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Sample records for reverse genetic applications

  1. TILLING without a plough: a new method with applications for reverse genetics

    E-print Network

    Haughn, George

    advantages over other reverse genetic techniques include its applicability to virtually any organism, its to generate or identify muta- tions in cloned genes to determine the function of these genes (reverse geneticsTILLING without a plough: a new method with applications for reverse genetics Erin J Gilchrist

  2. Flavivirus reverse genetic systems, construction techniques and applications: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Fabien; Nougairède, Antoine; Gould, Ernest A; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    The study of flaviviruses, which cause some of the most important emerging tropical and sub-tropical human arbovirus diseases, has greatly benefited from the use of reverse genetic systems since its first development for yellow fever virus in 1989. Reverse genetics technology has completely revolutionized the study of these viruses, making it possible to manipulate their genomes and evaluate the direct effects of these changes on their biology and pathogenesis. The most commonly used reverse genetics system is the infectious clone technology. Whilst flavivirus infectious clones provide a powerful tool, their construction as full-length cDNA molecules in bacterial vectors can be problematic, laborious and time consuming, because they are often unstable, contain unwanted induced substitutions and may be toxic for bacteria due to viral protein expression. The incredible technological advances that have been made during the past 30years, such as the use of PCR or new sequencing methods, have allowed the development of new approaches to improve preexisting systems or elaborate new strategies that overcome these problems. This review summarizes the evolution and major technical breakthroughs in the development of flavivirus reverse genetics technologies and their application to the further understanding and control of these viruses and their diseases. PMID:25512228

  3. Reverse genetics of floral scent: application of tobacco rattle virus-based gene silencing in Petunia.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Ben; Zvi, Michal Moyal Ben; Ovadis, Marianna; Marhevka, Elena; Barkai, Oren; Edelbaum, Orit; Marton, Ira; Masci, Tania; Alon, Michal; Morin, Shai; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Vainstein, Alexander

    2007-12-01

    Floral fragrance is responsible for attracting pollinators as well as repelling pathogens and pests. As such, it is of immense biological importance. Molecular dissection of the mechanisms underlying scent production would benefit from the use of model plant systems with big floral organs that generate an array of volatiles and that are amenable to methods of forward and reverse genetics. One candidate is petunia (Petunia hybrida), which has emerged as a convenient model system, and both RNAi and overexpression approaches using transgenes have been harnessed for the study of floral volatiles. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is characterized by a simple inoculation procedure and rapid results relative to transgenesis. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the tobacco rattle virus-based VIGS system to studies of floral scent. Suppression of the anthocyanin pathway via chalcone synthase silencing was used as a reporter, allowing easy visual identification of anthocyaninless silenced flowers/tissues with no effect on the level of volatile emissions. Use of tobacco rattle virus constructs containing target genes involved in phenylpropanoid volatile production, fused to the chalcone synthase reporter, allowed simple identification of flowers with suppressed activity of the target genes. The applicability of VIGS was exemplified with genes encoding S-adenosyl-l-methionine:benzoic acid/salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase, phenylacetaldehyde synthase, and the myb transcription factor ODORANT1. Because this high-throughput reverse-genetics approach was applicable to both structural and regulatory genes responsible for volatile production, it is expected to be highly instrumental for large-scale scanning and functional characterization of novel scent genes. PMID:17720754

  4. Versatile Gene-Specific Sequence Tags for Arabidopsis Functional Genomics: Transcript Profiling and Reverse Genetics Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hilson, Pierre; Allemeersch, Joke; Altmann, Thomas; Aubourg, Sébastien; Avon, Alexandra; Beynon, Jim; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P.; Bitton, Frédérique; Caboche, Michel; Cannoot, Bernard; Chardakov, Vasil; Cognet-Holliger, Cécile; Colot, Vincent; Crowe, Mark; Darimont, Caroline; Durinck, Steffen; Eickhoff, Holger; de Longevialle, Andéol Falcon; Farmer, Edward E.; Grant, Murray; Kuiper, Martin T.R.; Lehrach, Hans; Léon, Céline; Leyva, Antonio; Lundeberg, Joakim; Lurin, Claire; Moreau, Yves; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Paz-Ares, Javier; Reymond, Philippe; Rouzé, Pierre; Sandberg, Goran; Segura, Maria Dolores; Serizet, Carine; Tabrett, Alexandra; Taconnat, Ludivine; Thareau, Vincent; Van Hummelen, Paul; Vercruysse, Steven; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Weingartner, Magdalena; Weisbeek, Peter J.; Wirta, Valtteri; Wittink, Floyd R.A.; Zabeau, Marc; Small, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Microarray transcript profiling and RNA interference are two new technologies crucial for large-scale gene function studies in multicellular eukaryotes. Both rely on sequence-specific hybridization between complementary nucleic acid strands, inciting us to create a collection of gene-specific sequence tags (GSTs) representing at least 21,500 Arabidopsis genes and which are compatible with both approaches. The GSTs were carefully selected to ensure that each of them shared no significant similarity with any other region in the Arabidopsis genome. They were synthesized by PCR amplification from genomic DNA. Spotted microarrays fabricated from the GSTs show good dynamic range, specificity, and sensitivity in transcript profiling experiments. The GSTs have also been transferred to bacterial plasmid vectors via recombinational cloning protocols. These cloned GSTs constitute the ideal starting point for a variety of functional approaches, including reverse genetics. We have subcloned GSTs on a large scale into vectors designed for gene silencing in plant cells. We show that in planta expression of GST hairpin RNA results in the expected phenotypes in silenced Arabidopsis lines. These versatile GST resources provide novel and powerful tools for functional genomics. PMID:15489341

  5. Genetic Programming for Reverse Engineering Mark Harman, William B. Langdon and Westley Weimer

    E-print Network

    Harman, Mark

    Genetic Programming for Reverse Engineering Mark Harman, William B. Langdon and Westley Weimer of Genetic Programming (GP) and Genetic Improvement (GI) to reverse engineering. Section II presents that form part of a `GP4RE' research agenda; genetic programming applications for reverse engineering. II

  6. Reverse genetics: Its origins and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, P. )

    1991-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a gene and its flanking segments alone will not tell us how its expression is regulated during development and differentiation, or in response to environmental changes. To comprehend the physiological significance of the molecular details requires biological analysis. Recombinant DNA techniques provide a powerful experimental approach. A strategy termed reverse genetics' utilizes the analysis of the activities of mutant and normal genes and experimentally constructed mutants to explore the relationship between gene structure and function thereby helping elucidate the relationship between genotype and phenotype.

  7. Towards Reverse Engineering of Genetic Regulatory Networks Zelmina Lubovac

    E-print Network

    Chang, Joseph T.

    1 Towards Reverse Engineering of Genetic Regulatory Networks Zelmina Lubovac , Björn Olsson understanding of reverse engineering of regulatory networks. One of the aspects that have not been considered to a great extent in the development of reverse engineering approaches is combinatorial regulation

  8. An inducible and reversible mouse genetic rescue system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongkui; Horie, Kyoji; Madisen, Linda; Pavlova, Maria N; Gragerova, Galina; Rohde, Alex D; Schimpf, Brian A; Liang, Yuqiong; Ojala, Ethan; Kramer, Farah; Roth, Patricia; Slobodskaya, Olga; Dolka, Io; Southon, Eileen A; Tessarollo, Lino; Bornfeldt, Karin E; Gragerov, Alexander; Pavlakis, George N; Gaitanaris, George A

    2008-05-01

    Inducible and reversible regulation of gene expression is a powerful approach for uncovering gene function. We have established a general method to efficiently produce reversible and inducible gene knockout and rescue in mice. In this system, which we named iKO, the target gene can be turned on and off at will by treating the mice with doxycycline. This method combines two genetically modified mouse lines: a) a KO line with a tetracycline-dependent transactivator replacing the endogenous target gene, and b) a line with a tetracycline-inducible cDNA of the target gene inserted into a tightly regulated (TIGRE) genomic locus, which provides for low basal expression and high inducibility. Such a locus occurs infrequently in the genome and we have developed a method to easily introduce genes into the TIGRE site of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by recombinase-mediated insertion. Both KO and TIGRE lines have been engineered for high-throughput, large-scale and cost-effective production of iKO mice. As a proof of concept, we have created iKO mice in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene, which allows for sensitive and quantitative phenotypic analyses. The results demonstrated reversible switching of ApoE transcription, plasma cholesterol levels, and atherosclerosis progression and regression. The iKO system shows stringent regulation and is a versatile genetic system that can easily incorporate other techniques and adapt to a wide range of applications. PMID:18464897

  9. A Genetic Approach with a Simple Fitness Function for Sorting Unsigned Permutations by Reversals

    E-print Network

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    proposed. In this paper we propose a new genetic algorithm approach that uses modified crossoverA Genetic Approach with a Simple Fitness Function for Sorting Unsigned Permutations by Reversals applications in bio-informatics for the interpretation of the evolutionary relationship between organisms

  10. Reverse Engineering of Web Applications: A

    E-print Network

    Coenen, Frans

    Reverse Engineering of Web Applications: A Technical Review Reshma Patel1 Frans Coenen1 Russell/July 2007 #12;2Reverse Engineering of Web Applications: A Technical Report REVERSE ENGINEEING OF WEB, Wirral, CH62 3NX lawson@transglobalexpress.co.uk Abstract The World Wide Web (WWW) has become one

  11. Reverse engineering gene networks: Integrating genetic perturbations with dynamical modeling

    E-print Network

    Hasty, Jeff

    Reverse engineering gene networks: Integrating genetic perturbations with dynamical modeling Jesper contained in the genetic circuit. A natural plan of attack is to use a forward engineering approach, wherebyDynamics and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215; Division of Computational Biology

  12. FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION MOLECULAR GENETIC PATHOLOGY

    E-print Network

    FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION MOLECULAR GENETIC PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENTS OF PATHOLOGY, LABORATORY MEDICINE for the Molecular Genetic Pathology Fellowship beginning July 1 of_____________________________. year Full name

  13. Reverse engineering of genetic networks through multicriterion optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Someren, Eugene P.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Backer, Eric

    2002-06-01

    A major problem associated with the reverse engineering of genetic networks from micro-array data is how to reliably find genetic interactions when faced with a relatively small number of arrays compared to the number of genes. To cope with this dimensionality problem, it is imperative to employ additional (biological) knowledge about genetic networks, such as limited connectivity, redundancy, stability and robustness, to sensibly constrain the modeling process. Recently, we have shown that by applying single criteria, the inference of genetic interactions under realistic conditions can be significantly improved. In this paper, we study the problem of how to combine constraints by formulating it as a multi-criterion optimization problem.

  14. Bayesian Networks Applications in Genetics

    E-print Network

    Nuel, Gregory

    Bayesian Networks Applications in Genetics Segregation, IBD and Linkage from the Perspective the Perspective of BNT #12;Bayesian Networks Applications in Genetics Outline 1 Bayesian Networks Model and Notations Belief Propagation Exact Inference 2 Applications in Genetics Segregation IBD Linkage G. NUEL

  15. Reverse Genetics System for the Avian Coronavirus Infectious Bronchitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Casais, Rosa; Thiel, Volker; Siddell, Stuart G.; Cavanagh, David; Britton, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Major advances in the study of the molecular biology of RNA viruses have resulted from the ability to generate and manipulate full-length genomic cDNAs of the viral genomes with the subsequent synthesis of infectious RNA for the generation of recombinant viruses. Coronaviruses have the largest RNA virus genomes and, together with genetic instability of some cDNA sequences in Escherichia coli, this has hampered the generation of a reverse-genetics system for this group of viruses. In this report, we describe the assembly of a full-length cDNA from the positive-sense genomic RNA of the avian coronavirus, infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), an important poultry pathogen. The IBV genomic cDNA was assembled immediately downstream of a T7 RNA polymerase promoter by in vitro ligation and cloned directly into the vaccinia virus genome. Infectious IBV RNA was generated in situ after the transfection of restricted recombinant vaccinia virus DNA into primary chick kidney cells previously infected with a recombinant fowlpox virus expressing T7 RNA polymerase. Recombinant IBV, containing two marker mutations, was recovered from the transfected cells. These results describe a reverse-genetics system for studying the molecular biology of IBV and establish a paradigm for generating genetically defined vaccines for IBV. PMID:11711626

  16. Integrating chemical mutagenesis and whole-genome sequencing as a platform for forward and reverse genetic analysis of Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Kokes, Marcela; Dunn, Joe Dan; Granek, Joshua A; Nguyen, Bidong D; Barker, Jeffrey R; Valdivia, Raphael H; Bastidas, Robert J

    2015-05-13

    Gene inactivation by transposon insertion or allelic exchange is a powerful approach to probe gene function. Unfortunately, many microbes, including Chlamydia, are not amenable to routine molecular genetic manipulations. Here we describe an arrayed library of chemically induced mutants of the genetically intransigent pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, in which all mutations have been identified by whole-genome sequencing, providing a platform for reverse genetic applications. An analysis of possible loss-of-function mutations in the collection uncovered plasticity in the central metabolic properties of this obligate intracellular pathogen. We also describe the use of the library in a forward genetic screen that identified InaC as a bacterial factor that binds host ARF and 14-3-3 proteins and modulates F-actin assembly and Golgi redistribution around the pathogenic vacuole. This work provides a robust platform for reverse and forward genetic approaches in Chlamydia and should serve as a valuable resource to the community. PMID:25920978

  17. Reversed Genetic Algorithms for Generation of Bijective S-boxes with Good Cryptographic Properties

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Reversed Genetic Algorithms for Generation of Bijective S-boxes with Good Cryptographic Properties of heuristic approaches. Among the latter are the genetic algorithms. In this paper, a genetic algorithm structure and possess no linear redundancy. Keywords: Genetic Algorithms, S-boxes, Nonlinearity 1

  18. Rapid reverse genetic screening using CRISPR in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shah, Arish N; Davey, Crystal F; Whitebirch, Alex C; Miller, Adam C; Moens, Cecilia B

    2015-06-01

    Identifying genes involved in biological processes is critical for understanding the molecular building blocks of life. We used engineered CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) to efficiently mutate specific loci in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and screen for genes involved in vertebrate biological processes. We found that increasing CRISPR efficiency by injecting optimized amounts of Cas9-encoding mRNA and multiplexing single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) allowed for phenocopy of known mutants across many phenotypes in embryos. We performed a proof-of-concept screen in which we used intersecting, multiplexed pool injections to examine 48 loci and identified two new genes involved in electrical-synapse formation. By deep sequencing target loci, we found that 90% of the genes were effectively screened. We conclude that CRISPR can be used as a powerful reverse genetic screening strategy in vivo in a vertebrate system. PMID:25867848

  19. REVERSE ENGINEERING BY MEANS OF GENETIC PROGRAMMING OF METABOLIC PATHWAYS FROM OBSERVED DATA

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    REVERSE ENGINEERING BY MEANS OF GENETIC PROGRAMMING OF METABOLIC PATHWAYS FROM OBSERVED DATA John R, to automatically reverse engineer the network from the data. Genetic programming (Koza, Bennett, Andre, and Keane. Koza Biomedical Informatics, Department of Medicine Department of Electrical Engineering Stanford

  20. A Reverse Genetic Approach to Test Functional Redundancy During Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rikin, Amir; Rosenfeld, Gabriel E.; McCartin, Kellie; Evans, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Gene function during embryogenesis is typically defined by loss-of-function experiments, for example by targeted mutagenesis (knockout) in the mouse. In the zebrafish model, effective reverse genetic techniques have been developed using microinjection of gene-specific antisense morpholinos. Morpholinos target an mRNA through specific base-pairing and block gene function transiently by inhibiting translation or splicing for several days during embryogenesis (knockdown). However, in vertebrates such as mouse or zebrafish, some gene functions can be obscured by these approaches due to the presence of another gene that compensates for the loss. This is especially true for gene families containing sister genes that are co-expressed in the same developing tissues. In zebrafish, functional compensation can be tested in a relatively high-throughput manner, by co-injection of morpholinos that target knockdown of both genes simultaneously. Likewise, using morpholinos, a genetic interaction between any two genes can be demonstrated by knockdown of both genes together at sub-threshold levels. For example, morpholinos can be titrated such that neither individual knockdown generates a phenotype. If, under these conditions, co-injection of both morpholinos causes a phenotype, a genetic interaction is shown. Here we demonstrate how to show functional redundancy in the context of two related GATA transcription factors. GATA factors are essential for specification of cardiac progenitors, but this is revealed only by the loss of both Gata5 and Gata6. We show how to carry out microinjection experiments, validate the morpholinos, and evaluate the compensated phenotype for cardiogenesis. PMID:20736915

  1. Reversible Hydrogels from Self-Assembling Genetically Engineered Protein Block Copolymers

    E-print Network

    Breedveld, Victor

    Reversible Hydrogels from Self-Assembling Genetically Engineered Protein Block Copolymers Chunyu Xu-soluble polyelectrolyte segment flanked by two coiled-coil domains was synthesized by genetic engineering methods antibodies that can form complexes with antigens,20 and genetically engineered proteins containing coiled

  2. Silver electrodes for reversible oxygen sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-09-01

    We report a single oxygen atomic sensor based on a scanning tunneling microscope break-junction (STM-BJ) technique by using silver electrodes at room temperature. The oxygen concentration was adjusted with argon gas in a glove box. An oxygen atom was inserted in the gap of the Ag electrodes after the Ag metal point contact had been ruptured during stretching of the Ag atomic junctions by moving a piezo. We successfully measured the conductance of a single oxygen atom by forming a series with the Ag contact, Ag-O-Ag bond. We found that the probability of Ag-O-Ag junction formation increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Furthermore, we observed that the peak height in the oxygen conductance histogram was changed reversibly depending on the oxygen concentration in a glove box. It confirms that our STM-BJ can be used for atomic sensor applications in the future.

  3. Live vaccines for human metapneumovirus designed by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Ursula J; Nagashima, Kunio; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

    2006-10-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was first described in 2001 and has quickly become recognized as an important cause of respiratory tract disease worldwide, especially in the pediatric population. A vaccine against HMPV is required to prevent severe disease associated with infection in infancy. The primary strategy is to develop a live-attenuated virus for intranasal immunization, which is particularly well suited against a respiratory virus. Reverse genetics provides a means of developing highly characterized 'designer' attenuated vaccine candidates. To date, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed, each using a different mode of attenuation. One candidate involves deletion of the G glycoprotein, providing attenuation that is probably based on reduced efficiency of attachment. A second candidate involves deletion of the M2-2 protein, which participates in regulating RNA synthesis and whose deletion has the advantageous property of upregulating transcription and increasing antigen synthesis. A third candidate involves replacing the P protein gene of HMPV with its counterpart from the related avian metapneumovirus, thereby introducing attenuation owing to its chimeric nature and host range restriction. Another live vaccine strategy involves using an attenuated parainfluenza virus as a vector to express HMPV protective antigens, providing a bivalent pediatric vaccine. Additional modifications to provide improved vaccines will also be discussed. PMID:17181442

  4. Rapid reverse genetic screening using CRISPR in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arish N; Davey, Crystal F; Whitebirch, Alex C; Miller, Adam C; Moens, Cecilia B

    2015-01-01

    Identifying genes involved in biological processes is critical for understanding the molecular building blocks of life. The effectiveness of engineered CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) to efficiently mutate specific loci coupled with the accessibility of zebrafish (Danio rerio) provides an opportunity to screen for genes involved in vertebrate biological processes. Injection of Cas9-encoding mRNA and an engineered, single guide RNA (sgRNA) can cause biallelic mutations in injected embryos that phenocopy known mutant phenotypes. We found that increasing CRISPR efficiency and multiplexing sgRNAs allowed for phenocopy of known mutants across many phenotypes. We performed a proof-of-concept screen examining 48 loci by intersecting, multiplexed pool injections, and identified two new genes involved in electrical synapse formation. By deep-sequencing target loci we found that 90% of the genes were effectively screened. We conclude that CRISPR can be used as a powerful reverse genetic screening strategy in vivo in a vertebrate system. PMID:25867848

  5. Reverse genetics of rabies virus: new strategies to attenuate virus virulence for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shimao; Li, Hui; Wang, Chunhua; Luo, Farui; Guo, Caiping

    2015-08-01

    Rabies is an ancient neurological disease that is almost invariably fatal once the clinical symptoms develop. Currently, prompt wound cleansing after exposing to a potentially rabid animal and vaccination using rabies vaccine combined with administration of rabies immune globulin are the only effective methods for post-exposure prophylaxis against rabies. Reverse genetic technique is a novel approach to investigate the function of a specific gene by analyzing the phenotypic effects through directly manipulating the gene sequences. It has revolutionized and provided a powerful tool to study the molecular biology of RNA viruses and has been widely used in rabies virus research. The attenuation of rabies virus virulence is the prerequisite for rabies vaccine development. Given the current challenge that sufficient and affordable high-quality vaccines are limited and lacking for global rabies prevention and control, highly cell-adapted, stable, and attenuated rabies viruses with broad cross-reactivity against different viral variants are ideal candidates for consideration to meet the need for human rabies control in the future. A number of approaches have been pursued to reduce the virulence of the virus and improve the safety of rabies vaccines. The application of reverse genetic technique has greatly advanced the engineering of rabies virus and paves the avenue for utilizing rabies virus for vaccine against rabies, viral vectors for exogenous antigen expression, and gene therapy in the future. PMID:25994916

  6. Reversibility conditions for quantum channels and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shirokov, M E

    2013-08-31

    Conditions for a quantum channel (noncommutative Markov operator) to be reversible with respect to complete families of quantum states with bounded rank are obtained. A description of all quantum channels reversible with respect to a given (orthogonal or nonorthogonal) complete family of pure states is given. Some applications in quantum information theory are considered. Bibliography: 20 titles.

  7. Development of a reverse genetics system to generate a recombinant Ebola virus Makona expressing a green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Albariño, César G; Wiggleton Guerrero, Lisa; Lo, Michael K; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential application of reverse genetics technology in studying a broad range of aspects of viral biology, including gene regulation, protein function, cell entry, and pathogenesis. Here, we describe a highly efficient reverse genetics system used to generate recombinant Ebola virus (EBOV) based on a recent isolate from a human patient infected during the 2014-2015 outbreak in Western Africa. We also rescued a recombinant EBOV expressing a fluorescent reporter protein from a cleaved VP40 protein fusion. Using this virus and an inexpensive method to quantitate the expression of the foreign gene, we demonstrate its potential usefulness as a tool for screening antiviral compounds and measuring neutralizing antibodies. PMID:26122472

  8. Reverse genetics plasmid for cloning unstable influenza A virus gene segments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Jerzak, Greta; Scholes, Derek T; Donnelly, Matthew E; Li, Yan; Wentworth, David E

    2011-05-01

    Reverse genetics approaches that enable the generation of recombinant influenza A viruses entirely from plasmids are invaluable for studies on virus replication, morphogenesis, pathogenesis, or transmission. Furthermore, influenza virus reverse genetics is now critical for the development of new vaccines for this human and animal pathogen. Periodically, influenza gene segments are unstable within plasmids in bacteria. The PB2 gene segment of a highly pathogenic avian H5 influenza virus A/Turkey/Ontario/7732/1966 (Ty/Ont) was unstable in commonly available cloning plasmids (e.g., pcDNA3.1/V5-His-TOPO) and in standard influenza virus reverse genetics plasmids (e.g., pHH21), which contain high copy origins of replication. Thus, a low-copy influenza reverse genetics plasmid (pGJ3C3) was developed to enable rapid cloning of unstable influenza A virus genes using ligation-independent recombination-based cloning. The unstable Ty/Ont PB2 gene segment was efficiently cloned using the pGJ3C3 plasmid and this clone was used to rescue a recombinant Ty/Ont virus. This low copy reverse genetics plasmid will be useful for cloning other unstable segments of influenza A viruses in order to rescue recombinant viruses, which will facilitate basic studies and vaccine seed stock production. PMID:21295611

  9. Genetic Applications in Avian Conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.; Bronaugh, Whitcomb M.; Crowhurst, Rachel S.; D'Elia, Jesse; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Epps, Clinton W.; Knaus, Brian; Miller, Mark P.; Moses, Michael L.; Oyler-McCance, Sara; Robinson, W. Douglas; Sidlauskas, Brian

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental need in conserving species and their habitats is defining distinct entities that range from individuals to species to ecosystems and beyond (Table 1; Ryder 1986, Moritz 1994, Mayden and Wood 1995, Haig and Avise 1996, Hazevoet 1996, Palumbi and Cipriano 1998, Hebert et al. 2004, Mace 2004, Wheeler et al. 2004, Armstrong and Ball 2005, Baker 2008, Ellis et al. 2010, Winker and Haig 2010). Rapid progression in this interdisciplinary field continues at an exponential rate; thus, periodic updates on theory, techniques, and applications are important for informing practitioners and consumers of genetic information. Here, we outline conservation topics for which genetic information can be helpful, provide examples of where genetic techniques have been used best in avian conservation, and point to current technical bottlenecks that prevent better use of genomics to resolve conservation issues related to birds. We hope this review will provide geneticists and avian ecologists with a mutually beneficial dialogue on how this integrated field can solve current and future problems.

  10. Statistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology

    E-print Network

    Rosenberg, Noah

    Statistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology Volume 9, Issue 1 2010 Article 13 Comparing Spatial Maps of Human Population-Genetic Variation Using Procrustes Analysis Chaolong Wang Zachary The Berkeley Electronic Press. All rights reserved. #12;Comparing Spatial Maps of Human Population-Genetic

  11. Yeast Genetics and Biotechnological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Saroj; Baranwal, Richa

    Yeast can be recognized as one of the very important groups of microorganisms on account of its extensive use in the fermentation industry and as a basic eukaryotic model cellular system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used to elucidate the genetics and regulation of several key functions in the cell such as cell mating, electron transport chain, protein trafficking, cell cycle events and others. Even before the genome sequence of the yeast was out, the structural organization and function of several of its genes was known. With the availability of the origin of replication from the 2 ?m plasmid and the development of transformation system, it became the host of choice for expression of a number of important proteins. A large number of episomal and integrative shuttle vectors are available for expression of mammalian proteins. The latest developments in genomics and micro-array technology have allowed investigations of individual gene function by site-specific deletion method. The application of metabolic profiling has also assisted in understanding the cellular network operating in this yeast. This chapter is aimed at reviewing the use of this system as an experimental tool for conducting classical genetics. Various vector systems available, foreign genes expressed and the limitations as a host will be discussed. Finally, the use of various yeast enzymes in biotechnology sector will be reviewed.

  12. Reveal, A General Reverse Engineering Algorithm for Inference of Genetic Network Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Fuhrman, Stefanie; Somogyi, Roland

    1998-01-01

    Given the immanent gene expression mapping covering whole genomes during development, health and disease, we seek computational methods to maximize functional inference from such large data sets. Is it possible, in principle, to completely infer a complex regulatory network architecture from input/output patterns of its variables? We investigated this possibility using binary models of genetic networks. Trajectories, or state transition tables of Boolean nets, resemble time series of gene expression. By systematically analyzing the mutual information between input states and output states, one is able to infer the sets of input elements controlling each element or gene in the network. This process is unequivocal and exact for complete state transition tables. We implemented this REVerse Engineering ALgorithm (REVEAL) in a C program, and found the problem to be tractable within the conditions tested so far. For n = 50 (elements) and k = 3 (inputs per element), the analysis of incomplete state transition tables (100 state transition pairs out of a possible 10(exp 15)) reliably produced the original rule and wiring sets. While this study is limited to synchronous Boolean networks, the algorithm is generalizable to include multi-state models, essentially allowing direct application to realistic biological data sets. The ability to adequately solve the inverse problem may enable in-depth analysis of complex dynamic systems in biology and other fields.

  13. Human-competitive Applications of Genetic Programming

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Human-competitive Applications of Genetic Programming John R. Koza Stanford Medical Informatics, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Department of Electrical Engineering, School of Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 E-mail: koza@stanford.edu Summary: Genetic programming

  14. Potato genetics, genomics, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Potato has a variety of reproductive uniquenesses besides its clonal propagation by tubers. These traits are controlled by a different kind of genetic control. The reproductive information has been applied to enable interspecific hybridization to enhance valuable traits, such as disease and pest resistances, from the tuber-bearing Solanum gene pool. While progress has been made in potato breeding, many resources have been invested due to the requirements of large populations and long time frame. This is not only due to the general pitfalls in plant breeding, but also due to the complexity of polyploid genetics. Tetraploid genetics is the most prominent aspect associated with potato breeding. Genetic maps and markers have contributed to potato breeding, and genome information further elucidates questions in potato evolution and supports comprehensive potato breeding. Challenges yet remain on recognizing intellectual property rights to breeding and germplasm, and also on regulatory aspects to incorporate modern biotechnology for increasing genetic variation in potato breeding. PMID:25931980

  15. Experimental implementation of reverse time migration for nondestructive evaluation applications.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Griffa, Michele; Bas, Pierre-Yves Le; Ulrich, Timothy J; Johnson, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is a commonly employed imaging technique in seismic applications (e.g., to image reservoirs of oil). Its standard implementation cannot account for multiple scattering/reverberation. For this reason it has not yet found application in nondestructive evaluation (NDE). This paper applies RTM imaging to NDE applications in bounded samples, where reverberation is always present. This paper presents a fully experimental implementation of RTM, whereas in seismic applications, only part of the procedure is done experimentally. A modified RTM imaging condition is able to localize scatterers and locations of disbonding. Experiments are conducted on aluminum samples with controlled scatterers. PMID:21302980

  16. An Assessment of Heavy Ion Irradiation Mutagenesis for Reverse Genetics in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Timothy L.; Powell, Jonathan J.; Stiller, Jiri; Weese, Terri L.; Abe, Tomoko; Zhao, Guangyao; Jia, Jizeng; McIntyre, C. Lynne; Li, Zhongyi; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Reverse genetic techniques harnessing mutational approaches are powerful tools that can provide substantial insight into gene function in plants. However, as compared to diploid species, reverse genetic analyses in polyploid plants such as bread wheat can present substantial challenges associated with high levels of sequence and functional similarity amongst homoeologous loci. We previously developed a high-throughput method to identify deletions of genes within a physically mutagenized wheat population. Here we describe our efforts to combine multiple homoeologous deletions of three candidate disease susceptibility genes (TaWRKY11, TaPFT1 and TaPLDß1). We were able to produce lines featuring homozygous deletions at two of the three homoeoloci for all genes, but this was dependent on the individual mutants used in crossing. Intriguingly, despite extensive efforts, viable lines possessing homozygous deletions at all three homoeoloci could not be produced for any of the candidate genes. To investigate deletion size as a possible reason for this phenomenon, we developed an amplicon sequencing approach based on synteny to Brachypodium distachyon to assess the size of the deletions removing one candidate gene (TaPFT1) in our mutants. These analyses revealed that genomic deletions removing the locus are relatively large, resulting in the loss of multiple additional genes. The implications of this work for the use of heavy ion mutagenesis for reverse genetic analyses in wheat are discussed. PMID:25719507

  17. Prospects for fusion applications of reversed-field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) as a source of fusion neutrons for use in developing key fusion nuclear technologies is examined. This Fusion Test Facility (FTF) would emphasize high neutron wall loading, small plasma volume, low fusion and driver powers, and steady-state operation. Both parametric tradeoffs based on present-day physics understanding and a conceptual design based on an approx.1-MW/mS (neutron) driven operation are reported. 10 refs.

  18. Mobile Timekeeping Application Built on Reverse-Engineered JPL Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witoff, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Every year, non-exempt employees cumulatively waste over one man-year tracking their time and using the timekeeping Web page to save those times. This app eliminates this waste. The innovation is a native iPhone app. Libraries were built around a reverse- engineered JPL API. It represents a punch-in/punch-out paradigm for timekeeping. It is accessible natively via iPhones, and features ease of access. Any non-exempt employee can natively punch in and out, as well as save and view their JPL timecard. This app is built on custom libraries created by reverse-engineering the standard timekeeping application. Communication is through custom libraries that re-route traffic through BrowserRAS (remote access service). This has value at any center where employees track their time.

  19. Identification of Host Genes Involved in Geminivirus Infection Using a Reverse Genetics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Ana P.; Bejarano, Eduardo R.

    2011-01-01

    Geminiviruses, like all viruses, rely on the host cell machinery to establish a successful infection, but the identity and function of these required host proteins remain largely unknown. Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), a monopartite geminivirus, is one of the causal agents of the devastating Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD). The transgenic 2IRGFP N. benthamiana plants, used in combination with Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS), entail an important potential as a tool in reverse genetics studies to identify host factors involved in TYLCSV infection. Using these transgenic plants, we have made an accurate description of the evolution of TYLCSV replication in the host in both space and time. Moreover, we have determined that TYLCSV and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) do not dramatically influence each other when co-infected in N. benthamiana, what makes the use of TRV-induced gene silencing in combination with TYLCSV for reverse genetic studies feasible. Finally, we have tested the effect of silencing candidate host genes on TYLCSV infection, identifying eighteen genes potentially involved in this process, fifteen of which had never been implicated in geminiviral infections before. Seven of the analyzed genes have a potential anti-viral effect, whereas the expression of the other eleven is required for a full infection. Interestingly, almost half of the genes altering TYLCSV infection play a role in postranslational modifications. Therefore, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying geminivirus infections, and at the same time reveal the 2IRGFP/VIGS system as a powerful tool for functional reverse genetics studies. PMID:21818318

  20. Statistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology

    E-print Network

    Casella, George

    and Botstein (1989), there has been a vast wealth of literature concerning the development of statisticalStatistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology Volume 8, Issue 1 2009 Article 16 Score Statistics for Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Myron N. Chang Rongling Wu Samuel S. Wu George Casella

  1. Statistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology

    E-print Network

    Scott, Clayton

    ], the empirical Bayes procedure of Efron and Tibshirani [2002], the mixture of normals of Pan et al. [2003Statistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology Volume 7, Issue 1 2008 Article 15 Semi David Rossell, Rudy Guerra, and Clayton Scott Abstract We develop an approach for microarray

  2. Applications of genetic engineering in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, K; Trovitch, P

    2000-09-15

    A mutation of just one gene will cause abnormal cell behavior leading to the synthesis of a dysfunctional protein. This mutation will inevitably result in the cell functioning only marginally or not at all. Other genetic mutations interfere with the cell's normal life cycle, especially the cell-division cycle. The goal behind recombinant DNA technology is to deliver the correct version of a mutated gene to the cell so that the expression will lead to the normal production of protein and the restoration of normal cell function. This can be considered qualitatively different from other conventional treatments due to genetic material being a putative therapeutic agent. By altering the genetic material of cells, gene therapy may correct, or one day cure, the specific disease pathophysiology. Genetic engineering has been used in veterinary medicine to diagnose, prevent and treat diseases, breed different species and produce transgenic animals for therapeutic proteins or xenografting. In this review the current status of recombinant DNA technology and its application in veterinary medicine together with the obstacles to, and applications of, genetic engineering in veterinary medicine are discussed. PMID:10967221

  3. Application of Molecular Genetics and Transformation to Barley Improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter of the new barley monograph summarizes current applications of molecular genetics and transformation to barley improvement. The chapter describes recent applications of molecular markers including association genetics, QTL mapping and marker assisted selection in barley programs, and in...

  4. Divergent genetic mechanisms underlie reversals to radial floral symmetry from diverse zygomorphic flowered ancestors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenheng; Steinmann, Victor W.; Nikolov, Lachezar; Kramer, Elena M.; Davis, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Malpighiaceae possess flowers with a unique bilateral symmetry (zygomorphy), which is a hypothesized adaptation associated with specialization on neotropical oil bee pollinators. Gene expression of two representatives of the CYC2 lineage of floral symmetry TCP genes, CYC2A and CYC2B, demarcate the adaxial (dorsal) region of the flower in the characteristic zygomorphic flowers of most Malpighiaceae. Several clades within the family, however, have independently lost their specialized oil bee pollinators and reverted to radial flowers (actinomorphy) like their ancestors. Here, we investigate CYC2 expression associated with four independent reversals to actinomorphy. We demonstrate that these reversals are always associated with alteration of the highly conserved CYC2 expression pattern observed in most New World (NW) Malpighiaceae. In NW Lasiocarpus and Old World (OW) Microsteria, the expression of CYC2-like genes has expanded to include the ventral region of the corolla. Thus, the pattern of gene expression in these species has become radialized, which is comparable to what has been reported in the radial flowered legume clade Cadia. In striking contrast, in NW Psychopterys and OW Sphedamnocarpus, CYC2-like expression is entirely absent or at barely detectable levels. This is more similar to the pattern of CYC2 expression observed in radial flowered Arabidopsis. These results collectively indicate that, regardless of geographic distribution, reversals to similar floral phenotypes in this large tropical angiosperm clade have evolved via different genetic changes from an otherwise highly conserved developmental program. PMID:23970887

  5. Time Reversal and Applications to imaging Hongkai Zhao

    E-print Network

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    . · Automatic target detection and destruction. · Secure Communications. · Passive time reversal: time reversal reversal Ft is naturally provided by the medium. In passive time reversal, e.g., target detection, Ft has frequencies. Remarks: · Underwater sound (Kuperman et. al.) and ultrasound regime (Fink et. al.) experiments

  6. Chemical- and irradiation-induced mutants of indica rice IR64 for forward and reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Li; Wu, Chanjian; Lei, Cailin; Baraoidan, Marietta; Bordeos, Alicia; Madamba, Ma Reina Suzette; Ramos-Pamplona, Marilou; Mauleon, Ramil; Portugal, Arlett; Ulat, Victor Jun; Bruskiewich, Richard; Wang, Guoliang; Leach, Jan; Khush, Gurdev; Leung, Hei

    2005-09-01

    IR64, the most widely grown indica rice in South and Southeast Asia, possesses many positive agronomic characteristics (e.g., wide adaptability, high yield potential, tolerance to multiple diseases and pests, and good eating quality,) that make it an ideal genotype for identifying mutational changes in traits of agronomic importance. We have produced a large collection of chemical and irradiation-induced IR64 mutants with different genetic lesions that are amenable to both forward and reverse genetics. About 60,000 IR64 mutants have been generated by mutagenesis using chemicals (diepoxybutane and ethylmethanesulfonate) and irradiation (fast neutron and gamma ray). More than 38,000 independent lines have been advanced to M4 generation enabling evaluation of quantitative traits by replicated trials. Morphological variations at vegetative and reproductive stages, including plant architecture, growth habit, pigmentation and various physiological characters, are commonly observed in the four mutagenized populations. Conditional mutants such as gain or loss of resistance to blast, bacterial blight, and tungro disease have been identified at frequencies ranging from 0.01% to 0.1%. Results from pilot experiments indicate that the mutant collections are suitable for reverse genetics through PCR-detection of deletions and TILLING. Furthermore, deletions can be detected using oligomer chips suggesting a general technique to pinpoint deletions when genome-wide oligomer chips are broadly available. M4 mutant seeds are available for users for screening of altered response to multiple stresses. So far, more than 15,000 mutant lines have been distributed. To facilitate broad usage of the mutants, a mutant database has been constructed in the International Rice Information System (IRIS; http: //www.iris.irri.org) to document the phenotypes and gene function discovered by users. PMID:16217604

  7. 520 BIOCHEMISTRY OF GENE EXPRESSION [36] [36] Reverse Biochemistry: Methods and Applications

    E-print Network

    520 BIOCHEMISTRY OF GENE EXPRESSION [36] [36] Reverse Biochemistry: Methods and Applications for Synthesizing Yeast Proteins in Vitro By KEVIN STRUHL Introduction Reverse biochemistry is a recent and for analyzing the relationship between protein structure and function. The key feature of reverse biochemistry

  8. The Applications of Genetic Algorithms in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ghaheri, Ali; Shoar, Saeed; Naderan, Mohammad; Hoseini, Sayed Shahabuddin

    2015-01-01

    A great wealth of information is hidden amid medical research data that in some cases cannot be easily analyzed, if at all, using classical statistical methods. Inspired by nature, metaheuristic algorithms have been developed to offer optimal or near-optimal solutions to complex data analysis and decision-making tasks in a reasonable time. Due to their powerful features, metaheuristic algorithms have frequently been used in other fields of sciences. In medicine, however, the use of these algorithms are not known by physicians who may well benefit by applying them to solve complex medical problems. Therefore, in this paper, we introduce the genetic algorithm and its applications in medicine. The use of the genetic algorithm has promising implications in various medical specialties including radiology, radiotherapy, oncology, pediatrics, cardiology, endocrinology, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pulmonology, infectious diseases, orthopedics, rehabilitation medicine, neurology, pharmacotherapy, and health care management. This review introduces the applications of the genetic algorithm in disease screening, diagnosis, treatment planning, pharmacovigilance, prognosis, and health care management, and enables physicians to envision possible applications of this metaheuristic method in their medical career.] PMID:26676060

  9. DAIRY FARM PROFITABILITY ENHANCED BY APPLICATION OF QUANTITATIVE GENETICS

    E-print Network

    Obbard, Darren

    DAIRY FARM PROFITABILITY ENHANCED BY APPLICATION OF QUANTITATIVE GENETICS Methods of accounting resulted in a UK-herd-specific TDM which delivers more accurate genetic evaluations for production. Further that could be used to improve genetic evaluation. Genetic parameters for locomotion, which is used

  10. Examination of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system for human astrovirus.

    PubMed

    Chapellier, Benoit; Tange, Shoichiro; Tasaki, Hidetaka; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Zhou, Yan; Sakon, Naomi; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Akira

    2015-10-01

    A plasmid-based reverse genetics system for human astrovirus type 1 (HAstV1) is examined. Upon transfection into 293T cells, the plasmid vector, which harbors a HAstV1 expression cassette, expressed astroviral RNA that appeared to be capable of viral RNA replication, as indicated by the production of subgenomic RNA and capsid protein expression irrespective of the heterologous 5' ends of the transcribed RNA. Particles infectious to Caco-2 cells were made in this system; however, their infectivity was much lower than would be expected from the amount of particles apparently produced. Using Huh-7 cells as the transfection host with the aim of improving viral capsid processing for virion maturation partially restored the efficiency of infectious particle formation. Our results support the possibility that the DNA transfection process induces a cellular response that targets late, but not early, stages of HAstV1 infection. PMID:26272702

  11. Fractionation of bovine caseins by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography: identification of a genetic variant.

    PubMed

    Carles, C

    1986-02-01

    Samples of reduced whole casein from genetically typed individual cows were quantitatively separated into their main components, alpha s1-, alpha s2-, beta- and kappa-caseins by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) using a mobile phase of phosphate-buffered aqueous propan-2-ol containing sodium dodecyl sulphate and an octadecylsilyl stationary phase. One casein sample was found to give two peaks of beta-casein of approximately equal areas. RP-HPLC of tryptic digests of the two separated peak fractions gave identical patterns with the exception of one peptide peak with different retention times. Amino acid analyses performed on both fractions showed that they corresponded to peptide 114-169 of beta-casein A1. The atypical beta-casein differed from the typical one by a Pro----Leu substitution in region 114-169. PMID:3958291

  12. Application of Genetic Algorithms in Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soupios, Pantelis; Akca, Irfan; Mpogiatzis, Petros; Basokur, Ahmet; Papazachos, Constantinos

    2010-05-01

    In the earth sciences several inverse problems that require data fitting and parameter estimation are nonlinear and can involve a large number of unknown parameters. Consequently, the application of analytical inversion or optimization techniques may be quite restrictive. In practice, most analytical methods are local in nature and rely on a linearized form of the problem in question, adopting an iterative procedure using partial derivatives to improve an initial model. This approach can lead to a dependence of the final model solution on the starting model and is prone to entrapment in local misfit minima. Moreover, the calculation of derivatives can be computationally inefficient and create instabilities when numerical approximations are used. In contrast to these local minimization methods, global techniques that do not rely on partial derivatives, are independent of the form of the data misfit criterion, and are computationally robust. Such methods often use random processes to sample a selected wider span of the model space. In this situation, randomly generated models are assessed in terms of their data-fitting quality and the process may be stopped after a certain number of acceptable models is identified or continued until a satisfactory data fit is achieved. A new class of methods known as genetic algorithms achieves the aforementioned approximation through novel model representation and manipulations. Genetic algorithms (GAs) were originally developed in the field of artificial intelligence by John Holland more than 20 years ago, but even in this field it is less than a decade that the methodology has been more generally applied and only recently did the methodology attract the attention of the earth sciences community. Applications have been generally concentrated in geophysics and in particular seismology. As awareness of genetic algorithms grows there surely will be many more and varied applications to earth science problems. In the present work, the application of hybrid genetic algorithms in seismic tomography is examined and the efficiency of least squares and genetic methods as representative of the local and global optimization, respectively, is presented and evaluated. The robustness of both optimization methods has been tested and compared for the same source-receiver geometry and characteristics of the model structure (anomalies, etc.). A set of seismic refraction synthetic (noise free) data was used for modeling. Specifically, cross-well, down-hole and typical refraction studies using 24 geophones and 5 shoots were used to confirm the applicability of the genetic algorithms in seismic tomography. To solve the forward modeling and estimate the traveltimes, the revisited ray bending method was used supplemented by an approximate computation of the first Fresnel volume. The root mean square (rms) error as the misfit function was used and calculated for the entire random velocity model for each generation. After the end of each generation and based on the misfit of the individuals (velocity models), the selection, crossover and mutation (typical process steps of genetic algorithms) were selected continuing the evolution theory and coding the new generation. To optimize the computation time, since the whole procedure is quite time consuming, the Matlab Distributed Computing Environment (MDCE) was used in a multicore engine. During the tests, we noticed that the fast convergence that the algorithm initially exhibits (first 5 generations) is followed by progressively slower improvements of the reconstructed velocity models. Thus, to improve the final tomographic models, a hybrid genetic algorithm (GA) approach was adopted by combining the GAs with a local optimization method after several generations, on the basis of the convergence of the resulting models. This approach is shown to be efficient, as it directs the solution search towards a model region close to the global minimum solution.

  13. Development of an optimized RNA-based murine norovirus reverse genetics system.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Muhammad Amir; Chung, Liliane Man Wah; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Bailey, Dalan; Goodfellow, Ian

    2010-10-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV), identified in 2003, is the only norovirus which replicates efficiently in tissue culture and as a result has been used extensively as a model for human noroviruses, a major cause of acute gastroenteritis. The current report describes the generation of a new approach to reverse genetics recovery of genetically defined MNV that relies on the transfection of in vitro transcribed capped RNA directly into cells. The use of the recently developed ScriptCap post-transcriptional enzymatic capping system, followed by optimized Neon mediated electroporation of the highly permissive RAW 264.7 cells, resulted in the rapid and robust recovery of infectious MNV. Transfection of cells capable of supporting virus replication but not permissive to virus infection, namely human or hamster kidney cells, also resulted in robust recovery of infectious virus without subsequent amplification by multiple rounds of re-infection. This latter system may provide a reproducible method to measure the specific infectivity of mutant norovirus RNA allowing the accurate quantitation of the effect of mutations on norovirus replication. PMID:20637238

  14. A reverse genetics approach identifies novel mutants in light responses and anthocyanin metabolism in petunia.

    PubMed

    Berenschot, Amanda S; Quecini, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Flower color and plant architecture are important commercially valuable features for ornamental petunias (Petunia x hybrida Vilm.). Photoperception and light signaling are the major environmental factors controlling anthocyanin and chlorophyll biosynthesis and shade-avoidance responses in higher plants. The genetic regulators of these processes were investigated in petunia by in silico analyses and the sequence information was used to devise a reverse genetics approach to probe mutant populations. Petunia orthologs of photoreceptor, light-signaling components and anthocyanin metabolism genes were identified and investigated for functional conservation by phylogenetic and protein motif analyses. The expression profiles of photoreceptor gene families and of transcription factors regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis were obtained by bioinformatic tools. Two mutant populations, generated by an alkalyting agent and by gamma irradiation, were screened using a phenotype-independent, sequence-based method by high-throughput PCR-based assay. The strategy allowed the identification of novel mutant alleles for anthocyanin biosynthesis (CHALCONE SYNTHASE) and regulation (PH4), and for light signaling (CONSTANS) genes. PMID:24554834

  15. nAture methods | VOL.12 NO.6 | JUNE2015 | 535 rapid reverse genetic screening using crisPr

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    Articles nAture methods | VOL.12 NO.6 | JUNE2015 | 535 rapid reverse genetic screening using crisPr of life. We used engineered crisPr (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats biological processes. We found that increasing crisPr efficiency by injecting optimized amounts of cas9

  16. Machine learning applications in genetics and genomics.

    PubMed

    Libbrecht, Maxwell W; Noble, William Stafford

    2015-06-01

    The field of machine learning, which aims to develop computer algorithms that improve with experience, holds promise to enable computers to assist humans in the analysis of large, complex data sets. Here, we provide an overview of machine learning applications for the analysis of genome sequencing data sets, including the annotation of sequence elements and epigenetic, proteomic or metabolomic data. We present considerations and recurrent challenges in the application of supervised, semi-supervised and unsupervised machine learning methods, as well as of generative and discriminative modelling approaches. We provide general guidelines to assist in the selection of these machine learning methods and their practical application for the analysis of genetic and genomic data sets. PMID:25948244

  17. Application of time reversal acoustics focusing for nonlinear imaging ms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Sutin, Alexander

    2001-05-01

    Time reversal acoustic (TRA) focusing of ultrasound appears to be an effective tool for nonlinear imaging in industrial and medical applications because of its ability to efficiently concentrate ultrasonic energy (close to diffraction limit) in heterogeneous media. In this study, we used two TRA systems to focus ultrasonic beams with different frequencies in coinciding focal points, thus causing the generation of ultrasonic waves with combination frequencies. Measurements of the intensity of these combination frequency waves provide information on the nonlinear parameter of medium in the focal region. Synchronized stirring of two TRA focused beams enables obtaining 3-D acoustic nonlinearity images of the object. Each of the TRA systems employed an aluminum resonator with piezotransducers glued to its facet. One of the free facets of each resonator was submerged into a water tank and served as a virtual phased array capable of ultrasound focusing and beam steering. To mimic a medium with spatially varying acoustical nonlinearity a simplest model such as a microbubble column in water was used. Microbubbles were generated by electrolysis of water using a needle electrode. An order of magnitude increase of the sum frequency component was observed when the ultrasound beams were focused in the area with bubbles.

  18. Application of genetic algorithm to steganalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapik, Timothy; Lo, Ephraim; Marsh, John A.

    2006-05-01

    We present a novel application of genetic algorithm (GA) to optimal feature set selection in supervised learning using support vector machine (SVM) for steganalysis. Steganalysis attempts to determine whether a cover object (in our case an image file) contains hidden information. This is a bivariate classification problem: the image either does or does not contain hidden data. Our SVM classifier uses a training set of images with known classification to "learn" how to classify images with unknown classification. The SVM uses a feature set, essentially a set of statistical quantities extracted from the image. The performance of the SVM classifier is heavily dependent on the feature set used. Too many features not only increase computation time but decrease performance, and too few features do not provide enough information for accurate classification. Our steganalysis technique uses entropic features that yield up to 240 features per image. The selection of an optimum feature set is a problem that lends itself well to genetic algorithm optimization. We describe this technique in detail and present a "GA optimized" feature set of 48 features that, for our application, optimizes the tradeoff between computation time and classification accuracy.

  19. Genetically modified plants for law enforcement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.

    2002-08-01

    Plants are ubiquitous in the environment and have the unique ability to respond to their environment physiologically and through altered gene expression profiles (they cannot walk away). In addition, plant genetic transformation techniques and genomic information in plants are becoming increasingly advanced. We have been performing research to express the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) in plants. GFP emits green light when excited by blue or UV light. In addition, my group and collaborators have developed methods to detect GFP in plants by contact instruments and at a standoff. There are several law enforcement applications for this technology. One involves using tagging and perhaps modifying drug plants genetically. In one instance, we could tag them for destruction. In another, we could adulterate them directly. Another application is one that falls into the chemical terrorism and bioterrorism countermeasures category. We are developing plants to sense toxins and whole organisms covertly. Plants are well adapted to monitor large geographic areas; biosurveillance. Some examples of research being performed focus on plants with plant pathogen inducible promoters fused to GFP for disease sensing, and algae biosensors for chemicals.

  20. Deletion of liaR Reverses Daptomycin Resistance in Enterococcus faecium Independent of the Genetic Background.

    PubMed

    Panesso, Diana; Reyes, Jinnethe; Gaston, Elizabeth P; Deal, Morgan; Londoño, Alejandra; Nigo, Masayuki; Munita, Jose M; Miller, William R; Shamoo, Yousif; Tran, Truc T; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-12-01

    We have shown previously that changes in LiaFSR, a three-component regulatory system predicted to orchestrate the cell membrane stress response, are important mediators of daptomycin (DAP) resistance in enterococci. Indeed, deletion of the gene encoding the response regulator LiaR in a clinical strain of Enterococcus faecalis reversed DAP resistance (DAP-R) and produced a strain hypersusceptible to antimicrobial peptides. Since LiaFSR is conserved in Enterococcus faecium, we investigated the role of LiaR in a variety of clinical E. faecium strains representing the most common DAP-R genetic backgrounds. Deletion of liaR in DAP-R E. faecium R446F (DAP MIC of 16 ?g/ml) and R497F (MIC of 24 ?g/ml; harboring changes in LiaRS) strains fully reversed resistance (DAP MICs decreasing to 0.25 and 0.094 ?g/ml, respectively). Moreover, DAP at concentrations of 13 ?g/ml (achieved with human doses of 12 mg/kg body weight) retained bactericidal activity against the mutants. Furthermore, the liaR deletion derivatives of these two DAP-R strains exhibited increased binding of boron-dipyrromethene difluoride (BODIPY)-daptomycin, suggesting that high-level DAP-R mediated by LiaR in E. faecium involves repulsion of the calcium-DAP complex from the cell surface. In DAP-tolerant strains HOU503F and HOU515F (DAP MICs within the susceptible range but bacteria not killed by DAP concentrations of 5× the MIC), deletion of liaR not only markedly decreased the DAP MICs (0.064 and 0.047 ?g/ml, respectively) but also restored the bactericidal activity of DAP at concentrations as low as 4 ?g/ml (achieved with human doses of 4 mg/kg). Our results suggest that LiaR plays a relevant role in the enterococcal cell membrane adaptive response to antimicrobial peptides independent of the genetic background and emerges as an attractive target to restore the activity of DAP against multidrug-resistant strains. PMID:26369959

  1. Association of genetic polymorphisms in the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene with prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dapeng; Yu, Hongjie; Sun, Jielin; Qi, Jun; Liu, Qiang; Li, Ruipeng; Zheng, Siqun Lily; Xu, Jianfeng; Kang, Jian

    2015-07-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), encoded by the TERT gene, is an essential component of telomerase, essential for the maintenance of telomere DNA length, chromosomal stability and cellular immortality. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between common genetic variations across the TERT gene region and prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness in a Chinese population. A total of 12 TERT tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped on the Sequenom Mass-ARRAY iPLEX® platform in a case-case study with 1,210 Chinese patients with PCa. Unconditional logistic regression was used to investigate the association of genotypes with PCa aggressiveness, Gleason grade and risk of developing early-onset PCa. It was observed that the C allele of the TERT intron 2 SNP (rs2736100) was significantly associated with reduced risk of PCa aggressiveness [odds ratio (OR)=0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-0.99; P=0.037]. This allele was also significantly correlated with a reduced risk of developing a tumor with a high Gleason score (>7; OR=0.83; 95% CI: 0.70-0.99; P=0.039). The T allele of the intron 4 SNP (rs10069690) was found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk for an aggressive form of PCa (OR=0.76; 95% CI: 0.59-0.97; P=0.030). In addition, the A allele of rs10078761 located at the 3' end of the TERT gene exhibited a statistically significant association with the reduced risk of developing a higher grade disease (OR=0.48; 95% CI: 0.28-0.81; P=0.006). However, no association between TERT polymorphisms and age at diagnosis was observed in the present study. The present findings demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that genetic variations across the TERT gene are associated with PCa aggressiveness in a Chinese Han population. PMID:25738283

  2. Pharmacological and genetic reversal of age-dependent cognitive deficits attributable to decreased presenilin function.

