is D{sub L} = 5.6 {+-} 0.7 kpc. We also detect the orbital motion of the lens system.

  2. Amine-functionalized task-specific ionic liquids: a mechanistic explanation for the dramatic increase in viscosity upon complexation with CO{sub 2} from molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowski, K.E.; Maginn, E.J.

    2008-11-15

    The capture of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion, particularly in coal-fired power plants, represents a critical component of efforts aimed at stabilizing greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. Recently, a series of second-generation task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) containing amine functional groups have been synthesized and demonstrated to have much higher capacities for CO{sub 2} due to their reactivity with CO{sub 2}, as well unusually high viscosities in both the neat and complexed states. The current work extends the seminal studies of CO{sub 2} capture with ionic liquids (ILs) by providing insight from simulations into the mechanism responsible for the dramatic increase in viscosity upon complexation. Simulations conclusively demonstrate that the slow translational and rotational dynamics, which are manifest in the high viscosity, may be attributable to the formation of a strong, pervasive hydrogen-bonded network. Semiquantitative estimates of the cation and anion self-diffusion coefficients and rotational time constants, as well as detailed hydrogen bond analysis, are consistent with the experimentally observed formation of glassy or gel-like materials upon contact with CO{sub 2}. This has significant implications for the design of new approaches or materials involving ILs that take advantage of these preconceived limitations, in the synthesis or manipulation of new TSIL frameworks for CO{sub 2} capture, and in novel experimental studies of chemistries and dynamics in persistent heterogeneous environments.

  3. Dramatic Raman Gain Suppression in the Vicinity of the Zero Dispersion Point in a Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber.

    PubMed

    Bauerschmidt, S T; Novoa, D; Russell, P St J

    2015-12-11

    In 1964 Bloembergen and Shen predicted that Raman gain could be suppressed if the rates of phonon creation and annihilation (by inelastic scattering) exactly balance. This is only possible if the momentum required for each process is identical, i.e., phonon coherence waves created by pump-to-Stokes scattering are identical to those annihilated in pump-to-anti-Stokes scattering. In bulk gas cells, this can only be achieved over limited interaction lengths at an oblique angle to the pump axis. Here we report a simple system that provides dramatic Raman gain suppression over long collinear path lengths in hydrogen. It consists of a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber whose zero dispersion point is pressure adjusted to lie close to the pump laser wavelength. At a certain precise pressure, stimulated generation of Stokes light in the fundamental mode is completely suppressed, allowing other much weaker phenomena such as spontaneous Raman scattering to be explored at high pump powers. PMID:26705636

  4. Mortality from Western cancers rose dramatically among African-Americans during the 20th century: are dietary animal products to blame?

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2001-08-01

    Statistics compiled by the National Cancer Institute indicate that, between 1935 and 1974, age-adjusted mortality from most 'Western' cancers (those of the breast, colon, prostate, pancreas, ovary, and kidney) rose dramatically in African-Americans. This phenomenon is paralleled by marked increases in the incidence of these cancers in Asia and Southern Europe during the latter 20th century, in conjunction with increased intakes of dietary animal products. A credible case can be made that diets rich in animal products work in various complementary ways to up-regulate serum levels of insulin, free IGF-I, and free sex hormones: hormones that appear to have important promotional activity for Western cancers. It seems likely that dietary animal product intake by black Americans increased substantially during the 20th century, and that this fact is primarily responsible for their concurrent marked increase in mortality from Western cancers. A whole-food vegan diet rich in fruits and vegetables, especially if coupled with regular exercise and smoking avoidance, could be expected to have a remarkably positive impact on African-American cancer risk, reversing the increases in cancer risk incurred during the 20th century. PMID:11461167

  5. Helical Conformation of the SEVI Precursor Peptide PAP248-286, a Dramatic Enhancer of HIV Infectivity, Promotes Lipid Aggregation and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Brender, Jeffrey R.; Hartman, Kevin; Gottler, Lindsey M.; Cavitt, Marchello E.; Youngstrom, Daniel W.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2009-01-01

    In previous in vivo studies, amyloid fibers formed from a peptide ubiquitous in human seminal fluid (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI)) were found to dramatically enhance the infectivity of the HIV virus (3–5 orders of magnitude by some measures). To complement those studies, we performed in vitro assays of PAP248-286, the most active precursor to SEVI, and other polycationic polymers to investigate the physical mechanisms by which the PAP248-286 promotes the interaction with lipid bilayers. At acidic (but not at neutral) pH, freshly dissolved PAP248-286 catalyzes the formation of large lipid flocculates in a variety of membrane compositions, which may be linked to the promotion of convective transport in the vaginal environment rather than transport by a random Brownian motion. Furthermore, PAP248-286 is itself fusiogenic and weakens the integrity of the membrane in such a way that may promote fusion by the HIV gp41 protein. An α-helical conformation of PAP248-286, lying parallel to the membrane surface, is implicated in promoting bridging interactions between membranes by the screening of the electrostatic repulsion that occurs when two membranes are brought into close contact. This suggests that nonspecific binding of monomeric or small oligomeric forms of SEVI in a helical conformation to lipid membranes may be an additional mechanism by which SEVI enhances the infectivity of the HIV virus. PMID:19883590

  6. Rapid and dramatic response to alectinib in an anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer patient who is critically ill.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Hida, Toyoaki; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown promising clinical activity in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that harbors ALK rearrangement. The next-generation ALK-TKI, alectinib, has been reported to have potent efficacy in ALK-positive NSCLC patients including on mutations that confer resistance to crizotinib, which was the first ALK-TKI approved for ALK-positive NSCLC. The efficacy and safety of ALK-TKIs, including crizotinib and alectinib, as the first-line treatment in critically ill patients is unclear. We report one ALK-positive NSCLC patient with poor performance status (PS) and disseminated intravascular coagulation because of respiratory failure and multiple metastases, and experienced the rapid and dramatic response to alectinib without adverse events that can lead to discontinuation and dose reduction of the drug. After a couple of months of treatment with alectinib, radiological review indicated a complete response. The present case is the first reported case of rapid and marked response to alectinib in ALK-positive NSCLC patients who had poor PS and severe organ dysfunction, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation. Further investigation of the safety and efficacy of ALK-TKI for ALK-positive NSCLC patients who are critically ill is warranted. PMID:26938871

  7. DISCOVERY OF DRAMATIC OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN SDSS J1100+4421: A PECULIAR RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Doi, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Yuki; Itoh, Ryosuke; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S.; Tominaga, Nozomu; Saito, Yoshihiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Stawarz, Łukasz; Gandhi, Poshak; Ali, Gamal; Essam, Ahmad; Hamed, Gamal; Aoki, Tsutomu; Contreras, Carlos; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Iwata, Ikuru; and others

    2014-10-01

    We present our discovery of dramatic variability in SDSS J1100+4421 by the high-cadence transient survey Kiso Supernova Survey. The source brightened in the optical by at least a factor of three within about half a day. Spectroscopic observations suggest that this object is likely a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) at z = 0.840, however, with unusually strong narrow emission lines. The estimated black hole mass of ∼10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} implies bolometric nuclear luminosity close to the Eddington limit. SDSS J1100+4421 is also extremely radio-loud, with a radio loudness parameter of R ≅ 4 × 10{sup 2}-3 × 10{sup 3}, which implies the presence of relativistic jets. Rapid and large-amplitude optical variability of the target, reminiscent of that found in a few radio- and γ-ray-loud NLS1s, is therefore produced most likely in a blazar-like core. The 1.4 GHz radio image of the source shows an extended structure with a linear size of about 100 kpc. If SDSS J1100+4421 is a genuine NLS1, as suggested here, this radio structure would then be the largest ever discovered in this type of active galaxies.

  8. Dramatic Decrease in Prevalence of Soil-Transmitted Helminths and New Insights Into Intestinal Protozoa in Children Living in the Chaco Region, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Macchioni, Fabio; Segundo, Higinio; Gabrielli, Simona; Totino, Valentina; Gonzales, Patricia Rojas; Salazar, Esteban; Bozo, Ricardo; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of intestinal parasites among 268 2–12-year-old children living in rural areas, small villages, and semi-urban areas of the Chaco region, south-eastern Bolivia. The overall parasitism was 69%. Only protozoa, helminths, or co-infections were observed in 89.2%, 5.9%, or 4.9% of the positive children, respectively. A significant progressive increase in overall parasite prevalence was found when passing from rural areas to small villages and semi-urban areas. The most commonly found species were Entamoeba coli (38.4%), Giardia intestinalis (37.7%), and Blastocystis spp. (16%). Hymenolepis nana was the most prevalent helminth (5.6%), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides and hookworms (1.5% and 0.4%) evidenced only in rural areas and in villages. Molecular diagnostics identified Blastocystis subtypes 9 and 2, and 5 infections by Entamoeba histolytica and 4 by Entamoeba dispar. The dramatic decrease in prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths with respect to that observed about 20 years ago (> 40%) evidences the success of the preventive chemotherapy intervention implemented in 1986. Health education and improved sanitation should be intensified to control protozoan infections. PMID:25711609

  9. CHARACTERIZING A DRAMATIC ΔV ∼ –9 FLARE ON AN ULTRACOOL DWARF FOUND BY THE ASAS-SN SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Shappee, Benjamin J.; Kochanek, C. S.; Jencson, J.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Basu, U.; Beacom, John F.; Prieto, Jose L.; Morrell, Nidia; Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Szczygieł, D. M.; Pojmanski, G.; Brimacombe, J.; Dubberley, M.; Elphick, M.; Foale, S.; Hawkins, E.; Mullins, D.; Rosing, W.; and others

    2014-02-01

    We analyze a ΔV ∼ –9 magnitude flare on the newly identified M8 dwarf SDSS J022116.84+194020.4 (hereafter SDSSJ0221) detected as part of the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae. Using infrared and optical spectra, we confirm that SDSSJ0221 is a relatively nearby (d ∼ 76 pc) M8 dwarf with strong quiescent Hα emission. Based on kinematics and the absence of features consistent with low-gravity (young) ultracool dwarfs, we place a lower limit of 200 Myr on the age of SDSSJ0221. When modeled with a simple, classical flare light curve, this flare is consistent with a total U-band flare energy E{sub U} ∼ 10{sup 34} erg, confirming that the most dramatic flares are not limited to warmer, more massive stars. Scaled to include a rough estimate of the emission line contribution to the V band, we estimate a blackbody filling factor of ∼10%-30% during the flare peak and ∼0.5%-1.6% during the flare decay phase. These filling factors correspond to flare areas that are an order of magnitude larger than those measured for most mid-M dwarf flares.

  10. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner. PMID:22419949

  11. Ischemic Colitis Revealing Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Amira; Litaiem, Noureddine; Smiti Khanfir, M.; Ayadi, Sofiene; Nfoussi, Haifa; Houman, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is one of the most common intestinal ischemic injuries. It results from impaired perfusion of blood to the bowel and is rarely caused by vasculitis. We report a case of ischemic colitis revealing polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) in a 55-year-old man. Histological examination of the resected colon led to the diagnosis of PAN. PMID:24382967

  12. Urticarial vasculitis reveals unsuspected thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Olga; Mota, Alberto; Baudrier, Teresa; Azevedo, Filomena

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with erythematous, violaceous plaques with a serpiginous and unusual appearance located on the left shoulder, left thigh, and right buttock, evolving for 5 days, which eventually became generalized. A skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis and a diagnosis of urticarial vasculitis was made. The complete blood count, biochemistry, complement levels, and other immunological test results were unremarkable. However, antithyroid antibody titers were increased. Despite having normal thyroid function tests and an absence of specific symptoms, the patient underwent a thyroid ultrasound, which revealed features of thyroiditis, and was subsequently referred to an endocrinologist. Several diseases can be associated with urticarial vasculitis, namely infections and autoimmune connective-tissue disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren syndrome. Thyroiditis is an uncommon association. PMID:23000939

  13. Peatland restoration measures may have dramatic consequences - Greenhouse gas exchange and peat properties in a coastal fen in the first year after rewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurasinski, Gerald; Hahn, Juliane; Köhler, Stefan; Glatzel, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    190-times increase in CH4 compared to pre-flooding conditions. Highest GHG fluxes occurred in sedge stands that suffered from the heaviest die-back due to water level rise. None of the recorded environmental variables showed consistent correlation with the amounts of CH4 and CO2 exchanged. In the short term perspective covered in this study, rewetting by flooding did not - especially due to the dramatic increase in CH4 emissions - decrease GHG emissions. Furthermore, we observed an overall destabilization of the ecosystem functioning: The environmental parameters that are commonly used to explain variation in GHG exchange did not show any consistent correlation and some showed dramatic changes when comparing pre- and post-flooding. Our results suggest that rewetting projects should be monitored not only with regard to vegetation development but also with respect to biogeochemical conditions. Further, high CH4 emissions that likely occur directly after rewetting by flooding should be considered when forecasting the overall effect of rewetting on GHG exchange of a particular site.

  14. A paleoweathering profile from Griqualand West, South Africa: evidence for a dramatic rise in atmospheric oxygen between 2.2 and 1.9 bybp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, H. D.; Beukes, N. J.

    1990-01-01

    A core drilled near Wolhaarkop in Griqualand West, South Africa, intersected highly oxidized Kuruman Iron Formation below red beds of the Gamagara Formation. The lateral equivalents of the Kuruman Iron Formation in this drill hole consist largely of siderite, ankerite, magnetite, greenalite, and quartz. The oxidation of the Kuruman Iron Formation in WOL 2 occurred almost certainly during weathering prior to the deposition of the Gamagara Formation. The date of this weathering episode is bracketed between about 2.2 and 1.9 bybp by the age of the Ongeluk lavas in the Transvaal sequence below the unconformity and by the age of the Hartley lavas in the Olifantshoek Group above the unconformity. The ratio of iron to SiO2 in the several facies of the weathered Kuruman Iron Formation in WOL 2 is nearly the same as that in their unweathered equivalents. Since SiO2 loss during weathering was almost certainly minor, the similarity of the Fe/SiO2 ratio in the weathered and unweathered BIF indicates that nearly all the "FeO" in the Kuruman Iron Formation was oxidized and retained as FeO3 during weathering. Such a high degree of iron retention is best explained by an O2 content of the atmosphere > or = 0.03 atm at the time of weathering. Such an O2 pressure is very much greater than that suggested by the composition of paleosols developed on basalt > or = 2.2 bybp but is consistent with the highly oxidized nature of the 1.85 by Flin Flon paleosol. The new data suggest that PO2 rose dramatically from about 1 percent PAL (present atmospheric level) to > or = 15 percent PAL between 2.2 and 1.9 bybp.

  15. A point mutation in the [2Fe–2S] cluster binding region of the NAF-1 protein (H114C) dramatically hinders the cluster donor properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tamir, Sagi; Eisenberg-Domovich, Yael; Conlan, Andrea R.; Stofleth, Jason T.; Lipper, Colin H.; Paddock, Mark L.; Mittler, Ron; Jennings, Patricia A.; Livnah, Oded Nechushtai, Rachel

    2014-06-01

    NAF-1 has been shown to be related with human health and disease, is upregulated in epithelial breast cancer and suppression of its expression significantly suppresses tumor growth. It is shown that replacement of the single His ligand with Cys resulted in dramatic changes to the properties of its 2Fe-2S clusters without any global crystal structural changes. NAF-1 is an important [2Fe–2S] NEET protein associated with human health and disease. A mis-splicing mutation in NAF-1 results in Wolfram Syndrome type 2, a lethal childhood disease. Upregulation of NAF-1 is found in epithelial breast cancer cells, and suppression of NAF-1 expression by knockdown significantly suppresses tumor growth. Key to NAF-1 function is the NEET fold with its [2Fe–2S] cluster. In this work, the high-resolution structure of native NAF-1 was determined to 1.65 Å resolution (R factor = 13.5%) together with that of a mutant in which the single His ligand of its [2Fe–2S] cluster, His114, was replaced by Cys. The NAF-1 H114C mutant structure was determined to 1.58 Å resolution (R factor = 16.0%). All structural differences were localized to the cluster binding site. Compared with native NAF-1, the [2Fe–2S] clusters of the H114C mutant were found to (i) be 25-fold more stable, (ii) have a redox potential that is 300 mV more negative and (iii) have their cluster donation/transfer function abolished. Because no global structural differences were found between the mutant and the native (wild-type) NAF-1 proteins, yet significant functional differences exist between them, the NAF-1 H114C mutant is an excellent tool to decipher the underlying biological importance of the [2Fe–2S] cluster of NAF-1 in vivo.

  16. Larval anopheline mosquito recta exhibit a dramatic change in localization patterns of ion transport proteins in response to shifting salinity: a comparison between anopheline and culicine larvae.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kristin E; VanEkeris, Leslie A; Okech, Bernard A; Harvey, William R; Linser, Paul J

    2008-10-01

    Mosquito larvae live in dynamic aqueous environments, which can fluctuate drastically in salinity due to environmental events such as rainfall and evaporation. Larval survival depends upon the ability to regulate hemolymph osmolarity by absorbing and excreting ions. A major organ involved in ion regulation is the rectum, the last region for modification of the primary urine before excretion. The ultrastructure and function of culicine larval recta have been studied extensively; however, very little published data exist on the recta of anopheline larvae. To gain insight into the structure and functions of this organ in anopheline species, we used immunohistochemistry to compare the localization of three proteins [carbonic anhydrase (CA9), Na+/K+ P-ATPase and H+ V-ATPase] in the recta of anopheline larvae reared in freshwater and saline water with the localization of the same proteins in culicine larvae reared under similar conditions. Based on the following key points, we concluded that anophelines differ from culicines in larval rectal structure and in regulation of protein expression: (1) despite the fact that obligate freshwater and saline-tolerant culicines have structurally distinct recta, all anophelines examined (regardless of saline-tolerance) have a structurally similar rectum consisting of distinct DAR (dorsal anterior rectal) cells and non-DAR cells; (2) anopheline larvae undergo a dramatic shift in rectal Na+/K+-ATPase localization when reared in freshwater vs saline water. This shift is not seen in any culicine larvae examined. Additionally, we use these immunohistochemical analyses to suggest possible functions for the DAR and non-DAR cells of anopheline larvae in freshwater and saline conditions. PMID:18805805

  17. An ezetimibe-policosanol combination has the potential to be an OTC agent that could dramatically lower LDL cholesterol without side effects.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2005-01-01

    Although many risk factors influence atherogenesis, LDL appears to play a primary role in this process. In prospective epidemiology, coronary risk increases as LDL cholesterol increases, throughout the entire range of concentrations encountered in healthy humans. Coronary risk is minimal in individuals and populations whose serum cholesterol remains quite low throughout life. Thus, practical strategies for achieving large reductions of LDL cholesterol in the general population could have a dramatic impact on coronary mortality rates. Dietary measures have limited potential in this regard; modest restriction of saturated fat has a rather trivial effect on LDL cholesterol, and the very-low-fat quasi-vegan diets that do have a notable effect in this regard currently have little appeal to the majority of the population. With respect to pharmacotherapy, most available hypolipidemic agents with reasonably potent activity entail side effects or compliance difficulties that would render their use too expensive or impractical for population-wide application. However, two agents may have great potential in this regard: policosanol and ezetimibe. The former, a mixture of long-chain alcohols derived from sugar cane wax, has effects on serum lipids comparable to those of statins, and may work by down-regulating expression of HMG-CoA reductase. However, unlike statins, policosanol appears to be devoid of side effects or risks. Ezetimibe is a newly approved drug that is a potent and highly specific inhibitor of an intestinal sterol permease; in daily doses as low as 10 mg, it suppresses intestinal absorption of cholesterol and decreases serum LDL cholesterol by approximately 18%. No side effects have been seen in clinical doses, and the fact that its hypolipidemic activity is additive to that of statins has generated considerable interest. Both policosanol and ezetimibe can be administered once daily. Future studies should determine whether policosanol, like statins, interacts

  18. Plan competitions reveal entrepreneurial talent

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2011-05-15

    Monthly economic diversity column for Tri-City Herald business section. Excerpt below: There’s something to be said for gaining valuable real-world experience in a structured, nurturing environment. Take for instance learning to scuba dive in the comfort of my resort pool rather than immediately hanging out with sharks while I figure out little things like oxygen tanks and avoiding underwater panic attacks. Likewise, graduate students are getting some excellent, supportive real-world training through university business plan competitions. These competitions are places where smart minds, new technologies, months of preparation and coaching, and some healthy pre-presentation jitters collide to reveal not only solid new business ideas, but also some promising entrepreneurial talent. In fact, professionals from around our region descend upon college campuses every spring to judge these events, which help to bridge the gap between academics and the real technology and business-driven economy.

  19. Revealing ontological commitments by magic.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Thomas L

    2015-03-01

    Considering the appeal of different magical transformations exposes some systematic asymmetries. For example, it is more interesting to transform a vase into a rose than a rose into a vase. An experiment in which people judged how interesting they found different magic tricks showed that these asymmetries reflect the direction a transformation moves in an ontological hierarchy: transformations in the direction of animacy and intelligence are favored over the opposite. A second and third experiment demonstrated that judgments of the plausibility of machines that perform the same transformations do not show the same asymmetries, but judgments of the interestingness of such machines do. A formal argument relates this sense of interestingness to evidence for an alternative to our current physical theory, with magic tricks being a particularly pure source of such evidence. These results suggest that people's intuitions about magic tricks can reveal the ontological commitments that underlie human cognition. PMID:25490128

  20. CMB source apportionment during REVEAL

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenthal, D.H.; Gertler, A.W.; Wittorff, D.; Sakiyama, S.

    1997-01-01

    Source contributions to PM{sub 2.5} aerosol measured at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows in the Lower Fraser Valley, B.C., Canada, during the REVEAL study, were estimated using chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor modeling. ON average, motor vehicles accounted for 34 and 43% of PM{sub 2.5} at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows, respectively. Secondary sulfate and secondary nitrate were the next most significant PM{sub 2.5} components, accounting for 25 and 27%, respectively, at Chilliwack, and 27 and 12%, respectively, at Pitt Meadows. Geological material accounted for 3 and 5% of PM{sub 2.5} at Chilliwack and Pitt Meadows, respectively. A significant contribution of wood smoke was estimated for both sites: 8% at Chilliwack and 9% at Pitt Meadows.

  1. Archimedes: Accelerator Reveals Ancient Text

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2004-02-24

    Archimedes (287-212 BC), who is famous for shouting 'Eureka' (I found it) is considered one of the most brilliant thinkers of all times. The 10th-century parchment document known as the 'Archimedes Palimpsest' is the unique source for two of the great Greek's treatises. Some of the writings, hidden under gold forgeries, have recently been revealed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. An intense x-ray beam produced in a particle accelerator causes the iron in original ink, which has been partly erased and covered, to send out a fluorescence glow. A detector records the signal and a digital image showing the ancient writings is produced. Please join us in this fascinating journey of a 1,000-year-old parchment from its origin in the Mediterranean city of Constantinople to a particle accelerator in Menlo Park.

  2. Erosion and what it Reveals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 November 2003

    This image is located near the boundary between Syrtis Major and Isidis Planitia. The top of the image shows rough material that has eroded away from the lower portion of the image, revealing an underlying surface that has many small craters. It also reveals an ancient flow lobe that is barely discernable, crossing the southern part of the image (this flow lobe is much easier to see as a smooth region in the context image).

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.4, Longitude 77.9 East (282.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Dunes reveal Titan's recent history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Christopher J.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2010-04-01

    Large fields of linear dunes are abundant on Titan, covering nearly 20% of the surface. They are among the youngest features and represent interactions between near-surface winds and sediment. This interaction may vary from area to area creating unique populations of eolian features identified by dune field parameters such as crest-to-crest spacing, dune width and orientation. These parameters respond to changes in near-surface conditions over periods of time ranging from minutes to many thousands of years depending on dune size and the duration of the changes. While pattern analysis of dune field parameters on Earth and, in this study, Titan reveals much about current climatic conditions, such as wind regimes and wetter vs. drier areas, many inferences about past conditions can also be made. Initial pattern analysis of linear dunes on Titan reveals a single population of linear dunes representing a large percentage of all observed dunes. This single population is the result of two leading possibilities: Either there has been only one long period of dune building, leading to very old cores that have been built upon over long periods of time, perhaps punctuated with few or many intervals of non-deposition; or the current conditions of dune building have persisted long enough to completely erase any evidence of previous conditions. We have not yet worked through all the input parameters to adjust Earth's time scales to Titan's, and thus it is not yet possible to give a precise age for Titan's dunes. However, if these large linear dunes are similar to Earth's large linear dunes, they may represent at least several thousand years of dune building.