    PubMed

    McBride, Sean M J; Choi, Catherine H; Schoenfeld, Brian P; Bell, Aaron J; Liebelt, David A; Ferreiro, David; Choi, Richard J; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Terlizzi, Allison M; Ferrick, Neal J; Koenigsberg, Eric; Rudominer, Rebecca L; Sumida, Ai; Chiorean, Stephanie; Siwicki, Kathleen K; Nguyen, Hanh T; Fortini, Mark E; McDonald, Thomas V; Jongens, Thomas A

    2010-07-14

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of cognitive loss and neurodegeneration in the developed world. Although its genetic and environmental causes are not generally known, familial forms of the disease (FAD) are attributable to mutations in a single copy of the Presenilin (PS) and amyloid precursor protein genes. The dominant inheritance pattern of FAD indicates that it may be attributable to gain or change of function mutations. Studies of FAD-linked forms of presenilin (psn) in model organisms, however, indicate that they are loss of function, leading to the possibility that a reduction in PS activity might contribute to FAD and that proper psn levels are important for maintaining normal cognition throughout life. To explore this issue further, we have tested the effect of reducing psn activity during aging in Drosophila melanogaster males. We have found that flies in which the dosage of psn function is reduced by 50% display age-onset impairments in learning and memory. Treatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists or lithium during the aging process prevented the onset of these deficits, and treatment of aged flies reversed the age-dependent deficits. Genetic reduction of Drosophila metabotropic glutamate receptor (DmGluRA), the inositol trisphosphate receptor (InsP(3)R), or inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase also prevented these age-onset cognitive deficits. These findings suggest that reduced psn activity may contribute to the age-onset cognitive loss observed with FAD. They also indicate that enhanced mGluR signaling and calcium release regulated by InsP(3)R as underlying causes of the age-dependent cognitive phenotypes observed when psn activity is reduced. PMID:20631179

  3. Pharmacological and genetic reversal of age dependent cognitive deficits due to decreased presenilin function

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Sean M. J.; Choi, Catherine H.; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Bell, Aaron J.; Liebelt, David A.; Ferreiro, David; Choi, Richard J.; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Terlizzi, Allison M.; Ferrick, Neal J.; Koenigsberg, Eric; Rudominer, Rebecca L.; Sumida, Ai; Chiorean, Stephanie; Siwicki, Kathleen K.; Nguyen, Hanh T.; Fortini, Mark E.; McDonald, Thomas V.; Jongens, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of cognitive loss and neurodegeneration in the developed world. Although its genetic and environmental causes are not generally known, familial forms of the disease (FAD) are due to mutations in a single copy of the Presenilin (PS) and Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) genes. The dominant inheritance pattern of FAD indicates that it may be due to gain or change of function mutations. Studies of FAD-linked forms of presenilin in model organisms, however, indicate that they are loss of function, leading to the possibility that a reduction in PS activity might contribute to FAD and that proper psn levels are important for maintaining normal cognition throughout life. To explore this issue further, we have tested the effect of reducing psn activity during aging in Drosophila melanogaster males. We have found that flies in which the dosage of psn function is reduced by 50% display age-onset impairments in learning and memory. Treatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists or lithium during the aging process prevented the onset of these deficits, and treatment of aged flies reversed the age-dependent deficits. Genetic reduction of DmGluRA, the inositol trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R) or IPPase also prevented these age-onset cognitive deficits. These findings suggest that reduced psn activity may contribute to the age onset cognitive loss observed with FAD. They also indicate that enhanced mGluR signaling and calcium release regulated by InsP3R as underlying causes of the age-dependent cognitive phenotypes observed when psn activity is reduced. PMID:20631179

  4. A Genetic Toolbox for Creating Reversible Ca2+-Sensitive Materials Shana Topp,, V. Prasad, Gianguido C. Cianci, Eric R. Weeks, and Justin P. Gallivan*,,

    E-print Network

    Weeks, Eric R.

    A Genetic Toolbox for Creating Reversible Ca2+-Sensitive Materials Shana Topp,,§ V. Prasad Here, we describe a genetic toolbox of natural and engineered protein modules that can be rationally anticipated that a fully genetic approach would provide several important advantages to creating

  5. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.

  6. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

  7. Genetic Network Inference: From Co-Expression Clustering to Reverse Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhaeseleer, Patrik; Liang, Shoudan; Somogyi, Roland

    2000-01-01

    Advances in molecular biological, analytical, and computational technologies are enabling us to systematically investigate the complex molecular processes underlying biological systems. In particular, using high-throughput gene expression assays, we are able to measure the output of the gene regulatory network. We aim here to review datamining and modeling approaches for conceptualizing and unraveling the functional relationships implicit in these datasets. Clustering of co-expression profiles allows us to infer shared regulatory inputs and functional pathways. We discuss various aspects of clustering, ranging from distance measures to clustering algorithms and multiple-duster memberships. More advanced analysis aims to infer causal connections between genes directly, i.e., who is regulating whom and how. We discuss several approaches to the problem of reverse engineering of genetic networks, from discrete Boolean networks, to continuous linear and non-linear models. We conclude that the combination of predictive modeling with systematic experimental verification will be required to gain a deeper insight into living organisms, therapeutic targeting, and bioengineering.

  8. Establishment of a Reverse Genetics System for Studying Human Bocavirus in Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fang; Luo, Yong; Shen, Weiran; Lei-Butters, Diana C. M.; Chen, Aaron Yun; Li, Yi; Tang, Liang; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Engelhardt, John F.; Qiu, Jianming

    2012-01-01

    Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) has been identified as one of the etiological agents of wheezing in young children with acute respiratory-tract infections. In this study, we have obtained the sequence of a full-length HBoV1 genome (including both termini) using viral DNA extracted from a nasopharyngeal aspirate of an infected patient, cloned the full-length HBoV1 genome, and demonstrated DNA replication, encapsidation of the ssDNA genome, and release of the HBoV1 virions from human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The HBoV1 virions generated from this cell line-based production system exhibits a typical icosahedral structure of approximately 26 nm in diameter, and is capable of productively infecting polarized primary human airway epithelia (HAE) from the apical surface. Infected HAE showed hallmarks of lung airway-tract injury, including disruption of the tight junction barrier, loss of cilia and epithelial cell hypertrophy. Notably, polarized HAE cultured from an immortalized airway epithelial cell line, CuFi-8 (originally derived from a cystic fibrosis patient), also supported productive infection of HBoV1. Thus, we have established a reverse genetics system and generated the first cell line-based culture system for the study of HBoV1 infection, which will significantly advance the study of HBoV1 replication and pathogenesis. PMID:22956907

  9. Reverse genetics of Mononegavirales: How they work, new vaccines, and new cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Christian K.; Cattaneo, Roberto; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2015-01-01

    The order Mononegavirales includes five families: Bornaviridae, Filoviridae, Nyamaviridae, Paramyxoviridae, and Rhabdoviridae. The genome of these viruses is one molecule of negative-sense single strand RNA coding for five to ten genes in a conserved order. The RNA is not infectious until packaged by the nucleocapsid protein and transcribed by the polymerase and co-factors. Reverse genetics approaches have answered fundamental questions about the biology of Mononegavirales. The lack of icosahedral symmetry and modular organization in the genome of these viruses has facilitated engineering of viruses expressing fluorescent proteins, and these fluorescent proteins have provided important insights about the molecular and cellular basis of tissue tropism and pathogenesis. Studies have assessed the relevance for virulence of different receptors and the interactions with cellular proteins governing the innate immune responses. Research has also analyzed the mechanisms of attenuation. Based on these findings, ongoing clinical trials are exploring new live attenuated vaccines and the use of viruses re-engineered as cancer therapeutics. PMID:25702088

  10. Development of reverse genetics for Ibaraki virus to produce viable VP6-tagged IBAV

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Eiko; Saeki, Keiichi; Roy, Polly; Kawano, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Ibaraki virus (IBAV) is a member of the epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serogroup, which belongs to the Orbivirus genus of the Reoviridae family. Although EHDV, including IBAV, represents an ongoing threat to livestock in the world, molecular mechanisms of EHDV replication and pathogenesis have been unclear. The reverse genetics (RG) system is one of the strong tools to understand molecular mechanisms of virus replication. Here, we developed a RG system for IBAV to identify the nonessential region of a minor structural protein, VP6, by generating VP6-truncated IBAV. Moreover, several tags were inserted into the truncated region to produce VP6-tagged IBAV. We demonstrated that all VP6-tagged IBAV could replicate in BHK cells in the absence of any helper VP6 protein. Further, tagged-VP6 proteins were first assembled into puncta in cells infected with VP6-tagged IBAV. Our data suggests that, in order to initiate primary replication, IBAV VP6 is likely to accumulate in some parts of infected cells to assemble efficiently into the primary replication complex (subcore). PMID:26101741

  11. Application of real options to reverse logistics process

    E-print Network

    Kaga, Akihiro, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, real options are used to identify the optimal model for the reverse logistics process of a technology company in the circuit board business. Currently, customers return defective boards and the company ...

  12. Development and characterization of reverse genetics system for the Indian West Nile virus lineage 1 strain 68856.

    PubMed

    Pavitrakar, Daya V; Ayachit, Vijay M; Mundhra, Sonal; Bondre, Vijay P

    2015-12-15

    Our previous studies on West Nile virus (WNV) strains isolated from human patients in India suggested substantial variation at the genetic level reflecting their variable pathogenesis. This study describes the development of reverse genetics system for a neurovirulent WNV isolate 68856 and its characterization. Full length viral cDNA was cloned into bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) under the transcription control of T7 promoter. The RNA transcripts obtained by in vitro transcription were infectious in mammalian cells upon transfection. Cytopathic effect caused by synthetic RNA transcripts in mammalian cells, detection of cell associated viral protein after transfection and recovery of genetic markers in the progeny virus genome marked the successful development of reverse genetics system for WNV. Replication potential and plaque morphology of newly expressed virus along with its antigenic cross reactivity with the parental virus suggests synthesis of biologically identical replicative virus. Comparative neuropathogenesis studies in murine model indicated that the three genetic changes occurred in the recombinant virus during in vitro transcription has no impact on viral pathogenesis. The stable infectious cDNA clone generated from the neurovirulent Indian WNV strain will serve as a valuable experimental tool to study the viral factors contributing towards pathogenesis, host-virus interaction and immune evasion. PMID:26388421

  13. Microinjection of bivalve eggs: application in genetics.

    PubMed

    Cadoret, J P; Gendreau, S; Delecheneau, J M; Rousseau, C; Mialhe, E

    1997-03-01

    New strategies for embryonic manipulation have been developed in recent years through plant and animal research. However, research on marine invertebrate embryos has suffered from a lack of basic tools, such as microinjection. Here we present a technique developed for microinjecting eggs and embryos of the oyster Crassostrea gigas and the mussel Mytilus edulis. In experimental trials, approximately 40% of microinjected embryos survived. This technique was used to microinject beta-galactosidase, for which specific detection techniques were developed. A reporter construct (CMV-beta) based on a promoter of cytomegalovirus linked to the beta-galactosidase-encoding gene was then microinjected, and the expression level of this construct was monitored. The suitability of this technique is discussed in terms of its application to the manipulation of bivalve mollusks in pathology and genetics. PMID:9116873

  14. A Genome-Scale Vector Resource Enables High-Throughput Reverse Genetic Screening in a Malaria Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ana Rita; Bushell, Ellen; Schwach, Frank; Girling, Gareth; Anar, Burcu; Quail, Michael A.; Herd, Colin; Pfander, Claudia; Modrzynska, Katarzyna; Rayner, Julian C.; Billker, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Summary The genome-wide identification of gene functions in malaria parasites is hampered by a lack of reverse genetic screening methods. We present a large-scale resource of barcoded vectors with long homology arms for effective modification of the Plasmodium berghei genome. Cotransfecting dozens of vectors into the haploid blood stages creates complex pools of barcoded mutants, whose competitive fitness can be measured during infection of a single mouse using barcode sequencing (barseq). To validate the utility of this resource, we rescreen the P. berghei kinome, using published kinome screens for comparison. We find that several protein kinases function redundantly in asexual blood stages and confirm the targetability of kinases cdpk1, gsk3, tkl3, and PBANKA_082960 by genotyping cloned mutants. Thus, parallel phenotyping of barcoded mutants unlocks the power of reverse genetic screening for a malaria parasite and will enable the systematic identification of genes essential for in vivo parasite growth and transmission. PMID:25732065

  15. Application of time reverse modeling on ultrasonic non-destructive testing of concrete

    E-print Network

    Application of time reverse modeling on ultrasonic non-destructive testing of concrete Erik H-differences Wave propagation Source localization Non-destructive testing a b s t r a c t Time reverse modeling (TRM is to transform a method within exploration geo- physics to non-destructive testing. In contrast to previous time

  16. Semi-automatic Modeling of Reverse-Engineered Shapes through Design-by-Feature and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Francesco; Conti, Paolo; Pazzaglia, Gabriele

    2008-11-01

    Reverse Engineering aims at constructing CAD models of existing objects starting from measurement data. In the classical approach a reverse engineering procedure completes in three main steps: data acquisition data processing and modeling. Herein we describe a novel semi-automatic approach for integrating CAD and reverse engineering. The basic idea consists in constructing a parametric and feature-based approximate model and matching it with measurement data to determine the unknown parameters. The approach is semi-automatic since part of the model is constructed manually by the user, while the exact values of the parameters are computed through an optimization procedure based on genetic algorithms. Two case studies are presented and critically discussed.

  17. Population genetic structure and direct observations reveal sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in a cooperative bird.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Xavier A; York, Jennifer E; Young, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    Sex-biased dispersal is pervasive and has diverse evolutionary implications, but the fundamental drivers of dispersal sex biases remain unresolved. This is due in part to limited diversity within taxonomic groups in the direction of dispersal sex biases, which leaves hypothesis testing critically dependent upon identifying rare reversals of taxonomic norms. Here, we use a combination of observational and genetic data to demonstrate a rare reversal of the avian sex bias in dispersal in the cooperatively breeding white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali). Direct observations revealed that (i) natal philopatry was rare, with both sexes typically dispersing locally to breed, and (ii), unusually for birds, males bred at significantly greater distances from their natal group than females. Population genetic analyses confirmed these patterns, as (i) corrected Assignment index (AIc), FST tests and isolation-by-distance metrics were all indicative of longer dispersal distances among males than females, and (ii) spatial autocorrelation analysis indicated stronger within-group genetic structure among females than males. Examining the spatial scale of extra-group mating highlighted that the resulting 'sperm dispersal' could have acted in concert with individual dispersal to generate these genetic patterns, but gamete dispersal alone cannot account entirely for the sex differences in genetic structure observed. That leading hypotheses for the evolution of dispersal sex biases cannot readily account for these sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in white-browed sparrow weavers highlights the continued need for attention to alternative explanations for this enigmatic phenomenon. We highlight the potential importance of sex differences in the distances over which dispersal opportunities can be detected. PMID:25346189

  18. Population genetic structure and direct observations reveal sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in a cooperative bird

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Xavier A; York, Jennifer E; Young, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Sex-biased dispersal is pervasive and has diverse evolutionary implications, but the fundamental drivers of dispersal sex biases remain unresolved. This is due in part to limited diversity within taxonomic groups in the direction of dispersal sex biases, which leaves hypothesis testing critically dependent upon identifying rare reversals of taxonomic norms. Here, we use a combination of observational and genetic data to demonstrate a rare reversal of the avian sex bias in dispersal in the cooperatively breeding white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali). Direct observations revealed that (i) natal philopatry was rare, with both sexes typically dispersing locally to breed, and (ii), unusually for birds, males bred at significantly greater distances from their natal group than females. Population genetic analyses confirmed these patterns, as (i) corrected Assignment index (AIc), FST tests and isolation-by-distance metrics were all indicative of longer dispersal distances among males than females, and (ii) spatial autocorrelation analysis indicated stronger within-group genetic structure among females than males. Examining the spatial scale of extra-group mating highlighted that the resulting ‘sperm dispersal’ could have acted in concert with individual dispersal to generate these genetic patterns, but gamete dispersal alone cannot account entirely for the sex differences in genetic structure observed. That leading hypotheses for the evolution of dispersal sex biases cannot readily account for these sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in white-browed sparrow weavers highlights the continued need for attention to alternative explanations for this enigmatic phenomenon. We highlight the potential importance of sex differences in the distances over which dispersal opportunities can be detected. PMID:25346189

  19. Time Reversed Acoustics and applications to earthquake location and salt dome flank imaging

    E-print Network

    Lu, Rongrong

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the applications of Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) to locate seismic sources and image subsurface structures. The back-propagation process of the TRA experiment can be divided ...

  20. Reverse-engineering the genetic circuitry of a cancer cell with predicted intervention in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vallat, Laurent; Kemper, Corey A.; Jung, Nicolas; Maumy-Bertrand, Myriam; Bertrand, Frédéric; Meyer, Nicolas; Pocheville, Arnaud; Fisher, John W.; Gribben, John G.; Bahram, Seiamak

    2013-01-01

    Cellular behavior is sustained by genetic programs that are progressively disrupted in pathological conditions—notably, cancer. High-throughput gene expression profiling has been used to infer statistical models describing these cellular programs, and development is now needed to guide orientated modulation of these systems. Here we develop a regression-based model to reverse-engineer a temporal genetic program, based on relevant patterns of gene expression after cell stimulation. This method integrates the temporal dimension of biological rewiring of genetic programs and enables the prediction of the effect of targeted gene disruption at the system level. We tested the performance accuracy of this model on synthetic data before reverse-engineering the response of primary cancer cells to a proliferative (protumorigenic) stimulation in a multistate leukemia biological model (i.e., chronic lymphocytic leukemia). To validate the ability of our method to predict the effects of gene modulation on the global program, we performed an intervention experiment on a targeted gene. Comparison of the predicted and observed gene expression changes demonstrates the possibility of predicting the effects of a perturbation in a gene regulatory network, a first step toward an orientated intervention in a cancer cell genetic program. PMID:23267079

  1. TWS Symposium Application of molecular and genetic techniques to wildlife epidemiology

    E-print Network

    Ernest, Holly

    TWS Symposium ­ Application of molecular and genetic techniques to wildlife epidemiology Genetics primer: State of technology and applications for wildlife disease ecology & epidemiology View this online

  2. Bacterial dehalogenases: biochemistry, genetics, and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed Central

    Fetzner, S; Lingens, F

    1994-01-01

    This review is a survey of bacterial dehalogenases that catalyze the cleavage of halogen substituents from haloaromatics, haloalkanes, haloalcohols, and haloalkanoic acids. Concerning the enzymatic cleavage of the carbon-halogen bond, seven mechanisms of dehalogenation are known, namely, reductive, oxygenolytic, hydrolytic, and thiolytic dehalogenation; intramolecular nucleophilic displacement; dehydrohalogenation; and hydration. Spontaneous dehalogenation reactions may occur as a result of chemical decomposition of unstable primary products of an unassociated enzyme reaction, and fortuitous dehalogenation can result from the action of broad-specificity enzymes converting halogenated analogs of their natural substrate. Reductive dehalogenation either is catalyzed by a specific dehalogenase or may be mediated by free or enzyme-bound transition metal cofactors (porphyrins, corrins). Desulfomonile tiedjei DCB-1 couples energy conservation to a reductive dechlorination reaction. The biochemistry and genetics of oxygenolytic and hydrolytic haloaromatic dehalogenases are discussed. Concerning the haloalkanes, oxygenases, glutathione S-transferases, halidohydrolases, and dehydrohalogenases are involved in the dehalogenation of different haloalkane compounds. The epoxide-forming halohydrin hydrogen halide lyases form a distinct class of dehalogenases. The dehalogenation of alpha-halosubstituted alkanoic acids is catalyzed by halidohydrolases, which, according to their substrate and inhibitor specificity and mode of product formation, are placed into distinct mechanistic groups. beta-Halosubstituted alkanoic acids are dehalogenated by halidohydrolases acting on the coenzyme A ester of the beta-haloalkanoic acid. Microbial systems offer a versatile potential for biotechnological applications. Because of their enantiomer selectivity, some dehalogenases are used as industrial biocatalysts for the synthesis of chiral compounds. The application of dehalogenases or bacterial strains in environmental protection technologies is discussed in detail. PMID:7854251

  3. An Application of Reversible Entropic Dynamics on Curved Statistical Manifolds

    E-print Network

    Carlo Cafaro; S. A. Ali; Adom Giffin

    2009-01-09

    Entropic Dynamics (ED) is a theoretical framework developed to investigate the possibility that laws of physics reflect laws of inference rather than laws of nature. In this work, a RED (Reversible Entropic Dynamics) model is considered. The geometric structure underlying the curved statistical manifold, M is studied. The trajectories of this particular model are hyperbolic curves (geodesics) on M. Finally, some analysis concerning the stability of these geodesics on M is carried out.

  4. An Application of Reversible Entropic Dynamics on Curved Statistical Manifolds

    E-print Network

    Cafaro, C; Giffin, A; Cafaro, Carlo; Ali, Saleem A.; Giffin, Adom

    2006-01-01

    Entropic Dynamics (ED) is a theoretical framework developed to investigate the possibility that laws of physics reflect laws of inference rather than laws of nature. In this work, a RED (Reversible Entropic Dynamics) model is considered. The geometric structure underlying the curved statistical manifold, M is studied. The trajectories of this particular model are hyperbolic curves (geodesics) on M. Finally, some analysis concerning the stability of these geodesics on M is carried out.

  5. Reverse osmosis application for butanol-acetone fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Iannotti, E.L.; Fischer, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of dilute solvent concentration in butanol-acetone fermentation can be solved by using reverse osmosis to dewater the fermentation liquor. Polyamide membranes exhibited butanol rejection rates as high as 85%. Optimum rejection of butanol occurs at a pressure of approximately 5.5 to 6.5 MPa and hydraulic recoveries of 50-70%. Flux ranged from 0.5 to 1.8 l.

  6. Imaging-Genetics Applications in Child Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To place imaging-genetics research in the context of child psychiatry. Method: A conceptual overview is provided, followed by discussion of specific research examples. Results: Imaging-genetics research is described linking brain function to two specific genes, for the serotonin-reuptake-transporter protein and a monoamine oxidase…

  7. Statistical Applications in Genetics and Molecular Biology

    E-print Network

    Szpiech, Zachary

    Comparing Spatial Maps of Human Population-Genetic Variation Using Procrustes Analysis Chaolong Wang Zachary-Genetic Variation Using Procrustes Analysis Chaolong Wang, Zachary A. Szpiech, James H. Degnan, Mattias Jakobsson of these qualitative observations, we describe a Procrustes analysis approach for quantitatively assessing

  8. Evaluation of a reverse-hybridization StripAssay for the detection of genetic polymorphisms leading to acenocoumarol sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gialeraki, Argyri; Markatos, Christos; Grouzi, Elisabeth; Merkouri, Efrosyni; Travlou, Anthi; Politou, Marianna

    2010-04-01

    Acenocoumarol is mainly catabolized by CYP2C9 isoform of cytochrome P450 (CYP) liver complex and exerts its anticoagulant effect through the inhibition of Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase (VKOR). The most important genetic polymorphisms which lead to an impaired enzymatic activity and therefore predispose to acenocoumarol sensitivity, are considered to be CYP2C9*2 (Arg144Cys), CYP2C9*3 (Ile359Leu) and VKORC1-1639G>A, respectively. In this study we compared the results of the PGXThrombo StripAssay kit (ViennaLab Diagnostics,Vienna, Austria) with direct DNA sequencing and in house Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLP) for the detection of the aforementioned Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). The reverse hybridization StripAssay was found to be equally effective with RFLP and direct DNA sequencing for the detection of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 polymorphisms, respectively. The comparison of the RFLP reference method with the reverse hybridization StripAssay for the detection of VKORC1-1639 G>A polymorphism showed that the reverse hybridization StripAsssay might misclassify some A/A homozygotes as heterozygotes. Optimization of the hybridization procedures may eliminate the extra low signal band observed in some samples at the reverse hybridization StripAssay and improve its diagnostic value. PMID:19562511

  9. Stable transformation and reverse genetic analysis of Penium margaritaceum: a platform for studies of charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Fei, Zhangjun; Andreas, Amanda; Willats, William G T; Domozych, David S; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-02-01

    The charophyte green algae (CGA, Streptophyta, Viridiplantae) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the immediate ancestors of land plants but, paradoxically, are less well-studied than the other major plant lineages. This is particularly true in the context of functional genomic studies, where the lack of an efficient protocol for their stable genetic transformation has been a major obstacle. Observations of extant CGA species suggest the existence of some of the evolutionary adaptations that had to occur for land colonization; however, to date, there has been no robust experimental platform to address this genetically. We present a protocol for high-throughput Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Penium margaritaceum, a unicellular CGA species. The versatility of Penium as a model for studying various aspects of plant cell biology and development was illustrated through non-invasive visualization of protein localization and dynamics in living cells. In addition, the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) for reverse genetic studies was demonstrated by targeting genes associated with cell wall modification (pectin methylesterase) and biosynthesis (cellulose synthase). This provided evidence supporting current models of cell wall assembly and inter-polymer interactions that were based on studies of land plants, but in this case using direct observation in vivo. This new functional genomics platform has broad potential applications, including studies of plant organismal biology and the evolutionary innovations required for transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitats. PMID:24308430

  10. Reverse osmosis applications to low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, L.

    1990-09-01

    The Hanford Site at Richland, Washington, is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Since the Hanford Site was established in the 1940's, the operation of the various facilities has resulted in the contamination of liquid effluents and some groundwater with radioactive constituents. Westinghouse Hanford Company has been testing various technologies to determine their effectiveness in decontaminating these two types of liquids. Reverse osmosis (RO) has been applied to two process effluents and two groundwaters. Rejection data have been collected for uranium, technetium, tritium, strontium, cesium, and total alpha and beta. 4 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  11. Plasmid-based human norovirus reverse genetics system produces reporter-tagged progeny virus containing infectious genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kazuhiko; Murakami, Kosuke; Sharp, Tyler M.; Guix, Susana; Oka, Tomoichiro; Takai-Todaka, Reiko; Nakanishi, Akira; Crawford, Sue E.; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. HuNoV replication studies have been hampered by the inability to grow the virus in cultured cells. The HuNoV genome is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) molecule with three open reading frames (ORFs). We established a reverse genetics system driven by a mammalian promoter that functions without helper virus. The complete genome of the HuNoV genogroup II.3 U201 strain was cloned downstream of an elongation factor-1? (EF-1?) mammalian promoter. Cells transfected with plasmid containing the full-length genome (pHuNoVU201F) expressed the ORF1 polyprotein, which was cleaved by the viral protease to produce the mature nonstructural viral proteins, and the capsid proteins. Progeny virus produced from the transfected cells contained the complete NoV genomic RNA (VP1, VP2, and VPg) and exhibited the same density in isopycnic cesium chloride gradients as native infectious NoV particles from a patient’s stool. This system also was applied to drive murine NoV RNA replication and produced infectious progeny virions. A GFP reporter construct containing the GFP gene in ORF1 produced complete virions that contain VPg-linked RNA. RNA from virions containing the encapsidated GFP-genomic RNA was successfully transfected back into cells producing fluorescent puncta, indicating that the encapsidated RNA is replication-competent. The EF-1? mammalian promoter expression system provides the first reverse genetics system, to our knowledge, generalizable for human and animal NoVs that does not require a helper virus. Establishing a complete reverse genetics system expressed from cDNA for HuNoVs now allows the manipulation of the viral genome and production of reporter virions. PMID:25192933

  12. Application of Genetic Programming to High Energy Physics Event Selection

    E-print Network

    Link, J M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Castromonte, C; Göbel, C; Machado, A A; Magnin, J; Massafferri, A; De Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; Dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Stenson, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Pacetti, S; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Hernández, H; López, A M; Méndez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Ramírez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Luiggi, E; Moore, J E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2005-01-01

    We review genetic programming principles, their application to FOCUS data samples, and use the method to study the doubly Cabibbo suppressed decay D+ -> K+ pi+ pi- relative to its Cabibbo favored counterpart, D+ -> K- pi+ pi+. We find that this technique is able to improve upon more traditional analysis methods. To our knowledge, this is the first application of the genetic programming technique to High Energy Physics data.

  13. Influence Zone and Its Applications in Reverse k Nearest Neighbors Processing

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    Influence Zone and Its Applications in Reverse k Nearest Neighbors Processing Muhammad Aamir Cheema objects of p. In this paper, we introduce the concept of influence zone which is the area such that every zone has several applications in location based services, marketing and decision support systems

  14. Polyglot programming in applications used for genetic data analysis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Applications used for the analysis of genetic data process large volumes of data with complex algorithms. High performance, flexibility, and a user interface with a web browser are required by these solutions, which can be achieved by using multiple programming languages. In this study, I developed a freely available framework for building software to analyze genetic data, which uses C++, Python, JavaScript, and several libraries. This system was used to build a number of genetic data processing applications and it reduced the time and costs of development. PMID:25197633

  15. Polyglot Programming in Applications Used for Genetic Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Applications used for the analysis of genetic data process large volumes of data with complex algorithms. High performance, flexibility, and a user interface with a web browser are required by these solutions, which can be achieved by using multiple programming languages. In this study, I developed a freely available framework for building software to analyze genetic data, which uses C++, Python, JavaScript, and several libraries. This system was used to build a number of genetic data processing applications and it reduced the time and costs of development. PMID:25197633

  16. Clinical applications of schizophrenia genetics: genetic diagnosis, risk, and counseling in the molecular era

    PubMed Central

    Costain, Gregory; Bassett, Anne S

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex neuropsychiatric disease with documented clinical and genetic heterogeneity, and evidence for neurodevelopmental origins. Driven by new genetic technologies and advances in molecular medicine, there has recently been concrete progress in understanding some of the specific genetic causes of this serious psychiatric illness. In particular, several large rare structural variants have been convincingly associated with schizophrenia, in targeted studies over two decades with respect to 22q11.2 microdeletions, and more recently in large-scale, genome-wide case-control studies. These advances promise to help many families afflicted with this disease. In this review, we critically appraise recent developments in the field of schizophrenia genetics through the lens of immediate clinical applicability. Much work remains in translating the recent surge of genetic research discoveries into the clinic. The epidemiology and basic genetic parameters (such as penetrance and expression) of most genomic disorders associated with schizophrenia are not yet well characterized. To date, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the only established genetic subtype of schizophrenia of proven clinical relevance. We use this well-established association as a model to chart the pathway for translating emerging genetic discoveries into clinical practice. We also propose new directions for research involving general genetic risk prediction and counseling in schizophrenia. PMID:23144566

  17. Reversibility of a quantum channel: General conditions and their applications to Bosonic linear channels

    SciTech Connect

    Shirokov, M. E.

    2013-11-15

    The method of complementary channel for analysis of reversibility (sufficiency) of a quantum channel with respect to families of input states (pure states for the most part) are considered and applied to Bosonic linear (quasi-free) channels, in particular, to Bosonic Gaussian channels. The obtained reversibility conditions for Bosonic linear channels have clear physical interpretation and their sufficiency is also shown by explicit construction of reversing channels. The method of complementary channel gives possibility to prove necessity of these conditions and to describe all reversed families of pure states in the Schrodinger representation. Some applications in quantum information theory are considered. Conditions for existence of discrete classical-quantum subchannels and of completely depolarizing subchannels of a Bosonic linear channel are presented.

  18. Design and application of genetically encoded biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Amy E.; Qin, Yan; Park, Jungwon Genevieve; McCombs, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    In the past 5–10 years, the power of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its numerous derivatives has been harnessed toward the development of genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors. These sensors are incorporated into cells or organisms as plasmid DNA, which leads the transcriptional and translational machinery of the cell to express a functional sensor. To date, over 100 different genetically encoded biosensors have been developed for targets as diverse as ions, molecules and enzymes. Such sensors are instrumental in providing a window into the real-time biochemistry of living cells and whole organisms, and are providing unprecedented insight into the inner workings of a cell. PMID:21251723

  19. High volume molecular genetic identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms using Genetic Bit Analysis Application to human genetic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce-Jacino, M.T.; Reynolds, J.; Nikiforov, T.

    1994-09-01

    The most common type of genetic disease-associated mutation is the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Because most genetic diseases can be caused by multiple SNPs in the same gene, effective routine diagnosis of complex genetic diseases is dependent on a simple and reliable method of interrogating SNP sites. Molecular Tool`s solid phase assay capable of direct genotyping (single base sequencing) of SNP sites, Genetic Bit Analysis (GBA), involves hybridization-capture of a single-stranded PCR product to a sequence-specific, microtiter plate-bound oligonucleotide primer. The captured PCR product then acts as template for single-base extension of the capture primer across the polymorphic site, enabling direct determination of the base composition of the polymorphism through a simple colormetric assay. Genotyping in a high volume, semi-automated, processing system with a current capacity of 100 SNP interrogations per technician per day enables the screening of candidate mutations rapidly and cost-effectively, critically important to comprehensive genetic diagnosis. Using this gel-free technology, we have developed prototype diagnostic tests for CFTR and ApoE polymorphisms which enable direct sequencing of the polymorphic base at each site of interest. Routine clinical diagnosis of genetically complex diseases such as cystic fibrosis is dependent on this combination of robust biochemistry and simple format. Additionally, the ability to transfer the format and biochemistry to any disease gene of interest enables the broad application of this technology to clinical diagnostics, especially for genetically complex diseases.

  20. Reverse genetics in the tide pool: knock-down of target gene expression via RNA interference in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Felipe S; Schoville, Sean D; Burton, Ronald S

    2015-07-01

    Reverse genetic tools are essential for characterizing phenotypes of novel genes and testing functional hypotheses generated from next-generation sequencing studies. RNA interference (RNAi) has been a widely used technique for describing or quantifying physiological, developmental or behavioural roles of target genes by suppressing their expression. The marine intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has become an emerging model for evolutionary and physiological studies, but this species is not amenable to most genetic manipulation approaches. As crustaceans are susceptible to RNAi-mediated gene knock-down, we developed a simple method for delivery of gene-specific double-stranded RNA that results in significant suppression of target gene transcription levels. The protocol was examined on five genes of interest, and for each, at least 50% knock-down in expression was achieved. While knock-down levels did not reach 100% in any trial, a well-controlled experiment with one heat-shock gene showed unambiguously that such partial gene suppression may cause dramatic changes in phenotype. Copepods with suppressed expression of heat-shock protein beta 1 (hspb1) exhibited dramatically decreased tolerance to high temperatures, validating the importance of this gene during thermal stress, as proposed by a previous study. The application of this RNAi protocol in T. californicus will be invaluable for examining the role of genes putatively involved in reproductive isolation, mitochondrial function and local adaptation. PMID:25487181

  1. Genetic data simulators and their applications: an overview.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Chen, Huann-Sheng; Mechanic, Leah E; Racine, Ben; Clarke, John; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Feuer, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations have played an indispensable role in the development and applications of statistical models and methods for genetic studies across multiple disciplines. The need to simulate complex evolutionary scenarios and pseudo-datasets for various studies has fueled the development of dozens of computer programs with varying reliability, performance, and application areas. To help researchers compare and choose the most appropriate simulators for their studies, we have created the genetic simulation resources (GSR) website, which allows authors of simulation software to register their applications and describe them with more than 160 defined attributes. This article summarizes the properties of 93 simulators currently registered at GSR and provides an overview of the development and applications of genetic simulators. Unlike other review articles that address technical issues or compare simulators for particular application areas, we focus on software development, maintenance, and features of simulators, often from a historical perspective. Publications that cite these simulators are used to summarize both the applications of genetic simulations and the utilization of simulators. PMID:25504286

  2. 'Reversible chemical sphincterotomy' by local application of glyceryl trinitrate.

    PubMed

    Loder, P B; Kamm, M A; Nicholls, R J; Phillips, R K

    1994-09-01

    Nitric oxide has emerged as one of the most important neurotransmitters mediating internal anal sphincter relaxation. The effect of glyceryl trinitrate, a nitric oxide donor, on anal tone was examined. Maximum resting pressure, predominantly a function of the smooth muscle internal anal sphincter, was measured before and 20 min after application of 0.2 per cent glyceryl trinitrate ointment in ten patients. Pressure decreased by a mean of 27 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval 18-36 per cent) (P = 0.0004) after administration of the drug. A further 20 patients were then randomized to either active or placebo ointment. Anal pressure was significantly decreased (P = 0.002) in those who received 0.2 per cent glyceryl trinitrate, but there was no significant reduction in the control patients. Mild headache occurred in two patients who were given the active preparation and in one who received placebo. Manometry was repeated 9h after application of glyceryl trinitrate and showed a sustained decrease in pressure in two patients. Topical glyceryl trinitrate may have a role in the treatment of anal fissure, haemorrhoids, certain types of constipation and anal pain. It may also reduce injury to the internal sphincter during peranal operations. PMID:7953427

  3. The Reverse Cholesterol Transport Pathway Improves Understanding of Genetic Networks for Fat Deposition and Muscle Growth in Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Tyler F.; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Pan, Zengxiang; Michal, Jennifer J.; Wright, Raymond W.; Killinger, Karen M.; MacNeil, Michael D.; Jiang, Zhihua

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, thirteen genes involved in the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway were investigated for their associations with three fat depositions, eight fatty acid compositions and two growth-related phenotypes in a Wagyu x Limousin reference population, including 6 F1 bulls, 113 F1 dams, and 246 F2 progeny. A total of 37 amplicons were used to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on 6 F1 bulls. Among 36 SNPs detected in 11 of these 13 genes, 19 were selected for genotyping by the Sequenom assay design on all F2 progeny. Single-marker analysis revealed seven SNPs in ATP binding cassette A1, apolipoproteins A1, B and E, phospholipid transfer protein and paraoxinase 1 genes significantly associated with nine phenotypes (P<0.05). Previously, we reported genetic networks associated with 19 complex phenotypes based on a total of 138 genetic polymorphisms derived from 71 known functional genes. Therefore, after Bonferroni correction, these significant (adjusted P<0.05) and suggestive (adjusted P<0.10) associations were then used to identify genetic networks related to the RCT pathway. Multiple-marker analysis suggested possible genetic networks involving the RCT pathway for kidney-pelvic-heart fat percentage, rib-eye area, and subcutaneous fat depth phenotypes with markers derived from paraoxinase 1, apolipoproteins A1 and E, respectively. The present study confirmed that genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis are useful targets for investigating obesity in humans as well as for improving meat quality phenotypes in a livestock production. PMID:21151936

  4. Genetic Inactivation of D-Amino Acid Oxidase Enhances Extinction and Reversal Learning in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrie, Viviane; Duffy, Steven; Wang, Wei; Barger, Steven W.; Baker, Glen B.; Roder, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glycine site has been shown to accelerate adaptive forms of learning that may benefit psychopathologies involving cognitive and perseverative disturbances. In this study, the effects of increasing the brain levels of the endogenous NMDAR glycine site agonist D-serine, through the genetic

  5. Reverse genetic engineering of the human rhinovirus serotype 16 genome to introduce an antibody-detectable tag.

    PubMed

    Walker, Erin J; Jensen, Lora M; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately detect viral proteins during infection is essential for virology research, and the lack of specific antibodies can make this detection difficult. Reverse genetic engineering of virus genomes to alter the wild-type genome is a powerful technique to introduce a detectable tag onto a viral protein. Here we outline a method to incorporate an influenza hemagglutinin epitope tag onto the 2A protease of HRV16. The method uses site-directed mutagenesis PCR to introduce the sequence for the HA antigen onto either the C or N termini of 2A protease while keeping the relevant internal cleavage sites intact. The new viral product is then cloned into a wild-type HRV16 plasmid and transfected into Ohio Hela cells to produce recombinant virus. PMID:25261314

  6. Reversal of phenotypes in MECP2 duplication mice using genetic rescue or antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Chen, Hong-mei; Swann, John W; Hao, Shuang; Tang, Bin; Wu, Zhenyu; Tang, Jianrong; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Liu, Zhandong; Rigo, Frank; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-12-01

    Copy number variations have been frequently associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. MECP2 duplication syndrome is one of the most common genomic rearrangements in males and is characterized by autism, intellectual disability, motor dysfunction, anxiety, epilepsy, recurrent respiratory tract infections and early death. The broad range of deficits caused by methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) overexpression poses a daunting challenge to traditional biochemical-pathway-based therapeutic approaches. Accordingly, we sought strategies that directly target MeCP2 and are amenable to translation into clinical therapy. The first question that we addressed was whether the neurological dysfunction is reversible after symptoms set in. Reversal of phenotypes in adult symptomatic mice has been demonstrated in some models of monogenic loss-of-function neurological disorders, including loss of MeCP2 in Rett syndrome, indicating that, at least in some cases, the neuroanatomy may remain sufficiently intact so that correction of the molecular dysfunction underlying these disorders can restore healthy physiology. Given the absence of neurodegeneration in MECP2 duplication syndrome, we propose that restoration of normal MeCP2 levels in MECP2 duplication adult mice would rescue their phenotype. By generating and characterizing a conditional Mecp2-overexpressing mouse model, here we show that correction of MeCP2 levels largely reverses the behavioural, molecular and electrophysiological deficits. We also reduced MeCP2 using an antisense oligonucleotide strategy, which has greater translational potential. Antisense oligonucleotides are small, modified nucleic acids that can selectively hybridize with messenger RNA transcribed from a target gene and silence it, and have been successfully used to correct deficits in different mouse models. We find that antisense oligonucleotide treatment induces a broad phenotypic rescue in adult symptomatic transgenic MECP2 duplication mice (MECP2-TG), and corrected MECP2 levels in lymphoblastoid cells from MECP2 duplication patients in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:26605526

  7. Reverse Engineering Financial Markets with Majority and Minority Games using Genetic Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Wiesinger, J; Satinover, J

    2010-01-01

    Using virtual stock markets with artificial interacting software investors, aka agent-based models (ABMs), we present a method to reverse engineer real-world financial time series. We model financial markets as made of a large number of interacting boundedly rational agents. By optimizing the similarity between the actual data and that generated by the reconstructed virtual stock market, we obtain parameters and strategies, which reveal some of the inner workings of the target stock market. We validate our approach by out-of-sample predictions of directional moves of the Nasdaq Composite Index.

  8. Retrospective on reverse genetics in mice around the world and in Japan.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Shinichi

    2008-06-01

    The 2007 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Mario R. Capecchi, Martin J. Evans and Oliver Smithies for their contribution in generating mutant mice by gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Although there are many experimental animals, it is yet only in mouse that one can genetically examine functions of genes at will. It was merely a dream in the early 1980s that genetic studies with mutants would one day become a reality in mammals. The story began with tetratocarcinoma/embryonal carcinoma cells. Now, through the successes of cloning in mammals, somatic cells such as our skin cells will shortly be transformed into ES-like (induced pluripotent stem) cells by the proper activation of endogenous genes such as Oct4 and Sox2 with chemicals. How have times changed? PMID:18430168

  9. Silica-based nanocomposites via reverse microemulsions: classifications, preparations, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiasheng; Shah, Zameer Hussain; Zhang, Shufen; Lu, Rongwen

    2014-04-01

    Silica-based nanocomposites with amorphous silica as the matrix or carrier along with a functional component have been extensively investigated. These nanocomposites combine the advantages of both silica and the functional components, demonstrating great potential for various applications. To synthesize such composites, one of the most frequently used methods is reverse microemulsion due to its convenient control over the size, shape, and structures. The structures of the composites have a decisive significance for their properties and applications. In this review, we tried to categorize the silica-based nanocomposites via reverse microemulsions based on their structures, discussed the syntheses individually for each structure, summarized their applications, and made some perspectives based on the current progress of this field.Silica-based nanocomposites with amorphous silica as the matrix or carrier along with a functional component have been extensively investigated. These nanocomposites combine the advantages of both silica and the functional components, demonstrating great potential for various applications. To synthesize such composites, one of the most frequently used methods is reverse microemulsion due to its convenient control over the size, shape, and structures. The structures of the composites have a decisive significance for their properties and applications. In this review, we tried to categorize the silica-based nanocomposites via reverse microemulsions based on their structures, discussed the syntheses individually for each structure, summarized their applications, and made some perspectives based on the current progress of this field. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The structures of all the surfactants included in this review are listed. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06025j

  10. On some contrast reversals in SEM: application to metal/insulator systems.

    PubMed

    Cazaux, Jacques

    2008-11-01

    Contrast changes of SEM images with experimental conditions (beam energy, angle of detection, etc.) are analyzed by combining physical arguments based on secondary electron emission (SEE) to instrumental arguments involving detection. Possible occurrences of contrast reversals are explored to illustrate these changes in a striking manner. Deduced from SEE yield data, simulated SEM images show a material contrast reversal for a Pt/quartz specimen, a result partly supported by real images of a Cr/quartz integrated circuit. A shift of reversal energy with the detector's position is deduced from a difference in secondary electrons (SE) angular distributions between metals and insulators. Similarly, changes of topographic contrast with detection conditions, specimen composition and angle of tilt are investigated and a possible contrast reversal is again indicated. Finally, it is shown how charging contrast deduced from the expected evolution of SEE yield during irradiation is amplified by in-lens detection: a point illustrated by a contrast reversal of images of SiC particles. The main application concerns a proper interpretation of SEM images that is essential in the investigation of devices obtained from lithographic processes. The discussion on material contrast outlines the difficulty in generalizing the present analysis based on published data and experimental strategies based on implementing specific attachments in the SEM or on biasing the specimen holder are suggested. PMID:18692317

  11. Reverse transcription-PCR assays for detection of bovine enteric caliciviruses (BEC) and analysis of the genetic relationships among BEC and human caliciviruses.

    PubMed

    Smiley, J R; Hoet, A E; Tråvén, M; Tsunemitsu, H; Saif, L J

    2003-07-01

    Two genetically distinct bovine enteric caliciviruses (BECs) have been identified: the norovirus (NLV) Jena and Newbury Agent-2 (NA-2) BECs, which are genetically related to human noroviruses, and the Nebraska (NB) BECs, which is related to sapoviruses and lagoviruses but may also represent a new calicivirus genus. The prevalence of these two BEC genotypes in cattle is unknown. Although reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) primers for human NLV recognize NLV-BECs, the genetic relationships between NLV from humans and the NLV-BECs commonly circulating in cattle is undefined. In the present study, veal calf fecal samples were assayed for enteric caliciviruses by using six RT-PCR primer sets designed for the detection of human NLVs or BECs. Caliciviruses genetically related to the NLV-BEC Jena and NA-2 strains or to the recently characterized NB BEC strain were identified in three of four and four of four sampled veal herds, respectively. Extended 3'-terminal genome sequences of two NLV-BECs, designated CV95-OH and CV186-OH, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp; open reading frame 1 [ORF-1]), VP1 (ORF-2), and VP2 (ORF-3) genes were determined. Phylogenetic and sequence identity analyses of each genome region demonstrated these viruses to be most closely related to the NLV-BEC Jena and NA-2 strains. In initial testing, the human P289-P290 (P289/290) primer set was found to be the most sensitive for calicivirus detection. However, its failure to identify all positive fecal pools (as determined by other assays) led us to design two new primer sets, CBECU-F/R and NBU-F/R, for the sensitive and specific detection of NLV-BEC (NLV-BEC Jena and NA-2) and BEC-NB-like viruses, respectively. The RT-PCR assays with the new primers were compared against other primer sets, including P289/290. Composite results of the tests completed by using the new assays identified 72% (54 of 75) of veal calf fecal samples as positive, with 21 of 21 sequenced reaction products specific for the target RdRp gene. The same design strategy used for the new BEC assays may also be applicable to the design of similar assays for the detection of human caliciviruses (HuCVs). Our data support the genetic relationship between NLV-BECs and NLV-HuCVs but with the NLV-BECs comprising two clusters within a third NLV genogroup. PMID:12843048

  12. Genetically engineered antibody molecules and their application.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S L; Wims, L; Wallick, S; Tan, L; Oi, V T

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin genes can be efficiently expressed following transfection into myeloma cells. Using protoplast fusion, transfection frequencies greater than 10(-3) can be achieved. Compatible plasmids containing two different selectible markers are used to simultaneously deliver heavy and light chain genes to the same cell. To produce molecules with differing specificities the rearranged and expressed variable regions can be cloned from the appropriate hybridoma. In some cases, variable regions from cDNAs can be inserted into the expression vectors. It is possible to manipulate the immunoglobulin genes and produce novel antibody molecules. Antibodies have been produced in which the variable regions from mouse antibodies have been joined to human constant regions. In addition, antibodies with altered constant regions have been produced. These genetically engineered antibodies provide a unique set of reagents to study structure-function relationships within the molecule. They also can potentially be used in the diagnosis and therapy of human disease. PMID:3327412

  13. Genetic Algorithm Application in Optimization of Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Ali; Zaim, A. Halim

    2014-01-01

    There are several applications known for wireless sensor networks (WSN), and such variety demands improvement of the currently available protocols and the specific parameters. Some notable parameters are lifetime of network and energy consumption for routing which play key role in every application. Genetic algorithm is one of the nonlinear optimization methods and relatively better option thanks to its efficiency for large scale applications and that the final formula can be modified by operators. The present survey tries to exert a comprehensive improvement in all operational stages of a WSN including node placement, network coverage, clustering, and data aggregation and achieve an ideal set of parameters of routing and application based WSN. Using genetic algorithm and based on the results of simulations in NS, a specific fitness function was achieved, optimized, and customized for all the operational stages of WSNs. PMID:24693235

  14. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    PubMed

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K; Cottle, Denny L; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E; Watt, Fiona M; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P; Sundberg, John P; White, Jacqueline K; Smyth, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation. PMID:25340873

  15. Identification of Genes Important for Cutaneous Function Revealed by a Large Scale Reverse Genetic Screen in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K.; Cottle, Denny L.; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Watt, Fiona M.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P.; Sundberg, John P.; White, Jacqueline K.; Smyth, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation. PMID:25340873

  16. Genetic algorithms and their applications in accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, Alicia S.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-objective optimization techniques are widely used in an extremely broad range of fields. Genetic optimization for multi-objective optimization was introduced in the accelerator community in relatively recent times and quickly spread becoming a fundamental tool in multi-dimensional optimization problems. This discussion introduces the basics of the technique and reviews applications in accelerator problems.

  17. SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF THE COMPLETE GENOME OF AVIAN METAPNEUMOVIRUS SUBGROUP C COLORADO STRAIN: DEVELOPMENT OF A REVERSE GENETICS SYSTEM FOR THIS VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of the complete genome information is essential for development of a reverse genetics system to study the molecular biology and rescue infectious avian metapneumovirus from cloned DNA. Therefore, we determined the nucleotide (nt) sequence of the complete genome of aMPV-C Colorado s...

  18. Sex-Role Reversal and "Dominance Genes" in African Cichlid Fish The broad scope of my research aims to understand the genetic basis of behavior from an

    E-print Network

    Renn, Susan C.P.

    1 Sex-Role Reversal and "Dominance Genes" in African Cichlid Fish The broad scope of my research the genetic basis of species-specific "sex-role" behaviors, and how these behaviors relate to environmental specific aims designed to test the hypothesis that species- specific "sex-role" behaviors, imposed

  19. Quantitative genetic versions of Hamilton's rule with empirical applications

    PubMed Central

    McGlothlin, Joel W.; Wolf, Jason B.; Brodie, Edmund D.; Moore, Allen J.

    2014-01-01

    Hamilton's theory of inclusive fitness revolutionized our understanding of the evolution of social interactions. Surprisingly, an incorporation of Hamilton's perspective into the quantitative genetic theory of phenotypic evolution has been slow, despite the popularity of quantitative genetics in evolutionary studies. Here, we discuss several versions of Hamilton's rule for social evolution from a quantitative genetic perspective, emphasizing its utility in empirical applications. Although evolutionary quantitative genetics offers methods to measure each of the critical parameters of Hamilton's rule, empirical work has lagged behind theory. In particular, we lack studies of selection on altruistic traits in the wild. Fitness costs and benefits of altruism can be estimated using a simple extension of phenotypic selection analysis that incorporates the traits of social interactants. We also discuss the importance of considering the genetic influence of the social environment, or indirect genetic effects (IGEs), in the context of Hamilton's rule. Research in social evolution has generated an extensive body of empirical work focusing—with good reason—almost solely on relatedness. We argue that quantifying the roles of social and non-social components of selection and IGEs, in addition to relatedness, is now timely and should provide unique additional insights into social evolution. PMID:24686930

  20. Novel skin phenotypes revealed by a genome-wide mouse reverse genetic screen

    PubMed Central

    Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Heath, Emma; Smedley, Damian P.; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; DiTommaso, Tia; White, Jacqueline K.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Smyth, Ian; Steel, Karen P.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    Permanent stop-and-shop large-scale mouse mutant resources provide an excellent platform to decipher tissue phenogenomics. Here we analyse skin from 538 knockout mouse mutants generated by the Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project. We optimize immunolabelling of tail epidermal wholemounts to allow systematic annotation of hair follicle, sebaceous gland and interfollicular epidermal abnormalities using ontology terms from the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. Of the 50 mutants with an epidermal phenotype, 9 map to human genetic conditions with skin abnormalities. Some mutant genes are expressed in the skin, whereas others are not, indicating systemic effects. One phenotype is affected by diet and several are incompletely penetrant. In-depth analysis of three mutants, Krt76, Myo5a (a model of human Griscelli syndrome) and Mysm1, provides validation of the screen. Our study is the first large-scale genome-wide tissue phenotype screen from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium and provides an open access resource for the scientific community. PMID:24721909

  1. Adaptable Constrained Genetic Programming: Extensions and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    2005-01-01

    An evolutionary algorithm applies evolution-based principles to problem solving. To solve a problem, the user defines the space of potential solutions, the representation space. Sample solutions are encoded in a chromosome-like structure. The algorithm maintains a population of such samples, which undergo simulated evolution by means of mutation, crossover, and survival of the fittest principles. Genetic Programming (GP) uses tree-like chromosomes, providing very rich representation suitable for many problems of interest. GP has been successfully applied to a number of practical problems such as learning Boolean functions and designing hardware circuits. To apply GP to a problem, the user needs to define the actual representation space, by defining the atomic functions and terminals labeling the actual trees. The sufficiency principle requires that the label set be sufficient to build the desired solution trees. The closure principle allows the labels to mix in any arity-consistent manner. To satisfy both principles, the user is often forced to provide a large label set, with ad hoc interpretations or penalties to deal with undesired local contexts. This unfortunately enlarges the actual representation space, and thus usually slows down the search. In the past few years, three different methodologies have been proposed to allow the user to alleviate the closure principle by providing means to define, and to process, constraints on mixing the labels in the trees. Last summer we proposed a new methodology to further alleviate the problem by discovering local heuristics for building quality solution trees. A pilot system was implemented last summer and tested throughout the year. This summer we have implemented a new revision, and produced a User's Manual so that the pilot system can be made available to other practitioners and researchers. We have also designed, and partly implemented, a larger system capable of dealing with much more powerful heuristics.

  2. The genetic matrix of Mayan applicative acquisition

    E-print Network

    Pye, Clifton

    2007-07-01

    - jects to direct or primary objects and demotes the original direct object to a secondary object or an adjunct phrase (Baker 1988; Dryer 1986). The English applicative advances dative and beneficiary adjuncts to pri- mary objects and demotes the original...) reconstructs the ap- plicative su‰x *-b’e for Proto-Mayan which promotes a third person verb adjunct to a primary object, and demotes the former direct object to an oblique phrase (see also Mora-Mar?´n 2003). A form of this su‰x is found in the Eastern...

  3. Evolution of a persistent aphthovirus in cytolytic infections: partial reversion of phenotypic traits accompanied by genetic diversification.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, N; Domingo, E

    1996-10-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) shows a dual potential to be cytolytic or to establish persistent infections in cell culture. FMDV R100, a virus rescued after 100 passages of carrier BHK-21 cells persistently infected with FMDV clone C-S8c1, showed multiple genetic and phenotypic alterations relative to the parental clone C-S8c1. Several FMDV R100 populations have been subjected to 100 serial cytolytic infections in BHK-21 cells, and the reversion of phenotypic and genetic alterations has been analyzed. An extreme temperature sensitivity of R100 reverted totally or partially in some passage series but not in others. The small-plaque morphology reverted to normal size in all cases. The hypervirulence for BHK-21 cells did not revert, and even showed an increase, upon cytolytic passage. Most of the mutations that had been fixed in the R100 genome during persistence did not revert in the course of cytolytic passages, but the extended polyribocytidylate tract of R100 (about 460 residues, versus 290 in C-S8c1) decreased dramatically in length, to the range of 220 to 260 residues in all passage series examined. In passages involving very large viral populations, a variant with two amino acid substitutions (L-144-->V and A-145-->P) next to the highly conserved Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD motif; positions 141 to 143) within the G-H loop of capsid protein VP1 became dominant. A clonal analysis allowed isolation of a mutant with the single replacement A-145-->P. Viral production and growth competition experiments showed the two variants to have a fitness very close to that of the parental virus. The results provide evidence that the repertoire of variants that could potentially become dominant in viral quasispecies may be influenced by the population size of the evolving virus. The net results of a series of persistent-infection passages followed by a series of cytolytic passages was progressive genomic diversification despite reversion or stasis of phenotypic traits. Implications for the evolution of RNA viruses are discussed. PMID:8794296

  4. Cross flow filtration for radwaste applications reverse osmosis demonstration case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Malkmus, D.

    1995-05-01

    Today`s radwaste economic and regulatory scenarios signify the importance in the improvement of operational practices to reduce generator liabilities. This action is largely due to the rising cost dealing with burial sites and the imposed waste volume restriction. To control the economical burdens associated with waste burial and to comply with stricter environmental regulations, NPP`s are attempting to modify their radwaste system(s) design and operating philosophy by placing a major emphasis on waste volume reduction and processing techniques. The utilization of reverse osmosis technology as a means for treatment of process and wastewater streams in the nuclear power industry has been investigated for many years. This paper will outline reverse osmosis theory and highlight performance data for process and waste stream purification applications. Case studies performed at 5 nuclear plants have been outlined. The demonstrations were performed on a widely variety of process stream for both a PWR and BWR application. The data provided by the pilot systems, the equipment design, and the economical impact a reverse osmosis unit will have on producing treated (high purity) are as follows.

  5. Application of genetic algorithms to tuning fuzzy control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, Todd; Vombrack, Endre; Aldridge, Jack

    1993-01-01

    Real number genetic algorithms (GA) were applied for tuning fuzzy membership functions of three controller applications. The first application is our 'Fuzzy Pong' demonstration, a controller that controls a very responsive system. The performance of the automatically tuned membership functions exceeded that of manually tuned membership functions both when the algorithm started with randomly generated functions and with the best manually-tuned functions. The second GA tunes input membership functions to achieve a specified control surface. The third application is a practical one, a motor controller for a printed circuit manufacturing system. The GA alters the positions and overlaps of the membership functions to accomplish the tuning. The applications, the real number GA approach, the fitness function and population parameters, and the performance improvements achieved are discussed. Directions for further research in tuning input and output membership functions and in tuning fuzzy rules are described.

  6. Application of Genetic Algorithms to Molecular Biology: Locating Putative Protein Signal Sequences

    E-print Network

    Levin, Michael

    Application of Genetic Algorithms to Molecular Biology: Locating Putative Protein Signal Sequences-7758 mlevin@husc.harvard.edu #12;Summary This paper presents an application of genetic algorithms to a problem difficult task. No good algorithm currently exists for locating brand new signals. A genetic algorithm

  7. Time-reversal symmetry in nonstationary Markov processes with application to some fluctuation theorems.

    PubMed

    Van Vliet, Carolyne M

    2012-11-01

    Nonequilibrium processes require that the density operator of an interacting system with Hamiltonian H(t) = H(0)(t)+?V converges and produces entropy. Employing projection operators in the state space, the density operator is developed to all orders of perturbation and then resummed. In contrast to earlier treatments by Van Hove [Physica 21, 517 (1955)] and others [U. Fano, Rev. Mod. Phys. 29, 74 (1959); U. Fano, in Lectures on the Many-Body Problem, Vol 2, edited by E. R. Caniello (Academic Press, New York, 1964); R. Zwanzig, in Lectures in Theoretical Physics, Vol. III, edited by W. E. Britten, B. W. Downs, and J. Downs (Wiley Interscience, New York, 1961), pp. 116-141; K. M. Van Vliet, J. Math. Phys. 19, 1345 (1978); K. M. Van Vliet, Can. J. Phys. 56, 1206 (1978)], closed expressions are obtained. From these we establish the time-reversal symmetry property P(?,t|?',t') = P?',t'|?,t), where the tilde refers to the time-reversed protocol; also a nonstationary Markovian master equation is derived. Time-reversal symmetry is then applied to thermostatted systems yielding the Crooks-Tasaki fluctuation theorem (FT) and the quantum Jarzynski work-energy theorem, as well as the general entropy FT. The quantum mechanical concepts of work and entropy are discussed in detail. Finally, we present a nonequilibrium extension of Mazo's lemma of linear response theory, obtaining some applications via this alternate route. PMID:23214737

  8. Ontogenic and morphological study of gonadal formation in genetically-modified sex reversal XYPOS mice.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Yuria; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Hashimoto, Rie; Kinoshita, Kyoko; Omotehara, Takuya; Nagahara, Daichi; Hirano, Tetsushi; Kubota, Naoto; Minami, Kiichi; Yanai, Shogo; Masuda, Natsumi; Yuasa, Hideto; Mantani, Youhei; Matsuo, Eiko; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian sexual fate is determined by the presence or absence of sex determining region of the Y chromosome (Sry) in the "bipotential" gonads. Recent studies have demonstrated that both male and female sexual development are induced by distinct and active genetic pathways. Breeding the Y chromosome from Mus m. domesticus poschiavinus (POS) strains into C57BL/6J (B6J) mice (B6J-XYPOS) has been shown to induce sex reversal (75%: bilateral ovary, 25%: true hermaphrodites). However, our B6N-XYPOS mice, which were generated by backcrossing of B6J-XYPOS on an inbred B6N-XX, develop as males (36%: bilateral testis with fertility as well as bilateral ovary (34%), and the remainder develop as true hermaphrodites. Here, we investigated in detail the expressions of essential sex-related genes and histological features in B6N-XYPOS mice from the fetal period to adulthood. The onsets of both Sry and SRY-box 9 (Sox9) expressions as determined spatiotemporally by whole-mount immunohistochemistry in the B6N-XYPOS gonads occurred 2-3 tail somites later than those in B6N-XYB6 gonads, but earlier than those in B6J-XYPOS, respectively. It is possible that such a small difference in timing of the Sry expression underlies testicular development in our B6N-XYPOS. Our study is the first to histologically show the expression and ectopic localization of a female-related gene in the XYPOS testes and a male-related gene in the XYPOS ovaries. The results from these and previous experiments indicate that the interplay between genome variants, epigenetics and developmental gene regulation is crucial for testis development. PMID:26194606

  9. Trends in genetic patent applications: the commercialization of academic intellectual property

    PubMed Central

    Kers, Jannigje G; Van Burg, Elco; Stoop, Tom; Cornel, Martina C

    2014-01-01

    We studied trends in genetic patent applications in order to identify the trends in the commercialization of research findings in genetics. To define genetic patent applications, the European version (ECLA) of the International Patent Classification (IPC) codes was used. Genetic patent applications data from the PATSTAT database from 1990 until 2009 were analyzed for time trends and regional distribution. Overall, the number of patent applications has been growing. In 2009, 152?000 patent applications were submitted under the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) and within the EP (European Patent) system of the European Patent Office (EPO). The number of genetic patent applications increased until a peak was reached in the year 2000, with >8000 applications, after which it declined by almost 50%. Continents show different patterns over time, with the global peak in 2000 mainly explained by the USA and Europe, while Asia shows a stable number of >1000 per year. Nine countries together account for 98.9% of the total number of genetic patent applications. In The Netherlands, 26.7% of the genetic patent applications originate from public research institutions. After the year 2000, the number of genetic patent applications dropped significantly. Academic leadership and policy as well as patent regulations seem to have an important role in the trend differences. The ongoing investment in genetic research in the past decade is not reflected by an increase of patent applications. PMID:24448546

  10. Trends in genetic patent applications: the commercialization of academic intellectual property.

    PubMed

    Kers, Jannigje G; Van Burg, Elco; Stoop, Tom; Cornel, Martina C

    2014-10-01

    We studied trends in genetic patent applications in order to identify the trends in the commercialization of research findings in genetics. To define genetic patent applications, the European version (ECLA) of the International Patent Classification (IPC) codes was used. Genetic patent applications data from the PATSTAT database from 1990 until 2009 were analyzed for time trends and regional distribution. Overall, the number of patent applications has been growing. In 2009, 152?000 patent applications were submitted under the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) and within the EP (European Patent) system of the European Patent Office (EPO). The number of genetic patent applications increased until a peak was reached in the year 2000, with >8000 applications, after which it declined by almost 50%. Continents show different patterns over time, with the global peak in 2000 mainly explained by the USA and Europe, while Asia shows a stable number of >1000 per year. Nine countries together account for 98.9% of the total number of genetic patent applications. In The Netherlands, 26.7% of the genetic patent applications originate from public research institutions. After the year 2000, the number of genetic patent applications dropped significantly. Academic leadership and policy as well as patent regulations seem to have an important role in the trend differences. The ongoing investment in genetic research in the past decade is not reflected by an increase of patent applications. PMID:24448546

  11. Molecular scissors and their application in genetically modified farm animals.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bjoern; Niemann, Heiner

    2015-06-01

    Molecular scissors (MS), incl. Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFN), Transcription-activator like endoncleases (TALENS) and meganucleases possess long recognition sites and are thus capable of cutting DNA in a very specific manner. These molecular scissors mediate targeted genetic alterations by enhancing the DNA mutation rate via induction of double-strand breaks at a predetermined genomic site. Compared to conventional homologous recombination based gene targeting, MS can increase the targeting rate 10,000-fold, and gene disruption via mutagenic DNA repair is stimulated at a similar frequency. The successful application of different MS has been shown in different organisms, including insects, amphibians, plants, nematodes, and mammals, including humans. Recently, another novel class of molecular scissors was described that uses RNAs to target a specific genomic site. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is capable of targeting even multiple genomic sites in one shot and thus could be superior to ZFNs or TALEN, especially by its easy design. MS can be successfully employed for improving the understanding of complex physiological systems, producing transgenic animals, incl. creating large animal models for human diseases, creating specific cell lines, and plants, and even for treating human genetic diseases. This review provides an update on molecular scissors, their underlying mechanism and focuses on new opportunities for generating genetically modified farm animals. PMID:25603988

  12. Genetic markers and their application in poultry breeding.

    PubMed

    Emara, M G; Kim, H

    2003-06-01

    The current chicken genetic map contains at least 1,965 loci within 50 linkage groups, and it covers about 4,000 cM. About 235 of these loci have homology with known human or mammalian genes. The remaining loci are anonymous molecular DNA markers, including microsatellites, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), CR1 elements, and others. A third generation genetic map for human uses single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), which have allowed the mapping of complex traits by linkage disequilibrium. One advantage of SNP is that they are usually linked to the gene of interest, and association of the SNP with traits of economic importance can be analyzed using candidate gene approaches. With the tremendous advancements in characterizing chicken expressed sequence tags (EST), the identification of genetic polymorphisms such as SNP in chicken genes has become a reality. Our laboratory has undertaken an in silico analysis of the chicken EST at the University of Delaware by using a Phred/Phrap/Polyphred/Consed pipeline to identify candidate chicken SNP. Initial scanning of 23,427 chicken EST identified a total of 1,209 candidate SNP, with at least 182 non-synonymous SNP that result in an amino acid change observed. Validation of these candidate chicken SNP is ongoing. Placement of the SNP on the chicken genetic map will enhance marker density, thus allowing for mapping of complex traits through linkage analysis and linkage disequilibrium. Application of SNP to identify disease resistance genes in chickens is of special interest to our laboratory, especially in regards to Marek's disease and coccidiosis. PMID:12817450

  13. Two applications of time reversal mirrors: seismic radio and seismic radar.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Sherif M; Schuster, Gerard T

    2011-10-01

    Two seismic applications of time reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and tested with field experiments. The first one is sending, receiving, and decoding coded messages similar to a radio except seismic waves are used. The second one is, similar to radar surveillance, detecting and tracking a moving object(s) in a remote area, including the determination of the objects speed of movement. Both applications require the prior recording of calibration Green's functions in the area of interest. This reference Green's function will be used as a codebook to decrypt the coded message in the first application and as a moving sensor for the second application. Field tests show that seismic radar can detect the moving coordinates (x(t), y(t), z(t)) of a person running through a calibration site. This information also allows for a calculation of his velocity as a function of location. Results with the seismic radio are successful in seismically detecting and decoding coded pulses produced by a hammer. Both seismic radio and radar are highly robust to signals in high noise environments due to the super-stacking property of TRMs. PMID:21973353

  14. Reversal of micrographia in Parkinson's disease by application of picoTesla range magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Iacono, R P

    1994-07-01

    Micrographia, a common and often early sign of Parkinson's disease (PD), is a sensitive clinical marker of the severity of bradykinesia and rigidity in the disease. As micrographia may be reversed by treatment with dopaminergic drugs and may emerge during therapy with neuroleptic agents, it is thought to reflect striatal dopaminergic deficiency. It has been reported recently that external application of picoTesla range magnetic fields (MF) produced a dramatic improvement in the motor symptoms of PD suggesting that these weak MF enhance striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission. In the present communication, we present a 61 year old patient with PD in whom picoTesla range MF attenuated the severity of bradykinesia and rigidity, improved postural stability, and rapidly reversed the micrographia within 30 minutes after termination of treatment. In contrast, sham (placebo) MF did not influence the severity of the motor symptoms of the disease or the associated micrographia. This report demonstrates the antiParkinsonian effect of picoTesla range MF and highlights the unique efficacy of these weak MF in the therapy of Parkinsonism. PMID:7989163

  15. Comparative application of artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms for multivariate time-series modelling

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    -a, Microcystis, short-term prediction, artificial neural network model, genetic algorithm model, rule sets of rules or concepts. By contrast, genetic algorithms can derive explicit numerical or linguistic modelsComparative application of artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms for multivariate time

  16. Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 13 (2000) 611623 Genetic adaptive state estimation$

    E-print Network

    2000-01-01

    Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 13 (2000) 611­623 Genetic adaptive state in a nonlinear jet engine. Our main conclusion is that the genetic adaptive state estimator has the potential Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Estimation; Genetic algorithms; Jet engine surge=stall control 1

  17. New applications of the genetic algorithm for the interpretation of high-resolution spectra1

    E-print Network

    Nijmegen, University of

    804 New applications of the genetic algorithm for the interpretation of high-resolution spectra1 W. An alternative approach is unassigned fits of the spectra using genetic algorithms (GAs) with special cost, genetic algorithm, biomolecules, structure, van der Waals clusters. Résumé : La spectroscopie électronique

  18. Genetics

    MedlinePLUS

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  19. The multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm: Analysis and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cedeno, W.

    1995-09-01

    The ability of organisms to evolve and adapt to the environment has provided mother nature with a rich and diverse set of species. Only organisms well adapted to their environment can survive from one generation to the next, transferring on the traits, that made them successful, to their offspring. Competition for resources and the ever changing environment drives some species to extinction and at the same time others evolve to maintain the delicate balance in nature. In this disertation we present the multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm, a computational metaphor to the survival of species in ecological niches in the face of competition. The multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm maintains stable subpopulations of solutions in multiple niches in multimodal landscapes. The algorithm introduces the concept of crowding selection to promote mating among members with qirnilar traits while allowing many members of the population to participate in mating. The algorithm uses worst among most similar replacement policy to promote competition among members with similar traits while allowing competition among members of different niches as well. We present empirical and theoretical results for the success of the multiniche crowding genetic algorithm for multimodal function optimization. The properties of the algorithm using different parameters are examined. We test the performance of the algorithm on problems of DNA Mapping, Aquifer Management, and the File Design Problem. Applications that combine the use of heuristics and special operators to solve problems in the areas of combinatorial optimization, grouping, and multi-objective optimization. We conclude by presenting the advantages and disadvantages of the algorithm and describing avenues for future investigation to answer other questions raised by this study.

  20. Genetic engineering of the chloroplast: novel tools and new applications.

    PubMed

    Bock, Ralph

    2014-04-01

    The plastid genome represents an attractive target of genetic engineering in crop plants. Plastid transgenes often give high expression levels, can be stacked in operons and are largely excluded from pollen transmission. Recent research has greatly expanded our toolbox for plastid genome engineering and many new proof-of-principle applications have highlighted the enormous potential of the transplastomic technology in both crop improvement and the development of plants as bioreactors for the sustainable and cost-effective production of biopharmaceuticals, enzymes and raw materials for the chemical industry. This review describes recent technological advances with plastid transformation in seed plants. It focuses on novel tools for plastid genome engineering and transgene expression and summarizes progress with harnessing the potential of plastid transformation in biotechnology. PMID:24679252

  1. Programmable genetic algorithm IP core for sensing and surveillance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkoori, Srinivas; Fernando, Pradeep; Sankaran, Hariharan; Stoica, Adrian; Keymeulen, Didier; Zebulum, Ricardo

    2009-05-01

    Real-time evolvable systems are possible with a hardware implementation of Genetic Algorithms (GA). We report the design of an IP core that implements a general purpose GA engine which has been successfully synthesized and verified on a Xilinx Virtex II Pro FPGA Device (XC2VP30). The placed and routed IP core has an area utilization of only 13% and clock speed of 50MHz. The GA core can be customized in terms of the population size, number of generations, cross-over and mutation rates, and the random number generator seed. The GA engine can be tailored to a given application by interfacing with the application specific fitness evaluation module as well as the required storage memory (to store the current and new populations). The core is soft in nature i.e., a gate-level netlist is provided which can be readily integrated with the user's system. The GA IP core can be readily used in FPGA based platforms for space and military applications (for e.g., surveillance, target tracking). The main advantages of the IP core are its programmability, small footprint, and low power consumption. Examples of concept systems in sensing and surveillance domains will be presented.

  2. Innovative Applications of Genetic Algorithms to Problems in Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, Alicia; Terzic, Balsa; Kramer, Matthew; Zvezdin, Anton; Morozov, Vasiliy; Roblin, Yves; Lin, Fanglei; Jarvis, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a relatively new technique that implements the principles nature uses in biological evolution in order to optimize a multidimensional nonlinear problem. The GA works especially well for problems with a large number of local extrema, where traditional methods (such as conjugate gradient, steepest descent, and others) fail or, at best, underperform. The field of accelerator physics, among others, abounds with problems which lend themselves to optimization via GAs. In this paper, we report on the successful application of GAs in several problems related to the existing CEBAF facility, the proposed MEIC at Jefferson Lab, and a radio frequency (RF) gun based injector. These encouraging results are a step forward in optimizing accelerator design and provide an impetus for application of GAs to other problems in the field. To that end, we discuss the details of the GAs used, including a newly devised enhancement, which leads to improved convergence to the optimum and make recommendations for future GA developments and accelerator applications.

  3. Innovative applications of genetic algorithms to problems in accelerator physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofler, Alicia; Terzi?, Balša; Kramer, Matthew; Zvezdin, Anton; Morozov, Vasiliy; Roblin, Yves; Lin, Fanglei; Jarvis, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a powerful technique that implements the principles nature uses in biological evolution to optimize a multidimensional nonlinear problem. The GA works especially well for problems with a large number of local extrema, where traditional methods (such as conjugate gradient, steepest descent, and others) fail or, at best, underperform. The field of accelerator physics, among others, abounds with problems which lend themselves to optimization via GAs. In this paper, we report on the successful application of GAs in several problems related to the existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility nuclear physics machine, the proposed Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson Lab, and a radio frequency gun-based injector. These encouraging results are a step forward in optimizing accelerator design and provide an impetus for application of GAs to other problems in the field. To that end, we discuss the details of the GAs used, include a newly devised enhancement which leads to improved convergence to the optimum, and make recommendations for future GA developments and accelerator applications.

  4. Application of Bayesian Hierarchical Models in Genetic Data Analysis 

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Lin

    2012-08-15

    Genetic data analysis has been capturing a lot of attentions for understanding the mechanism of the development and progressing of diseases like cancers, and is crucial in discovering genetic markers and treatment targets in medical research...

  5. Detection of genetically modified crops using multiplex asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and asymmetric hyperbranched rolling circle amplification coupled with reverse dot blot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiumin; Teng, Da; Guan, Qingfeng; Tian, Fang; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-04-15

    To meet the ever-increasing demand for detection of genetically modified crops (GMCs), low-cost, high-throughput and high-accuracy detection assays are needed. The new multiplex asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and asymmetric hyper-branched rolling circle amplification coupled with reverse dot blot (RDB) systems were developed to detect GMCs. Thirteen oligonucleotide probes were designed to identify endogenous targets (Lec1, Hmg and Sad1), event-specific targets (RRS-5C, RRS-3C, Bt176-3C and MON810-3C), screening targets (35S promoter and NOS terminator), and control targets (18S and PLX). Optimised conditions were as follows: tailed hybridization probes (1-2 pmol/l) were immobilized on a membrane by baking for 2h, and a 10:1 ratio of forward to reverse primers was used. The detection limits were 0.1 ?g/l of 2% RRS and 0.5 ng/l of DNA from genetically modified (GM) soybean. These results indicate that the RDB assay could be used to detect multiplex target genes of GMCs rapidly and inexpensively. PMID:25466120

  6. Application of Cellular Genetic Programming in Data Mining

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    structure for rule generation to name a few. This study focuses on one type of parallel genetic algorithms a cellular framework, as well as examining parallel approaches. Cellular model of genetic programming with other machine learning algorithms. 1 Introduction First of all, focus of this paper is Genetic

  7. Polarization Reversal Over Flooded Regions and Applications to Large-Scale Flood Mapping with Spaceborne Scatterometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Liu, W. Timothy; Xie, Xiao-Su

    1999-01-01

    We present the polarization reversal in backscatter over flooded land regions, and demonstrate for the first time the utility of spaceborne Ku-band scatterometer for large-scale flood mapping. Scatterometer data were collected over the globe by the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) operated at 14 GHz on the Japanese ADEOS spacecraft from September 1996 to June 1997. During this time span, several severe floods occurred. Over most land surface, vertical polarization backscatter (Sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) is larger than horizontal polarization backscatter (sigma(sub hh)). Such polarization characteristics is reversed and sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) is smaller than sigma(sub hh) over flooded regions, except under a dense forest canopy. The total backscatter from the flooded landscape consists of direct backscatter and boundary-interaction backscatter. The direct term is contributed by direct backscattering from objects protruding above the water surface, and by backscattering from waves on the water surface. The boundary-interaction term is contributed by the forward scattering from the protruding objects and then reflected from the water surface, and also by the forward scattering from these objects after the water-surface reflection. Over flooded regions, the boundary-interaction term is dominant at large incidence angles and the strong water-surface reflection is much larger for horizontal polarization than the vertical one due to the Brewster effect in transverse-magnetic waves. These scattering mechanisms cause the polarization reversal over flooded regions. An example obtained with the Analytic Wave Theory is used to illustrate the scattering mechanisms leading to the polarization reversal. We then demonstrate the utility of spaceborne Ku-band scatterometer for large-scale flood mapping. We process NSCAT data to obtain the polarization ratio sigma(sub hh)/sigma(sub upsilon(upsilon)) with colocated data at incidence angles larger than 40 deg. The results over Asian summer monsoon regions in September-October 1996 indicate flooded areas in many countries such as Bangladesh, India, Lao, Vietnam, Cambodia, and China. Reports documented by the United Nation Department of Humanitarian Affairs (now called UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs) show loss of many lives and severe flood related damages which affected many million people in the corresponding flooded areas. We also map the NSCAT polarization ratio over the same regions in the "dry season" in January 1997 as a reference to confirm our results. Furthermore, we obtain concurrent ocean wind fields also derived from NSCAT data, and Asia topographic data (USGS GTOPO30) to investigate the flooded area. The results show that winds during summer monsoon season blowing inland, which perplex flood problems. Overlaying the topographic map over NSCAT results reveals an excellent correspondence between the confinement of flooded area within the relevant topographic features, which very well illustrates the value of topographic wetness index. Finally, we discuss the applications of future spaceborne scatterometers, including QuikSCAT and Seawinds, for flood mapping over the globe.

  8. The reverse cholesterol transport pathway improves understanding of genetic networks for fat deposition and muscle growth in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present study, thirteen genes involved in the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway were investigated for their associations with three fat depositions, eight fatty acid compositions and two growth-related phenotypes in a Wagyu x Limousin reference population, including 6 F1 bulls, 113 ...

  9. Investigations on the Suitability of Coated Steel Piping System for High Pressure Seawater Reverse Osmosis Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobin, Mohammad

    2010-03-01

    This study deals with the investigations concerning with the suitability of coated steel piping system as an economically viable alternative to costly stainless steel piping for high pressure seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) application. The piping system selected for investigation is a carbon steel piping coated internally and externally with thermoplastic coating (coating powder Plascoat PPA 571). The performance of thermoplastic coating was investigated by conducting SWRO pilot plant test, salt spray test, mechanical tests and testing of the coating under crevices (both in pilot plant and laboratory), and for leachable organics and inorganics (both in laboratory and pilot plant test). The testing of coating in the pilot plant resulted in the formation of some blisters on the internal surface of the pipes. The blisters were broken causing the corrosion of underneath steel. The coating showed a poor resistance to salt fog test. In general, the coating performed satisfactorily under the crevices but showed blistering on either side of the test panels. The adhesive strength of the coating was found to be poor; however, it showed good flexibility. The results of chemical analysis did not show the leaching of organic or inorganic pollutants from the coating.

  10. Second-law analysis and optimization of reverse brayton cycles of different configurations for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, James Ryder; Razani, Arsalan

    2012-06-01

    Second-law of thermodynamics (2nd law) and exergy analyses and optimization offour Reverse Brayton Refrigeration (RBR) cryogenic cycle configurations: Conventional 1-stage compression cycle; Conventional 2-stage compression cycle; 1-stage compressionModified cycle with intermediate cooling of the recuperator using an auxiliary cooler; andan Integrated 2-stage expansion RBR cycle are performed. The conventional RBR cyclesare analyzed for low and high pressure ratio applications using multistage compressorswith intercooling. Analytical solutions for the conventional cycles are developed includingthermal and fluid flow irreversibilities of the recuperators and all heat exchangers inaddition to the compression and expansion processes. Analytical solutions are used to findthe thermodynamic bounds for the performance of the cycles. Exergy irreversibilitydiagrams of the cycles are developed and the effects of important system parameters onRBR cycle performance are investigated. 2nd law/exergy analyses, and optimization of thecycles with intermediate cooling of the recuperator, considering the cooling temperatureand the recuperator effectiveness and pressure drop, are included. The effect of the 2ndlaw/exergy efficiency of the auxiliary cooler on the total system efficiencies is presented.

  11. Hybrid Stirling / Reverse Brayton and Multi-stage Brayton Cryocoolers for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkconnell, C. S.; Zagarola, M. V.; Russo, J. T.

    2006-04-01

    Space infrared (IR) sensor applications place demanding requirements on the cryogenic cooling system. These systems must typically have 8+ year life and very high reliability, typically >0.95 at eight years. This has been achieved by several companies, including Raytheon with Stirling-class machines and by Creare with reverse turbo Brayton (RTB) devices. Other requirements virtually always present for space cryocoolers include low mass, high efficiency, and low vibration output. For typical space infrared sensor cryogenic cooling applications, existing Stirling-class cryocoolers (which includes pulse tubes) excel relative to the RTB with respect to mass and often efficiency, but the RTB exports much less vibration. An additional requirement sometimes present for a given payload is that the refrigeration must be provided remotely, perhaps several meters from the ambient environment where the cryocooler machinery typically resides and to which the waste heat must be rejected. A Stirling-class machine cannot meet this last requirement unless it is coupled with a single- or two-phase pumped loop, a cryogenic heat pipe, or a recirculating cooling system. One approach is to combine a Stirling-class machine with a Joule-Thomson (JT) cooling system. Another approach, one that embodies important reliability and integration benefits, is to combine a Stirling-class cryocooler with a RTB cryocooler. The case study results for a particular Stirling-Brayton hybrid system are presented, along with a discussion of its integration characteristics. Such a hybrid system, if properly designed, accentuates the advantages and mitigates the weaknesses of the individual technologies. Finally, the hybrid approach is compared to a straightforward multi-stage RTB cryocooler.

  12. Thermally responsive polymer systems for self-healing, reversible adhesion and shape memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaofan

    Responsive polymers are "smart" materials that are capable of performing prescribed, dynamic functions under an applied stimulus. In this dissertation, we explore several novel design strategies to develop thermally responsive polymers and polymer composites for self-healing, reversible adhesion and shape memory applications. In the first case described in Chapters 2 and 3, a thermally triggered self-healing material was prepared by blending a high-temperature epoxy resin with a thermoplastic polymer, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL). The initially miscible system undergoes polymerization induced phase separation (PIPS) during the curing of epoxy and yields a variety of compositionally dependent morphologies. At a particular PCL loading, the cured blend displays a "bricks-and-mortar" morphology in which epoxy exists as interconnected spheres ("bricks") within a continuous PCL matrix ("mortar"). A heat induced "bleeding" phenomenon was observed in the form of spontaneous wetting of all free surfaces by the molten PCL, and is attributed to the volumetric thermal expansion of PCL above its melting point in excess of epoxy brick expansion, which we term differential expansive bleeding (DEB). This DEB is capable of healing damage such as cracks. In controlled self-healing experiments, heating of a cracked specimen led to PCL bleeding from the bulk that yields a liquid layer bridging the crack gap. Upon cooling, a "scar" composed of PCL crystals was formed at the site of the crack, restoring a significant portion of mechanical strength. We further utilized DEB to enable strong and thermally-reversible adhesion of the material to itself and to metallic substrates, without any requirement for macroscopic softening or flow. After that, Chapters 4--6 present a novel composite strategy for the design and fabrication of shape memory polymer composites. The basic approach involves physically combining two or more functional components into an interpenetrating fiber/matrix structure, allowing them to function in a synergistic fashion yet remain physically separated. This latter aspect is critical since it enables the control of overall composite properties and functions by separately tuning each component. Utilizing the intrinsic versatility of this approach, composites with novel properties and functions (in addition to "regular" shape memory) have been developed, including (1) shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs; Chapter 4), (2) triple-shape polymeric composites (TSPCs; Chapter 5), and (3) electrically conductive nanocomposites (Chapter 6). Then in Chapter 7, by combining the success in both thermoplastic based self-healing and shape memory polymer composites, we demonstrate a thermally triggered self-healing coating. This coating features a unique "shape memory assisted self-healing" mechanism in which crack closure (via shape memory) and crack re-bonding (via melting and diffusion of the thermoplastic healing agent) are achieved simultaneously upon a single heating step, leading to both structural and functional (corrosion resistance) recovery. Finally, Chapter 8 presents for the first time the preparation of functionally graded shape memory polymers (SMPs) that, unlike conventional SMPs, have a range of glass transition temperatures that are spatially graded. This was achieved using a temperature gradient curing method that imposes different vitrification limits at different positions along the gradient. The resulting material is capable of responding to a wide range of thermal triggers and a good candidate for low-cost, material based temperature sensors. All the aforementioned materials and methods show great potential for practical applications due to their high performance, low cost and broad applicability. Some recommendations for future research and development are given in Chapter 9.

  13. Designing a Multistage Supply Chain in Cross-Stage Reverse Logistics Environments: Application of Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Tzu-An; Che, Z. H.

    2014-01-01

    This study designed a cross-stage reverse logistics course for defective products so that damaged products generated in downstream partners can be directly returned to upstream partners throughout the stages of a supply chain for rework and maintenance. To solve this reverse supply chain design problem, an optimal cross-stage reverse logistics mathematical model was developed. In addition, we developed a genetic algorithm (GA) and three particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithms: the inertia weight method (PSOA_IWM), VMax method (PSOA_VMM), and constriction factor method (PSOA_CFM), which we employed to find solutions to support this mathematical model. Finally, a real case and five simulative cases with different scopes were used to compare the execution times, convergence times, and objective function values of the four algorithms used to validate the model proposed in this study. Regarding system execution time, the GA consumed more time than the other three PSOs did. Regarding objective function value, the GA, PSOA_IWM, and PSOA_CFM could obtain a lower convergence value than PSOA_VMM could. Finally, PSOA_IWM demonstrated a faster convergence speed than PSOA_VMM, PSOA_CFM, and the GA did. PMID:24772026

  14. Interactions of biomacromolecules with reverse hexagonal liquid crystals: drug delivery and crystallization applications.

    PubMed

    Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-04-15

    Recently, self-assembled lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) of lipids and water have attracted the attention of both scientific and applied research communities, due to their remarkable structural complexity and practical potential in diverse applications. The phase behavior of mixtures of glycerol monooleate (monoolein, GMO) was particularly well studied due to the potential utilization of these systems in drug delivery systems, food products, and encapsulation and crystallization of proteins. Among the studied lyotropic mesophases, reverse hexagonal LLC (H(II)) of monoolein/water were not widely subjected to practical applications since these were stable only at elevated temperatures. Lately, we obtained stable H(II) mesophases at room temperature by incorporating triacylglycerol (TAG) molecules into the GMO/water mixtures and explored the physical properties of these structures. The present feature article summarizes recent systematic efforts in our laboratory to utilize the H(II) mesophases for solubilization, and potential release and crystallization of biomacromolecules. Such a concept was demonstrated in the case of two therapeutic peptides-cyclosporin A (CSA) and desmopressin, as well as RALA peptide, which is a model skin penetration enhancer, and eventually a larger macromolecule-lysozyme (LSZ). In the course of the study we tried to elucidate relationships between the different levels of organization of LLCs (from the microstructural level, through mesoscale, to macroscopic level) and find feasible correlations between them. Since the structural properties of the mesophase systems are a key factor in drug release applications, we investigated the effects of these guest molecules on their conformations and the way these molecules partition within the domains of the mesophases. The examined H(II) mesophases exhibited great potential as transdermal delivery vehicles for bioactive peptides, enabling tuning the release properties according to their chemical composition and physical properties. Furthermore, we showed a promising opportunity for crystallization of CSA and LSZ in single crystal form as model biomacromolecules for crystallographic structure determination. The main outcomes of our research demonstrated that control of the physical properties of hexagonal LLC on different length scales is key for rational design of these systems as delivery vehicles and crystallization medium for biomacromolecules. PMID:21315366

  15. Genetic Network Programming with Actor-Critic and Its Application to Stock Trading Model

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Genetic Network Programming with Actor-Critic and Its Application to Stock Trading Model Shingo-Critic, GNP-AC), and Importance Index (IMX) is introduced for efficient stock trading decision making General Terms Algorithms Keywords Genetic Programming, Reinforcement Learning, Stock trad- ing model

  16. Rapid and Portable Genetic Identification Kits for World Health Applications Hsueh-Chia Chang

    E-print Network

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    and elsewhere in the third world include hemolytic uremic syndrome and bloody diarrhea (Escherichia coli O157:H7Rapid and Portable Genetic Identification Kits for World Health Applications Hsueh-Chia Chang motivate the need for a rapid and portable genetic identification kit whose design must be fundamentally

  17. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  18. Justice and Reverse Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alan H.

    Defining reverse discrimination as hiring or admissions decisions based on normally irrelevant criteria, this book develops principles of rights, compensation, and equal opportunity applicable to the reverse discrimination issue. The introduction defines the issue and discusses deductive and inductive methodology as applied to reverse

  19. A reverse osmosis treatment process for produced water: optimization, process control, and renewable energy application 

    E-print Network

    Mareth, Brett

    2009-06-02

    osmosis membranes were considered for demineralizing and desalinizing the water. Organo-clay adsorbant was found to be the most effective method for de-oiling, while reverse osmosis membranes were chosen over nanofiltration membranes due to superior...

  20. The application of reverse tubular medial upper arm flap in the reconstruction of ripped facial defects

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xianglin; Ma, Juan; Ma, Shaolin; Wen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Reverse medial upper arm flap is usually utilized in the reconstruction of defects in soft tissues of head and facial skin and is with good clinical efficacy. However, it has not been used in the reconstruction of ripped defects. In this study, we used the reverse tubular medial upper arm flap to repair the ripped facial defects. The reverse tubular skin flap from the medial upper arm was longitudinally cut into two parts. One part was used for the reconstruction of ripped facial defects. The other part was used as inner lining to repair the defects of mucosa. Using this method, 3 patients with ripped facial defects were successfully repaired. Thus the reverse tubular medial upper arm flap was successfully used in the reconstruction of ripped facial defects with little surgical trauma, simple manipulation of the operation, increased success rate of the operation and reduced incidence of complications. PMID:25550953

  1. Production of novel ebola virus-like particles from cDNAs: an alternative to ebola virus generation by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinji; Watanabe, Tokiko; Noda, Takeshi; Takada, Ayato; Feldmann, Heinz; Jasenosky, Luke D; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2004-01-01

    We established a plasmid-based system for generating infectious Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), which contain an Ebola virus-like minigenome consisting of a negative-sense copy of the green fluorescent protein gene. This system produced nearly 10(3) infectious particles per ml of supernatant, equivalent to the titer of Ebola virus generated by a reverse genetics system. Interestingly, infectious Ebola VLPs were generated, even without expression of VP24. Transmission and scanning electron microscopic analyses showed that the morphology of the Ebola VLPs was indistinguishable from that of authentic Ebola virus. Thus, this system allows us to study Ebola virus entry, replication, and assembly without biosafety level 4 containment. Furthermore, it may be useful in vaccine production against this highly pathogenic agent. PMID:14694131

  2. Reverse time migration: A seismic processing application on the connection machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiebrich, Rolf-Dieter

    1987-01-01

    The implementation of a reverse time migration algorithm on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel computer is described. Essential architectural features of this machine as well as programming concepts are presented. The data structures and parallel operations for the implementation of the reverse time migration algorithm are described. The algorithm matches the Connection Machine architecture closely and executes almost at the peak performance of this machine.

  3. Recent identity by descent in human genetic data - methods and applications 

    E-print Network

    Glodzik, Dominik

    2014-11-28

    The thesis describes algorithms for detecting regions of recent identity by descent (IBD) from human genetic data and its applications in optimising resequencing studies, genomic predictions and detecting Mendelian ...

  4. Epigenetics and Evolutionary Genetics The Department of Biological Science invites applications for tenure-track faculty

    E-print Network

    Bass, Hank W.

    Epigenetics and Evolutionary Genetics The Department of Biological Science invites applications. For more information see http://www.bio.fsu.edu/genphensearch/ . Epigenetics: Researchers investigating fundamental aspects of chromatin or RNA­ mediated regulation of phenotypic variation, epigenetic mechanisms

  5. Genetics of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Status and Possible Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most complex behavioral disorders with a strong genetic influence. The objectives of this article are to review the current status of genetic research in ASD, and to provide information regarding the potential candidate genes, mutations, and genetic loci possibly related to pathogenesis in ASD. Investigations on monogenic causes of ASD, candidate genes among common variants, rare de novo mutations, and copy number variations are reviewed. The current possible clinical applications of the genetic knowledge and their future possibilities are highlighted. PMID:26713075

  6. Rapid detection of genetically diverse tomato black ring virus isolates using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Budzy?ska, Daria; Borodynko, Natasza; Pospieszny, Henryk

    2015-12-01

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay (RT-LAMP) has been developed for detection of tomato black ring virus (TBRV) isolates collected from different hosts. One-step RT-LAMP was performed with a set of four primers, the design of which was based on the coat protein gene. Results of RT-LAMP were visualized by direct staining of products with fluorescent dyes, agarose gel electrophoresis, and analysis of amplification curves. The sensitivity of RT-LAMP was 100-fold greater than that of RT-PCR. The RT-LAMP assay developed here is a useful and practical method for diagnosis of TBRV. PMID:26338092

  7. Cystic fibrosis genetics: from molecular understanding to clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, Garry R.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of the human genome sequence and tools for interrogating individual genomes provide an unprecedented opportunity to apply genetics to medicine. Mendelian conditions, which are caused by dysfunction of a single gene, offer powerful examples that illustrate how genetics can provide insights into disease. Cystic fibrosis, one of the more common lethalautosomal recessive Mendelian disorders, is presented here as an example. Recent progress in elucidating disease mechanism and causes of phenotypic variation, as well as in the development of treatments, demonstrates that genetics continues to play an important part in cystic fibrosis research 25 years after the d iscove1y of the disease-causing gene. PMID:25404111

  8. Vasectomy Reversal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Home Urologic Conditions Vasectomy Reversal What is Vasectomy Reversal? Vasectomy Vasectomy is minor surgery to block ... their partners have had a vasectomy. What is Vasectomy Reversal? Vasectomy reversal reconnects the pathway for the ...

  9. Genetically engineered phage fibers and coatings for antibacterial applications

    E-print Network

    Mao, Joan Y

    2009-01-01

    Multifunctionality can be imparted to protein-based fibers and coatings via either synthetic or biological approaches. Here, we demonstrate potent antimicrobial functionality of genetically engineered, phage-based fibers ...

  10. Genetic type particle methods: An introduction with applications

    E-print Network

    Del Moral , Pierre

    . Evolutionary mathematics and engineering sciences ( 1970 s): Adaptive stochastic search method, evolutionary of particle/SMC in stochastic engineering : Physical and Biological intuitions [learning, adaptation Updating Genetic Algorithms Mutation Selection Evolutionary Population Exploration Branching Diffusion

  11. Genetic Algorithms applications to optimization and system identification 

    E-print Network

    Lin, Yun-Jeng

    1998-01-01

    Genetic Algorithms (GA) are very different from the traditional optimization techniques. GA is a new generation of artificial intelligence and its principles mimic the behavior of the biologic genes in the natural world. Its execution is simple...

  12. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINEAR TIME REVERSED ACOUSTICS (NLTRA) FOR APPLICATIONS TO CRACK DETECTION IN SOLIDS

    E-print Network

    and robustness of TRA (using Time Reversal Mirrors) to provide spatial and temporal focusing of an ultrasonic wave. A significance aspect of TRA is that it provides one the ability to focus an ultrasonic wave on the backside of the transducer using the laser vibrometer is shown in Fig

  14. Application of Hurst exponents to assess atrial reverse remodeling in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Julián, Matilde; Alcaraz, Raúl; Rieta, José J

    2015-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice. Although its termination mechanisms are not still completely known, previous works have reported significant electrocardiographic differences between immediately and non-immediately terminating episodes of paroxysmal AF (PAF). However, none studied how long these differences still hold as we move backward in time. The present work studies a time interval long enough to identify earlier signs forecasting atrial reverse remodeling that will provoke spontaneous AF termination. Reverse remodeling was estimated by measuring AF organisation with the second-order generalised Hurst exponent, H(2), which provided the highest accuracy. Organisation is associated with the number of simultaneous reentries in the atria, which plays a key role in reverse remodeling, thus causing arrhythmia termination. The computation of H(2) depended on two critical parameters: the analysed interval length (L) and the maximum search window for self-similarities ([Formula: see text]). A study with 660 combinations on these two parameters was performed together with the sampling frequency ([Formula: see text]) of the recording. The results reported that optimal computational parameters are L???=???15 s, [Formula: see text] milliseconds and [Formula: see text] Hz. A statistically significant organisation increase was observed during the last 2 min before AF termination, thus suggesting that reverse remodeling only occurs very close to the termination event. PMID:26393825

  15. APPLICATION OF A SPRAY DEPOSITION METHOD FOR REVERSED PHASE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four coal gasification wastewater samples were analyzed for nonvolatile and polar organics by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Samples were separated on a reverse phase liquid chromatographic column using an aqueous solvent as the eluant. A special spray depositio...

  16. Development and characterization of a reverse genetic system for studying dengue virus serotype 3 strain variation and neutralization.

    PubMed

    Messer, William B; Yount, Boyd; Hacker, Kari E; Donaldson, Eric F; Huynh, Jeremy P; de Silva, Aravinda M; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) are enveloped single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses transmitted by Aedes spp. mosquitoes. There are four genetically distinct serotypes designated DENV-1 through DENV-4, each further subdivided into distinct genotypes. The dengue scientific community has long contended that infection with one serotype confers lifelong protection against subsequent infection with the same serotype, irrespective of virus genotype. However this hypothesis is under increased scrutiny and the role of DENV genotypic variation in protection from repeated infection is less certain. As dengue vaccine trials move increasingly into field-testing, there is an urgent need to develop tools to better define the role of genotypic variation in DENV infection and immunity. To better understand genotypic variation in DENV-3 neutralization and protection, we designed and constructed a panel of isogenic, recombinant DENV-3 infectious clones, each expressing an envelope glycoprotein from a different DENV-3 genotype; Philippines 1982 (genotype I), Thailand 1995 (genotype II), Sri Lanka 1989 and Cuba 2002 (genotype III) and Puerto Rico 1977 (genotype IV). We used the panel to explore how natural envelope variation influences DENV-polyclonal serum interactions. When the recombinant viruses were tested in neutralization assays using immune sera from primary DENV infections, neutralization titers varied by as much as ?19-fold, depending on the expressed envelope glycoprotein. The observed variability in neutralization titers suggests that relatively few residue changes in the E glycoprotein may have significant effects on DENV specific humoral immunity and influence antibody mediated protection or disease enhancement in the setting of both natural infection and vaccination. These genotypic differences are also likely to be important in temporal and spatial microevolution of DENV-3 in the background of heterotypic neutralization. The recombinant and synthetic tools described here are valuable for testing hypotheses on genetic determinants of DENV-3 immunopathogenesis. PMID:22389731

  17. QTL x Genetic Background Interaction: Application to Predicting Progeny Value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Failures of the additive infinitesimal model continue to provide incentive to study other modes of gene action, in particular, epistasis. Epistasis can be modeled as a QTL by genetic background interaction. Association mapping models lend themselves to fitting such an interaction because they often ...

  18. Application of Genetic/Genomic Approaches to Allergic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baye, Tesfaye M.; Martin, Lisa J.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2010-01-01

    Completion of the human genome project and rapid progress in genetics and bioinformatics have enabled the development of large public databases, which include genetic and genomic data linked to clinical health data. With the massive amount of information available, clinicians and researchers have the unique opportunity to complement and integrate their daily practice with the existing resources to clarify the underlying etiology of complex phenotypes such as allergic diseases. The genome itself is now often utilized as a starting point for many studies and multiple innovative approaches have emerged applying genetic/genomic strategies to key questions in the field of allergy and immunology. There have been several successes, which have uncovered new insights into the biologic underpinnings of allergic disorders. Herein, we will provide an in depth review of genomic approaches to identifying genes and biologic networks involved in allergic diseases. We will discuss genetic and phenotypic variation, statistical approaches for gene discovery, public databases, functional genomics, clinical implications, and the challenges that remain. PMID:20638111

  19. GENETIC MARKERS AND THEIR APPLICATION IN POULTRY BREEDING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current chicken genetic map contains at least 1,965 loci within 50 linkage groups and it covers about 4,000 cM. About 235 of these loci have homology with known human or mammalian genes. The remaining loci are anonymous molecular DNA markers, including microsatellites, AFLP, RAPD, CR1 and othe...

  20. Clinical Application of Antenatal Genetic Diagnosis of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type IV

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Li, Song; Xu, YeYe; Cong, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical analysis and genetic testing of a family with osteogenesis imperfecta type IV were conducted, aiming to discuss antenatal genetic diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type IV. Material/Methods Preliminary genotyping was performed based on clinical characteristics of the family members and then high-throughput sequencing was applied to rapidly and accurately detect the changes in candidate genes. Results Genetic testing of the III5 fetus and other family members revealed missense mutation in c.2746G>A, pGly916Arg in COL1A2 gene coding region and missense and synonymous mutation in COL1A1 gene coding region. Conclusions Application of antenatal genetic diagnosis provides fast and accurate genetic counseling and eugenics suggestions for patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type IV and their families. PMID:25835785

  1. A reverse genetics system for the Great Lakes strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus: the NV gene is required for pathogenicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ammayappan, Arun; Kurath, Gael; Thompson, Tarin M.; Vakharia, Vikram N.

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), belonging to the genus Novirhabdovirus in the family of Rhabdoviridae, causes a highly contagious disease of fresh and saltwater fish worldwide. Recently, a novel genotype of VHSV, designated IVb, has invaded the Great Lakes in North America, causing large-scale epidemics in wild fish. An efficient reverse genetics system was developed to generate a recombinant VHSV of genotype IVb from cloned cDNA. The recombinant VHSV (rVHSV) was comparable to the parental wild-type strain both in vitro and in vivo, causing high mortality in yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A modified recombinant VHSV was generated in which the NV gene was substituted with an enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (rVHSV-?NV-EGFP), and another recombinant was made by inserting the EGFP gene into the full-length viral clone between the P and M genes (rVHSV-EGFP). The in vitro replication kinetics of rVHSV-EGFP was similar to rVHSV; however, the rVHSV-?NV-EGFP grew 2 logs lower. In yellow perch challenges, wtVHSV and rVHSV induced 82-100% cumulative per cent mortality (CPM), respectively, whereas rVHSV-EGFP produced 62% CPM and rVHSV-?NV-EGFP caused only 15% CPM. No reversion of mutation was detected in the recovered viruses and the recombinant viruses stably maintained the foreign gene after several passages. These results indicate that the NV gene of VHSV is not essential for viral replication in vitro and in vivo, but it plays an important role in viral replication efficiency and pathogenicity. This system will facilitate studies of VHSV replication, virulence, and production of viral vectored vaccines.