  4. APEX reveals glowing stellar nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Illustrating the power of submillimetre-wavelength astronomy, an APEX image reveals how an expanding bubble of ionised gas about ten light-years across is causing the surrounding material to collapse into dense clumps that are the birthplaces of new stars. Submillimetre light is the key to revealing some of the coldest material in the Universe, such as these cold, dense clouds. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 40/08 Glowing Stellar Nurseries The region, called RCW120, is about 4200 light years from Earth, towards the constellation of Scorpius. A hot, massive star in its centre is emitting huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, which ionises the surrounding gas, stripping the electrons from hydrogen atoms and producing the characteristic red glow of so-called H-alpha emission. As this ionised region expands into space, the associated shock wave sweeps up a layer of the surrounding cold interstellar gas and cosmic dust. This layer becomes unstable and collapses under its own gravity into dense clumps, forming cold, dense clouds of hydrogen where new stars are born. However, as the clouds are still very cold, with temperatures of around -250˚ Celsius, their faint heat glow can only be seen at submillimetre wavelengths. Submillimetre light is therefore vital in studying the earliest stages of the birth and life of stars. The submillimetre-wavelength data were taken with the LABOCA camera on the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, located on the 5000 m high plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Atacama desert. Thanks to LABOCA's high sensitivity, astronomers were able to detect clumps of cold gas four times fainter than previously possible. Since the brightness of the clumps is a measure of their mass, this also means that astronomers can now study the formation of less massive stars than they could before. The plateau of Chajnantor is also where ESO, together with international partners, is building a next generation submillimetre telescope, ALMA

  5. Hubble Images Reveal Jupiter's Auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These images, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, reveal changes in Jupiter's auroral emissions and how small auroral spots just outside the emission rings are linked to the planet's volcanic moon, Io. The images represent the most sensitive and sharply-detailed views ever taken of Jovian auroras.

    The top panel pinpoints the effects of emissions from Io, which is about the size of Earth's moon. The black-and-white image on the left, taken in visible light, shows how Io and Jupiter are linked by an invisible electrical current of charged particles called a 'flux tube.' The particles - ejected from Io (the bright spot on Jupiter's right) by volcanic eruptions - flow along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which thread through Io, to the planet's north and south magnetic poles. This image also shows the belts of clouds surrounding Jupiter as well as the Great Red Spot.

    The black-and-white image on the right, taken in ultraviolet light about 15 minutes later, shows Jupiter's auroral emissions at the north and south poles. Just outside these emissions are the auroral spots. Called 'footprints,' the spots are created when the particles in Io's 'flux tube' reach Jupiter's upper atmosphere and interact with hydrogen gas, making it fluoresce. In this image, Io is not observable because it is faint in the ultraviolet.

    The two ultraviolet images at the bottom of the picture show how the auroral emissions change in brightness and structure as Jupiter rotates. These false-color images also reveal how the magnetic field is offset from Jupiter's spin axis by 10 to 15 degrees. In the right image, the north auroral emission is rising over the left limb; the south auroral oval is beginning to set. The image on the left, obtained on a different date, shows a full view of the north aurora, with a strong emission inside the main auroral oval.

    The images were taken by the telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 between May 1994 and September 1995.

    This image and

  6. Plant transcriptomes reveal hidden guests.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiao; Wang, Guirong; Pelosi, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    With the wide adoption of transcriptome sequencing an ever increasing amount of information is becoming available, together with spurious data originating from contamination. We show that sometimes errors and inaccuracy can turn beneficial, revealing insect and arthropod pests when analysing plant transcriptomes. We have found a large number of soluble olfactory proteins, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs), in plant databases, likely due to contamination by guest insects. In fact, both classes of proteins are only expressed in insects, with few CSPs also present in other arthropods. In addition, we found many sequences of the Niemann-Pick (Npc2) family, proteins dedicated to cholesterol transport in vertebrates and hypothesised to be involved in chemical communication in insects, but absent in plants. In several cases we were able to trace down members of the three classes of proteins to the insect or arthopod species responsible for contamination. Our work suggests that genes found in plants and recognised as contaminants can be turned into useful information to investigate plant-insect relationships or to identify new sequences from insects species not yet investigated. PMID:27130825

  7. Revealing ionic motion molecular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurzo, I.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2006-01-01

    Thin films of mixed valence semiconductor copper-tetracyano-quinodimethane (Cu-TCNQ) and small molecule tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3) were investigated by current-voltage (I-V) and admittance (C-V,G-V) techniques in single-layer configuration with different combinations of electrodes. The predicted hysteresis of I-V curves and nearly constant loss (NCL) could be observed for both materials. When cycling devices between negative and positive biases, slowly decaying ionic transient currents interfere with steady-state currents and point to unidirectional motions of the ionic species with subsequent redox reaction at one of the electrodes. Plotting the frequency f dependence of the equivalent parallel capacitance at zero bias as log10 C(0) versus log10(f), the dielectric behavior of Cu-TCNQ and Alq3 complies with the effective-medium model for NCL in ionic conductors [J. R. Macdonald J. Appl. Phys. 94, 558 (2003)]. It also holds for a similar plot of the equivalent parallel zero-bias conductance G(0). The nature of the revealed mobile ions is discussed with emphasis on their sources.

  8. [Dramatic response of penile cancer with inguinal lymph node metastases to neoadjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin : a case report].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yasuaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Nagai, Shingo; Matsuoka, Kae; Arakawa, Hirotaka; Horie, Kengo; Deguchi, Takashi; Kato, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of the penis is rare, and the prognosis of penile cancer with inguinal metastases is extremely poor. Standard chemotherapy for advanced penile cancer has not been established because of its rarity. A case of penile cancer with inguinal metastases that responded well to neoadjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin (TIP) is described. A 55-year-old Japanese male visited our hospital for a penile tumor and fixed, 4 cm, right inguinal lymph nodes. Computed tomography and 18F-FDG-PET imaging showed not only right but also left inguinal lymphadenopathy. Penile cancer (clinical stage T3N3M0, 7th edition TNM classification) was diagnosed, and partial penectomy and right inguinal biopsy were performed. The pathological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the penis with right inguinal lymph node metastasis. The inguinal metastases were judged to be unsuitable for radical resection ; and, paclitaxel 60 mg/m2 (day 1), ifosfamide 1,200 mg/m2 (days 1-3), and cisplatin 60 mg/m2 (days 1-3) were given at 3-week intervals as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, the inguinal metastases were markedly reduced. He had neutropenia (grade 3) during each course and peripheral neuropathy after 2 courses, but there were no severe complications. The patient underwent bilateral inguinal and pelvic lymphadenectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Pathological examination revealed no viable cells in the resected specimens. The patient remains alive and well with no evidence of recurrence 8 months after this radical treatment. TIP chemotherapy appears to be effective for advanced penile cancer. PMID:25656018

  9. Into the Curriculum. Dramatics/Reading/Language Arts: Jellyfish Jiggle and More; Reading/Language Arts: Birthstone Folklore; Science: Jellyfish FAQ; Science: Minerals in Caves; Social Studies: Mapping the Oceans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Provides five fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in dramatics, reading, language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, activities and procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are describes for each…

  10. Reveal for Salmonella test system.

    PubMed

    Bird, C B; Miller, R L; Miller, B M

    1999-01-01

    The Reveal for Salmonella (RSS) test system is a presumptive qualitative test that detects the presence of Salmonella organisms in foods within 21 h total testing time, allowing the user to release negative products 24 h earlier than when using other rapid test kits. Foods are enriched with a proprietary resuscitation medium called Revive and then selectively enriched with either Selenite Cystine or Rappaport-Vassiliadis selective media. The enriched culture is used to inoculate the RSS detection device, which initiates a lateral flow through a reagent zone containing anti-Salmonella antibodies conjugated to colloidal gold particles that capture antigens present in the culture. The antigen-antibody complex migrates farther and is captured by an additional anti-Salmonella antibody, causing the colloidal gold to precipitate and form a visual line, indicating a positive result. A procedural control line also will form regardless of the presence of Salmonella organisms to indicate the test is working properly. Existing AOAC Official Methods for Salmonella organisms require a 48 h enrichment before testing. Hence, a food product has to be held before release, adding extra cost to the company and the consumer. The RSS test system was evaluated by quantitative spiking studies. Although AOAC encourages inclusion of naturally contaminated foods, almost all microbiological AOAC validation studies have been performed with artificially contaminated foods for absolute control over the study. The RSS test system is designed to test many food types for Salmonella organisms and has a limit of detection of 5-10 colony-forming units (cfu)/25 g with a false-negative rate of < 1% and a false-positive rate of < 5.0%. It showed an 81% overall agreement with the traditional procedure of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety Inspection Service. PMID:10367381

  11. Shocking Detail of Superstar's Activity Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged Eta Carinae and revealed a hot inner core around this mysterious superstar. The new X-ray observation shows three distinct structures: an outer, horseshoe shaped ring about two light years in diameter, a hot inner core about 3 light months in diameter, and a hot central source less than a light month in diameter which may contain the superstar. All three structures are thought to represent shock waves produced by matter rushing away from the superstar at supersonic speeds. The temperature of the shock-heated gas ranges from 60 million degrees Celsius in the central regions to 3 million degrees Celsius on the outer structure. An earlier image of Eta Carinae by the Hubble Space Telescope revealed two spectacular bubbles of gas expanding in opposite directions away from a central bright region at speeds in excess of a million miles per hour. The inner region visible in the Chandra image has never been resolved before, and appears to be associated with a central disk of high velocity gas rushing out at much higher speeds perpendicular to the bipolar optical nebula. "It is not what I expected," said Dr. Fred Seward of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "I expected to see a strong point source with a little diffuse emission cloud around it. Instead, we see just the opposite- a bright cloud of diffuse emission, and much less radiation from the center." "The Chandra image contains some puzzles for existing ideas of how a star can produce such hot and intense X-rays," agreed Prof. Kris Davidson of the University of Minnesota. "In the most popular theory, X-rays are made by colliding gas streams from two stars so close together that they'd look like a point source to us. But what happens to gas streams that escape to farther distances? The extended hot stuff in the middle of the new image gives demanding new conditions for any theory to meet." Eta Carinae is one of the most enigmatic and intriguing objects in our

  12. Focus groups reveal consumer ambivalence.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    According to qualitative research, Salvadoreans are ambivalent about the use of contraceptives. Since complete responsibility for management of the CSM project was accepted by the Association Demografica Salvadorena (ADS), the agency which operates the contraceptive social marketing project in El Salvador, in November 1980, the need for decisions in such areas as product price increases, introduction of new condom brands, promotion of the vaginal foaming tablet, and assessment of product sales performance had arisen. The ICSMP funded market research, completed during 1983, was intended to provide the data on which such decisions by ADS could be based. The qualitative research involved 8 focus groups, comprised of men and women, aged 18-45, contraceptive users and nonusers, from the middle and lower socioeconomic strata of the city of San Salvador and other suburban areas. In each group a moderator led discussion of family planning and probed respondents for specific attitudes, knowledge, and behavior regarding the use of contraceptives. To assess attitudes at a more emotional level, moderators asked respondents to "draw" their ideas on certain issues. A marked discrepancy was revealed between respondents' intellectual responses to the issues raised in group discussion, as opposed to their feelings expressed in the drawings. Intellectually, participants responded very positively to family planning practice, but when they were asked to draw their perceptions, ambivalent feelings emerged. Drawings of both the user and the nonuser convey primarily negative aspects for either choice. The user is tense and moody toward her children; the nonuser loses her attractiveness and "dies." Figures also show drawings of some of the attitudes of single and married male participants. 1 drawing shows an incomplete and a complete circle, symbolizing a sterilized man (incomplete) and a nonsterilized man (complete). Another picture depicts a chained man who has lost his freedom

  13. Microscopic study reveals the singular origins of growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaari, G.; Nowak, A.; Rakocy, K.; Solomon, S.

    2008-04-01

    Anderson [Science 177, 293 (1972)] proposed the concept of complexity in order to describe the emergence and growth of macroscopic collective patterns out of the simple interactions of many microscopic agents. In the physical sciences this paradigm was implemented systematically and confirmed repeatedly by successful confrontation with reality. In the social sciences however, the possibilities to stage experiments to validate it are limited. During the 90's a series of dramatic political and economic events have provided the opportunity to do so. We exploit the resulting empirical evidence to validate a simple agent based alternative to the classical logistic dynamics. The post-liberalization empirical data from Poland confirm the theoretical prediction that the dynamics is dominated by singular rare events which insure the resilience and adaptability of the system. We have shown that growth is led by few singular “growth centers" (Fig. 1), that initially developed at a tremendous rate (Fig. 3), followed by a diffusion process to the rest of the country and leading to a positive growth rate uniform across the counties. In addition to the interdisciplinary unifying potential of our generic formal approach, the present work reveals the strong causal ties between the “softer" social conditions and their “hard" economic consequences.

  14. Lipidome analysis reveals antifungal polyphenol curcumin affects membrane lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Singh, Ashutosh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2012-01-01

    This study shows that antifungal curcumin (CUR), significantly depletes ergosterol levels in Candida albicans. CUR while displaying synergy with fluconazole (FLC) lowers ergosterol. However, CUR alone at its synergistic concentration (lower than MIC50), could not affect ergosterol contents. For deeper insight of CUR effects on lipids, we performed high throughput mass spectroscopy (MS) based lipid profiling of C. albicans cells. The lipidome analysis revealed that there were no major changes in phosphoglycerides (PGLs) composition following CUR treatment of Candida, however, significant differences in molecular species of PGLs were detected. Among major SPLs, CUR treatment resulted in the reduction of ceramide and accumulation of IPCs levels. The lipidome of CUR treated cells confirmed a dramatic drop in the ergosterol levels with a simultaneous accumulation of its biosynthetic precursors. This was further supported by the fact that the mutants defective in ergosterol biosynthesis (ERG2 and ERG11) and those lacking the transcription factor regulating ergosterol biosynthesis, UPC2, were highly susceptible to CUR. Our study first time shows that CUR, for its antifungal activity, targets and down regulates delta 5, 6 desaturase (ERG3) resulting in depletion of ergosterol. This results in parallel accumulation of ergosterol biosynthetic precursors, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death. PMID:22201946

  15. An acoustic microscopy technique reveals hidden morphological defenses in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Laforsch, Christian; Ngwa, Wilfred; Grill, Wolfgang; Tollrian, Ralph

    2004-11-01

    Inducible defenses are common strategies for coping with the selective force of predation in heterogeneous environments. In recent years the conspicuous and often dramatic morphological plasticity of several waterflea species of the genus Daphnia have been found to be inducible defenses activated by chemical cues released by predators. However, the exact defensive mechanisms remained mysterious. Because even some minute morphological alterations proved to be protective against predatory invertebrates, it has been suggested that the visible morphological changes are only the tip of the iceberg of the entire protective mechanisms. Here we applied a method of ultrasonic microscopy with vector contrast at 1.2 GHz to probe hidden morphological defenses. We found that induction with predator kairomones increases the stability of the carapace in two Daphnia species up to 350%. This morphological plasticity provides a major advantage for the induced morphs during predation because predatory invertebrates need to crush or puncture the carapace of their prey to consume them. Our ultrastructural analyses revealed that the internal architecture of the carapace ensures maximal rigidity with minimal material investment. Our results uncover hidden morphological plasticity and suggest a reconsideration of former classification systems in defended and undefended genotypes in Daphnia and possibly in other prey organisms as well. PMID:15520396

  16. Global Population Genetic Structure of Caenorhabditis remanei Reveals Incipient Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Alivia; Jeon, Yong; Wang, Guo-Xiu; Cutter, Asher D.

    2012-01-01

    Mating system transitions dramatically alter the evolutionary trajectories of genomes that can be revealed by contrasts of species with disparate modes of reproduction. For such transitions in Caenorhabditis nematodes, some major causes of genome variation in selfing species have been discerned. And yet, we have only limited understanding of species-wide population genetic processes for their outcrossing relatives, which represent the reproductive state of the progenitors of selfing species. Multilocus–multipopulation sequence polymorphism data provide a powerful means to uncover the historical demography and evolutionary processes that shape genomes. Here we survey nucleotide polymorphism across the X chromosome for three populations of the outcrossing nematode Caenorhabditis remanei and demonstrate its divergence from a fourth population describing a closely related new species from China, C. sp. 23. We find high genetic variation globally and within each local population sample. Despite geographic barriers and moderate genetic differentiation between Europe and North America, considerable gene flow connects C. remanei populations. We discovered C. sp. 23 while investigating C. remanei, observing strong genetic differentiation characteristic of reproductive isolation that was confirmed by substantial F2 hybrid breakdown in interspecific crosses. That C. sp. 23 represents a distinct biological species provides a cautionary example of how standard practice can fail for mating tests of species identity in this group. This species pair permits full application of divergence population genetic methods to obligately outcrossing species of Caenorhabditis and also presents a new focus for interrogation of the genetics and evolution of speciation with the Caenorhabditis model system. PMID:22649079

  17. Metabolic phenotyping reveals a lipid mediator response to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Laiakis, Evagelia C; Strassburg, Katrin; Bogumil, Ralf; Lai, Steven; Vreeken, Rob J; Hankemeier, Thomas; Langridge, James; Plumb, Robert S; Fornace, Albert J; Astarita, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation has dramatically increased in modern society, raising serious health concerns. The molecular response to ionizing radiation, however, is still not completely understood. Here, we screened mouse serum for metabolic alterations following an acute exposure to γ radiation using a multiplatform mass-spectrometry-based strategy. A global, molecular profiling revealed that mouse serum undergoes a series of significant molecular alterations following radiation exposure. We identified and quantified bioactive metabolites belonging to key biochemical pathways and low-abundance, oxygenated, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the two groups of animals. Exposure to γ radiation induced a significant increase in the serum levels of ether phosphatidylcholines (PCs) while decreasing the levels of diacyl PCs carrying PUFAs. In exposed mice, levels of pro-inflammatory, oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid increased, whereas levels of anti-inflammatory metabolites of omega-3 PUFAs decreased. Our results indicate a specific serum lipidomic biosignature that could be utilized as an indicator of radiation exposure and as novel target for therapeutic intervention. Monitoring such a molecular response to radiation exposure might have implications not only for radiation pathology but also for countermeasures and personalized medicine. PMID:25126707

  18. Why noise-induced hearing loss of industrial workers is dramatic while that of similarly assessed musicians has been described as trivial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bies, David

    2005-09-01

    Criteria for noise exposure considered acceptable for hearing protection are based upon industrial experience, yet these same criteria do not describe the experience of musicians. Investigation of the physics of the human ear reveals a basic design compromise that explains this anomaly. Acoustic stimulation is encoded in the velocity response of the basilar membrane, which makes possible the use of damping control to achieve the dynamic range of the ear. The use of damping control for this purpose without unacceptable distortions is possible if damping is slowly varying. The ear is free running and guided by previous instruction, making it vulnerable to loud impulsive sounds. To protect the ear the aural reflex is provided, but this protection is limited to frequencies below about 1 to 2 kHz. In the natural environment this design compromise is satisfactory, but in the industrial environment loud impulsive sounds are common and the compromise fails. It is to be noted that impulsive sounds of high frequency and level for which the ear has no defense, and which are not characteristic of music, are averaged to zero using standard assessment procedures.

  19. Running over rough terrain reveals limb control for intrinsic stability

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Monica A.; Biewener, Andrew A.

    2006-01-01

    Legged animals routinely negotiate rough, unpredictable terrain with agility and stability that outmatches any human-built machine. Yet, we know surprisingly little about how animals accomplish this. Current knowledge is largely limited to studies of steady movement. These studies have revealed fundamental mechanisms used by terrestrial animals for steady locomotion. However, it is unclear whether these models provide an appropriate framework for the neuromuscular and mechanical strategies used to achieve dynamic stability over rough terrain. Perturbation experiments shed light on this issue, revealing the interplay between mechanics and neuromuscular control. We measured limb mechanics of helmeted guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) running over an unexpected drop in terrain, comparing their response to predictions of the mass–spring running model. Adjustment of limb contact angle explains 80% of the variation in stance-phase limb loading following the perturbation. Surprisingly, although limb stiffness varies dramatically, it does not influence the response. This result agrees with a mass–spring model, although it differs from previous findings on humans running over surfaces of varying compliance. However, guinea fowl sometimes deviate from mass–spring dynamics through posture-dependent work performance of the limb, leading to substantial energy absorption following the perturbation. This posture-dependent actuation allows the animal to absorb energy and maintain desired velocity on a sudden substrate drop. Thus, posture-dependent work performance of the limb provides inherent velocity control over rough terrain. These findings highlight how simple mechanical models extend to unsteady conditions, providing fundamental insights into neuromuscular control of movement and the design of dynamically stable legged robots and prosthetic devices. PMID:17032779

  20. Microsporidian genome analysis reveals evolutionary strategies for obligate intracellular growth

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Christina A.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Bakowski, Malina A.; Goldberg, Jonathan; Ma, Amy T.; Becnel, James J.; Didier, Elizabeth S.; Fan, Lin; Heiman, David I.; Levin, Joshua Z.; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Troemel, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    Microsporidia comprise a large phylum of obligate intracellular eukaryotes that are fungal-related parasites responsible for widespread disease, and here we address questions about microsporidia biology and evolution. We sequenced three microsporidian genomes from two species, Nematocida parisii and Nematocida sp1, which are natural pathogens of Caenorhabditis nematodes and provide model systems for studying microsporidian pathogenesis. We performed deep sequencing of transcripts from a time course of N. parisii infection. Examination of pathogen gene expression revealed compact transcripts and a dramatic takeover of host cells by Nematocida. We also performed phylogenomic analyses of Nematocida and other microsporidian genomes to refine microsporidian phylogeny and identify evolutionary events of gene loss, acquisition, and modification. In particular, we found that all microsporidia lost the tumor-suppressor gene retinoblastoma, which we speculate could accelerate the parasite cell cycle and increase the mutation rate. We also found that microsporidia acquired transporters that could import nucleosides to fuel rapid growth. In addition, microsporidian hexokinases gained secretion signal sequences, and in a functional assay these were sufficient to export proteins out of the cell; thus hexokinase may be targeted into the host cell to reprogram it toward biosynthesis. Similar molecular changes appear during formation of cancer cells and may be evolutionary strategies adopted independently by microsporidia to proliferate rapidly within host cells. Finally, analysis of genome polymorphisms revealed evidence for a sexual cycle that may provide genetic diversity to alleviate problems caused by clonal growth. Together these events may explain the emergence and success of these diverse intracellular parasites. PMID:22813931

  1. Microsporidian genome analysis reveals evolutionary strategies for obligate intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Christina A; Desjardins, Christopher A; Bakowski, Malina A; Goldberg, Jonathan; Ma, Amy T; Becnel, James J; Didier, Elizabeth S; Fan, Lin; Heiman, David I; Levin, Joshua Z; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Troemel, Emily R

    2012-12-01

    Microsporidia comprise a large phylum of obligate intracellular eukaryotes that are fungal-related parasites responsible for widespread disease, and here we address questions about microsporidia biology and evolution. We sequenced three microsporidian genomes from two species, Nematocida parisii and Nematocida sp1, which are natural pathogens of Caenorhabditis nematodes and provide model systems for studying microsporidian pathogenesis. We performed deep sequencing of transcripts from a time course of N. parisii infection. Examination of pathogen gene expression revealed compact transcripts and a dramatic takeover of host cells by Nematocida. We also performed phylogenomic analyses of Nematocida and other microsporidian genomes to refine microsporidian phylogeny and identify evolutionary events of gene loss, acquisition, and modification. In particular, we found that all microsporidia lost the tumor-suppressor gene retinoblastoma, which we speculate could accelerate the parasite cell cycle and increase the mutation rate. We also found that microsporidia acquired transporters that could import nucleosides to fuel rapid growth. In addition, microsporidian hexokinases gained secretion signal sequences, and in a functional assay these were sufficient to export proteins out of the cell; thus hexokinase may be targeted into the host cell to reprogram it toward biosynthesis. Similar molecular changes appear during formation of cancer cells and may be evolutionary strategies adopted independently by microsporidia to proliferate rapidly within host cells. Finally, analysis of genome polymorphisms revealed evidence for a sexual cycle that may provide genetic diversity to alleviate problems caused by clonal growth. Together these events may explain the emergence and success of these diverse intracellular parasites. PMID:22813931

  2. Mercury Sources and Cycling in the Great Lakes: Dramatic Changes Resulting from Altered Atmospheric Loads and the Near-Shore Shunt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhoft, D. P.; DeWild, J. F.; Maglio, M. M.; Tate, M. T.; Ogorek, J. M.; Hurley, J. P.; Lepak, R.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination of the aquatic food webs across the Great Lakes remains a significant environmental issue. However, our ability to prescribe corrective actions has been significantly hampered by a scarcity of data, particularly for methylmercury (MeHg) the most toxic and bioaccumulative form of mercury in freshwater ecosystems. As part of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative initiated in 2010, a joint effort was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to improve our understanding of total Hg and MeHg concentrations and distributions in the Great Lakes. Since 2010, sampling surveys have been conducted at about 15-20 stations twice annually (April and August) at 15-20 stations per lake to collect data from both cold and warm water conditions. All sampling was conducted using trace-metal free protocols using a sampling rosette equipped with 12 Teflon-lined Niskin. Water samples were collected at predetermined depths: mid-epilimnion, mid-thermocline, deep chlorophyll layer, mid-hypolimnion, and about 2 meters above the bottom. Seston samples were collected from the top 20 meters using plankton nets, while bottom sediments and benthos samples were acquired using a ponar sampler. Water, biota, and sediment samples were all analyzed for Hg and MeHg concentration at the USGS Mercury Research Laboratory in Middleton, Wisconsin. Several important trends are apparent from the water column samples. First, most stations reveal a strong top-to-bottom declining trend total Hg concentration, underscoring the importance of atmospheric deposition to the Great Lakes. Methylmercury profiles, show maximal concentrations at the thermocline or deep chlorophyll layer, suggesting in situ water-column MeHg production. Calculations suggest this in-lake MeHg source is similar in magnitude to tributary loading of MeHg, which heretofore was thought to be the dominant MeHg source. Aqueous total Hg results also suggest that

  3. How Dramatic is the Unrest at Colli Albani, the Volcanic District 20 km from Rome (Italy)? Insights from SAR Interferometry and Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trasatti, E.; Di Filippo, M.; Di Nezza, M.; Florindo, F.; Marra, F.; Moro, M.; Polcari, M.; Stramondo, S.; Ventura, G.