  2. Genetic algorithms and genetic programming for multiscale modeling: Applications in materials science and chemistry and advances in scalability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, Kumara Narasimha

    2007-03-01

    Effective and efficient rnultiscale modeling is essential to advance both the science and synthesis in a, wide array of fields such as physics, chemistry, materials science; biology, biotechnology and pharmacology. This study investigates the efficacy and potential of rising genetic algorithms for rnultiscale materials modeling and addresses some of the challenges involved in designing competent algorithms that solve hard problems quickly, reliably and accurately. In particular, this thesis demonstrates the use of genetic algorithms (GAs) and genetic programming (GP) in multiscale modeling with the help of two non-trivial case studies in materials science and chemistry. The first case study explores the utility of genetic programming (GP) in multi-timescaling alloy kinetics simulations. In essence, GP is used to bridge molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods to span orders-of-magnitude in simulation time. Specifically, GP is used to regress symbolically an inline barrier function from a limited set of molecular dynamics simulations to enable kinetic Monte Carlo that simulate seconds of real time. Results on a non-trivial example of vacancy-assisted migration on a surface of a face-centered cubic (fcc) Copper-Cobalt (CuxCo 1-x) alloy show that GP predicts all barriers with 0.1% error from calculations for less than 3% of active configurations, independent of type of potentials used to obtain the learning set of barriers via molecular dynamics. The resulting method enables 2--9 orders-of-magnitude increase in real-time dynamics simulations taking 4--7 orders-of-magnitude less CPU time. The second case study presents the application of multiobjective genetic algorithms (MOGAs) in multiscaling quantum chemistry simulations. Specifically, MOGAs are used to bridge high-level quantum chemistry and semiempirical methods to provide accurate representation of complex molecular excited-state and ground-state behavior. Results on ethylene and benzene---two common building blocks in organic chemistry---indicate that MOGAs produce High-quality semiempirical methods that (1) are stable to small perturbations, (2) yield accurate configuration energies on untested and critical excited states, and (3) yield ab initio quality excited-state dynamics. The proposed method enables simulations of more complex systems to realistic, multi-picosecond timescales, well beyond previous attempts or expectation of human experts, and 2--3 orders-of-magnitude reduction in computational cost. While the two applications use simple evolutionary operators, in order to tackle more complex systems, their scalability and limitations have to be investigated. The second part of the thesis addresses some of the challenges involved with a successful design of genetic algorithms and genetic programming for multiscale modeling. The first issue addressed is the scalability of genetic programming, where facetwise models are built to assess the population size required by GP to ensure adequate supply of raw building blocks and also to ensure accurate decision-making between competing building blocks. This study also presents a design of competent genetic programming, where traditional fixed recombination operators are replaced by building and sampling probabilistic models of promising candidate programs. The proposed scalable GP, called extended compact GP (eCGP), combines the ideas from extended compact genetic algorithm (eCGA) and probabilistic incremental program evolution (PIPE) and adaptively identifies, propagates and exchanges important subsolutions of a search problem. Results show that eCGP scales cubically with problem size on both GP-easy and GP-hard problems. Finally, facetwise models are developed to explore limitations of scalability of MOGAs, where the scalability of multiobjective algorithms in reliably maintaining Pareto-optimal solutions is addressed. The results show that even when the building blocks are accurately identified, massive multimodality of the search problems can easily overwhelm the nicher (diversity preserving operator) and l

  3. Local application of SCH 39166 reversibly and dose-dependently decreases acetylcholine release in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Acquas, E; Di Chiara, G

    1999-11-01

    The effect of local application by reverse dialysis of the dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist (-)-trans-6,7,7a,8,9, 13b-exahydro-3-chloro-2-hydroxy-N-methyl-5H-benzo-[d]-nap hto-[2, 1b]-azepine hydrochloride (SCH 39166) on acetylcholine release was studied in awake, freely moving rats implanted with concentric microdialysis probes in the dorsal striatum. In these experiments, the reversible acetylcholine esterase inhibitor, neostigmine, was added to the perfusion solution at two different concentrations, 0.01 and 0.1 microM. SCH 39166 (1, 5 and 10 microM), in the presence of 0.01 microM neostigmine, reversibly decreased striatal acetylcholine release (1 microM SCH 39166 by 8+/-4%; 5 microM SCH 39166 by 24+/-5%; 10 microM SCH 39166 by 27+/-7%, from basal). Similarly, SCH 39166, applied in the presence of a higher neostigmine concentration (0.1 microM), decreased striatal acetylcholine release by 14+/-4% at 1 microM, by 28+/-8% at 5 microM and by 30+/-5% at 10 microM, in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. These results are consistent with the existence of a facilitatory tone of dopamine on striatal acetylcholine transmission mediated by dopamine D(1) receptors located on striatal cholinergic interneurons. PMID:10594319

  4. Quantitative reverse sample genome probing of microbial communities and its application to oil field production waters

    SciTech Connect

    Voordouw, G.; Shen, Y.; Harrington, C.S.; Teland, A.J. ); Jack, T.R. ); Westlake, W.S. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper presents a protocol for quantitative analysis of microbial communities by reverse sample genome probing is presented in which (i) whole community DNA is isolated and labeled in the presence of a known amount of an added internal standard and (ii) the resulting spiked reverse genome probe is hybridized with a master filter on which denatured genomic DNAs from bacterial standards isolated from the target environment were spotted in large amounts (up to 1,500 ng) in order to improve detection sensitivity. This protocol allowed reproducible fingerprinting of the microbial community in oil field production waters at 19 sites from which water and biofilm samples were collected. It appeared that selected sulfate-reducing bacteria were significantly enhanced in biofilms covering the metal surfaces in contact with the production waters.

  5. Quantitative Reverse Sample Genome Probing of Microbial Communities and Its Application to Oil Field Production Waters

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Shen, Yin; Harrington, Clare S.; Telang, Anita J.; Jack, Thomas R.; Westlake, Donald W. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a protocol for quantitative analysis of microbial communities by reverse sample genome probing is presented in which (i) whole community DNA is isolated and labeled in the presence of a known amount of an added internal standard and (ii) the resulting spiked reverse genome probe is hybridized with a master filter on which denatured genomic DNAs from bacterial standards isolated from the target environment were spotted in large amounts (up to 1,500 ng) in order to improve detection sensitivity. This protocol allowed reproducible fingerprinting of the microbial community in oil field production waters at 19 sites from which water and biofilm samples were collected. It appeared that selected sulfate-reducing bacteria were significantly enhanced in biofilms covering the metal surfaces in contact with the production waters. Images PMID:16349111

  6. Next-generation sequencing technologies and applications for human genetic history and forensics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advances in the development of sequencing technologies in recent years have enabled an increasing number of applications in biology and medicine. Here, we review key technical aspects of the preparation of DNA templates for sequencing, the biochemical reaction principles and assay formats underlying next-generation sequencing systems, methods for imaging and base calling, quality control, and bioinformatic approaches for sequence alignment, variant calling and assembly. We also discuss some of the most important advances that the new sequencing technologies have brought to the fields of human population genetics, human genetic history and forensic genetics. PMID:22115430

  7. An Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA mutagenized population (GABI-Kat) for flanking sequence tag-based reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Mario G; Li, Yong; Strizhov, Nicolai; Reiss, Bernd; Dekker, Koen; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2003-09-01

    The GABI-Kat population of T-DNA mutagenized Arabidopsis thaliana lines with sequence-characterized insertion sites is used extensively for efficient progress in plant functional genomics. Here we provide details about the establishment of the material, demonstrate the population's functionality and discuss results from quality control studies. T-DNA insertion mutants of the accession Columbia (Col-0) were created by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. To allow selection of transformed plants under greenhouse conditions, a sulfadiazine resistance marker was employed. DNA from leaves of T1 plants was extracted and used as a template for PCR-based amplification of DNA fragments spanning insertion site borders. After sequencing, the data were placed in a flanking sequence tag (FST) database describing which mutant allele was present in which line. Analysis of the distribution of T-DNA insertions revealed a clear bias towards intergenic regions. Insertion sites appeared more frequent in regions in front of the ATG and after STOP codons of predicted genes. Segregation analysis for sulfadiazine resistance showed that 62% of the transformants contain an insertion at only one genetic locus. In quality control studies with gene-specific primers in combination with T-DNA primers, 76% of insertions could be confirmed. Finally, the functionality of the GABI-Kat population was demonstrated by exemplary confirmation of several new transparent testa alleles, as well as a number of other mutants, which were identified on the basis of the FST data. PMID:14756321

  8. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  9. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  10. Reverse engineering biological networks :applications in immune responses to bio-toxins.

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Anthony A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Thomas, Edward Victor; Slepoy, Alexander; Zhang, Zhaoduo; May, Elebeoba Eni; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-12-01

    Our aim is to determine the network of events, or the regulatory network, that defines an immune response to a bio-toxin. As a model system, we are studying T cell regulatory network triggered through tyrosine kinase receptor activation using a combination of pathway stimulation and time-series microarray experiments. Our approach is composed of five steps (1) microarray experiments and data error analysis, (2) data clustering, (3) data smoothing and discretization, (4) network reverse engineering, and (5) network dynamics analysis and fingerprint identification. The technological outcome of this study is a suite of experimental protocols and computational tools that reverse engineer regulatory networks provided gene expression data. The practical biological outcome of this work is an immune response fingerprint in terms of gene expression levels. Inferring regulatory networks from microarray data is a new field of investigation that is no more than five years old. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt that integrates experiments, error analyses, data clustering, inference, and network analysis to solve a practical problem. Our systematic approach of counting, enumeration, and sampling networks matching experimental data is new to the field of network reverse engineering. The resulting mathematical analyses and computational tools lead to new results on their own and should be useful to others who analyze and infer networks.

  11. Identification of a new genetic variant of bovine beta-casein using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Visser, S; Slangen, C J; Lagerwerf, F M; Van Dongen, W D; Haverkamp, J

    1995-09-01

    Various components of the beta-casein fraction from bovine milk were separated by preparative reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). They included the genetic variants beta A1, beta A2, beta A3, and an unknown component previously denoted beta X [S. Visser et al., J. Chromatogr. 548 (1991) 361-370]. Tryptic digests of these components were compared by RP-HPLC and most peaks were analysed by mass spectrometry (MS). The tryptic map of beta X was closest to that of beta A1, but with a few mutually different peak components. Electrospray ionisation MS revealed that in the beta X map these components had relative molecular masses of 16 higher than the corresponding ones in the beta A1 map. The main differential peaks represented the 114-169 fragments of beta A1 and beta X, respectively, which were both purified and then cleaved with cyanogen bromide. In the resulting mixtures, each of which contained three fragments, the corresponding peptides representing the 145-156 sequence showed the 16 relative molecular mass difference. In beta X this sequence contained a Leu residue at position 152 instead of the Pro-152 in beta A1, as established by fast-atom bombardment MS-MS. The Leu could be discriminated from an Ile residue by the presence of a side-chain-specific, D-type fragment ion in the MS-MS spectrum of the beta X CNBr peptide. The sequence of the two homologous 145-156 fragments was confirmed by regular amino acid sequence analysis. In accordance with internationally accepted guidelines for the nomenclature of milk proteins, the new genetic variant has been named beta-casein F-5P. PMID:7496485

  12. Cassava genetic transformation and its application in breeding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Zheng, Qijie; Ma, Qiuxiang; Gadidasu, Kranthi Kumar; Zhang, Peng

    2011-07-01

    As a major source of food, cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important root crop in the tropics and subtropics of Africa and Latin America, and serves as raw material for the production of starches and bioethanol in tropical Asia. Cassava improvement through genetic engineering not only overcomes the high heterozygosity and serious trait separation that occurs in its traditional breeding, but also quickly achieves improved target traits. Since the first report on genetic transformation in cassava in 1996, the technology has gradually matured over almost 15 years of development and has overcome cassava genotype constraints, changing from mode cultivars to farmer-preferred ones. Significant progress has been made in terms of an increased resistance to pests and diseases, biofortification, and improved starch quality, building on the fundamental knowledge and technologies related to planting, nutrition, and the processing of this important food crop that has often been neglected. Therefore, cassava has great potential in food security and bioenergy development worldwide. PMID:21564542

  13. Clinical application of exome sequencing in undiagnosed genetic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Need, Anna C; Shashi, Vandana; Hitomi, Yuki; Schoch, Kelly; Shianna, Kevin V; McDonald, Marie T; Meisler, Miriam H

    2012-01-01

    Background There is considerable interest in the use of next-generation sequencing to help diagnose unidentified genetic conditions, but it is difficult to predict the success rate in a clinical setting that includes patients with a broad range of phenotypic presentations. Methods The authors present a pilot programme of whole-exome sequencing on 12 patients with unexplained and apparent genetic conditions, along with their unaffected parents. Unlike many previous studies, the authors did not seek patients with similar phenotypes, but rather enrolled any undiagnosed proband with an apparent genetic condition when predetermined criteria were met. Results This undertaking resulted in a likely genetic diagnosis in 6 of the 12 probands, including the identification of apparently causal mutations in four genes known to cause Mendelian disease (TCF4, EFTUD2, SCN2A and SMAD4) and one gene related to known Mendelian disease genes (NGLY1). Of particular interest is that at the time of this study, EFTUD2 was not yet known as a Mendelian disease gene but was nominated as a likely cause based on the observation of de novo mutations in two unrelated probands. In a seventh case with multiple disparate clinical features, the authors were able to identify homozygous mutations in EFEMP1 as a likely cause for macular degeneration (though likely not for other features). Conclusions This study provides evidence that next-generation sequencing can have high success rates in a clinical setting, but also highlights key challenges. It further suggests that the presentation of known Mendelian conditions may be considerably broader than currently recognised. PMID:22581936

  14. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  15. Brainbow: new resources and emerging biological applications for multicolor genetic labeling and analysis.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Tamily A; Pan, Y Albert

    2015-02-01

    Brainbow is a genetic cell-labeling technique where hundreds of different hues can be generated by stochastic and combinatorial expression of a few spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins. Unique color profiles can be used as cellular identification tags for multiple applications such as tracing axons through the nervous system, following individual cells during development, or analyzing cell lineage. In recent years, Brainbow and other combinatorial expression strategies have expanded from the mouse nervous system to other model organisms and a wide variety of tissues. Particularly exciting is the application of Brainbow in lineage tracing, where this technique has been instrumental in parsing out complex cellular relationships during organogenesis. Here we review recent findings, new technical improvements, and exciting potential genetic and genomic applications for harnessing this colorful technique in anatomical, developmental, and genetic studies. PMID:25657347

  16. Version 3 June 25, 1996 for Handbook of Evolutionary Computation. Future Work and Practical Applications of Genetic Programming

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Applications of Genetic Programming John R. Koza Computer Science Department Stanford University 258 Gates@CS.Stanford.Edu WWW ADDRESS: http://www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~koza/ ABSTRACT Genetic programming is a relatively avenues for possible future research on genetic programming, opportunities to extend the technique

  17. Multivariate Analysis and Reverse Engineering of Signal Transduction Pathways

    E-print Network

    Fournier, John J.F.

    been used to study genetic networks are introduced. Fi- nally, a reverse engineering method intended Engineering of Genetic Networks 48 3.1 Discrete Boolean NetworksMultivariate Analysis and Reverse Engineering of Signal Transduction Pathways by Amy Norris B

  18. Molecular Identification and Genetic Analysis of Norovirus Genogroups I and II in Water Environments: Comparative Analysis of Different Reverse Transcription-PCR Assays?

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, G.; Fontana, S.; Di Grazia, A.; Iaconelli, M.; Pourshaban, M.; Muscillo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Noroviruses have received increased attention in recent years because their role as etiologic agents in acute gastroenteritis outbreaks is now clearly established. Our inability to grow them in cell culture and the lack of an animal model hinder the characterization of these viruses. More recently, molecular approaches have been used to study the genetic relationships that exist among them. In the present study, environmental samples from seawater, estuarine water, and effluents of sewage treatment plants were analyzed in order to evaluate the role of environmental surface contamination as a possible vehicle for transmission of norovirus genogroups I and II. Novel broad-range reverse transcription-PCR/nested assays targeting the region coding for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were developed, amplifying fragments of 516 bp and 687 bp in the nested reactions for genogroups II and I, respectively. The assays were evaluated and compared against widely used published assays. The newly designed assays provide long regions for high-confidence BLAST searches in public databases and therefore are useful diagnostic tools for molecular diagnosis and typing of human noroviruses in clinical and environmental samples, as well as for the study of molecular epidemiology and the evolution of these viruses. PMID:17483265

  19. Noninvasive Genetic Techniques and itsNoninvasive Genetic Techniques and its Application in Wildlife ConservationApplication in Wildlife Conservation

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    Regurgitates Found at roosting sitesFound at roosting sites of owlsof owls UrineUrine Wolf and wolverine studiesWolf and wolverine studies ApplicationsApplications #12;9 Abundance EstimationAbundance Estimation Obtaining reliable

  20. Gyroviscous stability theory with application to the internal tilt mode of a field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhauer, L.C. ); Ishida, A. )

    1990-10-01

    The variational formulation for a gyroviscous fluid plasma is constructed. This theory offers a fluid-based description of perpendicular kinetic effects, generally called finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects. This approach avoids the complexity of a more complete kinetic treatment and avoids local singularities that can appear in the standard FLR expansion treatment. The method is applied to the internal tilt mode of a field-reversed configuration (FRC), an instance where standard FLR theory clearly breaks down. The relative simplicity of the variational gyroviscous fluid theory allows easy computation of stability properties, including the scaling of marginal stability conditions.

  1. A General Reversible Hereditary Constitutive Model. Part 2; Application to a Titanium Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Saleeb, A. F.; Castelli, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    Given the mathematical framework and specific viscoelastic model in Part 1 our primary goal in this second part is focused on model characterization and assessment for the specific titanium alloy, TIMETAL 21S. The model is motivated by experimental evidence suggesting the presence of significant rate/time effects in the so-called quasilinear, reversible, material response range. An explanation of the various experiments performed and their corresponding results are also included. Finally, model correlations and predictions are presented for a wide temperature range.

  2. Almost isometries of non-reversible metrics with applications to stationary spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaloyes, Miguel Angel; Lichtenfelz, Leandro; Piccione, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    We develop the basics of a theory of almost isometries for spaces endowed with a quasi-metric. The case of non-reversible Finsler (more specifically, Randers) metrics is of particular interest, and it is studied in more detail. The main motivation arises from General Relativity, and more specifically in spacetimes endowed with a timelike conformal field K, in which case conformal diffeomorphisms correspond to almost isometries of the Fermat metrics defined in the spatial part. A series of results on the topology and the Lie group structure of conformal maps are discussed.

  3. The Concentration Dependence of the (Delta)s Term in the Gibbs Free Energy Function: Application to Reversible Reactions in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Ronald K.

    2004-01-01

    The concentration dependence of (delta)S term in the Gibbs free energy function is described in relation to its application to reversible reactions in biochemistry. An intuitive and non-mathematical argument for the concentration dependence of the (delta)S term in the Gibbs free energy equation is derived and the applicability of the equation to…

  4. The Application and Performance of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Population Genetic Analyses of Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Brad Steven; Bayles, Darrell O.; Wanner, Kevin W.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Hellmich, Richard L.; Sappington, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite markers are difficult to apply within lepidopteran studies due to the lack of locus-specific PCR amplification and the high proportion of “null” alleles, such that erroneous estimations of population genetic parameters often result. Herein single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are developed from Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) using next generation expressed sequence tag (EST) data. A total of 2742 SNPs were predicted within a reference assembly of 7414 EST contigs, and a subset of 763 were incorporated into 24 multiplex PCR reactions. To validate this pipeline, 5 European and North American sample sites were genotyped at 178 SNP loci, which indicated 84 (47.2%) were in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Locus-by-locus FST, analysis of molecular variance, and STRUCTURE analyses indicate significant genetic differentiation may exist between European and North American O. nubilalis. The observed genetic diversity was significantly lower among European sites, which may result from genetic drift, natural selection, a genetic bottleneck, or ascertainment bias due to North American origin of EST sequence data. SNPs are an abundant source of mutation data for molecular genetic marker development in non-model species, with shared ancestral SNPs showing application within closely related species. These markers offer advantages over microsatellite markers for genetic and genomic analyses of Lepidoptera, but the source of mutation data may affect the estimation of population parameters and likely need to be considered in the interpretation of empirical data. PMID:22303334

  5. Water uptake in barley grain: Physiology; genetics and industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Cu, Suong; Collins, Helen M; Betts, Natalie S; March, Timothy J; Janusz, Agnieszka; Stewart, Doug C; Skadhauge, Birgitte; Eglinton, Jason; Kyriacou, Bianca; Little, Alan; Burton, Rachel A; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2016-01-01

    Water uptake by mature barley grains initiates germination and is the first stage in the malting process. Here we have investigated the effects of starchy endosperm cell wall thickness on water uptake, together with the effects of varying amounts of the wall polysaccharide, (1,3;1,4)-?-glucan. In the latter case, we examined mutant barley lines from a mutant library and transgenic barley lines in which the (1,3;1,4)-?-glucan synthase gene, HvCslF6, was down-regulated by RNA interference. Neither cell wall thickness nor the levels of grain (1,3;1,4)-?-glucan were significantly correlated with water uptake but are likely to influence modification during malting. However, when a barley mapping population was phenotyped for rate of water uptake into grain, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified specific regions of chromosomes 4H, 5H and 7H that accounted for approximately 17%, 18% and 11%, respectively, of the phenotypic variation. These data indicate that variation in water uptake rates by elite malting cultivars of barley is genetically controlled and a number of candidate genes that might control the trait were identified under the QTL. The genomics data raise the possibility that the genetic variation in water uptake rates might be exploited by breeders for the benefit of the malting and brewing industries. PMID:26566843

  6. Non-Genetic Engineering Approaches for Isolating and Generating Novel Yeasts for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, P. J.; Bellon, J. R.; Schmidt, S. A.; Varela, C.; Pretorius, I. S.

    Generating novel yeast strains for industrial applications should be quite straightforward; after all, research into the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of Baker's Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has paved the way for many advances in the modern biological sciences. We probably know more about this humble eukaryote than any other, and it is the most tractable of organisms for manipulation using modern genetic engineering approaches. In many countries, however, there are restrictions on the use of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs), particularly in foods and beverages, and the level of consumer acceptance of GMOs is, at best, variable. Thus, many researchers working with industrial yeasts use genetic engineering techniques primarily as research tools, and strain development continues to rely on non-GM technologies. This chapter explores the non-GM tools and strategies available to such researchers.

  7. Genetic Programming and its Application to Analyze Dynamical Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Ming-Yi.

    In the past few decades, the growing interest in nonlinear dynamical systems has stimulated the development of numerical methods for analyzing these systems. The research reported in this dissertation is concerned with improving numerical methods for analyzing models that are represented by a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODE's). One of the most common ways to numerically study the ODE's of nonlinear dynamical systems is the direct integration of the ODE's from selected initial values. Such methods are numerous, and new ones continue to be developed. All such methods suffer from the same drawback: They are most used in conducting what are essentially computer experiments, yielding information about steady states, periodic or chaotic orbits and their basins of attraction asymptotically and at great cost of computer resources and user overhead. More powerful numerical analysis tools for dynamical systems make use of continuation methods. Beginning from a known steady state or periodic state, such methods can track the state as external parameters are changed and can locate values of the parameters at which the behavior of the system changes qualitatively. Although such methods represent a great improvement in efficiency over direct numerical integration, they have one principal drawback, i.e., a stationary solution must be found before continuation methods can be used. Typically, this is a difficult task in the numerical analysis of dynamical systems, especially for those systems which exhibit many steady and/or periodic states. In this dissertation, a brief review of types of behavior and bifurcations might exist in dynamical systems is presented. Conventional numerical methods to analyze them are also discussed, along with their drawbacks. Genetic Programming is then introduced to analyze the behavior of dynamical systems. It is used to study the existence of (multiple) steady states, to locate those points (bifurcations) at which the behavior of dynamical systems changes qualitatively, and to trace out bifurcation branches in a two-parameter space. Some ideas proposed to improve the performance of Genetic Programming are also discussed, along with their limitations. Several new directions for further improvement of Genetic Programming to analyze dynamical systems are also presented.

  8. A "Reverse-Schur" Approach to Optimization With Linear PDE Constraints: Application to Biomolecule Analysis and Design.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Altman, Michael D; Tidor, B; White, Jacob K

    2009-01-01

    We present a partial-differential-equation (PDE)-constrained approach for optimizing a molecule's electrostatic interactions with a target molecule. The approach, which we call reverse-Schur co-optimization, can be more than two orders of magnitude faster than the traditional approach to electrostatic optimization. The efficiency of the co-optimization approach may enhance the value of electrostatic optimization for ligand-design efforts-in such projects, it is often desirable to screen many candidate ligands for their viability, and the optimization of electrostatic interactions can improve ligand binding affinity and specificity. The theoretical basis for electrostatic optimization derives from linear-response theory, most commonly continuum models, and simple assumptions about molecular binding processes. Although the theory has been used successfully to study a wide variety of molecular binding events, its implications have not yet been fully explored, in part due to the computational expense associated with the optimization. The co-optimization algorithm achieves improved performance by solving the optimization and electrostatic simulation problems simultaneously, and is applicable to both unconstrained and constrained optimization problems. Reverse-Schur co-optimization resembles other well-known techniques for solving optimization problems with PDE constraints. Model problems as well as realistic examples validate the reverse-Schur method, and demonstrate that our technique and alternative PDE-constrained methods scale very favorably compared to the standard approach. Regularization, which ordinarily requires an explicit representation of the objective function, can be included using an approximate Hessian calculated using the new BIBEE/P (boundary-integral-based electrostatics estimation by preconditioning) method. PMID:23055839

  9. Application of Adjoint Methodology to Supersonic Aircraft Design Using Reversed Equivalent Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to shape an aircraft to equivalent area based objectives using the discrete adjoint approach. Equivalent areas can be obtained either using reversed augmented Burgers equation or direct conversion of off-body pressures into equivalent area. Formal coupling with CFD allows computation of sensitivities of equivalent area objectives with respect to aircraft shape parameters. The exactness of the adjoint sensitivities is verified against derivatives obtained using the complex step approach. This methodology has the benefit of using designer-friendly equivalent areas in the shape design of low-boom aircraft. Shape optimization results with equivalent area cost functionals are discussed and further refined using ground loudness based objectives.

  10. A low distorsion and reversible watermark: application to angiographic images of the retina.

    PubMed

    Coatrieux, G; Puentes, J; Roux, C; Lamard, M; Daccache, W

    2005-01-01

    Medical image security can be enhanced using watermarking, which allows embedding the protection information as a digital signature, by modifying the pixel gray levels of the image. In this paper we propose a reversible watermarking scheme which guarantees that once the embedded message is read, alterations introduced during the insertion process can be removed from the image. Thereafter, original pixel gray levels of the image are restored. The proposed approach relies on estimation of image signal that is invariant to the insertion process, and permits to introduce a very slight watermark within the image. In fact, the insertion process adds or subtracts at least one gray level to the pixels of the original image. Depending on the image to be watermarked, in our case angiographic images of the retina, it is expected that such image alteration will not have any impact on the diagnosis quality, and consequently that the watermark can be kept within the image while this one is interpreted. PMID:17282674

  11. Biometric Hashing Based on Genetic Selection and Its Application to On-Line Signatures

    E-print Network

    Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

    Biometric Hashing Based on Genetic Selection and Its Application to On-Line Signatures Manuel R. Freire, Julian Fierrez, Javier Galbally, and Javier Ortega-Garcia Biometric Recognition Group - ATVS a general biometric hash generation scheme based on vector quantization of multiple feature subsets selected

  12. The application and performance of single nucleotide polymorphism markers for population genetic analyses of Lepidoptera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are nucleotide substitution mutations that tend to be at high densities within eukaryotic genomes. The development of assays that detect allelic variation at SNP loci is attractive for genome mapping, population genetics, and phylogeographic applications. A p...

  13. Optimization of meander line antennas for RFID applications by using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucuci, Stefania C.; Anchidin, Liliana; Dumitrascu, Ana; Danisor, Alin; Berescu, Serban; Tamas, Razvan D.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach of optimization of meander line antennas by using genetic algorithm. Such antennas are used in RFID applications. As opposed to other approaches for meander antennas, we propose the use of only two optimization objectives, i.e. gain and size. As an example, we have optimized a single meander dipole antenna, resonating at 869 MHz.

  14. Parallelized genetic optimization of spatial light modulator addressing for diffractive applications.

    PubMed

    Haist, Tobias; Lingel, Christian; Adler, Rodolfo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We describe a new technique for optimizing the addressing of spatial light modulators in dynamic holographic applications. The method utilizes 200 times parallelization using imaging of subholograms in combination with genetic optimization. Compared to a fixed linear addressing curve for all different gratings, the diffraction efficiency can be improved by up to 25% for a Holoeye Pluto LCoS modulator. PMID:24663371

  15. STATISTICAL MODEL AND GENETIC OPTIMIZATION: APPLICATION TO PATTERN DETECTION IN SONAR IMAGES

    E-print Network

    STATISTICAL MODEL AND GENETIC OPTIMIZATION: APPLICATION TO PATTERN DETECTION IN SONAR IMAGES M by a high resolution sonar. A prior knowledge of the manufactured object shadow shape is described allows to determine the presence of the desired ob- ject in the sonar image. This method has been

  16. STATISTICAL MODEL AND GENETIC OPTIMIZATION: APPLICATION TO PATTERN DETECTION IN SONAR IMAGES

    E-print Network

    Mignotte, Max

    STATISTICAL MODEL AND GENETIC OPTIMIZATION: APPLICATION TO PATTERN DETECTION IN SONAR IMAGES M by a high resolution sonar. A prior knowledge of the manufactured object shadow shape is described allows to determine the presence of the desired ob­ ject in the sonar image. This method has been

  17. Credit card fraud detection: An application of the gene expression messy genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Kargupta, H.; Gattiker, J.R.; Buescher, K.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes an application of the recently introduced gene expression messy genetic algorithm (GEMGA) (Kargupta, 1996) for detecting fraudulent transactions of credit cards. It also explains the fundamental concepts underlying the GEMGA in the light of the SEARCH (Search Envisioned As Relation and Class Hierarchizing) (Kargupta, 1995) framework.

  18. On The Design of Genetic Algorithms for Geographical Applications S. van Dijk

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    On The Design of Genetic Algorithms for Geographical Applications S. van Dijk PO Box 80.089 3508 TB optimization problems, the linkage (which determines the structure of building blocks) is determined by the spa) stores geo- graphical data like the shape of countries, the height of mountains, the course of rivers

  19. Application of The Method of Elastic Maps In Analysis of Genetic Texts A. N. GORBAN

    E-print Network

    Gorban, Alexander N.

    Application of The Method of Elastic Maps In Analysis of Genetic Texts A. N. GORBAN Institute molecular biology collect huge amounts of information that needs intelligent data mining. The basic property in the multidimensional space. Fig 1. Node, edge and rib Fig 2. Elastic nets used in practice Lets define elastic net

  20. Stock Portfolio Evaluation: An Application of Genetic-Programming-Based Technical Analysis

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Stock Portfolio Evaluation: An Application of Genetic- Programming-Based Technical Analysis Liad to predictability of stock. When attempting to create an efficient portfolio of stocks, there are numerous factors. By using a set of fitness heuristics over a population of stock portfolios, the goal is to find a portfolio

  1. Identification of the Mechanisms Causing Reversion to Virulence in an Attenuated SARS-CoV for the Design of a Genetically Stable Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Perlman, Stanley; Enjuanes, Luis

    2015-10-01

    A SARS-CoV lacking the full-length E gene (SARS-CoV-?E) was attenuated and an effective vaccine. Here, we show that this mutant virus regained fitness after serial passages in cell culture or in vivo, resulting in the partial duplication of the membrane gene or in the insertion of a new sequence in gene 8a, respectively. The chimeric proteins generated in cell culture increased virus fitness in vitro but remained attenuated in mice. In contrast, during SARS-CoV-?E passage in mice, the virus incorporated a mutated variant of 8a protein, resulting in reversion to a virulent phenotype. When the full-length E protein was deleted or its PDZ-binding motif (PBM) was mutated, the revertant viruses either incorporated a novel chimeric protein with a PBM or restored the sequence of the PBM on the E protein, respectively. Similarly, after passage in mice, SARS-CoV-?E protein 8a mutated, to now encode a PBM, and also regained virulence. These data indicated that the virus requires a PBM on a transmembrane protein to compensate for removal of this motif from the E protein. To increase the genetic stability of the vaccine candidate, we introduced small attenuating deletions in E gene that did not affect the endogenous PBM, preventing the incorporation of novel chimeric proteins in the virus genome. In addition, to increase vaccine biosafety, we introduced additional attenuating mutations into the nsp1 protein. Deletions in the carboxy-terminal region of nsp1 protein led to higher host interferon responses and virus attenuation. Recombinant viruses including attenuating mutations in E and nsp1 genes maintained their attenuation after passage in vitro and in vivo. Further, these viruses fully protected mice against challenge with the lethal parental virus, and are therefore safe and stable vaccine candidates for protection against SARS-CoV. PMID:26513244

  2. Identification of the Mechanisms Causing Reversion to Virulence in an Attenuated SARS-CoV for the Design of a Genetically Stable Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Perlman, Stanley; Enjuanes, Luis

    2015-01-01

    A SARS-CoV lacking the full-length E gene (SARS-CoV-?E) was attenuated and an effective vaccine. Here, we show that this mutant virus regained fitness after serial passages in cell culture or in vivo, resulting in the partial duplication of the membrane gene or in the insertion of a new sequence in gene 8a, respectively. The chimeric proteins generated in cell culture increased virus fitness in vitro but remained attenuated in mice. In contrast, during SARS-CoV-?E passage in mice, the virus incorporated a mutated variant of 8a protein, resulting in reversion to a virulent phenotype. When the full-length E protein was deleted or its PDZ-binding motif (PBM) was mutated, the revertant viruses either incorporated a novel chimeric protein with a PBM or restored the sequence of the PBM on the E protein, respectively. Similarly, after passage in mice, SARS-CoV-?E protein 8a mutated, to now encode a PBM, and also regained virulence. These data indicated that the virus requires a PBM on a transmembrane protein to compensate for removal of this motif from the E protein. To increase the genetic stability of the vaccine candidate, we introduced small attenuating deletions in E gene that did not affect the endogenous PBM, preventing the incorporation of novel chimeric proteins in the virus genome. In addition, to increase vaccine biosafety, we introduced additional attenuating mutations into the nsp1 protein. Deletions in the carboxy-terminal region of nsp1 protein led to higher host interferon responses and virus attenuation. Recombinant viruses including attenuating mutations in E and nsp1 genes maintained their attenuation after passage in vitro and in vivo. Further, these viruses fully protected mice against challenge with the lethal parental virus, and are therefore safe and stable vaccine candidates for protection against SARS-CoV. PMID:26513244

  3. Reversible loss of gravitropic sensitivity in maize roots after tip application of calcium chelators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The application of calcium chelating agents (EDTA or EGTA) to the tips of maize roots caused a loss of gravitropic sensitivity. When the chelator was replaced with calcium chloride, gravitropic sensitivity was restored. Asymmetric application of calcium chloride near the tip of a vertical root caused curvature toward the calcium source. When the calcium was applied to the upper surface of the tip of a root oriented horizontally, the root curved upward even though control roots exhibited strong downward curvature. Application of calcium chloride to the tips of decapped roots, which are known to be gravitropically insensitive, did not restore gravitropic sensitivity. However, asymmetric application of calcium chloride near the tips of decapped roots caused curvature toward the calcium source. Calcium may play a key role in linking gravity detection to gravitropic curvature in roots.

  4. Application of genetic algorithm on optimization of laser beam shaping.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Fang, Yi-Chin; Lin, Chia-Te

    2015-06-15

    This study proposes a newly developed optimization method for an aspherical lens system employed in a refractive laser beam shaping system, which performs transformations on laser spots such that they are transformed into flat-tops of any size. In this paper, a genetic algorithm (GA) with multipoint search is proposed as the optimization method, together with macro language in optical simulation software, in order to search for ideal and optimized parameters. In comparison to a traditional two-dimensional (2D) computational method, using the one-dimensional (1D) computation for laser beam shaping can search for the optimal solution approximately twice as fast (after experiments). The optimal results show that when the laser spot shrinks from 3 mm to 1.07 mm, 88% uniformity is achieved, and when the laser spot increases from 3 mm to 5.273 mm, 90% uniformity is achieved. The distances between the lenses for both systems described above are even smaller than the thickness for the first lens, enabling us to conclude that our design objectives of extra light and slimness in the system are achieved. PMID:26193566

  5. Performance and cost of energy transport and storage systems for dish applications using reversible chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schredder, J. M.; Fujita, T.

    1984-01-01

    The use of reversible chemical reactions for energy transport and storage for parabolic dish networks is considered. Performance and cost characteristics are estimated for systems using three reactions (sulfur-trioxide decomposition, steam reforming of methane, and carbon-dioxide reforming of methane). Systems are considered with and without storage, and in several energy-delivery configurations that give different profiles of energy delivered versus temperature. Cost estimates are derived assuming the use of metal components and of advanced ceramics. (The latter reduces the costs by three- to five-fold). The process that led to the selection of the three reactions is described, and the effects of varying temperatures, pressures, and heat exchanger sizes are addressed. A state-of-the-art survey was performed as part of this study. As a result of this survey, it appears that formidable technical risks exist for any attempt to implement the systems analyzed in this study, especially in the area of reactor design and performance. The behavior of all components and complete systems under thermal energy transients is very poorly understood. This study indicates that thermochemical storage systems that store reactants as liquids have efficiencies below 60%, which is in agreement with the findings of earlier investigators.

  6. Application of modified reverse panoramic radiograph on lambdoid suture for age estimation

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedy, Shweta; Sah, Kunal; Sinha, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Background Cranial suture closure has long been recognized as a character of human development related to aging. For this reason, it has been utilized for various forensic and archaeological studies to determine the age of an unidentified/or skeletonized individuals. Various cadaveric studies have established the role of lambdoid suture in age estimation, but not routinely practiced. The objective is to establish if any correlation exists between individual’s age and lambdoid sutures closure status (ectocranially) in mortals through modified reverse panoramic radiograph (RPRg). Methods Total number of 85 subjects, 25 years and beyond were included in the study, and divided into four groups with an age interval of 10 years. Assessment of lambdoid suture closure was done according to Frederic Rating Scale on modified RPRg. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using Spearman’s correlation test. Results A significant difference was observed between the age group and suture closure. Correlation coefficient of 0.570 was obtained, and was interpreted as a good correlation between the age and suture closure status with a P value of <0.001. Conclusions Lambdoid suture can be very effective and practical tool for age assessment in mortals through modified RPRg (ectocranially). PMID:26435915

  7. Modelling liquid crystal elastomers and potential application as a reversibly switchable adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, James

    2013-03-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are rubbery materials that composed of liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) crosslinked into a network. The rod-like mesogens incorporated into the LCPs are have random orientations in the high temperature isotropic phase, but can adopt the canonical liquid crystalline phases as the temperature is lowered. Smectic liquid crystal elastomers have highly anisotropic mechanical behaviour. This arises in side chain smectic-A systems because the smectic layers behave as if they are embedded in the rubber matrix. The macroscopic mechanical behaviour of these solids is sensitive to the buckling of the layers, so is a multiscale problem. A coarse grained free energy that includes the fine-scale buckling of the layers has been developed, which enables continuum modelling of these systems. In the first part of this talk I present a model of the mechanical behaviour of side chain smectic elastomers. The properties of nematic LCEs, such as their high loss tangent, and mechanical strain hardening, might enable them to be used as reversibly switchable pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA). PSAs are typically made from viscoelastic polymers. The quality of their adhesion can be measured by the tack energy, which is the work required to separate two bodies. To obtain a high tack energy a PSA should be capable of a large strain. It should strain soften at low strain to produce crack blunting, and then strain harden at high strain to stiffen the fibrils formed late in the debonding process. I will present a model of the tack energy of weakly crosslinked nematic polymers. To describe the constitutive properties of this system the nematic dumbbell model of Maffettone et al. was used. This constutitive model was then combined with the block model of Yamaguchi et al. describing PSAs. It was found that the parallel orientation of the nematic has a higher tack energy than both the isotropic and the perpendicular director orientation. Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) are rubbery materials that composed of liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) crosslinked into a network. The rod-like mesogens incorporated into the LCPs are have random orientations in the high temperature isotropic phase, but can adopt the canonical liquid crystalline phases as the temperature is lowered. Smectic liquid crystal elastomers have highly anisotropic mechanical behaviour. This arises in side chain smectic-A systems because the smectic layers behave as if they are embedded in the rubber matrix. The macroscopic mechanical behaviour of these solids is sensitive to the buckling of the layers, so is a multiscale problem. A coarse grained free energy that includes the fine-scale buckling of the layers has been developed, which enables continuum modelling of these systems. In the first part of this talk I present a model of the mechanical behaviour of side chain smectic elastomers. The properties of nematic LCEs, such as their high loss tangent, and mechanical strain hardening, might enable them to be used as reversibly switchable pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA). PSAs are typically made from viscoelastic polymers. The quality of their adhesion can be measured by the tack energy, which is the work required to separate two bodies. To obtain a high tack energy a PSA should be capable of a large strain. It should strain soften at low strain to produce crack blunting, and then strain harden at high strain to stiffen the fibrils formed late in the debonding process. I will present a model of the tack energy of weakly crosslinked nematic polymers. To describe the constitutive properties of this system the nematic dumbbell model of Maffettone et al. was used. This constutitive model was then combined with the block model of Yamaguchi et al. describing PSAs. It was found that the parallel orientation of the nematic has a higher tack energy than both the isotropic and the perpendicular director orientation. This work is supported by EPSRC EP/I01277X/1, and SEPnet.

  8. Application of reverse dot blot hybridization to simultaneous detection and identification of harmful algae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo Fu; Zhang, Chun Yun; Wang, Yuan Yuan; Chen, Wen

    2015-07-01

    Warning and monitoring projects of harmful algal blooms require simple and rapid methods for simultaneous and accurate detection and identification of causative algae present in the environmental samples. Here, reverse dot blot hybridization (RDBH) was employed to simultaneously detect several harmful algae by using five representative bloom-forming microalgae along the Chinese coast. A set of specific probes for RDBH were developed by PCR, cloning, and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), alignment analysis, and probe design. Each probe was oligo (dT)-tailed and spotted onto positively charged nylon membrane to make up a low-density oligonucleotide array. Universal primers designed within the conserved regions were used to amplify the ITS sequences by using genomic DNA of target as templates. The digoxigenin (Dig)-labeled PCR products were denatured and then hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. The array produced a unique hybridization pattern for each target species differentiating them from each other. The preparations of oligonucleotide array and hybridization conditions were optimized. The developed RDBH demonstrated a detection limit up to 10 cells. The detection performance of RDBH was relatively stable and not affected by non-target species and the fixation time of target species over at least 30 days. The RDBH could recover all the target species from the simulated field samples and target species confirmed by the subsequent microscopy examination in the environmental samples. These results indicate that RDBH can be a new technical platform for parallel discrimination of harmful algae and is promising for environmental monitoring of these microorganisms. PMID:25731086

  9. Genetic programme of cardiogenesis: implications for therapeutic application

    PubMed Central

    van Tuyn, J.; de Vries, A.A.F.; van der Laarse, A.; Schalij, M.J.; van der Wall, E.E.; Atsma, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    It has become accepted that new cardiomyocytes can be derived from stem cells. Although the potential for therapeutic application is evident, the reported efficiency of differentiation varies greatly from 0.02 to 54%. To obtain clinically relevant numbers of newly differentiated cardiac cells, stem cell differentiation should be as efficient as possible. A plausible way to increase the efficiency of differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes is through the introduction of cardiac specific regulatory genes in the stem cells. This review summarises the role of several key transcription factors in cardiogenesis. PMID:25696254

  10. An Advanced Reverse Osmosis Technology For Application in Nuclear Desalination Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, J.R.; Davies, K.; Ackert, J.A.

    2002-07-01

    The lack of adequate supplies of clean, safe water is a growing global problem that has reached crisis proportions in many parts of the world. It is estimated that 1.5 billion people do not have access to adequate supplies of safe water, and that as a result nearly 10,000 people die every day and thousands more suffer from a range of debilitating illnesses due to water related diseases. Included in this total is an estimated 2.2 million child deaths annually. As the world's need for additional sources of fresh water continues to grow, seawater and brackish water desalination are providing an increasingly important contribution to the solution of this problem. Because desalination is an energy intensive process, nuclear desalination provides an economically attractive and environmentally sound alternative to the burning of fossil fuels for desalination. Nevertheless, the enormity of the problem dictates that additional steps must be taken to improve the efficiency of energy utilization and reduce the cost of water production in order to reduce the financial and environmental burden to communities in need. An advanced reverse osmosis (RO) desalination technology has been developed that emphasizes a nontraditional approach to system design and operation, and makes use of a sophisticated design optimization process that can lead to highly optimized design configurations and operating regimes. The technology can be coupled with a nuclear generating station (NGS) to provide an integrated facility for the co-generation of both water and electricity. Waste heat from the NGS allows the use of 'preheated' feedwater into the RO system, improving the efficiency of the RO process and reducing the cost of water production. Because waste heat, rather than process heat, is used the desalination system can be readily coupled to any existing or advanced reactor technology with little or no impact on reactor design and operation and without introducing additional reactor safety considerations. Analyses of nuclear desalination systems employing this advanced RO technology under a variety of seawater feed conditions have consistently shown that the cost of potable water production can be reduced by as much as 15-20% relative to systems designed in a more traditional manner. Demonstration testing has been carried out using a trailer mounted system producing up to 150 m{sup 3}/d of potable water. Experimental results from the demonstration testing are behaving as expected based on the analytical performance models, validating the advanced design concept and confirming that the performance improvements indicated by the analyses can be achieved in operating systems. Further demonstration testing is planned using a 1000 m{sup 3}/d containerized system, currently under design, coupled to an existing nuclear power reactor. (authors)

  11. Plastid genomics in horticultural species: importance and applications for plant population genetics, evolution, and biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Marcelo; do Nascimento Vieira, Leila; Fraga, Hugo P.; Guerra, Miguel P.

    2015-01-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, plastids, and mitochondria arose from an endosymbiotic process, which determined the presence of three genetic compartments into the incipient plant cell. After that, these three genetic materials from host and symbiont suffered several rearrangements, bringing on a complex interaction between nuclear and organellar gene products. Nowadays, plastids harbor a small genome with ?130 genes in a 100–220 kb sequence in higher plants. Plastid genes are mostly highly conserved between plant species, being useful for phylogenetic analysis in higher taxa. However, intergenic spacers have a relatively higher mutation rate and are important markers to phylogeographical and plant population genetics analyses. The predominant uniparental inheritance of plastids is like a highly desirable feature for phylogeny studies. Moreover, the gene content and genome rearrangements are efficient tools to capture and understand evolutionary events between different plant species. Currently, genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages as high-level of foreign protein expression, marker gene excision, gene expression in operon and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Therefore, plastid genome can be used for adding new characteristics related to synthesis of metabolic compounds, biopharmaceutical, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we describe the importance and applications of plastid genome as tools for genetic and evolutionary studies, and plastid transformation focusing on increasing the performance of horticultural species in the field. PMID:26284102

  12. Applications in genetic risk estimation of data on the induction of dominant skeletal mutations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies on the induction of dominant skeleton mutations and of dominant cataract mutations provide means of estimating genetic hazard to humans from radiation. The breeding-test method of studying the induction of dominant skeletal mutations is slow and cumbersome. In an attempt to devise a more rapid method, three non-breeding-test methods have been developed which are likely to have wider application in mutagenicity testing. (ACR)

  13. BB Seminar: Methods application to genetic variants for smoking & lung cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Methods developed for causal mediation analysis with a dichotomous outcome, applicable to case-control studies via prevalence weighting will be presented. These methods generalize traditional approaches to mediation in the social sciences by allowing for interactions and non-linear models. Methods for sensitivity analysis for unmeasured confounding and measurement error in the context of mediated effects will be described. The methodology is used to resolve a question concerning direct and indirect effects in genetic epidemiology.

  14. Using genetic algorithms to map first-principles results to model Hamiltonians: Application to the generalized Ising model for alloys

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    Using genetic algorithms to map first-principles results to model Hamiltonians: Application. We describe a genetic algorithm which automates this task. To avoid a possible trapping in a locally to the generalized Ising model for alloys Volker Blum,1, * Gus L. W. Hart,2 Michael J. Walorski,3 and Alex Zunger1 1

  15. Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 14 (2001) 114 Genetic adaptive control for an inverted wedge: experiments and

    E-print Network

    2001-01-01

    Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 14 (2001) 1­14 Genetic adaptive control. Passino* Department of Electrical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH and real-time implementation issues will be discussed and the genetic adaptive strategy will be compared

  16. Application of a reversible chemical reaction system to solar thermal power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanseth, E. J.; Won, Y. S.; Seibowitz, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    Three distributed dish solar thermal power systems using various applications of SO2/SO3 chemical energy storage and transport technology were comparatively assessed. Each system features various roles for the chemical system: (1) energy storage only, (2) energy transport, or (3) energy transport and storage. These three systems were also compared with the dish-Stirling, using electrical transport and battery storage, and the central receiver Rankine system, with thermal storage, to determine the relative merit of plants employing a thermochemical system. As an assessment criterion, the busbar energy costs were compared. Separate but comparable solar energy cost computer codes were used for distributed receiver and central receiver systems. Calculations were performed for capacity factors ranging from 0.4 to 0.8. The results indicate that SO2/SO3 technology has the potential to be more cost effective in transporting the collected energy than in storing the energy for the storage capacity range studied (2-15 hours)

  17. Simulating Population Genetics of Pathogen Vectors in Changing Landscapes: Guidelines and Application with Triatoma brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Rebaudo, Francois; Costa, Jane; Almeida, Carlos E.; Silvain, Jean-Francois; Harry, Myriam; Dangles, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms that influence the population dynamics and spatial genetic structure of the vectors of pathogens infecting humans is a central issue in tropical epidemiology. In view of the rapid changes in the features of landscape pathogen vectors live in, this issue requires new methods that consider both natural and human systems and their interactions. In this context, individual-based model (IBM) simulations represent powerful yet poorly developed approaches to explore the response of pathogen vectors in heterogeneous social-ecological systems, especially when field experiments cannot be performed. Methodology/Principal Findings We first present guidelines for the use of a spatially explicit IBM, to simulate population genetics of pathogen vectors in changing landscapes. We then applied our model with Triatoma brasiliensis, originally restricted to sylvatic habitats and now found in peridomestic and domestic habitats, posing as the most important Trypanosoma cruzi vector in Northeastern Brazil. We focused on the effects of vector migration rate, maximum dispersal distance and attraction by domestic habitat on T. brasiliensis population dynamics and spatial genetic structure. Optimized for T. brasiliensis using field data pairwise fixation index (FST) from microsatellite loci, our simulations confirmed the importance of these three variables to understand vector genetic structure at the landscape level. We then ran prospective scenarios accounting for land-use change (deforestation and urbanization), which revealed that human-induced land-use change favored higher genetic diversity among sampling points. Conclusions/Significance Our work shows that mechanistic models may be useful tools to link observed patterns with processes involved in the population genetics of tropical pathogen vectors in heterogeneous social-ecological landscapes. Our hope is that our study may provide a testable and applicable modeling framework to a broad community of epidemiologists for formulating scenarios of landscape change consequences on vector dynamics, with potential implications for their surveillance and control. PMID:25102068

  18. Should There Be An Obligation of Disclosure of Origin of Genetic Resources in Patent Applications? Learning Lessons from Developing Countries 

    E-print Network

    Laurie, Graeme

    2005-01-01

    The article discusses whether there should be an obligation of disclosure of origin of genetic resources in patent applications. In particular, Laurie comments on the evolving relations of the intellectual property world ...

  19. Molecular characterization with RAPD-PCR: Application of genetic diagnostics to biological control of the sweetpotato whitefly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The application of genetic diagnostics under the umbrella of classical taxonomy was imperative for successful development and delivery of the biological control program against the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius biotype B (= silverleaf whitefly, B. argentifolii Bellows and Perring)....

  20. Genetic algorithm based task reordering to improve the performance of batch scheduled massively parallel scientific applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Angel, Jordan; Brown, W. Michael

    2015-04-08

    The growth in size of networked high performance computers along with novel accelerator-based node architectures has further emphasized the importance of communication efficiency in high performance computing. The world's largest high performance computers are usually operated as shared user facilities due to the costs of acquisition and operation. Applications are scheduled for execution in a shared environment and are placed on nodes that are not necessarily contiguous on the interconnect. Furthermore, the placement of tasks on the nodes allocated by the scheduler is sub-optimal, leading to performance loss and variability. Here, we investigate the impact of task placement on themore »performance of two massively parallel application codes on the Titan supercomputer, a turbulent combustion flow solver (S3D) and a molecular dynamics code (LAMMPS). Benchmark studies show a significant deviation from ideal weak scaling and variability in performance. The inter-task communication distance was determined to be one of the significant contributors to the performance degradation and variability. A genetic algorithm-based parallel optimization technique was used to optimize the task ordering. This technique provides an improved placement of the tasks on the nodes, taking into account the application's communication topology and the system interconnect topology. As a result, application benchmarks after task reordering through genetic algorithm show a significant improvement in performance and reduction in variability, therefore enabling the applications to achieve better time to solution and scalability on Titan during production.« less

  1. Genetic algorithm based task reordering to improve the performance of batch scheduled massively parallel scientific applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Angel, Jordan; Brown, W. Michael

    2015-04-08

    The growth in size of networked high performance computers along with novel accelerator-based node architectures has further emphasized the importance of communication efficiency in high performance computing. The world's largest high performance computers are usually operated as shared user facilities due to the costs of acquisition and operation. Applications are scheduled for execution in a shared environment and are placed on nodes that are not necessarily contiguous on the interconnect. Furthermore, the placement of tasks on the nodes allocated by the scheduler is sub-optimal, leading to performance loss and variability. Here, we investigate the impact of task placement on the performance of two massively parallel application codes on the Titan supercomputer, a turbulent combustion flow solver (S3D) and a molecular dynamics code (LAMMPS). Benchmark studies show a significant deviation from ideal weak scaling and variability in performance. The inter-task communication distance was determined to be one of the significant contributors to the performance degradation and variability. A genetic algorithm-based parallel optimization technique was used to optimize the task ordering. This technique provides an improved placement of the tasks on the nodes, taking into account the application's communication topology and the system interconnect topology. As a result, application benchmarks after task reordering through genetic algorithm show a significant improvement in performance and reduction in variability, therefore enabling the applications to achieve better time to solution and scalability on Titan during production.

  2. The ontology of genetic susceptibility factors (OGSF) and its application in modeling genetic susceptibility to vaccine adverse events

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to human variations in genetic susceptibility, vaccination often triggers adverse events in a small population of vaccinees. Based on our previous work on ontological modeling of genetic susceptibility to disease, we developed an Ontology of Genetic Susceptibility Factors (OGSF), a biomedical ontology in the domain of genetic susceptibility and genetic susceptibility factors. The OGSF framework was then applied in the area of vaccine adverse events (VAEs). Results OGSF aligns with the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO). OGSF defines ‘genetic susceptibility’ as a subclass of BFO:disposition and has a material basis ‘genetic susceptibility factor’. The ‘genetic susceptibility to pathological bodily process’ is a subclasses of ‘genetic susceptibility’. A VAE is a type of pathological bodily process. OGSF represents different types of genetic susceptibility factors including various susceptibility alleles (e.g., SNP and gene). A general OGSF design pattern was developed to represent genetic susceptibility to VAE and associated genetic susceptibility factors using experimental results in genetic association studies. To test and validate the design pattern, two case studies were populated in OGSF. In the first case study, human gene allele DBR*15:01 is susceptible to influenza vaccine Pandemrix-induced Multiple Sclerosis. The second case study reports genetic susceptibility polymorphisms associated with systemic smallpox VAEs. After the data of the Case Study 2 were represented using OGSF-based axioms, SPARQL was successfully developed to retrieve the susceptibility factors stored in the populated OGSF. A network of data from the Case Study 2 was constructed by using ontology terms and individuals as nodes and ontology relations as edges. Different social network analys is (SNA) methods were then applied to verify core OGSF terms. Interestingly, a SNA hub analysis verified all susceptibility alleles of SNPs and a SNA closeness analysis verified the susceptibility genes in Case Study 2. These results validated the proper OGSF structure identified different ontology aspects with SNA methods. Conclusions OGSF provides a verified and robust framework for representing various genetic susceptibility types and genetic susceptibility factors annotated from experimental VAE genetic association studies. The RDF/OWL formulated ontology data can be queried using SPARQL and analyzed using centrality-based network analysis methods. PMID:24963371

  3. Reversal of acute complex regional pain syndrome using the practical application of neurodiagnostic evaluation process: a case study.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, a patient in my practice developed complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1) after bunion surgery. The condition was properly diagnosed within 4 weeks with a diagnostic technique that I routinely use to diagnose chronic musculoskeletal pain, and it was successfully treated. The tests, which are based on primitive and postural reflexes in infants, were adapted to reflect normal and abnormal motor behaviors in adults after provocation of reflexes of the autonomic nervous system (afferent C fibers in peripheral nerves). Approximately 60 days after my patient's operation, the tests indicated a positive reflex at the posterior tibial nerve in the operated foot. Surgery to remove an accessory ossicle from the talus adjacent to this nerve resolved the CRPS 1 within 2 weeks. Since CRPS 1 is a dysfunctional state of the autonomic regulatory control of pain, it was postulated that a test based on autonomic nerve function could isolate the source of CRPS 1. The Practical Application of Neurodiagnostic Evaluation process was shown to be diagnostic for the cause of acute CRPS 1 and to allow its reversal. Further evaluation of the test for diagnosis and treatment of CRPS is needed. PMID:24355904

  4. Preparation and application of reversed phase Chromatorotor for the isolation of natural products by centrifugal preparative chromatography.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Ilias; Samoylenko, Volodymyr; Machumi, Francis; Zakia, Mohamed Ahmed; Mohammed, Rabab; Hetta, Mona H; Gillum, Van

    2013-03-01

    A method of preparation of rotors with a reversed phase (RP) solid silica gel sorbent layer has been developed for centrifugal preparative chromatography (CPC), also known as rotational planar chromatography (RPC). The rotors consist of binder free RP solid SiO2 layers of different thicknesses packed between two supported circular glass discs and can be used in any appropriate device for centrifugal chromatography, like Chromatotron and CycloGraph. Polar and /or semi-polar compounds with close R(f) values, as well as extracts and column fractions were separated and/or purified in a preparative and/or semi-preparative scale using the RP rotors, eluted with mixtures of aqueous-based solvents. We herein report three examples of its application, using RP Chromatorotors, for the isolation of the diastereoisomeric alkaloids banistenosides I and II from Banisteriopsis caapi, saponins III and IV from Fagonia cretica, and the sesquiterpenes artemisinin (V) and artemisinic acid (VI) from Artemisia annua. PMID:23678798

  5. Applications of Population Genetics to Animal Breeding, from Wright, Fisher and Lush to Genomic Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Hill, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Although animal breeding was practiced long before the science of genetics and the relevant disciplines of population and quantitative genetics were known, breeding programs have mainly relied on simply selecting and mating the best individuals on their own or relatives’ performance. This is based on sound quantitative genetic principles, developed and expounded by Lush, who attributed much of his understanding to Wright, and formalized in Fisher’s infinitesimal model. Analysis at the level of individual loci and gene frequency distributions has had relatively little impact. Now with access to genomic data, a revolution in which molecular information is being used to enhance response with “genomic selection” is occurring. The predictions of breeding value still utilize multiple loci throughout the genome and, indeed, are largely compatible with additive and specifically infinitesimal model assumptions. I discuss some of the history and genetic issues as applied to the science of livestock improvement, which has had and continues to have major spin-offs into ideas and applications in other areas. PMID:24395822

  6. New application of intelligent agents in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies unexpected specific genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Penco, Silvana; Buscema, Massimo; Patrosso, Maria Cristina; Marocchi, Alessandro; Grossi, Enzo

    2008-01-01

    Background Few genetic factors predisposing to the sporadic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have been identified, but the pathology itself seems to be a true multifactorial disease in which complex interactions between environmental and genetic susceptibility factors take place. The purpose of this study was to approach genetic data with an innovative statistical method such as artificial neural networks to identify a possible genetic background predisposing to the disease. A DNA multiarray panel was applied to genotype more than 60 polymorphisms within 35 genes selected from pathways of lipid and homocysteine metabolism, regulation of blood pressure, coagulation, inflammation, cellular adhesion and matrix integrity, in 54 sporadic ALS patients and 208 controls. Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis Results Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis. An unexpected discovery of a strong genetic background in sporadic ALS using a DNA multiarray panel and analytical processing of the data with advanced artificial neural networks was found. The predictive accuracy obtained with Linear Discriminant Analysis and Standard Artificial Neural Networks ranged from 70% to 79% (average 75.31%) and from 69.1 to 86.2% (average 76.6%) respectively. The corresponding value obtained with Advanced Intelligent Systems reached an average of 96.0% (range 94.4 to 97.6%). This latter approach allowed the identification of seven genetic variants essential to differentiate cases from controls: apolipoprotein E arg158cys; hepatic lipase -480 C/T; endothelial nitric oxide synthase 690 C/T and glu298asp; vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor seven arg353glu, glycoprotein Ia/IIa 873 G/A and E-selectin ser128arg. Conclusion This study provides an alternative and reliable method to approach complex diseases. Indeed, the application of a novel artificial intelligence-based method offers a new insight into genetic markers of sporadic ALS pointing out the existence of a strong genetic background. PMID:18513389

  7. 47MCGAUGH ET AL. Applications of Modern Genetic Tools Defining Turtle Diversity: Proceedings of a Workshop on Genetics, Ethics, and Taxonomy of Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises

    E-print Network

    Feldman, Chris R

    in studies of conser- vation, evolution, and ecology of turtles. We show how standard approaches such as DNA to traditional field practices in illuminating the evolution and ecology of turtles. We illustrate how standard47MCGAUGH ET AL. ­ Applications of Modern Genetic Tools Defining Turtle Diversity: Proceedings

  8. Application of quantitative metabolomics in systems genetics in rodent models of complex phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gauguier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided remarkable advances in our understanding of the etiology of complex diseases in humans and have underlined the need to improve patients' phenotype characterization with intermediate molecular phenotypes. High resolution metabolomics is becoming an increasingly popular and robust strategy for metabolic phenotyping large cohorts of patients and controls in genetic studies, in order to map the genetic control of metabotypes in various biological matrices (organ extracts and biofluids) through Quantitative Trait Locus (mQTL) analysis. This article reviews results from ongoing research in mQTL mapping in rodent models of human complex traits, with a specific focus on the cardiometabolic syndrome, and prospects of applications of untargeted metabolomics to improve knowledge of multilevel genome expression control in health and disease and to detect potential novel biomarkers for complex phenotypes in experimental systems in mice and rats. PMID:26391925

  9. Defect Band Luminescence Intensity Reversal as Related to Application of Anti-Reflection Coating on mc-Si PV Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrey, H.; Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Gorman, B.; Al-Jassim, M.

    2012-06-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) imaging is widely used to identify defective regions within mc-Si PV cells. Recent PL imaging investigations of defect band luminescence (DBL) in mc-Si have revealed a perplexing phenomenon. Namely, the reversal of the DBL intensity in various regions of mc-Si PV material upon the application of a SiNx:H anti-reflective coating (ARC). Regions with low DBL intensity before ARC application often exhibit high DBL intensity afterwards, and the converse is also true. PL imaging alone cannot explain this effect. We have used high resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy and electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques to elucidate the origin of the DBL intensity reversal. Multiple sub-bandgap energy levels were identified that change in peak position and intensity upon the application of the ARC. Using this data, in addition to EBIC contrast information, we provide an explanation for the DBL intensity reversal based on the interaction of the detected energy levels with the SiNx:H ARC application. Multiple investigations have suggested that this is a global problem for mc-Si PV cells. Our results have the potential to provide mc-Si PV producers a pathway to increased efficiencies through defect mitigation strategies.

  10. Genetic architecture of sex determination in fish: applications to sex ratio control in aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Paulino; Viñas, Ana M.; Sánchez, Laura; Díaz, Noelia; Ribas, Laia; Piferrer, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the sex ratio is essential in finfish farming. A balanced sex ratio is usually good for broodstock management, since it enables to develop appropriate breeding schemes. However, in some species the production of monosex populations is desirable because the existence of sexual dimorphism, primarily in growth or first time of sexual maturation, but also in color or shape, can render one sex more valuable. The knowledge of the genetic architecture of sex determination (SD) is convenient for controlling sex ratio and for the implementation of breeding programs. Unlike mammals and birds, which show highly conserved master genes that control a conserved genetic network responsible for gonad differentiation (GD), a huge diversity of SD mechanisms has been reported in fish. Despite theory predictions, more than one gene is in many cases involved in fish SD and genetic differences have been observed in the GD network. Environmental factors also play a relevant role and epigenetic mechanisms are becoming increasingly recognized for the establishment and maintenance of the GD pathways. Although major genetic factors are frequently involved in fish SD, these observations strongly suggest that SD in this group resembles a complex trait. Accordingly, the application of quantitative genetics combined with genomic tools is desirable to address its study and in fact, when applied, it has frequently demonstrated a multigene trait interacting with environmental factors in model and cultured fish species. This scenario has notable implications for aquaculture and, depending upon the species, from chromosome manipulation or environmental control techniques up to classical selection or marker assisted selection programs, are being applied. In this review, we selected four relevant species or fish groups to illustrate this diversity and hence the technologies that can be used by the industry for the control of sex ratio: turbot and European sea bass, two reference species of the European aquaculture, and salmonids and tilapia, representing the fish for which there are well established breeding programs. PMID:25324858

  11. Hybrid Algorithms for Fuzzy Reverse Supply Chain Network Design

    PubMed Central

    Che, Z. H.; Chiang, Tzu-An; Kuo, Y. C.

    2014-01-01

    In consideration of capacity constraints, fuzzy defect ratio, and fuzzy transport loss ratio, this paper attempted to establish an optimized decision model for production planning and distribution of a multiphase, multiproduct reverse supply chain, which addresses defects returned to original manufacturers, and in addition, develops hybrid algorithms such as Particle Swarm Optimization-Genetic Algorithm (PSO-GA), Genetic Algorithm-Simulated Annealing (GA-SA), and Particle Swarm Optimization-Simulated Annealing (PSO-SA) for solving the optimized model. During a case study of a multi-phase, multi-product reverse supply chain network, this paper explained the suitability of the optimized decision model and the applicability of the algorithms. Finally, the hybrid algorithms showed excellent solving capability when compared with original GA and PSO methods. PMID:24892057

  12. Hybrid algorithms for fuzzy reverse supply chain network design.

    PubMed

    Che, Z H; Chiang, Tzu-An; Kuo, Y C; Cui, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    In consideration of capacity constraints, fuzzy defect ratio, and fuzzy transport loss ratio, this paper attempted to establish an optimized decision model for production planning and distribution of a multiphase, multiproduct reverse supply chain, which addresses defects returned to original manufacturers, and in addition, develops hybrid algorithms such as Particle Swarm Optimization-Genetic Algorithm (PSO-GA), Genetic Algorithm-Simulated Annealing (GA-SA), and Particle Swarm Optimization-Simulated Annealing (PSO-SA) for solving the optimized model. During a case study of a multi-phase, multi-product reverse supply chain network, this paper explained the suitability of the optimized decision model and the applicability of the algorithms. Finally, the hybrid algorithms showed excellent solving capability when compared with original GA and PSO methods. PMID:24892057

  13. Reversible shape memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; Zhou, Jing; White, Sarah; Ashby, Valerie

    2012-02-01

    An ``Achilles' heel'' of shape memory materials is that shape transformations triggered by an external stimulus are usually irreversible. Here we present a new concept of reversible transitions between two well-defined shapes by controlling hierarchic crystallization of a dual-network elastomer. The reversibility was demonstrated for different types of shape transformations including rod bending, winding of a helical coil, and widening an aperture. The distinct feature of the reversible shape alterations is that both counter-shapes are infinitely stable at a temperature of exploitation. Shape reversibility is highly desirable property in many practical applications such as non-surgical removal of a previously inserted catheter and handfree wrapping up of an earlier unraveled solar sail on a space shuttle.

  14. Protective efficacy of reverse genetics based on inactivated American and Asian neuraminidase DIVA marker vaccines against highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza has become endemic in several countries, and vaccination is commonly being used. Vaccination can affect surveillance, and therefore there is considerable interest in DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) vaccine strategies. Using reverse...

  15. The Systems Genetics Resource: A Web Application to Mine Global Data for Complex Disease Traits

    PubMed Central

    van Nas, Atila; Pan, Calvin; Ingram-Drake, Leslie A.; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Drake, Thomas A.; Sobel, Eric M.; Papp, Jeanette C.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2013-01-01

    The Systems Genetics Resource (SGR) (http://systems.genetics.ucla.edu) is a new open-access web application and database that contains genotypes and clinical and intermediate phenotypes from both human and mouse studies. The mouse data include studies using crosses between specific inbred strains and studies using the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. SGR is designed to assist researchers studying genes and pathways contributing to complex disease traits, including obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, heart failure, osteoporosis, and lipoprotein metabolism. Over the next few years, we hope to add data relevant to deafness, addiction, hepatic steatosis, toxin responses, and vascular injury. The intermediate phenotypes include expression array data for a variety of tissues and cultured cells, metabolite levels, and protein levels. Pre-computed tables of genetic loci controlling intermediate and clinical phenotypes, as well as phenotype correlations, are accessed via a user-friendly web interface. The web site includes detailed protocols for all of the studies. Data from published studies are freely available; unpublished studies have restricted access during their embargo period. PMID:23730305

  16. Field application of a genetically engineered microorganism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation process monitoring and control

    SciTech Connect

    Sayler, G.S.; Cox, C.D.; Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Werner, C.; Ahn, Y.; Matrubutham, U.; Burlage, R.

    1998-11-01

    On October 30, 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commenced the first test release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for use in bioremediation. The specific objectives of the investigation were multifaceted and include (1) testing the hypothesis that a GEM can be successfully introduced and maintained in a bioremediation process, (2) testing the concept of using, at the field scale, reporter organisms for direct bioremediation process monitoring and control, and (3) acquiring data that can be used in risk assessment decision making and protocol development for future field release applications of GEMs. The genetically engineered strain under investigation is Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (King et al., 1990). The original P. fluorescens parent strain was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated manufactured gas plant soil. Thus, this bacterium is able to biodegrade naphthalene (as well as other substituted naphthalenes and other PAHs) and is able to function as a living bioluminescent reporter for the presence of naphthalene contamination, its bioavailability, and the functional process of biodegradation. A unique component of this field investigation was the availability of an array of large subsurface soil lysimeters. This article describes the experience associated with the release of a genetically modified microorganism, the lysimeter facility and its associated instrumentation, as well as representative data collected during the first eighteen months of operation.

  17. Insights into the biology of Borrelia burgdorferi gained through the application of molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Groshong, Ashley M; Blevins, Jon S

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the vector-borne bacterium that causes Lyme disease, was first identified in 1982. It is known that much of the pathology associated with Lyme borreliosis is due to the spirochete's ability to infect, colonize, disseminate, and survive within the vertebrate host. Early studies aimed at defining the biological contributions of individual genes during infection and transmission were hindered by the lack of adequate tools and techniques for molecular genetic analysis of the spirochete. The development of genetic manipulation techniques, paired with elucidation and annotation of the B. burgdorferi genome sequence, has led to major advancements in our understanding of the virulence factors and the molecular events associated with Lyme disease. Since the dawn of this genetic era of Lyme research, genes required for vector or host adaptation have garnered significant attention and highlighted the central role that these components play in the enzootic cycle of this pathogen. This chapter covers the progress made in the Borrelia field since the application of mutagenesis techniques and how they have allowed researchers to begin ascribing roles to individual genes. Understanding the complex process of adaptation and survival as the spirochete cycles between the tick vector and vertebrate host will lead to the development of more effective diagnostic tools as well as identification of novel therapeutic and vaccine targets. In this chapter, the Borrelia genes are presented in the context of their general biological roles in global gene regulation, motility, cell processes, immune evasion, and colonization/dissemination. PMID:24377854

  18. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  19. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  20. AUTOMATIC CREATION OF A GENETIC NETWORK FOR THE lac OPERON FROM OBSERVED DATA BY MEANS OF GENETIC PROGRAMMING

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    to automatically create (reverse engineer) a computer program representing the logic underlying the genetic network "reverse engineer" the logic underlying a genetic network. This reverse engineering entails creating bothAUTOMATIC CREATION OF A GENETIC NETWORK FOR THE lac OPERON FROM OBSERVED DATA BY MEANS OF GENETIC

  1. Technological Advances in Bifidobacterial Molecular Genetics: Application to Functional Genomics and Medical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    FUKIYA, Satoru; HIRAYAMA, Yosuke; SAKANAKA, Mikiyasu; KANO, Yasunobu; YOKOTA, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are well known as beneficial intestinal bacteria that exert health-promoting effects in humans. In addition to physiological and immunological investigations, molecular genetic technologies have been developed and have recently started to be applied to clarify the molecular bases of host-Bifidobacterium interactions. These technologies include transformation technologies and Escherichia coli-Bifidobacterium shuttle vectors that enable heterologous gene expression. In this context, a plasmid artificial modification method that protects the introduced plasmid from the restriction system in host bifidobacteria has recently been developed to increase transformation efficiency. On the other hand, targeted gene inactivation systems, which are vital for functional genomics, seemed far from being practically applicable in bifidobacteria. However, remarkable progress in this technology has recently been achieved, enabling functional genomics in bifidobacteria. Integrated use of these molecular genetic technologies with omics-based analyses will surely boost characterization of the molecular basis underlying beneficial effects of bifidobacteria. Applications of recombinant bifidobacteria to medical treatments have also progressed. PMID:24936345

  2. PT-Flax (phenotyping and TILLinG of flax): development of a flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) mutant population and TILLinG platform for forward and reverse genetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an economically important fiber and oil crop that has been grown for thousands of years. The genome has been recently sequenced and transcriptomics are providing information on candidate genes potentially related to agronomically-important traits. In order to accelerate functional characterization of these genes we have generated a flax EMS mutant population that can be used as a TILLinG (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes) platform for forward and reverse genetics. Results A population of 4,894 M2 mutant seed families was generated using 3 different EMS concentrations (0.3%, 0.6% and 0.75%) and used to produce M2 plants for subsequent phenotyping and DNA extraction. 10,839 viable M2 plants (4,033 families) were obtained and 1,552 families (38.5%) showed a visual developmental phenotype (stem size and diameter, plant architecture, flower-related). The majority of these families showed more than one phenotype. Mutant phenotype data are organised in a database and can be accessed and searched at UTILLdb (http://urgv.evry.inra.fr/UTILLdb). Preliminary screens were also performed for atypical fiber and seed phenotypes. Genomic DNA was extracted from 3,515 M2 families and eight-fold pooled for subsequent mutant detection by ENDO1 nuclease mis-match cleavage. In order to validate the collection for reverse genetics, DNA pools were screened for two genes coding enzymes of the lignin biosynthesis pathway: Coumarate-3-Hydroxylase (C3H) and Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase (CAD). We identified 79 and 76 mutations in the C3H and CAD genes, respectively. The average mutation rate was calculated as 1/41?Kb giving rise to approximately 9,000 mutations per genome. Thirty-five out of the 52 flax cad mutant families containing missense or codon stop mutations showed the typical orange-brown xylem phenotype observed in CAD down-regulated/mutant plants in other species. Conclusions We have developed a flax mutant population that can be used as an efficient forward and reverse genetics tool. The collection has an extremely high mutation rate that enables the detection of large numbers of independant mutant families by screening a comparatively low number of M2 families. The population will prove to be a valuable resource for both fundamental research and the identification of agronomically-important genes for crop improvement in flax. PMID:24128060

  3. MONITORING MYCOTOXIN PRODUCTION AT THE GENETIC LEVEL ON VARIOUS GROWTH SUBSTRATES USING QUANTITATIVE REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION?EXPERIMENT DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a method of analyzing the production of mycotoxins at the genetic level by monitoring the intracellular levels of messenger RNA (mRNA). Initial work will focus on threshing out the mycotoxin gene clusters in Stachybotrys chartarum followed by analysis of toxin...

  4. Application of automation and information systems to forensic genetic specimen processing.

    PubMed

    Leclair, Benoît; Scholl, Tom

    2005-03-01

    During the last 10 years, the introduction of PCR-based DNA typing technologies in forensic applications has been highly successful. This technology has become pervasive throughout forensic laboratories and it continues to grow in prevalence. For many criminal cases, it provides the most probative evidence. Criminal genotype data banking and victim identification initiatives that follow mass-fatality incidents have benefited the most from the introduction of automation for sample processing and data analysis. Attributes of offender specimens including large numbers, high quality and identical collection and processing are ideal for the application of laboratory automation. The magnitude of kinship analysis required by mass-fatality incidents necessitates the application of computing solutions to automate the task. More recently, the development activities of many forensic laboratories are focused on leveraging experience from these two applications to casework sample processing. The trend toward increased prevalence of forensic genetic analysis will continue to drive additional innovations in high-throughput laboratory automation and information systems. PMID:15833053

  5. An Application of Reverse Engineering to Automatic Item Generation: A Proof of Concept Using Automatically Generated Figures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorié, William A.

    2013-01-01

    A reverse engineering approach to automatic item generation (AIG) was applied to a figure-based publicly released test item from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) mathematical literacy cognitive instrument as part of a proof of concept. The author created an item…

  6. Development and application of a hexaplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for screening global Citrus tristeza virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The discovery of the diversity of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypes has complicated detection and diagnostic measures. To simplify the identification and differentiation of CTV genotypes, an efficient multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) technique for the screenin...

  7. A School-Based Application of Modified Habit Reversal for Tourette Syndrome via a Translator: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Rich; Connor, Nancy; Haney, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    A school-based modified habit reversal intervention was utilized with an adolescent diagnosed with Tourette syndrome who recently immigrated from Mexico. Because the student possessed little proficiency of the English language, an interpreter was needed to help implement the procedure. The frequency of motor tics markedly decreased from baseline…

  8. Development and application of a hexaplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for screening global citrus tristeza virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The discovery of the diversity of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypes has complicated detection and diagnostic measures. To simplify the identification and differentiation of CTV genotypes, an efficient multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) technique for the screenin...

  9. The evolution of colorectal cancer genetics-Part 2: clinical implications and applications.

    PubMed

    Schlussel, Andrew T; Gagliano, Ronald A; Seto-Donlon, Susan; Eggerding, Faye; Donlon, Timothy; Berenberg, Jeffrey; Lynch, Henry T

    2014-10-01

    The genetic understanding of colorectal cancer (CRC) continues to grow, and it is now estimated that 10% of the population has a known hereditary CRC syndrome. This article will examine the evolving surgical and medical management of hereditary CRC syndromes, and the impact of tumor genetics on therapy. This review will focus on the most common hereditary CRC-prone diseases seen in clinical practice, which include Lynch syndrome (LS), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) & attenuated FAP (AFAP), MutYH-associated polyposis (MAP), and serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS). Each section will review the current recommendations in the evaluation and treatment of these syndromes, as well as review surgical management and operative planning. A highly detailed multigeneration cancer family history with verified genealogy and pathology documentation whenever possible, coupled with germline mutation testing when indicated, is critically important to management decisions. Although caring for patients with these syndromes remains complex, the application of this knowledge facilitates better treatment of both individuals and their affected family members for generations to come. PMID:25276406

  10. Genetic algorithm to solve constrained routing problem with applications for cruise missile routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latourell, James L.; Wallet, Bradley C.; Copeland, Bruce

    1998-03-01

    In this paper the use of a Genetic Algorithm to solve a constrained vehicle routing problem is explored. The problem is two-dimensional with obstacles represented as ellipses of uncertainty surrounding each obstacle point. A route is defined as a series of points through which the vehicle sequentially travels from the starting point to the ending point. The physical constraints of total route length and maximum turn angle are included and appear in the fitness function. In order to be valid, a route must go from start to finish without violating any constraint. The effects that different mutation rates and population sizes have on the algorithm's computation speed and ability to find a high quality route are also explored. Finally, possible applications of this algorithm to the problem of route planning for cruise missiles are discussed.

  11. Application of Genetic Algorithm to the Design Optimization of Complex Energy Saving Glass Coating Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johar, F. M.; Azmin, F. A.; Shibghatullah, A. S.; Suaidi, M. K.; Ahmad, B. H.; Abd Aziz, M. Z. A.; Salleh, S. N.; Shukor, M. Md

    2014-04-01

    Attenuation of GSM, GPS and personal communication signal leads to poor communication inside the building using regular shapes of energy saving glass coating. Thus, the transmission is very low. A brand new type of band pass frequency selective surface (FSS) for energy saving glass application is presented in this paper for one unit cell. Numerical Periodic Method of Moment approach according to a previous study has been applied to determine the new optimum design of one unit cell energy saving glass coating structure. Optimization technique based on the Genetic Algorithm (GA) is used to obtain an improved in return loss and transmission signal. The unit cell of FSS is designed and simulated using the CST Microwave Studio software at based on industrial, scientific and medical bands (ISM). A unique and irregular shape of an energy saving glass coating structure is obtained with lower return loss and improved transmission coefficient.

  12. Application of artificial neural network and genetic algorithm in flow and transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed, Jahangir; Kaluarachchi, Jagath J.

    Artificial neural network (ANN) is considered to be a powerful tool for solving groundwater problems which require a large number of flow and contaminant transport (GFCT) simulations. Often, GFCT models are nonlinear, and they are difficult to solve using traditional numerical methods to simulate specific input-output responses. In order to avoid these difficulties, ANN may be used to simulate the GFCT responses explicitly. In this manuscript, recent research related to the application of ANN in simulating GFCT responses is critically reviewed, and six research areas are identified. In order to study these areas, a one-dimensional unsaturated flow and transport scenario was developed, and ANN was used to simulate the effects of specific GFCT parameters on overall results. Using these results, ANN concepts related to architecture, sampling, training, and multiple function approximations are studied, and ANN training using back-propagation algorithm (BPA) and genetic algorithm (GA) are compared. These results are summarized, and appropriate conclusions are made.

  13. Recent Advances in Genetic Technique of Microbial Report Cells and Their Applications in Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial cell arrays have attracted consistent attention for their ability to provide unique global data on target analytes at low cost, their capacity for readily detectable and robust cell growth in diverse environments, their high degree of convenience, and their capacity for multiplexing via incorporation of molecularly tailored reporter cells. To highlight recent progress in the field of microbial cell arrays, this review discusses research on genetic engineering of reporter cells, technologies for patterning live cells on solid surfaces, cellular immobilization in different polymers, and studies on their application in environmental monitoring, disease diagnostics, and other related fields. On the basis of these results, we discuss current challenges and future prospects for novel microbial cell arrays, which show promise for use as potent tools for unraveling complex biological processes. PMID:26436087

  14. Automatic design of fuzzy systems using genetic algorithms and its application to lateral vehicle guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessburg, Thomas; Lee, Michael; Takagi, Hideyuki; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    1993-12-01

    A method of tuning a fuzzy logic controller (FLC) by a genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed for lane following maneuvers in an automated highway system. The GA simultaneously determines the shape of membership functions, number of rules, and consequent parameters of the FLC. The GA approach operates on binary representations of FLCs and uses an expression for a fitness score to be maximized, which takes into account the tracking error, yaw rate error, lateral acceleration error, rate of lateral acceleration, front wheel steering angle, and rate of front wheel steering angle, to find an optimal controller. Apriori knowledge about both the physical application and FLCs is incorporated into the design method to increase the performance of the design method and the resulting controller. The controllers designed by this method are compared in simulation to a conventional PID controller, a frequency shaped linear quadratic controller, and previously designed FLCs tuned manually.

  15. Optimisation of halogenase enzyme activity by application of a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Muffler, Kai; Retzlaff, Marco; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Ulber, Roland

    2007-01-10

    A genetic algorithm (GA) was applied for the optimisation of an enzyme assay composition respectively the enzyme activity of a recombinantly produced FADH(2)-dependent halogenating enzyme. The examined enzyme belongs to the class of halogenases and is capable to halogenate tryptophan regioselective in position 5. Therefore, the expressed trp-5-halogenase can be an interesting tool in the manufacturing of serotonin precursors. The application of stochastic search strategies (e.g. GAs) is well suited for fast determination of the global optimum in multidimensional search spaces, where statistical approaches or even the popular classical one-factor-at-a-time method often failures by misleading to local optima. The concentrations of six different medium components were optimised and the maximum yield of the halogenated tryptophan could be increased from 3.5 up to 65%. PMID:16919347

  16. Reversible concentric ring microfluidic interconnects

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    A reversible, Chip-to-Chip microfluidic interconnect was designed for use in high temperature, high pressure applications such as chemical microreactor systems. The interconnect uses two sets of concentric, interlocking ...

  17. Reverse osmosis reverses conventional wisdom with Superfund cleanup success

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M. ); Miller, K. )

    1994-09-01

    Although widely recognized as the most efficient means of water purification, reverse osmosis has not been considered effective for remediating hazardous wastewater. Scaling and fouling, which can cause overruns and downtime, and require membrane replacement, have inhibited success in high-volume wastewater applications. Despite this background, a reverse osmosis technology developed in Europe recently was used successfully to treat large volumes of contaminated water at a major Superfund site in Texas. The technology's success there may increase the chances for reverse osmosis to find wider use in future cleanups and other waste treatment applications.

  18. Use of Bayesian networks to dissect the complexity of genetic disease: application to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 simulated data.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jia; Zheng, Wei; Li, Lun; Lee, Joon Sang; Yan, Xiting; Zhao, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    Complex diseases are often the downstream event of a number of risk factors, including both environmental and genetic variables. To better understand the mechanism of disease onset, it is of great interest to systematically investigate the crosstalk among various risk factors. Bayesian networks provide an intuitive graphical interface that captures not only the association but also the conditional independence and dependence structures among the variables, resulting in sparser relationships between risk factors and the disease phenotype than traditional correlation-based methods. In this paper, we apply a Bayesian network to dissect the complex regulatory relationships among disease traits and various risk factors for the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 simulated data. We use the Bayesian network as a tool for the risk prediction of disease outcome. PMID:22373110

  19. Global-scale genetic identification of hammerhead sharks: Application to assessment of the international fin trade and law enforcement

    E-print Network

    Global-scale genetic identification of hammerhead sharks: Application to assessment, fin trade, hammerhead sharks, shark conservation, Sphyrna, Abstract The future status of sharks-bodied hammerhead sharks, Sphyrna lewini, S. mokarran and S. zygaena, even in regions where some management occurs

  20. Application of Interactive Genetic Algorithm to Fashion Design Hee-Su Kim and Sung-Bae Cho

    E-print Network

    Cho, Sung-Bae

    - 1 - Application of Interactive Genetic Algorithm to Fashion Design Hee-Su Kim and Sung-Bae Cho. This approach, however, can neither deal with continuous change of fashion nor reflect personal taste well to be applied to artistic domains, and we propose a fashion design aid system using it. Unlike the previous

  1. Application of Microsatellite Markers in Conservation Genetics and Fisheries Management: Recent Advances in Population Structure Analysis and Conservation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Muneer, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are the most popular and versatile genetic marker with myriads of applications in population genetics, conservation biology, and evolutionary biology. These are the arrays of DNA sequences, consisting of tandemly repeating mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide units, which are distributed throughout the genomes of most eukaryotic species. Microsatellites are codominant in nature, highly polymorphic, easily typed, and Mendelian inherited, all properties which make them very suitable for the study of population structure and pedigree analysis and capable of detecting differences among closely related species. PCR for microsatellites can be automated for identifying simple sequence repeat polymorphism. Small amount of blood samples or alcohol preserved tissue is adequate for analyzing them. Most of the microsatellites are noncoding, and therefore variations are independent of natural selection. These properties make microsatellites ideal genetic markers for conservation genetics and fisheries management. This review addresses the applications of microsatellite markers in conservation genetics and recent advances in population structure analysis in the context of fisheries management. PMID:24808959

  2. A kernel machine method for detecting effects of interaction between multidimensional variable sets: an imaging genetics application.

    PubMed

    Ge, Tian; Nichols, Thomas E; Ghosh, Debashis; Mormino, Elizabeth C; Smoller, Jordan W; Sabuncu, Mert R

    2015-04-01

    Measurements derived from neuroimaging data can serve as markers of disease and/or healthy development, are largely heritable, and have been increasingly utilized as (intermediate) phenotypes in genetic association studies. To date, imaging genetic studies have mostly focused on discovering isolated genetic effects, typically ignoring potential interactions with non-genetic variables such as disease risk factors, environmental exposures, and epigenetic markers. However, identifying significant interaction effects is critical for revealing the true relationship between genetic and phenotypic variables, and shedding light on disease mechanisms. In this paper, we present a general kernel machine based method for detecting effects of the interaction between multidimensional variable sets. This method can model the joint and epistatic effect of a collection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), accommodate multiple factors that potentially moderate genetic influences, and test for nonlinear interactions between sets of variables in a flexible framework. As a demonstration of application, we applied the method to the data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to detect the effects of the interactions between candidate Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk genes and a collection of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, on hippocampal volume measurements derived from structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Our method identified that two genes, CR1 and EPHA1, demonstrate significant interactions with CVD risk factors on hippocampal volume, suggesting that CR1 and EPHA1 may play a role in influencing AD-related neurodegeneration in the presence of CVD risks. PMID:25600633

  3. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures. PMID:3811050

  4. GENETIC ACTIVITY PROFILES--APPLICATION IN ASSESSING POTENTIAL CARCINOGENICITY OF COMPLEX ENVIRONMENTAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of a complex environmental mixture may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity of its component chemicals. he expanded Genetic Activity Profile (GAP) data base provides a computer generated graphic representation of ge...

  5. Rapid on-chip genetic detection microfluidic platform for real world applications

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Satyajyoti; Mahon, Andrew R.; Gordon, Jason; Nowak, Carsten; Sengupta, Shramik; Powell, Thomas H. Q.; Feder, Jeffrey; Lodge, David M.; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2009-01-01

    The development of genetic detection protocols for field applications is an important aspect of modern medical diagnostic technology and environmental monitoring. In this paper, we report a rapid, portable, and inexpensive DNA hybridization technique using a bead-based microfluidic platform that functions by passing fluorescently labeled target DNA through a chamber packed with functionalized beads within a microfluidic channel. DNA hybridization is then assessed using a digital camera attached to a Clare Chemical DR-45M dark reader non-UV transilluminator that uses visible light as an excitation source and a blue and amber filter to reveal fluorescence. This microfluidic approach significantly enhances hybridization by reducing the diffusion time between target DNA and the silica surface. The use of probe-functionalized beads as solid support also enhances the sensitivity and limit of detection due to a larger surface area per unit volume. This platform could be adapted for use in medical applications and environmental monitoring, including the detection of harmful organisms in the ballast water of ships. PMID:19693342

  6. THE PARABOLIC WAVE APPROXIMATION AND TIME REVERSAL

    E-print Network

    Solna, Knut

    -reversibility of the wave equation. The refocusing is approximate since the array of transducers (also called a time of the time-reversed signal has many applications in medicine, underwater sound, wireless communications etc description of various possible applications. One application is kidney stone destruction, when the signal re

  7. Genetic interaction analysis of point mutations enables interrogation of gene function at a residue-level resolution: exploring the applications of high-resolution genetic interaction mapping of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Moehle, Erica A; Shales, Michael; Guthrie, Christine; Krogan, Nevan J

    2014-07-01

    We have achieved a residue-level resolution of genetic interaction mapping - a technique that measures how the function of one gene is affected by the alteration of a second gene - by analyzing point mutations. Here, we describe how to interpret point mutant genetic interactions, and outline key applications for the approach, including interrogation of protein interaction interfaces and active sites, and examination of post-translational modifications. Genetic interaction analysis has proven effective for characterizing cellular processes; however, to date, systematic high-throughput genetic interaction screens have relied on gene deletions or knockdowns, which limits the resolution of gene function analysis and poses problems for multifunctional genes. Our point mutant approach addresses these issues, and further provides a tool for in vivo structure-function analysis that complements traditional biophysical methods. We also discuss the potential for genetic interaction mapping of point mutations in human cells and its application to personalized medicine. PMID:24842270

  8. Structural Variation (SV) Markers in the Basidiomycete Volvariella volvacea and Their Application in the Construction of a Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Bingzhi; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Junjie; Lu, Yuanping; Zhang, Xiaoyin; Jiang, Yuji; Wu, Taju; van Peer, Arend Frans; Li, Shaojie; Xie, Baogui

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers and genetic maps are useful tools in genetic studies. Novel molecular markers and their applications have been developed in recent years. With the recent advancements in sequencing technology, the genomic sequences of an increasingly great number of fungi have become available. A novel type of molecular marker was developed to construct the first reported linkage map of the edible and economically important basidiomycete Volvariella volvacea by using 104 structural variation (SV) markers that are based on the genomic sequences. Because of the special and simple life cycle in basidiomycete, SV markers can be effectively developed by genomic comparison and tested in single spore isolates (SSIs). This stable, convenient and rapidly developed marker may assist in the construction of genetic maps and facilitate genomic research for other species of fungi. PMID:26204838

  9. Genetic algorithm based input selection for a neural network function approximator with applications to SSME health monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Charles C.; Dhawan, Atam P.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A genetic algorithm is used to select the inputs to a neural network function approximator. In the application considered, modeling critical parameters of the space shuttle main engine (SSME), the functional relationship between measured parameters is unknown and complex. Furthermore, the number of possible input parameters is quite large. Many approaches have been used for input selection, but they are either subjective or do not consider the complex multivariate relationships between parameters. Due to the optimization and space searching capabilities of genetic algorithms they were employed to systematize the input selection process. The results suggest that the genetic algorithm can generate parameter lists of high quality without the explicit use of problem domain knowledge. Suggestions for improving the performance of the input selection process are also provided.

  10. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J.

    2012-03-31

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl?CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl?CoA. Two AACT?encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T?DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl?CoA precursor required for the cytosol?localized, mevalonate?derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  11. Alternative stable qP wave equations in TTI media with their applications for reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang; Wang, Huazhong; Liu, Wenqing

    2015-10-01

    Numerical instabilities may arise if the spatial variation of symmetry axis is handled improperly when implementing P-wave modeling and reverse time migration in heterogeneous tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media, especially in the cases where fast changes exist in TTI symmetry axis’ directions. Based on the pseudo-acoustic approximation to anisotropic elastic wave equations in Cartesian coordinates, alternative second order qP (quasi-P) wave equations in TTI media are derived in this paper. Compared with conventional stable qP wave equations, the proposed equations written in stress components contain only spatial derivatives of wavefield variables (stress components) and are free from spatial derivatives involving media parameters. These lead to an easy and efficient implementation for stable P-wave modeling and imaging. Numerical experiments demonstrate the stability and computational efficiency of the presented equations in complex TTI media.

  12. Genetic characterization of caffeine degradation by bacteria and its potential applications

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ryan M; Mohanty, Sujit K; Gopishetty, Sridhar; Subramanian, Mani

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to grow on caffeine as sole carbon and nitrogen source has been known for over 40 years. Extensive research into this subject has revealed two distinct pathways, N-demethylation and C-8 oxidation, for bacterial caffeine degradation. However, the enzymological and genetic basis for bacterial caffeine degradation has only recently been discovered. This review article discusses the recent discoveries of the genes responsible for both N-demethylation and C-8 oxidation. All of the genes for the N-demethylation pathway, encoding enzymes in the Rieske oxygenase family, reside on 13.2-kb genomic DNA fragment found in Pseudomonas putida?CBB5. A nearly identical DNA fragment, with homologous genes in similar orientation, is found in Pseudomonas sp. CES. Similarly, genes for C-8 oxidation of caffeine have been located on a 25.2-kb genomic DNA fragment of Pseudomonas sp. CBB1. The C-8 oxidation genes encode enzymes similar to those found in the uric acid metabolic pathway of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Various biotechnological applications of these genes responsible for bacterial caffeine degradation, including bio-decaffeination, remediation of caffeine-contaminated environments, production of chemical and fuels and development of diagnostic tests have also been demonstrated. PMID:25678373

  13. Reversible simulation of irreversible computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Tromp, John; Vitányi, Paul

    1998-09-01

    Computer computations are generally irreversible while the laws of physics are reversible. This mismatch is penalized by among other things generating excess thermic entropy in the computation. Computing performance has improved to the extent that efficiency degrades unless all algorithms are executed reversibly, for example by a universal reversible simulation of irreversible computations. All known reversible simulations are either space hungry or time hungry. The leanest method was proposed by Bennett and can be analyzed using a simple ‘reversible’ pebble game. The reachable reversible simulation instantaneous descriptions (pebble configurations) of such pebble games are characterized completely. As a corollary we obtain the reversible simulation by Bennett and, moreover, show that it is a space-optimal pebble game. We also introduce irreversible steps and give a theorem on the tradeoff between the number of allowed irreversible steps and the memory gain in the pebble game. In this resource-bounded setting the limited erasing needs to be performed at precise instants during the simulation. The reversible simulation can be modified so that it is applicable also when the simulated computation time is unknown.

  14. The Use of Prior Distributions to Learn Genetic Olivier Gevaert1

    E-print Network

    of a struc- ture prior for reverse-engineering genetic networks with Bayesian network models can improve more reliable models of genetic networks. 1 Introduction Reverse engineering genetic networks has been and extensions of Bayesian networks are popular models for reverse engineering genetic networks ([5, 15, 9, 10

  15. Ternary Cu2SnS3 cabbage-like nanostructures: large-scale synthesis and their application in Li-ion batteries with superior reversible capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Baihua; Li, Hongxing; Zhang, Ming; Mei, Lin; Chen, Libao; Wang, Yanguo; Li, Qiuhong; Wang, Taihong

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, novel ternary Cu2SnS3 cabbage-like nanostructures are synthesized on a large scale via a facile solvothermal route. The individual Cu2SnS3 cabbage-like hierarchitecture is constructed from 2D nanosheets with thickness of about 15.6 nm. The Cu2SnS3 electrodes exhibit an initial reversible capacity of 842 mAh g-1 and still reach 621 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles. Such an admirable performance could be related to their 3D porous structural features as well as the high electrical conductivity induced by Cu. The electrochemical properties of the 3D hierarchical nanostructures imply its potential application in high energy density Li-ion batteries.

  16. Teaching Applied Genetics and Molecular Biology to Agriculture Engineers. Application of the European Credit Transfer System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, J.; Egea-Cortines, M.

    2008-01-01

    We have been teaching applied molecular genetics to engineers and adapted the teaching methodology to the European Credit Transfer System. We teach core principles of genetics that are universal and form the conceptual basis of most molecular technologies. The course then teaches widely used techniques and finally shows how different techniques…

  17. Inverse/genetic method and its application in identification of mechanical parameters of interface in composite

    E-print Network

    Qin, Qinghua

    of interface; Inverse/genetic method; Hybrid analysis; Finite element method 1. Introduction With modern into an inverse approximation problem using the method which includes finite element method and genetic algorithms to meet the growing de- mand for practical industries and engineering. Conse- quently, it becomes

  18. Visual & reversible sensing of cyanide in real samples by an effective ratiometric colorimetric probe & logic gate application.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Shubhrajyotsna; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2015-10-15

    A novel anion probe 3 (2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-((2(2,4-dinitrophenyl) hydrazono) methyl) phenol) has been unveiled as an effective ratiometric and colorimetric sensor for selective and rapid detection of cyanide. The sensing behavior was demonstrated by UV-vis experiments and NMR studies. This sensory system exhibited prominent visual color change toward cyanide ion over other testing anions in DMSO (90%) solvent, with a 1:1 binding stoichiometry and a detection limit down to 3.6×10(-8) mol L(-1). Sensor reveals specific anti-jamming activity and reversible in the presence of Cu(2+) ions. This concept has been applied to design a logic gate circuit at the molecular level. Further we developed coated graphite electrode using probe 3 as ionophore and studied the performance characteristics of electrode. The sensitivity of ratiometric-based colorimetric assay is below the 1.9 ?M, accepted by the World Health Organization as the highest permissible cyanide concentration in drinking water. So it can be applied for both quantitative determination and qualitative supervising of cyanide concentrations in real samples. PMID:25913671

  19. Development of SNP markers and their application for genetic diversity analysis in the oil palm (Elaeis guineensis).

    PubMed

    Ong, P W; Maizura, I; Abdullah, N A P; Rafii, M Y; Ooi, L C L; Low, E T L; Singh, R

    2015-01-01

    The genetic evaluation of oil palm germplasm collections is required for insight into the variability among populations. The information obtained is also useful for incorporating new genetic materials into current breeding programs. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been widely used in many plant genetic studies due to the availability of large numbers of genomic sequences and expressed sequence tags. The present study examined 219 oil palms collected from two natural Angolan populations, a few hundred kilometers apart. A total of 62 SNPs were designed from oil palm genomic sequences and converted to cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS). Of these, nine were found to be informative across the two populations. The nine informative SNPs revealed mean major allele frequency of 0.693. The average expected and observed heterozygosities were 0.398 and 0.400, respectively. The mean polymorphism information content was 0.315 (ranging between 0.223 and 0.375). None of the loci deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and no rare alleles were detected. In cluster analysis using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic, the 219 oil palms fell into two clusters. This was further supported by the population structure analysis result (K = 2), suggesting that the samples were divided into two main genetic groups. However, the two groups did not coincide with the geographic populations. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that within-population variation contributed 93% of the total genetic variation. This study showed that SNP-based CAPS markers are useful for studying the genetic diversity of oil palm and have potential application for marker-trait association studies. PMID:26505369

  20. An application of LOH analysis for detecting the genetic influences of space environmental radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, F.; Umebayashi, Y.; Honma, M.; Abe, T.; Suzuki, H.; Shimazu, T.; Ishioka, N.; Iwaki, M.

    To detect the genetic influence of space environmental radiation at the chromosome level we proposed an application of loss of heterozygosity LOH analysis system for the mutations induced in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells Surprisingly we succeeded the mutation detection in the frozen dells which were exposed to a low-dose 10 cGy of carbon-ion beam irradiation Mutation assays were performed within a few days or after about one month preservation at --80 r C following irradiation The results showed an increase in mutation frequency at the thymidine kinase TK gene locus 1 6-fold 2 5 X 10 -6 to 3 9 X 10 -6 and 2 1-fold 2 5 X 10 -6 to 5 3 X 10 -6 respectively Although the relative distributions of mutation classes were not changed by the radiation exposure in either assay an interesting characteristic was detected using this LOH analysis system two TK locus markers and eleven microsatellite loci spanning chromosome 17 The radiation-specific patterns of interstitial deletions were observed in the hemizygous LOH mutants which were considered as a result of end-joining repair of carbon ion-induced DNA double-strand breaks These results clearly demonstrate that this analysis can be used for the detection of low-dose ionizing radiation effects in the frozen cells In addition we performed so called adaptive response experiments in which TK6 cells were pre-irradiated with low-dose 2 5 sim 10 cGy of X-ray and then exposed to challenging dose 2Gy of X-rays Interestingly the

  1. Genetic Counseling Program Information

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Genetic Counseling Program Information for Potential Applicants #12;Page 2 of 12 8.24.11 Program Overview "Genetic counseling is the process of helping people understand and adapt to the medical of Genetic Counselors Definition Task Force. Journal of Genetic Counseling (2006); 15(2):77-83. The practice

  2. Integrative Bayesian analysis of neuroimaging-genetic data with application to cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Azadeh, Shabnam; Hobbs, Brian P; Ma, Liangsuo; Nielsen, David A; Moeller, F Gerard; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran

    2016-01-15

    Neuroimaging and genetic studies provide distinct and complementary information about the structural and biological aspects of a disease. Integrating the two sources of data facilitates the investigation of the links between genetic variability and brain mechanisms among different individuals for various medical disorders. This article presents a general statistical framework for integrative Bayesian analysis of neuroimaging-genetic (iBANG) data, which is motivated by a neuroimaging-genetic study in cocaine dependence. Statistical inference necessitated the integration of spatially dependent voxel-level measurements with various patient-level genetic and demographic characteristics under an appropriate probability model to account for the multiple inherent sources of variation. Our framework uses Bayesian model averaging to integrate genetic information into the analysis of voxel-wise neuroimaging data, accounting for spatial correlations in the voxels. Using multiplicity controls based on the false discovery rate, we delineate voxels associated with genetic and demographic features that may impact diffusion as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) obtained from DTI images. We demonstrate the benefits of accounting for model uncertainties in both model fit and prediction. Our results suggest that cocaine consumption is associated with FA reduction in most white matter regions of interest in the brain. Additionally, gene polymorphisms associated with GABAergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmitters and receptors were associated with FA. PMID:26484829

  3. Critical overview of applications of genetic testing in sport talent identification.

    PubMed

    Roth, Stephen M

    2012-12-01

    Talent identification for future sport performance is of paramount interest for many groups given the challenges of finding and costs of training potential elite athletes. Because genetic factors have been implicated in many performance- related traits (strength, endurance, etc.), a natural inclination is to consider the addition of genetic testing to talent identification programs. While the importance of genetic factors to sport performance is generally not disputed, whether genetic testing can positively inform talent identification is less certain. The present paper addresses the science behind the genetic tests that are now commercially available (some under patent protection) and aimed at predicting future sport performance potential. Also discussed are the challenging ethical issues that emerge from the availability of these tests. The potential negative consequences associated with genetic testing of young athletes will very likely outweigh any positive benefit for sport performance prediction at least for the next several years. The paper ends by exploring the future possibilities for genetic testing as the science of genomics in sport matures over the coming decade(s). PMID:22789017

  4. Development and application of SINE multilocus and quantitative genetic markers to study oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) crops.

    PubMed

    Allnutt, T R; Roper, K; Henry, C

    2008-01-23

    A genetic marker system based on the S1 Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs) in the important commercial crop, oilseed rape ( Brassica napus L.) has been developed. SINEs provided a successful multilocus, dominant marker system that was capable of clearly delineating winter- and spring-type crop varieties. Sixteen of 20 varieties tested showed unique profiles from the 17 polymorphic SINE markers generated. The 3' or 5' flank region of nine SINE markers were cloned, and DNA was sequenced. In addition, one putative pre-transposition SINE allele was cloned and sequenced. Two SINE flanking sequences were used to design real-time PCR assays. These quantitative SINE assays were applied to study the genetic structure of eight fields of oilseed rape crops. Studied fields were more genetically diverse than expected for the chosen loci (mean H T = 0.23). The spatial distribution of SINE marker frequencies was highly structured in some fields, suggesting locations of volunteer impurities within the crop. In one case, the assay identified a mislabeling of the crop variety. SINE markers were a useful tool for crop genetics, phylogenetics, variety identification, and purity analysis. The use and further application of quantitative, real-time PCR markers are discussed. PMID:18092752

  5. Application of long-range and binding reverse transcription-quantitative PCR to indicate the viral integrities of noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; De Keuckelaere, Ann; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-10-01

    This study intends to establish and apply methods evaluating both viral capsid and genome integrities of human noroviruses (NoVs), which thus far remain nonculturable. Murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) and human NoV GII.4 in phosphate-buffered saline suspensions were treated with heat, UV light, or ethanol and detected by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), long-range RT-qPCR, binding RT-qPCR, and binding long-range RT-qPCR. For MNV-1 heated at 60°C for 2 and 30 min, limited reductions of genomic copies (<0.3-log) were obtained by RT-qPCR and long-range RT-qPCR, while the cell-binding pretreatments obtained higher reductions (>1.89-log reduction after 60°C for 30 min by binding long-range RT-qPCR). The human NoV GII.4 was found to be more heat resistant than MNV-1. For both MNV-1 and human NoV GII.4 after UV treatments of 20 and 200 mJ/cm(2), no significant difference (P > 0.05) was observed between the dose-dependent reductions obtained by the four detection methodologies. Treatment of 70% ethanol for 1 min was shown to be more effective for inactivation of both MNV-1 and human NoV GII.4 than the heat and UV treatments used in this study. Subsequently, eight raspberry and four shellfish samples previously shown to be naturally contaminated with human NoVs by RT-qPCR (GI and GII; thus, 24 RT-qPCR signals) were subjected to comparison by this method. RT-qPCR, long-range RT-qPCR, binding RT-qPCR, and binding long-range RT-qPCR detected 20/24, 14/24, 24/24, and 23/24 positive signals, respectively, indicating the abundant presence of intact NoV particles. PMID:25107982

  6. Application of Long-Range and Binding Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR To Indicate the Viral Integrities of Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    De Keuckelaere, Ann; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    This study intends to establish and apply methods evaluating both viral capsid and genome integrities of human noroviruses (NoVs), which thus far remain nonculturable. Murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) and human NoV GII.4 in phosphate-buffered saline suspensions were treated with heat, UV light, or ethanol and detected by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), long-range RT-qPCR, binding RT-qPCR, and binding long-range RT-qPCR. For MNV-1 heated at 60°C for 2 and 30 min, limited reductions of genomic copies (<0.3-log) were obtained by RT-qPCR and long-range RT-qPCR, while the cell-binding pretreatments obtained higher reductions (>1.89-log reduction after 60°C for 30 min by binding long-range RT-qPCR). The human NoV GII.4 was found to be more heat resistant than MNV-1. For both MNV-1 and human NoV GII.4 after UV treatments of 20 and 200 mJ/cm2, no significant difference (P > 0.05) was observed between the dose-dependent reductions obtained by the four detection methodologies. Treatment of 70% ethanol for 1 min was shown to be more effective for inactivation of both MNV-1 and human NoV GII.4 than the heat and UV treatments used in this study. Subsequently, eight raspberry and four shellfish samples previously shown to be naturally contaminated with human NoVs by RT-qPCR (GI and GII; thus, 24 RT-qPCR signals) were subjected to comparison by this method. RT-qPCR, long-range RT-qPCR, binding RT-qPCR, and binding long-range RT-qPCR detected 20/24, 14/24, 24/24, and 23/24 positive signals, respectively, indicating the abundant presence of intact NoV particles. PMID:25107982

  7. Design and analysis of genetical genomics studies and their potential applications in livestock research 

    E-print Network

    Lam, Alex C.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping has been widely used to identify genetic loci attributable to the variation observed in complex traits. In recent years, gene expression phenotypes have emerged as a new type of ...

  8. Application of Genetic Algorithms and Thermogravimetry to Determine the Kinetics of Polyurethane Foam in Smoldering Combustion 

    E-print Network

    Rein, Guillermo; Lautenberger, Chris; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Torero, Jose L; Urban, David

    In this work, the kinetic parameters governing the thermal and oxidative degradation of flexible polyurethane foam are determined using thermogravimetric data and a genetic algorithm. These kinetic parameters are needed ...