    2015-12-01

    Colli Albani (Italy) is an alkali-potassic volcanic district located about 20 km SE of Rome (3 M inhabitants) and lastly erupted 36 ka ago. Its eruptive activity is characterized by well-clustered, regularly spaced time cycles, with an average recurrence time of 45±5 ka. Since the modern volcanic activity at Colli Albani seems not particularly intense, scientists have interpreted this volcano to be quiescent. Therefore, unlike other Italian volcanoes, the area has not undergone extensive monitoring. However, a seismic swarm during 1989-1990 has been related to a local uplift of ca. 30 cm since the 1950's along a line crossing the western side of the volcano, giving rise to a debate about its possible interpretation in terms of unrest. Furthermore, recent geological investigations indicate a coupling of eruption history, uplift history, and changes in the regional stress field, pointing to the conclusion that Colli Albani is in unrest. As a result, an evaluation of the volcanic hazard of such a strongly inhabited and vulnerable area is needed. We present the results from the analysis of 20 years of SAR interferometry. The time series show a linear trending displacement (3 mm/yr maximum ground velocity) affecting the western flank of the volcano. In addition, results from gravimetric surveys conducted during 2005-2007 reveal a different behavior between the eastern and western sectors. In an attempt of understanding the dynamics of Colli Albani from the available geodetic and gravimetric data, we build a finite element model incorporating local structural and lithological features, such as mapped faults and elastic discontinuities. Our results suggest that magma is accumulating beneath the Colli Albani western flank, where uplift and positive microgravity anomalies are observed and where the recent seismic swarm took place. Our model constrains the location and geometry of the magmatic source, which is below the vents responsible for the last eruptive activity

  4. Dramatic differences in susceptibility to l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia between mice that are aged before or after a nigrostriatal dopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Bez, Francesco; Francardo, Veronica; Cenci, M Angela

    2016-10-01

    Mice with striatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions are widely used as a model to study the effects of neurorestorative, symptomatic, or antidyskinetic treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD). The standard praxis is to utilize young adult mice with relatively acute 6-OHDA lesions. However, long post-lesion intervals may be required for longitudinal studies of treatment interventions, and the long-term stability of the model's behavioral and cellular phenotypes is currently unknown. In this study, C57Bl/6J mice sustained unilateral striatal 6-OHDA lesions at approx. 2months of age, and were allowed to survive for 1, 10 or 22months. Another group of mice sustained the lesion at the age of 23months and survived for one month thereafter. Baseline and drug-induced motor behaviors were examined using a battery of tests (utilizing also a novel video-based methodology). The extent of nigral dopamine cell loss was stable across post-lesion intervals and ages. However, a prominent sprouting of both dopaminergic and serotonergic fibers was detected in the caudate-putamen in animals that survived until 10 and 22months post-lesion. This phenomenon was associated with a recovery of baseline motor deficits, and with a lack of dyskinetic responses upon treatment with either l-DOPA or apomorphine. By contrast, mice sustaining the lesion at 23months of age showed a striking susceptibility to the dyskinetic effects of both l-DOPA and apomorphine, which was associated with a pronounced drug-induced upregulation of ∆FosB in the ventrolateral striatum. The results reveal a remarkable compensatory capacity of a damaged nigrostriatal pathway in ageing mice, and how this impacts on the response to dopaminergic therapies for PD. PMID:27312773

  5. Transcriptomic Evidence for a Dramatic Functional Transition of the Malpighian Tubules after a Blood Meal in the Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel, Carlos J.; Cassone, Bryan J.; Piermarini, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The consumption of a vertebrate blood meal by adult female mosquitoes is necessary for their reproduction, but it also presents significant physiological challenges to mosquito osmoregulation and metabolism. The renal (Malpighian) tubules of mosquitoes play critical roles in the initial processing of the blood meal by excreting excess water and salts that are ingested. However, it is unclear how the tubules contribute to the metabolism and excretion of wastes (e.g., heme, ammonia) produced during the digestion of blood. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we used RNA-Seq to examine global changes in transcript expression in the Malpighian tubules of the highly-invasive Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus during the first 24 h after consuming a blood meal. We found progressive, global changes in the transcriptome of the Malpighian tubules isolated from mosquitoes at 3 h, 12 h, and 24 h after a blood meal. Notably, a DAVID functional cluster analysis of the differentially-expressed transcripts revealed 1) a down-regulation of transcripts associated with oxidative metabolism, active transport, and mRNA translation, and 2) an up-regulation of transcripts associated with antioxidants and detoxification, proteolytic activity, amino-acid metabolism, and cytoskeletal dynamics. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that blood feeding elicits a functional transition of the epithelium from one specializing in active transepithelial fluid secretion (e.g., diuresis) to one specializing in detoxification and metabolic waste excretion. Our findings provide the first insights into the putative roles of mosquito Malpighian tubules in the chronic processing of blood meals. PMID:24901705

  6. Model-driven mapping of transcriptional networks reveals the circuitry and dynamics of virulence regulation.

    PubMed

    Maier, Ezekiel J; Haynes, Brian C; Gish, Stacey R; Wang, Zhuo A; Skowyra, Michael L; Marulli, Alyssa L; Doering, Tamara L; Brent, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    Key steps in understanding a biological process include identifying genes that are involved and determining how they are regulated. We developed a novel method for identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in a specific process and used it to map regulation of the key virulence factor of a deadly fungus-its capsule. The map, built from expression profiles of 41 TF mutants, includes 20 TFs not previously known to regulate virulence attributes. It also reveals a hierarchy comprising executive, midlevel, and "foreman" TFs. When grouped by temporal expression pattern, these TFs explain much of the transcriptional dynamics of capsule induction. Phenotypic analysis of TF deletion mutants revealed complex relationships among virulence factors and virulence in mice. These resources and analyses provide the first integrated, systems-level view of capsule regulation and biosynthesis. Our methods dramatically improve the efficiency with which transcriptional networks can be analyzed, making genomic approaches accessible to laboratories focused on specific physiological processes. PMID:25644834

  7. Model-driven mapping of transcriptional networks reveals the circuitry and dynamics of virulence regulation

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Ezekiel J.; Haynes, Brian C.; Gish, Stacey R.; Wang, Zhuo A.; Skowyra, Michael L.; Marulli, Alyssa L.; Doering, Tamara L.; Brent, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Key steps in understanding a biological process include identifying genes that are involved and determining how they are regulated. We developed a novel method for identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in a specific process and used it to map regulation of the key virulence factor of a deadly fungus—its capsule. The map, built from expression profiles of 41 TF mutants, includes 20 TFs not previously known to regulate virulence attributes. It also reveals a hierarchy comprising executive, midlevel, and “foreman” TFs. When grouped by temporal expression pattern, these TFs explain much of the transcriptional dynamics of capsule induction. Phenotypic analysis of TF deletion mutants revealed complex relationships among virulence factors and virulence in mice. These resources and analyses provide the first integrated, systems-level view of capsule regulation and biosynthesis. Our methods dramatically improve the efficiency with which transcriptional networks can be analyzed, making genomic approaches accessible to laboratories focused on specific physiological processes. PMID:25644834

  8. Rapid Drug Tolerance and Dramatic Sterilizing Effect of Moxifloxacin Monotherapy in a Novel Hollow-Fiber Model of Intracellular Mycobacterium kansasii Disease

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shashikant; Pasipanodya, Jotam; Sherman, Carleton M.; Meek, Claudia; Leff, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is the second most common mycobacterial cause of lung disease. Standard treatment consists of rifampin, isoniazid, and ethambutol for at least 12 months after negative sputum. Thus, shorter-duration therapies are needed. Moxifloxacin has good MICs for M. kansasii. However, good preclinical models to identify optimal doses currently are lacking. We developed a novel hollow fiber system model of intracellular M. kansasii infection. We indexed the efficacy of the standard combination regimen, which was a kill rate of −0.08 ± 0.05 log10 CFU/ml/day (r2 = 0.99). We next performed moxifloxacin dose-effect and dose-scheduling studies at a half-life of 11.1 ± 6.47 h. Some systems also were treated with the efflux pump inhibitor reserpine. The highest moxifloxacin exposure, as well as lower exposures plus reserpine, sterilized the cultures by day 7. This suggests that efflux pump-mediated tolerance at low ratios of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24) to MICs is an early bacterial defense mechanism but is overcome by higher exposures. The highest rate of moxifloxacin monotherapy sterilization was −0.82 ± 0.15 log10 CFU/ml/day (r2 = 0.97). The moxifloxacin exposure associated with 80% of maximal kill (EC80) was an AUC0–24/MIC of 317 (the non-protein-bound moxifloxacin AUC0–24/MIC was 158.5). We performed Monte Carlo simulations of 10,000 patients in order to identify the moxifloxacin dose that would achieve or exceed the EC80. The simulations revealed an optimal moxifloxacin dose of 800 mg a day. The MIC susceptibility breakpoint at this dose was 0.25 mg/liter. Thus, moxifloxacin, at high enough doses, is suitable to study in patients for the potential to add rapid sterilization to the standard regimen. PMID:25645830

  9. Heterochronic evolution reveals modular timing changes in budding yeast transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene expression is a dynamic trait, and the evolution of gene regulation can dramatically alter the timing of gene expression without greatly affecting mean expression levels. Moreover, modules of co-regulated genes may exhibit coordinated shifts in expression timing patterns during evolutionary divergence. Here, we examined transcriptome evolution in the dynamical context of the budding yeast cell-division cycle, to investigate the extent of divergence in expression timing and the regulatory architecture underlying timing evolution. Results Using a custom microarray platform, we obtained 378 measurements for 6,263 genes over 18 timepoints of the cell-division cycle in nine strains of S. cerevisiae and one strain of S. paradoxus. Most genes show significant divergence in expression dynamics at all scales of transcriptome organization, suggesting broad potential for timing changes. A model test comparing expression level evolution versus timing evolution revealed a better fit with timing evolution for 82% of genes. Analysis of shared patterns of timing evolution suggests the existence of seven dynamically-autonomous modules, each of which shows coherent evolutionary timing changes. Analysis of transcription factors associated with these gene modules suggests a modular pleiotropic source of divergence in expression timing. Conclusions We propose that transcriptome evolution may generally entail changes in timing (heterochrony) rather than changes in levels (heterometry) of expression. Evolution of gene expression dynamics may involve modular changes in timing control mediated by module-specific transcription factors. We hypothesize that genome-wide gene regulation may utilize a general architecture comprised of multiple semi-autonomous event timelines, whose superposition could produce combinatorial complexity in timing control patterns. PMID:20969771

  10. Behavioral idiosyncrasy reveals genetic control of phenotypic variability

    PubMed Central

    Ayroles, Julien F.; Buchanan, Sean M.; O’Leary, Chelsea; Skutt-Kakaria, Kyobi; Grenier, Jennifer K.; Clark, Andrew G.; Hartl, Daniel L.; de Bivort, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative genetics has primarily focused on describing genetic effects on trait means and largely ignored the effect of alternative alleles on trait variability, potentially missing an important axis of genetic variation contributing to phenotypic differences among individuals. To study the genetic effects on individual-to-individual phenotypic variability (or intragenotypic variability), we used Drosophila inbred lines and measured the spontaneous locomotor behavior of flies walking individually in Y-shaped mazes, focusing on variability in locomotor handedness, an assay optimized to measure variability. We discovered that some lines had consistently high levels of intragenotypic variability among individuals, whereas lines with low variability behaved as although they tossed a coin at each left/right turn decision. We demonstrate that the degree of variability is itself heritable. Using a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for the degree of intragenotypic variability as the phenotype across lines, we identified several genes expressed in the brain that affect variability in handedness without affecting the mean. One of these genes, Ten-a, implicates a neuropil in the central complex of the fly brain as influencing the magnitude of behavioral variability, a brain region involved in sensory integration and locomotor coordination. We validated these results using genetic deficiencies, null alleles, and inducible RNAi transgenes. Our study reveals the constellation of phenotypes that can arise from a single genotype and shows that different genetic backgrounds differ dramatically in their propensity for phenotypic variabililty. Because traditional mean-focused GWASs ignore the contribution of variability to overall phenotypic variation, current methods may miss important links between genotype and phenotype. PMID:25953335

  11. Isotope Analysis Reveals Foraging Area Dichotomy for Atlantic Leatherback Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Elena; Das, Krishna; Girondot, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background The leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) has undergone a dramatic decline over the last 25 years, and this is believed to be primarily the result of mortality associated with fisheries bycatch followed by egg and nesting female harvest. Atlantic leatherback turtles undertake long migrations across ocean basins from subtropical and tropical nesting beaches to productive frontal areas. Migration between two nesting seasons can last 2 or 3 years, a time period termed the remigration interval (RI). Recent satellite transmitter data revealed that Atlantic leatherbacks follow two major dispersion patterns after nesting season, through the North Gulf Stream area or more eastward across the North Equatorial Current. However, information on the whole RI is lacking, precluding the accurate identification of feeding areas where conservation measures may need to be applied. Methodology/Principal Findings Using stable isotopes as dietary tracers we determined the characteristics of feeding grounds of leatherback females nesting in French Guiana. During migration, 3-year RI females differed from 2-year RI females in their isotope values, implying differences in their choice of feeding habitats (offshore vs. more coastal) and foraging latitude (North Atlantic vs. West African coasts, respectively). Egg-yolk and blood isotope values are correlated in nesting females, indicating that egg analysis is a useful tool for assessing isotope values in these turtles, including adults when not available. Conclusions/Significance Our results complement previous data on turtle movements during the first year following the nesting season, integrating the diet consumed during the year before nesting. We suggest that the French Guiana leatherback population segregates into two distinct isotopic groupings, and highlight the urgent need to determine the feeding habitats of the turtle in the Atlantic in order to protect this species from incidental take by commercial fisheries. Our

  12. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.; Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2008-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA s Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This report specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as a final report for that internship. The topics discussed include: the documentation of REVEAL source code; the migration of REVEAL to other platforms; and an end-to-end field test that successfully validates the efforts.

  13. Increasing phonological complexity reveals heightened instability in inter-articulatory coordination in adults who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Anne; Sadagopan, Neeraja; Walsh, Bridget; Weber-Fox, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The potential role of phonological complexity in destabilizing the speech motor systems of adults who stutter was explored by assessing the performance of 17 adults who stutter and 17 matched control participants on a nonword repetition task. The nonwords varied in length and phonological complexity. Behavioral results revealed no differences between the stuttering and normally fluent groups on accuracy of nonword repetition. In contrast, dramatic differences between groups were observed in the kinematic data. Indices of the consistency of inter-articulator coordination revealed that adults who stutter were much less consistent in their coordinative patterns over repeated productions. With increasing length and complexity of the nonwords, between-group differences in coordinative consistency were more pronounced. Coordination consistency measures revealed that adults who stutter (but not normally fluent adults) showed within-session practice effects; their coordinative consistency improved in five later compared to five earlier productions. Adults who stutter produced the nonwords at a slower rate, but both groups showed increased rates of production on the later trials, indicating a practice effect for duration for both groups. We conclude that, though the adults who stutter performed behaviorally with the same accuracy as normally fluent adults, the nonword repetition task reveals remarkable differences in the speech motor dynamics underlying fluent speech production in adults who stutter compared to their normally fluent peers. These results support a multifactorial, dynamic model of stuttering in which linguistic complexity and utterance length are factors that contribute to the probability of breakdown of the speech motor system. PMID:20412979

  14. Dramatic Demand Reduction In The Desert Southwest

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Robert; Hsieh, Sean; Lee, Joon; Baghzouz, Yahia; Cross, Andrew; Chatterjee, Sarah

    2015-07-06

    This report summarizes a project that was funded to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), with subcontractors Pulte Homes and NV Energy. The project was motivated by the fact that locations in the Desert Southwest portion of the US demonstrate very high peak electrical demands, typically in the late afternoons in the summer. These high demands often require high priced power to supply the needs, and the large loads can cause grid supply problems. An approach was proposed through this contact that would reduce the peak electrical demands to an anticipated 65% of what code-built houses of the similar size would have. It was proposed to achieve energy reduction through four approaches applied to a development of 185 homes in northwest part of Las Vegas named Villa Trieste. First, the homes would all be highly energy efficient. Secondly, each house would have a PV array installed on it. Third, an advanced demand response technique would be developed to allow the resident to have some control over the energy used. Finally, some type of battery storage would be used in the project. Pulte Homes designed the houses. The company considered initial cost vs. long-term savings and chose options that had relatively short paybacks. HERS (Home Energy Rating Service) ratings for the homes are approximately 43 on this scale. On this scale, code-built homes rate at 100, zero energy homes rate a 0, and Energy Star homes are 85. In addition a 1.764 Wp (peak Watt) rated PV array was used on each house. This was made up of solar shakes that were in visual harmony with the roofing material used. A demand response tool was developed to control the amount of electricity used during times of peak demand. While demand response techniques have been used in the utility industry for some time, this particular approach is designed to allow the customer to decide the degree of participation in the response activity. The temperature change in the residence can be decided by the residents by adjusting settings. In a sense the customer can choose between greater comfort and greater money savings during demand response circumstances. Finally a battery application was to be considered. Initially it was thought that a large battery (probably a sodium-sulfur type) would be installed. However, after the contract was awarded, it was determined that a single, centrally-located battery system would not be appropriate for many reasons, including that with the build out plan there would not be any location to put it. The price had risen substantially since the budget for the project was put together. Also, that type of battery has to be kept hot all the time, but its use was only sought for summer operation. Hence, individual house batteries would be used, and these are discussed at the end of this report. Many aspects of the energy use for climate control in selected houses were monitored before residents moved in. This was done both to understand the magnitude of the energy flows but also to have data that could be compared to the computer simulations. The latter would be used to evaluate various aspects of our plan. It was found that good agreement existed between actual energy use and computed energy use. Hence, various studies were performed via simulations. Performance simulations showed the impact on peak energy usage between a code built house of same size and shape compared to the Villa Trieste homes with and without the PV arrays on the latter. Computations were also used to understand the effect of varying orientations of the houses in this typical housing development, including the effect of PV electrical generation. Energy conservation features of the Villa Trieste homes decreased the energy use during peak times (as well as all others), but the resulting decreased peak occurred at about the same time as the code-built houses. Consideration of the PV generation decreases the grid energy use further during daylight hours, but did not extend long enough many days to decrease the peak. Hence, a demand response approach, as planned, was needed. With participation of the residents in the demand response program developed does enable the houses to reduce the peak demand between 66% and 72%, depending on the built years. This was addressed fully in the latter part the study and is described in the latter part of this report.

  15. Dramatic Applications of Educational Technology in Corrections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, John M.

    Public offenders have special educational needs due to past histories of school failure, dropout, poverty, lack of home support, and an acquired aversion to formal education. Prison education programs, however, tend to follow traditional patterns of instruction. Educational or instructional technology deals with the problems of individualizing…

  16. Dramatic innovations in modern surgical subspecialties

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.; Sutherland, Francis; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Dixon, Elijah; MacLean, Anthony R.; Mack, Lloyd A.; Feliciano, David V.; Rajani, Ravi R.; Karmy-Jones, Riyad; Buie, W. Donald; Temple, Walley J.; Rozycki, Grace S.; Simeone, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Innovation is defined as the introduction of something new, whether an idea, method or device. In this article, we describe the most important and innovative concepts and techniques that have advanced patient care within modern surgical subspecialties. We performed a systematic literature review and consulted academic subspecialty experts to evaluate recent changes in practice. The identified innovations included reduced blood loss and improved training in hepatobiliary surgery, total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant therapies in colorectal surgery, prosthetic mesh in outpatient surgery, sentinel lymph node theory in surgical oncology, endovascular and wire-based skills in vascular and cardiovascular surgery, and the acceptance of abnormal anatomy through damage-control procedures in trauma and critical care. The common denominator among all subspecialties is an improvement in patient care manifested as a decrease in morbidity and mortality. Surgeons must continue to pursue innovative thinking, technological advances, improved training and systematic research. PMID:20858379

  17. Dramatic Improvisation as English Teaching Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazier, Gil

    1969-01-01

    Over a period of months, illiterate and disruptive Black and Puerto Rican junior high school students in New York City developed and staged an updated version of "West Side Story." Although by professional standards the results were poor, students were able to participate in a highly rewarding activity which demanded discipline, creativity and…

  18. Nutrient Addition Dramatically Accelerates Microbial Community Succession

    PubMed Central

    Knelman, Joseph E.; Schmidt, Steven K.; Lynch, Ryan C.; Darcy, John L.; Castle, Sarah C.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Nemergut, Diana R.

    2014-01-01

    The ecological mechanisms driving community succession are widely debated, particularly for microorganisms. While successional soil microbial communities are known to undergo predictable changes in structure concomitant with shifts in a variety of edaphic properties, the causal mechanisms underlying these patterns are poorly understood. Thus, to specifically isolate how nutrients – important drivers of plant succession – affect soil microbial succession, we established a full factorial nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization plot experiment in recently deglaciated (∼3 years since exposure), unvegetated soils of the Puca Glacier forefield in Southeastern Peru. We evaluated soil properties and examined bacterial community composition in plots before and one year after fertilization. Fertilized soils were then compared to samples from three reference successional transects representing advancing stages of soil development ranging from 5 years to 85 years since exposure. We found that a single application of +NP fertilizer caused the soil bacterial community structure of the three-year old soils to most resemble the 85-year old soils after one year. Despite differences in a variety of soil edaphic properties between fertilizer plots and late successional soils, bacterial community composition of +NP plots converged with late successional communities. Thus, our work suggests a mechanism for microbial succession whereby changes in resource availability drive shifts in community composition, supporting a role for nutrient colimitation in primary succession. These results suggest that nutrients alone, independent of other edaphic factors that change with succession, act as an important control over soil microbial community development, greatly accelerating the rate of succession. PMID:25050551

  19. Study Predicts Dramatic Shifts in Enrollments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evangelauf, Jean

    1991-01-01

    A new study detailing demographic shifts in the college-age population predicts growth in minority high school graduates and shrinkage or maintenance of White graduation rates. The report is the first to provide state-by-state figures on actual and projected graduates from 1986 through 1995 by racial and ethnic group. (MSE)

  20. Dramatic Change in Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, A. A.; Wong, M. H.; Rogers, J. H.; Orton, G. S.; de Pater, I.; Asay-Davis, X.; Carlson, R. W.; Marcus, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features, having been continuously observed since the 1800's. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show analyses of 2014 Hubble spectral imaging data to study the color, structure and internal dynamics of this long-live storm.

  1. Dramatic Experiences for Future Middle Level Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weilbacher, Gary; LeMasters, Julie; Gill, Lana; Wisniewski, Jessica; Arnold, Christine

    2005-01-01

    During the last three years, Lincoln Middle School has been the site of a Professional Development School partnership in conjunction with the Illinois State University Middle School Department. With more than 90% of its 400-plus students receiving free or reduced price lunches, Lincoln is an eight-year-old, "Title I" building whose students come…

  2. Schnitzler Syndrome: A Dramatic Response to Anakinra.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Ana Isabel; Micaelo, Manuela; Pierdomenico, Francesca; Freitas, João Pedro

    2016-06-01

    Schnitzler syndrome is a rare acquired systemic disease with a chronic evolution and difficult treatment. We report a 50-year-old woman with Schnitzler syndrome for 10 years, with major impact on her quality of life and refractory to conventional therapies. The patient was started on anakinra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, with a rapid and sustained remission of the syndrome manifestations. PMID:27017618

  3. Dramaturgie et interculturel (Dramatics and the Intercultural).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldhendler, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    The use of techniques from drama and psychodrama to explore intercultural differences and relations is described. The process used incorporates eight stages of discovery of perceptions, stereotypes, cultural identity, communication taboos, and bringing together individuals from different cultures. (MSE)

  4. Portrait of a Dramatic Stellar Crib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    A new, stunning image of the cosmic spider, the Tarantula Nebula and its surroundings, finally pays tribute to this amazing, vast and intricately sculpted web of stars and gas. The newly released image, made with ESO's Wide Field Imager on the 2.2-m ESO/MPG Telescope at La Silla, covers 1 square degree on the sky and could therefore contain four times the full Moon. ESO PR Photo 50a/06 ESO PR Photo 50a/06 The Tarantula Nebula (WFI/2.2m) Known as the Tarantula Nebula for its spidery appearance, the 30 Doradus complex is a monstrous stellar factory. It is the largest emission nebula in the sky, and can be seen far down in the southern sky at a distance of about 170,000 light-years, in the southern constellation Dorado (The Swordfish or the Goldfish). It is part of one of the Milky Way's neighbouring galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud. The Tarantula Nebula is thought to contain more than half a million times the mass of the Sun in gas and this vast, blazing labyrinth hosts some of the most massive stars known. The nebula owes its name to the arrangement of its brightest patches of nebulosity, that somewhat resemble the legs of a spider. They extend from a central 'body' where a cluster of hot stars (designated 'R136') illuminates and shapes the nebula. This name, of the biggest spiders on the Earth, is also very fitting in view of the gigantic proportions of the celestial nebula - it measures nearly 1,000 light-years across and extends over more than one third of a degree: almost, but not quite, the size of the full Moon. If it were in our own Galaxy, at the distance of another stellar nursery, the Orion Nebula (1,500 light-years away), it would cover one quarter of the sky and even be visible in daylight. Because astronomers believe that most of the stars in the Universe were formed in large and hectic nurseries such as the 30 Doradus region, its study is fundamental. Early this year, astronomers took a new, wide look at the spider and its web of filaments, using the Wide Field Imager on the 2.2-m MPG/ESO telescope located at La Silla, Chile, while studying the dark clouds in the region. Dark clouds are enormous clouds of gas and dust, with a mass surpassing a million times that of the Sun. They are very cold, with temperatures about -260 degrees Celsius, and are difficult to study because of the heavy walls of dust behind which they hide. Their study is however essential, as it is in their freezing wombs that stars are born. ESO PR Photo 50b/06 ESO PR Photo 50b/06 SN 1987A and the Honeycomb Nebula (WFI/2.2m) Observing in four different bands, the astronomers made a mosaic of the half-degree field of view of the instrument to obtain an image covering one square degree. With each individual image containing 64 million pixels, the resultant mosaic thus contained 4 times as many, or 256 million pixels! The observations were made in very good image quality, the 'seeing' being typically below 1 arcsecond. The image is based on data collected through four filters, including two narrow-band filters that trace hydrogen (red) and oxygen (green). The predominance of green in the Tarantula is a result of the younger, hotter stars in this region of the complex. It would be easy to get lost in the meanderings of the filamentary structures or get stuck in the web of the giant arachnid, as is easily experienced with the zoom-in feature provided on the associated photo page, and it is therefore difficult to mention all the unique objects to be discovered. Deserving closer attention perhaps is the area at the right-hand border of the Tarantula. It contains the remains of a star that exploded and was seen with the unaided eye in February 1987, i.e. almost 20 years ago. Supernova SN 1987A, as it is known, is the brightest supernova since the one observed by the German astronomer Kepler in 1604. The supernova is known to be surrounded by a ring, which can be distinguished in the image. A little to the left of SN 1987A, another distinctive feature is apparent: the Honeycomb Nebula. This characteristic bubble-like structure results apparently

  5. Hummingbird: Dramatically Reducing Interplanetary Mission Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, J. R.; Van Allen, R. E.; Sarzi-Amade, N.; Shao, A.; Taylor, C.