  9. Application of a multiple-trait, multiple-country genetic evaluation model for female fertility traits.

    PubMed

    Nilforooshan, M A; Jakobsen, J H; Fikse, W F; Berglund, B; Jorjani, H

    2010-12-01

    The need to implement a method that can handle multiple traits per country in international genetic evaluations is evident. Today, many countries have implemented multiple-trait national genetic evaluations and they may expect to have their traits simultaneously analyzed in international genetic evaluations. Traits from the same country are residually correlated and the method currently in use, single-trait multiple across-country evaluation (ST-MACE), cannot handle nonzero residual correlations. Therefore, multiple-trait, multiple across-country evaluation (MT-MACE) was proposed to handle several traits from the same country simultaneously. To test the robustness of MT-MACE on real data, female fertility was chosen as a complex trait with low heritability. Data from 7 Holstein populations, 3 with 2 traits and 4 with 1 trait, were used. The differences in the estimated genetic correlations by MT-MACE and the single ST-MACE analysis (average absolute deviation of 0.064) were due to the bias of considering several traits from the same country in the ST-MACE analysis. However, the differences between the estimated genetic correlations by MT-MACE and multiple ST-MACE analyses avoiding more than one trait per country in each analysis (average absolute deviation of 0.066) were due to the lack of analysis of the correlated traits from the same country together and using the reported within-country genetic correlations. Applying MT-MACE resulted in reliability gain in international genetic evaluations, which was different from trait to trait and from bull to bull. The average reliability gain by MT-MACE over ST-MACE was 3.0 points for domestic bulls and 6.3 points for foreign bulls. Even countries with 1 trait benefited from the joint analysis of traits from the 2-trait countries. Another superiority of MT-MACE over ST-MACE is that the bulls that do not have national genetic evaluation for some traits from multiple trait countries will receive international genetic evaluations for those traits. Rank correlations were high between ST-MACE and MT-MACE when considering all bulls. However, the situation was different for the top 100 bulls. Simultaneous analysis of traits from the same country affected bull ranks, especially for top 100 bulls. Multi-trait MACE is a recommendable and robust method for international genetic evaluations and is appropriate for handling multiple traits per country, which can increase the reliability of international genetic evaluations. PMID:21094772

  10. Isolobal analogies in intermetallics: the reversed approximation MO approach and applications to CrGa4- and Ir3Ge7-type phases.

    PubMed

    Yannello, Vincent J; Kilduff, Brandon J; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2014-03-01

    Intermetallic phases offer a wealth of unique and unexplained structural features, which pose exciting challenges for the development of new bonding concepts. In this article, we present a straightforward approach to rapidly building bonding descriptions of such compounds: the reversed approximation Molecular Orbital (raMO) method. In this approach, we reverse the usual technique of using linear combinations of simple functions to approximate true wave functions and employ the fully occupied crystal orbitals of a compound as a basis set for the determination of the eigenfunctions of a simple, chemically transparent model Hamiltonian. The solutions fall into two sets: (1) a series of functions representing the best-possible approximations to the model system's eigenstates constructible from the occupied crystal orbitals and (2) a second series of functions that are orthogonal to the bonding picture represented by the model Hamiltonian. The electronic structure of a compound is thus quickly resolved into a series of orthogonal bonding subsystems. We first demonstrate the raMO analysis on a familiar molecule, 1,3-butadiene, and then move to illustrating its use in discovering new bonding phenomena through applications to three intermetallic phases: the PtHg4-type CrGa4 and the Ir3Ge7-type compounds Os3Sn7 and Ir3Sn7. For CrGa4, a density of states (DOS) minimum coinciding with its Fermi energy is traced to 18-electron configurations on the Cr atoms. For Os3Sn7 and Ir3Sn7, 18-electron configurations also underlie DOS pseudogaps. This time, however, the 18-electron counts involve multicenter interactions isolobal with classical Ir-Ir or Os-Os covalent bonds, as well as Sn-Sn single bonds serving as electron reservoirs. Our results are based on DFT-calibrated Hückel calculations, but in principle the raMO analysis can be implemented in any method employing one-electron wave functions. PMID:24555770

  11. Control of Wettability of Carbon Nanotube Array by Reversible Dry Oxidation for Superhydrophobic Coating and Supercapacitor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aria, Adrianus Indrat

    In this thesis, dry chemical modification methods involving UV/ozone, oxygen plasma, and vacuum annealing treatments are explored to precisely control the wettability of CNT arrays. The effect of oxidation using UV/ozone and oxygen plasma treatments is highly reversible as long as the O/C ratio of the CNT arrays is kept below 18%. At O/C ratios higher than 18%, the effect of oxidation is no longer reversible. This irreversible oxidation is caused by irreversible changes to the CNT atomic structure during the oxidation process. During the oxidation process, CNT arrays undergo three different processes. For CNT arrays with O/C ratios lower than 40%, the oxidation process results in the functionalization of CNT outer walls by oxygenated groups. Although this functionalization process introduces defects, vacancies and micropores opening, the graphitic structure of the CNT is still largely intact. For CNT arrays with O/C ratios between 40% and 45%, the oxidation process results in the etching of CNT outer walls. This etching process introduces large scale defects and holes that can be obviously seen under TEM at high magnification. Most of these holes are found to be several layers deep and, in some cases, a large portion of the CNT side walls are cut open. For CNT arrays with O/C ratios higher than 45%, the oxidation process results in the exfoliation of the CNT walls and amorphization of the remaining CNT structure. This amorphization process can be implied from the disappearance of C-C sp2 peak in the XPS spectra associated with the pi-bond network. The impact behavior of water droplet impinging on superhydrophobic CNT arrays in a low viscosity regime is investigated for the first time. Here, the experimental data are presented in the form of several important impact behavior characteristics including critical Weber number, volume ratio, restitution coefficient, and maximum spreading diameter. As observed experimentally, three different impact regimes are identified while another impact regime is proposed. These regimes are partitioned by three critical Weber numbers, two of which are experimentally observed. The volume ratio between the primary and the secondary droplets is found to decrease with the increase of Weber number in all impact regimes other than the first one. In the first impact regime, this is found to be independent of Weber number since the droplet remains intact during and subsequent to the impingement. Experimental data show that the coefficient of restitution decreases with the increase of Weber number in all impact regimes. The rate of decrease of the coefficient of restitution in the high Weber number regime is found to be higher than that in the low and moderate Weber number. Experimental data also show that the maximum spreading factor increases with the increase of Weber number in all impact regimes. The rate of increase of the maximum spreading factor in the high Weber number regime is found to be higher than that in the low and moderate Weber number. Phenomenological approximations and interpretations of the experimental data, as well as brief comparisons to the previously proposed scaling laws, are shown here. Dry oxidation methods are used for the first time to characterize the influence of oxidation on the capacitive behavior of CNT array EDLCs. The capacitive behavior of CNT array EDLCs can be tailored by varying their oxygen content, represented by their O/C ratio. The specific capacitance of these CNT arrays increases with the increase of their oxygen content in both KOH and Et4NBF4/PC electrolytes. As a result, their gravimetric energy density increases with the increase of their oxygen content. However, their gravimetric power density decreases with the increase of their oxygen content. The optimally oxidized CNT arrays are able to withstand more than 35,000 charge/discharge cycles in Et4NBF4/PC at a current density of 5 A/g while only losing 10% of their original capacitance. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  12. Analysis of Genetic Variation and Potential Applications in Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, João G. R.; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Herrgård, Markus J.; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation is the motor of evolution and allows organisms to overcome the environmental challenges they encounter. It can be both beneficial and harmful in the process of engineering cell factories for the production of proteins and chemicals. Throughout the history of biotechnology, there have been efforts to exploit genetic variation in our favor to create strains with favorable phenotypes. Genetic variation can either be present in natural populations or it can be artificially created by mutagenesis and selection or adaptive laboratory evolution. On the other hand, unintended genetic variation during a long term production process may lead to significant economic losses and it is important to understand how to control this type of variation. With the emergence of next-generation sequencing technologies, genetic variation in microbial strains can now be determined on an unprecedented scale and resolution by re-sequencing thousands of strains systematically. In this article, we review challenges in the integration and analysis of large-scale re-sequencing data, present an extensive overview of bioinformatics methods for predicting the effects of genetic variants on protein function, and discuss approaches for interfacing existing bioinformatics approaches with genome-scale models of cellular processes in order to predict effects of sequence variation on cellular phenotypes. PMID:25763369

  13. Applications of Multiple Nuclear Genes to the Molecular Phylogeny, Population Genetics and Hybrid Identification in the Mangrove Genus Rhizophora

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongmei; Hou, Yansong; Guo, Zixiao; Wang, Wenqing; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2015-01-01

    The genus Rhizophora is one of the most important components of mangrove forests. It is an ideal system for studying biogeography, molecular evolution, population genetics, hybridization and conservation genetics of mangroves. However, there are no sufficient molecular markers to address these topics. Here, we developed 77 pairs of nuclear gene primers, which showed successful PCR amplifications across all five Rhizophora species and sequencing in R. apiculata. Here, we present three tentative applications using a subset of the developed nuclear genes to (I) reconstruct the phylogeny, (II) examine the genetic structure and (III) identify natural hybridization in Rhizophora. Phylogenetic analyses support the hypothesis that Rhizophora had disappeared in the Atlantic-East Pacific (AEP) region and was re-colonized from the IWP region approximately 12.7 Mya. Population genetics analyses in four natural populations of R. apiculata in Hainan, China, revealed extremely low genetic diversity, strong population differentiation and extensive admixture, suggesting that the Pleistocene glaciations, particularly the last glacial maximum, greatly influenced the population dynamics of R. apiculata in Hainan. We also verified the hybrid status of a morphologically intermediate individual between R. apiculata and R. stylosa in Hainan. Based on the sequences of five nuclear genes and one chloroplast intergenic spacer, this individual is likely to be an F1 hybrid, with R. stylosa as its maternal parent. The nuclear gene markers developed in this study should be of great value for characterizing the hybridization and introgression patterns in other cases of this genus and testing the role of natural selection using population genomics approaches. PMID:26674070

  14. Characterization of Reverse Genetics-Derived Cold-Adapted Master Donor Virus A/Leningrad/134/17/57 (H2N2) and Reassortants with H5N1 Surface Genes in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Chen, Li-Mei; Bourgeois, Melissa; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Voeten, J. Theo M.; Heldens, Jacco G. M.; van den Bosch, Han; Klimov, Alexander; Rudenko, Larisa; Cox, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) offer significant advantages over subunit or split inactivated vaccines to mitigate an eventual influenza pandemic, including simpler manufacturing processes and more cross-protective immune responses. Using an established reverse genetics (rg) system for wild-type (wt) A/Leningrad/134/1957 and cold-adapted (ca) A/Leningrad/134/17/1957 (Len17) master donor virus (MDV), we produced and characterized three rg H5N1 reassortant viruses carrying modified HA and intact NA genes from either A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1, VN1203, clade 1) or A/Egypt/321/2007 (H5N1, EG321, clade 2) virus. A mouse model of infection was used to determine the infectivity and tissue tropism of the parental wt viruses compared to the ca master donor viruses as well as the H5N1 reassortants. All ca viruses showed reduced replication in lungs and enhanced replication in nasal epithelium. In addition, the H5N1 HA and NA enhanced replication in lungs unless it was restricted by the internal genes of the ca MDV. Mice inoculated twice 4 weeks apart with the H5N1 reassortant LAIV candidate viruses developed serum hemagglutination inhibition HI and IgA antibody titers to the homologous and heterologous viruses consistent with protective immunity. These animals remained healthy after challenge inoculation with a lethal dose with homologous or heterologous wt H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. The profiles of viral replication in respiratory tissues and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy characteristics of the two ca H5N1 candidate LAIV viruses warrant further development into a vaccine for human use. PMID:24648485

  15. Application of integrated genetic monitoring: the optimal approach for detecting environmental carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Legator, M S; Au, W W

    1994-01-01

    Short-term in vitro genetic toxicity assays have not fulfilled their anticipated role in predicting the carcinogenicity of environmental agents reliably and economically. A reduction in emphasis from nonanimal systems to relevant animal assays and population monitoring will help to reestablish the credibility of this field. An analysis of the various steps in the carcinogenic process indicates the biological responses occurring during these stages can be utilized for early detection of environmental carcinogens. Emphasis should be placed on using the earliest significant response that indicates genetic damage (e.g., gene mutations and chromosome alterations). Assays that detect pregenomic damage (e.g., adduct formation), without evidence of subsequent heritable genetic alterations, may produce misleading results for risk assessment and should not be considered as stand-alone monitoring procedures. Late biological responses may occur in tissues or organs where genetic damage may be difficult to measure, and the opportunity for intervention diminishes as we approach the clinical outcome. For example, analyzing localized cells that contain activated protooncogenes and inactivated tumor suppressor genes, although they further document adverse response from exposure to carcinogens, may be of greater value for indicating clinical outcome than for genetic monitoring. With few notable exceptions, the window of opportunity for genetic monitoring is the period after exposure where genetic damage is evident and where circulating lymphocytes can faithfully record this damage. An ongoing study of butadiene-exposed workers illustrates an optimum protocol, where multiple assays can be carried out and correlated with both external and internal measurements of exposure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7698074

  16. Genetic variation and its maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.F.; De Stefano, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains several papers divided among three sections. The section titles are: Genetic Diversity--Its Dimensions; Genetic Diversity--Its Origin and Maintenance; and Genetic Diversity--Applications and Problems of Complex Characters.

  17. Quantitative determination of casein genetic variants in goat milk: Application in Girgentana dairy goat breed.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, Maria; Segreto, Roberta; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Mastrangelo, Salvatore; Sardina, Maria Teresa

    2016-02-01

    The study was conducted to develop a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method to quantify casein genetic variants (?s2-, ?-, and ?-casein) in milk of homozygous individuals of Girgentana goat breed. For calibration experiments, pure genetic variants were extracted from individual milk samples of animals with known genotypes. The described HPLC approach was precise, accurate and highly suitable for quantification of goat casein genetic variants of homozygous individuals. The amount of each casein per allele was: ?s2-casein A = 2.9 ± 0.8 g/L and F = 1.8 ± 0.4 g/L; ?-casein C = 3.0 ± 0.8 g/L and C1 = 2.0 ± 0.7 g/L and ?-casein A = 1.6 ± 0.3 g/L and B = 1.1 ± 0.2 g/L. A good correlation was found between the quantities of ?s2-casein genetic variants A and F, and ?-casein C and C1 with other previously described method. The main important result was obtained for ?-casein because, till now, no data were available on quantification of single genetic variants for this protein. PMID:26304408

  18. Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Arthur M.

    1986-07-01

    Economic incentives have spurred numerous applications of genetically engineered organisms in manufacture of pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. These successes, involving a variety of methods of genetic manipulation, have dispelled early fears that genetic engineering could not be handled safely, even in the laboratory. Consequently, the potential for applications in the wider environment without physical containment is being considered for agriculture, mining, pollution control, and pest control. These proposed applications range from modest extensions of current plant breeding techniques for new disease-resistant species to radical combinations of organisms (for example, nitrogen-fixing corn plants). These applications raise concerns about potential ecological impacts (see chapter 5), largely because of adverse experiences with both deliberate and inadvertent introductions of nonindigenous species.

  19. Forward and reverse mutagenesis in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kutscher, Lena M.; Shaham, Shai

    2014-01-01

    Mutagenesis drives natural selection. In the lab, mutations allow gene function to be deciphered. C. elegans is highly amendable to functional genetics because of its short generation time, ease of use, and wealth of available gene-alteration techniques. Here we provide an overview of historical and contemporary methods for mutagenesis in C. elegans, and discuss principles and strategies for forward (genome-wide mutagenesis) and reverse (target-selected and gene-specific mutagenesis) genetic studies in this animal. PMID:24449699

  20. Genetic Engineering of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Its Application in Human Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Conrad P.; Gomez, José A.; Mirotsou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The use of stem cells for tissue regeneration and repair is advancing both at the bench and bedside. Stem cells isolated from bone marrow are currently being tested for their therapeutic potential in a variety of clinical conditions including cardiovascular injury, kidney failure, cancer, and neurological and bone disorders. Despite the advantages, stem cell therapy is still limited by low survival, engraftment, and homing to damage area as well as inefficiencies in differentiating into fully functional tissues. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells is being explored as a means to circumvent some of these problems. This review presents the current understanding of the use of genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells in human disease therapy with emphasis on genetic modifications aimed to improve survival, homing, angiogenesis, and heart function after myocardial infarction. Advancements in other disease areas are also discussed. PMID:20825283

  1. Sequence-specific retention calculator. A family of peptide retention time prediction algorithms in reversed-phase HPLC: applicability to various chromatographic conditions and columns.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Vic; Yamchuk, Andriy; Cortens, John; Sousa, Sandra; Ens, Werner; Standing, Kenneth G; Wilkins, John A; Krokhin, Oleg V

    2007-11-15

    Separation selectivity of C18 reversed-phase columns from different manufacturers has been compared to evaluate the applicability of our sequence-specific retention calculator (SSRCalc) peptide retention prediction algorithms. Three different versions of SSRCalc are currently in use: 300-A pore size sorbents (TFA as ion-pairing modifier, pH 2), 100 A (TFA, pH 2), and 100 A (pH 10), which have been applied for the separation of randomly chosen mixture of tryptic peptides. The major factor affecting separation selectivity of C18 sorbents was found to be apparent pore size, while differences in end-capping chemistry do not introduce a significant impact. The introduction of embedded polar groups to the C18 functionality increases the retention of peptides containing hydrophobic amino acid residues with polar groups: Tyr and Trp. We also demonstrate that changing the ion-pairing modifier to formic/acetic acid significantly reduces the algorithm's predictive ability, so models developed for different eluent conditions cannot be compared directly to each other. PMID:17939646

  2. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy and its application in the Sudan dyes residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liang; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-31

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a hotspot owing to the dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the MMIPs were obtained by the surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using Sudan I as the template. The resultant MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction. Benefiting from the controlled/living property of the RAFT strategy, the uniform MIP layer was successfully grafted on the surface of RAFT agent-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, favoring the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four Sudan dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV) from chili powder samples. The recoveries of the spiked samples in chili powder samples ranged from 74.1 to 93.3% with RSD lower than 6.4% and the relative standard uncertainty lower than 0.029. This work provided a good platform for the extraction and removal of Sudan dyes in complicated matrixes and demonstrated a bright future for the application of the well-constructed MMIPs in the field of solid-phase extraction. PMID:26077971

  3. Surfactant-Free Vanadium Oxides from Reverse Micelles and Organic Oxidants: Solution Processable Nanoribbons with Potential Applicability as Battery Insertion Electrodes Assembled in Different Configurations.

    PubMed

    Tartaj, Pedro; Amarilla, Jose M; Vazquez-Santos, Maria B

    2015-11-17

    Vanadium oxides similar to other metal transition oxides are prototypes of multifunctionality. Implementing new synthesis routes that lead to dry vanadium oxide nanomaterials with good functional and structural properties as well as good processing capabilities is thus of general interest. Here we report a facile method based on reverse micelles for the growth at room temperature and atmospheric pressure of surfactant-free vanadium oxide nanoribbons that retain after drying excellent solution-processable capabilities. Essential for the success of the method is the use of a soluble organic oxidant that acts as oxidant and cosurfactant during the synthesis, and facilitates surfactant removal with a simple washing protocol. Interestingly, this simple surfactant removal protocol could be of general applicability. As a proof-of-concept of the functional, structural, and processing capabilities of the dry vanadium oxide nanoribbons here prepared, we have checked their lithium insertion capabilities as battery cathodes built upon different configurations. Specifically, we show efficient insertion both in dry nanoribbons processed as films using doctor blade and organic solvents and in dry nanoribbons infiltrated in three-dimensional metal collectors from aqueous suspensions. PMID:26513340

  4. Preparation, characterization and application of a reversed phase liquid chromatography/hydrophilic interaction chromatography mixed-mode C18-DTT stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Long, Yao; Yao, Lin; Xu, Li; Shi, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Lanying

    2016-01-01

    A mixed-mode chromatographic stationary phase, C18-DTT (dithiothreitol) silica (SiO2) was prepared through "thiol-ene" click chemistry. The obtained material was characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscope, nitrogen adsorption analysis and contact angle analysis. Chromatographic performance of the C18-DTT was systemically evaluated by studying the effect of acetonitrile content, pH, buffer concentration of the mobile phase and column temperature. It was demonstrated that the novel stationary phase possessed reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC)/hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mixed-mode property. The stop-flow test revealed that C18-DTT exhibited excellent compatibility with 100% aqueous mobile phase. Additionally, the stability and column-to-column reproducibility of the C18-DTT material were satisfactory, with relative standard deviations of retention factor of the tested analytes (verapamil, fenbufen, guanine, tetrandrine and nicotinic acid) in the range of 1.82-3.72% and 0.85-1.93%, respectively. Finally, the application of C18-DTT column was demonstrated in the separation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aromatic carboxylic acids, alkaloids, nucleo-analytes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. It had great resolving power in the analysis of various compounds in HILIC and RPLC chromatographic conditions and was a promising RPLC/HILIC mixed-mode stationary phase. PMID:26695288

  5. Reversible ion exchange and structural stability of garnet-type Nb-doped Li7La3Zr2O12 in water for applications in lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cai; Rui, Kun; Shen, Chen; Badding, Michael E.; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-05-01

    H+/Li+ ion exchange and structural stability of the high ionic conductivity Nb-doped Zr-garnet Li6.75La3Nb0.25Zr1.75O12 (LLNZO) are investigated in this study. Relationships between ion exchange and Li-population per unit cell, which are necessary to establish the practical framework of garnet electrolytes, are deduced for garnet oxides within ion-exchange process. H+/Li+ ion exchange of cubic LLNZO powder is performed continuously in distilled water and products with various exchange levels are obtained via this simple method. FTIR spectra show the evolution of H-O bonding through the ion-exchange process. A maximum of 74.8% exchange of Li+ by H+ was found, consistent with a preferential replacement of octahedrally coordinated Li. The cubic garnet phase is maintained throughout all levels of proton exchange observed. The formation of garnet-type solid solution of Li6.75-xHxLa3Nb0.25Zr1.75O12 is indicated by well-resolved lattice fringes as well as the linear evolution of crystal lattice parameters with the ion exchange level. The reverse ion exchange of H+ by Li+ is successfully achieved in Li+ containing aqueous solutions, demonstrating its high structural stability and good compatibility for promising applications in lithium batteries.

  6. The Applications of Genetic Algorithms in Stock Market Data Mining Optimisation

    E-print Network

    Cao, Longbing

    : Technical trading rule; Genetic Algorithm; sub-domain; Parameter combination; 1 Introduction In stock market of trading rules from which the current GA may have been applied to. In stock market, when the brokers of trading (price changes, volume of transactions, etc.) in a certain stock or in "the Averages

  7. A genetic linkage map of the mouse: Current applications and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A.; Gilbert, D.J. ); Eppig, J.T.; Maltais, L.J.; Nadeau, J.H. ); Miller, J.C.; Dietrich, W.F.; Weaver, A.; Lincoln, S.E.; Steen, R.G.; Steing, L.D.; Lander, E.S. )

    1993-10-01

    Technological advances have made possible the development of high-resolution genetic linkage maps for the mouse. These maps in turn offer exciting prospects for understanding mammalian genome evolution through comparative mapping, for developing mouse models of human disease, and for identifying the function of all genes in the organism.

  8. Application of resistance gene analog markers to analysis of genetic structure and diversity in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant disease resistance gene analog (RGA) markers were designed according to the conserved sequence of known resistance gene analogs and were used to map resistance genes. We used genome-wide RGA markers for analysis of genetic structure and diversity in a global rice germplasm collection. In total...

  9. Application of exome sequencing in the search for genetic causes of rare disorders of copper metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sabine A; Harakalova, Magdalena; van Haaften, Gijs; van Hasselt, Peter M; Cuppen, Edwin; Houwen, Roderick H J

    2012-07-01

    The genetic defect in a number of rare disorders of metal metabolism remains elusive. The limited number of patients with these disorders impedes the identification of the causative gene through positional cloning, which requires numerous families with multiple affected individuals. However, with next-generation sequencing all coding DNA (exomes) or whole genomes of patients can be sequenced to identify genes that are consistently mutated in patients. With this strategy only a limited number of patients and/or pedigrees is needed, bringing the elucidation of the genetic cause of even very rare diseases within reach. The main challenge associated with whole exome sequencing is the identification of the disease-causing mutation(s) among abundant genetic candidate variants. We describe several strategies to manage this data wealth, including comparison with control databases, increasing the number of patients and controls, and reducing the genomic region under investigation through homozygosity mapping. In this review we introduce a number of rare disorders of copper metabolism, with a suspected but yet unknown monogenetic cause, as an attractive target for this strategy. We anticipate that use of these novel techniques will identify the basic defect in the disorders described in this review, as well as in other genetic disorders of metal metabolism, in the next few years. PMID:22555275

  10. Fuzzy Logic Controller Based on Observed Signals and a Genetic Algorithm Application with STATCOM for Power System Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongesombut, Komsan; Mitani, Yasunori; Tsuji, Kiichiro

    Fuzzy logic control has been applied to various applications in power systems. Its control rules and membership functions are typically obtained by trial and error methods or experience knowledge. Proposed here is the application of a micro-genetic algorithm (micro-GA) to simultaneously design optimal membership functions and control rules for STATCOM. First, we propose a simple approach to extract membership functions and fuzzy logic control rules based on observed signals. Then a proposed GA will be applied to optimize membership functions and its control rules. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, several simulation studies have been performed on a multimachine power system. Simulation results show that the proposed fuzzy logic controller with STATCOM can effectively and robustly enhance the damping of oscillations.

  11. Electroporation-mediated genetic vaccination for antigen mapping: application to Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA protein.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Bita; Gnidehou, Sédami; Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Doritchamou, Justin; Moussiliou, Azizath; Quiviger, Mickael; Deloron, Philippe; Scherman, Daniel; Bigey, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    Genetic vaccination, consisting in delivering a genetically engineered plasmid DNA by a non-viral vector or technique into a tissue, is currently of great interest. New delivery technique including DNA transfer by electroporation recently greatly improved the potency of this concept. Because it avoids the step of producing a recombinant protein, it is particularly of use in studying the immunogenic properties of large proteins. Here we describe the use of electroporation mediated DNA immunization to identify important protective epitopes from the large VAR2CSA protein from Plasmodium falciparum implicated in the pathology of placental malaria. Immunizing mice and rabbit with DNA plasmids encoding different fragments of VAR2CSA leads to high titer antisera. Moreover an N-terminal region of the protein was found to induce protective functional antibodies. PMID:22265101

  12. Telegenetics: application of a tele-education program in genetic syndromes for Brazilian students.

    PubMed

    Maximino, Luciana Paula; Picolini-Pereira, Mirela Machado; Carvalho, José Luiz Brito

    2014-01-01

    With the high occurrence of genetic anomalies in Brazil and the manifestations of communication disorders associated with these conditions, the development of educative actions that comprise these illnesses can bring unique benefits in the identification and appropriate treatment of these clinical pictures. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and analyze an educational program in genetic syndromes for elementary students applied in two Brazilian states, using an Interactive Tele-education model. Material and Methods The study was carried out in 4 schools: two in the state of São Paulo, Southeast Region, Brazil, and two in the state of Amazonas, North Region, Brazil. Forty-five students, both genders, aged between 13 and 14 years, of the 9th grade of the basic education of both public and private system, were divided into two groups: 21 of São Paulo Group (SPG) and 24 of Amazonas Group (AMG). The educational program lasted about 3 months and was divided into two stages including both classroom and distance activities on genetic syndromes. The classroom activity was carried out separately in each school, with expository lessons, graphs and audiovisual contents. In the activity at a distance the educational content was presented to students by means of the Interactive Tele-education model. In this stage, the students had access a Cybertutor, using the Young Doctor Project methodology. In order to measure the effectiveness of the educational program, the Problem Situation Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Web Site Motivational Analysis Checklist adapted (FPM) were used. Results The program developed was effective for knowledge acquisition in 80% of the groups. FPM showed a high satisfaction index from the participants in relation to the Interactive Tele-education, evaluating the program as "awesome course". No statistically significant differences between the groups regarding type of school or state were observed. Conclusion Thus, the Tele-Education Program can be used as a tool for educational purposes in genetic syndromes of other populations, in several regions of Brazil. PMID:25591016

  13. Genetic Mapping

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fact Sheets Genetic Mapping En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human ...

  14. Genetic screening for the next decade: application of present and new technologies.

    PubMed

    McCabe, E R

    1991-01-01

    Molecular genetic technology is diffusing from the research laboratory to the clinical laboratory, where it has already begun to influence prenatal diagnosis and counseling. In the very near future, this technology will be applied more generally, using population-based screening strategies. Pilot programs are beginning to evaluate the technical feasibility and efficacy of recombinant DNA techniques for newborn screening follow-up. DNA-based population screening is being considered for heterozygous carriers of an autosomal recessive disorder such as cystic fibrosis in order to identify carrier couples at risk of having an affected child. We will review the current DNA methodologies in the context of three genetic disorders: sickle-cell disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and cystic fibrosis. We will then consider the requirements for implementation of these new technologies. We will conclude that implementation will require two key factors: machines and people. Machines are required to automate molecular genetic procedures, which are currently personnel-intensive, so that the expense can be reduced and the procedures made more cost-effective. The people who are required are health professionals knowledgeable in the clinical aspects of the target disorders, as well as in the DNA laboratory testing. These professionals will be able to facilitate sample acquisition and information exchange among the laboratory, the primary health care provider, and the families requesting consultation. PMID:1680260

  15. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways in Ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, meabolic, signaling) t...

  16. The application of PCR and reverse line blot hybridization to detect arthropod-borne hemopathogens of dogs and cats in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Georges, Karla; Ezeokoli, Chukwudozi D; Newaj-Fyzul, Aweeda; Campbell, Mervyn; Mootoo, Natasha; Mutani, Alexander; Sparagano, Olivier A E

    2008-12-01

    Arthropod-borne diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality of companion animals in Trinidad. As clinical signs are vague, more sensitive methods to diagnose these diseases based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by reverse line blot hybridization (RLB) of amplified products are being developed. An RLB of 14 oligonucleotide probes coupled with polymerase chain-amplified regions of 16S rRNA or 18S rRNA genes of hemoparasites from cats and dogs detected Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Babesia canis vogeli, feline mycoplasmas ("Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum,"Mycoplasma haemofelis), and some unknown species within the Babesia/Theileria group and the Anaplasma/Ehrlichia tribe. Amplified products were obtained from blood samples collected from 348 dogs and 15 cats. Overall, hemopathogen DNA was detected in 92 (26.4%) dogs and six (40.0%) cats. E. canis (49, 14.1%) and feline mycoplasma (5, 33.3%) DNA were most frequently identified in dogs and cats, respectively. B. canis vogeli (1, 6.7%) and E. canis (1, 6.7%) were also detected in cats. Mixed infections of Anaplasma/Ehrlichia sp. and Babesia sp. were present in five (1.4%) dogs, while mixed infections of the feline mycoplasmas were present in two (13.3%) cats, one of which was also positive for E. canis. Pyrexia was significantly associated with a positive RLB result in dogs (P= 0.00, chi(2), 1 df). This is the first reported application of macro-arraying techniques to detect arthropod-borne hemopathogens of companion animals in the Americas and the first detection of DNA of B. canis vogeli and E. canis in cats in Trinidad. PMID:19120209

  17. Addressing Genetics Delivering Health

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Addressing Genetics Delivering Health A strategy for advancing the dissemination and application of genetics knowledge throughout our health professions Funded by Hilary Burton September 2003 Executive Summary #12;Summary of Recommendations Establishment of a national Steering Group for Genetics Education q

  18. An application of kernel methods to variety identification based on SSR markers genetic fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In crop production systems, genetic markers are increasingly used to distinguish individuals within a larger population based on their genetic make-up. Supervised approaches cannot be applied directly to genotyping data due to the specific nature of those data which are neither continuous, nor nominal, nor ordinal but only partially ordered. Therefore, a strategy is needed to encode the polymorphism between samples such that known supervised approaches can be applied. Moreover, finding a minimal set of molecular markers that have optimal ability to discriminate, for example, between given groups of varieties, is important as the genotyping process can be costly in terms of laboratory consumables, labor, and time. This feature selection problem also needs special care due to the specific nature of the data used. Results An approach encoding SSR polymorphisms in a positive definite kernel is presented, which then allows the usage of any kernel supervised method. The polymorphism between the samples is encoded through the Nei-Li genetic distance, which is shown to define a positive definite kernel between the genotyped samples. Additionally, a greedy feature selection algorithm for selecting SSR marker kits is presented to build economical and efficient prediction models for discrimination. The algorithm is a filter method and outperforms other filter methods adapted to this setting. When combined with kernel linear discriminant analysis or kernel principal component analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis, the approach leads to very satisfactory prediction models. Conclusions The main advantage of the approach is to benefit from a flexible way to encode polymorphisms in a kernel and when combined with a feature selection algorithm resulting in a few specific markers, it leads to accurate and economical identification models based on SSR genotyping. PMID:21595989

  19. Application of Genetic Algorithm to Optimal Design of Central Air-Conditioning Water System 

    E-print Network

    Feng, X.; Zou, Y.; Long, W.

    2006-01-01

    algorithm by simulating the biological genetic heredity and evolution. In the method, a mathematic model is built and the decision-making variable named gene is coded. A few genes form an individual named chromosome. A group of individuals composes of a... 5. CASE ANALYSIS 28-story Baoli square is a mixed- usefulness high-rising building with area of 35600 m2. It was built in Wuxi, jiangsu, China. The lower 3-story is commercial area. Floor 4~15 is for hotel and floor 16~27 is used for office...

  20. Genetic algorithm based adaptive neural network ensemble and its application in predicting carbon flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xue, Y.; Liu, S.; Hu, Y.; Yang, J.; Chen, Q.

    2007-01-01

    To improve the accuracy in prediction, Genetic Algorithm based Adaptive Neural Network Ensemble (GA-ANNE) is presented. Intersections are allowed between different training sets based on the fuzzy clustering analysis, which ensures the diversity as well as the accuracy of individual Neural Networks (NNs). Moreover, to improve the accuracy of the adaptive weights of individual NNs, GA is used to optimize the cluster centers. Empirical results in predicting carbon flux of Duke Forest reveal that GA-ANNE can predict the carbon flux more accurately than Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN), Bagging NN ensemble, and ANNE. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  1. Application of support vector machine and quantum genetic algorithm in infrared target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Huang, Yangwen; Ding, Haifei

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, a kind of classifier based on support vector machine (SVM) is designed for infrared target recognition. In allusion to the problem how to choose kernel parameter and error penalty factor, quantum genetic algorithm (QGA) is used to optimize the parameters of SVM model, it overcomes the shortcoming of determining its parameters after trial and error in the past. Classification experiments of infrared target features extracted by this method show that the convergence speed is fast and the rate of accurate recognition is high.

  2. Tubal ligation reversal

    MedlinePLUS

    Tubal ligation reversal is surgery done to allow a woman who has had her tubes tied (tubal ligation) to become pregnant again. The fallopian tubes are reconnected in this reversal surgery. A tubal ligation can't always be ...

  3. THE PARABOLIC WAVE APPROXIMATION AND TIME REVERSAL

    E-print Network

    Papanicolaou, George C.

    ­ focuses approximately on the source because of time­reversibility of the wave equation. The refocusing applications in medicine, underwater sound, wireless communications etc., and has been studied experimentally applications. One application is kidney stone destruction, when the signal reflected from a kidney stone

  4. THE PARABOLIC WAVE APPROXIMATION AND TIME REVERSAL

    E-print Network

    Papanicolaou, George C.

    - focuses approximately on the source because of time-reversibility of the wave equation. The refocusing applications in medicine, underwater sound, wireless communications etc., and has been studied experimentally applications. One application is kidney stone destruction, when the signal reflected from a kidney stone

  5. Reverse Sample Genome Probing, a New Technique for Identification of Bacteria in Environmental Samples by DNA Hybridization, and Its Application to the Identification of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Oil Field Samples

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Voordouw, Johanna K.; Karkhoff-Schweizer, Roxann R.; Fedorak, Phillip M.; Westlake, Donald W. S.

    1991-01-01

    A novel method for the identification of bacteria in environmental samples by DNA hybridization is presented. It is based on the fact that, even within a genus, the genomes of different bacteria may have little overall sequence homology. This allows the use of the labeled genomic DNA of a given bacterium (referred to as a “standard”) to probe for its presence and that of bacteria with highly homologous genomes in total DNA obtained from an environmental sample. Alternatively, total DNA extracted from the sample can be labeled and used to probe filters on which denatured chromosomal DNA from relevant bacterial standards has been spotted. The latter technique is referred to as reverse sample genome probing, since it is the reverse of the usual practice of deriving probes from reference bacteria for analyzing a DNA sample. Reverse sample genome probing allows identification of bacteria in a sample in a single step once a master filter with suitable standards has been developed. Application of reverse sample genome probing to the identification of sulfate-reducing bacteria in 31 samples obtained primarily from oil fields in the province of Alberta has indicated that there are at least 20 genotypically different sulfate-reducing bacteria in these samples. Images PMID:16348574

  6. Study on the application of parent-of-origin specific DNA methylation markers to forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guisen; Yang, Qingen; Huang, Daixin; Yu, Chunying; Yang, Rongzhi; Chen, Hui; Mei, Kun

    2005-11-25

    In paternity test, especially in motherless cases, the allele inherited from father (obligatory gene, OG) often cannot be determined. The paternity exclusion probability (PE) of a genetic marker is reduced considerably. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a new technique, by which the parental origin of alleles can be determined without genealogical analysis. In this paper, we explored the possibility of using parent-of-origin specific DNA methylation markers to determine the parental origin of alleles, choosing the imprinted single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) locus rs220028 (A/G) as a model system. We typed the SNP by mutagenically separated PCR (MS-PCR). The frequencies of alleles were A = 0.5085, G = 0.4915; the unbiased heterozygosity was 0.5020. In order to discriminate between the maternal allele and paternal allele, post-digestion MS-PCR, a novel PCR based methylation analysis and SNP typing technique was developed and performed on 18 heterozygous children, and the methylated maternal allele was detected specifically. As a pilot study on the use of epigenetic markers in forensic genetics, our results demonstrated the feasibility of using parent-of-origin specific DNA methylation markers to determine the parental origin of alleles. PMID:16182958

  7. Reverse Engineering Design Patterns

    E-print Network

    Herbordt, Martin

    Reverse Engineering Design Patterns Detecting Design Patterns in Compiled Programs. Thesis for MET CS Master of Science Tom VanCourt #12;Tom VanCourt Reverse Engineering Design Pattern Occurrences: Page 1 of 35 Detecting Design Patterns in Compiled Programs Reverse Engineering Design Pattern

  8. Intertransaction Class Association Rule Mining Based on Genetic Network Programming and Its Application to Stock Market Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuchen; Mabu, Shingo; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    Intertransaction association rules have been reported to be useful in many fields such as stock market prediction, but still there are not so many efficient methods to dig them out from large data sets. Furthermore, how to use and measure these more complex rules should be considered carefully. In this paper, we propose a new intertransaction class association rule mining method based on Genetic Network Programming (GNP), which has the ability to overcome some shortages of Apriori-like based intertransaction association methods. Moreover, a general classifier model for intertransaction rules is also introduced. In experiments on the real world application of stock market prediction, the method shows its efficiency and ability to obtain good results and can bring more benefits with a suitable classifier considering larger interval span.

  9. Binary Classification using Decision Tree based Genetic Programming and Its Application to Analysis of Bio-mass Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Cuong; Pham, Tuan D.

    2010-01-01

    In machine learning, pattern recognition may be the most popular task. "Similar" patterns identification is also very important in biology because first, it is useful for prediction of patterns associated with disease, for example cancer tissue (normal or tumor); second, similarity or dissimilarity of the kinetic patterns is used to identify coordinately controlled genes or proteins involved in the same regulatory process. Third, similar genes (proteins) share similar functions. In this paper, we present an algorithm which uses genetic programming to create decision tree for binary classification problem. The application of the algorithm was implemented on five real biological databases. Base on the results of comparisons with well-known methods, we see that the algorithm is outstanding in most of cases.

  10. Natural-Like Replication of an Unnatural Base Pair for the Expansion of the Genetic Alphabet and Biotechnology Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingjun; Degardin, Mélissa; Lavergne, Thomas; Malyshev, Denis A.; Dhami, Kirandeep; Ordoukhanian, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized a panel of unnatural base pairs whose pairing depends on hydrophobic and packing forces and identify dTPT3-dNaM, which is PCR amplified with a natural base pair-like efficiency and fidelity. In addition, the dTPT3 scaffold is uniquely tolerant of attaching a propargyl amine linker, resulting in the dTPT3PA-dNaM pair, which is amplified only slightly less well. The identification of dTPT3 represents significant progress towards developing an unnatural base pair for the in vivo expansion of an organism's genetic alphabet and for a variety of in vitro biotechnology applications where it is used to site-specifically label amplified DNA, and it also demonstrates for the first time that hydrophobic and packing forces are sufficient to mediate natural-like replication. PMID:24152106

  11. The Birmingham parallel genetic algorithm and its application to the direct DFT global optimisation of IrN (N = 10-20) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jack B. A.; Shayeghi, Armin; Horswell, Sarah L.; Johnston, Roy L.

    2015-08-01

    A new open-source parallel genetic algorithm, the Birmingham parallel genetic algorithm, is introduced for the direct density functional theory global optimisation of metallic nanoparticles. The program utilises a pool genetic algorithm methodology for the efficient use of massively parallel computational resources. The scaling capability of the Birmingham parallel genetic algorithm is demonstrated through its application to the global optimisation of iridium clusters with 10 to 20 atoms, a catalytically important system with interesting size-specific effects. This is the first study of its type on Iridium clusters of this size and the parallel algorithm is shown to be capable of scaling beyond previous size restrictions and accurately characterising the structures of these larger system sizes. By globally optimising the system directly at the density functional level of theory, the code captures the cubic structures commonly found in sub-nanometre sized Ir clusters.A new open-source parallel genetic algorithm, the Birmingham parallel genetic algorithm, is introduced for the direct density functional theory global optimisation of metallic nanoparticles. The program utilises a pool genetic algorithm methodology for the efficient use of massively parallel computational resources. The scaling capability of the Birmingham parallel genetic algorithm is demonstrated through its application to the global optimisation of iridium clusters with 10 to 20 atoms, a catalytically important system with interesting size-specific effects. This is the first study of its type on Iridium clusters of this size and the parallel algorithm is shown to be capable of scaling beyond previous size restrictions and accurately characterising the structures of these larger system sizes. By globally optimising the system directly at the density functional level of theory, the code captures the cubic structures commonly found in sub-nanometre sized Ir clusters. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR03774C

  12. ELSEVIER Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics 38 (1995) 203-207 Biomedical applications of electric pulses with special emphasis

    E-print Network

    Ljubljana, University of

    1995-01-01

    and reversible alteration of their cell membrane [1]. Consequently, the plasma membrane be- comes permeable to genetically modify any kind of bacterial, plant, fungal or animal cells [3-5]. At the cellular level, cell molecules, into living cells. Besides these in vitro applications, some in vivo applications have recently

  13. Dynamics of the Genetic Diversity of Subsurface Microbial Communities and Their Applications to Contaminated Site Cleanups

    EPA Science Inventory

    When compared to traditional approaches, the utilization of molecular and genomic techniques to soil and groundwater cleanup investigations can reduce inherent parameter variability when conducting bench and pilot-scale investigations or carrying out full-scale field applications...

  14. Calibration of neural networks using genetic algorithms, with application to optimal path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Terence R.; Pitney, Gilbert A.; Greenwood, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GA) are used to search the synaptic weight space of artificial neural systems (ANS) for weight vectors that optimize some network performance function. GAs do not suffer from some of the architectural constraints involved with other techniques and it is straightforward to incorporate terms into the performance function concerning the metastructure of the ANS. Hence GAs offer a remarkably general approach to calibrating ANS. GAs are applied to the problem of calibrating an ANS that finds optimal paths over a given surface. This problem involves training an ANS on a relatively small set of paths and then examining whether the calibrated ANS is able to find good paths between arbitrary start and end points on the surface.

  15. A new genetic distance with application to constrained variation at microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, L A

    1999-04-01

    Genetic variation at microsatellite loci is supposed to be constrained within some range in allele size. In this case, the average-square distance (delta mu)2 between two diverged populations moves asymptotically around and underestimates the time since the populations had split. A distance based on the between-locus correlation in the mean repeat scores, DR, is introduced. Numerical simulations show that DR is a linear function of time if the constraints are approximated by a linear centripetal force, which might be due to mutation bias toward a definite range or be caused both by directional mutation bias toward larger allele size and by selection against the greater number of repeats. PMID:10331272

  16. Application of cryopreservation to genetic analyses of a photosynthetic picoeukaryote community.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, Masanobu; Kataoka, Takafumi; Sato, Mayumi; Noël, Mary-Hélène; Kuwata, Akira; Demura, Mikihide; Yamaguchi, Haruyo

    2016-02-01

    Cryopreservation is useful for long-term maintenance of living strains in microbial culture collections. We applied this technique to environmental specimens from two monitoring sites at Sendai Bay, Japan and compared the microbial diversity of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes in samples before and after cryopreservation. Flow cytometry (FCM) showed no considerable differences between specimens. We used 2500 cells sorted with FCM for next-generation sequencing of 18S rRNA gene amplicons and after removing low-quality sequences obtained 10,088-37,454 reads. Cluster analysis and comparative correlation analysis of observed high-level operational taxonomic units indicated similarity between specimens before and after cryopreservation. The effects of cryopreservation on cells were assessed with representative culture strains, including fragile cryptophyte cells. We confirmed the usefulness of cryopreservation for genetic studies on environmental specimens, and found that small changes in FCM cytograms after cryopreservation may affect biodiversity estimation. PMID:26506442

  17. Application of carrier testing to genetic counseling for X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Nachtman, R.G.; Belmont, J.W.; Rosenblatt, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    Bruton X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a phenotypically recessive genetic disorder of B lymphocyte development. Female carriers of XLA, although asymptomatic, have a characteristic B cell lineage-specific skewing of the pattern of X inactivation. Skewing apparently results from defective growth and maturation of B cell precursors bearing a mutant active X chromosome. In this study, carrier status was tested in 58 women from 22 families referred with a history of agammaglobulinemia. Primary carrier analysis to examine patterns of X inactivation in CD19[sup +] peripheral blood cells (B lymphocytes) was conducted using quantitative PCR at the androgen-receptor locus. Obligate carriers of XLA demonstrated >95% skewing of X inactivation in peripheral blood CD19[sup +] cells but not in CD19[sup [minus

  18. Application of Genetic Algorithm to Predict Optimal Sowing Region and Timing for Kentucky Bluegrass in China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tingting; Jiang, Bo; Guo, Jiangfeng; Lu, Hongfei; Du, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is a predominant environmental factor affecting grass germination and distribution. Various thermal-germination models for prediction of grass seed germination have been reported, in which the relationship between temperature and germination were defined with kernel functions, such as quadratic or quintic function. However, their prediction accuracies warrant further improvements. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relative prediction accuracies of genetic algorithm (GA) models, which are automatically parameterized with observed germination data. The seeds of five P. pratensis (Kentucky bluegrass, KB) cultivars were germinated under 36 day/night temperature regimes ranging from 5/5 to 40/40°C with 5°C increments. Results showed that optimal germination percentages of all five tested KB cultivars were observed under a fluctuating temperature regime of 20/25°C. Meanwhile, the constant temperature regimes (e.g., 5/5, 10/10, 15/15°C, etc.) suppressed the germination of all five cultivars. Furthermore, the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) algorithm was integrated to optimize temperature-germination response models from these observed germination data. It was found that integrations of GA-BP-ANN (back propagation aided genetic algorithm artificial neural network) significantly reduced the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values from 0.21~0.23 to 0.02~0.09. In an effort to provide a more reliable prediction of optimum sowing time for the tested KB cultivars in various regions in the country, the optimized GA-BP-ANN models were applied to map spatial and temporal germination percentages of blue grass cultivars in China. Our results demonstrate that the GA-BP-ANN model is a convenient and reliable option for constructing thermal-germination response models since it automates model parameterization and has excellent prediction accuracy. PMID:26154163

  19. Genetics of resistance to Zymoseptoria tritici and applications to wheat breeding

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James K.M.; Chartrain, Laëtitia; Lasserre-Zuber, Pauline; Saintenac, Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge about genes for resistance to Septoria tritici blotch (STB) of wheat, caused by Zymoseptoria tritici (formerly Mycosphaerella graminicola). These genes can be placed into two classes, although a few may have characteristics of both classes. Qualitative resistance is controlled by genes which control large fractions of genetic variation, 21 of which have been discovered and mapped so far. Most of them have been shown to be genotype-specific, being effective against the minority of Z. tritici isolates which are avirulent, and Stb6 has been shown to control a gene-for-gene relationship. Most qualitative resistances are unlikely to be durable and some formerly effective genes have been overcome by the evolution of pathogen virulence. Quantitative resistance is generally controlled by genes with small-to-moderate effects on STB. They have generally weaker specificity than qualitative genes and have provided more durable resistance. 89 genome regions carrying quantitative trait loci (QTL) or meta-QTL have been identified to date. Some QTL have been mapped at or near loci of qualitative genes, especially Stb6, which is present in several sources of resistance. Another gene of particular interest is Stb16q, which has been effective against all Z. tritici isolates tested so far. In addition to resistance, the susceptibility of wheat cultivars to STB can also be reduced by disease escape traits, some of which may be undesirable in breeding. The fundamental requirements for breeding for STB-resistance are genetic diversity for resistance in wheat germplasm and a field trial site at which STB epidemics occur regularly and effective selection can be conducted for resistance combined with other desirable traits. If these are in place, knowledge of resistance genes can be applied to improving control of STB. PMID:26092788

  20. Polymorphic simple sequence repeat regions in chloroplast genomes: applications to the population genetics of pines.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, W; Morgante, M; McDevitt, R; Vendramin, G G; Rafalski, J A

    1995-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), consisting of tandemly repeated multiple copies of mono-, di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide motifs, are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes and are frequently used as genetic markers, taking advantage of their length polymorphism. We have examined the polymorphism of such sequences in the chloroplast genomes of plants, by using a PCR-based assay. GenBank searches identified the presence of several (dA)n.(dT)n mononucleotide stretches in chloroplast genomes. A chloroplast (cp) SSR was identified in three pine species (Pinus contorta, Pinus sylvestris, and Pinus thunbergii) 312 bp upstream of the psbA gene. DNA amplification of this repeated region from 11 pine species identified nine length variants. The polymorphic amplified fragments were isolated and the DNA sequence was determined, confirming that the length polymorphism was caused by variation in the length of the repeated region. In the pines, the chloroplast genome is transmitted through pollen and this PCR assay may be used to monitor gene flow in this genus. Analysis of 305 individuals from seven populations of Pinus leucodermis Ant. revealed the presence of four variants with intrapopulational diversities ranging from 0.000 to 0.629 and an average of 0.320. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of cpDNA on the same populations previously failed to detect any variation. Population subdivision based on cpSSR was higher (Gst = 0.22, where Gst is coefficient of gene differentiation) than that revealed in a previous isozyme study (Gst = 0.05). We anticipate that SSR loci within the chloroplast genome should provide a highly informative assay for the analysis of the genetic structure of plant populations. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7644491

  1. Application of Genetic Algorithm to Predict Optimal Sowing Region and Timing for Kentucky Bluegrass in China.

    PubMed

    Pi, Erxu; Qu, Liqun; Tang, Xi; Peng, Tingting; Jiang, Bo; Guo, Jiangfeng; Lu, Hongfei; Du, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is a predominant environmental factor affecting grass germination and distribution. Various thermal-germination models for prediction of grass seed germination have been reported, in which the relationship between temperature and germination were defined with kernel functions, such as quadratic or quintic function. However, their prediction accuracies warrant further improvements. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relative prediction accuracies of genetic algorithm (GA) models, which are automatically parameterized with observed germination data. The seeds of five P. pratensis (Kentucky bluegrass, KB) cultivars were germinated under 36 day/night temperature regimes ranging from 5/5 to 40/40 °C with 5 °C increments. Results showed that optimal germination percentages of all five tested KB cultivars were observed under a fluctuating temperature regime of 20/25 °C. Meanwhile, the constant temperature regimes (e.g., 5/5, 10/10, 15/15 °C, etc.) suppressed the germination of all five cultivars. Furthermore, the back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) algorithm was integrated to optimize temperature-germination response models from these observed germination data. It was found that integrations of GA-BP-ANN (back propagation aided genetic algorithm artificial neural network) significantly reduced the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values from 0.21~0.23 to 0.02~0.09. In an effort to provide a more reliable prediction of optimum sowing time for the tested KB cultivars in various regions in the country, the optimized GA-BP-ANN models were applied to map spatial and temporal germination percentages of blue grass cultivars in China. Our results demonstrate that the GA-BP-ANN model is a convenient and reliable option for constructing thermal-germination response models since it automates model parameterization and has excellent prediction accuracy. PMID:26154163

  2. Reversal of Oral Anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Limdi, Nita A.

    2013-01-01

    Although the use of dabigatran and rivaroxaban are increasing, data on reversal of their effects are limited. The lack of reliable monitoring methods and specific reversal agents renders treatment strategies empirical and as a result, , treatment consists mainly of supportive measures. Therefore, we performed a systematic search of the PubMed database to find studies and reviews pertaining to oral anticoagulation reversal strategies. This review discusses current anticoagulation reversal recommendations for the oral anticoagulants warfarin, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban for patients at a heightened risk of bleeding, actively bleeding or those in need for pre-procedural anticoagulation reversal. We highlight the literature that shaped these recommendations and provide directions for future research to address knowledge gaps. While reliable recommendations are available for anticoagulation reversal in patients treated with warfarin, guidance on reversal of dabigatran and rivaroxaban is varied and equivocal. Given the increasing use of the newer agents, focused research is needed to identify effective reversal strategies and develop and implement an accurate method (assay) to guide reversal of the newer agents. Determining patient-specific factors that influence the effectiveness of reversal treatments and comparing the effectiveness of various treatment strategies are pertinent areas for future anticoagulation reversal research. PMID:23606318

  3. Application of reversal electron attachment for ultrasensitive detection of thermal electron-attaching molecules - CCl4 and C6H5O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernius, Mark T.; Chutjian, Ara

    1990-01-01

    A standard gas-dilution method was used to determine the selective response of the reversal electron attachment detector to carbon tetrachloride concentrations in nitrogen. Data are provided that determine the lowest concentration of sample detectable with the present instrumental configuration as being below 1.0 part per trillion by volume. The incorporation of a 90-deg electrostatic deflector with the quadrupole mass spectrometer is shown to be vital, and with it, negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry is used to characterize the ionization process. Observations are also made of the reversal electron attachment response to nitrobenzene. The analytical potential of reversal electron capture negative-ion mass spectrometry is examined, and areas for future development are discussed.

  4. Application of genotyping-by-sequencing on semiconductor sequencing platforms: A comparison of genetic and reference-based marker ordering in barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid development of next generation sequencing platforms has enabled the use of sequencing for routine genotyping across a range of genetics studies and breeding applications. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), a low-cost, reduced representation sequencing method, is becoming a common approach fo...

  5. A Hierarchical and Distributed Approach for Mapping Large Applications to Heterogeneous Grids using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanyal, Soumya; Jain, Amit; Das, Sajal K.; Biswas, Rupak

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed approach for mapping a single large application to a heterogeneous grid environment. To minimize the execution time of the parallel application, we distribute the mapping overhead to the available nodes of the grid. This approach not only provides a fast mapping of tasks to resources but is also scalable. We adopt a hierarchical grid model and accomplish the job of mapping tasks to this topology using a scheduler tree. Results show that our three-phase algorithm provides high quality mappings, and is fast and scalable.

  6. Chemically induced dimerization: reversible and spatiotemporal control of protein function in cells.

    PubMed

    Voß, Stephanie; Klewer, Laura; Wu, Yao-Wen

    2015-10-01

    Small-molecule perturbation of biological systems is able to tackle biological problems that are not accessible by classical genetic interference methods. Chemically induced dimerization (CID) has been used as a valuable tool to study various biological processes. Recent years have seen tremendous progress in the development of orthogonal and reversible CID systems. These new systems allow control over protein function with unprecedented precision and spatiotemporal resolution. While the primary application of CID has been on dissecting signal transductions, new emerging approaches have extended the scope of this technique to elucidating membrane and protein trafficking. PMID:26431673

  7. Morphological evolution of protective works by Genetic Algorithms: An application to Mt Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocco, Davide; Spataro, William; D'Ambrosio, Donato; Filippone, Giuseppe; Rongo, Rocco; Iovine, Giulio; Neri, Marco

    2013-04-01

    The hazard induced by dangerous flow-type phenomena - e.g. lava flows, earth flows, debris flows, and debris avalanches - has increased in recent years due to continuous urbanization. In many cases, the numerical simulation of hypothetical events can help to forecast the flow path in advance and therefore give indications about the areas that can be considered for the construction of protective works - e.g. earth barriers or channels. In this way, urbanized areas, as well as cultural heritage sites or even important infrastructures, can be protected by diverting the flow towards lower interest regions. Here, we have considered the numerical Cellular Automata model Sciara-fv2 for simulating lava flows at Mt Etna and Genetic Algorithms for optimizing the position, orientation and extension of an earth barrier built to protect the Rifugio Sapienza, a well-known touristic facility located near the summit of the volcano. The Rifugio Sapienza area was in fact interested by a lava flow in 2003, which destroyed a Service Center, a parking area and a Cafeteria. In this study, a perimeter was devised around the Rifugio (i.e., security perimeter), which delimitates the area that has to be protected by the flow. Furthermore, another perimeter was devised (i.e., work perimeter), specifying the area in which the earth barrier can be located. The barrier is specified by three parameters, namely the two geographic coordinates of the vertex and the height. In fact, in this preliminary analysis the barrier was modeled as a segment (in plant) having a constant height. Though preliminary, the study has produced extremely positive results. Among different alternatives generated by the genetic algorithm, an interesting scenario consists of a 35 meters barrier high solution, which completely deviates the flow avoiding that the lava reaches the inhabited area. The relative elevated height of the barrier is high due to the fact that the crater is located close to the area to be protected and, consequently, the lava rate is very high.

  8. Estimation of Genetic Relationships Between Individuals Across Cohorts and Platforms: Application to Childhood Height.

    PubMed

    Fedko, Iryna O; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Pappa, Irene; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E M; Ehli, Erik A; Davies, Gareth E; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Tiemeier, Henning; Swertz, Morris A; Middeldorp, Christel M; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-09-01

    Combining genotype data across cohorts increases power to estimate the heritability due to common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), based on analyzing a Genetic Relationship Matrix (GRM). However, the combination of SNP data across multiple cohorts may lead to stratification, when for example, different genotyping platforms are used. In the current study, we address issues of combining SNP data from different cohorts, the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR) and the Generation R (GENR) study. Both cohorts include children of Northern European Dutch background (N = 3102 + 2826, respectively) who were genotyped on different platforms. We explore imputation and phasing as a tool and compare three GRM-building strategies, when data from two cohorts are (1) just combined, (2) pre-combined and cross-platform imputed and (3) cross-platform imputed and post-combined. We test these three strategies with data on childhood height for unrelated individuals (N = 3124, average age 6.7 years) to explore their effect on SNP-heritability estimates and compare results to those obtained from the independent studies. All combination strategies result in SNP-heritability estimates with a standard error smaller than those of the independent studies. We did not observe significant difference in estimates of SNP-heritability based on various cross-platform imputed GRMs. SNP-heritability of childhood height was on average estimated as 0.50 (SE = 0.10). Introducing cohort as a covariate resulted in ?2 % drop. Principal components (PCs) adjustment resulted in SNP-heritability estimates of about 0.39 (SE = 0.11). Strikingly, we did not find significant difference between cross-platform imputed and combined GRMs. All estimates were significant regardless the use of PCs adjustment. Based on these analyses we conclude that imputation with a reference set helps to increase power to estimate SNP-heritability by combining cohorts of the same ethnicity genotyped on different platforms. However, important factors should be taken into account such as remaining cohort stratification after imputation and/or phenotypic heterogeneity between and within cohorts. Whether one should use imputation, or just combine the genotype data, depends on the number of overlapping SNPs in relation to the total number of genotyped SNPs for both cohorts, and their ability to tag all the genetic variance related to the specific trait of interest. PMID:26036992

  9. Estimation and uncertainty of reversible Markov models.

    PubMed

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Reversibility is a key concept in Markov models and master-equation models of molecular kinetics. The analysis and interpretation of the transition matrix encoding the kinetic properties of the model rely heavily on the reversibility property. The estimation of a reversible transition matrix from simulation data is, therefore, crucial to the successful application of the previously developed theory. In this work, we discuss methods for the maximum likelihood estimation of transition matrices from finite simulation data and present a new algorithm for the estimation if reversibility with respect to a given stationary vector is desired. We also develop new methods for the Bayesian posterior inference of reversible transition matrices with and without given stationary vector taking into account the need for a suitable prior distribution preserving the meta-stable features of the observed process during posterior inference. All algorithms here are implemented in the PyEMMA software - http://pyemma.org - as of version 2.0. PMID:26547152

  10. Estimation and uncertainty of reversible Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Reversibility is a key concept in Markov models and master-equation models of molecular kinetics. The analysis and interpretation of the transition matrix encoding the kinetic properties of the model rely heavily on the reversibility property. The estimation of a reversible transition matrix from simulation data is, therefore, crucial to the successful application of the previously developed theory. In this work, we discuss methods for the maximum likelihood estimation of transition matrices from finite simulation data and present a new algorithm for the estimation if reversibility with respect to a given stationary vector is desired. We also develop new methods for the Bayesian posterior inference of reversible transition matrices with and without given stationary vector taking into account the need for a suitable prior distribution preserving the meta-stable features of the observed process during posterior inference. All algorithms here are implemented in the PyEMMA software — http://pyemma.org — as of version 2.0.

  11. A case study of crop model applications in an increasing diversity of genetically modified traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to develop variety files for six GM cultivars. Several experiments were conducted between 2001 and 2006 by varying cultivars, nitrogen, irrigation, and PIX applications on two different soils in two different growing seasons. In each experiment, plant height and numbers of main...

  12. The use of yeast genetic diversity for agricultural and biotechnological applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many yeasts have been shown to be effective for biocontrol of field, greenhouse, and storage diseases of agricultural crops. Yeasts are generally regarded as safe for a wide variety of applications and some species establish large populations on leaf and fruit surfaces, resulting in disease control ...

  13. The use of yeast genetic diversity for agricultural and biotechnological applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many types of yeast have been shown to be effective for biocontrol of field, greenhouse, and storage diseases of agricultural crops. Yeasts are generally regarded as safe for a wide variety of applications and some species establish large populations on leaf and fruit surfaces, resulting in disease ...

  14. Applications of High-Performance Computing (HPC) in Plant Breeding, Conservation, and Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasingly powerful and informative DNA sequencing and genotyping techniques, instruments, and software are being developed and used for a wide variety of applications in agriculture. However, the increasing flux and accumulation of data will also require more HPC facilities and expertise. In co...

  15. Genetically engineered silk-collagen-like copolymer for biomedical applications: production, characterization and evaluation of cellular response.

    PubMed

    W?odarczyk-Biegun, Ma?gorzata K; Werten, Marc W T; de Wolf, Frits A; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Kamperman, Marleen; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2014-08-01

    Genetically engineered protein polymers (GEPP) are a class of multifunctional materials with precisely controlled molecular structure and property profile. Representing a promising alternative for currently used materials in biomedical applications, GEPP offer multiple benefits over natural and chemically synthesized polymers. However, producing them in sufficient quantities for preclinical research remains challenging. Here, we present results from an in vitro cellular response study of a recombinant protein polymer that is soluble at low pH but self-organizes into supramolecular fibers and physical hydrogels at neutral pH. It has a triblock structure denoted as C2S(H)48C2, which consists of hydrophilic collagen-inspired and histidine-rich silk-inspired blocks. The protein was successfully produced by the yeast Pichia pastoris in laboratory-scale bioreactors, and it was purified by selective precipitation. This efficient and inexpensive production method provided material of sufficient quantities, purity and sterility for cell culture study. Rheology and erosion studies showed that it forms hydrogels exhibiting long-term stability, self-healing behavior and tunable mechanical properties. Primary rat bone marrow cells cultured in direct contact with these hydrogels remained fully viable; however, proliferation and mineralization were relatively low compared to collagen hydrogel controls, probably because of the absence of cell-adhesive motifs. As biofunctional factors can be readily incorporated to improve material performance, our approach provides a promising route towards biomedical applications. PMID:24814883

  16. Application of Genetic Algorithms to Sorting, Swapping and Shimming of the SOLEIL Undulator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Chubar, O.; Rudenko, O.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Marcouille, O.; Filhol, J. M.; Couprie, M. E.

    2007-01-19

    Undulators are typically composed of a large number of individual magnets, from tens to many hundreds, depending on undulator type and technology. Characteristics of real magnets often deviate from ideal values, resulting in degradation of the undulator performance. It is known that the imperfections of individual magnets can be mutually compensated, to certain extent, by appropriate sorting of the magnets and/or magnet modules, based on measurements of their individual characteristics, performed before the insertion device (ID) assembly. After the assembly, the quality of the ID magnetic field can be improved by magnet swapping and by shimming, consisting either in small displacements of some of the magnets or in adding small pieces of permanent magnet or soft iron material to appropriate locations of the structure. Mathematically, the magnet sorting, swapping and shimming can be considered as multi-objective constrained optimization problems with large numbers of variables. We show that each of these problems can be efficiently solved by means of Genetic Algorithms with 3D magnetostatics methods and magnetic measurements data used for the fitness calculation. First practical results obtained with three different undulators of the SOLEIL Synchrotron are presented.

  17. Teaching Biology through Statistics: Application of Statistical Methods in Genetics and Zoology Courses

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Berlingeri, Migdalisel; Burrowes, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Incorporation of mathematics into biology curricula is critical to underscore for undergraduate students the relevance of mathematics to most fields of biology and the usefulness of developing quantitative process skills demanded in modern biology. At our institution, we have made significant changes to better integrate mathematics into the undergraduate biology curriculum. The curricular revision included changes in the suggested course sequence, addition of statistics and precalculus as prerequisites to core science courses, and incorporating interdisciplinary (math–biology) learning activities in genetics and zoology courses. In this article, we describe the activities developed for these two courses and the assessment tools used to measure the learning that took place with respect to biology and statistics. We distinguished the effectiveness of these learning opportunities in helping students improve their understanding of the math and statistical concepts addressed and, more importantly, their ability to apply them to solve a biological problem. We also identified areas that need emphasis in both biology and mathematics courses. In light of our observations, we recommend best practices that biology and mathematics academic departments can implement to train undergraduates for the demands of modern biology. PMID:21885822

  18. Automatic clustering of white matter fibers in brain diffusion MRI with an application to genetics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yan; Shi, Yonggang; Zhan, Liang; Gutman, Boris; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie L.; Wright, Margaret J.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    To understand factors that affect brain connectivity and integrity, it is beneficial to automatically cluster white matter (WM) fibers into anatomically recognizable tracts. Whole brain tractography, based on diffusion-weighted MRI, generates vast sets of fibers throughout the brain; clustering them into consistent and recognizable bundles can be difficult as there are wide individual variations in the trajectory and shape of WM pathways. Here we introduce a novel automated tract clustering algorithm based on label fusion – a concept from traditional intensity-based segmentation. Streamline tractography generates many incorrect fibers, so our top-down approach extracts tracts consistent with known anatomy, by mapping multiple hand-labeled atlases into a new dataset. We fuse clustering results from different atlases, using a mean distance fusion scheme. We reliably extracted the major tracts from 105-gradient high angular resolution diffusion images (HARDI) of 198 young normal twins. To compute population statistics, we use a point-wise correspondence method to match, compare, and average WM tracts across subjects. We illustrate our method in a genetic study of white matter tract heritability in twins. PMID:24821529

  19. Genetic algorithm based approach to investigate doped metal oxide materials: Application to lanthanide-doped ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, James; Ismail, Arif; Giorgi, Javier B.; Woo, Tom K.

    2010-06-01

    A genetic algorithm (GA)-inspired method to effectively map out low-energy configurations of doped metal oxide materials is presented. Specialized mating and mutation operations that do not alter the identity of the parent metal oxide have been incorporated to efficiently sample the metal dopant and oxygen vacancy sites. The search algorithms have been tested on lanthanide-doped ceria (L=Sm,Gd,Lu) with various dopant concentrations. Using both classical and first-principles density-functional-theory (DFT) potentials, we have shown the methodology reproduces the results of recent systematic searches of doped ceria at low concentrations (3.2% L2O3 ) and identifies low-energy structures of concentrated samarium-doped ceria (3.8% and 6.6% L2O3 ) which relate to the experimental and theoretical findings published thus far. We introduce a tandem classical/DFT GA algorithm in which an inexpensive classical potential is first used to generate a fit gene pool of structures to enhance the overall efficiency of the computationally demanding DFT-based GA search.

  20. Analysis of a Stochastic Predator-Prey Model with Applications to Intrahost HIV Genetic Diversity

    E-print Network

    Leviyang, Sivan

    2009-01-01

    During an infection, HIV experiences strong selection by immune system T cells. Recent experimental work has shown that MHC escape mutations form an important pathway for HIV to avoid such selection. In this paper, we study a model of MHC escape mutation. The model is a predator-prey model with two prey, composed of two HIV variants, and one predator, the immune system CD8 cells. We assume that one HIV variant is visible to CD8 cells and one is not. The model takes the form of a system of stochastic differential equations. Motivated by well-known results concerning the short life-cycle of HIV intrahost, we assume that HIV population dynamics occur on a faster time scale then CD8 population dynamics. This separation of time scales allows us to analyze our model using an asymptotic approach. Using this model we study the impact of an MHC escape mutation on the population dynamics and genetic evolution of the intrahost HIV population. From the perspective of population dynamics, we show that the competition betw...

  1. Genetic manipulation of acidophilic bacteria which are potentially applicable in coal beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, F.F.; Glenn, A.W.; Bulmer, D.; Bruhn, D.F.; Ward, T.E.

    1991-01-01

    The economic and practical aspects of a biological coal desulfurization process are the subject of increasing study. Depyritization of coal by the bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans has been known for some time and pilot scale experiments are underway. A number of limitations have already been recognized for this process, foremost of which is the speed with which the microorganisms grow and attack the pyritic sulfur. Metal toxicity and mass transfer dynamics also present formidable hurdles. Removal of organic sulfur substituents poses even more difficult problems at this time, not least of which is the leak of efficient candidate organisms. Potential candidates at this time resemble members of the Psedomonadaceae, common environmental bacteria. The various limitations in the microorganisms being examined for a viable desulfurization process have led us to initiate studies on the extension of molecular genetic techniques to acidophilic bacteria, with an ultimate goal of introducing desirable characteristics for desulfurization (enhanced growth rate, metal resistance, biochemical capacity to degrade organic sulfur) either directly into T. ferrooxidans, or, alternatively, into a heterotrophic acidophile which can coexist in the same environment as T. ferrooxidans. We are focusing on members of the genus Acidiphilium, one such acidophilic heterotroph. 22 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  3. Time reversal acoustics for small targets using decomposition of the time reversal operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simko, Peter C.

    The method of time reversal acoustics has been the focus of considerable interest over the last twenty years. Time reversal imaging methods have made consistent progress as effective methods for signal processing since the initial demonstration that physical time reversal methods can be used to form convergent wave fields on a localized target, even under conditions of severe multipathing. Computational time reversal methods rely on the properties of the so-called 'time reversal operator' in order to extract information about the target medium. Applications for which time reversal imaging have previously been explored include medical imaging, non-destructive evaluation, and mine detection. Emphasis in this paper will fall on two topics within the general field of computational time reversal imaging. First, we will examine previous work on developing a time reversal imaging algorithm based on the MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm. MUSIC, though computationally very intensive, has demonstrated early promise in simulations using array-based methods applicable to true volumetric (three-dimensional) imaging. We will provide a simple algorithm through which the rank of the time reversal operator subspaces can be properly quantified so that the rank of the associated null subspace can be accurately estimated near the central pulse wavelength in broadband imaging. Second, we will focus on the scattering from small acoustically rigid two dimensional cylindrical targets of elliptical cross section. Analysis of the time reversal operator eigenmodes has been well-studied for symmetric response matrices associated with symmetric systems of scattering targets. We will expand these previous results to include more general scattering systems leading to asymmetric response matrices, for which the analytical complexity increases but the physical interpretation of the time reversal operator remains unchanged. For asymmetric responses, the qualitative properties of the time reversal operator eigenmodes remain consistent with those obtained from the more tightly constrained systems.

  4. Genetic Algorithms To provide a background and understanding of basic genetic

    E-print Network

    Qu, Rong

    Genetic Algorithms Objectives To provide a background and understanding of basic genetic algorithms and some of their applications. ·a basic genetic algorithm ·the basic discussion ·the applications of the algorithm #12;Genetic Algorithms 1859 Origin of the Species Survival of the Fittest #12;Genetic Algorithms

  5. Exploration and implementation for the construction of the quaternary teaching system of medical genetics including teaching, practice, research and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Fengjuan, Zhou; Wenmei, Xie; Qiang, Wang; Xiaorong, Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Medical genetics, the connection between basic and clinical medicine, is a subject with strong applicability and plays important role in modern medical education system. Based on years of teaching experience and during the construction of state-level top quality course, our teaching team has established the quaternary teaching system of medical genetics which includes teaching, practice, research and clinical application. The four elements of the system interpenetrate, complement and reinforce each other. Specifically, classroom teaching is the basics which is further complemented by social practice, improved by research and promoted by clinical application. The quaternary teaching system provides a feasible way to integrate theoretical and clinical courses. After years of implementation, the teaching system has got great effects on the obvious improvement of research ability, social reputation and clinical service capacities of the research team. PMID:26399535

  6. Cheaper Adjoints by Reversing Address Computations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hascoët, L.; Utke, J.; Naumann, U.

    2008-01-01

    The reverse mode of automatic differentiation is widely used in science and engineering. A severe bottleneck for the performance of the reverse mode, however, is the necessity to recover certain intermediate values of the program in reverse order. Among these values are computed addresses, which traditionally are recovered through forward recomputation and storage in memory. We propose an alternative approach for recovery that uses inverse computation based on dependency information. Address storage constitutes a significant portion of the overall storage requirements. An example illustrates substantial gains that the proposed approach yields, and we show use cases in practical applications.

  7. Crop Genetics: The Seeds of Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeYoung, H. Garrett

    1983-01-01

    Current research in plant genetics is described. Benefits of this research (which includes genetic engineering applications) will include reduction/elimination of crop diseases, assurance of genetic stability, and the creation of new crop varieties. (JN)

  8. Scheduling Using Genetic Algorithms Ursula Fissgus

    E-print Network

    Scheduling Using Genetic Algorithms Ursula Fissgus Computer Science Department University Halle memory machine. We present a scheduling derivation step based on the genetic algorithm paradigm, data parallelism, genetic algorithms. 1 Introduction Several applications from scientific computing, e

  9. [Advances of resveratrol synthase gene in the application of genetic engineering and biofunctional investigation].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shigang; Li, Zhen; Zhao, Shancang; Wang, Qingguo; Liu, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Resveratrol synthase (RS) plays a key role in resveratrol (Res) biosynthesis. RS gene has been formerly reported to be transformed into many plant species and microorganisms, and to play certain roles in metabolic and regulation processes. In this paper, the transformations of RS gene in plants, and the related changes of biological properties, such as metabolites, anti-pathogen activities, anti-radical properties, and developmental characters in transgenic plants, as well as the production of resveratrol in microbes by utilizing RS gene were summarized. Moreover, the application prospects of RS gene in bioengineering were also addressed. PMID:25007571

  10. Separation of aromatic carboxylic acids using quaternary ammonium salts on reversed-phase HPLC. 2. Application for the analysis of Loy Yang coal oxidation products

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, K.; Okuwaki, A.; Verheyen, T.V.; Perry, G.J.

    2006-07-01

    In order to develop separation processes and analytical methods for aromatic carboxylic acids for the coal oxidation products, the separation behavior of aromatic carboxylic acids on a reversed-phase HPLC using eluent containing quaternary ammonium salt was optimized using the solvent gradient method. This method was applied for the analysis of Loy Yang coal oxidation products. It was confirmed that the analytical data using this method were consistent with those determined using gas chromatography.

  11. Reversible surface two-electron transfer reactions in square wave voltcoulommetry: application to the study of the reduction of polyoxometalate [PMo12O40]3- immobilized at a boron doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Joaquin; Molina, Angela; Lopez-Tenes, Manuela; Karimian, Fereshteh

    2013-09-17

    Reversible surface two-electrons transfer reactions (stepwise processes) are analyzed using square wave voltcoulommetry (SWVC), which is a variety of square wave techniques based on the measurement of the transferred charge. Such reversible surface redox processes are exhibited by many two-redox center and multicenter biomolecules (proteins, enzymes, ...) and inorganic molecules like polyoxometalates (POMs), which have very interesting applications, mainly as electrocatalysts. Because of the stationary character of the response obtained, the key parameters that govern the cooperativity degree of the two reversible electron transfers (ETs) are the difference between their formal potentials, ?E(0), and the square wave amplitude, |E(SW)|, whose combined effect sets the two peaks ? one peak transition in the response. Working curves based on the variation of the peak parameters (peak potentials, half-peak widths, and peak heights) with ?E(0) and |E(SW)| are given, from which the formal potentials and the total surface excess can be accurately determined. SWVC has been applied to the study of the reduction of polyoxometalate [PMo12O40](3-) adsorbed at a boron doped diamond electrode (BDD), for which three stable and well-defined reversible charge peaks, corresponding to three cooperative EE processes, are obtained in the interval (0.6, -0.2) V by using low square wave frequencies. From the analysis of these peaks, the values of the total surface excess and the formal potentials of the six ETs have been obtained in aqueous media for two electrolytes: HClO4 and LiClO4. PMID:23980575

  12. Application of a Genetic Algorithm for Estimating Recharge Potential of the Choushui Rover Alluvial Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Chang, L.; Chen, Y.; Jung, C.; Huang, C.; Chen, J.; Tsai, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    As groundwater resources are vital to the regional water supply, protection of groundwater resources have become important issues. A systematic approach to locating high recharge areas is the first step in protection of groundwater. In a previous study proposed by the Central Geological Survey (CGS), the CGS used a factor-based approach to determine the spatial distribution of recharge potential (RP). Seven factors to define RP were selected, including “land usage”, “type of surface soil”, “drainage density”, “average annual rainfall”, “correlation between rainfall and variation of groundwater level”, “variation of unit aquifer storage”, and “hydraulic conductivity”. Features of each factor were transformed into factor scores, which ranged from 0 to 100. A high score implied high recharge capacity. The features of five factors (“drainage density”, “average annual rainfall”, “correlation between rainfall and variation of groundwater level”, “variation of unit aquifer storage”, and “hydraulic conductivity”) were continuous variables and could be linearly normalized as factor scores. The features of the remaining factors were discrete variables. In the abovementioned study, factor scores were subjectively assigned based on the experience, opinion, or judgment of the researchers. The factor scores of the seven factors were weighted and summed as the value of RP. The weighted values of various factors were based on a schematic sketch that showed the interactive influence of factors in regards to properties of recharge. The sketch, proposed by Shaban et. al. (2006), showed major and minor interactive influences. Shaban et. al. set the ratio of minor influence to major influence to 0.5. To increase objectivity in the calculation of RP, this study used a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine optimal scores for the two discrete factors. Because the spatial distribution of nitrate concentration (NC) was positively correlated with the spatial distribution of RP, the correlation coefficient of NC and RP was the validation target. The objective function of GA was maximization of the correlation coefficient. The decision variables were the factor scores of each feature. In this study, the ratio of minor influence to major influence varied in analysis of sensitivity. The ratios were set to 0 and 0.5 to compare the effects of different ratios. Results showed that the distribution of RP decreased from the proximal fan to the distal fan, which matched the opinion of experts. After comparing the original result with the optimal result, the correlation coefficient of RP and NC was found to be capable of increasing from 0.618 to 0.667 and from 0.621 to 0.688 respectively when the ratios were set to 0.5 and 0. This study proposes a systematic approach to increasing objectivity in calculation of RP. Although the correlation coefficient of NC and “drainage density” was very low, this was due to NC being caused by interaction between the recharged water and the fertilized land. Although quantity of recharge in areas with high drainage density was greater, recharged water from the river channel reduced NC in local areas. Therefore, the results indicated that NC might not be the best choice for validation of RP.

  13. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubitt, Toby; Kastoryano, Michael; Montanaro, Ashley; Temme, Kristan

    2015-10-01

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  14. New Genetics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free ... Different Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is a science education booklet explains the ...

  15. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePLUS

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. ... genetic testing. There are many reasons to seek genetic counseling. You may consider it if you Have a ...

  16. Genetic toxicity evaluation of 1,1,1,2,3,3,3- heptatfluoropropane. Volume 1. Results of salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay (ames assay). Final report, March-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    Under subcontract to ManTech Environmental Technology, Incorporated, Uenesys Research, Incorporated tested 1,1,12,3,3,3- heptafluoropropane (HFC-227ea) using Billups-Rothenberg exposure chambers for the exposure chamber modification of the Salmonella typhimurium histidine (his) reversion mutagenesis system (the Ames test), a microbial assay that measures his his+ reversion induced by chemicals that cause base changes or frameshift mutations i the genome of this organism. Testing was conducted using five Salmonella strains, with and without metabolic activation. HFC-227ea was tested in a preliminary test and in a mutagenesis assay. HFC-227ea was tested to toxic levels in the mutagenesis assay, but a sufficient number of nontoxic concentrations were tested to determine if HFC-227ea were capable of inducing a dose-related mutagenic response, and the positive control responses were consistent with historical data from the laboratory, and no evidence of a mutagenic response was obtained in any strain without or with activation. Therefore, HFC-227ea was negative in the Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion mutagenesis test in the presence and absence of metabolic activation.

  17. Development and application of a multi-targeting reference plasmid as calibrator for analysis of five genetically modified soybean events.

    PubMed

    Pi, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Cao, Yiwei; Wang, Canhua; Pan, Liangwen; Yang, Litao

    2015-04-01

    Reference materials are important in accurate analysis of genetically modified organism (GMO) contents in food/feeds, and development of novel reference plasmid is a new trend in the research of GMO reference materials. Herein, we constructed a novel multi-targeting plasmid, pSOY, which contained seven event-specific sequences of five GM soybeans (MON89788-5', A2704-12-3', A5547-127-3', DP356043-5', DP305423-3', A2704-12-5', and A5547-127-5') and sequence of soybean endogenous reference gene Lectin. We evaluated the specificity, limit of detection and quantification, and applicability of pSOY in both qualitative and quantitative PCR analyses. The limit of detection (LOD) was as low as 20 copies in qualitative PCR, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) in quantitative PCR was 10 copies. In quantitative real-time PCR analysis, the PCR efficiencies of all event-specific and Lectin assays were higher than 90%, and the squared regression coefficients (R(2)) were more than 0.999. The quantification bias varied from 0.21% to 19.29%, and the relative standard deviations were from 1.08% to 9.84% in simulated samples analysis. All the results demonstrated that the developed multi-targeting plasmid, pSOY, was a credible substitute of matrix reference materials, and could be used as a reliable reference calibrator in the identification and quantification of multiple GM soybean events. PMID:25673245

  18. Carotenoids gene markers for sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L. Lam): applications in genetic mapping, diversity evaluation and cross-species transference.

    PubMed

    Arizio, C M; Costa Tártara, S M; Manifesto, M M

    2014-04-01

    Carotenoids play essential biological roles in plants, and genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway are evolutionarily conserved. Orange sweetpotato is an important source of ?-carotene, a precursor of vitamin A. In spite of this, only a few research studies have focussed on the molecular aspects of carotenoid genes regarding their specific sequence and structure. In this study, we used published carotenoid gene sequences from Ipomoea and other species for "exon-primed intron-crossing" approaches. Fifteen pairs of primers representing six carotenoid genes were designed for different introns, eleven of which amplified scorable and reproducible alleles. The sequence of PCR products showed high homology to the original ones. Moreover, the structure and sequence of the introns and exons from five carotenoid structural genes were partially defined. Intron length polymorphism and intron single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected in amplified sequences. Marker dosages and allelic segregations were analysed in a mapping population. The developed markers were evaluated in a set of Ipomoeas batatas accessions so as to analyse genetic diversity and conservation applicability. Using CG strategy combined with EPIC-PCR technique, we developed carotenoid gene markers in sweetpotato. We reported the first set of polymorphic Candidate Gene markers for I. batatas, and demonstrated transferability in seven wild Ipomoea species. We described the sequence and structure of carotenoid genes and introduced new information about genomic constitution and allele dosage. PMID:24384928

  19. CicArVarDB: SNP and InDel database for advancing genetics research and breeding applications in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Khan, Aamir W.; Katta, Mohan A. V. S. K; Agarwal, Gaurav; Thudi, Mahendar; Ruperao, Pradeep; Edwards, David; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers are valuable tools for breeders to help accelerate crop improvement. High throughput sequencing technologies facilitate the discovery of large-scale variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Sequencing of chickpea genome along with re-sequencing of several chickpea lines has enabled the discovery of 4.4 million variations including SNPs and InDels. Here we report a repository of 1.9 million variations (SNPs and InDels) anchored on eight pseudomolecules in a custom database, referred as CicArVarDB that can be accessed at http://cicarvardb.icrisat.org/. It includes an easy interface for users to select variations around specific regions associated with quantitative trait loci, with embedded webBLAST search and JBrowse visualisation. We hope that this database will be immensely useful for the chickpea research community for both advancing genetics research as well as breeding applications for crop improvement. Database URL: http://cicarvardb.icrisat.org. PMID:26289427

  20. Direct extraction of genomic DNA from maize with aqueous ionic liquid buffer systems for applications in genetically modified organisms analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez García, Eric; Ressmann, Anna K; Gaertner, Peter; Zirbs, Ronald; Mach, Robert L; Krska, Rudolf; Bica, Katharina; Brunner, Kurt

    2014-12-01

    To date, the extraction of genomic DNA is considered a bottleneck in the process of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. Conventional DNA isolation methods are associated with long extraction times and multiple pipetting and centrifugation steps, which makes the entire procedure not only tedious and complicated but also prone to sample cross-contamination. In recent times, ionic liquids have emerged as innovative solvents for biomass processing, due to their outstanding properties for dissolution of biomass and biopolymers. In this study, a novel, easily applicable, and time-efficient method for the direct extraction of genomic DNA from biomass based on aqueous-ionic liquid solutions was developed. The straightforward protocol relies on extraction of maize in a 10 % solution of ionic liquids in aqueous phosphate buffer for 5 min at room temperature, followed by a denaturation step at 95 °C for 10 min and a simple filtration to remove residual biopolymers. A set of 22 ionic liquids was tested in a buffer system and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate, as well as the environmentally benign choline formate, were identified as ideal candidates. With this strategy, the quality of the genomic DNA extracted was significantly improved and the extraction protocol was notably simplified compared with a well-established method. PMID:25381609

  1. CicArVarDB: SNP and InDel database for advancing genetics research and breeding applications in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Khan, Aamir W; Katta, Mohan A V S K; Agarwal, Gaurav; Thudi, Mahendar; Ruperao, Pradeep; Edwards, David; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    Molecular markers are valuable tools for breeders to help accelerate crop improvement. High throughput sequencing technologies facilitate the discovery of large-scale variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Sequencing of chickpea genome along with re-sequencing of several chickpea lines has enabled the discovery of 4.4 million variations including SNPs and InDels. Here we report a repository of 1.9 million variations (SNPs and InDels) anchored on eight pseudomolecules in a custom database, referred as CicArVarDB that can be accessed at http://cicarvardb.icrisat.org/. It includes an easy interface for users to select variations around specific regions associated with quantitative trait loci, with embedded webBLAST search and JBrowse visualisation. We hope that this database will be immensely useful for the chickpea research community for both advancing genetics research as well as breeding applications for crop improvement. Database URL: http://cicarvardb.icrisat.org. PMID:26289427

  2. You're a What? Genetic Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, John

    2011-01-01

    When it first emerged about 50 years ago, genetic counseling focused primarily on prenatal testing to detect genetic conditions. But counseling services have evolved to keep pace with a greater knowledge of genetics and wider application of genetic diagnostic testing. Today, there are several types of genetic counselors, and their expertise covers…

  3. Wayne State University Master's Program in Genetic

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Wayne State University Master's Program in Genetic Counseling Overview & Information for Potential Applicants #12;Wayne State Genetic Counseling Program Overview "Genetic counseling is the process of helping or condition.*" *National Society of Genetic Counselors Definition Task Force. Journal of Genetic Counseling

  4. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nora, J.J.; Fraser, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of medical genetics for the practitioner treating or counseling patients with genetic disease. It includes a discussion of the relationship of heredity and diseases, the chromosomal basis for heredity, gene frequencies, and genetics of development and maldevelopment. The authors also focus on teratology, somatic cell genetics, genetics and cancer, genetics of behavior.

  5. The genetic rescue of two bottlenecked South Island robin populations using translocations of inbred donors.

    PubMed

    Heber, S; Varsani, A; Kuhn, S; Girg, A; Kempenaers, B; Briskie, J

    2013-02-01

    Populations forced through bottlenecks typically lose genetic variation and exhibit inbreeding depression. 'Genetic rescue' techniques that introduce individuals from outbred populations can be highly effective in reversing the deleterious effects of inbreeding, but have limited application for the majority of endangered species, which survive only in a few bottlenecked populations. We tested the effectiveness of using highly inbred populations as donors to rescue two isolated and bottlenecked populations of the South Island robin (Petroica australis). Reciprocal translocations significantly increased heterozygosity and allelic diversity. Increased genetic diversity was accompanied by increased juvenile survival and recruitment, sperm quality, and immunocompetence of hybrid individuals (crosses between the two populations) compared with inbred control individuals (crosses within each population). Our results confirm that the implementation of 'genetic rescue' using bottlenecked populations as donors provides a way of preserving endangered species and restoring their viability when outbred donor populations no longer exist. PMID:23235701

  6. Towards reversible basic linear algebra subprograms: A performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Yoginath, Srikanth B.

    2014-12-06

    Problems such as fault tolerance and scalable synchronization can be efficiently solved using reversibility of applications. Making applications reversible by relying on computation rather than on memory is ideal for large scale parallel computing, especially for the next generation of supercomputers in which memory is expensive in terms of latency, energy, and price. In this direction, a case study is presented here in reversing a computational core, namely, Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms, which is widely used in scientific applications. A new Reversible BLAS (RBLAS) library interface has been designed, and a prototype has been implemented with two modes: (1) a memory-mode in which reversibility is obtained by checkpointing to memory in forward and restoring from memory in reverse, and (2) a computational-mode in which nothing is saved in the forward, but restoration is done entirely via inverse computation in reverse. The article is focused on detailed performance benchmarking to evaluate the runtime dynamics and performance effects, comparing reversible computation with checkpointing on both traditional CPU platforms and recent GPU accelerator platforms. For BLAS Level-1 subprograms, data indicates over an order of magnitude better speed of reversible computation compared to checkpointing. For BLAS Level-2 and Level-3, a more complex tradeoff is observed between reversible computation and checkpointing, depending on computational and memory complexities of the subprograms.

  7. Towards reversible basic linear algebra subprograms: A performance study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Yoginath, Srikanth B.

    2014-12-06

    Problems such as fault tolerance and scalable synchronization can be efficiently solved using reversibility of applications. Making applications reversible by relying on computation rather than on memory is ideal for large scale parallel computing, especially for the next generation of supercomputers in which memory is expensive in terms of latency, energy, and price. In this direction, a case study is presented here in reversing a computational core, namely, Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms, which is widely used in scientific applications. A new Reversible BLAS (RBLAS) library interface has been designed, and a prototype has been implemented with two modes: (1) amore »memory-mode in which reversibility is obtained by checkpointing to memory in forward and restoring from memory in reverse, and (2) a computational-mode in which nothing is saved in the forward, but restoration is done entirely via inverse computation in reverse. The article is focused on detailed performance benchmarking to evaluate the runtime dynamics and performance effects, comparing reversible computation with checkpointing on both traditional CPU platforms and recent GPU accelerator platforms. For BLAS Level-1 subprograms, data indicates over an order of magnitude better speed of reversible computation compared to checkpointing. For BLAS Level-2 and Level-3, a more complex tradeoff is observed between reversible computation and checkpointing, depending on computational and memory complexities of the subprograms.« less

  8. The reverse laser drilling of transparent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, T. R.; Lindner, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    Within a limited range of incident laser-beam intensities, laser drilling of a sapphire wafer initiates on the surface of the wafer where the laser beam exits and proceeds upstream in the laser beam to the surface where the laser beam enters the wafer. This reverse laser drilling is the result of the constructive interference between the laser beam and its reflected component on the exit face of the wafer. Constructive interference occurs only at the exit face of the sapphire wafer because the internally reflected laser beam suffers no phase change there. A model describing reverse laser drilling predicts the ranges of incident laser-beam intensity where no drilling, reverse laser drilling, and forward laser drilling can be expected in various materials. The application of reverse laser drilling in fabricating feed-through conductors in silicon-on-sapphire wafers for a massively parallel processer is described.

  9. Theory of nematic order with aggregate dehydration for reversibly assembling proteins in concentrated solutions: Application to sickle-cell hemoglobin polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschke, Reinhard; Herzfeld, Judith

    1991-06-01

    The reversible association of globular protein molecules in concentrated solution leads to highly polydisperse fibers, e.g., actin filaments, microtubules, and sickle-cell hemoglobin fibers. At high concentrations, excluded-volume interactions between the fibers lead to spontaneous alignment analogous to that in simple lyotropic liquid crystals. However, the phase behavior of reversibly associating proteins is complicated by the threefold coupling between the growth, alignment, and hydration of the fibers. In protein systems aggregates contain substantial solvent, which may cause them to swell or shrink, depending on osmotic stress. Extending previous work, we present a model for the equilibrium phase behavior of the above-noted protein systems in terms of simple intra- and interaggregate interactions, combined with equilibration of fiber-incorporated solvent with the bulk solvent. Specifically, we compare our model results to recent osmotic pressure data for sickle-cell hemoglobin and find excellent agreement. This comparison shows that particle interactions sufficient to cause alignment are also sufficient to squeeze significant amounts of solvent out of protein fibers. In addition, the model is in accord with findings from independent sedimentation and birefringence studies on sickle-cell hemoglobin.

  10. Reversing the arms race

    SciTech Connect

    von Hippel, F. ); Sagdeev, R.Z. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains proceedings of Reversing The Arms Race. Topics covered include: Verifying Reductions of Nuclear Warheads; Verifying Limits on Nuclear-Armed Cruise Missiles; and The Technical Basis for Warhead Detection.

  11. Energy by reverse electrodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, R. E.

    The use of reverse electrodialysis, a reverse desalinization process, to derive energy from the difference between the chemical potentials of concentrated and dilute salt solutions is evaluated. The process employs the flows of brine and dilute solutions through alternating cells bounded by cation- and anion-exchange membranes in a stack placed between two electrodes to generate a voltage by the passage of salt through the membranes. Potential sources of brine include the salt domes of oil and gas wells, salt water lakes, and geothermal brines. Experiments have shown the technical feasibility of reverse electrodialysis, and have confirmed equations derived to predict their performance. Calculations show that in order for reverse electrolysis to be economically attractive, the internal resistance of the cells should be minimized and net output power maximized by using large concentration ratios between the brine and the dilute solution, the minimum dilute compartment and diffusive boundary layer thicknesses, low-resistance, highly selective membranes and appropriate manufacturing methods.

  12. Application of Genomic and Quantitative Genetic Tools to Identify Candidate Resistance Genes for Brown Rot Resistance in Peach

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Pedro J.; Parfitt, Dan E.; Bostock, Richard M.; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Vazquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Ogundiwin, Ebenezer A.; Gradziel, Thomas M.; Crisosto, Carlos H.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a complete peach genome assembly and three different peach genome sequences created by our group provide new opportunities for application of genomic data and can improve the power of the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) approaches to identify candidate genes for peach disease resistance. Brown rot caused by Monilinia spp., is the most important fungal disease of stone fruits worldwide. Improved levels of peach fruit rot resistance have been identified in some cultivars and advanced selections developed in the UC Davis and USDA breeding programs. Whole genome sequencing of the Pop-DF parents lead to discovery of high-quality SNP markers for QTL genome scanning in this experimental population. Pop-DF created by crossing a brown rot moderately resistant cultivar ‘Dr. Davis’ and a brown rot resistant introgression line, ‘F8,1–42’, derived from an initial almond × peach interspecific hybrid, was evaluated for brown rot resistance in fruit of harvest maturity over three seasons. Using the SNP linkage map of Pop-DF and phenotypic data collected with inoculated fruit, a genome scan for QTL identified several SNP markers associated with brown rot resistance. Two of these QTLs were placed on linkage group 1, covering a large (physical) region on chromosome 1. The genome scan for QTL and SNP effects predicted several candidate genes associated with disease resistance responses in other host-pathogen systems. Two potential candidate genes, ppa011763m and ppa026453m, may be the genes primarily responsible for M. fructicola recognition in peach, activating both PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) responses. Our results provide a foundation for further genetic dissection, marker assisted breeding for brown rot resistance, and development of peach cultivars resistant to brown rot. PMID:24244329

  13. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  14. Characterization of an internal-surface reversed-phase silica support for liquid chromatography and its application to assays of drugs in serum.

    PubMed

    Haginaka, J; Wakai, J; Yasuda, N; Yasuda, H; Kimura, Y

    1990-08-31

    Internal-surface reversed-phase (ISRP) silica supports having N-octanoylaminopropyl phases bound to the internal surfaces of the porous silica and N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)aminopropyl phases bound to the external surfaces were synthesized from silica particles differing in nominal pore diameters and specific surface areas. These ISRP supports were characterized with regard to physical and chromatographic properties. The support with an N-octanoylaminopropyl phase coverage of 485 mumol/g and an average pore diameter of 65 A was the most suitable for the direct-injection determination of hydrophilic or hydrophobic drugs in serum or plasma. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid) and tricyclic antidepressant drugs (desipramine and nortriptyline) in serum were successfully determined with this support and an acidic eluent. PMID:2178170

  15. MULTI-OBJECTIVE OPTIMAL DESIGN OF GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SYSTEMS: APPLICATION OF THE NICHED PARETO GENETIC ALGORITHM (NPGA). (R826614)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiobjective optimization algorithm is applied to a groundwater quality management problem involving remediation by pump-and-treat (PAT). The multiobjective optimization framework uses the niched Pareto genetic algorithm (NPGA) and is applied to simultaneously minimize the...

  16. The Application of a Genetic Algorithm to Estimate Material Properties for Fire Modeling from Bench-Scale Fire Test Data 

    E-print Network

    Lautenberger, Chris; Rein, Guillermo; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

    A methodology based on an automated optimization technique that uses a genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to estimate the material properties needed for CFD-based fire growth modeling from bench-scale fire test data. ...

  17. Generation of coherent radiation by magnetization reversal in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Henner, V. K.; Belozerova, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Local magnetic moments can be created in graphene by incorporating different defects. The possibility of regulating dynamics of magnetization in graphene, by employing the Purcell effect, is analyzed. The role of the system parameters in magnetization reversal is studied. The characteristics of such a reversal can be varied in a wide range, which can be used for various applications in spintronics. It is shown that fast magnetization reversal generates coherent radiation.

  18. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian Eric

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  19. A Tri-Part Model for Genetics Literacy: Exploring Undergraduate Student Reasoning about Authentic Genetics Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Nicole A.; Duncan, Ravit Golan; Stephenson, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Genetics literacy is becoming increasingly important as advancements in our application of genetic technologies such as stem cell research, cloning, and genetic screening become more prevalent. Very few studies examine how genetics literacy is applied when reasoning about authentic genetic dilemmas. However, there is evidence that situational…

  20. Combination of 15 N Reverse Labeling and Afterglow Spectroscopy for Assigning Membrane Protein Spectra by Magic-Angle-Spinning Solid-State NMR: Application to the Multidrug Resistance Protein EmrE

    PubMed Central

    Banigan, James R.; Gayen, Anindita; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a viable method to characterize membrane protein structure and dynamics. Nevertheless, the spectral resolution for uniformly labeled samples is often compromised by redundancy of the primary sequence and the presence of helical secondary structure that results in substantial resonance overlap. The ability to simplify the spectrum in order to obtain unambiguous site-specific assignments is a major bottleneck for structure determination. To address this problem, we used a combination of 15N reverse labeling and afterglow spectroscopic techniques that dramatically improved the ability to resolve peaks in a crowded spectrum. This was demonstrated using the polytopic membrane protein EmrE, an efflux pump involved in multidrug resistance. Residues preceding the 15N reverse labeled amino acid were imaged using a 3D NCOCX afterglow experiment and those following were recorded using a frequency-selective dephasing experiment. Our approach reduced the spectral congestion and provided a sensitive way to obtain chemical shift assignments for a membrane protein where no high-resolution structure is available. This MAS methodology is widely applicable to the study of other polytopic membrane proteins in functional lipid bilayer environments. PMID:23539118

  1. Genetic analysis of the U5-PBS of a novel HIV-1 reveals multiple interactions between the tRNA and RNA genome required for initiation of reverse transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z; Kang, S M; Li, Y; Morrow, C D

    1998-01-01

    A novel HIV-1 genome that stably utilizes tRNA(His) rather than tRNA(Lys,3) to initiate reverse transcription was used to study features for the interaction between the tRNA and viral RNA genome. In addition to a primer binding site (PBS) complementary to tRNA(His), this virus contains a six-nucleotide sequence in U5 complementary to the anticodon-loop of tRNA(His) and three additional substitutions: U174-to-G, G181-to-A, and U200-to-C [HXB2(His-AC-GAC)]. Mutations in these three nucleotides resulted in viruses with three different genotypes: one group maintained a PBS complementary to tRNA(His) with restored G174A181C200 or G174A181U200 configurations, one group reverted to a PBS complementary to tRNA(Lys,3), and one group contained two or more PBSs complementary to different tRNAs on the same viral genome. Characterization of a previously identified virus with additional C152-to-A and C160-to-U substitutions [HXB2(His-AC-A152U160-GAC)] revealed that this virus maintained a PBS complementary to tRNA(His), whereas a mutant HXB2(His-AC-U152A160-GAC) reverted after culture to contain dual PBS complementary to tRNA(Lys,3) and tRNA(His), respectively. Our results demonstrate that regions in U5 act in concert with the PBS to promote use of the tRNA primer for initiation of reverse transcription. These results are discussed with respect to structural models for the U5-PBS interactions with tRNA. PMID:9630246

  2. Rotating Reverse-Osmosis for Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueptow, RIchard M.

    2004-01-01

    A new design for a water-filtering device combines rotating filtration with reverse osmosis to create a rotating reverse- osmosis system. Rotating filtration has been used for separating plasma from whole blood, while reverse osmosis has been used in purification of water and in some chemical processes. Reverse- osmosis membranes are vulnerable to concentration polarization a type of fouling in which the chemicals meant not to pass through the reverse-osmosis membranes accumulate very near the surfaces of the membranes. The combination of rotating filtration and reverse osmosis is intended to prevent concentration polarization and thereby increase the desired flux of filtered water while decreasing the likelihood of passage of undesired chemical species through the filter. Devices based on this concept could be useful in a variety of commercial applications, including purification and desalination of drinking water, purification of pharmaceutical process water, treatment of household and industrial wastewater, and treatment of industrial process water. A rotating filter consists of a cylindrical porous microfilter rotating within a stationary concentric cylindrical outer shell (see figure). The aqueous suspension enters one end of the annulus between the inner and outer cylinders. Filtrate passes through the rotating cylindrical microfilter and is removed via a hollow shaft. The concentrated suspension is removed at the end of the annulus opposite the end where the suspension entered.

  3. Genetic Counseling

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Articles Genetic Counseling Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetic Counseling Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... informed decisions about testing and treatment. Reasons for Genetic Counseling There are many reasons that people go ...

  4. The Reversible Umbilic Bifurcation Heinz Hanmann

    E-print Network

    The Reversible Umbilic Bifurcation Heinz Han�mann Institut f¨ur Reine und Angewandte Mathematik der of freedom regularly lead to the investiga­ tion of bifurcating equilibria in reduced one related to the elliptic and hyperbolic umbilic catastrophes. This has applications to gyrostat motion

  5. Visa Type Alien Number (If Applicable) FPd Which of the following categories best describes you? Response is voluntary. See notes on reverse side for explanation.

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Weigang

    COLLEGE USE ONLY DIV FEE GRPADM CURRICULUM RESIDENCY STP YR MO Visa Type Alien Number (If of application . 3. Permanent residents of the United States will be required to present their Alien Registration

  6. Synthesis of a mixed-model stationary phase derived from glutamine for HPLC separation of structurally different biologically active compounds: HILIC and reversed-phase applications.

    PubMed

    Aral, Tar?k; Aral, Hayriye; Ziyadano?ullar?, Berrin; Ziyadano?ullar?, Recep

    2015-01-01

    A novel mixed-mode stationary phase was synthesised starting from N-Boc-glutamine, aniline and spherical silica gel (4 µm, 60 Å). The prepared stationary phase was characterized by IR and elemental analysis. The new stationary phase bears an embedded amide group into phenyl ring, highly polar a terminal amide group and non-polar groups (phenyl and alkyl groups). At first, this new mixed-mode stationary phase was used for HILIC separation of four nucleotides and five nucleosides. The effects of different separation conditions, such as pH value, mobile phase and temperature, on the separation process were investigated. The optimum separation for nucleotides was achieved using HILIC isocratic elution with aqueous mobile phase and acetonitrile with 20°C column temperature. Under these conditions, the four nucleotides could be separated and detected at 265 nm within 14 min. Five nucleosides were separated under HILIC isocratic elution with aqueous mobile phase containing pH=3.25 phosphate buffer (10mM) and acetonitrile with 20°C column temperature and detected at 265 nm within 14 min. Chromatographic parameters as retention factor, selectivity, theoretical plate number and peak asymmetry factor were calculated for the effect of temperature and water content in mobile phase on the separation process. The new column was also tested for nucleotides and nucleosides mixture and six analytes were separated in 10min. The chromatographic behaviours of these polar analytes on the new mixed-model stationary phase were compared with those of HILIC columns under similar conditions. Further, phytohormones and phenolic compounds were separated in order to see influence of the new stationary phase in reverse phase conditions. Eleven plant phytohormones were separated within 13 min using RP-HPLC gradient elution with aqueous mobile phase containing pH=2.5 phosphate buffer (10mM) and acetonitrile with 20°C column temperature and detected at 230 or 278 nm. The best separation conditions for seven phenolic compounds was also achieved using reversed-phase HPLC gradient elution with aqueous mobile phase containing pH=2.5 phosphate buffer (10mM) and acetonitrile with 20°C column temperature and seven phenolic compounds could be separated and detected at 230 nm within 16 min. PMID:25281074

  7. Reverse Auction Bidding - Multiple Group Study 

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Xun

    2012-10-19

    ) and (Guhya, 2010) .......................................................................................... 32 Figure 5. Reverse Auction Bidding Login Screen ......................................................... 35 Figure 6. Reverse Auction...

  8. Reversibly immobilized biological materials in monolayer films on electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, Paul F. (Golden, CO); Frank, Arthur J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1993-01-01

    Methods and techniques are described for reversibly binding charged biological particles in a fluid medium to an electrode surface. The methods are useful in a variety of applications. The biological materials may include microbes, proteins, and viruses. The electrode surface may consist of reversibly electroactive materials such as polyvinylferrocene, silicon-linked ferrocene or quinone.

  9. Reversibly immobilized biological materials in monolayer films on electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, P.F.; Frank, A.J.

    1993-05-04

    Methods and techniques are described for reversibly binding charged biological particles in a fluid medium to an electrode surface. The methods are useful in a variety of applications. The biological materials may include microbes, proteins, and viruses. The electrode surface may consist of reversibly electroactive materials such as polyvinylferrocene, silicon-linked ferrocene or quinone.