    2012-06-01

    The Hummingbird interplanetary spacecraft has an available delta V of 2 to 4 km/sec and a recurring cost of 2 to 3 million, depending on the payload and configuration. The baseline telescope has a resolution of 30 cm at a distance of 100 km.

  6. Dramatization of Polymeric Bonding Using Slime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarquis, A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a typical presentation in which slime is prepared for young, concrete operational students. Includes the procedures used and a summary written by a fourth-grade teacher after completing the slime experiment with her class. (JN)

  7. Revealing advantage in a quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Kaushiki; Paul, Biswajit; Sarkar, Debasis

    2016-07-01

    The assumption of source independence was used to reveal nonlocal (apart from standard Bell-CHSH scenario) nature of correlations generated in entanglement swapping experiments. In this work, we have discussed the various utilities of this assumption to reveal nonlocality (via generation of nonbilocal correlations) and thereby exploiting quantumness under lesser requirements compared to some standard means of doing the same. We have also provided with a set of sufficient criteria, imposed on the states (produced by the sources) under which source independence can reveal nonbilocal nature of correlations in a quantum network.

  8. Bacterial Motility Reveals Unknown Molecular Organization.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Ismaël; Rainville, Simon; Galstian, Tigran

    2015-11-17

    The water solubility of lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs) makes them very attractive to study the behavior of biological microorganisms in an environment where local symmetry is broken (as often encountered in nature). Several recent studies have shown a dramatic change in the behavior of flagellated bacteria when swimming in solutions of the lyotropic LC disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). In this study, the movements of Escherichia coli bacteria in DSCG-water solutions of different concentrations are observed to improve our understanding of this phenomenon. In addition, the viscosity of DSCG aqueous solutions is measured as a function of concentration at room temperature. We also experimentally identify a previously undescribed isotropic pretransition zone where bacteria start sticking to each other and to surfaces. Simple estimations show that the unbalanced osmotic pressure induced depletion force might be responsible for this sticking phenomenon. An estimate of the bacteria propulsive force and the DSCG aggregates length (versus concentration) are calculated from the measured viscosity of the medium. All these quantities are found to undergo a strong increase in the pretransition zone, starting at a threshold concentration of 6±1 wt % DSCG that is well below the known isotropic-LC transition (∼10 wt %). This study also shines light on the motility of flagellated bacteria in realistic environments, and it opens new avenues for interesting applications such as the use of motile microorganisms to probe the physical properties of their host or smart bandages that could guide bacteria out of wounds. PMID:26588572

  9. Hiding personal information reveals the worst

    PubMed Central

    John, Leslie K.; Barasz, Kate; Norton, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Seven experiments explore people’s decisions to share or withhold personal information, and the wisdom of such decisions. When people choose not to reveal information—to be “hiders”—they are judged negatively by others (experiment 1). These negative judgments emerge when hiding is volitional (experiments 2A and 2B) and are driven by decreases in trustworthiness engendered by decisions to hide (experiments 3A and 3B). Moreover, hiders do not intuit these negative consequences: given the choice to withhold or reveal unsavory information, people often choose to withhold, but observers rate those who reveal even questionable behavior more positively (experiments 4A and 4B). The negative impact of hiding holds whether opting not to disclose unflattering (drug use, poor grades, and sexually transmitted diseases) or flattering (blood donations) information, and across decisions ranging from whom to date to whom to hire. When faced with decisions about disclosure, decision-makers should be aware not just of the risk of revealing, but of what hiding reveals. PMID:26755591

  10. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.

    2011-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA's Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This presentation specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as an overview of the content of the final report for that internship.

  11. Omics strategies for revealing Yersinia pestis virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin; Han, Yanping; Zhou, Lei; Song, Yajun; Zhou, Dongsheng; Cui, Yujun

    2012-01-01

    Omics has remarkably changed the way we investigate and understand life. Omics differs from traditional hypothesis-driven research because it is a discovery-driven approach. Mass datasets produced from omics-based studies require experts from different fields to reveal the salient features behind these data. In this review, we summarize omics-driven studies to reveal the virulence features of Yersinia pestis through genomics, trascriptomics, proteomics, interactomics, etc. These studies serve as foundations for further hypothesis-driven research and help us gain insight into Y. pestis pathogenesis. PMID:23248778

  12. Revealing a Child's Pathology: Physicians' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scelles, Regine; Aubert-Godard, Anne; Gargiulo, Marcela; Avant, Monique; Gortais, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 12 physicians and 12 care-givers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. We explored physicians' experiences when they revealed a diagnosis. We also tried to understand which family members the physician was thinking of, with whom they identified themselves, and their first choice of the person to whom they prefer to…

  13. [Factor VII deficiency revealed by intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Thabet, A; Aloulou, H; Turki, H; Chabchoub, I; Mhiri, F; Mnif, Z; Ben Ali, H; Kammoun, T; Hachicha, M

    2009-07-01

    Constitutional factor VII deficiency is a hereditary disease with recessive autosomic transmission. Its incidence is estimated to be 1/1,000,000 in the general population. We report a case of severe factor VII deficiency in infancy revealed by an intracranial hemorrhage in a 2-month-old infant. We describe the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of this disease. PMID:19409767

  14. Eye Movements Reveal Dynamics of Task Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kuhns, David; Rieter, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    With the goal to determine the cognitive architecture that underlies flexible changes of control settings, we assessed within-trial and across-trial dynamics of attentional selection by tracking of eye movements in the context of a cued task-switching paradigm. Within-trial dynamics revealed a switch-induced, discrete delay in onset of…

  15. PULMONARY ARTERY ACCELERATED FLOW REVEALING HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tony; Chehab, Ghassan; Saliba, Zakhia; Smayra, Tarek; Baz, Maria; Abdo, Lynn; Haddad, Fady; Abdel-Massih, Tony

    2016-01-01

    We present a case in which transthoracic echocardiography was the first diagnostic tool to suspect mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma by revealing a change in the hemodynamic of left pulmonary artery flow, and it was used as a follow-up method for monitoring treatment efficacy by demonstrating a normalization of pulmonary artery hemodynamics. PMID:27169170

  16. The cattle genome reveals its secrets

    PubMed Central

    Burt, David W

    2009-01-01

    The domesticated cow is the latest farm animal to have its genome sequenced and deciphered. The members of the Bovine Genome Consortium have published a series of papers on the assembly and what the sequence reveals so far about the biology of this ruminant and the consequences of its domestication. PMID:19439025

  17. [Skin metastases revealing a bronchial adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Zemmez, Youssef; Zegmout, Adil; Hamama, Jalal; Bouhamidi, Ahmed; El Amraoui, Mohammed; El Azhari, Jaouad; Boui, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of bronchial carcinoma revealed by metastatic skin nodules on the scalp. This fairly common mode of discovery is often associated with poor prognosis. This study aims to underline the importance of directing the search for a primary lung cancer in cases of secondary skin involvement. PMID:27583066

  18. Septic sacroiliitis revealing an infectious endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Hariz, Anis; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man admitted for right hip ache and fever. Physical examination revealed a fever, an ache at the manipulation of the sacroiliac joint and a limitation of abduction and external rotation of the right hip. There was no murmur in cardiac auscultation. No anomaly was found at the conventional radiographs of the sacroiliac joint, while the pelvic MRI confirmed a right sacroiliitis. A sacroiliac puncture with a study of synovial fluid demonstrated the presence of Streptococcus viridans. The blood culture revealed the same germ. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography confirmed infectious endocarditis with vegetation in the mitral valve. He received penicillin G and gentamicin relayed by pristinamycin because of an allergy to penicillin G with a total duration of treatment of 40 days. His symptoms and the laboratory and radiological tests abnormalities resolved totally with no recurrence. PMID:25123569

  19. Orbital tumor revealing a systemic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Hannanachi Sassi, Samia; Dhouib, Rim; Kanchal, Fatma; Doghri, Raoudha; Boujelbene, Nadia; Bouguila, Hedi; Mrad, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Ocular involvement is seen in approximately 25% of patients with sarcoidosis. Uveitis is the most common ocular manifestation, but sarcoidosis may involve any part of the eye. Orbital manifestations of sarcoidosis are uncommon with few series in the literature. A 65-year-old woman presented with redness of the right eye and painless, unilateral eyelid swelling. Orbital scanning revealed mass infiltrating the soft tissue of the inferior right orbital quadrant. Biopsy results showed nodular, noncaseating granulomas consistent with sarcoidosis. The complete systemic workup revealed systemic manifestations of sarcoidosis at the time of examination with hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathies noted on CT scan. The orbital surgical treatment was followed by systemic prednisone therapy with good response. Although rare, orbital sarcoidosis must be considered in the evaluation of orbital tumors in elderly patients. A search for systemic findings should be undertaken and appropriate therapy should be instituted. PMID:25796029

  20. Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Revealed by Empyema.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Benali, Anas; Achaachi, Leila; El Ftouh, Mustapha; Bellarbi, Salma; Tilfine, Charaf; Taouarsa, Firdaous

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumors, manifested with a great variety of clinical features; the most common extragonadal site is the anterior mediastinum. In this case, we report the patient with a large mature mediastinal teratoma with several components of ectodermal and endothermal epithelium. A 24-year-old female patient presented with history of persistent chest pain and progressively aggravating dyspnea for the previous 3 months. A chest X-ray showed a large opacity of the entire left hemithorax. Transcutaneous needle aspiration revealed a purulent fluid. The tube thoracostomy was introduced and the effusion was evacuated. Some weeks later, patient was seen in emergency for persistent cough and lateral chest pain. CT scan revealed a mass of the left hemithorax. The mass showed heterogeneous density, without compressing mediastinum great vessels and left hilar structures. Lipase value was elevated in needle aspiration. The patient underwent a total resection of the mediastinum mass via a left posterolateral thoracotomy. Microscopy revealed a mature teratoma with cystic structures. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. This case provide benign mediastinal teratoma with total atelectasis of left lung and elevated lipase value in needle transcutaneous aspiration; this event is explained by pancreatic component in the cystic tumor. Total removal of the tumor is adequate treatment for this type of teratoma and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:27144046

  1. Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Revealed by Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Benali, Anas; Achaachi, Leila; El Ftouh, Mustapha; Bellarbi, Salma; Tilfine, Charaf; Taouarsa, Firdaous

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumors, manifested with a great variety of clinical features; the most common extragonadal site is the anterior mediastinum. In this case, we report the patient with a large mature mediastinal teratoma with several components of ectodermal and endothermal epithelium. A 24-year-old female patient presented with history of persistent chest pain and progressively aggravating dyspnea for the previous 3 months. A chest X-ray showed a large opacity of the entire left hemithorax. Transcutaneous needle aspiration revealed a purulent fluid. The tube thoracostomy was introduced and the effusion was evacuated. Some weeks later, patient was seen in emergency for persistent cough and lateral chest pain. CT scan revealed a mass of the left hemithorax. The mass showed heterogeneous density, without compressing mediastinum great vessels and left hilar structures. Lipase value was elevated in needle aspiration. The patient underwent a total resection of the mediastinum mass via a left posterolateral thoracotomy. Microscopy revealed a mature teratoma with cystic structures. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. This case provide benign mediastinal teratoma with total atelectasis of left lung and elevated lipase value in needle transcutaneous aspiration; this event is explained by pancreatic component in the cystic tumor. Total removal of the tumor is adequate treatment for this type of teratoma and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:27144046

  2. Assessment of Orbital-Optimized MP2.5 for Thermochemistry and Kinetics: Dramatic Failures of Standard Perturbation Theory Approaches for Aromatic Bond Dissociation Energies and Barrier Heights of Radical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Soydaş, Emine; Bozkaya, Uğur

    2015-04-14

    An assessment of orbital-optimized MP2.5 (OMP2.5) [ Bozkaya, U.; Sherrill, C. D. J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141, 204105 ] for thermochemistry and kinetics is presented. The OMP2.5 method is applied to closed- and open-shell reaction energies, barrier heights, and aromatic bond dissociation energies. The performance of OMP2.5 is compared with that of the MP2, OMP2, MP2.5, MP3, OMP3, CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods. For most of the test sets, the OMP2.5 method performs better than MP2.5 and CCSD, and provides accurate results. For barrier heights of radical reactions and aromatic bond dissociation energies OMP2.5-MP2.5, OMP2-MP2, and OMP3-MP3 differences become obvious. Especially, for aromatic bond dissociation energies, standard perturbation theory (MP) approaches dramatically fail, providing mean absolute errors (MAEs) of 22.5 (MP2), 17.7 (MP2.5), and 12.8 (MP3) kcal mol(-1), while the MAE values of the orbital-optimized counterparts are 2.7, 2.4, and 2.4 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Hence, there are 5-8-folds reductions in errors when optimized orbitals are employed. Our results demonstrate that standard MP approaches dramatically fail when the reference wave function suffers from the spin-contamination problem. On the other hand, the OMP2.5 method can reduce spin-contamination in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) initial guess orbitals. For overall evaluation, we conclude that the OMP2.5 method is very helpful not only for challenging open-shell systems and transition-states but also for closed-shell molecules. Hence, one may prefer OMP2.5 over MP2.5 and CCSD as an O(N(6)) method, where N is the number of basis functions, for thermochemistry and kinetics. The cost of the OMP2.5 method is comparable with that of CCSD for energy computations. However, for analytic gradient computations, the OMP2.5 method is only half as expensive as CCSD. PMID:26574366

  3. ACE Minority Concerns Report: New Demographics Reveal the "Invisible" Asians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokuyama, M. Yukie

    1989-01-01

    The dramatic shift in immigration patterns is discussed. By the end of the 1980s Asian refugees will account for 75.2 percent and Southeast Asians will total 60 percent of immigrants. The new Asians are too often excluded from special programs and scholarships and forced to compete with native-born Asians. (MLW)

  4. Blocking the ZZ domain of sequestosome1/p62 suppresses myeloma growth and osteoclast formation in vitro and induces dramatic bone formation in myeloma-bearing bones in vivo.

    PubMed

    Teramachi, J; Silbermann, R; Yang, P; Zhao, W; Mohammad, K S; Guo, J; Anderson, J L; Zhou, D; Feng, R; Myint, K-Z; Maertz, N; Beumer, J H; Eiseman, J L; Windle, J J; Xie, X-Q; Roodman, G D; Kurihara, N

    2016-02-01

    We reported that p62 (sequestosome 1) serves as a signaling hub in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) for the formation of signaling complexes, including NFκB, p38MAPK and JNK, that are involved in the increased osteoclastogenesis and multiple myeloma (MM) cell growth induced by BMSCs that are key contributors to multiple myeloma bone disease (MMBD), and demonstrated that the ZZ domain of p62 (p62-ZZ) is required for BMSC enhancement of MMBD. We recently identified a novel p62-ZZ inhibitor, XRK3F2, which inhibits MM cell growth and BMSC growth enhancement of human MM cells. In the current study, we evaluate the relative specificity of XRK3F2 for p62-ZZ, characterize XRK3F2's capacity to inhibit growth of primary MM cells and human MM cell lines, and test the in vivo effects of XRK3F2 in the immunocompetent 5TGM1 MM model. We found that XRK3F2 induces dramatic cortical bone formation that is restricted to MM containing bones and blocked the effects and upregulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), an osteoblast (OB) differentiation inhibitor that is increased in the MM bone marrow microenvironment and utilizes signaling complexes formed on p62-ZZ, in BMSC. Interestingly, XRK3F2 had no effect on non-MM bearing bone. These results demonstrate that targeting p62 in MM models has profound effects on MMBD. PMID:26286116

  5. Pseudouridine profiling reveals regulated mRNA pseudouridylation in yeast and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Carlile, Thomas M.; Rojas-Duran, Maria F.; Zinshteyn, Boris; Shin, Hakyung; Bartoli, Kristen M.; Gilbert, Wendy V.

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modification of RNA nucleosides occurs in all living organisms. Pseudouridine, the most abundant modified nucleoside in non-coding RNAs1, enhances the function of transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA by stabilizing RNA structure2–8. mRNAs were not known to contain pseudouridine, but artificial pseudouridylation dramatically affects mRNA function – it changes the genetic code by facilitating non-canonical base pairing in the ribosome decoding center9,10. However, without evidence of naturally occurring mRNA pseudouridylation, its physiological was unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of pseudouridylation in yeast and human RNAs using Pseudo-seq, a genome-wide, single-nucleotide-resolution method for pseudouridine identification. Pseudo-seq accurately identifies known modification sites as well as 100 novel sites in non-coding RNAs, and reveals hundreds of pseudouridylated sites in mRNAs. Genetic analysis allowed us to assign most of the new modification sites to one of seven conserved pseudouridine synthases, Pus1–4, 6, 7 and 9. Notably, the majority of pseudouridines in mRNA are regulated in response to environmental signals, such as nutrient deprivation in yeast and serum starvation in human cells. These results suggest a mechanism for the rapid and regulated rewiring of the genetic code through inducible mRNA modifications. Our findings reveal unanticipated roles for pseudouridylation and provide a resource for identifying the targets of pseudouridine synthases implicated in human disease11–13. PMID:25192136

  6. NREL Scientists Reveal Origin of Diverse Melting Behaviors of Aluminum Nanoclusters (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Research reveals active role of cluster symmetries on the size-sensitive, diverse melting behaviors of metallic nanoclusters, providing insight to understanding phase changes of nanoparticles for thermal energy storage. Unlike macroscopic bulk materials, intermediate-sized nanoclusters with around 55 atoms inherently exhibit size-sensitive melting changes: adding just a single atom to a nanocluster can cause a dramatic change in melting behavior. Microscopic understanding of thermal behaviors of metal nanoclusters is important for nanoscale catalysis and thermal energy storage applications. However, it is a challenge to obtain a structural interpretation at the atomic level from measured thermodynamic quantities such as heat capacity. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) revealed a clear correlation between the diverse melting behaviors of aluminum nanoclusters and cluster core symmetries. These simulations reproduced, for the first time, the size-sensitive heat capacities of aluminum nanoclusters, which exhibit several distinctive shapes associated with the diverse melting behaviors of the clusters. The size-dependent, diverse melting behaviors of the aluminum clusters are attributed to the reduced symmetry (from Td {yields} D2d {yields} Cs) with increasing the cluster sizes and can be used to help design thermal storage materials.

  7. Gemini spectroscopy of Galactic Bulge Sources: a population of hidden accreting binaries revealed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Jonker, P. G.; Torres, M. A. P.; Britt, C. T.; Johnson, C. B.; Hynes, R. I.; Greiss, S.; Steeghs, D. T. H.; Maccarone, T. J.; Heinke, C. O.; Wevers, T.

    2015-04-01

    We present Gemini spectroscopy for 21 candidate optical counterparts to X-ray sources discovered in the Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS). For the majority of the 21 sources, the optical spectroscopy establishes that they are indeed the likely counterparts. One of the criteria we used for the identification was the presence of an Hα emission line. The spectra of several sources revealed an Hα emission line only after careful subtraction of the F or G stellar spectral absorption lines. In a subclass of three of these sources, the residual Hα emission line is broad (≳ 400 km s-1) which suggests that it is formed in an accretion disc, whereas in other cases the line width is such that we currently cannot determine whether the line emission is formed in an active star/binary or in an accretion disc. GBS source CX377 shows this hidden-accretion behaviour most dramatically. The previously identified broad Hα emission of this source is not present in its Gemini spectra taken ˜1 yr later. However, broad emission is revealed after subtracting an F6 template star spectrum. The Gemini spectra of three sources (CX446, CX1004, and CXB2) as well as the presence of possible eclipses in light curves of these sources suggest that these sources are accreting binaries viewed under a high inclination.

  8. Revealing giant internal magnetic fields due to spin fluctuations in magnetically doped colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Rice, William D; Liu, Wenyong; Baker, Thomas A; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A; Klimov, Victor I; Crooker, Scott A

    2016-02-01

    Strong quantum confinement in semiconductors can compress the wavefunctions of band electrons and holes to nanometre-scale volumes, significantly enhancing interactions between themselves and individual dopants. In magnetically doped semiconductors, where paramagnetic dopants (such as Mn(2+), Co(2+) and so on) couple to band carriers via strong sp-d spin exchange, giant magneto-optical effects can therefore be realized in confined geometries using few or even single impurity spins. Importantly, however, thermodynamic spin fluctuations become increasingly relevant in this few-spin limit. In nanoscale volumes, the statistical fluctuations of N spins are expected to generate giant effective magnetic fields Beff, which should dramatically impact carrier spin dynamics, even in the absence of any applied field. Here we directly and unambiguously reveal the large Beff that exist in Mn(2+)-doped CdSe colloidal nanocrystals using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. At zero applied magnetic field, extremely rapid (300-600 GHz) spin precession of photoinjected electrons is observed, indicating Beff ∼ 15 -30 T for electrons. Precession frequencies exceed 2 THz in applied magnetic fields. These signals arise from electron precession about the random fields due to statistically incomplete cancellation of the embedded Mn(2+) moments, thereby revealing the initial coherent dynamics of magnetic polaron formation, and highlighting the importance of magnetization fluctuations on carrier spin dynamics in nanomaterials. PMID:26595331

  9. Aquatic insect ecophysiological traits reveal phylogenetically based differences in dissolved cadmium susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Buchwalter, David B.; Cain, Daniel J.; Martin, Caitrin A.; Xie, Lingtian; Luoma, Samuel N.; Garland, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    We used a phylogenetically based comparative approach to evaluate the potential for physiological studies to reveal patterns of diversity in traits related to susceptibility to an environmental stressor, the trace metal cadmium (Cd). Physiological traits related to Cd bioaccumulation, compartmentalization, and ultimately susceptibility were measured in 21 aquatic insect species representing the orders Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera. We mapped these experimentally derived physiological traits onto a phylogeny and quantified the tendency for related species to be similar (phylogenetic signal). All traits related to Cd bioaccumulation and susceptibility exhibited statistically significant phylogenetic signal, although the signal strength varied among traits. Conventional and phylogenetically based regression models were compared, revealing great variability within orders but consistent, strong differences among insect families. Uptake and elimination rate constants were positively correlated among species, but only when effects of body size and phylogeny were incorporated in the analysis. Together, uptake and elimination rates predicted dramatic Cd bioaccumulation differences among species that agreed with field-based measurements. We discovered a potential tradeoff between the ability to eliminate Cd and the ability to detoxify it across species, particularly mayflies. The best-fit regression models were driven by phylogenetic parameters (especially differences among families) rather than functional traits, suggesting that it may eventually be possible to predict a taxon's physiological performance based on its phylogenetic position, provided adequate physiological information is available for close relatives. There appears to be great potential for evolutionary physiological approaches to augment our understanding of insect responses to environmental stressors in nature. PMID:18559853

  10. Middle atmosphere composition revealed by satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M., III; Solomon, S.; Mccormick, M. P.; Miller, A. J.; Barnett, J. J.; Jones, R. L.; Rusch, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    A series of plots that describe the state of the stratosphere and to some degree, the mesosphere as revealed by satellite observations are shown. The pertinent instrument features, spatial and temporal coverage, and details of accuracy and precision for the experiments providing the data were described. The main features of zonal mean cross sections and polar stereographic projections were noted and intercomparisons were discussed where a parameter was measured by more than one experiment. The main purpose was to collect the available data in one place and provide enough inforamation on limitations or cautions about the data so that they could be used in model comparisons and science studies.

  11. Trench Reveals Two Faces of Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image mosaic from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a trench dug by the rover in the vicinity of the 'Anatolia' region. Two imprints from the rover's Mossbauer spectrometer instrument were left in the exposed soils. Detailed comparisons between soils exposed at the surface and those found at depth reveal that surface soils have higher levels of hematite while subsurface soils show fine particles derived from basalt. The trench is approximately 11 centimeters deep. This image was taken on sol 81 with the panoramic camera's 430-, 530- and 750-nanometer filters.

  12. Reveal quantum correlation in complementary bases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengjun; Ma, Zhihao; Chen, Zhihua; Yu, Sixia

    2014-01-01

    An essential feature of genuine quantum correlation is the simultaneous existence of correlation in complementary bases. We reveal this feature of quantum correlation by defining measures based on invariance under a basis change. For a bipartite quantum state, the classical correlation is the maximal correlation present in a certain optimum basis, while the quantum correlation is characterized as a series of residual correlations in the mutually unbiased bases. Compared with other approaches to quantify quantum correlation, our approach gives information-theoretical measures that directly reflect the essential feature of quantum correlation. PMID:24503595

  13. Cerebral venous thrombosis revealing an ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Taous, Abdellah; Berri, Maha Aït; Lamsiah, Taoufik; Zainoun, Brahim; Ziadi, Tarik; Rouimi, Abdelhadi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has been reported as an uncommon and devastating complication of ulcerative colitis (UC), with an annual incidence varying between 0,5 to 6,7%. It is suspected to be a consequence of the hypercoagulable state occurring during disease relapse. We report a case of 22-year-old female patient presenting with CVT revealing an UC. Our case raises the awareness among health professionals about the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as a rare etiology of CVT, and signifies the importance of considering antithrombotic prophylaxis in all hospitalised IBD patients, especially those with active disease. PMID:27279947

  14. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  15. What Eye Movements Reveal about Deaf Readers

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Nathalie N.; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Levels of illiteracy in the deaf populations around the world have been extremely high for decades and much higher than the illiteracy levels found in the general population. Research has mostly focused on deaf readers’ difficulties rather than on their strengths, which can then inform reading education. Deaf readers are a unique population. They process language and the world surrounding them mostly via the visual channel and this greatly affects how they read or might learn to read. The study of eye movements in reading provides highly sophisticated information about how words and sentences are processed and our research with deaf readers reveals the importance of their uniqueness. PMID:26594098

  16. Apocalypto: revealing lost text with XMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, David; Davis, Graham R.; Lai, Yu-kun; Rosin, Paul

    2014-09-01

    "Can brute-force high-contrast tomography techniques and image processing techniques retrieve textual content from damaged heritage materials?" The Dental Institute at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) is the leading centre for very high contrast X-Ray Microtomography imaging. The Apocalypto Project is our collaboration with the heritage community and experts in Computer Vision systems in the Computer Science Department at Cardiff University. This collaboration has developed techniques and a workflow that allows us to reveal textual content from moisture-damaged parchment rolls. This article will also present some initial results from burned and heat shrunken parchment rolls, an insect damaged Mamluk cap and a birch bark roll.

  17. Saturn's secrets revealed - A special report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, C.

    1980-11-01

    Scientific results of the encounter of Voyager 1 with Saturn are reported. Instruments on the Voyager spacecraft, which was launched on September 5, 1977 and flew within 124,200 km of the Saturn cloud tops on November 12, 1980, revealed the presence of several hundred rings within the six visible from earth, as well as eccentric rings, braiding and clumps within the narrow F ring, and spoke-like structures in the B ring. During its flight beneath the ring plane, Voyager 1 also discovered that the rings extend toward the visible surface of the cloud tops, and are composed of ice chunks or silicate with an icy coating about a meter in diameter. Observations of Titan revealed the satellite to have a dense atmosphere, composed primarily of molecular nitrogen, with as many as three layers of haze above the cloud tops. Three additional moons of Saturn were discovered apparently focusing ring particles, and the moon Janus, discovered from earth in 1966, was shown to be actually two moons. Close approaches to other Saturn satellites show Mimas, Tethys, Dione and Rhea to be heavily cratered, icy bodies, some with features indicating they had been struck by objects almost large enough to shatter them. Surface features on Saturn, which is covered by a deep layer of haze, and the details of the Saturn magnetosphere have also been observed.

  18. Exertional rhabdomyolysis and exercise intolerance revealing dystrophinopathies.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, D; Baeta Machado, A M; Putzu, G A; Malzac, P; Voelckel, M A; Pellissier, J F

    1997-07-01

    Exercise intolerance associated with myalgias, muscle cramps or myoglobinuria may be associated with a dystrophinopathy. A search for abnormal dystrophin expression (using immunohistochemistry, immunoblot and DNA analysis) was carried out in a series of 15 patients. They were selected because they presented exercise intolerance, negative biochemical tests (lipid, glycogen and mitochondrial metabolism) and abnormal immunohistochemistry with at least one anti-dystrophin antibody (anti-Dys 1, rod domain; anti-Dys 2, C terminus; anti-Dys 3, N terminus). Lack of anti-Dys 1 immunoreactivity was seen in three patients and abnormal immunoreactivity with all three anti-dystrophin antibodies in two. Immunoblot confirmed the dystrophinopathy in these five patients only, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction DNA analysis revealed a deletion in the dystrophin gene in two of these patients, affecting the proximal part of the rod domain in one and the distal part of this domain in the other. The clinical, biological and histopathological features of the five patients reported here, together with the previous cases reported in the literature, are described and reveal that exercise intolerance associated with dystrophinopathy displays characteristic clinical, biological and immunohistochemical features and defines a new dystrophinopathy phenotype. The absence of staining in the rod domain provides a secure diagnosis of this syndrome. Dystrophinopathy is one etiology of idiopathic myoglobinuria, requiring genetic counseling. PMID:9224530

  19. Mammalian phylogeny reveals recent diversification rate shifts.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Tanja

    2011-04-12

    Phylogenetic trees of present-day species allow investigation of the rate of evolution that led to the present-day diversity. A recent analysis of the mammalian phylogeny challenged the view of explosive mammalian evolution after the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary (65 Mya). However, due to lack of appropriate methods, the diversification (speciation minus extinction) rates in the more recent past of mammalian evolution could not be determined. In this paper, I provide a method that reveals that the tempo of mammalian evolution did not change until ∼ 33 Mya. This constant period was followed by a peak of diversification rates between 33 and 30 Mya. Thereafter, diversification rates remained high and constant until 8.55 Mya. Diversification rates declined significantly at 8.55 and 3.35 Mya. Investigation of mammalian subgroups (marsupials, placentals, and the six largest placental subgroups) reveals that the diversification rate peak at 33-30 Mya is mainly driven by rodents, cetartiodactyla, and marsupials. The recent diversification rate decrease is significant for all analyzed subgroups but eulipotyphla, cetartiodactyla, and primates. My likelihood approach is not limited to mammalian evolution. It provides a robust framework to infer diversification rate changes and mass extinction events in phylogenies, reconstructed from, e.g., present-day species or virus data. In particular, the method is very robust toward noise and uncertainty in the phylogeny and can account for incomplete taxon sampling. PMID:21444816

  20. Interior Evolution of Ceres Revealed by Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Carol A.; Park, Ryan S.; Konopliv, Alex S.; Bland, Michael T.; Marchi, Simone; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; McCord, Thomas B.; Jaumann, Ralf; Russell, Christopher T.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    Dawn's exploration of Ceres has revealed its geophysical characteristics, informing the processes that have shaped it. Dawn has determined the average diameter of Ceres to be 940 km, smaller than the previously estimated 975 km [1]. This implies a density of 2160 kg/m3, indicating that Ceres is less differentiated than predicted [2]. The low-degree gravity field is consistent with the body being in hydrostatic equilibrium and the magnitude of J2 implies some central condensation. Ceres' entire surface is cratered, implying the lack of a thick (10's of km) water ice layer at the surface. Variability in Ceres' crater morphology indicates that the near-surface layer has variable strength and rheology, likely due to heterogeneity in the near-surface mixture of rock, ice and salt. The lack of a number of expected large impact basins on Ceres can be interpreted to be the result of viscous relaxation, resurfacing or a combination of both. These data provide insights into Ceres' thermal evolution and mechanical properties, which appear to be unique to this warm, icy body.[1] Thomas, P. C., et al., Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape, Nature, 437, 224-226, 2005; [2] McCord et al., Ceres: Its Origin, Evolution and Structure and Dawn's Potential Contribution, Space Sci Rev DOI 10.1007/s11214-010-9729-9, 2011.

  1. The Dramatic Effects of C-S-O-H-Cl on the Melt-Fluid Partitioning of Cl and the Challenge of Accurately Modeling Cl Concentrations of Evolving Magmatic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, J. D.; Sintoni, M. F.; de Vivo, B.

    2007-12-01

    New experimental constraints on the distribution of Cl between Vesuvius phonolite melt and H2O-, CO2-, SO2-, and Cl-bearing vapor, vapor plus saline liquid, or saline liquid have been determined at 200 MPa and 900°C. Some experiments involve melts saturated in all four volatile components. The addition of small quantities of SO2, CO2, and SO2 plus CO2 to fluids dominated by water and alkali chlorides causes dramatic reductions in DXCl (mole fraction Cl in fluid(s)/mole fraction Cl in silicate melt). Experiments with XCO2fluid of 0.15 or XSO2fluid of 0.15 are characterized by values of DXCl that are an order of magnitude lower than those of S- and C-free runs. This observation has important consequences for open systems that exsolve CO2- and/or SO2-enriched fluids "early" in the chemical differentiation of magma. Extrapolation of our experimental results to other pressures and for other melt compositions indicates that CO2- and/or SO2-bearing fluids will not sequester significant abundances of Cl from magma. Thus, CO2- and/or SO2-enriched fluids that exsolve and escape "early" from magma will not dramatically alter the magmatic Cl content. This is consistent with the oft-quoted, general degassing order of: C (first), S, Cl, and H2O (last) associated with decreasing pressure. To apply these new partitioning data to models of the exsolution and chemical evolution of magmatic fluids, they must be integrated with experimental constraints on other parameters that also strongly influence the distribution of Cl between melts and fluids (e.g., pressure, temperature, melt composition, and the Cl content of the bulk system). Expressed as DXCl, published values for Cl partitioning range from 20 (with felsic melts) to ca. 0.4 (with mafic melts), but DXCl is a complex function of these parameters. For example, DXCl increases by an order of magnitude as temperature decreases from 1000° to 800°C with vapor-saturated felsic melts at 200 MPa. Conversely, DXCl decreases by an

  2. IL-1beta, but not BMP-7 leads to a dramatic change in the gene expression pattern of human adult articular chondrocytes--portraying the gene expression pattern in two donors.

    PubMed

    Saas, J; Haag, J; Rueger, D; Chubinskaya, S; Sohler, F; Zimmer, R; Bartnik, E; Aigner, T

    2006-10-01

    Anabolic and catabolic cytokines and growth factors such as BMP-7 and IL-1beta play a central role in controlling the balance between degradation and repair of normal and (osteo)arthritic articular cartilage matrix. In this report, we investigated the response of articular chondrocytes to these factors IL-1beta and BMP-7 in terms of changes in gene expression levels. Large scale analysis was performed on primary human adult articular chondrocytes isolated from two human, independent donors cultured in alginate beads (non-stimulated and stimulated with IL-1beta and BMP-7 for 48 h) using Affymetrix gene chips (oligo-arrays). Biostatistical and bioinformatic evaluation of gene expression pattern was performed using the Resolver software (Rosetta). Part of the results were confirmed using real-time PCR. IL-1beta modulated significantly 909 out of 3459 genes detectable, whereas BMP-7 influenced only 36 out of 3440. BMP-7 induced mainly anabolic activation of chondrocytes including classical target genes such as collagen type II and aggrecan, while IL-1beta, both, significantly modulated the gene expression levels of numerous genes; namely, IL-1beta down-regulated the expression of anabolic genes and induced catabolic genes and mediators. Our data indicate that BMP-7 has only a limited effect on differentiated cells, whereas IL-1beta causes a dramatic change in gene expression pattern, i.e. induced or repressed much more genes. This presumably reflects the fact that BMP-7 signaling is effected via one pathway only (i.e. Smad-pathway) whereas IL-1beta is able to signal via a broad variety of intracellular signaling cascades involving the JNK, p38, NFkB and Erk pathways and even influencing BMP signaling. PMID:17161615

  3. Substitution of the Lys Linker with the β-Ala Linker Dramatically Decreased the Renal Uptake of 99mTc-Labeled Arg-X-Asp-Conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-Conjugated α-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the substitution of the Lys linker with the β-Ala could reduce the renal uptake of 99mTc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RSD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (1) {c[Arg-Ser-Asp-dTyr-Asp]-β-Ala-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2}, RTD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (2), RVD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (3), RAD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (4), NAD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (5), and EAD-β-Ala-(Arg11)CCMSH (6) peptides were synthesized and evaluated for their melanocortin 1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution of their 99mTc-conjugates were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The substitution of the Lys linker with β-Ala linker dramatically reduced the renal uptake of all six 99mTc-peptides. 99mTc-4 exhibited the highest melanoma uptake (15.66 ± 6.19% ID/g) and the lowest kidney uptake (20.18 ± 3.86% ID/g) among these 99mTc-peptides at 2 h postinjection. The B16/F1 melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT using 99mTc-4 as an imaging probe. PMID:25290883

  4. Semantic priming revealed by mouse movement trajectories.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kunchen; Yamauchi, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Congruency effects are taken as evidence that semantic information can be processed automatically. However, these effects are often weak, and the straightforward association between primes and targets can exaggerate congruency effects. To address these problems, a mouse movement method is applied to scrutinize congruency effects. In one experiment, participants judged whether two numbers were the same ("3\\3") or different ("3\\5"), preceded by briefly presented pictures with either positive or negative connotations. Participants indicated their responses by clicking a "Same" or "Different" button on the computer screen, while their cursor trajectories were recorded for each trial. The trajectory data revealed greater deviation to unselected buttons in incongruent trials (e.g., "3\\5" preceded by a green traffic light picture). This effect was influenced by the type of responses but not by prime durations. We suggest that the mouse movement method can complement the reaction time to study masked semantic priming. PMID:24797040

  5. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-Lin; Horita, Jusuke; Perfect, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  6. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L.; Bass, Hank W.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  7. Social patterns revealed through random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Camellia; Jalan, Sarika

    2014-11-01

    Despite the tremendous advancements in the field of network theory, very few studies have taken weights in the interactions into consideration that emerge naturally in all real-world systems. Using random matrix analysis of a weighted social network, we demonstrate the profound impact of weights in interactions on emerging structural properties. The analysis reveals that randomness existing in particular time frame affects the decisions of individuals rendering them more freedom of choice in situations of financial security. While the structural organization of networks remains the same throughout all datasets, random matrix theory provides insight into the interaction pattern of individuals of the society in situations of crisis. It has also been contemplated that individual accountability in terms of weighted interactions remains as a key to success unless segregation of tasks comes into play.

  8. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome.

    PubMed

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L; Bass, Hank W; Buckler, Edward S

    2016-05-31

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  9. Revealing effective classifiers through network comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Fefferman, Nina H.

    2014-11-01

    The ability to compare complex systems can provide new insight into the fundamental nature of the processes captured, in ways that are otherwise inaccessible to observation. Here, we introduce the n-tangle method to directly compare two networks for structural similarity, based on the distribution of edge density in network subgraphs. We demonstrate that this method can efficiently introduce comparative analysis into network science and opens the road for many new applications. For example, we show how the construction of a “phylogenetic tree” across animal taxa according to their social structure can reveal commonalities in the behavioral ecology of the populations, or how students create similar networks according to the University size. Our method can be expanded to study many additional properties, such as network classification, changes during time evolution, convergence of growth models, and detection of structural changes during damage.

  10. Metabolomics reveals metabolic biomarkers of Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, J.K.; Willing, B.; Lucio, M.; Fekete, A.; Dicksved, J.; Halfvarson, J.; Tysk, C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The causes and etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) are currently unknown although both host genetics and environmental factors play a role. Here we used non-targeted metabolic profiling to determine the contribution of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota towards disease status of the host. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) was used to discern the masses of thousands of metabolites in fecal samples collected from 17 identical twin pairs, including healthy individuals and those with CD. Pathways with differentiating metabolites included those involved in the metabolism and or synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, bile acids and arachidonic acid. Several metabolites were positively or negatively correlated to the disease phenotype and to specific microbes previously characterized in the same samples. Our data reveal novel differentiating metabolites for CD that may provide diagnostic biomarkers and/or monitoring tools as well as insight into potential targets for disease therapy and prevention.

  11. Chain networking revealed by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yexin; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Based on Kremer-Grest model for entangled polymer melts, we demonstrate how the response of a polymer glass depends critically on the chain length. After quenching two melts of very different chain lengths (350 beads per chain and 30 beads per chain) into deeply glassy states, we subject them to uniaxial extension. Our MD simulations show that the glass of long chains undergoes stable necking after yielding whereas the system of short chains is unable to neck and breaks up after strain localization. During ductile extension of the polymer glass made of long chain significant chain tension builds up in the load-bearing strands (LBSs). Further analysis is expected to reveal evidence of activation of the primary structure during post-yield extension. These results lend support to the recent molecular model 1 and are the simulations to demonstrate the role of chain networking. This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859)

  12. Licking Microstructure Reveals Rapid Attenuation of Neophobia

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Kevin J.; Rubin, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    Many animals hesitate when initially consuming a novel food and increase their consumption of that food between the first and second sessions of access—a process termed attenuation of neophobia (AN). AN has received attention as a model of learning and memory; it has been suggested that plasticity resulting from an association of the novel tastant with “safe outcome” results in a change in the neural response to the tastant during the second session, such that consumption increases. Most studies have reported that AN emerges only an hour or more after the end of the first exposure to the tastant, consistent with what is known of learning-related plasticity. But these studies have typically measured consumption, rather than real-time behavior, and thus the possibility exists that a more rapidly developing AN remains to be discovered. Here, we tested this possibility, examining both consumption and individual lick times in a novel variant of a brief-access task (BAT). When quantified in terms of consumption, data from the BAT accorded well with the results of a classic one-bottle task—both revealed neophobia/AN specific to higher concentrations (for instance, 28mM) of saccharin. An analysis of licking microstructure, however, additionally revealed a real-time correlate of neophobia—an explicit tendency, similarly specific for 28-mM saccharin, to cut short the initial bout of licks in a single trial (compared with water). This relative hesitancy (i.e., the shortness of the first lick bout to 28-mM saccharin compared with water) that constitutes neophobia not only disappeared between sessions but also gradually declined in magnitude across session 1. These data demonstrate that the BAT accurately measures AN, and that aspects of AN—and the processes underlying familiarization—begin within minutes of the very first taste. PMID:24363269

  13. Ceres Revealed in a Grain of Salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Fries, M.; Chan, Q. H.-S.; Kebukawa, Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Komatsu, M.; Ohsumi, K.; Steele, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Zag and Monahans (1998) are H chondrite regolith breccias containing 4.5 giga-year-old halite crystals which contain abundant inclusions of aqueous fluids, solids and organics. These all originated on a cryo-volcanically-active C class asteroid, probably 1 Ceres; the halite was transported to the regolith of the H chondrite parent asteroid, potentially 6 Hebe. Detailed analysis of these solids will thus potentially reveal the mineralogy of Ceres. Mineralogy of solids in the Monahans Halite Solid grains are present in the halites, which were entrained within the mother brines during eruption, including material from the interior and surface of the erupting body. The solids include abundant, widely variable organics that could not have been significantly heated (which would have resulted in the loss of fluids from the halite). Our analyses by Raman microprobe, SEM/EDX, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, UPLC-FD/QToF-MS, C-XANES and TEM reveal that these trapped grains include macromolecular carbon (MMC) similar in structure to CV3 chondrite matrix carbon, aliphatic carbon compounds, olivine (Fo99-59), high- and low-Ca pyroxene, feldspars, phyllosilicates, magnetite, sulfides, metal, lepidocrocite, carbonates, diamond, apatite and zeolites. Conclusions: The halite in Monahans and Zag derive from a water and carbon-rich object that was cryo-volcanically active in the early solar system, probably Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft found that Ceres includes C chondrite materials. Our samples include both protolith and aqueously-altered samples of the body, permitting understanding of alteration conditions. Whatever the halite parent body, it was rich in a wide variety of organics and warm, liquid water at the solar system's dawn.

  14. Space Movie Reveals Shocking Secrets Of The Crab Pulsa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    Just when it seemed like the summer movie season had ended, two of NASA's Great Observatories have produced their own action movie. Multiple observations made over several months with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope captured the spectacle of matter and antimatter propelled to near the speed of light by the Crab pulsar, a rapidly rotating neutron star the size of Manhattan. "Through this movie, the Crab Nebula has come to life," said Jeff Hester of Arizona State University in Tempe, lead author of a paper in the September 20th issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "We can see how this awesome cosmic generator actually works." The Crab was first observed by Chinese astronomers in 1054 A.D. and has since become one of the most studied objects in the sky. By combining the power of both Chandra and Hubble, the movie reveals features never seen in still images. By understanding the Crab, astronomers hope to unlock the secrets of how similar objects across the universe are powered. Crab Nebula Composite Image Crab Nebula Composite Image Bright wisps can be seen moving outward at half the speed of light to form an expanding ring that is visible in both X-ray and optical images. These wisps appear to originate from a shock wave that shows up as an inner X-ray ring. This ring consists of about two dozen knots that form, brighten and fade, jitter around, and occasionally undergo outbursts that give rise to expanding clouds of particles, but remain in roughly the same location. "These data leave little doubt that the inner X-ray ring is the location of the shock wave that turns the high-speed wind from the pulsar into extremely energetic particles," said Koji Mori of Penn State University in University Park, a coauthor of the paper. Another dramatic feature of the movie is a turbulent jet that lies perpendicular to the inner and outer rings. Violent internal motions are obvious, as is a slow motion outward into the surrounding nebula of

  15. Carbon limitation reveals allocation priority to defense compounds in peppermint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkelova, Lenka; Unsicker, Sybille; Forkel, Matthias; Huang, Jianbei; Trumbore, Susan; Hartmann, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    Studies of carbon partitioning during insect or pathogen infestation reveal high carbon investment into induced chemical defenses to deter the biotic agent (Baldwin, 1998). However, little is known how carbon investment into chemical defenses changes under abiotic stress such as drought. Drought forces plants to close their stomata to prevent water loss through transpiration while decreasing the amount of assimilated carbon. Furthermore drought hampers carbohydrates translocation due to declining plant hydration and reduced phloem functioning (McDowell, 2011; Hartmann et al., 2013; Sevanto, 2014). Hence long lasting drought can force plants into carbon starvation. The aim of our study was to disentangle carbon allocation priorities between growth, maintenance metabolism, storage and production of defense compounds under carbon limiting conditions using peppermint as our model plant. Drought is not the only method how to manipulate plant carbon metabolism and photosynthetic yield. Exposing plants to reduced [CO2] air is a promising tool simulating drought induced carbon limitation without affecting phloem functioning and so carbohydrate translocation (Hartmann et al., 2015). We exposed peppermint plants to drought (50% of the control irrigation) and to low [CO2] (progressive decrease from 350 ppm to 20 ppm) to disentangle hydraulic failure from carbon starvation effects on carbon allocation. Drought was applied as a cross-treatment yielding four treatments: watered and high [CO2] (W+CO2), drought and high [CO2] (D+CO2), water and low [CO2] (W-CO2), drought and low [CO2] (D-CO2). We analyzed the most abundant terpenoid defense compounds (α-Pinene, sabinene, myrcene, limonene, menthone, menthol and pulegone) and used continuous 13CO2 labelling to trace allocation pattern of new and old assimilated carbon in the four carbon sinks (structural biomass, water soluble sugars, starch and terpenoid defense compounds) in young expanding leaf tissue. This leaf tissue grew

  16. Landsat 7 Reveals Large-scale Fractal Motion of Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Landsat 7 image of clouds off the Chilean coast near the Juan Fernandez Islands (also known as the Robinson Crusoe Islands) on September 15, 1999, shows a unique pattern called a 'von Karman vortex street.' This pattern has long been studied in the laboratory, where the vortices are created by oil flowing past a cylindrical obstacle, making a string of vortices only several tens of centimeters long. Study of this classic 'flow past a circular cylinder' has been very important in the understanding of laminar and turbulent fluid flow that controls a wide variety of phenomena, from the lift under an aircraft wing to Earth's weather. Here, the cylinder is replaced by Alejandro Selkirk Island (named after the true 'Robinson Crusoe,' who was stranded here for many months in the early 1700s). The island is about 1.5 km in diameter, and rises 1.6 km into a layer of marine stratocumulus clouds. This type of cloud is important for its strong cooling of the Earth's surface, partially counteracting the Greenhouse warming. An extended, steady equatorward wind creates vortices with clockwise flow off the eastern edge and counterclockwise flow off the western edge of the island. The vortices grow as they advect hundreds of kilometers downwind, making a street 10,000 times longer than those made in the laboratory. Observing the same phenomenon extended over such a wide range of sizes dramatizes the 'fractal' nature of atmospheric convection and clouds. Fractals are characteristic of fluid flow and other dynamic systems that exhibit 'chaotic' motions. Both clockwise and counter-clockwise vortices are generated by flow around the island. As the flow separates from the island's leeward (away from the source of the wind) side, the vortices 'swallow' some of the clear air over the island. (Much of the island air is cloudless due to a local 'land breeze' circulation set up by the larger heat capacity of the waters surrounding the island.) The 'swallowed' gulps of clear island air

  17. Mechanistic insights into EGFR membrane clustering revealed by super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing; Wang, Ye; Cai, Mingjun; Pan, Yangang; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Ji, Hongbin; Wang, Hongda

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of membrane receptors such as EGFR is critical for various biological processes, for example cell signaling and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, we used a super resolution imaging technique, which has shattered the longstanding resolution barrier of light diffraction, to investigate the distribution of membrane EGFR on apical or basal surfaces of COS-7 cells and on the surface of suspended COS-7 cells. Our data show that more and larger EGFR clusters are detected on the apical surface in comparison with those on the basal surface and this difference is not affected by the EGFR activation state, whereas suspended COS-7 cells exhibit a moderate clustering state and a homogeneous distribution pattern, indicating that the external environment surrounding the cell membrane is the decisive factor in the EGFR clustering pattern. A dual-color dSTORM image reveals the significant colocalization of EGFR and lipid rafts; interestingly MβCD treatment leads to a dramatic decrease of the amount and size of EGFR clusters on both apical and basal surfaces, highlighting a key role of lipid rafts in EGFR cluster formation. Altogether, our results illustrate the distribution pattern of EGFR in polarized cells and uncover the essential role of lipid rafts in EGFR cluster maintenance.The clustering of membrane receptors such as EGFR is critical for various biological processes, for example cell signaling and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, we used a super resolution imaging technique, which has shattered the longstanding resolution barrier of light diffraction, to investigate the distribution of membrane EGFR on apical or basal surfaces of COS-7 cells and on the surface of suspended COS-7 cells. Our data show that more and larger EGFR clusters are detected on the apical surface in comparison with those on the basal surface and this difference is not affected by the EGFR

  18. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ quantification of soil-plant water fluxes have not been fully successful due to a lack of non-destructive techniques capable of revealing roots or water fluxes at relevant spatial scales. Neutron imaging is a unique non-invasive tool that can assess sub-millimeter scale material properties and transport in situ, and which has been successfully applied to characterize soil and plant water status. Here, we have applied neutron radiography and tomography to quantify water transport through individual maize roots in response to internal plant demand. Zea mays seedlings were grown for 10 days in Flint silica sand within 2.6 cm diameter Al chambers. Using a reactor-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (HFIR), water fluxes were tracked through the maize soil-root systems by collecting consecutive neutron radiographs over a 12 h period following irrigation with D2O. D has a much lower neutron attenuation than H, thus D2O displacement of existing H2O within the plant vascular system, or influx of D2O into previously dry tissue or soil is readily tracked by changes in image intensity through time. Plant water release and uptake was regulated by periodically cycling on a high-intensity grow light. From each maize replicate, selected regions of interest (ROI) were delineated around individual roots, root free soil, stem and leaf segments. Changes in ROI were tracked through time to reveal patterns of water flux. The hydration of root and stem tissue cycled in response to illumination; root water content often increased during darkness, then decreased with illumination as water was transported from the root into the stem. Relative root-shoot hydration through time illustrates the balance between demand, storage capacity and uptake, which varies depending on root characteristics and its localized soil environment. The dynamic transport of water between soil, individual roots, stems and leaves was readily visualized and quantified illustrating the value

  19. Revealing the Hot Side of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, Donald; Stencel, Robert; Howell, Steve

    2012-12-01

    We request a small investment of 24 minutes of Spitzer time, to obtain four IRAC observations of epsilon Aurigae. A naked eye object located near Capella, epsilon Aurigae is the eclipsing binary star with the longest known orbital period, showing a single long duration (~2 yr) eclipse every 27.1 yr. For much of the last 200 years, the nature of the eclipsing object defied explanation. We recently demonstrated that epsilon Aurigae consists of a high luminosity F0 post-AGB star in orbit with a B5 V star surrounded by a solar system sized (~8 AU diameter) disk of cool, dust-dominated material. The eclipse of epsilon Aurigae is a rare event; moreover, it is a unique astrophysical opportunity, since the backlighting of the disk by the high luminosity eclipsed star reveals details that cannot be detected in similar dusty disks around single stars. The current eclipse started in August 2009 and ended in July 2011; we are now in the post-eclipse phase, when the irradiation-heated side of the disk will begin rotating into view. The goals for these observations include: (1) extend our ongoing IRAC monitoring campaign covering the current eclipse to post-eclipse visits; (2) provide a consistent, well-calibrated space-based set of IR photometry for comparison with ongoing ground-based work; and (3) use the composite results to constrain the thermal profile of the disk. A key expectation of these particular observations is to reveal the irradiation-heated portion of the disk, which will be visible on its trailing side following eclipse. Observations of this side of the disk will be crucial to test and constrain new models of disk structure. As part of our overall monitoring campaign with Spitzer, Hubble, Herschel, and numerous ground-based facilities, these proposed observations will make an important contribution to the understanding of stellar evolution in binary stars, including mass transfer and evolution studies, along with new insights into astrophysical disks and post

  20. Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use.

    PubMed

    Gable, Jacob T; Crowder, David W; Northfield, Tobin D; Steffan, Shawn A; Snyder, William E

    2012-09-01

    Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying complementary niches. Demonstrating niche complementarity among species is challenging, however, due to the difficulty in relating differences between species in particular traits to their use of complementary resources. Here, we overcame this obstacle by exploiting plastic foraging behavior in a community of predatory insects common on Brassica oleracea plants in Washington, USA. These predators complemented one another by partitioning foraging space, with some species foraging primarily along leaf edges and others at leaf centers. We hypothesized that emergent biodiversity effects would occur when predators partitioned foraging space on leaves, but not when spatial complementarity was dampened. Indeed, on intact leaves, edge- and center-foraging predators combined to kill more prey than any single predator species could by itself. These emergent diversity effects, however, disappeared on plants damaged by the caterpillar Plutella xylostella. Caterpillar chew-holes brought edge habitats to the center of leaves, so that all predator species could attack aphids anywhere on plants. With spatial niche differences diminished, there were no benefits of predator diversity; the most voracious single predator species killed the most aphids. Thus, caterpillar herbivory determined whether multi-predator-species effects reflected complementarity or species' individual impacts. Our study provides direct evidence for a causative relationship between niche differentiation and increased resource consumption by diverse communities, as revealed by ecological engineers that homogenize the foraging environment. PMID:23094370

  1. VISTA Reveals the Secret of the Unicorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    A new infrared image from ESO's VISTA survey telescope reveals an extraordinary landscape of glowing tendrils of gas, dark clouds and young stars within the constellation of Monoceros (the Unicorn). This star-forming region, known as Monoceros R2, is embedded within a huge dark cloud. The region is almost completely obscured by interstellar dust when viewed in visible light, but is spectacular in the infrared. An active stellar nursery lies hidden inside a massive dark cloud rich in molecules and dust in the constellation of Monoceros. Although it appears close in the sky to the more familiar Orion Nebula it is actually almost twice as far from Earth, at a distance of about 2700 light-years. In visible light a grouping of massive hot stars creates a beautiful collection of reflection nebulae where the bluish starlight is scattered from parts of the dark, foggy outer layers of the molecular cloud. However, most of the new-born massive stars remain hidden as the thick interstellar dust strongly absorbs their ultraviolet and visible light. In this gorgeous infrared image taken from ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA [1], eso0949) penetrates the dark curtain of cosmic dust and reveals in astonishing detail the folds, loops and filaments sculpted from the dusty interstellar matter by intense particle winds and the radiation emitted by hot young stars. "When I first saw this image I just said 'Wow!' I was amazed to see all the dust streamers so clearly around the Monoceros R2 cluster, as well as the jets from highly embedded young stellar objects. There is such a great wealth of exciting detail revealed in these VISTA images," says Jim Emerson, of Queen Mary, University of London and leader of the VISTA consortium. With its huge field of view, large mirror and sensitive camera, VISTA is ideal for obtaining deep, high quality infrared images of large areas of the sky, such as the Monoceros R2 region

  2. Overnight lexical consolidation revealed by speech segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Nicolas; Gareth Gaskell, M

    2012-04-01

    Two experiments explored the consolidation of spoken words, and assessed whether post-sleep novel competitor effects truly reflect engagement of these novel words in competition for lexical segmentation. Two types of competitor relationships were contrasted: the onset-aligned case (such as "frenzylk"), where the novel word is a close variant of the existing word: they start at the same time point and overlap on most of their segments; and the fully embedding case (such as "lirmucktoze"), where the existing word corresponds to a smaller embedded portion of its novel competitor and is thus less noticeable. Experiment 1 (pause detection) revealed a similar performance for both cases, with no competitor effect immediately after exposure, but significant inhibition after 24 h and seven days. Experiment 2 (word spotting) produced exactly the same pattern; however, as is the case with existing word carriers (cf. McQueen, Norris, & Cutler, 1994), the inhibition was much stronger for fully embedded than for onset-aligned targets (e.g., "lirmuckt" vs. "frenzyl"). Meanwhile, explicit measures of learning, i.e., free recall and recognition, improved over time. These results cannot be explained by either consolidation of episodic traces or acquisition of new phonological/dialectal variants. We argue instead that they reflect a general trait of vocabulary learning and consolidation. PMID:22261419

  3. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Cao, Guoshuai; Schäfer, Christian G; Zhao, Qibin; Gallei, Markus; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2015-06-24

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their "smartness" arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core-shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core-shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  4. Chimaeric sounds reveal dichotomies in auditory perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary M.; Delgutte, Bertrand; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2002-03-01

    By Fourier's theorem, signals can be decomposed into a sum of sinusoids of different frequencies. This is especially relevant for hearing, because the inner ear performs a form of mechanical Fourier transform by mapping frequencies along the length of the cochlear partition. An alternative signal decomposition, originated by Hilbert, is to factor a signal into the product of a slowly varying envelope and a rapidly varying fine time structure. Neurons in the auditory brainstem sensitive to these features have been found in mammalian physiological studies. To investigate the relative perceptual importance of envelope and fine structure, we synthesized stimuli that we call `auditory chimaeras', which have the envelope of one sound and the fine structure of another. Here we show that the envelope is most important for speech reception, and the fine structure is most important for pitch perception and sound localization. When the two features are in conflict, the sound of speech is heard at a location determined by the fine structure, but the words are identified according to the envelope. This finding reveals a possible acoustic basis for the hypothesized `what' and `where' pathways in the auditory cortex.

  5. Bone structure as revealed by microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Tor; Laib, Andres; Ulrich, Dieter; Kohlbrenner, Adrian; Ruegsegger, Peter

    1997-10-01

    The appearance of cancellous bone architecture is different for various skeletal sites and various disease states. In the iliac crest it is more plate-like, whereas in the spine rods dominate. During aging and disease plates are perforated and connecting rods are dissolved. There is a continuous shift from one structural type to the other. So traditional histomorphometric procedures, which are based on a fixed model type, will lead to questionable results. 3D microtomography allows to assess model independent structural parameters so that trabecular thickness, for example, can be determined directly. Not only mean thicknesses are available but also thickness histograms which are helpful to identify pathological states. Other features such as trabecular separation, degree of anisotropy and structural type index can be extracted from the 3D images and allow to characterize cancellous bone and its changes due to aging, disease and treatment. To fully exploit the significance of bone structure on bone strength large scale finite element (FE) analyses are performed. Hence microtomography, performed with a sufficiently fine isotropic spatial resolution, reveals information on the structural features of cancellous bone which were not available so far and which will, hopefully, lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of bone diseases and subsequently to improved treatment regimes.

  6. Biosignatures as revealed by spectropolarimetry of Earthshine.

    PubMed

    Sterzik, Michael F; Bagnulo, Stefano; Palle, Enric

    2012-03-01

    Low-resolution intensity spectra of Earth's atmosphere obtained from space reveal strong signatures of life ('biosignatures'), such as molecular oxygen and methane with abundances far from chemical equilibrium, as well as the presence of a 'red edge' (a sharp increase of albedo for wavelengths longer than 700 nm) caused by surface vegetation. Light passing through the atmosphere is strongly linearly polarized by scattering (from air molecules, aerosols and cloud particles) and by reflection (from oceans and land). Spectropolarimetric observations of local patches of Earth's sky light from the ground contain signatures of oxygen, ozone and water, and are used to characterize the properties of clouds and aerosols. When applied to exoplanets, ground-based spectropolarimetry can better constrain properties of atmospheres and surfaces than can standard intensity spectroscopy. Here we report disk-integrated linear polarization spectra of Earthshine, which is sunlight that has been first reflected by Earth and then reflected back to Earth by the Moon. The observations allow us to determine the fractional contribution of clouds and ocean surface, and are sensitive to visible areas of vegetation as small as 10 per cent. They represent a benchmark for the diagnostics of the atmospheric composition, mean cloud height and surfaces of exoplanets. PMID:22382980

  7. Revealing the values behind convenience food consumption.

    PubMed

    Botonaki, Anna; Mattas, Konstadinos

    2010-12-01

    The increasing importance of convenience in consumer food choices has attracted researchers' interest. In the effort to understand how convenience affects consumers' food preferences, values are believed to play an important role. The present study attempts to examine the way personal values suggested by Schwartz (1992) are associated with behaviour and attitudes regarding convenience food. A number of constructs describing food related attitudes and behaviours were developed and their relationship with personal values was analyzed following the methodology proposed by Brunsø, Scholderer, and Grunert (2004). Data were collected through a questionnaire survey from a random sample of consumers in Thessaloniki city, Greece. The results reveal that convenience food consumption and convenience orientation in the food domain are mainly connected with values that motivate people to seek new experiences, act independently and enhance their own personal interests, while are in conflict with values of conservation and self-transcendence. The opposite holds for other food related attitudes and behaviours like involvement with cooking and variety in diet. The findings seem to be of particular interest not only for marketers of food products, but also for food policy makers. PMID:20875475

  8. Dynamic Environmental Photosynthetic Imaging Reveals Emergent Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeffrey A; Savage, Linda J; Zegarac, Robert; Hall, Christopher C; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Davis, Geoffry A; Kovac, William Kent; Chen, Jin; Kramer, David M

    2016-06-22

    Understanding and improving the productivity and robustness of plant photosynthesis requires high-throughput phenotyping under environmental conditions that are relevant to the field. Here we demonstrate the dynamic environmental photosynthesis imager (DEPI), an experimental platform for integrated, continuous, and high-throughput measurements of photosynthetic parameters during plant growth under reproducible yet dynamic environmental conditions. Using parallel imagers obviates the need to move plants or sensors, reducing artifacts and allowing simultaneous measurement on large numbers of plants. As a result, DEPI can reveal phenotypes that are not evident under standard laboratory conditions but emerge under progressively more dynamic illumination. We show examples in mutants of Arabidopsis of such "emergent phenotypes" that are highly transient and heterogeneous, appearing in different leaves under different conditions and depending in complex ways on both environmental conditions and plant developmental age. These emergent phenotypes appear to be caused by a range of phenomena, suggesting that such previously unseen processes are critical for plant responses to dynamic environments. PMID:27336966

  9. VISTA Reveals the Secret of the Unicorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    A new infrared image from ESO's VISTA survey telescope reveals an extraordinary landscape of glowing tendrils of gas, dark clouds and young stars within the constellation of Monoceros (the Unicorn). This star-forming region, known as Monoceros R2, is embedded within a huge dark cloud. The region is almost completely obscured by interstellar dust when viewed in visible light, but is spectacular in the infrared. An active stellar nursery lies hidden inside a massive dark cloud rich in molecules and dust in the constellation of Monoceros. Although it appears close in the sky to the more familiar Orion Nebula it is actually almost twice as far from Earth, at a distance of about 2700 light-years. In visible light a grouping of massive hot stars creates a beautiful collection of reflection nebulae where the bluish starlight is scattered from parts of the dark, foggy outer layers of the molecular cloud. However, most of the new-born massive stars remain hidden as the thick interstellar dust strongly absorbs their ultraviolet and visible light. In this gorgeous infrared image taken from ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA [1], eso0949) penetrates the dark curtain of cosmic dust and reveals in astonishing detail the folds, loops and filaments sculpted from the dusty interstellar matter by intense particle winds and the radiation emitted by hot young stars. "When I first saw this image I just said 'Wow!' I was amazed to see all the dust streamers so clearly around the Monoceros R2 cluster, as well as the jets from highly embedded young stellar objects. There is such a great wealth of exciting detail revealed in these VISTA images," says Jim Emerson, of Queen Mary, University of London and leader of the VISTA consortium. With its huge field of view, large mirror and sensitive camera, VISTA is ideal for obtaining deep, high quality infrared images of large areas of the sky, such as the Monoceros R2 region

  10. Chandra Reveals Remains of Giant Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo taken by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory that reveals the remains of an explosion in the form of two enormous arcs of multimillion-degree gas in the galaxy Centaurus A that appear to be part of a ring 25,000 light years in diameter. The size and location of the ring suggest that it could have been an explosion that occurred about 10 million years ago. A composite image made with radio (red and green), optical (yellow-orange), and X-ray data (blue) presents a sturning tableau of a turbulent galaxy. A broad band of dust and cold gas is bisected at an angle by opposing jets of high-energy particles blasting away from the supermassive black hole in the nucleus. Lying in a plane perpendicular to the jets are the two large arcs of x-ray emitting multi-million degree gas. This discovery can help astronomers better understand the cause and effect of violent outbursts from the vicinity of supermassive black holes of active galaxies. The Chandra program is managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

  11. Sequence tagging reveals unexpected modifications in toxicoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Collins, Ben C.; Pennington, Stephen R.; Gallagher, William M.; Tabb, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Toxicoproteomic samples are rich in posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Identifying these modifications via standard database searching can incur significant performance penalties. Here we describe the latest developments in TagRecon, an algorithm that leverages inferred sequence tags to identify modified peptides in toxicoproteomic data sets. TagRecon identifies known modifications more effectively than the MyriMatch database search engine. TagRecon outperformed state of the art software in recognizing unanticipated modifications from LTQ, Orbitrap, and QTOF data sets. We developed user-friendly software for detecting persistent mass shifts from samples. We follow a three-step strategy for detecting unanticipated PTMs in samples. First, we identify the proteins present in the sample with a standard database search. Next, identified proteins are interrogated for unexpected PTMs with a sequence tag-based search. Finally, additional evidence is gathered for the detected mass shifts with a refinement search. Application of this technology on toxicoproteomic data sets revealed unintended cross-reactions between proteins and sample processing reagents. Twenty five proteins in rat liver showed signs of oxidative stress when exposed to potentially toxic drugs. These results demonstrate the value of mining toxicoproteomic data sets for modifications. PMID:21214251

  12. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their “smartness” arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core–shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core–shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  13. Micellar Effects on Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Aqueous Solutions Revisited: Dramatic Enhancement of Cage Escape Yields in Surfactant Ru(II) Diimine Complex/[Ru(NH3)6](2+) Systems.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rebecca E; Schmehl, Russell H

    2016-08-30

    The effect of cationic micelle incorporation on light induced electron transfer, charge separation and back electron transfer between an aqueous electron donor, [Ru(NH3)6](2+), and a series of Ru(II) diimine complex chromophores/acceptors, is presented. The chromophores have the general formula [(bpy)2Ru(LL)](2+) (LL = bpy; 4-R-4'-methyl-2,2'-bpy, R = pentyl (MC5), terdecyl (MC13), heptadecyl (MC17); 4,4'-di(heptadecyl)-2,2'-bpy (DC17)). Of the five chromophores, the MC13, MC17, and DC17 complexes associate with the added micelle forming surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Quenching of the luminescence of the bpy and MC5 complexes by [Ru(NH3)6](2+) is unaffected by addition of surfactant, while rate constants for quenching of the MC13 and MC17 complexes are decreased. Cage escape yields following photoinduced electron transfer to generate [(bpy)2Ru(LL)](+) and [Ru(NH3)6](3+) are approximately 0.1 for all the water-soluble chromophores (excluding DC17) in the absence of added CTAB. In the presence of surfactant, the cage escape yields dramatically increase for the MC13 (0.4) and MC17 (0.6) complexes, while remaining unchanged for [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and the MC5 complex. Back electron transfer of the solvent separated ions is also strongly influenced by the presence of surfactant. For the MC13 and MC17 complexes, back electron transfer rate constants decrease by factors of 270 and 190, respectively. The MC5 complex exhibits two component back electron transfer, with the fast component having a rate constant close to that in the absence of surfactant and a slow component nearly 200 times smaller. Results are interpreted in terms of the partitioning of the 2+ and 1+ forms of the chromophores between aqueous and micellar phases. The extended lifetimes of the radical ions may prove useful in coupling the strong reductants formed to kinetically facile catalysts for reduction of water to hydrogen. PMID:27486891

  14. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor microimaging reveals a role for Bcl-x in brain development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyang; Chen, Ying-bei; Hardwick, J Marie; Miller, Michael I; Plachez, Celine; Richards, Linda J; Yarowsky, Paul; van Zijl, Peter; Mori, Susumu

    2005-02-23

    A new technique based on diffusion tensor imaging and computational neuroanatomy was developed to efficiently and quantitatively characterize the three-dimensional morphology of the developing brains. The technique was used to analyze the phenotype of conditional Bcl-x knock-out mice, in which the bcl-x gene was deleted specifically in neurons of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus beginning at embryonic day 13.5 as cells became postmitotic. Affected brain regions and associated axonal tracts showed severe atrophy in adult Bcl-x-deficient mice. Longitudinal studies revealed that these phenotypes are established by regressive processes that occur primarily during the first postnatal week, whereas neurogenesis and migration showed no obvious abnormality during embryonic stages. Specific families of white matter tracts that once formed normally during the embryonic stages underwent dramatic degeneration postnatally. Thus, this technique serves as a powerful tool to efficiently localize temporal and spatial manifestation of morphological phenotype. PMID:15728827

  15. [The life of human hair follicle revealed].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Bruno A

    2006-02-01

    The human hair follicle is a unique appendage which results from epithelio-mesenchymal interactions initiated around the 3rd month of development. This appendage has a very complex structure, with a dermal compartment and an epithelial compartment. The dermal compartment comprises the connective tissue sheath and the dermal papilla, both of which are irrigated by microvessels. The epithelial compartment is made of highly replicating matrix cells giving rise to three concentrical domains, namely the outer root sheath, the inner root sheath and the hair shaft. The pigmentation unit, responsible for hair color, is made of fully active melanocytes located on top of the dermal papilla. Altogether a hair follicle contains more than 20 different cell types, engaged in different differentiation pathways and/or interacting with each other. This complex appendage has a unique behavior in mammals since, after a hair production phase, it involutes in place before entering a resting phase after which it renews itself under a cyclical but stochastic way, out of a double reservoir of pluripotent stem cells able to also regenerate epidermis. For yet unknown reasons, this well ordered process can be disturbed, provoking alopecia. The pigmentation unit also renews itself under a cyclical way, out of a melanocyte progenitor reservoir which progressively declines with time, provoking the hair whitening process. Finally, the shape of the hair shaft is programmed from the bulb. What makes this appendage unique and fascinating is its high degree of autonomy, its incredibly complex though stable structure, the number of different cell types interacting under an equilibrated way and its potential of regeneration. It represents a true paradigm of tissue homeostasis, exemplifying in a small living cylinder all the fundamental laws of cell-cell and tissue interactions. This life is revealed in this short synthesis. PMID:16457752

  16. World population profile reveals bleak data.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    This article presents selected demographic and HIV/AIDS indicators for 1998 and projections for 2010 for selected African countries. The statistics are provided by the US Bureau of the Census. The Census HIV/AIDS database is one of the best in the world. Findings reveal that Africa is the worst affected by AIDS. Eight countries are particularly affected: Zimbabwe, Namibia, Botswana, Swaziland, Zambia, Kenya, Malawi, and South Africa. In 1998, life expectancy declined by 25.7 years. Population growth is expected to decline from 2.5% to 1.1% due to the impact of AIDS mortality. HIV continues to spread in African countries and its spread and impact is not recorded in present data. With AIDS, life expectancy is likely to decline in Zimbabwe from 39.2 to 38.8 years during 1998-2010; without AIDS, it is expected to rise from 64.9 to 69.5 years during the same time period. Only in Zambia is there a slight increase in life expectancy with AIDS. The overwhelming poor life prospects for Africans are reflected in this article, which can provide statistics only for 21 of 53 African countries. The absence of data may mean low HIV prevalence, lack of data, or the beginning of the HIV epidemic. The UNDP provides a Human Poverty Index with indicators for deprivation in knowledge, deprivation in living standards, and longevity. African countries are likely to shift to the bottom of this index due to the impact of AIDS. PMID:12294386

  17. NASA's Hyperwall Revealing the Big Picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers

    2011-01-01

    NASA:s hyperwall is a sophisticated visualization tool used to display large datasets. The hyperwall, or video wall, is capable of displaying multiple high-definition data visualizations and/or images simultaneously across an arrangement of screens. Functioning as a key component at many NASA exhibits, the hyperwall is used to help explain phenomena, ideas, or examples of world change. The traveling version of the hyperwall is typically comprised of nine 42-50" flat-screen monitors arranged in a 3x3 array (as depicted below). However, it is not limited to monitor size or number; screen sizes can be as large as 52" and the arrangement of screens can include more than nine monitors. Generally, NASA satellite and model data are used to highlight particular themes in atmospheric, land, and ocean science. Many of the existing hyperwall stories reveal change across space and time, while others display large-scale still-images accompanied by descriptive, story-telling captions. Hyperwall content on a variety of Earth Science topics already exists and is made available to the public at: eospso.gsfc.nasa.gov/hyperwall. Keynote and PowerPoint presentations as well as Summary of Story files are available for download on each existing topic. New hyperwall content and accompanying files will continue being developed to promote scientific literacy across a diverse group of audience members. NASA invites the use of content accessible through this website but requests the user to acknowledge any and all data sources referenced in the content being used.

  18. Saturn Probe: Revealing Solar System Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative studies of the gas giant and ice giant planets are needed to reliably discriminate among competing theories of the origin and evolution of giant planets and the solar system, but we lack critical measurements. A Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission would fill a vital part of that gap, allowing comparative studies of Jupiter and Saturn, providing the basis for later comparisons with the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, and informing studies of extrasolar planetary systems now being characterized. The Galileo Probe mission provided the first in situ studies of Jupiter's atmosphere. Similar measurements at Saturn, Uranus and Neptune would provide an important comparative planetology context for the Galileo results. Cassini's "Proximal Orbits" in 2017 will reveal Saturn's internal structure to complement the Juno mission's similar measurements at Jupiter. A Saturn entry probe, complementing the Galileo Probe investigations at Jupiter, would complete a solid basis for improved understanding of both Jupiter and Saturn, an important stepping stone to understanding Uranus and Neptune and solar system formation and evolution. The 2012 Decadal Survey ("DS") added Saturn Probe science objectives to NASA's New Frontiers Program: highest-priority Tier 1 objectives any New Frontiers implementation must achieve, and Tier 2, high priority but lower than Tier 1. A DS mission concept study using extremely conservative assumptions concluded that a Saturn Probe project could fit within New Frontiers resource constraints, giving a PI confidence that they could pursue some Tier 2 objectives, customizing for the proper balance of science return, science team composition, procured or contributed instruments, etc. Contributed instruments could significantly enhance the payload and the science team for greater science return. They also provide international collaboration opportunities, with science benefits well demonstrated by missions such as Cassini-Huygens and Rosetta.

  19. Microradiometers Reveal Ocean Health, Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    When NASA researcher Stanford Hooker is in the field, he pays close attention to color. For Hooker, being in the field means being at sea. On one such research trip to the frigid waters of the Arctic, with a Coast Guard icebreaker looming nearby and the snow-crusted ice shelf a few feet away, Hooker leaned over the edge of his small boat and lowered a tethered device into the bright turquoise water, a new product devised by a NASA partner and enabled by a promising technology for oceanographers and atmospheric scientists alike. Color is a function of light. Pure water is clear, but the variation in color observed during a visit to the beach or a flight along a coastline depends on the water s depth and the constituents in it, how far down the light penetrates and how it is absorbed and scattered by dissolved and suspended material. Hooker cares about ocean color because of what it can reveal about the health of the ocean, and in turn, the health of our planet. "The main thing we are interested in is the productivity of the water," Hooker says. The seawater contains phytoplankton, microscopic plants, which are the food base for the ocean s ecosystems. Changes in the water s properties, whether due to natural seasonal effects or human influence, can lead to problems for delicate ecosystems such as coral reefs. Ocean color can inform researchers about the quantities and distribution of phytoplankton and other materials, providing clues as to how the world ocean is changing. NASA s Coastal Zone Color Scanner, launched in 1978, was the first ocean color instrument flown on a spacecraft. Since then, the Agency s ocean color research capabilities have become increasingly sophisticated with the launch of the SeaWiFS instrument in 1997 and the twin MODIS instruments carried into orbit on NASA s Terra (1999) and Aqua (2002) satellites. The technology provides sweeping, global information on ocean color on a scale unattainable by any other means. One issue that arises from

  20. Passive seismology reveals biannual calving periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Larsen, C. F.; West, M. E.; Oneel, S.

    2013-12-01

    Iceberg calving is a large and variable component of the total mass loss from marine-terminating glaciers worldwide. However, the processes that control the size and variability of calving fluxes are poorly understood. Even more basic descriptions of iceberg calving, such as its seasonality, are uncertain. Here, we present nearly two years of automatically-estimated calving fluxes at Yahtse Glacier, a tidewater glacier whose terminus flows at ~7 km/yr towards the Gulf of Alaska. At the terminus, ice losses to calving and submarine melt total approximately 1.5 km^3/yr. In order to identify temporal variability in this mean rate, we develop a statistical model of calving size based on characteristics of calving-generated icequakes. These characteristics include 4 amplitude-based variables and 5 variables related to the shape of the icequake envelope. We build our model by combining automatically-detected icequakes (O'Neel et al., 2007) located at the terminus of Yahtse Glacier (Jones et al., 2013) with a training set of 1400 icequakes produced by visually-observed calving events (Bartholomaus et al., 2012). In each of the models tested (regression trees, multinomial logistic regression and multiple linear regession), icequake duration emerges as the single best predictor of iceberg size, consistent with past studies (Qamar, 1988; O'Neel et al., 2007). Additional predictors, such as the mean icequake amplitude and the kurtosis of the icequake envelope improve the predictive capability of the model and reduce the mean squared error to well-within the error of the in-person classification. Once validated, we apply our model to ~ 400,000 icequakes produced by calving events at Yahtse Glacier between June 2009 and September 2011. These results reveal fluctuations in calving rate at a range of timescales, including twice per year. We suggest that the roughly 50%, biannual variation in calving rate is the result of the trade-off between two competing processes at the

  1. Frantic activity revealed in dusty stellar factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to the Very Large Telescope's acute and powerful near-infrared eye, astronomers have uncovered a host of new young, massive and dusty stellar nurseries in nearby galaxy NGC 253. The centre of this galaxy appears to harbour a twin of our own Milky Way's supermassive black hole. ESO PR Photo 02a/09 The Spiral Galaxy NGC 253 Astronomers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain) used NACO, a sharp-eyed adaptive optics instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), to study the fine detail in NGC 253, one of the brightest and dustiest spiral galaxies in the sky. Adaptive Optics (AO) corrects for the blurring effect introduced by the Earth's atmosphere. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way that delights poets, but frustrates astronomers, since it smears out the images. With AO in action the telescope can produce images that are as sharp as is theoretically possible, as if the telescope were in space. NACO revealed features in the galaxy that were only 11 light-years across. "Our observations provide us with so much spatially resolved detail that we can, for the first time, compare them with the finest radio maps for this galaxy -- maps that have existed for more than a decade," says Juan Antonio Fernández-Ontiveros, the lead author of the paper reporting the results [1]. Astronomers identified 37 distinct bright regions, a threefold increase on previous results, packed into a tiny region at the core of the galaxy, comprising just one percent of the galaxy's total size. The astronomers combined their NACO images with data from another VLT instrument, VISIR, as well as with images from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and radio observations made by the Very Large Array and the Very Large Baseline Interferometer. Combining these observations, taken in different wavelength regimes, provided a clue to the nature of these regions. "We now think that these are probably very active nurseries that contain many stars bursting from their

  2. Metatranscriptomics reveal differences in in situ energy and nitrogen metabolism among hydrothermal vent snail symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, J G; Beinart, R A; Stewart, F J; Delong, E F; Girguis, P R

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of chemoautotrophic symbioses at hydrothermal vents, our understanding of the influence of environmental chemistry on symbiont metabolism is limited. Transcriptomic analyses are useful for linking physiological poise to environmental conditions, but recovering samples from the deep sea is challenging, as the long recovery times can change expression profiles before preservation. Here, we present a novel, in situ RNA sampling and preservation device, which we used to compare the symbiont metatranscriptomes associated with Alviniconcha, a genus of vent snail, in which specific host–symbiont combinations are predictably distributed across a regional geochemical gradient. Metatranscriptomes of these symbionts reveal key differences in energy and nitrogen metabolism relating to both environmental chemistry (that is, the relative expression of genes) and symbiont phylogeny (that is, the specific pathways employed). Unexpectedly, dramatic differences in expression of transposases and flagellar genes suggest that different symbiont types may also have distinct life histories. These data further our understanding of these symbionts' metabolic capabilities and their expression in situ, and suggest an important role for symbionts in mediating their hosts' interaction with regional-scale differences in geochemistry. PMID:23619306

  3. Water in Carbon Nanotubes: The Peculiar Hydrogen Bond Network Revealed by Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dalla Bernardina, Simona; Paineau, Erwan; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Judeinstein, Patrick; Rouzière, Stéphan; Launois, Pascale; Roy, Pascale

    2016-08-24

    A groundbreaking discovery in nanofluidics was the observation of the tremendously enhanced water permeability of carbon nanotubes, those iconic objects of nanosciences. The origin of this phenomenon is still a subject of controversy. One of the proposed explanations involves dramatic modifications of the H-bond network of nanoconfined water with respect to that of bulk water. Infrared spectroscopy is an ideal technique to follow modifications of this network through the inter- and intramolecular bonds of water molecules. Here we report the first infrared study of water uptake at controlled vapor pressure in single walled carbon nanotubes with diameters ranging from 0.7 to 2.1 nm. It reveals a predominant contribution of loose H bonds even for fully hydrated states, irrespective of the nanotube size. Our results show that, while the dominating loosely bond signature is attributed to a one-dimensional chain structure for small diameter nanotubes, this feature also results from a water layer with "free" OH (dangling) bonds facing the nanotube wall for larger diameter nanotubes. These experimental findings provide a solid reference for further modeling of water behavior in hydrophobic nanochannels. PMID:27455124

  4. Diurnal Changes in Mitochondrial Function Reveal Daily Optimization of Light and Dark Respiratory Metabolism in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun Pong; Eubel, Holger; Millar, A. Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Biomass production by plants is often negatively correlated with respiratory rate, but the value of this rate changes dramatically during diurnal cycles, and hence, biomass is the cumulative result of complex environment-dependent metabolic processes. Mitochondria in photosynthetic plant tissues undertake substantially different metabolic roles during light and dark periods that are dictated by substrate availability and the functional capacity of mitochondria defined by their protein composition. We surveyed the heterogeneity of the mitochondrial proteome and its function during a typical night and day cycle in Arabidopsis shoots. This used a staged, quantitative analysis of the proteome across 10 time points covering 24 h of the life of 3-week-old Arabidopsis shoots grown under 12-h dark and 12-h light conditions. Detailed analysis of enzyme capacities and substrate-dependent respiratory processes of isolated mitochondria were also undertaken during the same time course. Together these data reveal a range of dynamic changes in mitochondrial capacity and uncover day- and night-enhanced protein components. Clear diurnal changes were evident in mitochondrial capacities to drive the TCA cycle and to undertake functions associated with nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, redox poise, and mitochondrial antioxidant defense. These data quantify the nature and nuances of a daily rhythm in Arabidopsis mitochondrial respiratory capacity. PMID:20601493

  5. Single-Molecule FRET Reveals Hidden Complexity in a Protein Energy Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Tsytlonok, Maksym; Ibrahim, Shehu M.; Rowling, Pamela J.E.; Xu, Wenshu; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Orte, Angel; Klenerman, David; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here, using single-molecule FRET, we reveal previously hidden conformations of the ankyrin-repeat domain of AnkyrinR, a giant adaptor molecule that anchors integral membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton through simultaneous binding of multiple partner proteins. We show that the ankyrin repeats switch between high-FRET and low-FRET states, controlled by an unstructured “safety pin” or “staple” from the adjacent domain of AnkyrinR. Opening of the safety pin leads to unravelling of the ankyrin repeat stack, a process that will dramatically affect the relative orientations of AnkyrinR binding partners and, hence, the anchoring of the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the membrane. Ankyrin repeats are one of the most ubiquitous molecular recognition platforms in nature, and it is therefore important to understand how their structures are adapted for function. Our results point to a striking mechanism by which the order-disorder transition and, thereby, the activity of repeat proteins can be regulated. PMID:25565106

  6. A case of subarachnoid hemorrhage revealed by an acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

    PubMed

    Hatim, Abdedaim; El Otmani, Wafae; Houssa, Mehdi Ait; Atmani, Noureddine; Moutakiallah, Younes; Haimeur, Charqui; Drissi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is definitely the best descriptive model of the interaction between cardiovascular system and cerebral damage. The underlying mechanism of cardiovascular alterations after SAH is linked to the adrenergic discharge related to aneurysm rupture. Cardiac and pulmonary complications are common after severe brain injury, especially the aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Acute neurogenic pulmonary edema is not exceptional; it may occur in 20% of cases and commonly follows a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage. Severe myocardial damage with cardiogenic shock may possibly reveal the SAH (3% of cases) and mislead to wrong diagnosis of ACS with dramatic therapeutic consequences. The contribution of CT and cerebral angiography is essential for diagnosis and treatment. Surgical or endovascular treatment depends on location, size and shape of the aneurysm, on patient's age, neurological status and existence of concomitant diseases. We report the case of a 58 years old patient, with a past medical history of diabetes and hypertension, admitted for acute pulmonary edema with cardiogenic shock. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of aneurismal SAH in a patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26309459

  7. Evolution-guided functional analyses reveal diverse antiviral specificities encoded by IFIT1 genes in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Matthew D; Schaller, Aaron M; Geballe, Adam P; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-01-01

    IFIT (interferon-induced with tetratricopeptide repeats) proteins are critical mediators of mammalian innate antiviral immunity. Mouse IFIT1 selectively inhibits viruses that lack 2'O-methylation of their mRNA 5' caps. Surprisingly, human IFIT1 does not share this antiviral specificity. Here, we resolve this discrepancy by demonstrating that human and mouse IFIT1 have evolved distinct functions using a combination of evolutionary, genetic and virological analyses. First, we show that human IFIT1 and mouse IFIT1 (renamed IFIT1B) are not orthologs, but are paralogs that diverged >100 mya. Second, using a yeast genetic assay, we show that IFIT1 and IFIT1B proteins differ in their ability to be suppressed by a cap 2'O-methyltransferase. Finally, we demonstrate that IFIT1 and IFIT1B have divergent antiviral specificities, including the discovery that only IFIT1 proteins inhibit a virus encoding a cap 2'O-methyltransferase. These functional data, combined with widespread turnover of mammalian IFIT genes, reveal dramatic species-specific differences in IFIT-mediated antiviral repertoires. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14228.001 PMID:27240734

  8. The transcriptome of the bowhead whale Balaena mysticetus reveals adaptations of the longest-lived mammal

    PubMed Central

    Seim, Inge; Ma, Siming; Zhou, Xuming; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Lee, Sang-Goo; Suydam, Robert; George, John C.; Bickham, John W.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals vary dramatically in lifespan, by at least two-orders of magnitude, but the molecular basis for this difference remains largely unknown. The bowhead whale Balaena mysticetus is the longest-lived mammal known, with an estimated maximal lifespan in excess of two hundred years. It is also one of the two largest animals and the most cold-adapted baleen whale species. Here, we report the first genome-wide gene expression analyses of the bowhead whale, based on the de novo assembly of its transcriptome. Bowhead whale or cetacean-specific changes in gene expression were identified in the liver, kidney and heart, and complemented with analyses of positively selected genes. Changes associated with altered insulin signaling and other gene expression patterns could help explain the remarkable longevity of bowhead whales as well as their adaptation to a lipid-rich diet. The data also reveal parallels in candidate longevity adaptations of the bowhead whale, naked mole rat and Brandt's bat. The bowhead whale transcriptome is a valuable resource for the study of this remarkable animal, including the evolution of longevity and its important correlates such as resistance to cancer and other diseases. PMID:25411232

  9. Population Genomics Reveals Chromosome-Scale Heterogeneous Evolution in a Protoploid Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Anne; Jung, Paul; Reisser, Cyrielle; Fischer, Gilles; Schacherer, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Yeast species represent an ideal model system for population genomic studies but large-scale polymorphism surveys have only been reported for species of the Saccharomyces genus so far. Hence, little is known about intraspecific diversity and evolution in yeast. To obtain a new insight into the evolutionary forces shaping natural populations, we sequenced the genomes of an expansive worldwide collection of isolates from a species distantly related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Lachancea kluyveri (formerly S. kluyveri). We identified 6.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms and showed that a large introgression event of 1 Mb of GC-rich sequence in the chromosomal arm probably occurred in the last common ancestor of all L. kluyveri strains. Our population genomic data clearly revealed that this 1-Mb region underwent a molecular evolution pattern very different from the rest of the genome. It is characterized by a higher recombination rate, with a dramatically elevated A:T → G:C substitution rate, which is the signature of an increased GC-biased gene conversion. In addition, the predicted base composition at equilibrium demonstrates that the chromosome-scale compositional heterogeneity will persist after the genome has reached mutational equilibrium. Altogether, the data presented herein clearly show that distinct recombination and substitution regimes can coexist and lead to different evolutionary patterns within a single genome. PMID:25349286

  10. Population genomics reveals chromosome-scale heterogeneous evolution in a protoploid yeast.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Anne; Jung, Paul; Reisser, Cyrielle; Fischer, Gilles; Schacherer, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Yeast species represent an ideal model system for population genomic studies but large-scale polymorphism surveys have only been reported for species of the Saccharomyces genus so far. Hence, little is known about intraspecific diversity and evolution in yeast. To obtain a new insight into the evolutionary forces shaping natural populations, we sequenced the genomes of an expansive worldwide collection of isolates from a species distantly related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Lachancea kluyveri (formerly S. kluyveri). We identified 6.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms and showed that a large introgression event of 1 Mb of GC-rich sequence in the chromosomal arm probably occurred in the last common ancestor of all L. kluyveri strains. Our population genomic data clearly revealed that this 1-Mb region underwent a molecular evolution pattern very different from the rest of the genome. It is characterized by a higher recombination rate, with a dramatically elevated A:T → G:C substitution rate, which is the signature of an increased GC-biased gene conversion. In addition, the predicted base composition at equilibrium demonstrates that the chromosome-scale compositional heterogeneity will persist after the genome has reached mutational equilibrium. Altogether, the data presented herein clearly show that distinct recombination and substitution regimes can coexist and lead to different evolutionary patterns within a single genome. PMID:25349286

  11. Structure of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in the Postfusion Conformation Reveals Preservation of Neutralizing Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-09-16

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) invades host cells via a type I fusion (F) glycoprotein that undergoes dramatic structural rearrangements during the fusion process. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, such as 101F, palivizumab, and motavizumab, target two major antigenic sites on the RSV F glycoprotein. The structures of these sites as peptide complexes with motavizumab and 101F have been previously determined, but a structure for the trimeric RSV F glycoprotein ectodomain has remained elusive. To address this issue, we undertook structural and biophysical studies on stable ectodomain constructs. Here, we present the 2.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of the trimeric RSV F ectodomain in its postfusion conformation. The structure revealed that the 101F and motavizumab epitopes are present in the postfusion state and that their conformations are similar to those observed in the antibody-bound peptide structures. Both antibodies bound the postfusion F glycoprotein with high affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Modeling of the antibodies bound to the F glycoprotein predicts that the 101F epitope is larger than the linear peptide and restricted to a single protomer in the trimer, whereas motavizumab likely contacts residues on two protomers, indicating a quaternary epitope. Mechanistically, these results suggest that 101F and motavizumab can bind to multiple conformations of the fusion glycoprotein and can neutralize late in the entry process. The structural preservation of neutralizing epitopes in the postfusion state suggests that this conformation can elicit neutralizing antibodies and serve as a useful vaccine antigen.

  12. Evolution-guided functional analyses reveal diverse antiviral specificities encoded by IFIT1 genes in mammals.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Matthew D; Schaller, Aaron M; Geballe, Adam P; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-01-01

    IFIT (interferon-induced with tetratricopeptide repeats) proteins are critical mediators of mammalian innate antiviral immunity. Mouse IFIT1 selectively inhibits viruses that lack 2'O-methylation of their mRNA 5' caps. Surprisingly, human IFIT1 does not share this antiviral specificity. Here, we resolve this discrepancy by demonstrating that human and mouse IFIT1 have evolved distinct functions using a combination of evolutionary, genetic and virological analyses. First, we show that human IFIT1 and mouse IFIT1 (renamed IFIT1B) are not orthologs, but are paralogs that diverged >100 mya. Second, using a yeast genetic assay, we show that IFIT1 and IFIT1B proteins differ in their ability to be suppressed by a cap 2'O-methyltransferase. Finally, we demonstrate that IFIT1 and IFIT1B have divergent antiviral specificities, including the discovery that only IFIT1 proteins inhibit a virus encoding a cap 2'O-methyltransferase. These functional data, combined with widespread turnover of mammalian IFIT genes, reveal dramatic species-specific differences in IFIT-mediated antiviral repertoires. PMID:27240734

  13. Declining streamflows reveal nonstationary orographic precipitation enhancement driven by reduced westerly flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, Charles; Abatzoglou, John; Holden, Zachary

    2016-04-01

    Although orographic enhancement of precipitation lends mountains an important role in water resources, they are dramatically undersampled by long-term precipitation gages. This has led to the widespread practice of extrapolating trends in low-elevation precipitation gage networks to high elevations via simple climatological precipitation ratios developed from isohyetal maps. An implicit assumption in such a process is non-stationarity in orographic precipitation enhancement, an assumption that can lead to large errors in trend detection and attribution of climate change effects. We show an example from the Northwestern United States where streamflows from mountain watersheds show substantial declines over the last 60 years, even while long-term precipitation gage networks in the region show no trend. We demonstrate that these observed streamflow declines are driven by previously unexplored differential trends in precipitation. November to March westerly winds are strongly correlated with high-elevation precipitation but weakly correlated with low-elevation precipitation. Decreases in winter westerlies across the region from 1950 to 2012 are hypothesized to have reduced orographic precipitation enhancement, yielding differential trends in precipitation across elevations leading to the apparent paradox. Climate projections show continued weakening meridional pressure gradients and westerly flow across the region under greenhouse forcing, highlighting an additional stressor that is relevant for climate change impacts on water resources. This study also reveals the potential of wind speed data from circulation reanalysis products to better inform historical precipitation reconstructions.

  14. Thermodynamics imprinting reveals differential binding of metals to {alpha}-synuclein: Relevance to parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathi; Rao, K.S.J. . E-mail: kjr5n@yahoo.co.in

    2007-07-20

    The aggregation of {alpha}-synuclein is a hallmark feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other synucleinopathies. Metals are the significant etiological factors in PD, and their interaction with {alpha}-synuclein affect dramatically the kinetics of fibrillation in vitro and are proposed to play an important and potential neurodegenerative role in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the stoichiometry of binding of copper [Cu (II)] and iron [Fe (III)] with {alpha}-synuclein (wild recombinant type and A30P, A53T, E46K mutant forms) using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). {alpha}-Synuclein monomer (wild and mutant forms) titrated by Cu (II), showed two binding sites, with an apparent K {sub B} of 10{sup 5} M and 10{sup 4} M, respectively. But, {alpha}-synuclein (wild type and mutant forms) titrated with Fe (III) revealed a K {sub B} of 10{sup 5} M with single binding site. The present investigation uncovers the detailed binding propensities between metals and {alpha}-synuclein and has biological implications in PD.

  15. Breeding signatures of rice improvement revealed by a genomic variation map from a large germplasm collection

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Weibo; Wang, Gongwei; Yuan, Meng; Yao, Wen; Lyu, Kai; Zhao, Hu; Yang, Meng; Li, Pingbo; Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Quanxiu; Liu, Fang; Dong, Huaxia; Zhang, Lejing; Li, Xinglei; Meng, Xiangzhou; Zhang, Wan; Xiong, Lizhong; He, Yuqing; Wang, Shiping; Yu, Sibin; Xu, Caiguo; Luo, Jie; Li, Xianghua; Xiao, Jinghua; Lian, Xingming; Zhang, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Intensive rice breeding over the past 50 y has dramatically increased productivity especially in the indica subspecies, but our knowledge of the genomic changes associated with such improvement has been limited. In this study, we analyzed low-coverage sequencing data of 1,479 rice accessions from 73 countries, including landraces and modern cultivars. We identified two major subpopulations, indica I (IndI) and indica II (IndII), in the indica subspecies, which corresponded to the two putative heterotic groups resulting from independent breeding efforts. We detected 200 regions spanning 7.8% of the rice genome that had been differentially selected between IndI and IndII, and thus referred to as breeding signatures. These regions included large numbers of known functional genes and loci associated with important agronomic traits revealed by genome-wide association studies. Grain yield was positively correlated with the number of breeding signatures in a variety, suggesting that the number of breeding signatures in a line may be useful for predicting agronomic potential and the selected loci may provide targets for rice improvement. PMID:26358652

  16. Genetic programs in human and mouse early embryos revealed by single-cell RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhigang; Huang, Kevin; Cai, Chaochao; Cai, Lingbo; Jiang, Chun-yan; Feng, Yun; Liu, Zhenshan; Zeng, Qiao; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E.; Liu, Jia-yin; Horvath, Steve; Fan, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian pre-implantation development is a complex process involving dramatic changes in the transcriptional architecture1–4. We report here a comprehensive analysis of transcriptome dynamics from oocyte to morula in both human and mouse embryos, using single-cell RNA sequencing. Based on single-nucleotide variants in human blastomere messenger RNAs and paternal-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we identify novel stage-specific monoallelic expression patterns for a significant portion of polymorphic gene transcripts (25 to 53%). By weighted gene co-expression network analysis5,6, we find that each developmental stage can be delineated concisely by a small number of functional modules of co-expressed genes. This result indicates a sequential order of transcriptional changes in pathways of cell cycle, gene regulation, translation and metabolism, acting in a step-wise fashion from cleavage to morula. Cross-species comparisons with mouse pre-implantation embryos reveal that the majority of human stage-specific modules (7out of 9) are notably preserved, but developmental specificity and timing differ between human and mouse. Furthermore, we identify conserved key members (or hub genes) of the human and mouse networks. These genes represent novel candidates that are likely to be key in driving mammalian pre-implantation development. Together, the results provide a valuable resource to dissect gene regulatory mechanisms underlying progressive development of early mammalian embryos. PMID:23892778

  17. Injury-induced decline of intrinsic regenerative ability revealed by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Belin, Stephane; Nawabi, Homaira; Wang, Chen; Tang, Shaojun; Latremoliere, Alban; Warren, Peter; Schorle, Hubert; Uncu, Ceren; Woolf, Clifford; He, Zhigang; Steen, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Neurons differ in their responses to injury but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using quantitative proteomics, we characterized the injury-triggered response from purified intact and axotomized retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Subsequent informatics analyses revealed a network of injury-response signaling hubs. In addition to confirm known players, such as mTOR, this also identified new candidates, such as c-myc, NFkB and Huntingtin. Similar to mTOR, c-myc has been implicated as key regulators of anabolic metabolism and is down-regulated by axotomy. Forced expression of c-myc in RGCs, either before or after injury, promotes dramatic RGCs neuronal survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. Finally, in contrast to RGCs, neither c-myc nor mTOR was down-regulated in injured peripheral sensory neurons. Our studies suggest that c-myc and other injury responsive pathways are critical to the intrinsic regenerative mechanisms and might represent a novel target for developing neural repair strategies in adults. PMID:25937169

  18. Quasibiennial Oscillation in Tropical Ozone as Revealed by Ozonesonde and Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, J. A.; Jones, D. B. A.; Megretskaia, I. A.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Voemel, H.; Randel, W. J.; Kimani, W.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    2003-01-01

    We present an analysis of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in tropical ozone using recent in situ measurements made by ozonesondes, supplemented by satellite profile and column data. The first in situ equatorial ozone profiles reveal the dramatic change in shape of the profile that accompanies the descent of the westerly shear zone. The partial pressure maximum in ozone increases by -25% in 5-6 months as it descends from 17.5 to 24 hPa. The amplitude of the QBO anomaly that extends from 15 to 80 hPa is found to exceed *20%, larger than indicated by earlier analyses of satellite data. The influence of the QBO on equatorial ozone is dominant between 10 and 45 hPa, but the seasonal cycle is more important below 50 hPa. The equatorial ozone anomalies are influenced by El Niiio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the lowest part of the stratosphere. The ozone anomaly in the lower stratosphere at 20"s lags that at the equator by only a few months during the easterlies from 1994 to 1998, contrary to the previous picture of the subtropical and equatorial anomalies being out of phase.

  19. The transcriptome of the bowhead whale Balaena mysticetus reveals adaptations of the longest-lived mammal.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Ma, Siming; Zhou, Xuming; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Lee, Sang-Goo; Suydam, Robert; George, John C; Bickham, John W; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2014-10-01

    Mammals vary dramatically in lifespan, by at least two-orders of magnitude, but the molecular basis for this difference remains largely unknown. The bowhead whale Balaena mysticetus is the longest-lived mammal known, with an estimated maximal lifespan in excess of two hundred years. It is also one of the two largest animals and the most cold-adapted baleen whale species. Here, we report the first genome-wide gene expression analyses of the bowhead whale, based on the de novo assembly of its transcriptome. Bowhead whale or cetacean-specific changes in gene expression were identified in the liver, kidney and heart, and complemented with analyses of positively selected genes. Changes associated with altered insulin signaling and other gene expression patterns could help explain the remarkable longevity of bowhead whales as well as their adaptation to a lipid-rich diet. The data also reveal parallels in candidate longevity adaptations of the bowhead whale, naked mole rat and Brandt's bat. The bowhead whale transcriptome is a valuable resource for the study of this remarkable animal, including the evolution of longevity and its important correlates such as resistance to cancer and other diseases. PMID:25411232

  20. 30-Year Satellite Record Reveals Contrasting Arctic and Antarctic Decadal Sea Ice Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Parkinson, C. L.; Vinnikov, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    A 30-year satellite record of sea ice extents derived mostly from satellite microwave radiometer observations reveals that the Arctic sea ice extent decreased by 0.30+0.03 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers per 10 yr from 1972 through 2002, but by 0.36 plus or minus 0.05 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers per 10yr from 1979 through 2002, indicating an acceleration of 20% in the rate of decrease. In contrast, the Antarctic sea ice extent decreased dramatically over the period 1973-1977, then gradually increased. Over the full 30-year period, the Antarctic ice extent decreased by 0.15 plus or minus 0.08 x 10(exp 6) square kilometers per 10 yr. The trend reversal is attributed to a large positive anomaly in Antarctic sea ice extent in the early 1970's, an anomaly that apparently began in the late 1960's, as observed in early visible and infrared satellite images.

  1. Interdomain conformational changes in Akt activation revealed by chemical cross-linking and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bill X; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2006-06-01

    Akt, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a critical role in cell survival. Upon growth factor receptor stimulation, cytosolic Akt is recruited to the plasma membrane by phospholipid binding and activated through phosphorylation at Thr(308) and Ser(473). Although crystal structures for the parts of Akt have been reported, neither the three-dimensional structure of the whole molecule nor sequential conformational changes during activation have been demonstrated. In this study, we demonstrated that Akt undergoes dramatic interdomain conformational changes during activation processes by probing the three-dimensional structure of full-length Akt in solution using chemical cross-linking and tandem mass spectrometry. The cross-linking results not only provided new structural information but also revealed distinctive spatial arrangements of individual domains in the Akt molecule in resting, membrane-interacted, phosphorylated, and substrate-bound states. Our data allowed a new model for stepwise interdomain conformational changes in Akt activation sequence, setting a stage for the further investigation on Akt-membrane, Akt-protein, and/or Akt-drug interactions in solution to understand molecular mechanisms involved in physiological and pathophysiological processes of cell survival. PMID:16531397

  2. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMahon, Katherine D.; Malmstrom, Rex R.

    2014-06-18

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ‘ecotype model’ of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  3. Genome-wide Selective Sweeps in Natural Bacterial Populations Revealed by Time-series Metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Bendall, Matthew L.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Schwientek, Patrick; Tremblay, Julien; Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Pati, Amrita; Bushnell, Brian; Foster, Brian; Kang, Dongwan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bertilsson, Stefan; Moran, Mary Ann; Shade, Ashley; Newton, Ryan J.; Stevens, Sarah; McMcahon, Katherine D.; Mamlstrom, Rex R.

    2014-05-12

    Multiple evolutionary models have been proposed to explain the formation of genetically and ecologically distinct bacterial groups. Time-series metagenomics enables direct observation of evolutionary processes in natural populations, and if applied over a sufficiently long time frame, this approach could capture events such as gene-specific or genome-wide selective sweeps. Direct observations of either process could help resolve how distinct groups form in natural microbial assemblages. Here, from a three-year metagenomic study of a freshwater lake, we explore changes in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and patterns of gene gain and loss in populations of Chlorobiaceae and Methylophilaceae. SNP analyses revealed substantial genetic heterogeneity within these populations, although the degree of heterogeneity varied considerably among closely related, co-occurring Methylophilaceae populations. SNP allele frequencies, as well as the relative abundance of certain genes, changed dramatically over time in each population. Interestingly, SNP diversity was purged at nearly every genome position in one of the Chlorobiaceae populations over the course of three years, while at the same time multiple genes either swept through or were swept from this population. These patterns were consistent with a genome-wide selective sweep, a process predicted by the ecotype model? of diversification, but not previously observed in natural populations.

  4. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated.

    PubMed

    Chung, Daehwan; Young, Jenna; Bomble, Yannick J; Vander Wall, Todd A; Groom, Joseph; Himmel, Michael E; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm for cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. It will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role in the structure

  5. Aquatic insect ecophysiological traits reveal phylogenetically based differences in dissolved cadmium susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchwalter, D.B.; Cain, D.J.; Martin, C.A.; Xie, Lingtian; Luoma, S.N.; Garland, T., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    We used a phylogenetically based comparative approach to evaluate the potential for physiological studies to reveal patterns of diversity in traits related to susceptibility to an environmental stressor, the trace metal cadmium (Cd). Physiological traits related to Cd bioaccumulation, compartmentalization, and ultimately susceptibility were measured in 21 aquatic insect species representing the orders Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera. We mapped these experimentally derived physiological traits onto a phylogeny and quantified the tendency for related species to be similar (phylogenetic signal). All traits related to Cd bioaccumulation and susceptibility exhibited statistically significant phylogenetic signal, although the signal strength varied among traits. Conventional and phylogenetically based regression models were compared, revealing great variability within orders but consistent, strong differences among insect families. Uptake and elimination rate constants were positively correlated among species, but only when effects of body size and phylogeny were incorporated in the analysis. Together, uptake and elimination rates predicted dramatic Cd bioaccumulation differences among species that agreed with field-based measurements. We discovered a potential tradeoff between the ability to eliminate Cd and the ability to detoxify it across species, particularly mayflies. The best-fit regression models were driven by phylogenetic parameters (especially differences among families) rather than functional traits, suggesting that it may eventually be possible to predict a taxon's physiological performance based on its phylogenetic position, provided adequate physiological information is available for close relatives. There appears to be great potential for evolutionary physiological approaches to augment our understanding of insect responses to environmental stressors in nature. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  6. Integrated metabolomics and transcriptomics reveal enhanced specialized metabolism in Medicago truncatula root border cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Bonnie S; Bedair, Mohamed F; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Huhman, David V; Yang, Dong Sik; Allen, Stacy N; Li, Wensheng; Tang, Yuhong; Sumner, Lloyd W

    2015-04-01

    Integrated metabolomics and transcriptomics of Medicago truncatula seedling border cells and root tips revealed substantial metabolic differences between these distinct and spatially segregated root regions. Large differential increases in oxylipin-pathway lipoxygenases and auxin-responsive transcript levels in border cells corresponded to differences in phytohormone and volatile levels compared with adjacent root tips. Morphological examinations of border cells revealed the presence of significant starch deposits that serve as critical energy and carbon reserves, as documented through increased β-amylase transcript levels and associated starch hydrolysis metabolites. A substantial proportion of primary metabolism transcripts were decreased in border cells, while many flavonoid- and triterpenoid-related metabolite and transcript levels were increased dramatically. The cumulative data provide compounding evidence that primary and secondary metabolism are differentially programmed in border cells relative to root tips. Metabolic resources normally destined for growth and development are redirected toward elevated accumulation of specialized metabolites in border cells, resulting in constitutively elevated defense and signaling compounds needed to protect the delicate root cap and signal motile rhizobia required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Elevated levels of 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone were further increased in border cells of roots exposed to cotton root rot (Phymatotrichopsis omnivora), and the value of 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone as an antimicrobial compound was demonstrated using in vitro growth inhibition assays. The cumulative and pathway-specific data provide key insights into the metabolic programming of border cells that strongly implicate a more prominent mechanistic role for border cells in plant-microbe signaling, defense, and interactions than envisioned previously. PMID:25667316

  7. Integrated Metabolomics and Transcriptomics Reveal Enhanced Specialized Metabolism in Medicago truncatula Root Border Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Bonnie S.; Bedair, Mohamed F.; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Huhman, David V.; Yang, Dong Sik; Allen, Stacy N.; Li, Wensheng; Tang, Yuhong; Sumner, Lloyd W.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated metabolomics and transcriptomics of Medicago truncatula seedling border cells and root tips revealed substantial metabolic differences between these distinct and spatially segregated root regions. Large differential increases in oxylipin-pathway lipoxygenases and auxin-responsive transcript levels in border cells corresponded to differences in phytohormone and volatile levels compared with adjacent root tips. Morphological examinations of border cells revealed the presence of significant starch deposits that serve as critical energy and carbon reserves, as documented through increased β-amylase transcript levels and associated starch hydrolysis metabolites. A substantial proportion of primary metabolism transcripts were decreased in border cells, while many flavonoid- and triterpenoid-related metabolite and transcript levels were increased dramatically. The cumulative data provide compounding evidence that primary and secondary metabolism are differentially programmed in border cells relative to root tips. Metabolic resources normally destined for growth and development are redirected toward elevated accumulation of specialized metabolites in border cells, resulting in constitutively elevated defense and signaling compounds needed to protect the delicate root cap and signal motile rhizobia required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Elevated levels of 7,4′-dihydroxyflavone were further increased in border cells of roots exposed to cotton root rot (Phymatotrichopsis omnivora), and the value of 7,4′-dihydroxyflavone as an antimicrobial compound was demonstrated using in vitro growth inhibition assays. The cumulative and pathway-specific data provide key insights into the metabolic programming of border cells that strongly implicate a more prominent mechanistic role for border cells in plant-microbe signaling, defense, and interactions than envisioned previously. PMID:25667316

  8. Homologous Expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA Reveals that the Extracellular Protein Is Glycosylated

    PubMed Central

    Bomble, Yannick J.; Vander Wall, Todd A.; Groom, Joseph; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm for cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. It will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role in the structure

  9. Comparative Genomic Analysis of the Endosymbionts of Herbivorous Insects Reveals Eco-Environmental Adaptations: Biotechnology Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Weibing; Xie, Shangxian; Chen, Xueyan; Sun, Su; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Lantao; Gao, Peng; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; No, En-Gyu; Yuan, Joshua S.

    2013-01-01

    Metagenome analysis of the gut symbionts of three different insects was conducted as a means of comparing taxonomic and metabolic diversity of gut microbiomes to diet and life history of the insect hosts. A second goal was the discovery of novel biocatalysts for biorefinery applications. Grasshopper and cutworm gut symbionts were sequenced and compared with the previously identified metagenome of termite gut microbiota. These insect hosts represent three different insect orders and specialize on different food types. The comparative analysis revealed dramatic differences among the three insect species in the abundance and taxonomic composition of the symbiont populations present in the gut. The composition and abundance of symbionts was correlated with their previously identified capacity to degrade and utilize the different types of food consumed by their hosts. The metabolic reconstruction revealed that the gut metabolome of cutworms and grasshoppers was more enriched for genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and transport than wood-feeding termite, whereas the termite gut metabolome was enriched for glycosyl hydrolase (GH) enzymes relevant to lignocellulosic biomass degradation. Moreover, termite gut metabolome was more enriched with nitrogen fixation genes than those of grasshopper and cutworm gut, presumably due to the termite's adaptation to the high fiber and less nutritious food types. In order to evaluate and exploit the insect symbionts for biotechnology applications, we cloned and further characterized four biomass-degrading enzymes including one endoglucanase and one xylanase from both the grasshopper and cutworm gut symbionts. The results indicated that the grasshopper symbiont enzymes were generally more efficient in biomass degradation than the homologous enzymes from cutworm symbionts. Together, these results demonstrated a correlation between the composition and putative metabolic functionality of the gut microbiome and host diet, and suggested

  10. Identification of Genes Required for Nonhost Resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Reveals Novel Signaling Components

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Xu, You-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Cao, Wen-Yuan; Li, Fei; Zhou, Xueping; Chen, Gong-You; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Background Nonhost resistance is a generalized, durable, broad-spectrum resistance exhibited by plant species to a wide variety of microbial pathogens. Although nonhost resistance is an attractive breeding strategy, the molecular basis of this form of resistance remains unclear for many plant-microbe pathosystems, including interactions with the bacterial pathogen of rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Methods and Findings Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and an assay to detect the hypersensitive response (HR) were used to screen for genes required for nonhost resistance to Xoo in N. benthamiana. When infiltrated with Xoo strain YN-1, N. benthamiana plants exhibited a strong necrosis within 24 h and produced a large amount of H2O2 in the infiltrated area. Expression of HR- and defense-related genes was induced, whereas bacterial numbers dramatically decreased during necrosis. VIGS of 45 ACE (Avr/Cf-elicited) genes revealed identified seven genes required for nonhost resistance to Xoo in N. benthamiana. The seven genes encoded a calreticulin protein (ACE35), an ERF transcriptional factor (ACE43), a novel Solanaceous protein (ACE80), a hydrolase (ACE117), a peroxidase (ACE175) and two proteins with unknown function (ACE95 and ACE112). The results indicate that oxidative burst and calcium-dependent signaling pathways play an important role in nonhost resistance to Xoo. VIGS analysis further revealed that ACE35, ACE80, ACE95 and ACE175, but not the other three ACE genes, interfered with the Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HR. Conclusions/Significance N. benthamiana plants inoculated with Xoo respond by rapidly eliciting an HR and nonhost resistance. The oxidative burst and other signaling pathways are pivotal in Xoo-N. benthamiana nonhost resistance, and genes involved in this response partially overlap with those involved in Cf/Avr4-dependent HR. The seven genes required for N. benthamiana-mediated resistance to Xoo provide a basis for further dissecting the molecular

  11. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chung, Daehwan; Young, Jenna; Bomble, Yannick J.; Vander Wall, Todd A.; Groom, Joseph; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-03-23

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm formore » cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. Finally, it will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role

  12. Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    A new study using results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory provides one of the best pieces of evidence yet that many supermassive black holes are spinning extremely rapidly. The whirling of these giant black holes drives powerful jets that pump huge amounts of energy into their environment and affects galaxy growth. A team of scientists compared leading theories of jets produced by rotating supermassive black holes with Chandra data. A sampling of nine giant galaxies that exhibit large disturbances in their gaseous atmospheres showed that the central black holes in these galaxies must be spinning at near their maximum rates. People Who Read This Also Read... NASA’s Swift Satellite Catches First Supernova in The Act of Exploding Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself "We think these monster black holes are spinning close to the limit set by Einstein's theory of relativity, which means that they can drag material around them at close to the speed of light," said Rodrigo Nemmen, a visiting graduate student at Penn State University, and lead author of a paper on the new results presented at American Astronomical Society in Austin, Texas. The research reinforces other, less direct methods previously used which have indicated that some stellar and supermassive black holes are spinning rapidly. According to Einstein's theory, a rapidly spinning black hole makes space itself rotate. This effect, coupled with gas spiraling toward the black hole, can produce a rotating, tightly wound vertical tower of magnetic field that flings a large fraction of the inflowing gas away from the vicinity of the black hole in an energetic, high-speed jet. Computer simulations by other authors have suggested that black holes may acquire their rapid spins when galaxies merge, and through the accretion of gas from their surroundings. "Extremely fast spin might be very common for large

  13. Alteration of the Alkaloid Profile in Genetically Modified Tobacco Reveals a Role of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase in Nicotine N-Demethylation1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Fan, Longjiang; Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Sun, Kehan; Qiu, Jie; Tang, She; Holliday, Bronwyn M.; Xiao, Bingguang; Burkey, Kent O.; Bush, Lowell P.; Conkling, Mark A.; Roje, Sanja; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme of the tetrahydrofolate (THF)-mediated one-carbon (C1) metabolic network. This enzyme catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylene-THF to 5-methyl-THF. The latter donates its methyl group to homocysteine, forming methionine, which is then used for the synthesis of S-adenosyl-methionine, a universal methyl donor for numerous methylation reactions, to produce primary and secondary metabolites. Here, we demonstrate that manipulating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) MTHFR gene (NtMTHFR1) expression dramatically alters the alkaloid profile in transgenic tobacco plants by negatively regulating the expression of a secondary metabolic pathway nicotine N-demethylase gene, CYP82E4. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and alkaloid analyses revealed that reducing NtMTHFR expression by RNA interference dramatically induced CYP82E4 expression, resulting in higher nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. Conversely, overexpressing NtMTHFR1 suppressed CYP82E4 expression, leading to lower nicotine-to-nornicotine conversion rates. However, the reduced expression of NtMTHFR did not affect the methionine and S-adenosyl-methionine levels in the knockdown lines. Our finding reveals a new regulatory role of NtMTHFR1 in nicotine N-demethylation and suggests that the negative regulation of CYP82E4 expression may serve to recruit methyl groups from nicotine into the C1 pool under C1-deficient conditions. PMID:23221678

  14. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a... to reveal facts that are: (1) Material in light of other representations made or suggested...

  15. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a) Labeling of a food, drug, device, or cosmetic shall be deemed to be misleading if it fails to reveal...

  16. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a) Labeling of a food, drug, device, or cosmetic shall be deemed to be misleading if it fails to reveal...

  17. Emotional effects of sertraline: novel findings revealed by meditation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Roger; Victor, Bruce; Bitner, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors continues to increase, as does concern about previously unrecognized, subtle side effects and questions about whether these drugs produce effects on healthy subjects. The authors report novel emotional effects identified by an experienced, psychologically healthy meditator who is a psychiatrist and researcher. On a meditation retreat, the subject identified a specific profile of emotional changes related to sertraline use. In particular, cognitive abilities and the emotions of fear and anger seemed unaffected. However, the emotions of sadness, happiness, rapture, and love were dramatically reduced in intensity and duration. PMID:16569138

  18. Floral CO2 reveals flower profitability to moths.

    PubMed

    Thom, Corinna; Guerenstein, Pablo G; Mechaber, Wendy L; Hildebrand, John G

    2004-06-01

    The hawkmoth Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), an experimentally favorable Lepidopteran that is highly sensitive to carbon dioxide (CO2), feeds on the nectar of a range of flowering plants, such as Datura wrightii (Solanaceae). Newly opened Datura flowers give off dramatically elevated levels of CO2 and offer ample nectar. Thus, floral CO2 emission could indicate food-source profitability. This study documents that foraging Manduca moths prefer surrogate flowers that emit high levels of CO2, characteristic of newly opened Datura flowers. We show for the first time that CO2 may play an important role in the foraging behavior of nectar-feeding insects. PMID:15303329

  19. O2.04TREATMENT WITH OMX-4.80, A TUMOR-PENETRATING TUNABLE OXYGEN CARRIER, REDUCES TUMOR HYPOXIA AND DRAMATICALLY ENHANCES RADIATION THERAPY IN INTRACRANIAL MODELS OF GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Krtolica, A.; Le Moan, N.; Serwer, L.; Yoshida, Y.; Ozawa, T.; Butowski, N.; James, D.; Cary, S.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed OMX-4.80, a tunable oxygen carrier from the H-NOX protein family, that preferentially accumulates in tumor tissue, reduces hypoxia and enhances radiotherapy (RT). Tumor hypoxia is associated with poor patient outcomes in multiple solid tumors including glioblastoma (GB) and is thought to be a major contributor to poor cancer responses to chemo and radiation therapy. Here, we show that OMX-4.80 administered i.v. into the tail vein of mice bearing orthotopic GB passes the blood-tumor barrier, penetrates deep into intracranial tumors, and significantly reduces tumor hypoxia in a dose-dependent manner. Hypoxia reduction is demonstrated by a significant decrease in levels of hypoxia inducible factor, HIF1α, and the external hypoxia marker pimonidazole as assessed by IHC and image analysis. Furthermore, hypoxia before and after treatment is compared in the individual tumors by concurrent immunostaining of tumors with a long-term hypoxia marker, Glut1, and short-lived HIF-1α. These data reveal >50% reduction in hypoxic tumor area after OMX-4.80 treatment confirming the effectiveness of OMX-4.80 in reducing hypoxia in individual tumors. When OMX-4.80 treatment was coupled with a single high dose of RT, we observed a 2.7-fold increase in tumor growth delay and 2.9-fold longer survival (p < 0.05, by logrank). Toxicology studies in rodents and dogs with single and multiple supratherapeutic doses of OMX-4.80 revealed a good safety profile affirming its suitability for clinical development. In conclusion, our results indicate that OMX-4.80 is an effective and promising RT enhancer that warrants clinical development in GB patients.

  20. The lower atmosphere of Pluto revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    ), attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope, have now revealed that the atmosphere as a whole, not just the upper atmosphere, has a mean temperature of minus 180 degrees Celsius, and so it is indeed "much hotter" than the surface. In contrast to the Earth's atmosphere [2], most, if not all, of Pluto's atmosphere is thus undergoing a temperature inversion: the temperature is higher, the higher in the atmosphere you look. The change is about 3 to 15 degrees per kilometre. On Earth, under normal circumstances, the temperature decreases through the atmosphere by about 6 degrees per kilometre. "It is fascinating to think that with CRIRES we are able to precisely measure traces of a gas in an atmosphere 100 000 times more tenuous than the Earth's, on an object five times smaller than our planet and located at the edge of the Solar System," says co-author Hans-Ulrich Käufl. "The combination of CRIRES and the VLT is almost like having an advanced atmospheric research satellite orbiting Pluto." The reason why Pluto's surface is so cold is linked to the existence of Pluto's atmosphere, and is due to the sublimation of the surface ice; much like sweat cools the body as it evaporates from the surface of the skin, this sublimation has a cooling effect on the surface of Pluto. In this respect, Pluto shares some properties with comets, whose coma and tails arise from sublimating ice as they approach the Sun. The CRIRES observations also indicate that methane is the second most common gas in Pluto's atmosphere, representing half a percent of the molecules. "We were able to show that these quantities of methane play a crucial role in the heating processes in the atmosphere and can explain the elevated atmospheric temperature," says Lellouch. Two different models can explain the properties of Pluto's atmosphere. In the first, the astronomers assume that Pluto's surface is covered with a thin layer of methane, which will inhibit the sublimation of the nitrogen frost. The second scenario invokes