  10. Chemical Genetics: Elucidating Biological Systems with Small-Molecule Compounds

    E-print Network

    Nghiem, Paul

    Chemical Genetics: Elucidating Biological Systems with Small-Molecule Compounds Masaoki Kawasumi1 and Paul Nghiem1,2 Chemical genetics employs diverse small-molecule compounds to elucidate biological chemical genetic approach, whereas the reverse approach involves small molecules targeting a single protein

  11. A new way to measure milk yield persistency: a genetic point of view with application to Gyr (Bos indicus) cattle.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rodrigo Junqueira; Ayres, Denise Rocha; Faro, Lenira El; Filho, Aníbal Eugênio Vercesi; Verneque, Rui da Silva; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this work was to estimate genetic parameters for a measure of persistency of milk yield and to evaluate its association with 305-d cumulative milk yield and lactation length. 12 346 records from 8202 dairy Gyr cows including lactations up to fifth calving were used. The measure of persistency was obtained from one of the parameters of a quadratic model that describes the cumulative yield across lactation as a function of days in milk. A three-trait multivariate analysis was done. Heritability and repeatability for persistency were 0·08 and 0·21, respectively. Deviance Information Criterion provided evidence that the additive genetic covariance between the measure of persistency studied and 305-d cumulative yield is zero. Genetic correlations between persistency and lactation length were 0·50 and 0·27 for first or all lactations, respectively. Milk yield persistency as measured in this study has low heritability. Selection for persistency can increase lactation length. The measure of milk yield persistency studied here is genetically independent of total milk yield and can be included in routine genetic evaluations of dairy cattle. PMID:26242491

  12. Extension of Toth function from gas-solid to liquid-solid equilibria and application to reversed-phase liquid chromatography systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-03-01

    The extension of the {Psi} function developed by Toth from equilibria taking place at gas-solid interfaces to those taking place at liquid-solid interfaces was investigated. The results were applied to conventional liquid-solid systems used in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). The adsorbents in these systems are made of porous silica having a hydrophobic solid surface obtained by chemically bonding C{sub 18} alkyl chains to a porous silica gel then endcapping the surface with trimethylsilyl groups. The liquid is an aqueous solution of an organic solvent, most often methanol or acetonitrile. The probe compound used here is phenol. Adsorption data of phenol were measured using the dynamic frontal analysis (FA) method. The excess adsorption of the organic solvent was measured using the minor disturbance (MD) method. Activity coefficients in the bulk were estimated through the UNIFAC group contributions. The results show that the {Psi} function predicts 90% of the total free energy of immersion, {Delta}F, of the solid when the concentration of phenol is moderate (typically less than 10 g/L). At higher concentrations, the nonideal behavior of the bulk liquid phase becomes significant and it may contribute up to about 30% of {Delta}F. The high concentration of adsorbed molecules of phenol at the interface decreases the interfacial tension, {sigma}, by about 18 mN/m, independently of the structure of the adsorbed phase and of the nature of the organic solvent.

  13. Analysis of Cocoa Proanthocyanidins Using Reversed Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Electrochemical Detection: Application to Studies on the Effect of Alkaline Processing.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Todd H; Smithson, Andrew T; Neilson, Andrew P; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C; Lambert, Joshua D

    2015-07-01

    Flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins play a key role in the health beneficial effects of cocoa. Here, we developed a new reversed phased high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) method for the analysis of flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins of degree of polymerization (DP) 2-7. We used this method to examine the effect of alkalization on polyphenol composition of cocoa powder. Treatment of cocoa powder with NaOH (final pH 8.0) at 92 °C for up to 1 h increased catechin content by 40%, but reduced epicatechin and proanthocyanidins by 23-66%. Proanthocyanidin loss could be modeled using a two-phase exponential decay model (R(2) > 0.7 for epicatchin and proanthocyanidins of odd DP). Alkalization resulted in a significant color change and 20% loss of total polyphenols. The present work demonstrates the first use of HPLC-ECD for the detection of proanthocyanidins up to DP 7 and provides an initial predictive model for the effect of alkali treatment on cocoa polyphenols. PMID:26042917

  14. Synchronized separation of seven medications representing most commonly prescribed antihypertensive classes by using reversed-phase liquid chromatography: Application for analysis in their combined formulations.

    PubMed

    Ebeid, Walid M; Elkady, Ehab F; El-Zaher, Asmaa A; El-Bagary, Ramzia I; Patonay, Gabor

    2014-04-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the diuretic, hydrochlorothiazide, along with six drugs representing the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive pharmacological classes such as atenolol, a selective ?1 blocker, amlodipine besylate, a calcium channel blocker, moexipril hydrochloride, an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor, valsartan and candesartan cilexetil, which are angiotensin II receptor blockers, and aliskiren hemifumarate, a renin inhibitor, using irbesartan as an internal standard. The chromatographic separation was achieved using acetonitrile/sodium phosphate dibasic buffer (0.02 M, pH 5.5) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min in gradient elution mode at ambient temperature on a stationary phase composed of an Eclipse XDB-C18 (4.6 × 150 mm, 5 ?m) column. UV detection was carried out at 220 nm. The method was validated according to ICH guidelines. Linearity, accuracy, and precision were satisfactory over the concentration ranges of 2-40 ?g/mL for hydrochlorothiazide and candesartan cilexetil, 20-120, 10-160, 5-40, 20-250, and 5-50 ?g/mL for atenolol, valsartan, moexipril hydrochloride, aliskiren hemifumarate, and amlodipine besylate, respectively. The method was successfully applied for the determination of each of the studied drugs in their combined formulations with hydrochlorothiazide. The developed method is suitable for the quality control and routine analysis of the cited drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage forms. PMID:24482404

  15. The application of a duplex reverse transcription real-time PCR for the surveillance of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yi; Deng, Ming-Chung; Wang, Fun-In; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung; Yang, Chia-Huei; Chang, Chieh; Huang, Yu-Liang

    2014-06-01

    The porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is the most common disease in commercial pork production worldwide. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the most important agents of PRDC, usually co-infect in the same pigs. In order to survey the prevalence of PCV2 and PRRSV in pigs of various ages, a duplex reverse transcription real-time PCR (DRT-rPCR) was developed and applied in the present study. The DRT-rPCR did not cross-react with 10 swine viruses other than PCV2 and PRRSV, with detection limits of 1 TCID50/ml for PCV2 and 6.3 TCID50/ml for PRRSV. Surveillance using DRT-rPCR together with serology revealed that in the five farms studied, pigs were most susceptible to PRRSV at 6-14 weeks of age, whereas susceptibility to PCV2 varied by the management system but was mostly at 10-14 weeks of age. Cross analysis of viral loads versus antibody titers revealed that PCV2 load was affected negatively by anti-PCV2 ORF2 antibody, which constituted the most important non-infectious factor affecting the development of PMWS. These results indicated that DRT-rPCR was developed and applied successfully to the surveillance of PCV2 and PRRSV in the field. PMID:24560782

  16. MINI REVIEW TUMOR REVERSION: CORRECTION OF MALIGNANT BEHAVIOR BY

    E-print Network

    Kenny, Paraic

    MINI REVIEW TUMOR REVERSION: CORRECTION OF MALIGNANT BEHAVIOR BY MICROENVIRONMENTAL CUES Paraic A that is intimately linked to, and controlled by, reciprocal signaling between the genetically altered tumor defects can revert tumor cells to a normal phenotype, both in vivo and in culture, even when the tumor

  17. A methodology for exploiting the tolerance for imprecision in genetic fuzzy systems and its application to characterization of rotor blade leading edge materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Luciano; Couso, Inés; Palacios, Ana M.; Palacios, José L.

    2013-05-01

    A methodology for obtaining fuzzy rule-based models from uncertain data is proposed. The granularity of the linguistic discretization is decided with the help of a new estimation of the mutual information between ill-known random variables, and a combination of boosting and genetic algorithms is used for discovering new rules. This methodology has been applied to predict whether the coating of an helicopter rotor blade is adequate, considering the shear adhesion strength of ice to different materials. The discovered knowledge is intended to increase the level of post-processing interpretation accuracy of experimental data obtained during the evaluation of ice-phobic materials for rotorcraft applications.

  18. The AWWE-based hybrid absorbing boundary condition for finite-difference modeling and its application in reverse-time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Liu, Yang; Cai, Xiaohui; Ren, Zhiming

    2015-12-01

    The reverse-time migration (RTM) crosscorrelation imaging condition requires that the forward-propagated source wavefield and the backward-propagated receiver wavefield must be obtained at the same time. The easiest way to get the source wavefield is to save the entire time history of the full wavefield into computer memory. However, this strategy requires huge amount of data storage. It is impossible for large-scale 3D RTM. To reduce the computer memory cost, the back-propagated source wavefield is reconstructed by using the stored boundary wavefield. Its computer memory is proportional to the saved boundary grid points. For high order of spatial finite-difference (FD) schemes, more boundary grid points are needed to be stored, which consumes a large amount of the computer memory required for RTM. To further reduce the computer memory cost, we adopt the hybrid absorbing boundary condition (ABC) combined with the arbitrarily wide-angle wave equations (AWWEs). In our method, three boundary grid points can obtain good absorption. The source wavefield can be accurately reconstructed by using these points and the mirror-image symmetry method. Numerical experiments demonstrate the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed method. We compared our method with the conventional hybrid ABC method based on the 15°one way wave equations (OWWEs). Comparisons show that our method with three boundary grid points can achieve the same absorption as the conventional method with ten boundary grid points. For twentieth order of accuracy in space, our method uses only about 30% of memory requirement and about 59% of computation time required by the conventional method.

  19. Introducing Catastrophe-QSAR. Application on Modeling Molecular Mechanisms of Pyridinone Derivative-Type HIV Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Lazea, Marius; Putz, Ana-Maria; Duda-Seiman, Corina

    2011-01-01

    The classical method of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) is enriched using non-linear models, as Thom’s polynomials allow either uni- or bi-variate structural parameters. In this context, catastrophe QSAR algorithms are applied to the anti-HIV-1 activity of pyridinone derivatives. This requires calculation of the so-called relative statistical power and of its minimum principle in various QSAR models. A new index, known as a statistical relative power, is constructed as an Euclidian measure for the combined ratio of the Pearson correlation to algebraic correlation, with normalized t-Student and the Fisher tests. First and second order inter-model paths are considered for mono-variate catastrophes, whereas for bi-variate catastrophes the direct minimum path is provided, allowing the QSAR models to be tested for predictive purposes. At this stage, the max-to-min hierarchies of the tested models allow the interaction mechanism to be identified using structural parameter succession and the typical catastrophes involved. Minimized differences between these catastrophe models in the common structurally influential domains that span both the trial and tested compounds identify the “optimal molecular structural domains” and the molecules with the best output with respect to the modeled activity, which in this case is human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 inhibition. The best molecules are characterized by hydrophobic interactions with the HIV-1 p66 subunit protein, and they concur with those identified in other 3D-QSAR analyses. Moreover, the importance of aromatic ring stacking interactions for increasing the binding affinity of the inhibitor-reverse transcriptase ligand-substrate complex is highlighted. PMID:22272148

  20. Introducing catastrophe-QSAR. Application on modeling molecular mechanisms of pyridinone derivative-type HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Lazea, Marius; Putz, Ana-Maria; Duda-Seiman, Corina

    2011-01-01

    The classical method of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) is enriched using non-linear models, as Thom's polynomials allow either uni- or bi-variate structural parameters. In this context, catastrophe QSAR algorithms are applied to the anti-HIV-1 activity of pyridinone derivatives. This requires calculation of the so-called relative statistical power and of its minimum principle in various QSAR models. A new index, known as a statistical relative power, is constructed as an Euclidian measure for the combined ratio of the Pearson correlation to algebraic correlation, with normalized t-Student and the Fisher tests. First and second order inter-model paths are considered for mono-variate catastrophes, whereas for bi-variate catastrophes the direct minimum path is provided, allowing the QSAR models to be tested for predictive purposes. At this stage, the max-to-min hierarchies of the tested models allow the interaction mechanism to be identified using structural parameter succession and the typical catastrophes involved. Minimized differences between these catastrophe models in the common structurally influential domains that span both the trial and tested compounds identify the "optimal molecular structural domains" and the molecules with the best output with respect to the modeled activity, which in this case is human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 inhibition. The best molecules are characterized by hydrophobic interactions with the HIV-1 p66 subunit protein, and they concur with those identified in other 3D-QSAR analyses. Moreover, the importance of aromatic ring stacking interactions for increasing the binding affinity of the inhibitor-reverse transcriptase ligand-substrate complex is highlighted. PMID:22272148

  1. Mendelian randomization: can genetic epidemiology help redress the failures of observational epidemiology?

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Shah; Davey Smith, George

    2008-02-01

    Establishing causal relationships between environmental exposures and common diseases is beset with problems of unresolved confounding, reverse causation and selection bias that may result in spurious inferences. Mendelian randomization, in which a functional genetic variant acts as a proxy for an environmental exposure, provides a means of overcoming these problems as the inheritance of genetic variants is independent of-that is randomized with respect to-the inheritance of other traits, according to Mendel's law of independent assortment. Examples drawn from exposures and outcomes as diverse as milk and osteoporosis, alcohol and coronary heart disease, sheep dip and farm workers' compensation neurosis, folate and neural tube defects are used to illustrate the applications of Mendelian randomization approaches in assessing potential environmental causes of disease. As with all genetic epidemiology studies there are problems associated with the need for large sample sizes, the non-replication of findings, and the lack of relevant functional genetic variants. In addition to these problems, Mendelian randomization findings may be confounded by other genetic variants in linkage disequilibrium with the variant under study, or by population stratification. Furthermore, pleiotropy of effect of a genetic variant may result in null associations, as may canalisation of genetic effects. If correctly conducted and carefully interpreted, Mendelian randomization studies can provide useful evidence to support or reject causal hypotheses linking environmental exposures to common diseases. PMID:18038153

  2. PROCESS PER PROCESSOR ALLOCATION USING GENETIC ALGORITHMS

    E-print Network

    Cirstea, Horatiu

    PROCESS PER PROCESSOR ALLOCATION USING GENETIC ALGORITHMS PROF. NICOLAE TAPUS, HORATIU CIRSTEA Keywords: mapping problem, genetic algorithms This paper addresses an application of genetic algorithms be applied in real situations. To speed up the search we can use heuristics (genetic algorithms, simulated

  3. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-04-01

    We define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by classical feedback communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This protocol family leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted entanglement distribution capacity for some interesting channels.

  4. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    In this Letter we define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by feedback classical communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted capacity for some interesting channels.

  5. Time reversal communication system

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V. (Danville, CA); Meyer, Alan W. (Danville, CA)

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  6. REVERSE ENGINEERING RECENT ADVANCES

    E-print Network

    Telea, Alexandru C.

    and not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. No responsibility is accepted for the accuracy of information, Tilak Mitra and Usha Thulasiram Chapter 5 Reverse Engineering the Peer to Peer Streaming Media System 95, the amount of data produced by scientific, engineering, and

  7. APPLICATION OF A PLAN TEST SYSTEM IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF POTENTIAL GENETIC HAZARDS AT CHEMICAL WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have utilized the Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay for evaluating genetic hazards at a chemical waste site contaminated with agricultural insecticides scheduled for clean-up under the Superfund program. he chemical analysis of soil samples from the site indicates pre...

  8. Making Quantitative Genetics Relevant: Effectiveness of a Laboratory Investigation that Links Scientific Research, Commercial Applications, and Legal Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Michael L.; Mathis, Philip M.; Seipelt, Rebecca L.

    2005-01-01

    As students apply their knowledge of scientific concepts and of science as a method of inquiry, learning becomes relevant. This laboratory exercise is designed to foster students' understanding of the genetics of quantitative traits and of the nature of science as a method of inquiry by engaging them in a real-world business scenario. During the…

  9. Successful application of new cost-effective procedures for genotyping pearl millets for genetic diversity and linkage mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of technology advancement, procedures of DNA extraction and genotyping of large plant populations are cumbersome and expensive. Therefore, in order to genotype large mapping populations for studying genetic diversity, and linkage/QTL mapping for disease and pest resistance in pearl millet (...

  10. Genetic Selection for Reproduction: Current Reproductive Status of the National Herd; Application of Selection Indexes for Dairy Producers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using service sires with higher conception rates returns a profit fairly quickly. However, the heritability of bull fertility after AI organizations remove bulls with inferior fertility based on sperm morphology is essentially 0. Thus, little genetic improvement in male fertility is expected over ti...

  11. Applicability of RAPD markers on silver-stained polyacrylamide gels to ascertain genetic diversity in Peripatus acacioi (Peripatidae; Onychophora).

    PubMed

    DeLaat, Daiane Mariele; Carvalho, Maria Raquel Santos; Lovato, Maria Bernadete; Acedo, Maria Dolores Porto; da Fonseca, Cleusa Graça

    2005-01-01

    RAPD (random amplification of polymorphic DNA) molecular markers can be utilized for analyzing genetic variability in populations for which only a few or no molecular markers are available. They were used in a study of an endangered species, Peripatus acacioi, found in the Tripuí Ecological Station, in Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil. The ecological station was specifically created to protect this velvet worm species, the first of this group found in Brazil. For an initial evaluation of the genetic diversity of this species, DNA samples from the lobopods of four individuals, collected at random, were analyzed using RAPD. Each reaction was run with a different primer (Operon RAPD 10-mer Kits), totaling 13 primers (OPC2, OPC3, OPC4, OPC6, OPC8, OPC10, OPC11, OPL2, OPL7, OPL11, OPL13, OPL18, and OPL19). Due to the low amplification yield, RAPD fragments were separated in polyacrylamide gels and stained with silver nitrate. Numerous bands were observed. Fifty-five of the amplified bands proved to be reproducible, both in terms of presence and intensity. Among these, 27 were variable and 28 were constant. The average number of bands per gel was 4.2. Nine of the 13 primers tested allowed the identification of constant and variable bands among these four individuals. RAPD analysis of genetic variation using silver-stained polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis provided measures of band sharing among the individuals, and therefore could be used in population genetics studies of P. acacioi. PMID:16475117

  12. Fluorescence-Tagged Transgenic Lines Reveal Genetic Defects in Pollen Growth--Application to the Eif3

    E-print Network

    Copenhaver, Gregory P.

    Fluorescence-Tagged Transgenic Lines Reveal Genetic Defects in Pollen Growth factor 3 (eIF3) cause male transmission defects in Arabidopsis thaliana. To identify the stage of pollen development at which eIF3 becomes essential it is desirable to examine viable pollen and distinguish mutant

  13. The application of genetic information for regulatory standard setting under the clean air act: a decision-analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Alison C; Corrales, Mark A; Kramer, C Bradley; Faustman, Elaine M

    2008-08-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released an "Interim Policy on Genomics," stating a commitment to developing guidance on the inclusion of genetic information in regulatory decision making. This statement was followed in 2004 by a document exploring the potential implications. Genetic information can play a key role in understanding and quantifying human susceptibility, an essential step in many of the risk assessments used to shape policy. For example, the federal Clean Air Act (CAA) requires EPA to set National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for criteria pollutants at levels to protect even sensitive populations from adverse health effects with an adequate margin of safety. Asthmatics are generally regarded as a sensitive population, yet substantial research gaps in understanding genetic susceptibility and disease have hindered quantitative risk analysis. This case study assesses the potential role of genomic information regarding susceptible populations in the NAAQS process for fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) under the CAA. In this initial assessment, we model the contribution of a single polymorphism to asthma risk and mortality risk; however, multiple polymorphisms and interactions (gene-gene and gene-environment) are known to play key roles in the disease process. We show that the impact of new information about susceptibility on estimates of population risk or average risk derived from large epidemiological studies depends on the circumstances. We also suggest that analysis of a single polymorphism, or other risk factor such as health status, may or may not change estimates of individual risk enough to alter a particular regulatory decision, but this depends on specific characteristics of the decision and risk information. We also show how new information about susceptibility in the context of the NAAQS for PM(2.5) could have a large impact on the estimated distribution of individual risk. This would occur if a group were consequently identified (based on genetic and/or disease status), that accounted for a disproportionate share of observed effects. Our results highlight certain conditions under which genetic information is likely to have an impact on risk estimates and the balance of costs and benefits within groups, and highlight critical research needs. As future studies explore more fully the relationship between exposure, genetic makeup, and disease status, the opportunity for genetic information and disease status to play pivotal roles in regulation can only increase. PMID:18631305

  14. Inference of Protein Complex Activities from Chemical-Genetic Profile and Its Applications: Predicting Drug-Target Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangjo; Kim, Dongsup

    2008-01-01

    The chemical-genetic profile can be defined as quantitative values of deletion strains' growth defects under exposure to chemicals. In yeast, the compendium of chemical-genetic profiles of genomewide deletion strains under many different chemicals has been used for identifying direct target proteins and a common mode-of-action of those chemicals. In the previous study, valuable biological information such as protein–protein and genetic interactions has not been fully utilized. In our study, we integrated this compendium and biological interactions into the comprehensive collection of ?490 protein complexes of yeast for model-based prediction of a drug's target proteins and similar drugs. We assumed that those protein complexes (PCs) were functional units for yeast cell growth and regarded them as hidden factors and developed the PC-based Bayesian factor model that relates the chemical-genetic profile at the level of organism phenotypes to the hidden activities of PCs at the molecular level. The inferred PC activities provided the predictive power of a common mode-of-action of drugs as well as grouping of PCs with similar functions. In addition, our PC-based model allowed us to develop a new effective method to predict a drug's target pathway, by which we were able to highlight the target-protein, TOR1, of rapamycin. Our study is the first approach to model phenotypes of systematic deletion strains in terms of protein complexes. We believe that our PC-based approach can provide an appropriate framework for combining and modeling several types of chemical-genetic profiles including interspecies. Such efforts will contribute to predicting more precisely relevant pathways including target proteins that interact directly with bioactive compounds. PMID:18769708

  15. Development and application of a multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for screening a global collection of Citrus tristeza virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avijit; Ananthakrishnan, G; Hartung, John S; Brlansky, R H

    2010-10-01

    The emerging diversity of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genotypes has complicated detection and diagnostic measures and prompted the search for new differentiation methods. To simplify the identification and differentiation of CTV genotypes, a multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique for the screening of CTV isolates was developed. Variable regions within the open reading frame (ORF)-1a of diverse CTV genotypes were identified to develop first a simplex (S) and then a hexaplex (H) RT-PCR. CTV isolates have been grouped previously into five genotypes (namely, T3, T30, T36, VT, and B165) based on the nucleotide sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses. Nucleotide sequences from GenBank were used to design species and genotype-specific primers (GSPs). The GSPs were initially used for reliable detection of all CTV genotypes using S-RT-PCR. Furthermore, detection of all five recognized CTV genotypes was established using the H-RT-PCR. Six amplicons, one generic to all CTV isolates and one for each of the five recognized genotypes, were identified on the basis of their size and were confirmed by sequence analysis. In all, 175 CTV isolates from 29 citrus-growing countries were successfully analyzed by S- and H-RT-PCR. Of these, 97 isolates contained T36 genotypes, 95 contained T3 genotypes, 76 contained T30 genotypes, 71 contained VT genotypes, and 24 contained B165 genotype isolates. In total, 126 isolates contained mixed infections of 2 to 5 of the known CTV genotypes. Two of the CTV isolates could not be assigned to a known genotype. H-RT-PCR provides a sensitive, specific, reliable, and rapid way to screen for CTV genotypes compared with other methods for CTV genotype detection. Efficient identification of CTV genotypes will facilitate a better understanding of CTV isolates, including the possible interaction of different genotypes in causing or preventing diseases. The methods described can also be used in virus-free citrus propagation programs and in the development of CTV-resistant cultivars. PMID:20839943

  16. Development and performance evaluation of a multi-PID muscle loading driven in vitro active-motion shoulder simulator and application to assessing reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Giles, Joshua William; Ferreira, Louis Miguel; Athwal, George Singh; Johnson, James Andrew

    2014-12-01

    In vitro active shoulder motion simulation can provide improved understanding of shoulder biomechanics; however, accurate simulators using advanced control theory have not been developed. Therefore, our objective was to develop and evaluate a simulator which uses real-time kinematic feedback and closed loop proportional integral differential (PID) control to produce motion. The simulator's ability to investigate a clinically relevant variable-namely muscle loading changes resulting from reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA)-was evaluated and compared to previous findings to further demonstrate its efficacy. Motion control of cadaveric shoulders was achieved by applying continuously variable forces to seven muscle groups. Muscle forces controlling each of the three glenohumeral rotational degrees of freedom (DOF) were modulated using three independent PID controllers running in parallel, each using measured Euler angles as their process variable. Each PID controller was configured and tuned to control the loading of a set of muscles which, from previous in vivo investigations, were found to be primarily responsible for movement in the PID's DOF. The simulator's ability to follow setpoint profiles for abduction, axial rotation, and horizontal extension was assessed using root mean squared error (RMSE) and average standard deviation (ASD) for multiple levels of arm mass replacement. A specimen was then implanted with an RTSA, and the effect of joint lateralization (0, 5, 10 mm) on the total deltoid force required to produce motion was assessed. Maximum profiling error was <2.1 deg for abduction and 2.2 deg for horizontal extension with RMSE of <1 deg. The nonprofiled DOF were maintained to within 5.0 deg with RMSE <1.0 deg. Repeatability was high, with ASDs of <0.31 deg. RMSE and ASD were similar for all levels of arm mass replacement (0.73-1.04 and 0.14-0.22 deg). Lateralizing the joint's center of rotation (CoR) increased total deltoid force by up to 8.5% body weight with the maximum early in abduction. This simulator, which is the first to use closed loop control, accurately controls the shoulder's three rotational DOF with high repeatability, and produces results that are in agreement with previous investigations. This simulator's improved performance, in comparison to others, increases the statistical power of its findings and thus its ability to provide new biomechanical insights. PMID:25321092

  17. Developments in reverse Brayton cycle cryocooler in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Zhao, H. L.; Chen, C. Z.; Xiong, L. Y.

    2006-05-01

    As one of the primary methods of cryogenic refrigeration, reverse Brayton cycle cryocooler, which includes high-speed turbine using gas bearing and compact heat exchanger, has many advantages such as long-life, high reliability and efficiency. In this paper general aspects of reverse Brayton cycle cryocooler in China are introduced, such as its application in the space simulation program, mechanical cryocooler for lower temperature space applications. The main design parameters and operating performance of cryocoolers are presented in this paper.

  18. Time reversal for damage detection in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Yujie; Harley, Joel; Garrett, James H., Jr.; Jin, Yuanwei; Moura, José M. F.; O'Donoughue, Nicholas; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Soibelman, Lucio

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring the structural integrity of vast natural gas pipeline networks requires continuous and economical inspection technology. Current approaches for inspecting buried pipelines require periodic excavation of sections of pipe to assess only a couple of hundred meters at a time. These inspection systems for pipelines are temporary and expensive. We propose to use guided-wave ultrasonics with Time Reversal techniques to develop an active sensing and continuous monitoring system. Pipe environments are complex due to the presence of multiple modes and high dispersion. These are treated as adverse effects by most conventional ultrasonic techniques. However, Time Reversal takes advantage of the multi-modal and dispersive behaviors to improve the spatial and temporal wave focusing. In this paper, Time Reversal process is mathematically described and experimentally demonstrated through six laboratory experiments, providing comprehensive and promising results on guided wave focusing in a pipe with/without welded joint, with/without internal pressure, and detection of three defects: lateral, longitudinal and corrosion-like. The experimental results show that Time Reversal can effectively compensate for multiple modes and dispersion in pipes, resulting in an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and effective damage detection ability. As a consequence, Time Reversal shows benefits in long-distance and lowpower pipeline monitoring, as well as potential for applications in other infrastructures.

  19. Novel Techniques and Their Wide Applications to Health Foods, Medical and Agricultural Biotechnology in Relation to Policy Making on Genetically Modified Crops and Foods

    E-print Network

    Baianu, I C; Lozano, P; Lin, H C

    2004-01-01

    Selected applications of novel techniques in Agricultural Biotechnology, Health Food formulations and Medical Biotechnology are being reviewed with the aim of unraveling future developments and policy changes that are likely to open new markets for Biotechnology and prevent the shrinking or closing of existing ones. Amongst the selected novel techniques with applications in both Agricultural and Medical Biotechnology are: immobilized bacterial cells and enzymes, microencapsulation and liposome production, genetic manipulation of microorganisms, development of novel vaccines from plants, epigenomics of mammalian cells and organisms, and biocomputational tools for molecular modeling related to disease and Bioinformatics. Both fundamental and applied aspects of the emerging new techniques are being discussed in relation to their anticipated, marked impact on future markets and present policy changes that are needed for success in either Agricultural or Medical Biotechnology. The novel techniques are illustrated ...

  20. Wireless Access Point Configuration by Genetic Programming

    E-print Network

    Hu, Jianjun

    Wireless Access Point Configuration by Genetic Programming Jianjun Hu Genetic Algorithm Research and Application Group Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48823 Email: hujianju@cse.msu.edu Erik Goodman Genetic Algorithm Research and Application Group Dept

  1. An unusual route to polarization reversal in ferroelectric ultrathin nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Herchig, R.; Chang, Ch.-M.; Mani, B. K.; Ponomareva, I.

    2014-07-07

    Ferroelectric nanowires are promising candidates for miniaturized ferroelectric devices. Some potential nanoscale applications of the nanowires, such as ultra high density ferroelectric memory, utilize their reversible polarization. To meet the ever increasing demand for low energy consumption, it is extremely desirable to reduce the operational fields associated with polarization reversal. In this Letter, we use first-principles-based simulations to explore an unusual route to polarization reversal that utilizes a combination of relatively low bias field and THz pulsed radiation. Such an approach allows for lower operational fields and may lead to other potential applications such as THz radiation sensing and remote switches.

  2. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  3. Genetic Algorithms and Local Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Darrell

    1996-01-01

    The first part of this presentation is a tutorial level introduction to the principles of genetic search and models of simple genetic algorithms. The second half covers the combination of genetic algorithms with local search methods to produce hybrid genetic algorithms. Hybrid algorithms can be modeled within the existing theoretical framework developed for simple genetic algorithms. An application of a hybrid to geometric model matching is given. The hybrid algorithm yields results that improve on the current state-of-the-art for this problem.

  4. Reversible Dysphasia and Statins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case of reversible dysphasia occurring in a patient prescribed atorvastatin in combination with indapamide. A milder dysphasia recurred with the prescription of rosuvastatin and was documented on clinical examination. This resolved following cessation of rosuvastatin. The case highlights both a need for a wider understanding of potential drug interactions through the CYP 450 system and for an increased awareness, questioning and reporting of drug side-effects. PMID:22468114

  5. Reversing Glass Wettability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Smith, J. E., Jr.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Treatment reverses wettability of glassware: Liquids that normally wet glass no longer do, and those that do not wet glass are made to do so. Useful in research on container effects in nucleation and growth of secondary phase from solution. Treatment consists of spreading 3 percent (by weight) solution of silicone oil in hexane isomers over glass, drying in air, and curing at 300 degrees C in vacuum for one hour.

  6. Reversal of Envy

    E-print Network

    Sultana, Rezina

    2011-01-26

    December 2010 CWPE 1106 Paper presented at Silvaplana 2010 19th Workshop on Political Economy, July 2010 REVERSAL OF ENVY Rezina Sultana? Department of Economics, Bar-Ilan University, 52900 Ramat-Gan, Israel Abstract Studies... the given opportunity set. 11 In the context of classical exchange economies, unanimous envy (i.e., every agent envies another) cannot exist in an efficient allocation (Varian, 1974) but it is also possible to have unanimous envy at the interim stage...

  7. Tevatron reverse injection

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-25

    In the new injection scenario antiprotons are injected onto a helical orbit in the Tevatron in order to avoid the detrimental effects of the beam-beam interaction at 150 GeV. The new scenario required changes in the tuning procedure. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning, therefore the antiproton injection line has to be tuned with protons by reverse injecting them from the Tevatron into the Main Pang (MR). Previously, the reverse injection was performed in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS dock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus marking it possible to inject 6 proton batches and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR.

  8. Application of sonication in combination with vacuum infiltration enhances the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation in Indian soybean cultivars.

    PubMed

    Arun, Muthukrishnan; Subramanyam, Kondeti; Mariashibu, Thankaraj Salammal; Theboral, Jeevaraj; Shivanandhan, Ganeshan; Manickavasagam, Markandan; Ganapathi, Andy

    2015-02-01

    Soybean is a recalcitrant crop to Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Development of highly efficient, reproducible, and genotype-independent transformation protocol is highly desirable for soybean genetic improvement. Hence, an improved Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation protocol has been developed for cultivar PK 416 by evaluating various parameters including Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains (LBA4404, EHA101, and EHA105 harboring pCAMBIA1304 plasmid), sonication duration, vacuum infiltration pressure, and vacuum duration using cotyledonary node explants of soybean prepared from 7-day-old seedlings. The transformed plants were successfully developed through direct organogenesis system. Transgene expression was assessed by GUS histochemical and gfp visual assays, and integration was analyzed by PCR and Southern blot hybridization. Among the different combinations and durations evaluated, a maximum transformation efficiency of 18.6 % was achieved when the cotyledonary node explants of cv. PK 416 were sonicated for 20 s and vacuum infiltered for 2 min at 250 mmHg in A. tumefaciens EHA105 suspension. The amenability of the standardized protocol was tested on four more soybean cultivars JS 90-41, Hara Soy, Co 1, and Co 2 in which all the cultivars responded favorably with transformation efficiency ranging from 13.3 to 16.6 %. The transformation protocol developed in the present study would be useful to transform diverse soybean cultivars with desirable traits. PMID:25480345

  9. Molecular genetics of pediatric brain stem gliomas. Application of PCR techniques to small and archival brain tumor specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N.; Rubio, M.P.; Correa, K.M.; Gusella, J.F.; Deimling, A. von )

    1993-09-01

    Brain stem gliomas are pediatric astrocytomas that histologically resemble adult supratentorial astrocytomas such as gliobastomas multiforme (GBM). The molecular genetic studies have suggested that adult GBM can be divided into two genetic subsets: Tumors with p53 tumor suppressor gene mutations and chromosome 17p loss that occur more commonly in younger patients; and tumors with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification that occur more commonly in older patients. Brain stem gliomas have not been studied since biopsies of these tumors are rare and extremely small. The authors investigated the molecular genetic composition of seven brain stem glioblastomas (two small biopsies, five autopsies) using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for chromosomal loss, gene mutation and gene amplification. Four cases lost portions of chromosome 17p that included the 53p gene. These four cases and one additional case had mutations in the p53 gene. None of the cases showed amplification of the EGFR gene. Allelic losses of the long arm of chromosome 10 were noted in four cases. These results suggest similarities between pediatric brain stem glioblastomas and those GBM that occur in younger adult patients, and confirm the utility of PCR-based means of studying small and archival brain tumor specimens. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Algorithmic co-optimization of genetic constructs and growth conditions: application to 6-ACA, a potential nylon-6 precursor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Vonk, Brenda; Roubos, Johannes A; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Voigt, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Optimizing bio-production involves strain and process improvements performed as discrete steps. However, environment impacts genotype and a strain that is optimal under one set of conditions may not be under different conditions. We present a methodology to simultaneously vary genetic and process factors, so that both can be guided by design of experiments (DOE). Advances in DNA assembly and gene insulation facilitate this approach by accelerating multi-gene pathway construction and the statistical interpretation of screening data. This is applied to a 6-aminocaproic acid (6-ACA) pathway in Escherichia coli consisting of six heterologous enzymes. A 32-member fraction factorial library is designed that simultaneously perturbs expression and media composition. This is compared to a 64-member full factorial library just varying expression (0.64 Mb of DNA assembly). Statistical analysis of the screening data from these libraries leads to different predictions as to whether the expression of enzymes needs to increase or decrease. Therefore, if genotype and media were varied separately this would lead to a suboptimal combination. This is applied to the design of a strain and media composition that increases 6-ACA from 9 to 48 mg/l in a single optimization step. This work introduces a generalizable platform to co-optimize genetic and non-genetic factors. PMID:26519464

  11. Microsatellite markers from the 'South American fruit fly' Anastrepha fraterculus: a valuable tool for population genetic analysis and SIT applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anastrepha fraterculus Wiedemann is a horticultural pest which causes significant economic losses in the fruit-producing areas of the American continent and limits the access of products to international markets. The use of environmentally friendly control strategies against this pest is constrained due to the limited knowledge of its population structure. Results We developed microsatellite markers for A. fraterculus from four genomic libraries, which were enriched in CA, CAA, GA and CAT microsatellite motifs. Fifty microsatellite regions were evaluated and 14 loci were selected for population genetics studies. Genotypes of 122 individuals sampled from four A. fraterculus populations were analyzed. The level of polymorphism ranged from three to 13 alleles per locus and the mean expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.60 to 0.64. Comparison between allelic and genotypic frequencies showed significant differences among all pairs of populations. Conclusions This novel set of microsatellite markers provides valuable information for the description of genetic variability and population structure of wild populations and laboratory strains of A. fraterculus. This information will be used to identify and characterize candidate strains suitable to implement effective pest control strategies and might represent a first step towards having a more comprehensive knowledge about the genetics of this pest. PMID:25471285

  12. Algorithmic co-optimization of genetic constructs and growth conditions: application to 6-ACA, a potential nylon-6 precursor

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Vonk, Brenda; Roubos, Johannes A.; Bovenberg, Roel A.L.; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing bio-production involves strain and process improvements performed as discrete steps. However, environment impacts genotype and a strain that is optimal under one set of conditions may not be under different conditions. We present a methodology to simultaneously vary genetic and process factors, so that both can be guided by design of experiments (DOE). Advances in DNA assembly and gene insulation facilitate this approach by accelerating multi-gene pathway construction and the statistical interpretation of screening data. This is applied to a 6-aminocaproic acid (6-ACA) pathway in Escherichia coli consisting of six heterologous enzymes. A 32-member fraction factorial library is designed that simultaneously perturbs expression and media composition. This is compared to a 64-member full factorial library just varying expression (0.64 Mb of DNA assembly). Statistical analysis of the screening data from these libraries leads to different predictions as to whether the expression of enzymes needs to increase or decrease. Therefore, if genotype and media were varied separately this would lead to a suboptimal combination. This is applied to the design of a strain and media composition that increases 6-ACA from 9 to 48 mg/l in a single optimization step. This work introduces a generalizable platform to co-optimize genetic and non-genetic factors. PMID:26519464

  13. Theoretical framework of population genetics with somatic mutations taken into account: application to copy number variations in humans.

    PubMed

    Ezawa, K; Innan, H

    2013-11-01

    Traditionally, population genetics focuses on the dynamics of frequencies of alleles acquired by mutations on germ-lines, because only such mutations are heritable. Typical genotyping experiments, however, use DNA from some somatic tissues such as blood, which harbors somatic mutations at the current generation in addition to germ-line mutations accumulated since the most recent common ancestor of the sample. This common practice may sometimes cause erroneous interpretations of polymorphism data, unless we properly understand the role of somatic mutations in population genetics. We here introduce a very basic theoretical framework of population genetics with somatic mutations taken into account. It is easy to imagine that somatic mutations at the current generation simply add individual-specific variations, as errors in mutation detection do. Our theory quantifies this increment under various conditions. We find that the major contribution of somatic mutations plus errors is to very rare variants, particularly to singletons. The relative contribution is markedly large when mutations are deleterious. Because negative selection also increases rare variants, it is important to distinguish the roles of these mutually confounding factors when we interpret the data, even after correcting for demography. We apply this theory to human copy number variations (CNVs), for which the composite effect of somatic mutations and errors may not be negligible. Using genome-wide CNV data, we demonstrate how the joint action of the two factors, selection and somatic mutations plus errors, shapes the observed pattern of polymorphism. PMID:23981956

  14. Genetic Network Identification Using Convex Programming A. Agung Julius

    E-print Network

    Zavlanos, Michael

    engineering the genetic network. Genetic network identification has important potential applicationsGenetic Network Identification Using Convex Programming A. Agung Julius , Michael Zavlanos , Stephen Boyd , and George J. Pappas Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering Department

  15. Performance Evaluation of Reversible IntegertoInteger Wavelet Transforms for Image Compression

    E-print Network

    Adams, Michael D.

    interest in reversible integer­to­integer wavelet transforms for im­ age coding applicationsPerformance Evaluation of Reversible Integer­to­Integer Wavelet Transforms for Image Compression: (604)822­2872, Fax: (604)822­5949 Email: mdadams@ece.ubc.ca #12; Performance Evaluation of Reversible

  16. Identifying rare variants for genetic risk through a combined pedigree and phenotype approach: application to suicide and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, T M; Pimentel, R; Smith, K; Bakian, A V; Jerominski, L; Cardon, J; Camp, N J; Callor, W B; Grey, T; Singleton, M; Yandell, M; Renshaw, P F; Yurgelun-Todd, D A; Gray, D; Coon, H

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a complex disorder, with evidence for genetic risk independent of other genetic risk factors including psychiatric disorders. Since 1996, over 3000 DNA samples from Utah suicide decedents have been collected and banked for research use through the Utah Medical Examiner. In addition, over 12?000 Utah suicides were identified through examination of death certificates back to 1904. By linking this data with the Utah Population Database, we have identified multiple extended pedigrees with increased risk for suicide completion. A number of medical conditions co-occur with suicide, including asthma, and this study was undertaken to identify genetic risk common to asthma and suicide. This study tests the hypothesis that a particular comorbid condition may identify a more homogeneous genetic subgroup, facilitating the identification of specific genetic risk factors in that group. From pedigrees at increased risk for suicide, we identified three pedigrees also at significantly increased familial risk for asthma. Five suicide decedents from each of these pedigrees, plus an additional three decedents not from these pedigrees with diagnosed asthma, and 10 decedents with close relatives with asthma were genotyped. Results were compared with 183 publicly available unaffected control exomes from 1000 Genomes and CEPH (Centre d'etude du polymorphisme humain) samples genotyped on the same platform. A further 432 suicide decedents were also genotyped as non-asthma suicide controls. Genotyping was done using the Infinium HumanExome BeadChip. For analysis, we used the pedigree extension of Variant Annotation, Analysis and Search Tool (pVAAST) to calculate the disease burden of each gene. The Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool (Phevor) then re-ranked our pVAAST results in context of the phenotype. Using asthma as a seed phenotype, Phevor traversed biomedical ontologies and identified genes with similar biological properties to those known to result in asthma. Our top associated genes included those related to neurodevelopment or neural signaling (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (SMPD2), homeobox b2 (HOXB2), neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM2), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A0 (HNRNPA0)), inflammation (free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2)) and inflammation with additional evidence of neuronal involvement (oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1), toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)). Of particular interest, BDNF has been previously implicated in both psychiatric disorders and asthma. Our results demonstrate the utility of combining pedigree and co-occurring phenotypes to identify rare variants associated with suicide risk in conjunction with specific co-occurring conditions. PMID:25335167

  17. Diploid sperm produced by artificially sex-reversed clone loaches.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Morishima, Kagayaki; Kusuda, Satoshi; Yamaha, Etsuro; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2007-02-01

    Clone loaches reproduce unisexually in a wild population of Hokkaido Island, Japan. These clone loaches produce genetically identical unreduced eggs which develop to diploid individuals without any genetic contribution of sperm donors. In the present study, sex reversal of clone loaches was attempted and the reproductive potential of resultant clone males was examined. Clone loaches administered 0.5 ppm of 17-alpha methyltestosterone (MT) for 30 days from 1 month after hatching differentiated into physiological males. These sex-reversed clone males produced fertile spermatozoa with a diploid DNA content. Diploid spermatozoa had significantly larger heads than normal haploid sperm, but had a normal shape showing a head, mid-piece, and tail. The motility of diploid spermatozoa was low after ambient water was added. Concentration of diploid spermatozoa per unit of sperm was lower than that of control haploid spermatozoa. Microsatellite genotyping revealed that triploid progeny from the cross between a normal diploid female and a sex-reversed clone male had two alleles specific to the diploid clone male and one allele of the mother loach. These results indicated that the sex-reversed clone males produced fertile diploid spermatozoa genetically identical to the clone lineage. PMID:17177281

  18. Novel designs of nanometric parity preserving reversible compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoaei, Soghra; Haghparast, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Reversible logic is a new field of study that has applications in optical information processing, low power CMOS design, DNA computing, bioinformatics, and nanotechnology. Low power consumption is a basic issue in VLSI circuits today. To prevent the distribution of errors in the quantum circuit, the reversible logic gates must be converted into fault-tolerant quantum operations. Parity preserving is used to realize fault tolerant in this circuits. This paper proposes a new parity preserving reversible gate. We named it NPPG gate. The most significant aspect of the NPPG gate is that it can be used to produce parity preserving reversible full adder circuit. The proposed parity preserving reversible full adder using NPPG gate is more efficient than the existing designs in term of quantum cost and it is optimized in terms of number of constant inputs and garbage outputs. Compressors are of importance in VLSI and digital signal processing applications. Effective VLSI compressors reduce the impact of carry propagation of arithmetic operations. They are built from the full adder blocks. We also proposed three new approaches of parity preservation reversible 4:2 compressor circuits. The third design is better than the previous two in terms of evaluation parameters. The important contributions have been made in the literature toward the design of reversible 4:2 compressor circuits; however, there are not efforts toward the design of parity preservation reversible 4:2 compressor circuits. All the scales are in the nanometric criteria.

  19. Genetic and genomic approaches for improving turfgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this chapter, we discuss molecular marker and genetic transformation methods, highlights, and progress in turfgrasses. In addition, we discuss DNA sequencing, genomic applications including RNA expression assays, uses of molecular markers in population genetics and association studies, and phylo...

  20. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  1. Genetic Discrimination

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Informed Consent for Genomics Research Intellectual Property Online Bioethics Resources Privacy in Genomics Regulation of Genetic Tests ... Medicine: Policy Implications for Research and Medicine Online Bioethics Resources Privacy in Genomics Regulation of Genetic Tests · ...

  2. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePLUS

    ... certain diseases are also often determined by genes. Genetic counseling is the process where parents can learn more ... up to you whether or not to have genetic counseling and testing. You will want to think about ...

  3. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  4. A Research Introduction toA Research Introduction to Genetic ProgrammingGenetic Programming

    E-print Network

    McKay, Robert Ian

    1 A Research Introduction toA Research Introduction to Genetic ProgrammingGenetic Programming Bob McKayBob McKay Dept of Computer Science and EngineeringDept of Computer Science and Engineering SeoulIntroduction ­­ BackgroundBackground ­­ Variants of Genetic ProgrammingVariants of Genetic Programming ­­ Applications

  5. Genetic Analysis of Xenopus tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Geach, Timothy J.; Stemple, Derek L.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.

    2014-01-01

    The pipid frog Xenopus tropicalis has emerged as a powerful new model system for combining genetic and genomic analysis of tetrapod development with robust embryological, molecular and biochemical assays. Its early development closely resembles that of its well-understood relative X. laevis, from which techniques and reagents can be readily transferred. In contrast to the tetraploid X. laevis, X. tropicalis has a compact diploid genome with strong synteny to those of amniotes. Recently, advances in high-throughput sequencing together with solution-hybridization whole-exome enrichment technology offer powerful strategies for cloning novel mutations as well as reverse genetic identification of sequence lesions in specific genes of interest. Further advantages include the wide range of functional and molecular assays available, the large number of embryos/meioses produced, and the ease of haploid genetics and gynogenesis. The addition of these genetic tools to X. tropicalis provides a uniquely flexible platform for analysis of gene function in vertebrate development. PMID:22956083

  6. Genetic analysis of Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Geach, Timothy J; Stemple, Derek L; Zimmerman, Lyle B

    2012-01-01

    The pipid frog Xenopus tropicalis has emerged as a powerful new model system for combining genetic and genomic analysis of tetrapod development with robust embryological, molecular, and biochemical assays. Its early development closely resembles that of its well-understood relative X. laevis, from which techniques and reagents can be readily transferred. In contrast to the tetraploid X. laevis, X. tropicalis has a compact diploid genome with strong synteny to those of amniotes. Recently, advances in high-throughput sequencing together with solution-hybridization whole-exome enrichment technology offer powerful strategies for cloning novel mutations as well as reverse genetic identification of sequence lesions in specific genes of interest. Further advantages include the wide range of functional and molecular assays available, the large number of embryos/meioses produced, and the ease of haploid genetics and gynogenesis. The addition of these genetic tools to X. tropicalis provides a uniquely flexible platform for analysis of gene function in vertebrate development. PMID:22956083

  7. Genetic secrets: Protecting privacy and confidentiality in the genetic era

    SciTech Connect

    Rothstein, M.A.

    1998-07-01

    Few developments are likely to affect human beings more profoundly in the long run than the discoveries resulting from advances in modern genetics. Although the developments in genetic technology promise to provide many additional benefits, their application to genetic screening poses ethical, social, and legal questions, many of which are rooted in issues of privacy and confidentiality. The ethical, practical, and legal ramifications of these and related questions are explored in depth. The broad range of topics includes: the privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; the challenges to privacy and confidentiality that may be projected to result from the emerging genetic technologies; the role of informed consent in protecting the confidentiality of genetic information in the clinical setting; the potential uses of genetic information by third parties; the implications of changes in the health care delivery system for privacy and confidentiality; relevant national and international developments in public policies, professional standards, and laws; recommendations; and the identification of research needs.

  8. SOYBEAN GENETICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean genetics is a broad area encompassing all aspects, such as qualitative genetics, molecular genetics, etc. The objective of this book chapter, a revision of a 1998 book on soybean, was to include information that could be used for soybean improvement, and to summarize the current status of s...

  9. Imaging Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  10. Soybean Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean genetics is a broad area encompassing all aspects, such as qualitative genetics, molecular genetics, etc. The objective of this book chapter was to include information that could be used for soybean improvement, and to summarize the current status of soybean genomics. Soybean germplasm is ...

  11. Application of capillary electrophoretic chips in protein profiling of plant extracts for identification of genetic modifications of maize.

    PubMed

    Pobo?y, Ewa; Filaber, Monika; Koc, Anna; Garcia-Reyes, Juan F

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the chip gel electrophoresis with LIF detection was applied in protein profiling of fractionated and total extracts of maize standards. The sensitivity of such determinations can be enhanced by lyophilization of extracts or employing filtering and preconcentration with cutoff filters. Combinatorial peptide ligand library applied for sample processing prior to the electrophoretic analysis was, especially, an effective pretreatment step in the determination of low-abundance proteins. Several repeatable differences were observed for protein profiles between maize standards not containing the genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and those containing GMO, which can be potentially employed for identification of GMO in maize samples and foods of maize origin. PMID:23856913

  12. Oligonucleotide Arrays vs. Metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation and BAC Arrays for Single-Cell Analysis: First Applications to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Robertsonian Translocation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (?20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  13. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (? 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  14. Reversible brazing process

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, J.D.; Stephens, J.J.; Walker, C.A.

    1999-09-14

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together is disclosed. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  15. Reversible brazing process

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Jim D. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Walker, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  16. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  17. Gradient liquid chromatographic retention time prediction for suspect screening applications: A critical assessment of a generalised artificial neural network-based approach across 10 multi-residue reversed-phase analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Barron, Leon P; McEneff, Gillian L

    2016-01-15

    For the first time, the performance of a generalised artificial neural network (ANN) approach for the prediction of 2492 chromatographic retention times (tR) is presented for a total of 1117 chemically diverse compounds present in a range of complex matrices and across 10 gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography-(high resolution) mass spectrometry methods. Probabilistic, generalised regression, radial basis function as well as 2- and 3-layer multilayer perceptron-type neural networks were investigated to determine the most robust and accurate model for this purpose. Multi-layer perceptrons most frequently yielded the best correlations in 8 out of 10 methods. Averaged correlations of predicted versus measured tR across all methods were R(2)=0.918, 0.924 and 0.898 for the training, verification and test sets respectively. Predictions of blind test compounds (n=8-84 cases) resulted in an average absolute accuracy of 1.02±0.54min for all methods. Within this variation, absolute accuracy was observed to marginally improve for shorter runtimes, but was found to be relatively consistent with respect to analyte retention ranges (~5%). Finally, optimised and replicated network dependency on molecular descriptor data is presented and critically discussed across all methods. Overall, ANNs were considered especially suitable for suspects screening applications and could potentially be utilised in bracketed-type analyses in combination with high resolution mass spectrometry. PMID:26592605

  18. Preparation of a bifunctional pyrazosulfuron-ethyl imprinted polymer with hydrophilic external layers by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and its application in the sulfonylurea residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meixian; Zhang, Yingying; Lin, Shen; Yang, Xinlin; Fan, Zhijin; Yang, Lixia; Dong, Xiangchao

    2013-09-30

    A new bifunctional pyrazosulfuron-ethyl imprinted polymer was synthesized by the combination of molecular imprinting technology and living radical polymerization. In the synthesis, the pyrazosulfuron-ethyl imprinted polymer was obtained by the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) precipitation polymerization followed by grafting poly(glyceryl monomethacrylate) (pGMMA) by the post-RAFT polymerization. In this research, we used polyethylene glycol (PEG) as the polymeric porogen in order to increase the porosity of the material which is a new porogen application in the precipitation polymerization. The imprinted polymer has selectivity for the template and ability of humic acids exclusion which has shown the merits of molecularly imprinted polymers and restricted access materials. An online solid-phase extraction/HPLC method for the analysis of three sulfonylurea residues in soil samples has been developed and validated. The recovery of 81-99% in the spiked levels of 40-200 ?g kg(-1) was obtained and the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were less than 4.8 and 15.9 ?g kg(-1) respectively. The results demonstrated that this bifunctional material can be used for the efficient pyrazosulfuron-ethyl extraction in the sulfonylurea residue analysis from environmental samples. PMID:23953454

  19. An improved model for prediction of retention times of tryptic peptides in ion pair reversed-phase HPLC: its application to protein peptide mapping by off-line HPLC-MALDI MS.

    PubMed

    Krokhin, O V; Craig, R; Spicer, V; Ens, W; Standing, K G; Beavis, R C; Wilkins, J A

    2004-09-01

    The proposed model is based on the measurement of the retention times of 346 tryptic peptides in the 560- to 4,000-Da mass range, derived from a mixture of 17 protein digests. These peptides were measured in HPLC-MALDI MS runs, with peptide identities confirmed by MS/MS. The model relies on summation of the retention coefficients of the individual amino acids, as in previous approaches, but additional terms are introduced that depend on the retention coefficients for amino acids at the N-terminal of the peptide. In the 17-protein mixture, optimization of two sets of coefficients, along with additional compensation for peptide length and hydrophobicity, yielded a linear dependence of retention time on hydrophobicity, with an R2 value about 0.94. The predictive capability of the model was used to distinguish peptides with close m/z values and for detailed peptide mapping of selected proteins. Its applicability was tested on columns of different sizes, from nano- to narrow-bore, and for direct sample injection, or injection via a pre-column. It can be used for accurate prediction of retention times for tryptic peptides on reversed-phase (300-A pore size) columns of different sizes with a linear water-ACN gradient and with TFA as the ion-pairing modifier. PMID:15238601

  20. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference