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Sample records for reversed electroosmotic flow

  1. Electroosmotic Flow Reversal Outside Glass Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report observations of a striking reversal in the direction of electroosmotic flow (EOF) outside a conical glass nanopore as a function of salt concentration. At high ionic strengths (>100 mM), we observe EOF in the expected direction as predicted by classical electrokinetic theory, while at low salt concentrations (<1 mM) the direction of the flow is reversed. The critical crossover salt concentration depends on the pore diameter. Finite-element simulations indicate a competition between the EOF generated from the inner and outer walls of the pore, which drives flows in opposite directions. We have developed a simple analytical model which reveals that, as the salt concentration is reduced, the flow rates inside the pore are geometrically constrained, whereas there is no such limit for flows outside the pore. This model captures all of the essential physics of the system and explains the observed data, highlighting the key role the external environment plays in determining the overall electroosmotic behavior. PMID:25490120

  2. Microfluidic point-of-care blood panel based on a novel technique: Reversible electroosmotic flow.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mahdi; Madadi, Hojjat; Casals-Terré, Jasmina

    2015-09-01

    A wide range of diseases and conditions are monitored or diagnosed from blood plasma, but the ability to analyze a whole blood sample with the requirements for a point-of-care device, such as robustness, user-friendliness, and simple handling, remains unmet. Microfluidics technology offers the possibility not only to work fresh thumb-pricked whole blood but also to maximize the amount of the obtained plasma from the initial sample and therefore the possibility to implement multiple tests in a single cartridge. The microfluidic design presented in this paper is a combination of cross-flow filtration with a reversible electroosmotic flow that prevents clogging at the filter entrance and maximizes the amount of separated plasma. The main advantage of this design is its efficiency, since from a small amount of sample (a single droplet [Formula: see text]10 μl) almost 10% of this (approx 1 μl) is extracted and collected with high purity (more than 99%) in a reasonable time (5-8 min). To validate the quality and quantity of the separated plasma and to show its potential as a clinical tool, the microfluidic chip has been combined with lateral flow immunochromatography technology to perform a qualitative detection of the thyroid-stimulating hormone and a blood panel for measuring cardiac Troponin and Creatine Kinase MB. The results from the microfluidic system are comparable to previous commercial lateral flow assays that required more sample for implementing fewer tests. PMID:26396660

  3. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field. PMID:26923197

  4. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-02-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field.

  5. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-01-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field. PMID:26923197

  6. Electroosmotic flow hysteresis for dissimilar ionic solutions.

    PubMed

    Lim, An Eng; Lim, Chun Yee; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2015-03-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) with two or more fluids is commonly encountered in various microfluidics applications. However, no investigation has hitherto been conducted to investigate the hysteretic or flow direction-dependent behavior during the displacement flow of solutions with dissimilar ionic species. In this investigation, electroosmotic displacement flow involving dissimilar ionic solutions was studied experimentally through a current monitoring method and numerically through finite element simulations. The flow hysteresis can be characterized by the turning and displacement times; turning time refers to the abrupt gradient change of current-time curve while displacement time is the time for one solution to completely displace the other solution. Both experimental and simulation results illustrate that the turning and displacement times for a particular solution pair can be directional-dependent, indicating that the flow conditions in the microchannel are not the same in the two different flow directions. The mechanics of EOF hysteresis was elucidated through the theoretical model which includes the ionic mobility of each species, a major governing parameter. Two distinct mechanics have been identified as the causes for the EOF hysteresis involving dissimilar ionic solutions: the widening/sharpening effect of interfacial region between the two solutions and the difference in ion concentration distributions (and thus average zeta potentials) in different flow directions. The outcome of this investigation contributes to the fundamental understanding of flow behavior in microfluidic systems involving solution pair with dissimilar ionic species. PMID:25945139

  7. Electroosmotic flow hysteresis for dissimilar ionic solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) with two or more fluids is commonly encountered in various microfluidics applications. However, no investigation has hitherto been conducted to investigate the hysteretic or flow direction-dependent behavior during the displacement flow of solutions with dissimilar ionic species. In this investigation, electroosmotic displacement flow involving dissimilar ionic solutions was studied experimentally through a current monitoring method and numerically through finite element simulations. The flow hysteresis can be characterized by the turning and displacement times; turning time refers to the abrupt gradient change of current-time curve while displacement time is the time for one solution to completely displace the other solution. Both experimental and simulation results illustrate that the turning and displacement times for a particular solution pair can be directional-dependent, indicating that the flow conditions in the microchannel are not the same in the two different flow directions. The mechanics of EOF hysteresis was elucidated through the theoretical model which includes the ionic mobility of each species, a major governing parameter. Two distinct mechanics have been identified as the causes for the EOF hysteresis involving dissimilar ionic solutions: the widening/sharpening effect of interfacial region between the two solutions and the difference in ion concentration distributions (and thus average zeta potentials) in different flow directions. The outcome of this investigation contributes to the fundamental understanding of flow behavior in microfluidic systems involving solution pair with dissimilar ionic species. PMID:25945139

  8. Electro-osmotic flow in bicomponent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarenko, Andrei; Sega, Marcello

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) is a widely used technique that uses the action of external electric fields on solvated ions to move fluids around in microfluidics devices. For homogeneous fluids, the characteristics of the flow can be well approximated by simple analytical models, but in multicomponent systems such as oil-in-water droplets one has to rely to numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to investigate physical properties of the EOF in a bicomponent fluid by solving the coupled equations of motions of explicit ions in interaction with a continuous model of the flow. To do so we couple the hydrodynamics equations as solved by a Shan-Chen Lattice-Boltzmann method to the molecular dynamics of the ions. The presence of explicit ions allows us to go beyond the simple Poisson-Boltzmann approximations, and investigate a variety of EOF regimes. ETN-COLLDENSE (H2020-MCSA-ITN-2014, Grant No. 642774).

  9. The role of electroosmotic flow in transdermal iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pikal, M J

    2001-03-01

    Iontophoresis enhances transdermal drug delivery by three mechanisms: (a) the ion-electric field interaction provides an additional force which drives ions through the skin; (b) flow of electric current increases permeability of skin; and (c) electroosmosis produces bulk motion of the solvent itself that carries ions or neutral species, with the solvent 'stream'. The relative importance of electroosmotic flow is the subject of this review. Experimental observations and theoretical concepts are reviewed to clarify the nature of electroosmotic flow and to define the conditions under which electroosmotic flow is an important effect in transdermal iontophoresis. Electroosmotic flow is bulk fluid flow which occurs when a voltage difference is imposed across a charged membrane. Electroosmotic flow occurs in a wide variety of membranes, is always in the same direction as flow of counterions and may either assist or hinder drug transport. Since both human skin and hairless mouse skin are negatively charged above about pH 4, counterions are positive ions and electroosmotic flow occurs from anode to cathode. Thus, anodic delivery is assisted by electroosmosis, but cathodic delivery is retarded. Water carried by ions as 'hydration water' does not contribute significantly to electroosmotic flow. Rather electroosmotic flow is caused by an electrical volume force acting on the mobile counterions. The simple 'limiting law' theory commonly given in textbooks and some research articles is a very poor approximation for transdermal systems. However, several extensions of the limiting law are compatible with each other and with the available experimental data. One of these theories, the Manning theory, has been incorporated into a theory for the effect of electroosmotic flow on iontophoresis, the latter theory being in good agreement with experiment. Both theory and experimental data indicate that electroosmotic flow increases in importance as the size of the drug ion increases. The

  10. Electroosmotic flow in single PDMS nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ran; Li, Dongqing

    2016-06-01

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity in single PDMS nanochannels with dimensions as small as 20 nm is investigated systematically by the current slope method in this paper. A novel method for the fabrication of single nanochannels on PDMS surfaces is developed. The effects of channel size, ionic concentration of the electrolyte solution and electric field on the EOF velocity in single nanochannels are investigated. The results show that the EOF velocity in smaller nanochannels with overlapped electric double layers (EDL) is proportional to the applied electric field but is smaller than the EOF velocity in microchannels under the same applied electric field. The EOF velocity in relatively large nanochannels without the overlap of EDLs is independent of the channel size and is the same as that in microchannels under the same applied electric field. Furthermore, in smaller nanochannels with overlapped EDLs, the EOF velocity depends on the ionic concentration and also on the channel size. The experimental results reported in this paper are valuable for the future studies of electrokinetic nanofluidics.The electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity in single PDMS nanochannels with dimensions as small as 20 nm is investigated systematically by the current slope method in this paper. A novel method for the fabrication of single nanochannels on PDMS surfaces is developed. The effects of channel size, ionic concentration of the electrolyte solution and electric field on the EOF velocity in single nanochannels are investigated. The results show that the EOF velocity in smaller nanochannels with overlapped electric double layers (EDL) is proportional to the applied electric field but is smaller than the EOF velocity in microchannels under the same applied electric field. The EOF velocity in relatively large nanochannels without the overlap of EDLs is independent of the channel size and is the same as that in microchannels under the same applied electric field. Furthermore, in

  11. Electro-osmotic flow in coated nanocapillaries: a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Monteferrante, Michele; Melchionna, Simone

    2014-12-14

    Motivated by recent experiments, we present a theoretical investigation of how the electro-osmotic flow occurring in a capillary is modified when its charged surfaces are coated with charged polymers. The theoretical treatment is based on a three-dimensional model consisting of a ternary fluid-mixture, representing the solvent and two species for the ions, confined between two parallel charged plates decorated with a fixed array of scatterers representing the polymer coating. The electro-osmotic flow, generated by a constant electric field applied in a direction parallel to the plates, is studied numerically by means of Lattice Boltzmann simulations. In order to gain further understanding we performed a simple theoretical analysis by extending the Stokes-Smoluchowski equation to take into account the porosity induced by the polymers in the region adjacent to the walls. We discuss the nature of the velocity profiles by focusing on the competing effects of the polymer charges and the frictional forces they exert. We show evidence of the flow reduction and of the flow inversion phenomenon when the polymer charge is opposite to the surface charge. By using the density of polymers and the surface charge as control variables, we propose a phase diagram that discriminates the direct and the reversed flow regimes and determines their dependence on the ionic concentration. PMID:25343500

  12. Electroosmotic Flow Hysteresis for Dissimilar Anionic Solutions.

    PubMed

    Lim, An Eng; Lim, Chun Yee; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-08-16

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) with two or more fluids is often encountered in various microfluidic applications. However, no investigation has hitherto been conducted to investigate the hysteretic or flow direction-dependent behavior during displacement flow of solutions with dissimilar anion species. In this investigation, EOF of dissimilar anionic solutions was studied experimentally through the current monitoring method and numerically through finite element simulations. As opposed to other conventional displacement flows, EOF involving dissimilar anionic solutions exhibits counterintuitive behavior, whereby the current-time curve does not reach the steady-state value of the displacing electrolyte. Two distinct mechanics have been identified as the causes for this observation: (a) ion concentration adjustment when the displacing anions migrate upstream against EOF due to competition between the gradients of electromigrative and convective fluxes and (b) ion concentration readjustment induced by the static diffusive interfacial region between the dissimilar fluids which can only be propagated throughout the entire microchannel with the presence of EOF. The resultant ion distributions lead to the flow rate to be directional-dependent, indicating that the flow conditions are asymmetric between these two different flow directions. The outcomes of this investigation contribute to the in-depth understanding of flow behavior in microfluidic systems involving inhomogeneous fluids, particularly dissimilar anionic solutions. The understanding of EOF hysteresis is fundamentally important for the accurate prediction of analytes transport in microfluidic devices under EOF. PMID:27426052

  13. Optical control of electro-osmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirei, Huba; Der, Andras; Oroszi, Laszlo; Ferencz, Karpat; Rakovics, Vilmos; Ormos, Pal

    2005-08-01

    Electro-osmotic pumping is an efficient way to move fluids in microfluidic systems. It is driven by the interaction of the Debye layer formed in the vicinity of the charged channel wall with a tangential electric field. The key parameters that determine the flow properties are the zeta potential of the surface and the electric field that drives the flow. Consequently, the flow can be controlled by appropriately modifying these parameters. Controlling the charge on the channel wall makes it possible to modify fluid flow. Likewise, the electric field close to the surface can be modified by changing the conductivity of the surface. The surface charge of appropriate materials can be changed by light illumination: the application of this phenomenon offers the possibility to optically control flow parameters. We have tested this possibility with several light sensitive surfaces. In the class of materials that change their charge upon illumination TiO2, a well known photoactive material was investigated. Experiments were also performed with the protein bacteriorhodopsin, known to change its surface charge following the release of protons into the solvent upon illumination. CdS was tested as the photoconductive material to modify the electric field by light. Linear microfluidic channels were prepared by soft lithography: a PDMS mold was placed upon a planar glass surface so that a rectangular cross section channel was formed upon the glass. The photosensitive materials covered the bottom glass surface. The experiments show that the flow can be readily modulated by illumination. The results demonstrate that it is possible to dynamically control microfluidic flow, opening up the prospect to create optically controlled complex microfluidic networks.

  14. Electroosmotic flow in single PDMS nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ran; Li, Dongqing

    2016-06-16

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity in single PDMS nanochannels with dimensions as small as 20 nm is investigated systematically by the current slope method in this paper. A novel method for the fabrication of single nanochannels on PDMS surfaces is developed. The effects of channel size, ionic concentration of the electrolyte solution and electric field on the EOF velocity in single nanochannels are investigated. The results show that the EOF velocity in smaller nanochannels with overlapped electric double layers (EDL) is proportional to the applied electric field but is smaller than the EOF velocity in microchannels under the same applied electric field. The EOF velocity in relatively large nanochannels without the overlap of EDLs is independent of the channel size and is the same as that in microchannels under the same applied electric field. Furthermore, in smaller nanochannels with overlapped EDLs, the EOF velocity depends on the ionic concentration and also on the channel size. The experimental results reported in this paper are valuable for the future studies of electrokinetic nanofluidics. PMID:27256765

  15. Electroosmotic Flow Rectification in Pyramidal-Pore Mica Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, P.; Mukaibo, H.; Horne, L.; Bishop, G.; Martin, C. R.

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate here a new electrokinetic phenomenon, Electroosmotic flow (EOF) rectification, in synthetic membranes containing asymmetric pores. Mica membranes with pyramidally shaped pores prepared by the track-etch method were used. EOF was driven through these membranes by using an electrode in solutions on either side to pass a constant ionic current through the pores. The velocity of EOF depends on the polarity of the current. A high EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is such that EOF is driven from the larger base opening to the smaller tip opening of the pore. A smaller EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is reversed such that EOF goes from tip to base. We show that this rectified EOF phenomenon is the result of ion current-rectification observed in such asymmetric-pore membranes.

  16. Theoretical model of electroosmotic flow for capillary zone electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Tavares, M.F.M.; McGuffin, V.L.

    1995-10-15

    A mathematical model of electroosmotic flow in capillary zone electrophoresis has been developed by taking into consideration of the ion-selective properties of silica surfaces. The electroosmotic velocity was experimentally determined, underboth constant voltage and constant current conditions, by using the resistance-monitoring method. A detailed study of electroosmotic flow characteristics in solutions of singly charged, strong electrolytes (NaCl, LiCl, KCl, NaBr, NaI, NaNO{sub 3}, and NaClO{sub 4}), as well as the phosphate buffer system, revealed a linear correlation between the {Zeta} potential and the logarithm of the cation activity. These results suggest that the capillary surface behaves as an ion-selective electrode. Consequently, the {Zeta} potential can be calculated as a function of the composition and pH of the solution with the corresponding modified Nernst equation for ion-selective electrodes. If the viscosity and dielectric constant of the solution are known, the electroosmotic velocity can then be accurately predicted by means of the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation. The proposed model has been successfully applied to phosphate buffer solutions in the range of pH from 4 to 10, containing sodium chloride from 5 to 15 mM, resulting in nearly 3% error in the estimation of the electroosmotic velocity. 53 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Highly efficient electroosmotic flow through functionalized carbon nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Gerstandt, Karen; Majumder, Mainak; Zhan, Xin; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2011-08-01

    Carbon nanotube membranes with inner diameter ranging from 1.5-7 nm were examined for enhanced electroosmotic flow. After functionalization via electrochemical diazonium grafting and carbodiimide coupling reaction, it was found that neutral caffeine molecules can be efficiently pumped via electroosmosis. An electroosmotic velocity as high as 0.16 cm s-1 V-1 has been observed. Power efficiencies were 25-110 fold improved compared to related nanoporous materials, which has important applications in chemical separations and compact medical devices. Nearly ideal electroosmotic flow was seen in the case where the mobile cation diameter nearly matched the inner diameter of the single-walled carbon nanotube resulting in a condition of using one ion is to pump one neutral molecule at equivalent concentrations.

  18. Viscoelectric effect on electroosmotic flow in a cylindrical microcapillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marroquin-Desentis, J.; Méndez, F.; Bautista, O.

    2016-06-01

    Electroosmotic flow, under the Debye–Hückel approximation, has been widely analyzed in the specialized literature. This is a severe restriction in practice, where zeta potentials as high as 100–200 mV are encountered frequently. Under this condition, the variation of the viscosity with the electric field in the electric double layer (EDL), known as the viscoelectric effect, can lead to a considerable variation in comparison to the Helmholtz–Smoluchowsky equation for the electroosmotic velocity. The objective of this work is to analyze the electroosmotic flow in a cylindrical capillary at high zeta potentials in the thin EDL approximation, taking into account the viscoelectric effect. In order to obtain the potential distribution, the Poisson–Boltzmann equation was solved by using the matched asymptotic expansions method, and then, by applying the same technique, the flow field was determined from the momentum equation by considering that the viscosity of the electrolyte changes according to the relationship η ={η }0[1+{{fE}}2], where {η }0 is the viscosity evaluated in the absence of an electric field, f is the viscoelectric constant and E is the intrinsic electric field in direction transversal to the EDL. For asserting the correctness of the asymptotic solution, this result was compared against a numerical solution, and a very good agreement between them was found. The results show that the viscoelectric effect has a noticeable influence by reducing the electroosmotic flow velocity in about 10% in comparison to the standard Helmholtz–Smoluchowski velocity.

  19. Controlling electroosmotic flows by polymer coatings: A joint experimental-theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteferrante, Michele; Sola, Laura; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella; Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Melchionna, Simone

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the electroosmotic flow (EOF) of an electrolytic solution in a polymer coated capillary electrophoresis tube. The polymeric density, charge, thickness, and the capillary tube charge vary as a function of pH and produce a non-trivial modulation of the EOF, including a flow reversal at acid pH conditions. By means of a theoretical argument and numerical simulations, we recover the experimental curve for the EOF, providing a firm approach for predictive analysis of electroosmosis under different polymeric coating conditions. A proposed application of the approach is to determine the near-wall charge of the coating to be used for further quantitative analysis of the electroosmotic flow and mobility.

  20. The surface charge density effect on the electro-osmotic flow in a nanochannel: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, M.; Azimian, A. R.; Semiromi, D. Toghraie

    2015-05-01

    The electro-osmotic flow of an aqueous solution of NaCl between two parallel silicon walls is studied through a molecular dynamics simulation. The objective here is to examine the dependency of the electro-osmotic flow on the surface charge density by considering the changes made in the structural properties of the electric double layer (EDL). The ion concentration, velocity profiles, and electric charge density of the electrolyte solution are investigated. Due to the partially charged atoms of the water molecules, water concentration is of a layered type near the wall. The obtained profiles revealed that an increase in the surface charge density, at low surface charges where the governing electrostatic coupling regime is Debye-Hückel, increases both the electro-osmotic velocity and the EDL thickness; whereas, a decreasing trend is observed in these two parameters in the intermediate regime. For high values of surface charge density, due to the charge inversion phenomenon, the reversed electro-osmotic flow will be generated in the channel. Results indicate that the absolute value of the reversed electro-osmotic velocity rises with an increase in the surface charge density.

  1. Effect of electro-osmotic flow on energy conversion on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Gowrishankar; Baier, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    It has been suggested that superhydrophobic surfaces, due to the presence of a no-shear zone, can greatly enhance transport of surface charges, leading to a considerable increase in the streaming potential. This could find potential use in micro-energy harvesting devices. In this paper, we show using analytical and numerical methods, that when a streaming potential is generated in such superhydrophobic geometries, the reverse electro-osmotic flow and hence current generated by this, is significant. A decrease in streaming potential compared to what was earlier predicted is expected. We also show that, due to the electro-osmotic streaming-current, a saturation in both the power extracted and efficiency of energy conversion is achieved in such systems for large values of the free surface charge densities. Nevertheless, under realistic conditions, such microstructured devices with superhydrophobic surfaces have the potential to even reach energy conversion efficiencies only achieved in nanostructured devices so far.

  2. Electroosmotic flow and its contribution to iontophoretic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Natalie R.; Kile, Brian M.; Carelli, Regina M.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Iontophoresis is the movement of charged molecules in solution under applied current using pulled multi-barrel glass capillaries drawn to a sharp tip. The technique is generally non-quantitative, and to address this, we have characterized the ejection of charged and neutral species using carbon-fiber electrodes attached to iontophoretic barrels. Our results show that observed ejections are due to the sum of iontophoretic and electroosmotic forces. Using the neutral, electroactive molecule 2-(4-nitrophenoxy) ethanol (NPE), which is only transported by electroosmotic flow (EOF), a positive correlation between the amount ejected and the diameter of each barrel's tip was found. In addition, using various charged and neutral electroactive compounds we found that, when each compound is paired with the EOF marker, the percentage of the ejection due to EOF remains constant. This percentage varies for each pair of compounds, and the differences in mobility are positively correlated to differences in electrophoretic mobility. Overall, the results show that capillary electrophoresis (CE) can be used to predict the percentage of ejection that will be due to EOF. With this information, quantitative iontophoresis is possible for electrochemically inactive drugs by using NPE as a marker for EOF. PMID:18947198

  3. Electro-osmotic flow enhancement in carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Mattia, Davide; Leese, Hannah; Calabrò, Francesco

    2016-02-13

    In this work, experimental evidence of the presence of electro-osmotic flow (EOF) in carbon nanotube membranes with diameters close to or in the region of electrical double layer overlap is presented for two different electrolytes for the first time. No EOF in this region should be present according to the simplified theoretical framework commonly used for EOF in micrometre-sized channels. The simplifying assumptions concern primarily the electrolyte charge density structure, based on the Poisson-Boltzmann (P-B) equation. Here, a numerical analysis of the solutions for the simplified case and for the nonlinear and the linearized P-B equations is compared with experimental data. Results show that the simplified solution produces a significant deviation from experimental data, whereas the linearized solution of the P-B equation can be adopted with little error compared with the full P-B case. This work opens the way to using electro-osmotic pumping in a wide range of applications, from membrane-based ultrafiltration and nanofiltration (as a more efficient alternative to mechanical pumping at the nanoscale) to further miniaturization of lab-on-a-chip devices at the nanoscale for in vivo implantation. PMID:26712647

  4. A handy liquid metal based electroosmotic flow pump.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Gui, Lin

    2014-06-01

    A room temperature liquid metal based electroosmotic flow (EOF) pump has been proposed in this work. This low-cost EOF pump is convenient for both fabrication and integration. It utilizes polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels filled with the liquid-metal as non-contact pump electrodes. The electrode channels are fabricated symmetrically to both sides of the pumping channel, having no contact with the pumping channel. To test the pumping performance of the EOF pump, the mean flow velocities of the fluid (DI water) in the EOF pumps were experimentally measured by tracing the fluorescent microparticles in the flow. To provide guidance for designing a low voltage EOF pump, parametric studies on dimensions of the electrode and pumping channels were performed in this work. According to the experimental results, the pumping speed can reach 5.93 μm s(-1) at a driving voltage of only 1.6 V, when the gap between the electrode and the pumping channel is 20 μm. Injecting a room temperature liquid metal into microchannels can provide a simple, rapid, low-cost but accurately self-aligned way to fabricate microelectrodes for EOF pumps, which is a promising method to achieve the miniaturization and integration of the EOF pump in microfluidic systems. The non-contact liquid electrodes have no influence on the fluid in the pumping channel when pumping, reducing Joule heat generation and preventing gas bubble formation at the surface of electrodes. The pump has great potential to drive a wide range of fluids, such as drug reagents, cell suspensions and biological macromolecule solutions. PMID:24706096

  5. Development of polymeric coatings for control of electro-osmotic flow in ASTP MA-011 electrophoresis technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    The development of a methyl cellulose based coating system for control of electro-osmotic flow at the walls of electrophoresis cells is described. Flight electrophoresis columns were coated with this system, resulting in a flight set of six columns. In flight photography of MA-011 electrophoretic separations verified control of electro-osmotic flow.

  6. Continuous flow nanoparticle concentration using alternating current-electroosmotic flow.

    PubMed

    Hoettges, Kai F; McDonnell, Martin B; Hughes, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    Achieving real-time detection of environmental pathogens such as viruses and bacterial spores requires detectors with both rapid action and a suitable detection threshold. However, most biosensors have detection limits of an order of magnitude or more above the potential infection threshold, limiting their usefulness. This can be improved through the use of automated sample preparation techniques such as preconcentration. In this paper, we describe the use of AC electroosmosis to concentrate nanoparticles from a continuous flow. Electrodes at an optimized angle across a flow cell, and energized by a 1 kHz signal, were used to push nanoparticles to one side of a flow cell, and to extract the resulting stream with a high particle concentration from that side of the flow cell. A simple model of the behavior of particles in the flow cell has been developed, which shows good agreement with experimental results. The method indicates potential for higher concentration factors through cascading devices. PMID:24166772

  7. Instability of electro-osmotic channel flow with streamwise conductivity gradients.

    PubMed

    Santos, J Jobim; Storey, Brian D

    2008-10-01

    This work considers the stability of an electro-osmotic microchannel flow with streamwise electrical conductivity gradients, a configuration common in microfluidic applications such as field amplified sample stacking. Previous work on such flows has focused on how streamwise conductivity gradients set a nonuniform electro-osmotic velocity which results in dispersion of the conductivity field. However, it has been known for many years that electric fields can couple with conductivity gradients to generate unstable flows. This work demonstrates that at high electric fields such an electrohydrodynamic instability arises in this configuration and the basic mechanisms are explored through numerical simulations. The instability is unique in that the nonuniform electro-osmotic flow sets the shape of the underlying conductivity field in a way that makes it susceptible to instability. While nonuniform electro-osmotic flow sets the stage, the instability is ultimately the result of electric body forces due to slight departure from electroneutrality in the fluid bulk. A simple stability map is created where two dimensionless numbers can predict system stability reasonably well, even though the system formally depends on six dimensionless groups. PMID:18999535

  8. Electromigration dispersion in a capillary in the presence of electro-osmotic flow

    PubMed Central

    GHOSAL, S.; CHEN, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The differential migration of ions in an applied electric field is the basis for separation of chemical species by capillary electrophoresis. Axial diffusion of the concentration peak limits the separation efficiency. Electromigration dispersion is observed when the concentration of sample ions is comparable to that of the background ions. Under such conditions, the local electrical conductivity is significantly altered in the sample zone making the electric field, and therefore, the ion migration velocity concentration dependent. The resulting nonlinear wave exhibits shock like features, and, under certain simplifying assumptions, is described by Burgers’ equation (S. Ghosal and Z. Chen Bull. Math. Biol. 2010 72, pg. 2047). In this paper, we consider the more general situation where the walls of the separation channel may have a non-zero zeta potential and are therefore able to sustain an electro-osmotic bulk flow. The main result is a one dimensional nonlinear advection diffusion equation for the area averaged concentration. This homogenized equation accounts for the Taylor-Aris dispersion resulting from the variation in the electro-osmotic slip velocity along the wall. It is shown that in a certain range of parameters, the electro-osmotic flow can actually reduce the total dispersion by delaying the formation of a concentration shock. However, if the electro-osmotic flow is sufficiently high, the total dispersion is increased because of the Taylor-Aris contribution. PMID:23390324

  9. Effect of heat transfer on rotating electroosmotic flow through a micro-vessel: haemodynamical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A.; Mondal, A.; Shit, G. C.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes the heat transfer characteristics associated with electroosmotic flow of blood through a micro-vessel having permeable walls. The analysis is based on the Debye-Hückel approximation for charge distributions and the Navier-Stokes equations are assumed to represent the flow field in a rotating system. The velocity slip condition at the vessel walls is taken into account. The essential features of the rotating electroosmotic flow of blood and associated heat transfer characteristics through a micro-vessel are clearly highlighted by the variation in the non-dimensional flow velocity, volumetric flow rate and non-dimensional temperature profiles. Moreover, the effect of Joule heating parameter and Prandtl number on the thermal transport characteristics are discussed thoroughly. The study reveals that the flow of blood is appreciably influenced by the elctroosmotic parameter as well as rotating Reynolds number.

  10. Hybrid lattice-Boltzmann and finite-difference simulation of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masilamani, Kannan; Ganguly, Suvankar; Feichtinger, Christian; Rüde, Ulrich

    2011-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) transient mathematical model is developed to simulate electroosmotic flows (EOFs) in a homogeneous, square cross-section microchannel, with and without considering the effects of axial pressure gradients. The general governing equations for electroosmotic transport are incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation for electric potential distribution within the channel. In the present numerical approach, the hydrodynamic equations are solved using a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) algorithm and the PB equation is solved using a finite-difference (FD) method. The hybrid LB-FD numerical scheme is implemented on an iterative framework solving the system of coupled time-dependent partial differential equations subjected to the pertinent boundary conditions. Transient behavior of the EOF and effects due to the variations of different physicochemical parameters on the electroosmotic velocity profile are investigated. Transport characteristics for the case of combined electroosmotic- and pressure-driven microflows are also examined with the present model. For the sake of comparison, the cases of both favorable and adverse pressure gradients are considered. EOF behaviors of the non-Newtonian fluid are studied through implementation of the power-law model in the 3D LB algorithm devised for the fluid flow analysis. Numerical simulations reveal that the rheological characteristic of the fluid changes the EOF pattern to a considerable extent and can have significant consequences in the design of electroosmotically actuated bio-microfluidic systems. To improve the performance of the numerical solver, the proposed algorithm is implemented for parallel computing architectures and the overall parallel performance is found to improve with the number of processors.

  11. Theoretical prediction of stationary positions in the rectangular chamber during asymmetric electroosmotic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Most microscopic cell electrophoretic work depends on the theortical prediction of stationary positions by Smoluchowski and Komagata. Their theoretical solutions are based on the assumption that the electroosmotic flow in a chamber is symmetric. Because experiences with the rectangular chamber indicate that symmetric flow occurs during less than 8% of the experiments, the existing theory for stationary position determination is expanded to include the more general case of asymmetric flow. Smoluchowski's equation for symmetric electroosmotic flow in a rectangular chamber having a width much smaller than its height or length is examined. Smoluchowski's approach is used to approximate stationary positions in rectangular chambers with height/width ratios greater than 40. Support for the theoretical prediction of stationary positions using is given by three types of experimental evidence.

  12. Electroosmotic flow and Joule heating in preparative continuous annular electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, René; Bart, Hans-Jörg

    2015-09-01

    An openFOAM "computational fluid dynamic" simulation model was developed for the description of local interaction of hydrodynamics and Joule heating in annular electrochromatography. A local decline of electrical conductivity of the background eluent is caused by an electrokinetic migration of ions resulting in higher Joule heat generation. The model equations consider the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluids, the energy equation for stationary temperature fields, and the mass transfer equation for the electrokinetic flow. The simulations were embedded in commercial ANSYS Fluent software and in open-source environment openFOAM. The annular gap (1 mm width) contained an inorganic C8 reverse-phase monolith as stationary phase prepared by an in situ sol-gel process. The process temperature generated by Joule heating was determined by thermal camera system. The local hydrodynamics in the prototype was detected by a gravimetric contact-free measurement method and experimental and simulated values matched quite well. PMID:25997390

  13. Multiscale study of nanoparticle-wall interactions in electroosmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlisk, A. T.; Zambrano, Harvey; Peng, Zhizi

    2011-11-01

    In electroosmotic transport (EOT), particle mobility results not only from the dragging exerted by the electrolyte, but also from the force exerted by the External Electric Field (EEF), and from the interactions with the walls and with the solvent. The objective of this work is to develop a unified theory of the motion of colloidal particles near walls and compare with the experiments of Kazoe and Yoda for EOT. In the present study a novel continuum approach is developed to study the particle interactions with polystyrene beads. Moreover, we conduct Non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations (NEMDS) of a nanoparticle as it moves near a solid-liquid interface subjected to an EEF. We investigate the response of the particle to changes in the surface electrostatics and the electrolyte concentration. Therefore, we perform NEMDS of a silica particle immersed in an electrolyte. The electrolyte solution is mounted on a silica substrate and the particle is constrained to move parallel to the surface so that we can extract the forces acting between the particle and the wall. We vary the electrolyte concentration, the particle size and the surface electrostatics. Supported by the Army Research Office, the National Science Foundation NSEC Center for the Affordable Nanoengineering of Polymeric Biomedical Devices

  14. Mass transfer during catalytic reaction in electroosmotically driven flow in a channel microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Himanshu; Vasu, Nadapana; de, Sirshendu

    2011-05-01

    Analytical solution for concentration profile in a microreactor is obtained during heterogeneous catalytic reaction. Reaction occurs in rectangular microchannel with catalyst-coated walls. Flow is induced electroosmotically in the microchannel. A general solution is obtained for first order reaction using a power series solution. Profiles of conversion, cup-mixing concentration of reactant, etc. and variation of Sherwood number is analyzed as function of operating variables. Analytical solution is compared with numerical results.

  15. Asymmetric electroosmotic flow and mobility measurements at nonstationary positions in the rectangular chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of a cell in solution is defined by its velocity divided by the electric field strength it experiences. An obvious way to measure the mobility of cells is to apply a constant electric field to a suspension of cells in a glass chamber and clock the velocities of individual cells through a microscope. This microscope method is the classic technique in cell electrophoresis and it has been used for the bulk of research in this field. Two aspects of the microscope method can critically affect the accuracy and consistency of its cell mobility measurements: (1) the electroosmotic fluctuations in the chamber from measurement to measurement; and (2) the number of cells which can be practically measured for statistically meaningful results. A new method of analyzing microelectrophoretic data using a computer program has been developed which addresses both of these aspects. It makes possible the mobility measurements of individual cells as positions throughout the rectangular chamber depth during asymmetric electroosmotic flow.

  16. Effect of viscoelasticity on the flow pattern and the volumetric flow rate in electroosmotic flows through a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Park, H M; Lee, W M

    2008-07-01

    Many lab-on-a-chip based microsystems process biofluids such as blood and DNA solutions. These fluids are viscoelastic and show extraordinary flow behaviors, not existing in Newtonian fluids. Adopting appropriate constitutive equations these exotic flow behaviors can be modeled and predicted reasonably using various numerical methods. In the present paper, we investigate viscoelastic electroosmotic flows through a rectangular straight microchannel with and without pressure gradient. It is shown that the volumetric flow rates of viscoelastic fluids are significantly different from those of Newtonian fluids under the same external electric field and pressure gradient. Moreover, when pressure gradient is imposed on the microchannel there appear appreciable secondary flows in the viscoelastic fluids, which is never possible for Newtonian laminar flows through straight microchannels. The retarded or enhanced volumetric flow rates and secondary flows affect dispersion of solutes in the microchannel nontrivially. PMID:18584093

  17. Direction dependence of displacement time for two-fluid electroosmotic flow

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2012-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow that involves one fluid displacing another fluid is commonly encountered in various microfludic applications and experiments, for example, current monitoring technique to determine zeta potential of microchannel. There is experimentally observed anomaly in such flow, namely, the displacement time is flow direction dependent, i.e., it depends if it is a high concentration fluid displacing a low concentration fluid, or vice versa. Thus, this investigation focuses on the displacement flow of two fluids with various concentration differences. The displacement time was determined experimentally with current monitoring method. It is concluded that the time required for a high concentration solution to displace a low concentration solution is smaller than the time required for a low concentration solution to displace a high concentration solution. The percentage displacement time difference increases with increasing concentration difference and independent of the length or width of the channel and the voltage applied. Hitherto, no theoretical analysis or numerical simulation has been conducted to explain this phenomenon. A numerical model based on finite element method was developed to explain the experimental observations. Simulations showed that the velocity profile and ion distribution deviate significantly from a single fluid electroosmotic flow. The distortion of ion distribution near the electrical double layer is responsible for the displacement time difference for the two different flow directions. The trends obtained from simulations agree with the experimental findings. PMID:22662083

  18. Study of three-dimensional electro-osmotic flow with curved boundary via lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Zhang, X. B.; Li, Q.; Jiang, X. S.; Zhou, H. P.

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) lattice Boltzmann model and boundary method is developed to simulate electro-osmotic flow (EOF) with a charged spherical particle immersed in an electrolyte solution. The general governing equations for electro-osmotic transport are Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for electric potential distribution around the particle. Two sets of D3Q19 lattice structure with curved boundary conditions are implemented. The simulation results are compared with analytical predictions and are found to be in excellent agreement. The potential distribution appears circularly symmetric and the flow velocity decreases with the cross-sectional area for flow passage increasing due to the mass conservation. The effects of the ionic concentration, the sphere radius, electric potential and external electric field on the velocity profiles are investigated. The flow velocity increases with both the electric potential and the external electric field. However, the variation in flow velocity with the ionic concentration and the sphere radius is complex due to the change in electrical double layer (EDL) thickness.

  19. Electroosmotic flow behaviour of metal contaminated expansive soil.

    PubMed

    Sivapullaiah, P V; Prakash, B S Nagendra

    2007-05-17

    It is important to study the flow behaviour through soil during electrokinetic extraction of contaminants to understand their removal mechanism. The flow through the expansive soil containing montmorillonite is monitored during laboratory electrokinetic extraction of heavy metal contaminants. The permeability of soil, which increases due to the presence of contaminants, is further enhanced during electrokinetic extraction of contaminants due to osmotic permeability. The variations in flow rates through the soil while the extracting fluid is changed to dilute acetic acid (used to control the increase of pH) and EDTA solution (used to desorb the metal ions from soil) are studied. The trends of removal of contaminants vis-a-vis the changes in the flow through the soil during different phases of electrokinetic extraction are established. Chromium ions are removed by flushing of water through the soil and increased osmotic flow is beneficial. Removal of iron ions is enhanced by induced osmotic flow and desorption of ions by electrokinetic processes. PMID:17276001

  20. Experimental Verification of Overlimiting Current by Surface Conduction and Electro-Osmotic Flow in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Sungmin; Cho, Inhee; Heo, Joonseong; Lim, Geunbae; Bazant, Martin Z.; Moon, Dustin Jaesuk; Sung, Gun Yong; Kim, Sung Jae

    2015-03-01

    Direct evidence is provided for the transition from surface conduction (SC) to electro-osmotic flow (EOF) above a critical channel depth (d ) of a nanofluidic device. The dependence of the overlimiting conductance (OLC) on d is consistent with theoretical predictions, scaling as d-1 for SC and d4 /5 for EOF with a minimum around d =8 μ m . The propagation of transient deionization shocks is also visualized, revealing complex patterns of EOF vortices and unstable convection with increasing d . This unified picture of surface-driven OLC can guide further advances in electrokinetic theory, as well as engineering applications of ion concentration polarization in microfluidics and porous media.

  1. Chaotic mixing enhancement in electro-osmotic flows by random period modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, J. Rafael; Chen, Kang Ping; Pacheco-Vega, Arturo; Chen, Baisong; Hayes, Mark A.

    2008-02-01

    In this Letter we report a method for enhancing mixing of a passive tracer in an electro-osmotic flow in a rectangular microchannel. A time-periodic electric field across the microchannel, filled with an electrolyte solution, is applied in order to realize a well-mixed state. A random perturbation to the time-periodic electric field is introduced in order to break the invariant tori of the system and achieve better mixing results. It is shown that under such period-modulation the enhancement effect increases with the strength of the modulation, and it is much reduced as diffusion is increased.

  2. Lift forces on colloidal particles in combined electroosmotic and Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Cevheri, Necmettin; Yoda, Minami

    2014-11-25

    Colloidal particles suspended in aqueous electrolyte solutions flowing through microchannels are subject to lift forces that repel the particles from the wall due to the voltage and pressure gradients commonly used to drive flows in microfluidic devices. There are very few studies that have considered particles subject to both an electric field and a pressure gradient, however. Evanescent-wave particle tracking velocimetry was therefore used to investigate the near-wall dynamics of a dilute suspension of 245 nm radius polystyrene particles in a monovalent electrolyte solution in Poiseuille and combined electroosmotic (EO) and Poiseuille flow through 30-μm-deep fused-silica channels. The lift force observed in Poiseuille flow, which is estimated from the near-wall particle distribution, appears to be proportional to the shear rate, a scaling consistent with hydrodynamic lift forces previously reported in field-flow fractionation studies. The estimates of the lift force observed in combined flow suggest that the force magnitude exceeds the sum of the lift forces observed in EO flow at the same electric field or in Poiseuille flow at the same shear rate. Moreover, the force magnitude appears to be proportional to the electric field magnitude and have a power law dependence on the shear rate with an exponent between 0.4 and 0.5. This unexpected scaling suggests that the repulsive lift force observed in combined electroosmotic and Poiseuille flow is a new phenomenon, distinct from previously reported electroviscous, hydrodynamic lift, or dielectrophoretic-like forces, and warrants further study. PMID:25343853

  3. Oscillatory electro-osmotic flow through a slit channel with slipping stripes on walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Henry C. W.; Ng, Chiu-On

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical model is presented in this paper for time-oscillating electro-osmotic flow through a plane channel bounded by two parallel plates, which are patterned with periodic stripes of distinct hydrodynamic slippage and wall potential. The flow is driven by oscillatory pressure gradient and electric field of the same frequency in the axial direction. Flows that are longitudinal or transverse to the stripes are investigated. Based on the Debye-Hückel approximation, and assuming Stokes flow, the electric potential and the velocity fields are found by the methods of eigenfunction expansion and point collocation. The phenomenological coefficients of the Onsager relations for the fluid and current fluxes are deduced as functions of the channel height, the area fraction of wall with slippage, the intrinsic slip length, the Debye parameter, the zeta potentials and the oscillation parameter. Considering several kinds of wall patterns, we extend the theoretical limits in the steady-flow regime to the oscillatory-flow regime. For a uniformly charged wall, the effective slip length obtained from the hydrodynamic problem can still be used directly in the electro-osmotic flow as if the wall were uniformly slipping. When the slipping stripes are perfectly slipping but uncharged, the presence of such stripes will always have a decreasing effect on the streaming conductance, unlike the steady case in which it gives no net effect on the flow in the limit of a very thin double layer. Furthermore, we confirm the presence of a threshold frequency, beyond which the flow will diminish significantly. The slipping fraction of the wall will always introduce a phase lag to the response and lower the threshold frequency. Increasing the wall potential in the presence of slippage can appreciably increase the streaming conductance and the phase lag.

  4. Experimental and theoretical investigations of non-Newtonian electro-osmotic driven flow in rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Chen, Juzheng; Wong, TeckNeng; Liow, Jong-Leng

    2016-07-20

    With the development of microfluidics, electro-osmotic (EO) driven flow has gained intense research interest as a result of its unique flow profile and the corresponding benefits in its application in the transportation of sensitive samples. Sensitive samples, such as DNA, are incapable of enduring strong flow shear induced by conventional hydrodynamic driven methods. EO driven flow is thus a niche area. However, even though there are a few research studies focusing on bio-fluidic samples related to EO driven flow, the majority of them are merely theoretical modeling without solid evidence from experiments due to the inherent complex rheological behavior of the bio-fluids. Challenges occur when the EO driven mechanism meets with complex rheology; vital questions such as can the zeta potential still be assumed to be constant when dealing with fluids with complex rheology? and "Does the shear thinning effect enhance electro-osmotic driven flow?" need to be answered. We conducted experiments using current monitoring and microscopy fluorescence methods, and developed a theoretical model by coupling a generalized Smoluchowski approach with the power-law constitutive model. We calculated the zeta potential and compared the experimental results with modeling to answer the questions. The results show a reduction of zeta potential in the presence of PEO aqueous solutions. A constant zeta potential is also indicated by varying the PEO concentration and the electric field strength.The shear thinning effect is also addressed via experimental data and theoretical calculations. The results show a promising enhancement of the EO driven velocity due to the shear thinning effect. PMID:27381295

  5. Influence of atomistic physics on electro-osmotic flow: An analysis based on density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilson, Robert H.; Griffiths, Stewart K.

    2006-10-01

    Molecular density profiles and charge distributions determined by density functional theory (DFT) are used in conjunction with the continuum Navier-Stokes equations to compute electro-osmotic flows in nanoscale channels. The ion species of the electrolyte are represented as centrally charged hard spheres, and the solvent is treated as a dense fluid of neutral hard spheres having a uniform dielectric constant. The model explicitly accounts for Lennard-Jones interactions among fluid and wall molecules, hard sphere repulsions, and short range electrical interactions, as well as long range Coulombic interactions. Only the last of these interactions is included in classical Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) modeling of the electric field. Although the proposed DFT approach is quite general, the sample calculations presented here are limited to symmetric monovalent electrolytes. For a prescribed surface charge, this DFT model predicts larger counterion concentrations near charged channel walls, relative to classical PB modeling, and hence smaller concentrations in the channel center. This shifting of counterions toward the walls reduces the effective thickness of the Debye layer and reduces electro-osmotic velocities as compared to classical PB modeling. Zeta potentials and fluid speeds computed by the DFT model are as much as two or three times smaller than corresponding PB results. This disparity generally increases with increasing electrolyte concentration, increasing surface charge density and decreasing channel width. The DFT results are found to be comparable to those obtained by molecular dynamics simulation, but require considerably less computing time.

  6. A novel microfluidic valve controlledby induced charge electro-osmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengfa; Song, Yongxin; Pan, Xinxiang; Li, Dongqing

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a novel microfluidic valve by utilizing induced charge electro-osmotic flow (ICEOF) is proposed and analyzed. The key part of the microfluidic valve is a Y-shaped microchannel. A small metal plate is placed at each corner of the junction of the Y-shaped microchannel. When a DC electrical field is applied through the channels, electro-osmotic flows occur in the channels, and two vortices will be formed near each of the metal plates due to the ICEOF. The two vortices behave like virtual ‘blocking columns’ to restrain and direct the flow in the Y-channel. In this paper, effects of the length of the metal plates, the applied voltages, the width of the microchannel, the zeta potential of the non-metal microchannel wall, and the orientation of the branch channels on the flow switching between two outlet channels are numerically investigated. The results show that the flow switching between the two outlet channels can be flexibly achieved by adjusting the applied DC voltages. The critical switching voltage (CSV), under which one outlet channel is closed, decreases with the increase in the metal plate length and the orientation angle of the outlet channels. The CSV, however, increases with the increase in the inlet voltage, the width of the microchannel, and the absolute value of the zeta potential of the non-metal microchannel wall. Compared with other types of micro-valves, the proposed micro-valve is simple in structure without any moving parts. Only a DC power source is needed for its actuation, thus it can operate automatically by controlling the applied voltages.

  7. Modelling of electrokinetic phenomena involving confined polymers: Applications to DNA separation and electroosmotic flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, Frederic

    Microfluidic and nanofluidic technology is revolutionizing experimental practices in analytical chemistry, molecular biology and medicine. Indeed, the development of systems of small dimensions for the processing of fluids heralds the miniaturization of traditional, cumbersome laboratory equipment onto robust, portable and efficient microchip devices (similar to the electronic microchips found in computers). Moreover, the conjunction of scale between the smallest man-made device and the largest macromolecules evolved by Nature is fertile ground for the blooming of our knowledge about the key processes of life. In fact, the conjunction is threefold, because modern computational resources also allow us to contemplate a rather explicit modelling of physical systems between the nanoscale and the microscale. In the five articles comprising this thesis, we present the results of computer simulations that address specific questions concerning the operation of two different model systems relevant to the development of small-scale fluidic devices for the manipulation and analysis of biomolecules. First, we use a Bond-Fluctuation Monte Carlo approach to study the electrophoretic drift of macromolecules across an entropic trap array built for the length separation of long, double-stranded DNA molecules. We show that the motion of the molecules is consistent with a simple balance between electric and entropic forces, in terms of a single characteristic parameter. We also extract detailed information on polymer deformation during migration, predict the separation of topoisomers, and investigate innovative ratchet driving regimes. Secondly, we present theoretical derivations, numerical calculations and Molecular Dynamics simulation results for an electrolyte confined in a capillary of nanoscopic dimensions. In particular, we study the effectiveness of neutral grafted polymer chains in reducing the magnitude of electroosmotic flow (fluid flow induced by an external electric field

  8. Digital Flow Control of Electroosmotic Pump: Onsager Coefficients and Interfacial Parameters Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuli; Miao, Jianying; Wang, Ning; Sheng, Ping

    2011-03-01

    Electroosmosis (EO) and streaming potential (SP) are two complementary electrokinetic processes related by the Onsager relation. In particular, electroosmotic pump (EOP) is potentially useful for a variety of engineering and bio-related applications. By fabricating samples consisting of dry-etched cylindrical pores (50 μ m in length and 3.5 μ m in diameter) on silicon wafers, we demonstrate that the use of digital control via voltage pulses can resolve the flow regulation and stability issues associated with the EOP, so that the intrinsic characteristics of the porous sample medium may be revealed. Through the consistency of the measured electroosmosis and the streaming potential coefficients as required by the Onsager relation, we deduce the zeta potential and the surface conductivity, both physical parameters pertaining to the liquid-solid interface.

  9. Digital flow control of electroosmotic pump: Onsager coefficients and interfacial parameters determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuli; Miao, Jianying; Wang, Ning; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2011-03-01

    Electroosmosis and streaming potential are two complementary electrokinetic processes related by the Onsager relation. In particular, an electroosmotic pump (EOP) is potentially useful for a variety of engineering and bio-related applications. By fabricating samples consisting of dry-etched cylindrical pores (50 μm in length and 3.5 μm in diameter) on silicon wafers, we demonstrate that the use of digital control via voltage pulses can resolve the flow regulation and stability issues associated with the EOP, so that the intrinsic characteristics of the porous sample medium may be revealed. Through the consistency of the measured electroosmosis (EO) and the streaming potential (SP) coefficients as required by the Onsager relation, we deduce the zeta potential and the surface conductivity, both physical parameters pertaining to the liquid-solid interface.

  10. Experimental verification of overlimiting current by surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sungmin; Cho, Inhee; Heo, Joonseong; Lim, Geunbae; Bazant, Martin Z; Moon, Dustin Jaesuk; Sung, Gun Yong; Kim, Sung Jae

    2015-03-20

    Direct evidence is provided for the transition from surface conduction (SC) to electro-osmotic flow (EOF) above a critical channel depth (d) of a nanofluidic device. The dependence of the overlimiting conductance (OLC) on d is consistent with theoretical predictions, scaling as d(-1) for SC and d(4/5) for EOF with a minimum around d=8  μm. The propagation of transient deionization shocks is also visualized, revealing complex patterns of EOF vortices and unstable convection with increasing d. This unified picture of surface-driven OLC can guide further advances in electrokinetic theory, as well as engineering applications of ion concentration polarization in microfluidics and porous media. PMID:25839275

  11. Heat-transfer enhancement in AC electro-osmotic micro-flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. P.; Speetjens, M. F. M.; Frijns, A. J. H.; van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2012-11-01

    Heat transfer in micro-flows is essential to emerging technologies as advanced microelectronics cooling systems and chemical processes in lab-on-a-chip applications. The present study explores the potential of AC electro-osmotic (ACEO) flow forcing, a promising technique for the actuation and manipulation of micro-flows, for heat-transfer enhancement. Subjects of investigation include the 3D flow structure due to ACEO forcing via an array of electrodes in a micro-channel by way of 3D velocity measurements. Presence and properties of vortical structures of the 3D flow are quantified in laboratory experiments. Typical outcomes of the experimental study result from a number of 3D particle trajectories obtained by using 3D micro-Particle-Tracking Velocimetry (3D μ-PTV). The steady nature of the flow enables combination of results from a series of measurements into one dense data set. This facilitates accurate evaluation of quantities relevant for heat transfer by data-processing methods. The primary circulation is given above one half of an electrode in terms of the spanwise component of vorticity. The outline of the vortex boundary is determined via the eigenvalues of the strain-rate tensor. To estimate convective heat transfer, wall shear rate above one half of an electrode is quantitatively analyzed as function of voltage amplitude and frequency. These results yield first insights into the characteristics of 3D ACEO flows and ways to exploit and manipulate them for heat-transfer enhancement.

  12. Poisson-Fokker-Planck model for biomolecules translocation through nanopore driven by electroosmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, XiaoHui; Zhang, ChiBin; Gu, Jun; Jiang, ShuYun; Yang, JueKuan

    2014-11-01

    A non-continuous electroosmotic flow model (PFP model) is built based on Poisson equation, Fokker-Planck equation and Navier-Stokse equation, and used to predict the DNA molecule translocation through nanopore. PFP model discards the continuum assumption of ion translocation and considers ions as discrete particles. In addition, this model includes the contributions of Coulomb electrostatic potential between ions, Brownian motion of ions and viscous friction to ion transportation. No ionic diffusion coefficient and other phenomenological parameters are needed in the PFP model. It is worth noting that the PFP model can describe non-equilibrium electroosmotic transportation of ions in a channel of a size comparable with the mean free path of ion. A modified clustering method is proposed for the numerical solution of PFP model, and ion current translocation through nanopore with a radius of 1 nm is simulated using the modified clustering method. The external electric field, wall charge density of nanopore, surface charge density of DNA, as well as ion average number density, influence the electroosmotic velocity profile of electrolyte solution, the velocity of DNA translocation through nanopore and ion current blockade. Results show that the ion average number density of electrolyte and surface charge density of nanopore have a significant effect on the translocation velocity of DNA and the ion current blockade. The translocation velocity of DNA is proportional to the surface charge density of nanopore, and is inversely proportional to ion average number density of electrolyte solution. Thus, the translocation velocity of DNAs can be controlled to improve the accuracy of sequencing by adjusting the external electric field, ion average number density of electrolyte and surface charge density of nanopore. Ion current decreases when the ion average number density is larger than the critical value and increases when the ion average number density is lower than the

  13. Electroosmotic Flow of Power-Law Fluids in a Cylindrical Microcapillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, M. H.; Babaie, Ashkan; Sadeghi, Arman; Center of Excellence in Energy Conversion Team

    2012-11-01

    In biological applications where most fluids are considered to be non-Newtonian, Newtonian law of viscosity looks insufficient for describing the flow characteristics. In the present work, the electroosmotic flow of power-law fluids in a circular micro tube is investigated. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation for electrical potential is solved numerically in the complete form without using the Debye-Hückel approximation. The physical model includes the Joule heating and viscous dissipation effects. Once the momentum and energy equations are solved numerically, a parametric study is done to investigate the effects of different parameters such as flow behavior index, wall zeta potential and the Debye-Hückel parameter on thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of the flow. Results show that based on the value of viscous dissipation and the Debye-Hückel parameter the non-Newtonian characteristics of the flow can lead to significant changes regarding to Newtonian behaviors. The provided results in this study would lead to accurate prediction of temperature of biofluids in Lab-on-a-chip devices which is vital for retaining samples in a healthy condition.

  14. 2D Flow patterning in Hele-Shaw configurations using Non-Uniform Electroosmotic Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Rubin, Shimon; Gat, Amir; Bercovici, Moran

    2015-11-01

    We present an analytical study, validated by numerical simulations, of electroosmotic flow in a Hele-Shaw configuration with non-uniform zeta potential distribution. Applying the lubrication approximation and assuming thin electric double layer, we derive a pair of uncoupled Poisson equations for the pressure and the stream function, and show that the inhomogeneous parts in these equations are governed by gradients in zeta potential parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field, respectively. We obtain a solution for the case of a disk with uniform zeta potential and show that the flow field created is an exact dipole, even in the immediate vicinity of the disk. We then illustrate the ability to generate complex flow fields using superposition of such disks. Furthermore, we study the inverse problem in which we define the desired flow pattern and solve for the zeta potential distribution required in order to establish it. We demonstrate that such inverse problem solutions can be used to create directional flows confined within narrow regions, without physical walls. We show that these solutions can be assembled to create complex microfluidic networks, composed of intersecting channels and turns, which are basic building blocks in microfluidic devices.

  15. Flow patterning in Hele-Shaw configurations using non-uniform electro-osmotic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Rubin, Shimon; Gat, Amir D.; Bercovici, Moran

    2015-10-01

    We present an analytical study of electro-osmotic flow in a Hele-Shaw configuration with non-uniform zeta potential distribution. Applying the lubrication approximation and assuming thin electric double layer, we obtain a pair of uncoupled Poisson equations for the pressure and depth-averaged stream function, and show that the inhomogeneous parts in these equations are governed by gradients in zeta potential parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field, respectively. We obtain a solution for the case of a disk-shaped region with uniform zeta potential and show that the flow field created is an exact dipole, even in the immediate vicinity of the disk. In addition, we study the inverse problem where the desired flow field is known and solve for the zeta potential distribution required in order to establish it. Finally, we demonstrate that such inverse problem solutions can be used to create directional flows confined within narrow regions, without physical walls. Such solutions are equivalent to flow within channels and we show that these can be assembled to create complex microfluidic networks, composed of intersecting channels and turns, which are basic building blocks in microfluidic devices.

  16. Numerical study of active control of mixing in electro-osmotic flows by temperature difference using lattice Boltzmann methods.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, A; Wang, J K; Pooyan, S; Mirbozorgi, S A; Wang, M

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of temperature difference between inlet flow and walls on the electro-osmotic flow through a two-dimensional microchannel is investigated. The main objective is to study the effect of temperature variations on the distribution of ions and consequently internal electric potential field, electric body force, and velocity fields in an electro-osmotic flow. We assume constant temperature and zeta potential on walls and use the mean temperature of each cross section to characterize the Boltzmann ion distribution across the channel. Based on these assumptions, the multiphysical transports are still able to be described by the classical Poisson-Boltzmann model. In this work, the Navier-Stokes equation for fluid flow, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for ion distribution, and the energy equation for heat transfer are solved by a couple lattice Boltzmann method. The modeling results indicate that the temperature difference between walls and the inlet solution may lead to two symmetrical vortices at the entrance region of the microchannel which is appropriate for mixing enhancements. The advantage of this phenomenon for active control of mixing in electro-osmotic flow is the manageability of the vortex scale without extra efforts. For instance, the effective domain of this pattern could broaden by the following modulations: decreasing the external electric potential field, decreasing the electric double layer thickness, or increasing the temperature difference between inlet flow and walls. This work may provide a novel strategy for design or optimization of microsystems. PMID:23859813

  17. Refinement of current monitoring methodology for electroosmotic flow assessment under low ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Espinosa, Mario A; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H

    2016-05-01

    Current monitoring is a well-established technique for the characterization of electroosmotic (EO) flow in microfluidic devices. This method relies on monitoring the time response of the electric current when a test buffer solution is displaced by an auxiliary solution using EO flow. In this scheme, each solution has a different ionic concentration (and electric conductivity). The difference in the ionic concentration of the two solutions defines the dynamic time response of the electric current and, hence, the current signal to be measured: larger concentration differences result in larger measurable signals. A small concentration difference is needed, however, to avoid dispersion at the interface between the two solutions, which can result in undesired pressure-driven flow that conflicts with the EO flow. Additional challenges arise as the conductivity of the test solution decreases, leading to a reduced electric current signal that may be masked by noise during the measuring process, making for a difficult estimation of an accurate EO mobility. This contribution presents a new scheme for current monitoring that employs multiple channels arranged in parallel, producing an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the electric current to be measured and increasing the estimation accuracy. The use of this parallel approach is particularly useful in the estimation of the EO mobility in systems where low conductivity mediums are required, such as insulator based dielectrophoresis devices. PMID:27375813

  18. Thermal transport characteristics of combined electroosmotic and pressure driven flow in soft nanofluidics.

    PubMed

    Matin, M H; Ohshima, H

    2016-08-15

    The present study deals with thermal transport characteristics of an electrolyte solution flowing through a slit nanochannel with polyelectrolyte walls, known as soft nanochannel. The sources of the fluid flow are the pressure gradient along the channel axis and the electrokinetic effects that trigger an electroosmotic flow under the impact of a uniformly applied electric field. The polyelectrolyte layer (PEL) is denoted as a fixed charge layer (FCL) and the electrolyte ions can be present both inside and outside the PEL. Therefore, the PEL-electrolyte interface acts as a semi-penetrable membrane. To the best of our knowledge, the thermal analysis of mixed electrokinetically and pressure driven flow in such soft nanochannels has never been addressed. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation is solved assuming the Debye-Huckel linearization for the low electric potential to provide us with analytical closed form solutions for the conservation equations. The conservation equations are solved to obtain the electric potential; velocity and temperature distributions in terms of governing dimensionless parameters. Also results for the Nusselt number are presented and discussed in detail. PMID:27214147

  19. Thermal characteristics of time-periodic electroosmotic flow in a circular microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Ali Jabari

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical analysis is performed to explore the thermal characteristics of electroosmotic flow in a circular microchannel under an alternating electric field. An analytical approach is presented to solve energy equation, and then, the exact solution of temperature profiles is obtained by using the Green's function method. This study reveals that the temperature field repeats itself for each half-period. Frequency has a strong influence on the thermal behavior of the flow field. For small values of the dimensionless frequency (small channel size, large kinematic viscosity, or small frequency), the advection mechanism is dominant in the whole domain and the resultant heating (Joule heating and wall heat flux) can be transferred by the complete flow field in the axial direction; while, the middle portion of the flow field at high dimensionless frequencies does not have sufficient time to transfer heat by advection, and the bulk fluid temperature, especially in heating, may consequently become greater than the wall temperature. In a particular instance of cooling mode, a constant surface temperature case is temporarily occurred in which the axial temperature gradient will be zero. For relatively high frequencies, the unsteady bulk fluid temperature in some radial positions at some moments may be equal to the wall temperature; hence instantaneous cylindrical surfaces with zero radial heat flux may occur over a period of time. Depending on the value and sign of the thermal scale ratio, the quasi-steady-state Nusselt number (time-averaged at one period) approaches a specific value as the electrokinetic radius becomes infinity.

  20. Conditions for similitude and the effect of finite Debye length in electroosmotic flows.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung Min; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2007-06-15

    Under certain conditions, the velocity field is similar to the electric field for electroosmotic flow (EOF) inside a channel. There was a disagreement between investigators on the necessity of the infinitesimal-Reynolds-number condition for the similarity when the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski relation is applied throughout the boundaries. What is puzzling is a recent numerical result that showed, contrary to the conventional belief, an evident Reynolds number dependence of the EOF. We show here that the notion that the infinitesimal-Reynolds-number condition is required originates from the misunderstanding that the EOF is the Stokes flow. We point out that the EOF becomes the potential flow when the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski relation is applied at the boundaries. We carry out a numerical simulation to investigate the effect of finiteness of the Debye length and the vorticity layer inherently existing at the channel wall. We show that the Reynolds number dependence of the previous numerical simulation resulted from the finiteness of the Debye length and subsequent convective transport of vorticity toward the bulk flow. We discuss in detail how the convection of vorticity occurs and what factors are involved in the transport process, after carrying out the simulation for different Reynolds numbers, Debye lengths, corner radii, and geometries. PMID:17368472

  1. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (<0.5% relative error). An extensive parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space. PMID:23554584

  2. Electro-osmotically driven MHD flow and heat transfer in micro-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Mondal, A.; Sinha, A.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for electro-osmotic flow (EOF) of blood in a hydrophobic micro-channel with externally applied magnetic field. The lumen of micro-channels is assumed to be porous medium in addition to the consideration of permeability of the channel walls. The effects of slip velocity and thermal-slip are taken into consideration. The governing equations in the electrical double layer (EDL) together with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the body force exerted by the applied potential are furthermore considered. The flow is governed by the non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluid model. These equations along with the thermal energy equation are approximated by assuming that the channel height is much greater than the thickness of electrical double layer consisting the stern and diffusive layers. The problem is solved analytically and the computed results have presented graphically for various values of the dimensionless parameters. The results presented here have significant impact on the therapeutic treatment in hyperthermia as well as in controlling blood flow and heat transfer in micro-channels.

  3. Non-isothermal electro-osmotic flow in a microchannel with charge-modulated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Oscar; Sanchez, Salvador; Mendez, Federico

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we present an theoretical analysis of a nonisothermal electro-osmotic flow of a Newtonian fluid over charge-modulated surfaces in a microchannel. Here, the heating in the microchannel is due to the Joule effect caused by the imposition of an external electric field. The study is conducted through the use of perturbation techniques and is validated by means of numerical simulations. We consider that both, viscosity and electrical conductivity of the fluid are temperature-dependent; therefore, in order to determine the heat transfer process and the corresponding effects on the flow field, the governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy and electric potential have to be solved in a coupled manner. The principal obtained results evidence that the flow patterns are perturbed in a noticeable manner in comparison with the isothernal case. Our results may be used for increasing microfluidics mixing by conjugating thermal effects with the use of charge-modulated surfaces. This work has been supported by the research grants no. 220900 of Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT) and 20150919 of SIP-IPN at Mexico. F. Méndez acknowledges also the economical support of PAPIIT-UNAM under contract number IN112215.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis: Imaging of electroosmotic and pressure driven flow profiles in fused silica capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George O., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This study is a continuation of the summer of 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. This effort is a portion of the ongoing work by the Biophysics Branch of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The work has focused recently on the separation of macromolecules using capillary electrophoresis (CE). Two primary goals were established for the effort this summer. First, we wanted to use capillary electrophoresis to study the electrohydrodynamics of a sample stream. Secondly, there was a need to develop a methodology for using CE for separation of DNA molecules of various sizes. In order to achieve these goals we needed to establish a procedure for detection of a sample plug under the influence of an electric field Detection of the sample with the microscope and image analysis system would be helpful in studying the electrohydrodynamics of this stream under load. Videotaping this process under the influence of an electric field in real time would also be useful. Imaging and photography of the sample/background electrolyte interface would be vital to this study. Finally, detection and imaging of electroosmotic flow and pressure driven flow must be accomplished.

  5. Conditions for similitude between the fluid velocity and electric field in electroosmotic flow

    SciTech Connect

    E. B. Cummings; S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson; P. H. Paul

    1999-04-01

    Electroosmotic flow is fluid motion driven by an electric field acting on the net fluid charge produced by charge separation at a fluid-solid interface. Under many conditions of practical interest, the resulting fluid velocity is proportional to the local electric field, and the constant of proportionality is everywhere the same. Here the authors show that the main conditions necessary for this similitude are a steady electric field, uniform fluid and electric properties, an electric Debye layer that is thin compared to any physical dimension, and fluid velocities on all inlet and outlet boundaries that satisfy the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski relation normally applicable to fluid-solid boundaries. Under these conditions, the velocity field can be determined directly from the Laplace equation governing the electric potential, without solving either the continuity or momentum equations. Three important consequences of these conditions are that the fluid motion is everywhere irrotational, that fluid velocities in two-dimensional channels bounded by parallel planes are independent of the channel depth, and that such flows exhibit no dependence on the Reynolds number.

  6. Strong electro-osmotic flows about dielectric surfaces of zero surface charge.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, Ory; Yariv, Ehud

    2014-04-01

    We analyze electro-osmotic flow about a dielectric solid of zero surface charge, using the prototypic configurations of a spherical particle and an infinite circular cylinder. We assume that the ratio δ of Debye width to particle size is asymptotically small, and consider the flow engendered by the application of a uniform electric field; the control parameter is E-the voltage drop on the particle (normalized by the thermal scale) associated with this field. For moderate fields, E=O(1), the induced ζ potential scales as the product of the applied-field magnitude and the Debye width; being small compared with the thermal voltage, its resolution requires addressing one higher asymptotic order than that resolved in the comparable analysis of electrophoresis of charged particles. For strong fields, E=O(δ-1), the ζ potential becomes comparable to the thermal voltage, depending nonlinearly on δ and E. We obtain a uniform approximation for the ζ-potential distribution, valid for both moderate and strong fields; it holds even under intense fields, E≫δ-1, where it scales as log|E|. The induced-flow magnitude therefore undergoes a transition from an E2 dependence at moderate fields to an essentially linear variation with |E| at intense fields. Remarkably, surface conduction is negligible as long as E≪δ-2: the ζ potential, albeit induced, remains mild even under intense fields. Thus, unlike the related problem of induced-charge flow about a perfect conductor, the theoretical velocity predictions in the present problem may actually be experimentally realized. PMID:24827330

  7. Strong electro-osmotic flows about dielectric surfaces of zero surface charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Yariv, Ehud

    2014-04-01

    We analyze electro-osmotic flow about a dielectric solid of zero surface charge, using the prototypic configurations of a spherical particle and an infinite circular cylinder. We assume that the ratio δ of Debye width to particle size is asymptotically small, and consider the flow engendered by the application of a uniform electric field; the control parameter is E—the voltage drop on the particle (normalized by the thermal scale) associated with this field. For moderate fields, E =O(1), the induced ζ potential scales as the product of the applied-field magnitude and the Debye width; being small compared with the thermal voltage, its resolution requires addressing one higher asymptotic order than that resolved in the comparable analysis of electrophoresis of charged particles. For strong fields, E =O(δ-1), the ζ potential becomes comparable to the thermal voltage, depending nonlinearly on δ and E. We obtain a uniform approximation for the ζ-potential distribution, valid for both moderate and strong fields; it holds even under intense fields, E ≫δ-1, where it scales as log|E|. The induced-flow magnitude therefore undergoes a transition from an E2 dependence at moderate fields to an essentially linear variation with |E| at intense fields. Remarkably, surface conduction is negligible as long as E ≪δ-2: the ζ potential, albeit induced, remains mild even under intense fields. Thus, unlike the related problem of induced-charge flow about a perfect conductor, the theoretical velocity predictions in the present problem may actually be experimentally realized.

  8. Design of a single-cell positioning controller using electroosmotic flow and image processing.

    PubMed

    Ay, Chyung; Young, Chao-Wang; Chen, Jhong-Yin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current research was not only to provide a fast and automatic positioning platform for single cells, but also improved biomolecular manipulation techniques. In this study, an automatic platform for cell positioning using electroosmotic flow and image processing technology was designed. The platform was developed using a PCI image acquisition interface card for capturing images from a microscope and then transferring them to a computer using human-machine interface software. This software was designed by the Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Workbench, a graphical language for finding cell positions and viewing the driving trace, and the fuzzy logic method for controlling the voltage or time of an electric field. After experiments on real human leukemic cells (U-937), the success of the cell positioning rate achieved by controlling the voltage factor reaches 100% within 5 s. A greater precision is obtained when controlling the time factor, whereby the success rate reaches 100% within 28 s. Advantages in both high speed and high precision are attained if these two voltage and time control methods are combined. The control speed with the combined method is about 5.18 times greater than that achieved by the time method, and the control precision with the combined method is more than five times greater than that achieved by the voltage method. PMID:23698272

  9. Miniature liquid flow sensor and feedback control of electroosmotic and pneumatic flows for a micro gas analysis system.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2006-01-01

    Accurate liquid flow control is important in most chemical analyses. In this work, the measurement of liquid flow in microliters per minute was performed, and feedback control of the flow rate was examined. The flow sensor was arranged on a channel made in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) block. The center of the channel was cooled by a miniature Peltier device, and the change in temperature balance along the channel formed by the flow was measured by two temperature sensors. Using this flow sensor, feedback flow control was examined with two pumping methods. One was the electroosmotic flow method, made by applying a high voltage (HV) between the reagent and waste reservoirs; the other was the piezo valve method, in which a micro-valve-seat was fabricated in a PDMS cavity with a silicone diaphragm. The latter was adopted for a micro gas analysis system (microGAS) for measuring atmospheric H2S and SO2. The obtained baselines were stable, and better limits of detection were obtained. PMID:16429774

  10. Rotating electro-osmotic flow over a plate or between two plates.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Chang-Yi

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate rotating electro-osmotic (EO) flow over an infinite plate or in a channel formed by two parallel plates. The analysis is based on the Debye-Hückel approximation for charge distributions and the Navier-Stokes equation for a transport electrolyte in the rotating frame. It is shown that, for the single plate, the nondimensional speed of system rotation ω is the singly most important parameter, while for the channel, in addition to ω, the nondimensional electrokinetic width K also plays an important role. However, the parameter ω≡η(2) has different natural appearances in the respective cases of a single plate (SP) and two plates (TPs). More precisely, η(SP) measures the ratio λ(D)/L(K) of the Debye length to the Ekman depth, while η(TP) measures the ratio L/L(K) of the channel width to the Ekman depth. The effect of rotation is always to reduce the axial flow rate along the direction of the applied electric field, accompanied by a (secondary) transverse flow. In the SP case, the plot on the velocity plane for each ω shows an interesting closed EO Ekman spiral. The size of the spiral shrinks with increasing ω. The transverse flow is so significant that the volume transport associated with the EO Ekman spiral turns clockwise 45° to the applied field near ω=0 and gradually turns at a right angle to the applied field as ω is increased. In contrast, in the TP case, the transverse flow rate is smaller than the axial flow rate when ω is small. The transverse flow rates at all K are observed to reach their maxima at ω of order 1. The volume transport is nearly at a zero angle to the applied field near ω=0 and gradually turns to 45° to the applied field as ω is increased. In the limit of ω→∞, for both SP and TP cases, the entire system forms a rigid body rotation-there is neither axial nor transverse flow. PMID:22181511

  11. Rotating electro-osmotic flow over a plate or between two plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Chang-Yi

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate rotating electro-osmotic (EO) flow over an infinite plate or in a channel formed by two parallel plates. The analysis is based on the Debye-Hückel approximation for charge distributions and the Navier-Stokes equation for a transport electrolyte in the rotating frame. It is shown that, for the single plate, the nondimensional speed of system rotation ω is the singly most important parameter, while for the channel, in addition to ω, the nondimensional electrokinetic width K also plays an important role. However, the parameter ω≡η2 has different natural appearances in the respective cases of a single plate (SP) and two plates (TPs). More precisely, η(SP) measures the ratio λD/LK of the Debye length to the Ekman depth, while η(TP) measures the ratio L/LK of the channel width to the Ekman depth. The effect of rotation is always to reduce the axial flow rate along the direction of the applied electric field, accompanied by a (secondary) transverse flow. In the SP case, the plot on the velocity plane for each ω shows an interesting closed EO Ekman spiral. The size of the spiral shrinks with increasing ω. The transverse flow is so significant that the volume transport associated with the EO Ekman spiral turns clockwise 45° to the applied field near ω=0 and gradually turns at a right angle to the applied field as ω is increased. In contrast, in the TP case, the transverse flow rate is smaller than the axial flow rate when ω is small. The transverse flow rates at all K are observed to reach their maxima at ω of order 1. The volume transport is nearly at a zero angle to the applied field near ω=0 and gradually turns to 45° to the applied field as ω is increased. In the limit of ω→∞, for both SP and TP cases, the entire system forms a rigid body rotation—there is neither axial nor transverse flow.

  12. Surface charge, electroosmotic flow and DNA extension in chemically modified thermoplastic nanoslits and nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Uba, Franklin I; Pullagurla, Swathi R; Sirasunthorn, Nichanun; Wu, Jiahao; Park, Sunggook; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Shin, Heungjoo; Soper, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Thermoplastics have become attractive alternatives to glass/quartz for microfluidics, but the realization of thermoplastic nanofluidic devices has been slow in spite of the rather simple fabrication techniques that can be used to produce these devices. This slow transition has in part been attributed to insufficient understanding of surface charge effects on the transport properties of single molecules through thermoplastic nanochannels. We report the surface modification of thermoplastic nanochannels and an assessment of the associated surface charge density, zeta potential and electroosmotic flow (EOF). Mixed-scale fluidic networks were fabricated in poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Oxygen plasma was used to generate surface-confined carboxylic acids with devices assembled using low temperature fusion bonding. Amination of the carboxylated surfaces using ethylenediamine (EDA) was accomplished via EDC coupling. XPS and ATR-FTIR revealed the presence of carboxyl and amine groups on the appropriately prepared surfaces. A modified conductance equation for nanochannels was developed to determine their surface conductance and was found to be in good agreement with our experimental results. The measured surface charge density and zeta potential of these devices were lower than glass nanofluidic devices and dependent on the surface modification adopted, as well as the size of the channel. This property, coupled to an apparent increase in fluid viscosity due to nanoconfinement, contributed to the suppression of the EOF in PMMA nanofluidic devices by an order of magnitude compared to the micro-scale devices. Carboxylated PMMA nanochannels were efficient for the transport and elongation of λ-DNA while these same DNA molecules were unable to translocate through aminated nanochannels. PMID:25369728

  13. Surface Charge, Electroosmotic Flow and DNA Extension in Chemically Modified Thermoplastic Nanoslits and Nanochannels

    PubMed Central

    Uba, Franklin I.; Pullagurla, Swathi R.; Sirasunthorn, Nichanun; Wu, Jiahao; Park, Sunggook; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Cho, Yoonkyoung; Shin, Heungjoo; Soper, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Thermoplastics have become attractive alternatives to glass/quartz for microfluidics, but the realization of thermoplastic nanofluidic devices has been slow in spite of the rather simple fabrication techniques that can be used to produce these devices. This slow transition has in part been attributed to insufficient understanding of surface charge effects on the transport properties of single molecules through thermoplastic nanochannels. We report the surface modification of thermoplastic nanochannels and an assessment of the associated surface charge density, zeta potential and electroosmotic flow (EOF). Mixed-scale fluidic networks were fabricated in poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Oxygen plasma was used to generate surface-confined carboxylic acids with devices assembled using low temperature fusion bonding. Amination of the carboxylated surfaces using ethylenediamine (EDA) was accomplished via EDC coupling. XPS and ATR-FTIR revealed the presence of carboxyl and amine groups on the appropriately prepared surfaces. A modified conductance equation for nanochannels was developed to determine their surface conductance and was found to be in good agreement with our experimental results. The measured surface charge density and zeta potential of these devices were lower than glass nanofluidic devices and dependent on the surface modification adopted, as well as the size of the channel. This property, coupled to an apparent increase in fluid viscosity due to nanoconfinement, contributed to the suppression of the EOF in PMMA nanofluidic devices by an order of magnitude compared to the micro-scale devices. Carboxylated PMMA nanochannels were efficient for the transport and elongation of λ-DNA while these same DNA molecules were unable to translocate through aminated nanochannels. PMID:25369728

  14. Monitoring the electroosmotic flow in capillary electrophoresis using contactless conductivity detection and thermal marks.

    PubMed

    Saito, Renata Mayumi; Neves, Carlos Antonio; Lopes, Fernando Silva; Blanes, Lucas; Brito-Neto, José Geraldo Alves; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio

    2007-01-01

    The fundamental aspects and the capillary electrophoresis usage of thermal marks are presented. The so-called thermal mark is a perturbation of the electrolyte concentration generated by a punctual heating of the capillary while the separation electric field is maintained. The heating pulse is obtained by powering tungsten filaments or surface mount device resistors with 5 V during a few tens to hundreds of milliseconds. In the proposed model, the variation of the transport numbers with the rising temperature leads to the formation of low- and high-concentration regions during the heating. After cooling down, the initial mobilities of the species are restored and these regions (the thermal mark) migrate chiefly due to the electroosmotic flow (EOF). The mark may be recorded with a conductivity detector as part of a usual electropherogram and be used to index the analyte peaks and thus compensate for variations of the EOF. In a favorable case, 10 mmol/L KCl solution, the theory suggests that the error in the measurement of EOF mobility by this mean is only -6.5 x 10(-7) cm2 V-1 s-1. The method was applied to the analysis of alkaline ions in egg white, and the relative standard deviations of the corrected mobilities of these ions were smaller than 1%. This is a challenging matrix, because albumin reduces the EOF to 20% of its initial value after 11 runs. The combination of thermal mark, electrolysis separated, and contactless conductivity detection allowed the measurement of the EOF of a silica capillary with unbuffered KCl solution with constant ionic strength. The overall approach is advantageous, because one can easily control the chemical composition of the solution in contact with the inner surface of the capillary. PMID:17194142

  15. Poly(N,N-Dimethylacrylamide)-Based Coatings to Modulate Electroosmotic Flow and Capillary Surface Properties for Protein Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sola, Laura; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is one of the most powerful techniques for the separation of biomolecules. However, the separation efficiency of proteins in CE is often compromised by their tendency to interact with the silanol groups on the surface of the inner capillary and by an uncontrolled electroosmotic flow. Herein, we report on the use of novel hydrophilic polymeric coatings that can modulate the properties of the capillary walls. The novelty of these poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide)-based copolymers relies on the simultaneous presence of chemically reactive groups (N-acryloyloxysuccinimide and glycidyl methacrylate) and silane groups in the backbone, which results in highly stable films due to the covalent reaction between the polymer and the glass silanols. A careful optimization of monomer concentration confers anti-fouling properties to the polymer coatings, and thus allows for highly efficient acidic and alkaline protein separations. Furthermore, the presence of these monomers makes it possible to modulate the electroosmotic flow from negligible to reduced values, depending on the desired application. PMID:27473485

  16. Ion fluxes and electro-osmotic fluid flow in electrolytes around a metallic nanowire tip under large applied ac voltage.

    PubMed

    Poetschke, M; Bobeth, M; Cuniberti, G

    2013-09-10

    Motivated by the analysis of electrochemical growth of metallic nanowires from solution, we studied ion fluxes near nanoelectrodes in a binary symmetric electrolyte on the basis of the modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations in the strongly nonlinear region at large applied ac voltage. For an approximate calculation of the electric field near the nanowire tip, concentric spherical blocking electrodes were considered with radius of the inner electrode being of typically a few ten nanometers. The spatiotemporal evolution of the ion concentrations within this spherical model was calculated numerically by using the finite element method. The potential drop at the electric double layer, the electric field enhancement at the electrode surface, and the field screening in the bulk solution were determined for different bulk concentrations, ac voltages, and frequencies. The appearance of ac electro-osmotic fluid flow at the tip of a growing metallic nanowire is discussed, based on an estimation of the body force in the liquid near the nanowire tip, which was modeled by a cylinder with hemispherical cap. Electric field components tangential to the electrode surface exist near the contact between cylinder and hemisphere. Our analysis suggests that ac electro-osmotic flow causes an additional convective transport of metal complexes to the tip of the growing metal nanowire and thus affects the nanowire growth velocity. PMID:23927385

  17. Investigation of poly(styrene-divinylbenzene-vinylsulfonic acid) as retentive and electroosmotic flow generating phase in open-tubular electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Seppe; Lynen, Frederic

    2015-07-24

    In this work, a new sulfonated polystyrene based porous layer was synthesized on the wall of a capillary by a single step in situ polymerization process. To obtain a capillary suited for electrochromatography, vinylsulfonic acid (VSA) was, next to divinylbenzene (DVB), copolymerized to induce charges for the electroosmotic flow (EOF) generation. The VSA ratio in the monomer mixture and the polymerization time were optimized while the chromatographic characteristics of the obtained open tubular columns were investigated in electrochromatography. To allow unambiguous study of only chromatographic processes, evaluations were performed with a mixture of sufficiently retained and electrophoretically neutral parabens. Comparison of SEM pictures and chromatograms revealed that the polymerization time had a great influence on the polymer layer morphology and on the chromatographic performance. An increase in the VSA ratio, led to an increase in the mobile phase velocity but simultaneously lowered paraben retention. The novel optimized stationary phase could generate a stable and significant electro-osmotic flow (EOF) of 1.1mm/s over a wide pH range which could be produced in a reproducible manner. Minimal plate heights of 10μm, equivalent to the capillary internal diameter, were obtained. The open-tubular character of this optimized porous layer column allowed successful analyses at elevated temperature, resulting in a maximum efficiency of 85,500 plates for a 75cm capillary and linear velocities up to 1.4mm/s. Finally, a thermal gradient was successfully applied, leading to artificial sharpened peaks with a peak capacity of 55 in a 20min time span. PMID:26065568

  18. Transport and reaction of nanoliter samples in a microfluidic reactor using electro-osmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumbuliyur Comandur, Kaushik; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Dasgupta, Subhashish; Papautsky, Ian; Banerjee, Rupak K.

    2010-03-01

    The primary focus of the paper is to establish both numerical and experimental methods to control the concentration of samples in a microreactor well. The concentration of the reacting samples is controlled by varying the initial sample size and electric field. Further, the paper numerically investigates the feasibility of mixing and reacting nanoliter samples with a wide variation in reaction rates in the microreactor driven by electro-osmotic pumping. Two discrete samples are measured and transported to the microreactor simultaneously by electro-osmotic pinching and switching. The transported samples are mixed in the microreactor and floated for 4.5 s for reaction to occur. It is seen that the normalized concentration of the product increases from 0.25 to 0.45 during that period. Also the effects of sample size and applied electric field on sample concentration during the switching process are studied. It is found that the normalized final sample concentration increases from 0.03 to 0.11 with an increase in sample size from 60 to 150 µm, at a constant electric field. Further, by increasing the electric field from 100 to 1000 V cm-1, at a constant sample size, there is a significant decrease in the final concentration of the sample from 0.14 to 0.04. Our studies also show that the normalized product concentration depends on the reaction rate and increases from 0.28 to 0.48 as the reaction rate increases from 10 L mol-1 s-1 to 105 L mol-1 s-1. However, the increase in the reaction rate beyond 105 L mol-1 s-1 does not influence the product concentration for the present design of the microreactor. Our microreactor with improved mixing can be used for assessing reactions of biological samples. The optimized sample size along with a controlled electric field for sample injection forms the basis for developing a prototype of a microreactor device for high throughput drug screening.

  19. Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

  20. Effect of pore's geometry on the electroosmotic flow and nanoparticle dynamics in the nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulings, Zachery; Melnikov, Dmitriy; Gracheva, Maria

    We theoretically study how the electroosmotic fluid velocity in a charged cylindrical nanopore in a solid state membranes depends on the pore's geometry, electrolyte concentration, and applied electrolyte bias. We find that in long pores, the fluid velocity follows the classical von Smoluchowski result for an infinite pore with a maximum along the pore axis. However, when the pore's length is comparable to its diameter, the velocity profile develops a local minimum along the pore axis with a maximum value near the membrane walls. The minimum becomes more pronounced when the electrolyte concentration and/or applied bias become larger. We attribute this effect to the inhomogeneous electric field distribution in the nanopore with the field along the axis of the pore being smaller than along the pore's walls due to the effects of access resistance on each side of the channel. We also investigate repercussions of such a velocity profile on the transport of a nanoparticle through the nanopore. NSF DMR and CBET Grant No. 1352218.

  1. A Theoretical Study of the Use of Electroosmotic Flow to Extend the Read-Length of DNA Sequencing by End Labeled Free Solution Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Laurette

    2005-03-01

    End Labeled Free Solution Electrophoresis provides a means of separating DNA with free solution capillary electrophoresis, eliminating the need for gels and polymer solutions which increase the run-time and can be difficult to load into a capillary. In free solution electrophoresis, DNA is normally free-draining and all fragments elute at the same time, whereas ELFSE uses an uncharged label molecule attached to each DNA fragment in order to render the electrophoretic mobility size-dependent. We show how an electroosmotic flow could be used to extend the read-length of DNA sequencing with ELFSE. In particular, we demonstrate that the magnitude of the electroosmotic flow must be selected very carefully in order to gain both in speed and in read length. The possibility of having molecules moving in opposite directions is also examined.

  2. AC Electroosmotic Pumping in Nanofluidic Funnels.

    PubMed

    Kneller, Andrew R; Haywood, Daniel G; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2016-06-21

    We report efficient pumping of fluids through nanofluidic funnels when a symmetric AC waveform is applied. The asymmetric geometry of the nanofluidic funnel induces not only ion current rectification but also electroosmotic flow rectification. In the base-to-tip direction, the funnel exhibits a lower ion conductance and a higher electroosmotic flow velocity, whereas, in the tip-to-base direction, the funnel has a higher ion conductance and a lower electroosmotic flow velocity. Consequently, symmetric AC waveforms easily pump fluid through the nanofunnels over a range of frequencies, e.g., 5 Hz to 5 kHz. In our experiments, the nanofunnels were milled into glass substrates with a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument, and the funnel design had a constant 5° taper with aspect ratios (funnel tip width to funnel depth) of 0.1 to 1.0. We tracked ion current rectification by current-voltage (I-V) response and electroosmotic flow rectification by transport of a zwitterionic fluorescent probe. Rectification of ion current and electroosmotic flow increased with increasing electric field applied to the nanofunnel. Our results support three-dimensional simulations of ion transport and electroosmotic transport through nanofunnels, which suggest the asymmetric electroosmotic transport stems from an induced pressure at the junction of the nanochannel and nanofunnel tip. PMID:27230495

  3. Influence of electroosmotic flow on the ionic current rectification in a pH-regulated, conical nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dong-Huei; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tseng, Shiojenn; Hsu, Jyh-Ping

    2015-08-01

    The ionic current rectification (ICR) is studied theoretically by considering a pH-regulated, conical nanopore. In particular, the effect of electroosmotic flow (EOF), which was often neglected in previous studies, is investigated by solving a set of coupled Poisson, Nernst-Planck, and Navier-Stokes equations. The behaviors of ICR under various conditions are examined by varying solution pH, bulk ionic concentration, and applied electric potential bias. We show that the EOF effect is significant when the bulk ionic concentration is medium high, the pH is far away from the iso-electric point, and the electric potential bias is high. The percentage deviation in the current rectification ratio arising from neglecting the EOF effect can be on the order of 100%. In addition, the behavior of the current rectification ratio at a high pH taking account of EOF is different both qualitatively and quantitatively from that without taking account of EOF.The ionic current rectification (ICR) is studied theoretically by considering a pH-regulated, conical nanopore. In particular, the effect of electroosmotic flow (EOF), which was often neglected in previous studies, is investigated by solving a set of coupled Poisson, Nernst-Planck, and Navier-Stokes equations. The behaviors of ICR under various conditions are examined by varying solution pH, bulk ionic concentration, and applied electric potential bias. We show that the EOF effect is significant when the bulk ionic concentration is medium high, the pH is far away from the iso-electric point, and the electric potential bias is high. The percentage deviation in the current rectification ratio arising from neglecting the EOF effect can be on the order of 100%. In addition, the behavior of the current rectification ratio at a high pH taking account of EOF is different both qualitatively and quantitatively from that without taking account of EOF. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03433g

  4. Trace analysis of oxidized, nitrated, and chlorinated aromatic amino acids by capillary electrophoresis with electroosmotic flow modification allowing large-volume sample stacking.

    PubMed

    Tábi, Tamás; Magyar, Kálmán; Szöko, Eva

    2005-05-01

    A capillary electrophoresis method has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of the oxidized, nitrated, and chlorinated aromatic amino acids, as well as their parent compounds. These modifications of the aromatic amino acids in proteins or free form are induced by the attack of reactive, mainly free radical species generated during cell stress, and these stable products may serve as biomarkers of cell damage. The analytes tyrosine, phenylalanine, dihydroxyphenylalanine, tryptophan, 3-nitrotyrosine, 3-chlorotyrosine, ortho-tyrosine, meta-tyrosine, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (internal standard 1), and alpha-methyltyrosine (internal standard 2) were separated in their anionic forms in alkaline borate buffer. The polyamine spermine was used as electroosmotic flow (EOF) modifier. Adsorbing to the capillary wall, spermine can either suppress or even reverse the EOF depending on its concentration and the pH. The effects of the pH of the separation buffer, the spermine concentration, the temperature, and the applied field strength on the separation were examined. The modified aromatic amino acids are present in biological fluids in a much lower concentration than their parent compounds, thus high detection sensitivity of the analytical method is required. To achieve good detection sensitivity, field-amplified sample stacking of large injection volumes was applied. Omitting polyamine from the sample buffer allowed local reversal of the EOF, thus removal of the low conductivity sample buffer at the capillary inlet. In this way, 100% of the capillary to the detection window could be filled with the sample, and the detection limits achieved for the modified aromatic amino acids were in the range of 2.5-10 nM. PMID:15818575

  5. Stagnation point reverse flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Ben T. (Inventor); Neumeier, Yedidia (Inventor); Seitzman, Jerry M. (Inventor); Jagoda, Jechiel (Inventor); Weksler, Yoav (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for combusting a combustible fuel includes providing a vessel having an opening near a proximate end and a closed distal end defining a combustion chamber. A combustible reactants mixture is presented into the combustion chamber. The combustible reactants mixture is ignited creating a flame and combustion products. The closed end of the combustion chamber is utilized for directing combustion products toward the opening of the combustion chamber creating a reverse flow of combustion products within the combustion chamber. The reverse flow of combustion products is intermixed with combustible reactants mixture to maintain the flame.

  6. Mixing enhancement of low-Reynolds electro-osmotic flows in microchannels with temperature-patterned walls.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, A; Zhang, L; Wang, M

    2014-10-01

    Mixing becomes challenging in microchannels because of the low Reynolds number. This study aims to present a mixing enhancement method for electro-osmotic flows in microchannels using vortices caused by temperature-patterned walls. Since the fluid is non-isothermal, the conventional form of Nernst-Planck equation is modified by adding a new migration term which is dependent on both temperature and internal electric potential gradient. This term results in the so-called thermo-electrochemical migration phenomenon. The coupled Navier-Stokes, Poisson, modified Nernst-Planck, energy and advection-diffusion equations are iteratively solved by multiple lattice Boltzmann methods to obtain the velocity, internal electric potential, ion distribution, temperature and species concentration fields, respectively. To enhance the mixing, three schemes of temperature-patterned walls have been considered with symmetrical or asymmetrical arrangements of blocks with surface charge and temperature. Modeling results show that the asymmetric arrangement scheme is the most efficient scheme and enhances the mixing of species by 39% when the Reynolds number is on the order of 10(-3). Current results may help improve the design of micro-mixers at low Reynolds number. PMID:24984071

  7. Influence of the Modifier Type and its Concentration on Electroosmotic Flow of the Mobile Phase in Pressurized Planar Electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Hałka-Grysińska, Aneta; Płocharz, Paweł W; Torbicz, Andrzej; Skwarek, Ewa; Janusz, Władysław; Dzido, Tadeusz H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find a relationship between electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity of the mobile phase in pressurized planar electrochromatography (PPEC) and physicochemical properties like zeta potential, dielectric constant, and viscosity of the mobile phase as well as its composition. The study included different types of organic modifiers (acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, acetone, formamide, N-methylformamide and N,N-dimethylformamide) in the full concentration range. In all experiments, chromatographic glass plates HPTLC RP-18 W from Merck (Darmstadt) were used as a stationary phase. During the study we found that there is no linear correlation between EOF velocity of the mobile phase and single variables such as zeta potential or dielectric constant or viscosity. However, there is quite strong linear correlation between EOF velocity of the mobile phase and variable obtained by multiplying zeta potential of the stationary phase-mobile phase interface, by dielectric constant of the mobile phase solution and dividing by viscosity of the mobile phase. Therefore, it could be concluded that the PPEC system fulfilled the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation. PMID:25067847

  8. Enhanced capture of magnetic microbeads using combination of reduced magnetic field strength and sequentially switched electroosmotic flow--a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Das, Debarun; Al-Rjoub, Marwan F; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2015-05-01

    Magnetophoretic immunoassay is a widely used technique in lab-on-chip systems for detection and isolation of target cells, pathogens, and biomolecules. In this method, target pathogens (antigens) bind to specific antibodies coated on magnetic microbeads (mMBs) which are then separated using an external magnetic field for further analysis. Better capture of mMB is important for improving the sensitivity and performance of magnetophoretic assay. The objective of this study was to develop a numerical model of magnetophoretic separation in electroosmotic flow (EOF) using magnetic field generated by a miniaturized magnet and to evaluate the capture efficiency (CE) of the mMBs. A finite-volume solver was used to compute the trajectory of mMBs under the coupled effects of EOF and external magnetic field. The effect of steady and time varying (switching) electric fields (150-450 V/cm) on the CE was studied under reduced magnetic field strength. During switching, the electric potential at the inlet and outlet of the microchannel was reversed or switched, causing reversal in flow direction. The CE was a function of the momentum of the mMB in EOF and the applied magnetic field strength. By switching the electric field, CE increased from 75% (for steady electric field) to 95% for lower electric fields (150-200 V/cm) and from 35% to 47.5% for higher electric fields (400-450 V/cm). The CE was lower at higher EOF electric fields because the momentum of the mMB overcame the external magnetic force. Switching allowed improved CE due to the reversal and decrease in EOF velocity and increase in mMB residence time under the reduced magnetic field strength. These improvements in CE, particularly at higher electric fields, made sequential switching of EOF an efficient separation technique of mMBs for use in high throughput magnetophoretic immunoassay devices. The reduced size of the magnet, along with the efficient mMB separation technique of switching can lead to the development

  9. Flow batteries for microfluidic networks: configuring an electroosmotic pump for nonterminal positions.

    PubMed

    He, Chiyang; Lu, Joann J; Jia, Zhijian; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiayan; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Liu, Shaorong

    2011-04-01

    A micropump provides flow and pressure for a lab-on-chip device, just as a battery supplies current and voltage for an electronic system. Numerous micropumps have been developed, but none is as versatile as a battery. One cannot easily insert a micropump into a nonterminal position of a fluidic line without affecting the rest of the fluidic system, and one cannot simply connect several micropumps in series to enhance the pressure output, etc. In this work we develop a flow battery (or pressure power supply) to address this issue. A flow battery consists of a +EOP (in which the liquid flows in the same direction as the field gradient) and a -EOP (in which the liquid flows opposite to the electric field gradient), and the outlet of the +EOP is directly connected to the inlet of the -EOP. An external high voltage is applied to this outlet-inlet joint via a short gel-filled capillary that allows ions but not bulk liquid flow, while the +EOP's inlet and the -EOP's outlet (the flow battery's inlet and outlet) are grounded. This flow battery can be deployed anywhere in a fluidic network without electrically affecting the rest of the system. Several flow batteries can be connected in series to enhance the pressure output to drive HPLC separations. In a fluidic system powered by flow batteries, a hydraulic equivalent of Ohm's law can be applied to analyze system pressures and flow rates. PMID:21375230

  10. Electroosmotic access resistance of a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sandip; Sherwood, John D.; Mao, Mao

    2014-11-01

    Electroosmotic flow through a nanopore that traverses a dielectric membrane with a fixed surface charge density is considered. In the limit where the surface charge is small and the applied electric field weak, the reciprocal theorem is used to derive an expression for the electroosmotic flux through the pore up to quadratures over the fluid volume. Thus, an ``electroosmotic conductance'' (the fluid flux per unit applied voltage) may be defined in analogy to the corresponding electrical conductance of a hole in an insulating membrane immersed in a uniform conductor. In the limit when the membrane is thick compared to the pore diameter, the usual result for the electroosmotic conductance through long cylindrical channels (which varies inversely as the membrane thickness) is recovered. The electroosmotic conductance is shown to approach a finite value for an infinitely thin membrane: this residual electroosmotic resistance (inverse of conductance) is analogous to the concept of ``access resistance of a pore'' in the corresponding electrical problem. The dependence of the electroosmotic conductance on pore radius, Debye length and membrane thickness is investigated. Reference: Supported by the NIH under Grant 4R01HG004842. SG acknowledges a visiting professorship at Cambridge University funded by the Leverhulme Trust, UK. JDS thanks DAMTP (Cambridge University) and Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse for hospitality.

  11. The dominant role of surface conduction in electro-osmotic flows through periodically varying narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludar, Lotan; Yariv, Ehud

    2015-11-01

    As surface conduction has no effect on electro-osmosis in uniform channel flows, where the tangential Debye-layer currents are longitudinally uniform, it may appear as it would only result in a small modifying correction in lubrication analyses of slowly varying channels. This misconception is refuted here by analyzing flows through periodic channels of slowly varying but otherwise arbitrary geometry. Assuming that the channel width is still large compared with the Debye thickness we employ the simplest thin-double-layer model which incorporates surface conduction. We find that surface conduction affects the leading-order flow and the consequent net volumetric flux, introducing a nonlinear dependence upon the zeta potential. Remarkably, as the channel becomes more and more narrow, the scaled flux approaches a limit which is independent of the Dukhin number yet different from that calculated for zero Dukhin number.

  12. Mixing enhancement in electro-osmotic flows via modulation of electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    The mixing of a passive tracer in a three-dimensional rectangular microchannel is studied numerically. A time-dependent electric field across a microchannel, filled with an electrolyte solution, is applied in order to realize a well-mixed state. Random perturbations to a time-periodic electric field are introduced in order to break the invariant tori of the system and to attain better mixing results. Two types of nonperiodic protocols are used to generate chaotic mixing by modulating the transverse electric field. In each case the quality of mixing is quantified with Lyapunov exponents for nondiffusive tracers and variance in concentration for diffusive tracers. The numerical results suggest that when the Lyapunov exponent is properly scaled, its probability density function measured over various numbers of periods has the same geometrical structure. It was also found that the variance in the concentration of the passive scalar exhibits an exponential decay. For the modulated and periodic systems considered in this investigation, its evolution curves exhibited self-similarity when plotted versus the product of the nondimensional time and the mean Lyapunov exponent of the flow. As the axial flow in this study varies only inside the Debye layer, and the tracers were introduced into the middle pluglike region of the flow, it was found that Taylor dispersion effects are more pronounced for flows (at least in their early stages) with effective mixing in the cross section.

  13. Electroosmotic flow through a microparallel channel with 3D wall roughness.

    PubMed

    Chang, Long; Jian, Yongjun; Buren, Mandula; Sun, Yanjun

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a perturbation method is introduced to study the EOF in a microparallel channel with 3D wall roughness. The corrugations of the two walls are periodic sinusoidal waves of small amplitude in two directions either in phase or half-period out of phase. Based on linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, Laplace equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations, the perturbation solutions of velocity, electrical potential, and volume flow rate are obtained. By using numerical computation, the influences of the wall corrugations on the mean velocity are analyzed. The variations of electrical potential, velocity profile, mean velocity, and their dependences on the wave number α and β of wall corrugations in two directions, the nondimensional electrokinetic width K, and the zeta potential ratio between the lower wall and the upper wall ς are analyzed graphically. PMID:26333852

  14. Multiwire Thermocouples in Reversing Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements are recorded for multiwire thermocouples consisting of either two or three wires of unequal diameters. Signals from the multiwire probe are recorded for a reversing gas flow with both a periodic temperature and time constant fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the multiwire thermocouple requires no compensation provided omega/omega(sub 1) less than 2.3 for two wires or omega/omega(sub 1) less than 3.6 for three wires where omega(sub 1) (= 2(pi)f) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire based on the maximum gas velocity. The latter results were possible provided Fourier transformed data from the wires were used and knowledge of the gas velocity phase angle was available.

  15. Modeling of the impact of ionic strength on the electroosmotic flow in capillary electrophoresis with uniform and discontinuous buffer systems.

    PubMed

    Thormann, W; Zhang, C X; Caslavska, J; Gebauer, P; Mosher, R A

    1998-02-01

    A new dynamic computer model permitting the combined simulation of the temporal behavior of electroosmosis and electrophoresis under constant voltage or current conditions and in a capillary which exhibits a pH-dependent surface charge has been constructed and applied to the description of capillary zone electrophoresis, isotachophoresis, and isoelectric focusing with electroosmotic zone displacement. Electroosmosis is calculated via use of a normalized wall titration curve (mobility vs pH). Two approaches employed for normalization of the experimentally determined wall titration data are discussed, one that considers the electroosmotic mobility to be inversely proportional to the square root of the ionic strength (method based on the Gouy-Chapman theory with the counterion layer thickness being equal to the Debye-Hückel length) and one that assumes the double-layer thickness to be the sum of a compact layer of fixed charges and the Debye-Hückel thickness and the existence of a wall adsorption equilibrium of the buffer cation other than the proton (method described by Salomon, K.; et al. J. Chromatogr. 1991, 559, 69). The first approach is shown to overestimate the magnitude of electroosmosis, whereas, with the more complex dependence between the electroosmotic mobility and ionic strength, qualitative agreement between experimental and simulation data is obtained. Using one set of electroosmosis input data, the new model is shown to provide detailed insight into the dynamics of electroosmosis in typical discontinuous buffer systems employed in capillary zone electrophoresis (in which the sample matrix provides the discontinuity), in capillary isotachophoresis, and in capillary isoelectric focusing. PMID:21644753

  16. Streamwise Oscillation of Airfoils into Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granlund, Kenneth; Jones, Anya; Ol, Michael

    2015-11-01

    An airfoil in freestream is oscillated in streamwise direction to cyclically enter reverse flow. Measured lift is compared to analytical blade element theories. Advance ratio, reduced frequency and angle of attack is varied within those typical for helicopters. Experimental results reveal that lift does not become negative in the flow reversal part, contradicting one theory and supported by another. Flow visualization reveal the leading edge vortex advecting against the freestream to a point in front of the leading edge.

  17. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  18. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1995-10-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Uncertainties about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal has limited the reactor operating power to 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these uncertainties is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW.

  19. Time-reversed, flow-reversed ballistics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E. J.; Scheffler, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of planar sheet jet formation are studied to examine the hydrodynamic issues involved when simulations are carried out in the inverse direction, that is, with reversed time and flow. Both a realistic copper equation of state and a shockless equation of state were used. These studies are an initial step in evaluating this technique as a ballistics design tool.

  20. A novel micro/nano fabrication process based on the combined use of dielectrophoresis, electroosmotic flow, and electrodeposition for surface patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Gonzalez, Victor H.; Ho, Vinh; Vazquez-Pinon, Matias; Martinez-Chapa, Sergio O.; Kulinsky, Lawrence

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a novel application of electrokinetic forces is presented. Employing a gold interdigitated electrode array (IDEA), dielectrophoresis (a force acting on polarizable material) and electroosmosis (a force acting on ionic fluids) were utilized as microfabrication tools. Through electroosmotic flow, particles were dragged toward dielectrophoretic trapping zones, where they were held. Then polypyrrole, an electroconductive material with good mechanical and electrical properties, wide electrochemical window, and ease of fabrication, was electrodeposited onto the gold IDEA surface, permanently entrapping the microparticles within the structure. The process was tested employing organic (polystyrene), inorganic (silicon), and biologic (yeast cells) microparticles, all of which were successfully trapped. Computational models were developed to predict the electrokinetic response of the microparticles and compared to experimental observations. It was demonstrated that this process can be used to produce hierarchical structures through sequential repetition of entrapment cycles. Additionally, it is compatible with the Carbon-MEMS process. The fabrication process presented in this paper opens a wide range of applications that include: energy storage devices, scaffolds for cell culture, biomedical devices, electrochemical sensors, electrokinetic devices, among many others.

  1. Experimental Study on Basic Performance of Electroosmotic Pump with Ion Exchanging Porous Glass Slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho; Kim, Gyu Man; Lee, Choon Young; Park, Cheol Woo; Kim, Dae Joong

    The basic concept and preliminary performance results of a miniaturized electroosmotic pump with diaphragms were included in the present study. The separation of an electroosmotic pumping liquid from a drug using diaphragms is mainly to have a freedom in choosing an electroosmotic pumping liquid and to achieve the optimal drug delivery with its preferable precise control. As a result, the maximum flow rate and current increased linearly according to the increment of applied voltage that is electric potential.

  2. Unsteady Airloads on Airfoils in Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2014-11-01

    This work gives insight into the influence of airfoil characteristics on unsteady airloads for rotor applications where local airfoil sections may operate at high and/or reverse flow angles of attack. Two-dimensional wind tunnel experiments have been performed on four airfoil sections to investigate the effects of thickness, camber, and trailing edge shape on unsteady airloads (lift, pressure drag, and pitching moment). These model rotor blades were tested through 360 deg of incidence for 104 <=Re <=106 . Unsteady pressure transducers were mounted on the airfoil surface to measure the high frequency, dynamic pressure variations. The temporal evolution of chordwise pressure distributions and resulting airloads is quantified for each airfoil in each of the three unsteady wake regimes present in reverse flow. Specifically, the influence of the formation, growth, and shedding of vortices on the surface pressure distribution is quantified and compared between airfoils with a sharp geometric trailing edge and those with a blunt geometric trailing edge. These findings are integral to mitigation of rotor blade vibrations for applications where airfoil sections are subjected to reverse flow, such as high-speed helicopters and tidal turbines.

  3. Electro-osmotically driven liquid delivery method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rakestraw, David J.; Anex, Deon S.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, Rajeev; Zare, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus for controlling precisely the composition and delivery of liquid at sub-.mu.L/min flow rate. One embodiment of such a delivery system is an electro-osmotically driven gradient flow delivery system that generates dynamic gradient flows with sub-.mu.L/min flow rates by merging a plurality of electro-osmotic flows. These flows are delivered by a plurality of delivery arms attached to a mixing connector, where they mix and then flow into a receiving means, preferably a column. Each inlet of the plurality of delivery arms is placed in a corresponding solution reservoir. A plurality of independent programmable high-voltage power supplies is used to apply a voltage program to each of the plurality of solution reservoirs to regulate the electro-osmotic flow in each delivery arm. The electro-osmotic flow rates in the delivery arms are changed with time according to each voltage program to deliver the required gradient profile to the column.

  4. Electro-osmotically driven liquid delivery method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rakestraw, D.J.; Anex, D.S.; Yan, C.; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1999-08-24

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for controlling precisely the composition and delivery of liquid at sub-{micro}L/min flow rate. One embodiment of such a delivery system is an electro-osmotically driven gradient flow delivery system that generates dynamic gradient flows with sub-{micro}L/min flow rates by merging a plurality of electro-osmotic flows. These flows are delivered by a plurality of delivery arms attached to a mixing connector, where they mix and then flow into a receiving means, preferably a column. Each inlet of the plurality of delivery arms is placed in a corresponding solution reservoir. A plurality of independent programmable high-voltage power supplies is used to apply a voltage program to each of the plurality of solution reservoirs to regulate the electro-osmotic flow in each delivery arm. The electro-osmotic flow rates in the delivery arms are changed with time according to each voltage program to deliver the required gradient profile to the column. 4 figs.

  5. Flow reversal in enzymatic microfluidic pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Henry; Ortiz-Rivera, Isamar; Agrawal, Arjun; Sen, Ayusman; Balazs, Anna

    A chemical reaction occurring at an enzyme-covered patch in a closed fluid chamber generates local solute concentration gradients and, hence, fluid density gradients. This has recently been shown to drive fluid flows with speeds of the order of microns per second. We develop and analyze a model that accounts for fluid density changes due to consumption of the reaction substrate and accumulation of products for such a fluid pump based on the enzyme urease. Hydrolysis of urea by urease produces ammonium bicarbonate, which leads to a net increase in solution density. Higher density fluid is expected to sink and spread horizontally away from the pump. Modeling reveals, however, that the local fluid density is not necessarily greatest near the pump and fluid flow can even reverse in direction after some time. The qualitative behavior depends on two dimensionless parameters, the ratio of solutal expansion coefficients and the ratio of diffusion coefficients for the reaction substrate and product. The predicted reversal of pumping direction is experimentally verified and we show that the direction of pumping also depends on the amount of enzyme present on the patch. A better understanding of these pumps will aid in the design of responsive, chemically powered microfluidic flow control.

  6. 100,000-fold concentration of anions in capillary zone electrophoresis using electroosmotic flow controlled counterflow isotachophoretic stacking under field amplified conditions.

    PubMed

    Breadmore, Michael C; Quirino, Joselito P

    2008-08-15

    An electroosmotic flow (EOF) controlled counterflow isotachophoretic stacking boundary (cf-ITPSB) system under field amplified conditions has been examined as a way to improve the sensitivity of anions separated by capillary zone electrophoresis. The system comprised a high concentration of a high-mobility leading ion (100 mM chloride) and a low concentration of low-mobility terminating ion (1-3 mM MES or CHES) added to the sample in an unmodified fused-silica capillary at pH 8.05, buffered with Tris. Computer simulation studies using the software GENTRANS showed an increase in sensitivity of at least 10-fold over the previous cf-ITPSB system for simple inorganic ions, nitrite and nitrate. The simulations also suggested that the cf-ITPSB became stationary within the capillary and that its stationary position was not adversely affected by the concentration of MES. This was in contrast to experimental results that showed a slow and continual movement of the cf-ITPSB. This was more pronounced at lower concentrations of terminator (i.e., <3 mM) and resulted in a loss of resolution due to the cf-ITPSB being closer to the detector upon separation. This discrepancy was attributed to the change in pH across the capillary due to electrolysis and low buffering capacity in the sample, a phenomenon that cannot be simulated by the GENTRANS software. Replacement of MES with CHES as a lower mobility ion with increased buffer capacity failed to reduce the movement of the cf-ITPSB but did provide a further 3-fold improvement in sensitivity. The potential of this approach for sensitivity enhancement was demonstrated for the co-EOF separation of a mixture of six inorganic and small organic ions, with detection limits at the single-figure nanogram per liter level. These detection limits are 100,000 times better than can be achieved by normal hydrodynamic injection (ions prepared in water) and 250 times better than has been achieved by other online preconcentration approaches. The

  7. Electro-osmotic pumping and ion-concentration polarization based on conical nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hung-Chun; Chang, Chih-Chang; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2015-06-01

    A numerical investigation is performed into the characteristics of an electro-osmotic pump consisting of a negatively charged conical nanopore. It is shown that the dependence of the flow rectification effect on the bias direction is the reverse of that of the ion current rectification effect. Moreover, the nozzle mode (i.e., the bias is applied from the base side of the nanopore to the tip side) has a higher flow rate compared to the diffuser mode (i.e., the bias is applied from the tip side of the nanopore to the base side). The results showed that the ion-concentration polarization effect occurred inside the conical nanopore, resulting in surface conduction dominating in the ionic current. The ions inside the nanopore are depleted and enriched under the nozzle mode and the diffuser mode, respectively. As a result, the electro-osmotic pump yields a greater pumping pressure, flow rate, and energy conversion efficiency when operating in the nozzle mode. In addition, we also investigated the flow rate rectification behavior for the conical nanopore. The best flow rate rectification factor in this work is 2.06 for an electrolyte concentration of 10-3M .

  8. Electroosmotic Pumps with Frits Synthesized from Potassium Silicate

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic pumps employing silica frits synthesized from potassium silicate as a stationary phase show strong electroosmotic flow velocity and resistance to pressure-driven flow. We characterize these pumps and measure an electroosmotic mobility of 2.5×10-8 m2/V s and hydrodynamic resistance per unit length of 70 ×1017 Pa s/m4 with a standard deviation of less than 2% even when varying the amount of water used in the potassium silicate mixture. Furthermore, we demonstrate the simple integration of these pumps into a proof-of-concept PDMS lab-on-a-chip device fabricated from a 3D-printed template. PMID:26629907

  9. Flow reversals in turbulent convection via vortex reconnections.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Mani; Verma, Mahendra K

    2013-03-15

    We employ detailed numerical simulations to probe the mechanism of flow reversals in two-dimensional turbulent convection. We show that the reversals occur via a vortex reconnection of two attracting corner rolls having the same sign of vorticity, thus leading to major restructuring of the flow. Large fluctuations in heat transport are observed during the reversal due to the flow reconfiguration. The flow configurations during the reversals have been analyzed quantitatively using large-scale modes. Using these tools, we also show why flow reversals occur for a restricted range of Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers. PMID:25166544

  10. Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M.; Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of {sup 99}Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying <400 V and <1 A for 1--3 h (energy consumption of 0.4--12 kWh/ft{sup 2}).

  11. High Pressure Reverse Flow APS Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    A design and test demonstration effort was undertaken to evaluate the concept of the reverse flow engine for the APS engine application. The 1500 lb (6672 N) thrust engine was designed to operate on gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen propellants at a mixture ratio of 4 and to achieve the objective performance of 435 sec (4266 Nsec/kg) specific impulse. Superimposed durability requirements called for a million-cycle capability with 50 hours duration. The program was undertaken as a series of tasks including the initial preliminary design, design of critical test components and finally, the design and demonstration of an altitude engine which could be used interchangeably to examine operating parameters as well as to demonstrate the capability of the concept. The program results are reported with data to indicate that all of the program objectives were met or exceeded within the course of testing on the program. The analysis effort undertaken is also reported in detail and supplemented with test data in some cases where prior definitions could not be made. The results are contained of these analyses as well as the test results conducted throughout the course of the program. Finally, the test data and analytical results were combined to allow recommendations for a flight weight design. This preliminary design effort is also detailed.

  12. Extensional instability in electro-osmotic microflows of polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, R. M.; Freeman, M. R.

    2010-03-01

    Fluid transport in microfluidic systems typically is laminar due to the low Reynolds number characteristic of the flow. The inclusion of suspended polymers imparts elasticity to fluids, allowing instabilities to be excited when substantial polymer stretching occurs. For high molecular weight polymer chains we find that flow velocities achievable by standard electro-osmotic pumping are sufficient to excite extensional instabilities in dilute polymer solutions. We observe a dependence in measured fluctuations on polymer concentration which plateaus at a threshold corresponding to the onset of significant molecular crowding in macromolecular solutions; plateauing occurs well below the overlap concentration. Our results show that electro-osmotic flows of complex fluids are disturbed from the steady regime, suggesting potential for enhanced mixing and requiring care in modeling the flow of complex liquids such as biopolymer suspensions.

  13. Reversed flow injection spectrophotometric determination of chlorate.

    PubMed

    Chuesaard, Thanyarat; Wonganan, Tharinee; Wongchanapiboon, Teerapol; Liawruangrath, Saisunee

    2009-09-15

    An interfacing has been developed to connect a spectrophotometer with a personal computer and used as a readout system for development of a simple, rapid and sensitive reversed flow injection (rFI) procedure for chlorate determination. The method is based on the oxidation of indigo carmine by chlorate ions in an acidic solution (dil. HCl) leading to the decrease in absorbance at 610 nm. The decrease in absorbance is directly related to the chlorate concentration present in the sample solutions. Optimum conditions for chlorate were examined. A linear calibration graph over the range of 0.1-0.5 mg L(-1) chlorate was established with the regression equation of Y=104.5X+1.0, r(2)=0.9961 (n=6). The detection limit (3 sigma) of 0.03 mg L(-1), the limit of quantitation (10 sigma) of 0.10 mg L(-1) and the RSD of 3.2% for 0.3 mg L(-1) chlorate (n=11) together with a sample throughput of 92 h(-1) were obtained. The recovery of the added chlorate in spiked water samples was 98.5+/-3.1%. Major interferences for chlorate determination were found to be BrO(3)(-), ClO(2)(-), ClO(-) and IO(3)(-) which were overcome by using SO(3)(2-) (as Na(2)SO(3)) as masking agent. The method has been successfully applied for the determination of chlorate in spiked water samples with the minimum reagent consumption of 14.0 mL h(-1). Good agreement between the proposed rFIA and the reference methods was found verified by Student's t-test at 95% confidence level. PMID:19615529

  14. Electroosmotic transport in polyelectrolyte-grafted nanochannels with pH-dependent charge density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-05-01

    "Smart" polyelectrolyte-grafted or "soft" nanochannels with pH-responsiveness have shown great promise for applications like manipulation of ion transport, ion sensing and selection, current rectification, and many more. In this paper, we develop a theory to study the electroosmotic transport in a polyelectrolyte-grafted (or soft) nanochannel with pH-dependent charge density. In one of our recent studies, we have identified that explicit consideration of hydrogen ion concentration is mandatory for appropriately describing the electrostatics of such systems and the resulting monomer concentration must obey a non-unique, cubic distribution. Here, we use this electrostatic calculation to study the corresponding electroosmotic transport. We establish that the effect of pH in the electroosmotic transport in polyelectrolyte-grafted nanochannels introduces two separate issues: first is the consideration of the hydrogen and hydroxyl ion concentrations in describing the electroosmotic body force, and second is the consideration of the appropriate drag force that bears the signature of this cubic monomeric distribution. Our results indicate that the strength of the electroosmotic velocity for the pH-dependent case is always smaller than that for the pH-independent case, with the extent of this difference being a function of the system parameters. Such nature of the electroosmotic transport will be extremely significant in suppressing the electroosmotic flow strength with implications in large number applications such as capillary electrophoresis induced separation, electric field mediated DNA elongation, electrophoretic DNA nanopore sequencing, and many more.

  15. Reverse vortex flow in near-surface explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1981-09-01

    Nuclear explosions conducted near the ground surface but higher than about 5 to 6 m/kt/sup 1/3/ produce a reverse flow (downward along the symmetry axis) after the shock wave is reflected from the ground. This reverse flow persists until destroyed by the buoyant rise of the fireball on time scales of several seconds. Six calculations of bursts with scaled heights-of-burst ranging upward from 15 m/kt/sup 1/3/ are described. The height of the reverse flow is a simple function of the burst height and explosion yield.

  16. Electroosmotic pumps and their applications in microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiayan; Cheng, Chang; Wang, Shili; Liu, Shaorong

    2009-01-01

    Electroosmotic pumping is receiving increasing attention in recent years owing to the rapid development in micro total analytical systems. Compared with other micropumps, electroosmotic pumps (EOPs) offer a number of advantages such as creation of constant pulse-free flows and elimination of moving parts. The flow rates and pumping pressures of EOPs matches well with micro analysis systems. The common materials and fabrication technologies make it readily integrateable with lab-on-a-chip devices. This paper reviews the recent progress on EOP fabrications and applications in order to promote the awareness of EOPs to researchers interested in using micro- and nano-fluidic devices. The pros and cons of EOPs are also discussed, which helps these researchers in designing and constructing their micro platforms. PMID:20126306

  17. Reverse-flow strategy in biofilters treating CS₂ emissions.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Naiara; Gallastegui, Gorka; Gurtubay, Luis; Barona, Astrid; Elías, Ana

    2013-04-01

    The bacteriostatic properties of carbon disulphide (CS₂) hamper its biodegradation in conventional biofilters. The response of four biofilters operating in downflow mode and reverse-flow mode was compared in a laboratory-scale plant treating CS₂ under sudden short-term changes in operating conditions. A process shutdown for 24 h, an inlet concentration increase and an interruption of the inlet air humidification for 48 h at an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 240 s did not impact significantly on biodegradation performance, regardless of flow mode. Nevertheless, a reduction in the EBRT to 60 s resulted in a significant decrease in removal efficiency in all the biofilters. The CS₂ degradation profile showed that the reverse-flow mode strategy rendered a more homogenous distribution of biomass along the bed height. The benefits of the reverse-flow mode were demonstrated even when the unidirectional flow mode was re-established. PMID:22903570

  18. Reverse Flow Engine Core Having a Ducted Fan with Integrated Secondary Flow Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kisska, Michael K. (Inventor); Princen, Norman H. (Inventor); Kuehn, Mark S. (Inventor); Cosentino, Gary B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Secondary air flow is provided for a ducted fan having a reverse flow turbine engine core driving a fan blisk. The fan blisk incorporates a set of thrust fan blades extending from an outer hub and a set of integral secondary flow blades extending intermediate an inner hub and the outer hub. A nacelle provides an outer flow duct for the thrust fan blades and a secondary flow duct carries flow from the integral secondary flow blades as cooling air for components of the reverse flow turbine engine.

  19. Electro-osmotically induced convection at a permselective membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2000-08-01

    The paper is concerned with convection at an ion exchange electrodialysis membrane induced by nonequilibrium electro-osmosis in the course of concentration polarization under the passage of electric current through the membrane. Derivation of nonequilibrium electro-osmotic slip condition is recapitulated along with the linear stability analysis of quiescent electrodiffusion through a flat ion exchange membrane. Results of numerical calculation for nonlinear steady state convection, developing from the respective instability, are reported along with those for a slightly wavy membrane. Besides these results, we report those of time dependent calculations for periodic and chaotic oscillations, resulting from instability of the respective steady state flows, and also the results of recent experiments with modified membranes. These latter rule in favor of electro-osmotic versus bulk electroconvective origin of overlimiting conductance through ion exchange membranes.

  20. Maximum efficiency of the electro-osmotic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuli; Miao, Jianying; Wang, Ning; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2011-06-01

    Electro-osmotic effect in a porous medium arises from the electrically charged double layer at the fluid-solid interface, whereby an externally applied electric field can give rise to fluid flow. The electro-osmotic pump (EOP) is potentially useful for a variety of engineering and biorelated applications, but its generally low efficiency is a negative factor in this regard. A study to determine the optimal efficiency of the EOP and the condition(s) under which it can be realized is therefore of scientific interest and practical importance. We present the results of a theoretical and experimental study on the maximum efficiency optimization of the electrokinetic effect in artificially fabricated porous media with controlled pore diameters. It is shown that whereas the EOP efficiency increases with decreasing channel diameter, from 4.5 to 2.5 μm for samples fabricated on oxidized silicon wafers as expected for the interfacial nature of the electro-osmotic effect, the opposite trend was observed for samples with much smaller channel diameters fabricated on anodized aluminum oxide films, with the pore surface coated with silica. These results are in agreement with the theoretical prediction, based on the competition between interfacial area and the no-slip flow boundary condition, that an optimal efficiency of ˜1% is attained at a microchannel diameter that is five times the Debye length, with a zeta potential of ˜100 mV.

  1. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m[sup 2]-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25[degrees]C and 40[degrees]C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  2. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-12-31

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m{sup 2}-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25{degrees}C and 40{degrees}C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  3. Dynamics of poloidal flows in enhanced reverse shear bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Avinash, K.

    2005-07-15

    A simple reduced enhanced reverse shear (RERS) model is constructed to study the dynamics of poloidal flows during the ERS transition. This model predicts that a reversal of poloidal flow shear occurs just prior to the transition, as seen in experiment [R. E. Bell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1429 (1998)]. This transition front propagates until the radial location where the safety factor (q) is minimum and becomes locked there due to insufficient input power to overcome the threshold requirement for the bifurcation. This study also reveals that there can be many routes to ERS transition depending upon various tunable parameters.

  4. Swelling and electro-osmotic properties of cation-exchange membranes with different structures in methanol-water media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, V. M.; Villaluenga, J. P. G.; Godino, M. P.; Izquierdo-Gil, M. A.; Ruiz-Bauzá, C.; Seoane, B.

    Electro-osmosis experiments through three cation-exchange membranes with different morphology and similar electric properties have been performed using methanol-water solutions under different experimental conditions. The influence on the electro-osmotic transport of the percentage of methanol on solvent with two different electrolytes, NaCl and LiCl, has been studied. The experimental results show that the presence of methanol in the solutions affects strongly the electro-osmotic flow, and this influence is different depending on the membrane morphology. Correlations among electro-osmotic permeability, swelling behavior, and cell resistance are studied for these membrane systems at different percentages of methanol in solvent.

  5. A dynamic model of the electroosmotic droplet switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, Dominik P. J.; Steen, Paul H.

    2013-09-01

    A capillary switch is a bi-stable system of liquid/gas interfaces with a trigger to toggle back and forth between the two stable equilibrium states. We use an electro-osmotic pump as trigger. The pump, consisting of two electrodes and a porous substrate arranged between the droplets, moves volume between the droplets. This bistable system is called an electro-osmotic droplet switch. With the pump off, for low total volumes, the stable states are a pair of identical sub-hemispherical droplets or, for large enough total volumes, a large-small droplet configuration (two mirror-symmetric states). With the pump on, these stationary states are shifted and, if the pump strength is too great, there are no stationary states at all. In this article, we report the pump-on behavior as a modification of the pump-off behavior. To build the dynamic model of the system, we first develop a characterization of the electro-osmotic pump in the spirit of the Blake-Kozeny correlation for viscous flow through a packed bed. The control-volume model is based on center-of-mass motion. Model predictions compare favorably to observation.

  6. Oxford Miniature Vaporiser output with reversed gas flows.

    PubMed

    Donovan, A; Perndt, H

    2007-06-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate and calibrate the isoflurane output of an Oxford Miniature Vaporiser (OMV) draw-over vaporiser with reversed gas flows. Plenum or Boyles type machines have gas flowing left to right through the apparatus. Draw over anaesthesia systems, in contrast, traditionally have the carrier gas, air plus oxygen, flowing right to left through the vaporiser. There are a number of variations in the external design of the OMV vaporiser: 1) a back bar mounted draw-over vaporiser with 23-mm taper and left to right gas flow, 2) the Tri-Service with 22-mm taper and left to right gas flow, and 3) the traditional draw-over OMV with right to left gas flow with a variety of tapers. Non-uniformity leads to a variety of possible connections. The predictable output of the OMV vaporiser assumes the correct direction of gas flows for the device. There are many second hand right to left OMV vaporisers for sale to developing countries where the nuances of vaporiser orientation add unnecessarily to the desired simplicity of anaesthesia. A simple calibration scale for reversed gas flows through the OMV vaporiser would be useful. PMID:17506742

  7. Simultaneous separation of five major ribonucleic acids by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence in the presence of electroosmotic flow: application to the rapid screening of 5S rRNA from ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chu; Liao, Ching-Ru; Chung, I-Che; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Po-Ling

    2014-10-17

    RNA integrity is important in RNA studies because poor RNA quality may impact downstream methodologies. This study proposes a rapid and cost-effective method for the determination of RNA integrity based on CE-LIF in the presence of electroosmotic flow. The proposed method uses poly(ethylene) oxide (Mavg=4,000,000 Da) as a sieving matrix for total RNA separation. Ethidium bromide (μg mL(-1)) was dissolved in a polymer solution as an interchelating dye for on-column fluorescent labeling. The 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, 5S rRNA and tRNA from the total human RNA extracted from the cells were fully separated using the proposed method. The lowest detectable concentration of total RNA achieved was 100 pg μL(-1) with a 6 min sample injection followed by on-column concentration. In addition, the temperature-induced degradation of total RNA was observed by CE-LIF. The electropherograms revealed more fragmentation of 28S and 18S rRNAs by temperature-induced hydrolysis compared with the 5.8S rRNA, 5S rRNA and tRNA. Therefore, the results indicated that RNA degradation should be considered for long-term, high-temperature incubations in RNA-related experiments involving RNA hybridization. The proposed method is furthermore, applied to the determination of 5S rRNA overexpressed in ovarian cancer cells as compared to the cervical cancer cells. Overall, CE-LIF is highly promising for rapid screening of ovarian cancers without tedious pre-amplification steps. PMID:25261903

  8. a Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows in Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EVERSMAN, W.

    2001-09-01

    A reverse flow theorem for acoustic propagation in compressible potential flow has been obtained directly from the field equations without recourse to energy conservation arguments. A reciprocity theorem for the scattering matrix for the propagation of acoustic modes in a duct with either acoustically rigid walls or acoustically absorbing walls follows. It is found that for a source at a specific end of the duct, suitably scaled reflection matrices in direct and reverse flow have a reciprocal relationship. Scaled transmission matrices obtained for direct flow and reversed flow with simultaneous switching of source location from one end to the other also have a reciprocal relationship. A related reverse flow theorem specialized to one-dimensional acoustic propagation has also been obtained. Reciprocity relationships for the scattering coefficients for propagation are derived, and are found to be similar though much simpler than in the case of multi-mode propagation. In one-dimensional flow, reciprocal relations and power conservation arguments are used to show that scaled power reflection and transmission coefficients are invariant to flow reversal and switching of source location from one end of the duct to the other. Numerical verification of the reciprocal relationships is given in a companion paper.

  9. Electrokinetic soil remediation: Impact of aqueous phase properties on soil surface charge and electroosmotic efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, L.M.; Zang, G.M.

    1995-10-01

    The electrokinetic remediation of soils is described. The effect of pore fluid properties on the surface charge of clays was examined. Zeta potential results indicate that the electro-osmotic efficiency (flow/voltage ratio) in bentonite should be relatively insensitive to pH and ionic strength variations. The zeta potential of kaolinite, however, was found to be quite sensitive to pH. The electro-osmotic efficiency for kaolinite was found to be equally sensitive to pH. Zeta potential results further indicate that the electro-osmotic efficiency as well as the direction of electroosmosis in kaolinite will be impacted dramatically by the presence of metal cations. These results suggest that zeta potential measurements could be used to study the impact on electro osmotic efficiency of initial site conditions as well as conditions expected during an electrokinetic remediation process.

  10. Further studies of unsteady boundary layers with flow reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    One set of calculations was performed using the first order, time dependent turbulent boundary layer equations, and extended earlier work by Nash and Patel to a wider range of flows. Another set of calculations was performed for laminar flow using the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. The results of the calculations confirm previous conclusions concerning the existence of a regime of unseparated flow, containing an embedded region of reversal, which is accessible to first order boundary layer theory. However, certain doubts are cast on the precise nature of the events which accompany the eventual breakdown of the theory due to singularity onset. The earlier view that the singularity appears as the final event in a sequence involving rapid thickening of the boundary layer and the formation of a localized region of steep gradients is called into question by the present results. It appears that singularity onset is not necessarily preceded by rapid boundary layer thickening, or even necessarily produces immediate thickening.

  11. Applications of Electro-Osmotic Transport in the Processing of Textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Krueger, R.; Hopper, R.; Cherepy, N.

    1999-11-29

    We report development of a pilot process for the industrial rinsing of fabrics. This process combines hydraulic (pressure-driven) transport with electro-osmotic transport. It reduces the total amount of water required in certain rinsing operations by a factor of about five. Cotton exhibits an electro-osmotic transport coefficient of about 6 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V resulting from a partial ionization of hydroxyl groups on the cellulose polymer substrate. This process applies a field transverse to the fabric to effect the movement of water in the spaces between the 10 {micro}m cotton fibers which constitute the yam. The field strength is adjusted so that the induced electro-osmotic flux is comparable to a pressure-driven flux, which moves preferentially in the more open channels between the yams. For a fixed current density, solution conductivity and electro-osmotic transport vary inversely. The process is most practical for removal of liquids of relatively low conductivity (<500 {micro}S/cm). For removal of solutions of conductivity greater than 1200 {micro}S/cm, the rate of electro-osmotic flow may be too low to benefit the rinsing process if current densities are restricted to practical levels of about 30 mA/cm{sup 2}. Electra-osmotic transport may have important applications in wet processing of extremely fine textiles, such as micro fiber fabrics. In addition to rinsing, electro-osmotic transport may also be used to speed the penetration of chemicals and dyestuffs that are applied to the surface of wet textiles.

  12. The phase reversal phenomenon at flow separation and reattachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, J. Pete; Mangalam, S. M.; Kalburgi, V.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were conducted on two different airfoils, one of them in a low-turbulence tunnel, to detect laminar separation and turbulent reattachment locations. A 'nonintrusive' multielement sensor consisting of a large number of closely spaced individual nickel films was vacuum deposited on a thin substrate and bonded to the airfoil model surface. Each sensor element was a part of an independent constant temperature anemometer system. Time history as well as spectral analysis of signals from surface film gauges were used to determine the surface shear flow characteristics. A major breakthrough was achieved with the discovery of phase reversal in low-frequency dynamic shear stress signals across regions of flow separation and reattachment.

  13. An Alternating Current Electroosmotic Pump Based on Conical Nanopore Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojian; Ramiah Rajasekaran, Pradeep; Martin, Charles R

    2016-04-26

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) is used to pump solutions through microfluidic devices and capillary electrophoresis columns. We describe here an EOF pump based on membrane EOF rectification, an electrokinetic phenomenon we recently described. EOF rectification requires membranes with asymmetrically shaped pores, and conical pores in a polymeric membrane were used here. We show here that solution flow through the membrane can be achieved by applying a symmetrical sinusoidal voltage waveform across the membrane. This is possible because the alternating current (AC) carried by ions through the pore is rectified, and we previously showed that rectified currents yield EOF rectification. We have investigated the effect of both the magnitude and frequency of the voltage waveform on flow rate through the membrane, and we have measured the maximum operating pressure. Finally, we show that operating in AC mode offers potential advantages relative to conventional DC-mode EOF pumps. PMID:27046145

  14. Compliant Metal Enhanced Convection Cooled Reverse-Flow Annular Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paskin, Marc D.; Acosta, Waldo A.

    1994-01-01

    A joint Army/NASA program was conducted to design, fabricate, and test an advanced, reverse-flow, small gas turbine combustor using a compliant metal enhanced (CME) convection wall cooling concept. The objectives of this effort were to develop a design method (basic design data base and analysis) for the CME cooling technique and tben demonstrate its application to an advanced cycle, small, reverse-flow combustor with 3000 F (1922 K) burner outlet temperature (BOT). The CME concept offers significant improvements in wall cooling effectiveness resulting in a large reduction in cooling air requirements. Therefore, more air is available for control of burner outlet temperature pattern in addition to the benefit of improved efficiency, reduced emissions, and smoke levels. Rig test results demonstrated the benefits and viability of the CME concept meeting or exceeding the aerothermal performance and liner wall temperature characteristics of similar lower temperature-rise combustors, achieving 0.15 pattern factor at 3000 F (1922 K) BOT, while utilizing approximately 80 percent less cooling air than conventional, film-cooled combustion systems.

  15. Flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, M.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers. The computations are performed using an elliptic solver incorporates the {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. Heat production by combustion is simulated by adding heat generation source terms in the energy equation. And it is assumed that heat generation occurs only a section of the furnace. A number of different inlet conditions with different geometries are considered, and the changes of flow structure, temperature distribution, convective heat flux rate are presented and compared. The results show that, in general, heat transfer in the reversed flow combustion chamber can be improved by properly chosen geometry for the required output.

  16. ac electroosmotic pumping induced by noncontact external electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shau-Chun; Chen, Hsiao-Ping; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2007-01-01

    Electroosmotic (EO) pumps based on dc electroosmosis is plagued by bubble generation and other electrochemical reactions at the electrodes at voltages beyond 1 V for electrolytes. These disadvantages limit their throughput and offset their portability advantage over mechanical syringe or pneumatic pumps. ac electroosmotic pumps at high frequency (>100 kHz) circumvent the bubble problem by inducing polarization and slip velocity on embedded electrodes,1 but they require complex electrode designs to produce a net flow. We report a new high-throughput ac EO pump design based on induced-polarization on the entire channel surface instead of just on the electrodes. Like dc EO pumps, our pump electrodes are outside of the load section and form a cm-long pump unit consisting of three circular reservoirs (3 mm in diameter) connected by a 1×1 mm channel. The field-induced polarization can produce an effective Zeta potential exceeding 1 V and an ac slip velocity estimated as 1 mm∕sec or higher, both one order of magnitude higher than earlier dc and ac pumps, giving rise to a maximum throughput of 1 μl∕sec. Polarization over the entire channel surface, quadratic scaling with respect to the field and high voltage at high frequency without electrode bubble generation are the reasons why the current pump is superior to earlier dc and ac EO pumps. PMID:19693362

  17. Electroosmotic micro-pump array for local control of droplets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Amit; Hirsa, Amir; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra

    2006-11-01

    Droplet-based microfluidic devices have a wide range of applications in various fields such as diagnostics and clinical testing, drug delivery and opto-electronics. This paper presents a novel microfluidic device for actuation and control of individual droplets employing electroosmotic pumping across a nanoporous membrane. To fabricate the device, arrays of gold electrodes pairs are first patterned on both sides of an anodic alumina membrane (Whatman, ˜50 μm in thickness, with parallel cylindrical pores of 150 nm in diameter). One side of the membrane is then attached to a liquid reservoir while the other side is covered partially with Teflon to prevent droplet spreading. When voltage is applied between the two aligned top and bottom gold electrodes electroosmotic flow occurs from the liquid reservoir through the membrane and a droplet forms onto the Teflon-coated surface of the membrane. Actuation time and droplet shape are investigated by video microscopy in order to assess the effect of electrode configuration and electrolyte ionic strength Possible applications for the device include addressable liquid microlens arrays, fast-response droplet switches and fast, sample collection devices for brain microdialysis.

  18. Convective flow reversal in self-powered enzyme micropumps.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Rivera, Isamar; Shum, Henry; Agrawal, Arjun; Sen, Ayusman; Balazs, Anna C

    2016-03-01

    Surface-bound enzymes can act as pumps that drive large-scale fluid flows in the presence of their substrates or promoters. Thus, enzymatic catalysis can be harnessed for “on demand” pumping in nano- and microfluidic devices powered by an intrinsic energy source. The mechanisms controlling the pumping have not, however, been completely elucidated. Herein, we combine theory and experiments to demonstrate a previously unreported spatiotemporal variation in pumping behavior in urease-based pumps and uncover the mechanisms behind these dynamics. We developed a theoretical model for the transduction of chemical energy into mechanical fluid flow in these systems, capturing buoyancy effects due to the solution containing nonuniform concentrations of substrate and product. We find that the qualitative features of the flow depend on the ratios of diffusivities δ=D(P)/D(S) and expansion coefficients β=β(P)/β(S) of the reaction substrate (S) and product (P). If δ>1 and δ>β (or if δ<1 and δ<β ), an unexpected phenomenon arises: the flow direction reverses with time and distance from the pump. Our experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the model and show that both the speed and direction of fluid pumping (i) depend on the enzyme activity and coverage, (ii) vary with the distance from the pump, and (iii) evolve with time. These findings permit the rational design of enzymatic pumps that accurately control the direction and speed of fluid flow without external power sources, enabling effective, self-powered fluidic devices. PMID:26903618

  19. Experimental results from a reverse flow annual combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert, F. M.; Hattingh, H. V.

    Computer-predicted temperature distributions in the wall liners of a combustion chamber were compared to the experimentally obtained values from combustion tests carried out in a small, full-scale reverse-flow annular combustor at sea level take-off conditionns. The largest discrepancies between the measured and predicted linear temperatures occured in the primary zone, with most of the predictions falling above the measured values, and with neither of the two computer programs satisfying the accuracy of 4 percent (of the experimental values) needed for making estimates on the life of a combustor. On the other hand, the correlation between the measured and predicted liner pressure drop was satisfactory. The validity and usefulnes of simple computer models as aids in the design of gas turbine combustion chambers are discussed.

  20. Computation of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal and evaluation of two separate turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure which solves the governing boundary layer equations within Keller's box method was developed for calculating unsteady laminar flows with flow reversal. This method is extended to turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal. Test cases are used to investigate the proposition that unsteady turbulent boundary layers also remain free of singularities. Turbulent flow calculations are performed. The governing equations for both models are solved. As in laminar flows, the unsteady turbulent boundary layers are free from singularities, but there is a clear indication of rapid thickening of the boundary layer with increasing flow reversal. Predictions of both turbulence models are the same for all practical purposes.

  1. High-performance, low-voltage electroosmotic pumps with molecularly thin silicon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica L; Getpreecharsawas, Jirachai; Fang, David Z; Gaborski, Thomas R; Striemer, Christopher C; Fauchet, Philippe M; Borkholder, David A; McGrath, James L

    2013-11-12

    We have developed electroosmotic pumps (EOPs) fabricated from 15-nm-thick porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si) membranes. Ultrathin pnc-Si membranes enable high electroosmotic flow per unit voltage. We demonstrate that electroosmosis theory compares well with the observed pnc-Si flow rates. We attribute the high flow rates to high electrical fields present across the 15-nm span of the membrane. Surface modifications, such as plasma oxidation or silanization, can influence the electroosmotic flow rates through pnc-Si membranes by alteration of the zeta potential of the material. A prototype EOP that uses pnc-Si membranes and Ag/AgCl electrodes was shown to pump microliter per minute-range flow through a 0.5-mm-diameter capillary tubing with as low as 250 mV of applied voltage. This silicon-based platform enables straightforward integration of low-voltage, on-chip EOPs into portable microfluidic devices with low back pressures. PMID:24167263

  2. High-performance, low-voltage electroosmotic pumps with molecularly thin silicon nanomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Jessica L.; Getpreecharsawas, Jirachai; Fang, David Z.; Gaborski, Thomas R.; Striemer, Christopher C.; Fauchet, Philippe M.; Borkholder, David A.; McGrath, James L.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed electroosmotic pumps (EOPs) fabricated from 15-nm-thick porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si) membranes. Ultrathin pnc-Si membranes enable high electroosmotic flow per unit voltage. We demonstrate that electroosmosis theory compares well with the observed pnc-Si flow rates. We attribute the high flow rates to high electrical fields present across the 15-nm span of the membrane. Surface modifications, such as plasma oxidation or silanization, can influence the electroosmotic flow rates through pnc-Si membranes by alteration of the zeta potential of the material. A prototype EOP that uses pnc-Si membranes and Ag/AgCl electrodes was shown to pump microliter per minute-range flow through a 0.5-mm-diameter capillary tubing with as low as 250 mV of applied voltage. This silicon-based platform enables straightforward integration of low-voltage, on-chip EOPs into portable microfluidic devices with low back pressures. PMID:24167263

  3. Cylindrical Couette flows of a rarefied gas with evaporation and condensation: Reversal and bifurcation of flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Aoki, Kazuo

    1999-02-01

    A rarefied gas between two coaxial circular cylinders made of the condensed phase of the gas is considered, where each cylinder is kept at a uniform temperature and is rotating at a constant angular velocity around its axis (cylindrical Couette flows of a rarefied gas with evaporation or condensation on the cylinders). The steady behavior of the gas, with special interest in bifurcation of a flow, is studied on the basis of kinetic theory from the continuum to the Knudsen limit. The solution shows profound variety: reversal of direction of evaporation-condensation with variation of the speed of rotation of the cylinders; contrary to the conventional cylindrical Couette flow without evaporation and condensation, bifurcation of a flow in a simple case where the state of the gas is circumferentially and axially uniform.

  4. Electroosmotic enhancement of the binding of a neutral molecule to a transmembrane pore

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Li-Qun; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan

    2003-01-01

    The flux of solvent water coupled to the transit of ions through protein pores is considerable. The effect of this electroosmotic solvent flow on the binding of a neutral molecule [β-cyclodextrin (βCD)] to sites within the staphylococcal α-hemolysin pore was investigated. Mutant α-hemolysin pores were used to which βCD can bind from either entrance and through which the direction of water flow can be controlled by choosing the charge selectivity of the pore and the polarity of the applied potential. The Kd values for βCD for individual mutant pores varied by >100-fold with the applied potential over a range of –120 to +120 mV. In all cases, the signs of the changes in binding free energy and the influence of potential on the association and dissociation rate constants for βCD were consistent with an electroosmotic effect. PMID:14676320

  5. Gliding arc in tornado using a reverse vortex flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Chiranjeev S.; Cho, Young I.; Gutsol, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander; Rufael, Tecle S.

    2005-02-01

    The present article reports a new gliding arc (GA) system using a reverse vortex flow ('tornado') in a cylindrical reactor (gliding arc in tornado, or GAT), as used to preserve the main advantages of traditional GA systems and overcome their main drawbacks. The primary advantages of traditional GA systems retained in the present GAT are the possibility to generate transitional plasma and to avoid considerable electrode erosion. In contrast to a traditional GA, the new GAT system ensures much more uniform gas treatment and has a significantly larger gas residence time in the reactor. The present article also describes the design of the new reactor and its stable operation regime when the variation of GAT current is very small. These features are understood to be very important for most viable applications. Additionally the GAT provides near-perfect thermal insulation from the reactor wall, indicating that the present GAT does not require the reactor wall to be constructed of high-temperature materials. The new GAT system, with its unique properties such as a high level of nonequilibrium and a large residence time, looks very promising for many industrial applications including fuel conversion, carbon dioxide conversion to carbon monoxide and oxygen, surface treatment, waste treatment, flame stabilization, hydrogen sulfide treatment, etc.

  6. The reversibility theorem for thin airfoils in subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clinton E

    1950-01-01

    A method introduced by Munk is extended to prove that the light-curve slope of thin wings in either subsonic flow or supersonic flow is the same when the direction of flight of the wing is reversed. It is also shown that the wing reversal does not change the thickness drag, damping-in-roll parameter or the damping-in-pitch parameter.

  7. Electroosmotic fluid motion and late-time solute transport at non-negligible zeta potentials

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-12-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are employed to determine the electric potential, fluid velocity and late-time solute distribution for electroosmotic flow in a tube and channel when the zeta potential is not small. The electric potential and fluid velocity are in general obtained by numerical means. In addition, new analytical solutions are presented for the velocity in a tube and channel in the extremes of large and small Debye layer thickness. The electroosmotic fluid velocity is used to analyze late-time transport of a neutral non-reacting solute. Zeroth and first-order solutions describing axial variation of the solute concentration are determined analytically. The resulting expressions contain eigenvalues representing the dispersion and skewness of the axial concentration profiles. These eigenvalues and the functions describing transverse variation of the concentration field are determined numerically using a shooting technique. Results are presented for both tube and channel geometries over a wide range of the normalized Debye layer thickness and zeta potential. Simple analytical approximations to the eigenvalues are also provided for the limiting cases of large and small values of the Debye layer thickness. The methodology developed here for electroosmotic flow is also applied to the Taylor problem of late-time transport and dispersion in pressure-driven flows.

  8. Effect of Trailing Edge Shape on the Unsteady Aerodynamics of Reverse Flow Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2015-11-01

    This work considers dynamic stall in reverse flow, where flow travels over an oscillating airfoil from the geometric trailing edge towards the leading edge. An airfoil with a sharp geometric trailing edge causes early formation of a primary dynamic stall vortex since the sharp edge acts as the aerodynamic leading edge in reverse flow. The present work experimentally examines the potential merits of using an airfoil with a blunt geometric trailing edge to delay flow separation and dynamic stall vortex formation while undergoing oscillations in reverse flow. Time-resolved and phase-averaged flow fields and pressure distributions are compared for airfoils with different trailing edge shapes. Specifically, the evolution of unsteady flow features such as primary, secondary, and trailing edge vortices is examined. The influence of these flow features on the unsteady pressure distributions and integrated unsteady airloads provide insight on the torsional loading of rotor blades as they oscillate in reverse flow. The airfoil with a blunt trailing edge delays reverse flow dynamic stall, but this leads to greater downward-acting lift and pitching moment. These results are fundamental to alleviating vibrations of high-speed helicopters, where much of the rotor operates in reverse flow.

  9. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-01-25

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). In this report, we report our application of Flow Reversal technique in clarification of apple juice containing pectin. The presence of pectin in apple juice makes the clarification process difficult and is believed to cause membrane fouling. Of all compounds found in apple juice, pectin is most often identified as the major hindrance to filtration performance. Based on our ultrafiltration experiments with apple juice, we conclude that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. Thus, flow reversal

  10. Thrust-reverser flow investigation on a twin-engine transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 14 x 22 foot Subsonic Tunnel to study the effects of engine thrust reversing on an aft-mounted twin-engine transport and to develop effective testing techniques. Testing was done over a fixed and a moving-belt ground plane and over a pressure instrumented ground board. Free-stream dynamic pressure was set at values up to 12.2 psf, which corresponded to a maximum Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of 765,000. The thrust reversers examined included cascade, target and four-door configurations. The investigation focused on the range of free-stream velocities and engine thrust-reverser flow rates that would be typical for landing ground-roll conditions. Flow visualization techniques were investigated, and the use of water or smoke injected into the reverser flow proved effective to determine the forward progression of the reversed flow and reingestion limits. When testing over a moving-belt ground plane, as opposed to a fixed ground plane, forward penetration of the reversed flow was reduced. The use of a pressure-instrumented ground board enabled reversed flow ground velocities to be obtained, and it provided a means by which to identify the reversed flow impingement point on the ground.

  11. Static internal performance of a nonaxisymmetric vaned thrust reverser with flow splay capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, Linda S.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel on a dual-port, nonaxisymmetric, block-and-turn type thrust reverser model with vane cascades in the reverser ports which turned the flow in the splay direction and aided in turning the flow in the reverse direction. Splaying reverser flow is a method of delaying to lower landing ground roll speeds the reingestion of hot exhaust flow into the inlets. Exhaust flow splay can also help prevent the impingement of hot exhaust gases on the empennage surfaces when the reverser is integrated into an actual airframe. The vane cascades consisted of two sets of perpendicular vanes with a variable number of turning and splay vanes. A skewed vane box was also tested which had only one set of vanes angled to provide both turning and splay. Vane cascades were designed to provide different amounts of flow splay in the top and bottom ports. Inner doors, trim tabs, and an orifice plate all provided means of varying the port area for reverser flow modulation. The outer door position was varied as a means of influencing the flow reverse angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.75 to approximately 6.00.

  12. Flux Enhancement in Crossflow Membrane Filtration: Fouling and It's Minimization by Flow Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-08-04

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). Three feed solutions (Bovine serum albumin (BSA), apple juice and citrus fruit pectin) were studied in crossflow membrane filtration. These solutes are well-known in membrane filtration for their fouling and concentration polarization potentials. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using each of the feed solutes show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. The flux enhancement is dramatic (by an order of magnitude) with increased feed concentration and

  13. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2004-06-14

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). In our previous report, we reported our work on UF of BSA. In this report, we report our continuing application of Flow Reversal technique in clarification of apple juice containing pectin. The presence of pectin in apple juice makes the clarification process difficult and is believed to cause membrane fouling. Of all compounds found in apple juice, pectin is most often identified as the major hindrance to filtration performance. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using pectin in apple juice as feed show that under flow reversal conditions, the

  14. Buoyancy-driven flow reversal phenomena in radially rotating serpentine ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.J.; Wang, W.J.; Chen, C.K.

    2000-02-01

    Convective characteristics are analyzed numerically in a rotating multipass square duct connecting with 180-deg sharp returns. Isoflux is applied to each duct wall and periodic conditions are used between the entrance and exit of a typical two-pass module. Emphasis is placed on the phenomenon of buoyancy-driven reversed flow in the serpentine duct. Predictions reveal that the radial distance from the rotational axis to the location of flow separation in the radial-outward duct decreases with increasing the Richardson number. In addition, the local buoyancy that is required to yield the radial flow reversal increases with increasing the rotation number. This buoyancy-driven reversed flow in the radial-outward duct always results in local hot spots in the cooling channels. The critical buoyancy for the initiation of flow reversal is therefore concluded for the design purpose.

  15. Descending aortic flow reversal in obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anupama K; Radhakrishnan, Sitaraman; Iyer, Krishna S

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we present the case of a neonate with obstructed infracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous connection with severe pulmonary hypertension and a patent ductus arteriosus with right-to-left shunting. The patient had an unusual finding of pandiastolic flow reversal in the upper descending thoracic aorta. He underwent emergency surgical re-routing of the pulmonary veins to the left atrium, and postoperative echocardiography showed disappearance of the descending aortic flow reversal. We hypothesise that in severely obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection the left ventricular output may be extremely low, resulting in flow reversal in the descending aorta. PMID:27055647

  16. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Electroosmotic Membrane Micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuli; Miao, Jianying; Wang, Ning; Sheng, Ping

    2008-03-01

    Electroosmotic (EO) effect means fluid flow (through a porous medium) induced by an applied electric field E. EO pumps have the advantages of no moving parts and easily-controlled accurate flow rate at low applied voltages. We have fabricated nano-channel EO membrane pumps using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) as the template [1]. The diameter of the uniform-sized nanochannels can range from 60-300nm, with a membrane thickness of 30-100 microns. The EO effect is enhanced by coating the nano-channels with silica. By using de-ionized water, the nanopump performance is shown to agree reasonably well with the theoretical model, with factors such as the ratio of the double layer thickness to channel diameter, channel geometry, and treatment of the AAO membranes playing important roles. With silica coating to the nanochannels, the nanopump can produce a maximum pressure of 1 atm and a maximum flow rate of 86,000μL/min.cm2 under an applied field of 0.94 V/μm. Besides DI water, the micropumps have also been tested to work well with salt, acid or base solution. [1] J.Y. Miao, Z.L. Xu, X.Y. Zhang, N. Wang, Z.Y. Yang, P. Sheng, submitted to Advanced Materials (Appeared online: 10.1002/adma.200700767).

  17. Electro-Osmotic Remediation of Fine-Grained Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N.J.; McNab, W.W.; Wildenschild, D.; Ruiz, R.; Elsholz, A.

    1999-11-22

    The coupled-flow phenomenon, electro-osmosis, whereby water flow results from an applied electrical potential gradient, is being used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to induce water flow through deep (25-40 meters below surface) fine-grained sediments. The scoping work described here lays the groundwork for implementation of this technology to remediate solvent-contaminated clayey zones at the LLNL site. The electro-osmotic conductivity (k{sub e}) measured in-situ between two 37 m deep wells, 3 m apart of 2.3 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V is in good agreement with the value determined from bench-top studies on the core extracted from one of the wells of 0.94 {+-} 0.29 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V. Hydraulic conductivity (k{sub h}) of the same core is measured to be 2.03 {+-} 0.36 x 10{sup -10} m/s. Thus, a voltage gradient of 1 V/cm produces an effective hydraulic conductivity of {approx}1 x 10{sup -7} m/s; an increase in conductivity of nearly three orders of magnitude.

  18. Analysis of HRCT-derived xylem network reveals reverse flow in some vessels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric F; Matthews, Mark A; McElrone, Andrew J; Phillips, Ronald J; Shackel, Kenneth A; Brodersen, Craig R

    2013-09-21

    Long distance water and nutrient transport in plants is dependent on the proper functioning of xylem networks, a series of interconnected pipe-like cells that are vulnerable to hydraulic dysfunction as a result of drought-induced embolism and/or xylem-dwelling pathogens. Here, flow in xylem vessels was modeled to determine the role of vessel connectivity by using three dimensional xylem networks derived from High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) images of grapevine (Vitis vinifera cv. 'Chardonnay') stems. Flow in 4-27% of the vessel segments (i.e. any section of vessel elements between connection points associated with intervessel pits) was found to be oriented in the direction opposite to the bulk flow under normal transpiration conditions. In order for the flow in a segment to be in the reverse direction, specific requirements were determined for the location of connections, distribution of vessel endings, diameters of the connected vessels, and the conductivity of the connections. Increasing connectivity and decreasing vessel length yielded increasing numbers of reverse flow segments until a maximum value was reached, after which more interconnected networks and smaller average vessel lengths yielded a decrease in the number of reverse flow segments. Xylem vessel relays also encouraged the formation of reverse flow segments. Based on the calculated flow rates in the xylem network, the downward spread of Xylella fastidiosa bacteria in grape stems was modeled, and reverse flow was shown to be an additional mechanism for the movement of bacteria to the trunk of grapevine. PMID:23743143

  19. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices.

  20. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices. PMID:26687638

  1. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices. PMID:26687638

  2. Transition zone dynamics in combined isotachophoretic and electro-osmotic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönfeld, Friedhelm; Goet, Gabriele; Baier, Tobias; Hardt, Steffen

    2009-09-01

    The present study focuses on the interplay of isotachophoresis (ITP) and electro-osmotic flow (EOF). While EOF is commonly suppressed in ITP applications, we investigate scenarios of the combination of both EOF and ITP. Experimental results of ITP/EOF experiments within cross-patterned polymer chips show characteristic deformations of fluorescent sample zones sandwiched between leading and trailing electrolytes. A changing curvature of the deformation is observed during ITP/EOF runs, but overall a well defined sample segment is maintained after a transport over a few centimeters. By means of numerical modeling we study the deformation attributed to the mismatch of EOF between leading and trailing electrolytes. The model results are found to qualitatively agree with our experimental findings. We introduce the ratio of the EOF velocities in the leading and trailing electrolyte, expressed via the respective mobilities, as a dimensionless parameter γ and show that in the case where electro-osmotically induced convection dominates over electromigration the deformation width scales as 1-γ. In particular, we find that the EOF-induced dispersion virtually vanishes for the case γ =1. Hence, in this particular case isotachophoretic self-sharpening and electro-osmotic pumping can be combined without any detrimental effects on sample transport even for large EOF velocities.

  3. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2002-03-14

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is a well-studied model solute in membrane filtration known for its fouling and concentration polarization capabilities. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using BSA solution as feed show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. The flux enhancement is dramatic (by an order of magnitude) with increased feed concentration and operating transmembrane pressure.

  4. Unsteady aerodynamics of reverse flow dynamic stall on an oscillating blade section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew H.; Jones, Anya R.

    2016-07-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed on a sinusoidally oscillating NACA 0012 blade section in reverse flow. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry and unsteady surface pressure measurements were used to characterize the evolution of reverse flow dynamic stall and its sensitivity to pitch and flow parameters. The effects of a sharp aerodynamic leading edge on the fundamental flow physics of reverse flow dynamic stall are explored in depth. Reynolds number was varied up to Re = 5 × 105, reduced frequency was varied up to k = 0.511, mean pitch angle was varied up to 15∘, and two pitch amplitudes of 5∘ and 10∘ were studied. It was found that reverse flow dynamic stall of the NACA 0012 airfoil is weakly sensitive to the Reynolds numbers tested due to flow separation at the sharp aerodynamic leading edge. Reduced frequency strongly affects the onset and persistence of dynamic stall vortices. The type of dynamic stall observed (i.e., number of vortex structures) increases with a decrease in reduced frequency and increase in maximum pitch angle. The characterization and parameter sensitivity of reverse flow dynamic stall given in the present work will enable the development of a physics-based analytical model of this unsteady aerodynamic phenomenon.

  5. Fast three dimensional ac electro-osmotic pumps with nonphotolithographic electrode patterning

    PubMed Central

    Senousy, Y. M.; Harnett, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) stepped electrodes dramatically improve the flow rate and frequency range of ac electro-osmotic pumps, compared to planar electrodes. However, the fabrication of 3D stepped electrodes for ac electro-osmosis (ACEO) pumps usually involves several processing steps. This paper demonstrates results from ACEO pumps produced by a faster and less expensive method to fabricate the 3D electrodes—extending the previous work to disposable devices. The method is based on shadowed evaporation of metal on an insulating substrate that can be injection molded. Flow velocities through the 3D ACEO pump are similar to those seen in the previous work. PMID:20697462

  6. Flow reversal and heat transfer of fully developed mixed convection in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chin-Hsiang; Kou, Hong-Sen; Huang, Wen-Hsiung

    1990-07-01

    The present analysis is concerned with flow reversal phenomena and heat transfer characteristics of the fully developed laminar combined free and forced convection in the heated vertical channels. Three fundamental combinations of thermal boundary conditions on the respective wall surface (namely isoflux-isoflux, isoflux-isothermal, and isothermal-isothermal) are considered separately so as to investigate extensively their distinct influence on the flow pattern. Results of the velocity distribution and temperature distribution as well as the Nusselt number in terms of bulk mean temperature are carried out. Based on the analytical solutions obtained, flow reversal adjacent to the relatively colder wall is found to exist within the channel as Re/Gr is below a threshold value related to the thermal boundary conditions. Parameter zones for the occurrence of reversed flow are presented. Comparisons and verification are made using the existing numerical solutions at locations far downstream of developing flow.

  7. Asymmetrical reverse vortex flow due to induced-charge electro-osmosis around carbon stacking structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2011-05-01

    Broken symmetry of vortices due to induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) around stacking structures is important for the generation of a large net flow in a microchannel. Following theoretical predictions in our previous study, we herein report experimental observations of asymmetrical reverse vortex flows around stacking structures of carbon posts with a large height (~110 μm) in water, prepared by the pyrolysis of a photoresist film in a reducing gas. Further, by the use of a coupled calculation method that considers boundary effects precisely, the experimental results, except for the problem of anomalous flow reversal, are successfully explained. That is, unlike previous predictions, the precise calculations here show that stacking structures accelerate a reverse flow rather than suppressing it for a microfluidic channel because of the deformation of electric fields near the stacking portions; these structures can also generate a large net flow theoretically in the direction opposite that of a previous prediction for a standard vortex flow. Furthermore, by solving the one-dimensional Poisson-Nernst-Plank (PNP) equations in the presence of ac electric fields, we find that the anomalous flow reversal occurs by the phase retardation between the induced diffuse charge and the tangential electric field. In addition, we successfully explain the nonlinearity of the flow velocity on the applied voltage by the PNP analysis. In the future, we expect to improve the pumping performance significantly by using stacking structures of conductive posts along with a low-cost process.

  8. Performance characteristics of plane-wall venturi-like reverse flow diverters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Counce, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of plane-wall venturi-like reverse flow diverters (RFD) are presented. In general, the flow characteristics of the RFD are reasonably well predicted by the mathematical model of the RFD, although a divergence between theory and data is observed for the output characteristics in the reverse flow mode as the output impedance is reduced. Overall, the performance of these devices indicates their usefulness in fluid control and fluid power systems, such as displacement pumping systems.

  9. Real-time Assessment of Flow Reversal in an Eccentric Arterial Stenotic Model

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Lisong; Zhang, Lequan; Dai, Wangde; Hu, Changhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2010-01-01

    Plaque rupture is the leading cause of acute coronary syndromes and stroke. Plaque formation, or otherwise known as stenosis, preferentially occurs in the regions of arterial bifurcation or curvatures. To date, real-time assessment of stenosis-induced flow reversal remains a clinical challenge. By interfacing Micro-electro-mechanical Systems (MEMS) thermal sensors with the high frequency Pulsed Wave (PW) Doppler ultrasound, we proposed to assess flow reversal in the presence of an eccentric stenosis. We developed a 3-D stenotic model (inner diameter of 6 mm, an eccentric stenosis with a height of 2.75mm and width of 21 mm) simulating a superficial arterial vessel. We demonstrated that heat transfer from the sensing element (2 × 80 μm) to the flow field peaked as a function of flow rates at the throat of the stenosis alone the center/midline of arterial model, and dropped downstream from the stenosis where flow reversal was detected by the high frequency ultrasound device at 45 MHz. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were in agreement with the ultrasound-acquired flow profiles upstream, downstream, and at the throat of the stenosis. Hence, we characterized regions of eccentric stenosis in terms of changes in heat transfer alone the midline of vessel and identified points of flow reversal with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:20655537

  10. Avalanches, breathers, and flow reversal in a continuous Lorenz-96 model.

    PubMed

    Blender, R; Wouters, J; Lucarini, V

    2013-07-01

    For the discrete model suggested by Lorenz in 1996, a one-dimensional long-wave approximation with nonlinear excitation and diffusion is derived. The model is energy conserving but non-Hamiltonian. In a low-order truncation, weak external forcing of the zonal mean flow induces avalanchelike breather solutions which cause reversal of the mean flow by a wave-mean flow interaction. The mechanism is an outburst-recharge process similar to avalanches in a sandpile model. PMID:23944570

  11. Is a high-latitude, second, reversed meridional flow cell the Sun's common choice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, M.

    2012-04-01

    Observations of surface Doppler meridional flow show that a high-latitude, reversed (equatorward) meridional flow cell, along with a poleward primary flow-cell, occurred during cycles 20, 21 and 22. The reversed cell vanished during most of cycle 23, but is reappearing in the current cycle 24. We explore theoretically what the Sun's natural choice of polar-region flow can be. We build a hydrodynamical model for computing and understanding the Sun's large-scale high latitude flows that includes Coriolis forces, turbulent diffusion of momentum and gyroscopic pumping. We solve for the meridional flow in a spherical 'polar cap' with a boundary at about 60-degree latitude. We find that there always exists at least one node in the latitudinal flow profile if the turbulent viscosity in the Sun's convection zone is 1010 to 1015 cm2 s-1. The Sun's turbulent viscosity is generally thought to be in the range of 1012 - 1013 cm2 s-1. For certain combinations of turbulent viscosity values and flow-speeds at the polar-cap boundary, our model exhibits 'node merging', producing only one flow-cell going all the way to the pole from the equator. These results suggest that it is more natural for the Sun to have one or more high-latitude reversed cells, but occasionally a single, unusually long primary cell, as was observed in cycle 23.

  12. A fast way to make a monolithic column for a high pressure electroosmotic pump.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Zhang, Feifang; Yang, Bingcheng; Liang, Xinmiao

    2010-01-01

    A simple way was proposed to make a monolithic column for a high pressure electroosmotic pump (EOP). It is in-situ synthesized inside the silica capillary from potassium silicate solution and no frit is required. Compared with common approaches to make columns for EOP, the present method is robust and fast (<4 h). For pure water, a stand-alone EOP operated at 15 kV applied voltage is capable of generating a flow rate of 3.1 microL/min and a maximum static pressure of approximately 5.4 MPa. PMID:20702950

  13. An enzyme-based reversible CNOT logic gate realized in a flow system.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Fiona; Halámek, Jan; Kramer, Friederike; Poghossian, Arshak; Schöning, Michael J; Katz, Evgeny

    2014-04-21

    An enzyme system organized in a flow device was used to mimic a reversible Controlled NOT (CNOT) gate with two input and two output signals. Reversible conversion of NAD(+) and NADH cofactors was used to perform a XOR logic operation, while biocatalytic hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate resulted in an Identity operation working in parallel. The first biomolecular realization of a CNOT gate is promising for integration into complex biomolecular networks and future biosensor/biomedical applications. PMID:24603754

  14. Electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetically driven microfluidic devices are usually used to analyze and process biofluids which can be classified as non-Newtonian fluids. Conventional electrokinetic theories resulting from Newtonian hydrodynamics then fail to describe the behaviors of these fluids. In this study, a theoretical analysis of electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids is reported. The general Cauchy momentum equation is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy–Chapman solution to the Poisson–Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then a nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the electro-osmotic velocity of Carreau fluids is obtained and solved numerically. The effects of the Weissenberg number (Wi), the surface zeta potential (ψ¯s), the power-law exponent(n), and the transitional parameter (β) on electro-osmotic mobility are examined. It is shown that the results presented in this study for the electro-osmotic mobility of Carreau fluids are quite general so that the electro-osmotic mobility for the Newtonian fluids and the power-law fluids can be obtained as two limiting cases. PMID:21503161

  15. Reverse Kebab Structure Formed inside Carbon Nanofibers via Nanochannel Flow.

    PubMed

    Nie, Min; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Fisher, Frank T

    2015-09-15

    The morphology of polymers inside a confined space has raised great interest in recent years. However, polymer crystallization within a one-dimensional carbon nanostructure is challenging due to the difficulty of polar solvents carrying polymers to enter a nonpolar graphitic nanotube in bulk solution at normal temperature and pressure. Here we describe a method whereby nylon-11 was crystallized and periodically distributed on the individual graphitic nanocone structure within hollow carbon nanofibers (CNF). Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction indicate that the nylon polymer is in the crystalline phase. A mechanism is suggested for the initiation of nanochannel flow in a bulk solvent as a prerequisite condition to achieve interior polymer crystallization. Selective etching of polymer crystals on the outer wall of CNF indicates that both surface tension and viscosity affect the flow within the CNF. This approach provides an opportunity for the interior functionalization of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for applications in the biomedical, energy, and related fields. PMID:26313253

  16. On the reverse flow ceiling jet in pool fire-ventilation crossflow interactions in a simulated aircraft cabin interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwack, E. Y.; Bankston, C. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of the reverse flow ceiling jet against the ventilation flow from 0.58 to 0.87 m/s was investigated in a 1/3 scale model of a wide body aircraft interior. For all tests, strong reverse-flow ceiling jets of hot gases were detected well upstream of the fire. Both thicknesses of the reverse-flow ceiling jet and the smoke layer increased with the fire-crossflow parameter. The thickness of the smoke layer where the smoke flows along the main flow below the reverse-flow ceiling jet was almost twice that of the reverse-flow ceiling jet. Detailed spatial and time-varying temperatures of the gas in the test section were measured, and velocity profiles were also measured using a temperature compensated hot film.

  17. Structural and temporal requirements for geomagnetic field reversal deduced from lava flows.

    PubMed

    Singer, Brad S; Hoffman, Kenneth A; Coe, Robert S; Brown, Laurie L; Jicha, Brian R; Pringle, Malcolm S; Chauvin, Annick

    2005-03-31

    Reversals of the Earth's magnetic field reflect changes in the geodynamo--flow within the outer core--that generates the field. Constraining core processes or mantle properties that induce or modulate reversals requires knowing the timing and morphology of field changes that precede and accompany these reversals. But the short duration of transitional field states and fragmentary nature of even the best palaeomagnetic records make it difficult to provide a timeline for the reversal process. 40Ar/39Ar dating of lavas on Tahiti, long thought to record the primary part of the most recent 'Matuyama-Brunhes' reversal, gives an age of 795 +/- 7 kyr, indistinguishable from that of lavas in Chile and La Palma that record a transition in the Earth's magnetic field, but older than the accepted age for the reversal. Only the 'transitional' lavas on Maui and one from La Palma (dated at 776 +/- 2 kyr), agree with the astronomical age for the reversal. Here we propose that the older lavas record the onset of a geodynamo process, which only on occasion would result in polarity change. This initial instability, associated with the first of two decreases in field intensity, began approximately 18 kyr before the actual polarity switch. These data support the claim that complete reversals require a significant period for magnetic flux to escape from the solid inner core and sufficiently weaken its stabilizing effect. PMID:15800621

  18. Direct and reverse pollen-mediated gene flow between GM rice and red rice weed

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, X.; Esteban, R.; Peñas, G.; Català, M. M.; Melé, E.; Messeguer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Potential risks of genetically modified (GM) crops must be identified before their commercialization, as happens with all new technologies. One of the major concerns is the proper risk assessment of adventitious presence of transgenic material in rice fields due to cross-pollination. Several studies have been conducted in order to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) to both conventional rice and red rice weed (O. sativa f. spontanea) under field conditions. Some of these studies reported GM pollen-donor rice transferring GM traits to red rice. However, gene flow also occurs in the opposite direction, in a phenomenon that we have called reverse gene flow, resulting in transgenic seeds that have incorporated the traits of wild red rice. We quantified reverse gene flow using material from two field trials. A molecular analysis based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms was carried out, being complemented with a phenotypic identification of red rice traits. In both field trials, the reverse gene flow detected was greater than the direct gene flow. The rate of direct gene flow varied according to the relative proportions of the donor (GM rice) and receptor (red rice) plants and was influenced by wind direction. The ecological impact of reverse gene flow is limited in comparison with that of direct gene flow because non-shattered and non-dormant seeds would be obtained in the first generation. Hybrid seed would remain in the spike and therefore most of it would be removed during harvesting. Nevertheless, this phenomenon must be considered in fields used for elite seed production and in developing countries where farmers often keep some seed for planting the following year. In these cases, there is a higher risk of GM red rice weed infestation increasing from year to year and therefore a proper monitoring plan needs to be established.

  19. Dynamic Deformation and Recovery Response of Red Blood Cells to a Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow: Effects of Frequency of Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow and Shear Stress Level

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic deformation and recovery responses of red blood cells (RBCs) to a cyclically reversing shear flow generated in a 30-μm clearance, with the peak shear stress of 53, 108, 161, and 274 Pa at the frequency of 1, 2, 3, and 5 Hz, respectively, were studied. The RBCs' time-varying velocity varied after the glass plate velocity without any time lag, whereas the L/W change, where L and W were the major and minor axes of RBCs' ellipsoidal shape, exhibited a rapid increase and gradual decay during the deformation and recovery phase. The time of minimum L/W occurrence lagged behind the zero-velocity time of the glass plate (zero stress), and the delay time normalized to the one-cycle duration remained constant at 8.0%. The elongation of RBCs at zero stress time became larger with the reversing frequency. A simple mechanical model consisting of an elastic linear element during a rapid elongation period and a parallel combination of elements such as a spring and dashpot during the nonlinear recovery phase was suggested. The dynamic response behavior of RBCs under a cyclically reversing shear flow was different from the conventional shape change where a steplike force was applied to and completely released from the RBCs. PMID:16766612

  20. Blood-clotting-inspired reversible polymer-colloid composite assembly in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsieh; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Huck, Volker; Angerer, Jennifer I.; Reininger, Armin J.; Schneider, Stefan W.; Schneider, Matthias F.; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Blood clotting is a process by which a haemostatic plug is assembled at the site of injury. The formation of such a plug, which is essentially a (bio)polymer-colloid composite, is believed to be driven by shear flow in its initial phase, and contrary to our intuition, its assembly is enhanced under stronger flowing conditions. Here, inspired by blood clotting, we show that polymer-colloid composite assembly in shear flow is a universal process that can be tailored to obtain different types of aggregates including loose and dense aggregates, as well as hydrodynamically induced ‘log’-type aggregates. The process is highly controllable and reversible, depending mostly on the shear rate and the strength of the polymer-colloidbinding potential. Our results have important implications for the assembly of polymer-colloid composites, an important challenge of immense technological relevance. Furthermore, flow-driven reversible composite formation represents a new paradigm in non-equilibrium self-assembly.

  1. Flow reversal of fully developed double diffusive mixed convection in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhatar, Nur Asiah Mohd; Saleh, Habibis; Hashim, Ishak

    2015-10-01

    The mixed convection flow within a vertical channel having internal heat generation at a rate proportional to a power of the temperature difference is considered. The analysis is concerning the studies of occurrence of flow reversal and the effects of three dimensionless parameters, identified as the internal heat parameter (G), a mixed convection parameter (λ) and the exponent (p) in the local heating term on the fully developed double diffusive mixed convection flow in a vertical channel. The governing equations are solved numerically via MAPLE. It was found that flow reversal occurs with larger values of internal heat parameter and mixed convection parameter, but smaller values of local-heating exponent. They also show that, unlike the internal heat parameter and the local-heating exponent, the mixed convection parameter do not give any significant effect on the temperature.

  2. Reversing Flows and Heat Spike: Caused by Solar g-Modes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Wolff, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    The Quasi Biennial Oscillation in the Earth s upper atmosphere has an analog deep inside the Sun. As on Earth, the flow is east or west, it is at low latitude, and it reverses direction in a roughly periodic manner. The period in the solar case is 1.3 years. It was detected using solar oscillations similar to the way earthquakes are used to study the Earth's interior. But its cause was not known. We showed that global oscillations (g-modes) can supply enough angular momentum to drive zonal flows with the observed reversal period. This required a calculation of wave dissipation rates inside each flow and in the turbulent layer that separates any two flows of opposite sign. Heat that this process leaves behind causes a thermal spike inside the Sun at the same depth. This may explain an anomaly in observed sound speed that has had no sure explanation.

  3. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-09-22

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

  4. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1998-01-01

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

  5. Electroosmotic Trap Against the Electrophoretic Force Near a Protein Nanopore Reveals Peptide Dynamics During Capture and Translocation.

    PubMed

    Asandei, Alina; Schiopu, Irina; Chinappi, Mauro; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung; Luchian, Tudor

    2016-05-25

    We report on the ability to control the dynamics of a single peptide capture and passage across a voltage-biased, α-hemolysin nanopore (α-HL), under conditions that the electroosmotic force exerted on the analyte dominates the electrophoretic transport. We demonstrate that by extending outside the nanopore, the electroosmotic force is able to capture a peptide at either the lumen or vestibule entry of the nanopore, and transiently traps it inside the nanopore, against the electrophoretic force. Statistical analysis of the resolvable dwell-times of a metastable trapped peptide, as it occupies either the β-barrel or vestibule domain of the α-HL nanopore, reveals rich kinetic details regarding the direction and rates of stochastic movement of a peptide inside the nanopore. The presented approach demonstrates the ability to shuttle and study molecules along the passage pathway inside the nanopore, allows to identify the mesoscopic trajectory of a peptide exiting the nanopore through either the vestibule or β-barrel moiety, thus providing convincing proof of a molecule translocating the pore. The kinetic analysis of a peptide fluctuating between various microstates inside the nanopore, enabled a detailed picture of the free energy description of its interaction with the α-HL nanopore. When studied at the limit of vanishingly low transmembrane potentials, this provided a thermodynamic description of peptide reversible binding to and within the α-HL nanopore, under equilibrium conditions devoid of electric and electroosmotic contributions. PMID:27159806

  6. A 3D model of a reverse vortex flow gliding arc reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchev, G.; Kolev, St.; Bogaerts, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this computational study, a gliding arc plasma reactor with a reverse-vortex flow stabilization is modelled for the first time by a fluid plasma description. The plasma reactor operates with argon gas at atmospheric pressure. The gas flow is simulated using the k-ε Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes turbulent model. A quasi-neutral fluid plasma model is used for computing the plasma properties. The plasma arc movement in the reactor is observed, and the results for the gas flow, electrical characteristics, plasma density, electron temperature, and gas temperature are analyzed.

  7. Performance of a low-pressure fan stage with reverse flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.; Lewis, G. W., Jr.; Tysl, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    The reverse flow aerodynamic performance of a 51-centimeter-diameter fan stage is presented. The stage was tested with the variable pitch rotor blades set through feather at -75 deg, -80 deg, and -85 deg from design setting angle. Of the three tested the stage with the rotor blades set at -75 deg exhibited the highest pressure ratio and highest flow. For all three configurations, there was little or no flow in the inner third of the exit passage due to the rotor blade being almost perpendicular to the axial direction in the hub region.

  8. Modeling the Material Flow and Heat Transfer in Reverse Dual-Rotation Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Wu, C. S.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    Reverse dual-rotation friction stir welding (RDR-FSW) is a novel modification of conventional friction stir welding (FSW) process. During the RDR-FSW process, the tool pin and the assisted shoulder are separated and rotate with opposite direction independently, so that there are two material flows with reverse direction. The material flow and heat transfer in RDR-FSW have significant effects on the microstructure and properties of the weld joint. A 3D model is developed to quantitatively analyze the effects of the separated tool pin and the assisted shoulder which rotate in reverse direction on the material flow and heat transfer during RDR-FSW process. Numerical simulation is conducted to predict the temperature profile, material flow field, streamlines, strain rate, and viscosity distributions near the tool. The calculated results show that as the rotation speed of the tool pin increases, the temperature near the tool gets higher, the zone with higher temperature expands, and approximately symmetric temperature distribution is obtained near the tool. Along the workpiece thickness direction, the calculated material flow velocity and its layer thickness near the tool get lowered because the effect of the shoulder is weakened as the distance away from the top surface increases. The model is validated by comparing the predicted values of peak temperature at some typical locations with the experimentally measured ones.

  9. Seasonal Reversals of Groundwater Flow Around Lakes and the Relevance to Stagnation Points and Lake Budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mary P.; Munter, James A.

    1981-08-01

    Several researchers have observed seasonal reversals in the direction of groundwater flow around lakes. If these reversals are prolonged and are accompanied by the formation of a stagnation point, they may have a significant effect on a lake's water and nutrient budgets. The formation of a stagnation point at a flow-through lake (i.e., a lake that receives groundwater through part of the lake basin and recharges the groundwater system over the rest of the lake basin) is accomplished by the formation of a groundwater mound on the downgradient side of the lake. In this paper the seasonal formation of a stagnation point at Snake Lake, Wisconsin, is investigated with the aid of two-dimensional transient computer models applied in cross section and areally. The analysis demonstrates the potential for the seasonal formation of a stagnation point at a flow-through lake and provides some insight into the transient development of the stagnation point.

  10. An experimental study of static and oscillating rotor blade sections in reverse flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew Hume

    The rotorcraft community has a growing interest in the development of high-speed helicopters to replace outdated fleets. One barrier to the design of such helicopters is the lack of understanding of the aerodynamic behavior of retreating rotor blades in the reverse flow region. This work considers two fundamental models of this complex unsteady flow regime: static and oscillating (i.e., pitching) airfoils in reverse flow. Wind tunnel tests have been performed at the University of Maryland (UMD) and the United States Naval Academy (USNA). Four rotor blade sections are considered: two featuring a sharp geometric trailing edge (NACA 0012 and NACA 0024) and two featuring a blunt geometric trailing edge (ellipse and cambered ellipse). Static airfoil experiments were performed at angles of attack through 180 deg and Reynolds numbers up to one million, representative of the conditions found in the reverse flow region of a full-scale high-speed helicopter. Time-resolved velocity field measurements were used to identify three unsteady flow regimes: slender body vortex shedding, turbulent wake, and deep stall vortex shedding. Unsteady airloads were measured in these three regimes using unsteady pressure transducers. The magnitude of the unsteady airloads is high in the turbulent wake regime when the separated shear layer is close to the airfoil surface and in deep stall due to periodic vortex-induced flow. Oscillating airfoil experiments were performed on a NACA 0012 and cambered ellipse to investigate reverse flow dynamic stall characteristics by modeling cyclic pitching kinematics. The parameter space spanned three Reynolds numbers (165,000; 330,000; and 500,000), five reduced frequencies between 0.100 and 0.511, three mean pitch angles (5,10, and 15 deg), and two pitch amplitudes (5 deg and 10 deg). The sharp aerodynamic leading edge of the NACA 0012 airfoil forces flow separation resulting in deep dynamic stall. The number of associated vortex structures depends strongly

  11. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Andrew J; Dubief, Yves; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Danforth, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth's weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA) methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF) to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction. PMID:26849061

  12. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Andrew J.; Dubief, Yves; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Danforth, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth’s weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA) methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF) to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction. PMID:26849061

  13. Reversed portal flow: Clinical influence on the long-term outcomes in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takayuki; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Sekimoto, Tadashi; Shimada, Taro; Takahashi, Masanori; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the natural history and the longitudinal outcomes in cirrhotic patients with non-forward portal flow (NFPF). METHODS: The present retrospective study consisted of 222 cirrhotic patients (120 males and 102 females; age, 61.7 ± 11.1 years). The portal hemodynamics were evaluated at baseline and during the observation period using both pulsed and color Doppler ultrasonography. The diameter (mm), flow direction, mean flow velocity (cm/s), and mean flow volume (mL/min) were assessed at the portal trunk, the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein, and the collateral vessels. The average values from 2 to 4 measurements were used for the data analysis. The portal flow direction was defined as follows: forward portal flow (FPF) for continuous hepatopetal flow; bidirectional flow for to-and-fro flow; and reversed flow for continuous hepatofugal flow. The bidirectional flow and the reversed flow were classified as NFPF in this study. The clinical findings and prognosis were compared between the patients with FPF and those with NFPF. The median follow-up period was 40.9 mo (range, 0.3-156.5 mo). RESULTS: Twenty-four patients (10.8%) demonstrated NFPF, accompanied by lower albumin level, worse Child-Pugh scores, and model for end-stage liver disease scores. The portal hemodynamic features in the patients with NFPF were smaller diameter of the portal trunk; presence of short gastric vein, splenorenal shunt, or inferior mesenteric vein; and advanced collateral vessels (diameter > 8.7 mm, flow velocity > 10.2 cm/s, and flow volume > 310 mL/min). The cumulative incidence rates of NFPF were 6.5% at 1 year, 14.5% at 3 years, and 23.1% at 5 years. The collateral vessels characterized by flow velocity > 9.5 cm/s and those located at the splenic hilum were significant predictive factors for developing NFPF. The cumulative survival rate was significantly lower in the patients with NFPF (72.2% at 1 year, 38.5% at 3 years, 38.5% at 5 years) than in those with forward

  14. Kinetic Stress as a Flow Driver in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lin, L.; Bergerson, W. F.; Almagri, A.; den Hartog, D. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.

    2011-10-01

    Self-generated or intrinsic parallel flows are routinely observed in the MST RFP where flow parallel to equilibrium magnetic field reverses sign at mid-radius. In the absence of external torque, the intrinsic flow may arise from residual stresses. Kinetic stress, the correlated product of parallel pressure and radial magnetic field fluctuations, has been measured by using a high-speed polarimetry-interferometry diagnostic (for both radial magnetic field and density fluctuations). Away from the sawtooth crash, it is found that the measured kinetic stress has the finite amplitude comparable to the change of flow in the core. This indicates that kinetic stress plays an important role in self-generated flow in high-temperature RFP plasmas. Work supported by US DOE and NSF.

  15. Properties of spikelike shear flow reversals observed in the auroral plasma by Atmosphere Explorer C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Lennartsson, W.; Hanson, W. B.; Heelis, R. A.; Hoffman, J. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A study of the characteristics of pairs of oppositely directed spikes in ionospheric convection velocities (or shear flow reversals), as first described by Gurnett, has been conducted by using data from Atmosphere Explorer C. These phenomena tend to occur near the large-scale reversal from sunward to antisunward convection on the nightside of the earth. Generally, the spikelike shear flow reversals involve electric field components along the spacecraft orbit that are directed toward the region between them, in which inverted V type electron precipitation is observed. This relationship between the electron precipitation and the electric field spikes is consistent with an upward-flowing field-aligned current that is fed by Pedersen currents from the adjacent regions of strong convection. In one case a divergent equivalent electric field structure was observed, that is, with the spikelike electric fields pointing away from the region in between, which in this case exhibited a sharp electron flux dropout. This opposite configuration may be an example of counterparts to inverted V structures existing in regions of downward-flowing field-aligned currents.

  16. Electro-osmotic fluxes in multi-well electro-remediation processes.

    PubMed

    López-Vizcaíno, Rubén; Sáez, Cristina; Mena, Esperanza; Villaseñor, Jose; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, electrokinetic techniques on a laboratory scale have been studied but few applications have been assessed at full-scale. In this work, a mock-up plant with two rows of three electrodes positioned in semipermeable electrolyte wells has been used to study the electro-osmotic flux distribution. Water accumulated in the cathodic wells when an electric voltage gradient was applied between the two electrode-well rows. Likewise, slight differences in the water flux were observed depending on the position and number of electrodes used and on the voltage gradient applied. Results show that the electro-osmotic flow did not increase proportionally with the number of electrodes used. During the start-up of the study, there was an abrupt change in the current density, pH and conductivity of the soil portions closest to electrodic wells due to electrokinetic processes. These differences can be explained in terms of the complex current distributions from anode and cathode rows. PMID:22029697

  17. Determination of maximum reactor power level consistent with the requirement that flow reversal occurs without fuel damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D.V.; Darby, J.L.; Ross, S.B.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-04-19

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) operated by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) employs forced downflow for heat removal during normal operation. In the event of total loss of forced flow, the reactor will shutdown and the flow reversal valves open. When the downward core flow becomes sufficiently small then the opposing thermal buoyancy induces flow reversal leading to decay heat removal by natural convection. There is some uncertainty as to whether the natural circulation is adequate for decay heat removal after 60 MW operation. BNL- staff carried out a series of calculations to establish the adequacy of flow reversal to remove decay heat. Their calculations are based on a natural convective CHF model. The primary purpose of the present calculations is to review the accuracy and applicability of Fauske`s CHF model for the HFBR, and the assumptions and methodology employed by BNL-staff to determine the heat removal limit in the HFBR during a flow reversal and natural convection situation.

  18. RELAP5 analyses of two hypothetical flow reversal events for the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents RELAP5 results of two hypothetical, low flow transients analyzed as part of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor safety program. The reactor design features four independent coolant loops (three active and one in standby), each containing a main curculation pump (with battery powered pony motor), heat exchanger, an accumulator, and a check valve. The first transient assumes one of these pumps fails, and additionally, that the check valve in that loop remains stuck in the open position. This accident is considered extremely unlikely. Flow reverses in this loop, reducing the core flow because much of the coolant is diverted from the intact loops back through the failed loop. The second transient examines a 102-mm-diam instantaneous pipe break near the core inlet (the worst break location). A break is assumed to occur 90 s after a total loss-of-offsite power. Core flow reversal occurs because accumulator injection overpowers the diminishing pump flow. Safety margins are evaluated against four thermal limits: T{sub wall}=T{sub sat}, incipient boiling, onset of significant void, and critical heat flux. For the first transient, the results show that these limits are not exceeded (at a 95% non-exceedance probability level) if the pony motor battery lasts 30 minutes (the present design value). For the second transient, the results show that the closest approach of the fuel surface temperature to the local saturation temperature during core flow reversal is about 39{degrees}C. Therefore the fuel remains cool during this transient. Although this work is done specifically for the ANSR geometry and operating conditions, the general conclusions may be applicable to other highly subcooled reactor systems.

  19. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  20. Reverse-flow combustor for small gas turbines with pressure-atomizing fuel injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Mularz, E. J.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    A reverse flow combustor suitable for a small gas turbine (2 to 3 kg/s mass flow) was used to evalute the effect of pressure atomizing fuel injectors on combustor performance. In these tests an experimental combustor was designed to operate with 18 simplex pressure atomizing fuel injectors at sea level takeoff conditions. To improve performance at low power conditions, fuel was redistributed so that only every other injector was operational. Combustor performance, emissions, and liner temperature were compared over a range of pressure and inlet air temperatures corresponding to simulated idle, cruise, and takeoff conditions typical of a 16 to 1 pressure ratio turbine engine.

  1. Reversible Decrease of Portal Venous Flow in Cirrhotic Patients: A Positive Side Effect of Sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Coriat, Romain; Gouya, Hervé; Mir, Olivier; Ropert, Stanislas; Vignaux, Olivier; Chaussade, Stanislas; Sogni, Philippe; Pol, Stanislas; Blanchet, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension, the most important complication with cirrhosis of the liver, is a serious disease. Sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor is validated in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Because angiogenesis is a pathological hallmark of portal hypertension, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of sorafenib on portal venous flow and portosystemic collateral circulation in patients receiving sorafenib therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Porto-collateral circulations were evaluated using a magnetic resonance technique prior sorafenib therapy, and at day 30. All patients under sorafenib therapy had a decrease in portal venous flow of at least 36%. In contrast, no specific change was observed in the azygos vein or the abdominal aorta. No portal venous flow modification was observed in the control group. Sorafenib is the first anti-angiogenic therapy to demonstrate a beneficial and reversible decrease of portal venous flow among cirrhotic patients. PMID:21340026

  2. Experimental investigation of the interaction of a thrust reverser jet with an external subsonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnier, J.-M.; Deckers, K.; Wens, G.

    1993-11-01

    An experimental modelization of a door-type thrust reverser is conducted in a subsonic wind tunnel. The geometry of the model is defined in order to simulate both the internal and external flow of a real thrust reverser. Different door configurations are studied for a selected value of the mass flux injection ratio of three. Visualizations illustrate qualitatively the jet interaction, and extensive mean velocity and pressure measurements are conducted in sections perpendicular to the upstream flow direction with a five hole probe. The total pressure losses and the drag force produced by the thrust reverser are deduced from the measurements. As a result, it shows that the smaller opening angle of the door (56 deg), with a becquet deflection of 15 deg gives the larger drag force. In addition to the classical pair of counter rotating vortices observed in jet in cross flow interactions, a second pair of counter rotating vortices below the main pair is found. The vorticity field is described with good agreement by a simple vortex model simulating the two pairs of vortices.

  3. First Signs of Flow Reversal Within a Separated Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerton, Jared; Lang, Amy

    2015-11-01

    A shark's skin is covered in millions of microscopic scales that have been shown to be able to bristle in a reversing flow. The motive of this project is to further explore a potential bio-inspired passive separation control mechanism which can reduce drag. To better understand this mechanism, a more complete understanding of flow reversal within the turbulent boundary layer is required. In order to capture this phenomenon, water tunnel testing at The University of Alabama was conducted. Using a long flat plate and a rotating cylinder, a large turbulent boundary layer and adverse pressure gradient were generated. Under our testing conditions the boundary layer had a Reynolds number of 200,000 and a boundary layer height in the testing window of 5.6 cm. The adverse pressure gradient causes the viscous length scale to increase and thus increase the size of the individual components of the turbulent boundary layer. This will make the low speed streaks approximately 1 cm in width and thus large enough to measure. Results will be presented that test our hypothesis that the first signs of flow reversal will occur within the section of lowest momentum located furthest from the wall, or within the low speed streaks. This Project was funded by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  4. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q. We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2×10^{3}flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra/Q=10, where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach. PMID:27176392

  5. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q . We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2 ×103flow reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra /Q =10 , where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  6. Reverse capillary flow of condensed water through aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jongju; Jeon, Wonjae; Alam Khan, Fakhre; Lee, Jinkee; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-06-01

    Molecular transport through nanopores has recently received considerable attention as a result of advances in nanofabrication and nanomaterial synthesis technologies. Surprisingly, water transport investigations through carbon nanochannels resulted in two contradicting observations: extremely fast transport or rejection of water molecules. In this paper, we elucidate the mechanism of impeded water vapor transport through the interstitial space of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWCNTs)—capillary condensation, agglomeration, reverse capillary flow, and removal by superhydrophobicity at the tip of the nanotubes. The origin of separation comes from the water’s phase change from gas to liquid, followed by reverse capillary flow. First, the saturation water vapor pressure is decreased in a confined space, which is favorable for the phase change of incoming water vapor into liquid drops. Once continuous water meniscus is formed between the nanotubes by the adsoprtion and agglomeration of water molecules, a high reverse Laplace pressure is induced in the mushroom-shaped liquid meniscus at the entry region of the aligned-MWCNTs. The reverse Laplace pressure can be significantly enhanced by decreasing the pore size. Finally, the droplets pushed backward by the reverse Laplace pressure can be removed by superhydrophobicity at the tip of the aligned-MWCNTs. The analytical analysis was also supported by experiments carried out using 4 mm-long aligned-MWCNTs with different intertube distances. The water rejection rate and the separation factor increased as the intertube distance decreased, resulting in 90% and 10, respectively, at an intertube distance of 4 nm. This mechanism and nanotube membrane may be useful for energy-efficient water vapor separation and dehumidification.

  7. Reversible and irreversible electroporation of cell suspensions flowing through a localized DC electric field.

    PubMed

    Korohoda, Włodzimierz; Grys, Maciej; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2013-03-01

    Experiments on reversible and irreversible cell electroporation were carried out with an experimental setup based on a standard apparatus for horizontal electrophoresis, a syringe pump with regulated cell suspension flow velocity and a dcEF power supply. Cells in suspension flowing through an orifice in a barrier inserted into the electrophoresis apparatus were exposed to defined localized dcEFs in the range of 0-1000 V/cm for a selected duration in the range 10-1000 ms. This method permitted the determination of the viability of irreversibly electroperforated cells. It also showed that the uptake by reversibly electroperforated cells of fluorescent dyes (calcein, carboxyfluorescein, Alexa Fluor 488 Phalloidin), which otherwise do not penetrate cell membranes, was dependent upon the dcEF strength and duration in any given single electrical field exposure. The method yields reproducible results, makes it easy to load large volumes of cell suspensions with membrane non-penetrating substances, and permits the elimination of irreversibly electroporated cells of diameter greater than desired. The results concur with and elaborate on those in earlier reports on cell electroporation in commercially available electroporators. They proved once more that the observed cell perforation does not depend upon the thermal effects of the electric current upon cells. In addition, the method eliminates many of the limitations of commercial electroporators and disposable electroporation chambers. It permits the optimization of conditions in which reversible and irreversible electroporation are separated. Over 90% of reversibly electroporated cells remain viable after one short (less than 400 ms) exposure to the localized dcEF. Experiments were conducted with the AT-2 cancer prostate cell line, human skin fibroblasts and human red blood cells, but they could be run with suspensions of any cell type. It is postulated that the described method could be useful for many purposes in

  8. Method and apparatus for cold gas reinjection in through-flow and reverse-flow wave rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalim, M. Razi (Inventor); Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for cold gas reinjection in through-flow and reverse-flow wave rotors having a plurality of channels formed around a periphery thereof. A first port injects a supply of cool air into the channels. A second port allows the supply of cool air to exit the channels and flow to a combustor. A third port injects a supply of hot gas from the combustor into the channels. A fourth port allows the supply of hot gas to exit the channels and flow to a turbine. A diverting port and a reinjection port are connected to the second and third ports, respectively. The diverting port diverts a portion of the cool air exiting through the second port as reinjection air. The diverting port is fluidly connected to the reinjection port which reinjects the reinjection air back into the channels. The reinjection air evacuates the channels of the hot gas resident therein and cools the channel walls, a pair of end walls of the rotor, ducts communicating with the rotor and subsequent downstream components. In a second embodiment, the second port receives all of the cool air exiting the channels and the diverting port diverts a portion of the cool air just prior to the cool air flowing to the combustor.

  9. Laboratory Investigation of Electro-Osmotic Remediation of Fine-Grained Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N.; Wildenschild, D.; Elsholz, A.

    2000-02-23

    Electro-osmosis, a coupled-flow phenomenon in which an applied electrical potential gradient drives water flow, may be used to induce water flow through fine-grained sediments. We plan to use this technology to remediate chlorinated solvent-contaminated clayey zones at the LLNL site. The electro-osmotic conductivity (k{sub e}) determined from bench-top studies for a core extracted from a sediment zone 36.4-36.6 m below surface was initially 7.37 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s-V, decreasing to 3.44 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s-V, after electro-osmotically transporting 0.70 pore volumes of water through it (195 ml). Hydraulic conductivity (k{sub h}) of the same core was initially measured to be 5.00 x 10{sup -10} m/s, decreasing to 4.08 x 10{sup -10} m/s at the end of processing. This decline in permeability is likely due to formation of a chemical precipitation zone within the core. Water splitting products and ions electromigrate and precipitate within the core; H{sup +} and metal cations migrate toward the cathode, and OH{sup -} from the cathode moves toward the anode. We are now exploring how to minimize this effect using pH control. The significance of this technology is that for this core, a 3 V/cm voltage gradient produced an initial effective hydraulic conductivity of 2.21 x 10{sup -7} m/s, >400x greater than the initial hydraulic conductivity.

  10. Flow reversal in traveling-wave electrokinetics: an analysis of forces due to ionic concentration gradients.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, P; Ramos, A; González, A; Green, N G; Morgan, H

    2009-05-01

    Pumping of electrolytes using ac electric fields from arrays of microelectrodes is a subject of current research. The behavior of fluids at low signal amplitudes (<2-3 V(pp)) is in qualitative agreement with the prediction of the ac electroosmosis theory. At higher voltages, this theory cannot account for the experimental observations. In some cases, net pumping is generated in the direction opposite to that predicted by the theory (flow reversal). In this work, we use fluorescent dyes to study the effect of ionic concentration gradients generated by Faradaic currents. We also evaluate the influence of factors such as the channel height and microelectrode array shape in the pumping of electrolytes with traveling-wave potentials. Induced charge beyond the Debye length is postulated to be responsible for the forces generating the observed flows at higher voltages. Numerical calculations are performed in order to illustrate the mechanisms that might be responsible for generating the flow. PMID:19320476

  11. Plasma flow reversals at the dayside magnetopause and the origin of asymmetric polar cap convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Bame, S. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Events observed in a fast plasma experiment, where the y-component of the plasma flow within the low latitude boundary layer and magnetopause current layer was oppositely directed to that in the adjacent magnetosheath, are examined. The observations are shown to be qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with previous observations of accelerated flows at the magnetopause and with models of magnetic reconnection, with reconnection occurring at low latitudes near the GSE XY plane, independently of the magnitude or the sign of the y-component ot the local magnetosheath magnetic field. Local magnetic shears at the magnetopause for these events (in 60-180 deg range) and the fact that these events occur at low latitudes do not support the antiparallel merging hypothesis. The observations of B(y)-dependent flow reversals demonstrate how the asymmetric polar cap convection and related phenomena, such as the Svalgaard-Mansurov effect, originate in magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause.

  12. Two-dimensional nonlinear cylindrical equilibria with reversed magnetic shear and sheared flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.; Throumoulopoulos

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear translational symmetric equilibria with up to quartic flux terms in free functions, reversed magnetic shear, and sheared flow are constructed in two ways: (i) quasi-analytically by an ansatz, which reduces the pertinent generalized Grad-Shafranov equation to a set of ordinary differential equations and algebraic constraints which is then solved numerically, and (ii) completely numerically by prescribing analytically a boundary having an X-point. This latter case presented in Sec. 4 is relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project. The equilibrium characteristics are then examined by means of pressure, safety factor, current density, and electric field. For flows parallel to the magnetic field, the stability of the equilibria constructed is also examined by applying a sufficient condition. It turns out that the equilibrium nonlinearity has a stabilizing impact, which is slightly enhanced by the sheared flow. In addition, the results indicate that the stability is affected by the up-down asymmetry.

  13. Dilution jet configurations in a reverse flow combustor. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zizelman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of measurements of both temperature and velocity fields within a reverse flow combustor are presented. Flow within the combustor is acted upon by perpendicularly injected cooling jets introduced at three different locations along the inner and outer walls of the combustor. Each experiment is typified by a group of parameters: density ratio, momentum ratio, spacing ratio, and confinement parameter. Measurements of both temperature and velocity are presented in terms of normalized profiles at azimuthal positions through the turn section of the combustion chamber. Jet trajectories defined by minimum temperature and maximum velocity give a qualitative indication of the location of the jet within the cross flow. Results of a model from a previous temperature study are presented in some of the plots of data from this work.

  14. Aortic Blood Flow Reversal Determines Renal Function: Potential Explanation for Renal Dysfunction Caused by Aortic Stiffening in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Aortic stiffness determines the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and predicts the progressive decline of the GFR. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanism remains obscure. Recent evidence has shown a close link between aortic stiffness and the bidirectional (systolic forward and early diastolic reverse) flow characteristics. We hypothesized that the aortic stiffening-induced renal dysfunction is attributable to altered central flow dynamics. In 222 patients with hypertension, Doppler velocity waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio. Tonometric waveforms were recorded to measure the carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities, to estimate the aortic pressure from the radial waveforms, and to compute the aortic characteristic impedance. In addition, renal hemodynamics was evaluated by duplex ultrasound. The estimated GFR was inversely correlated with the aortic pulse wave velocity, reverse/forward flow ratio, pulse pressure, and characteristic impedance, whereas it was not correlated with the peripheral pulse wave velocity or mean arterial pressure. The association between aortic pulse wave velocity and estimated GFR was independent of age, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and antihypertensive medication. However, further adjustment for the aortic reverse/forward flow ratio and pulse pressure substantially weakened this association, and instead, the reverse/forward flow ratio emerged as the strongest determinant of estimated GFR (P=0.001). A higher aortic reverse/forward flow ratio was also associated with lower intrarenal forward flow velocities. These results suggest that an increase in aortic flow reversal (ie, retrograde flow from the descending thoracic aorta toward the aortic arch), caused by aortic stiffening and impedance mismatch, reduces antegrade flow into the kidney and thereby deteriorates renal function. PMID:25916721

  15. Network modeling for reverse flows of end-of-life vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ene, Seval; Öztürk, Nursel

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We developed a network model for reverse flows of end-of-life vehicles. • The model considers all recovery operations for end-of-life vehicles. • A scenario-based model is used for uncertainty to improve real case applications. • The model is adequate to real case applications for end-of-life vehicles recovery. • Considerable insights are gained from the model by sensitivity analyses. - Abstract: Product recovery operations are of critical importance for the automotive industry in complying with environmental regulations concerning end-of-life products management. Manufacturers must take responsibility for their products over the entire life cycle. In this context, there is a need for network design methods for effectively managing recovery operations and waste. The purpose of this study is to develop a mathematical programming model for managing reverse flows in end-of-life vehicles’ recovery network. A reverse flow is the collection of used products from consumers and the transportation of these products for the purpose of recycling, reuse or disposal. The proposed model includes all operations in a product recovery and waste management network for used vehicles and reuse for vehicle parts such as collection, disassembly, refurbishing, processing (shredding), recycling, disposal and reuse of vehicle parts. The scope of the network model is to determine the numbers and locations of facilities in the network and the material flows between these facilities. The results show the performance of the model and its applicability for use in the planning of recovery operations in the automotive industry. The main objective of recovery and waste management is to maximize revenue and minimize pollution in end-of-life product operations. This study shows that with an accurate model, these activities may provide economic benefits and incentives in addition to protecting the environment.

  16. Evidence from lava flows for complex polarity transitions: The new composite Steens Mountain reversal record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarboe, N.A.; Coe, R.S.; Glen, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic polarity transitions may be significantly more complex than are currently depicted in many sedimentary and lava-flow records. By splicing together paleomagnetic results from earlier studies at Steens Mountain with those from three newly studied sections of Oregon Plateau flood basalts at Catlow Peak and Poker Jim Ridge 70-90 km to the southeast and west, respectively, we provide support for this interpretation with the most detailed account of a magnetic field reversal yet observed in volcanic rocks. Forty-five new distinguishable transitional (T) directions together with 30 earlier ones reveal a much more complex and detailed record of the 16.7 Ma reversed (R)-to-normal (N) polarity transition that marks the end of Chron C5Cr. Compared to the earlier R-T-N-T-N reversal record, the new record can be described as R-T-N-T-N-T-R-T-N. The composite record confirms earlier features, adds new west and up directions and an entire large N-T-R-T segment to the path, and fills in directions on the path between earlier directional jumps. Persistent virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) clusters and separate VGPs have a preference for previously described longitudinal bands from transition study compilations, which suggests the presence of features at the core-mantle boundary that influence the flow of core fluid and distribution of magnetic flux. Overall the record is consistent with the generalization that VGP paths vary greatly from reversal to reversal and depend on the location of the observer. Rates of secular variation confirm that the flows comprising these sections were erupted rapidly, with maximum rates estimated to be 85-120 m ka-1 at Catlow and 130-195 m ka-1 at Poker Jim South. Paleomagnetic poles from other studies are combined with 32 non-transitional poles found here to give a clockwise rotation of the Oregon Plateau of 11.4???? 5.6?? with respect to the younger Columbia River Basalt Group flows to the north and 14.5???? 4.6?? with respect to cratonic

  17. Flow behaviour analysis of reversible pump-turbine in "S" characteristic operating zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Shi, Q. H.; Zhang, K. W.

    2012-11-01

    The pumped storage plant undertakes the task for peak regulation, frequency modulation, phase modulation and accident standby in the electric grid system. Since the design consideration of a pumped storage plant is different from the conventional hydropower plant, the "S" shaped characteristic of pump-turbine will appear in four quadrants characteristic curves, and this characteristic will lead to a series of instabilities while the pump-turbine start at low water head. This paper presents the CFD simulation results of a pump-turbine model with the full flow passage which are compared with model test results. Based on the comparison, the hydraulic reason of the "S" shaped characteristic is discussed and a new concept of partial reverse pump is put forward, i.e. the reverse flow at inlet of runner is the real hydraulic cause of "S" shaped characteristic of a pump-turbine when the unit discharge descends to a certain degree. With the decrease of unit discharge, the effect of partial reverse pump becomes more and more obvious, which leads to an increase of head and finally results the "S" shaped characteristic of a pump-turbine.

  18. Network modeling for reverse flows of end-of-life vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ene, Seval; Öztürk, Nursel

    2015-04-01

    Product recovery operations are of critical importance for the automotive industry in complying with environmental regulations concerning end-of-life products management. Manufacturers must take responsibility for their products over the entire life cycle. In this context, there is a need for network design methods for effectively managing recovery operations and waste. The purpose of this study is to develop a mathematical programming model for managing reverse flows in end-of-life vehicles' recovery network. A reverse flow is the collection of used products from consumers and the transportation of these products for the purpose of recycling, reuse or disposal. The proposed model includes all operations in a product recovery and waste management network for used vehicles and reuse for vehicle parts such as collection, disassembly, refurbishing, processing (shredding), recycling, disposal and reuse of vehicle parts. The scope of the network model is to determine the numbers and locations of facilities in the network and the material flows between these facilities. The results show the performance of the model and its applicability for use in the planning of recovery operations in the automotive industry. The main objective of recovery and waste management is to maximize revenue and minimize pollution in end-of-life product operations. This study shows that with an accurate model, these activities may provide economic benefits and incentives in addition to protecting the environment. PMID:25659298

  19. Nanometer-thick lateral polyelectrolyte micropatterns induce macrosopic electro-osmotic chaotic fluid instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessling, M.; Morcillo, L. Garrigós; Abdu, S.

    2014-03-01

    Electro-convective vortices in ion concentration polarization under shear flow have been of practical relevance for desalination processes using electrodialysis. The phenomenon has been scientifically disregarded for decades, but is recently embraced by a growing fluid dynamics community due its complex superposition of multi-scale gradients in electrochemical potential and space charge interacting with emerging complex fluid momentum gradients. While the visualization, quantification and fundamental understanding of the often-chaotic fluid dynamics is evolving rapidly due to sophisticated simulations and experimentation, little is known whether these instabilities can be induced and affected by chemical topological heterogeneity in surface properties. In this letter, we report that polyelectrolyte layers applied as micropatterns on ion exchange membranes induce and facilitate the electro-osmotic fluid instabilities. The findings stimulate a variety of fundamental questions comparable to the complexity of today's turbulence research.

  20. Nanometer-thick lateral polyelectrolyte micropatterns induce macrosopic electro-osmotic chaotic fluid instabilities

    PubMed Central

    Wessling, M.; Morcillo, L. Garrigós; Abdu, S.

    2014-01-01

    Electro-convective vortices in ion concentration polarization under shear flow have been of practical relevance for desalination processes using electrodialysis. The phenomenon has been scientifically disregarded for decades, but is recently embraced by a growing fluid dynamics community due its complex superposition of multi-scale gradients in electrochemical potential and space charge interacting with emerging complex fluid momentum gradients. While the visualization, quantification and fundamental understanding of the often-chaotic fluid dynamics is evolving rapidly due to sophisticated simulations and experimentation, little is known whether these instabilities can be induced and affected by chemical topological heterogeneity in surface properties. In this letter, we report that polyelectrolyte layers applied as micropatterns on ion exchange membranes induce and facilitate the electro-osmotic fluid instabilities. The findings stimulate a variety of fundamental questions comparable to the complexity of today's turbulence research. PMID:24598972

  1. Nanometer-thick lateral polyelectrolyte micropatterns induce macrosopic electro-osmotic chaotic fluid instabilities.

    PubMed

    Wessling, M; Morcillo, L Garrigós; Abdu, S

    2014-01-01

    Electro-convective vortices in ion concentration polarization under shear flow have been of practical relevance for desalination processes using electrodialysis. The phenomenon has been scientifically disregarded for decades, but is recently embraced by a growing fluid dynamics community due its complex superposition of multi-scale gradients in electrochemical potential and space charge interacting with emerging complex fluid momentum gradients. While the visualization, quantification and fundamental understanding of the often-chaotic fluid dynamics is evolving rapidly due to sophisticated simulations and experimentation, little is known whether these instabilities can be induced and affected by chemical topological heterogeneity in surface properties. In this letter, we report that polyelectrolyte layers applied as micropatterns on ion exchange membranes induce and facilitate the electro-osmotic fluid instabilities. The findings stimulate a variety of fundamental questions comparable to the complexity of today's turbulence research. PMID:24598972

  2. Development of stable low-electroosmotic mobility coatings. [for use in electrophoresis systems in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; Micale, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    Long-time rinsings of the Z6040-methlycellulose coating used successfully on the ASTP MA=011 experiment indicate the permanency of this coating is inadequate for continuous flowing systems. Two approaches are described for developing coatings which are stable under continuous fluid movement and which exhibit finite and predictable electroosmotic mobility values while being effective on different types of surfaces, such as glass, plastics, and ceramic alumina, such as is currently used as the electrophoresis channel in the GE-SPAR-CPE apparatus. The surface charge modification of polystyrene latex, especially by protein absorption, to be used as model materials for ground-based electrophoresis experiments, and the preliminary work directed towards the seeded polymerization of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  3. Pioneer 7 observations of plasma flow and field reversal regions in the distant geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. C.; Lazarus, A. J.; Villante, U.

    1975-01-01

    The present paper gives the results of an extensive analysis of plasma and magnetic-field data from Pioneer 7 taken in the geomagnetic tail approximately 1000 earth radii downstream from earth. The principal observations are: (1) measurable fluxes of protons in the tail, flowing away from earth, sometimes with a double-peaked velocity distribution; (2) field reversal regions in which the field changes from radial to antiradial by a vector rotation in the north-south plane; and (3) general characteristics of the tail similar to those observed near earth with good correlation between taillike magnetic fields and plasma.

  4. [Coverage of anterior knee defect by reverse flow anterolateral thigh flap: About two cases].

    PubMed

    Montoya-Faivre, D; Pineau, V; Colson, T; Brix, M; Simon, E

    2016-08-01

    The coverage of soft-tissue defects concerning the front of the knee and the proximal lower leg is a complex procedure. The reverse flow anterolateral thigh flap represents a good solution for this defects, especially when the coverage surface is large-sized and a free flap is not appropriate regarding the difficulty of the process. Flap retrograde vascularization is based on the anastomosis between the descending branch of the circumflex femoral artery and lateral superior genicular artery. It is an easy solution with low morbidity. The authors have chosen this flap to cover soft-tissue defect of anterior knee from two patients with total knee prothesis. PMID:26169962

  5. Characterization of electroosmotic flow through nanoporous self-assembled arrays.

    PubMed

    Bell, Kevan; Gomes, Mikel; Nazemifard, Neda

    2015-08-01

    Characterization of EOF mobility for Tris and TBE buffer solutions is performed in nanoporous arrays using the fluorescent marker method to examine the magnitude of EOFs through nanopores with mean diameters close to electric double layer thickness (Debye length). Structures made from solid silica nanospheres with effective pore sizes from 104 nm down to 8 nm are produced within the microchannel using an evaporation self-assembly method. EOF results in nanoporous matrices show higher EOF mobilities for stronger electrolyte solutions, which are drastically different compared to microchannel EOF. The effects of scaling are also examined by comparing the EOF mobility for varying ratios of pore diameters to the Debye length, which shows a surprising consistency across all particle sizes examined. This work demonstrates various factors which must be considered when designing nanofluidic devices, and discusses the causes of these small scale effects. PMID:25964193

  6. Effect of fuel injector type on performance and emissions of reverse-flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The combustion process in a reverse-flow combustor suitable for a small gas turbine engine was investigated to evaluate the effect of fuel injector type on performance and emissions. Fuel injector configurations using pressure-atomizing, spill-flow, air blast, and air-assist techniques were compared and evaluated on the basis of performance obtained in a full-scale experimental combustor operated at inlet conditions corresponding to takeoff, cruise, low power, and idle and typical of a 16:1-pressure-ratio turbine engine. Major differences in combustor performance and emissions characteristics were experienced with each injector type even though the aerodynamic configuration was common to most combustor models. Performance characteristics obtained with the various fuel injector types could not have been predicted from bench-test injector spray characteristics. The effect of the number of operating fuel injectors on performance and emissions is also presented.

  7. Effect of broad properties fuel on injector performance in a reverse flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raddlebaugh, S. M.; Norgren, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of fuel type on the performance of various fuel injectors was investigated in a reverse flow combustor. Combustor performance and emissions are documented for simplex pressure atomizing, spill flow, and airblast fuel injectors using a broad properties fuel and compared with performance using Jet A fuel. Test conditions simulated a range of flight conditions including sea level take off, low and high altitude cruise, as well as a parametric evaluation of the effect of increased combustor loading. The baseline simplex injector produced higher emission levels with corresponding lower combustion efficiency with the broad properties fuel. There was little or not loss in performance by the two advanced concept injectors with the broad properties fuel. The airblast injector proved to be especially insensitive to fuel type.

  8. CFD analysis of mine fire smoke spread and reverse flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.C.; Hwang, C.C.

    1999-07-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program was used to model buoyancy induced Product-Of-Combustion (POC) spread from experimental fires in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Pittsburgh Research Laboratory (PRL), safety research coal mine. In one application, the CFD program was used to predict spread from fires in an entry under zero airflow conditions. At a location, 0.41 m below the entry's roof at a distance of 30 m from the fire, the measured smoke spread rates were 0.093 and 0.23 m/s for a 30 and a 296 kw fire, respectively. The CFD program predicted spread rates of 0.15 and 0.26 m/s based upon the measured fire heat production rates. Based upon a computation with C{sub 3}H{sub 8} as the hydrocarbon fuel, a predicted 5 ppm CO alert time of 70 s at a distance of 30 m from the fire is to be compared with the measured alert time of 148 S. In a second application, the CFD program was used to analyze smoke flow reversal conditions, and the results were compared with visual observations of smoke reversal for 12 diesel fuel fires. The CFD predictions were in qualitative agreement with visual observations of smoke reversal.

  9. In situ cell retention of a CHO culture by a reverse-flow diafiltration membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Meier, Kristina; Djeljadini, Suzana; Regestein, Lars; Büchs, Jochen; Carstensen, Frederike; Wessling, Matthias; Holland, Tanja; Raven, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneities occur in various bioreactor designs including cell retention devices. Whereas in external devices changing environmental conditions cannot be prevented, cells are retained in their optimal environment in internal devices. Conventional reverse-flow diafiltration utilizes an internal membrane device, but pulsed feeding causes temporal heterogeneities. In this study, the influence of conventional reverse-flow diafiltration on the yeast Hansenula polymorpha is investigated. Alternating 180 s of feeding with 360 s of non-feeding at a dilution rate of 0.2 h(-1) results in an oscillating DOT signal with an amplitude of 60%. Thereby, induced short-term oxygen limitations result in the formation of ethanol and a reduced product concentration of 25%. This effect is enforced at increased dilution rate. To overcome this cyclic problem, sequential operation of three membranes is introduced. Thus, quasi-continuous feeding is achieved reducing the oscillation of the DOT signal to an amplitude of 20% and 40% for a dilution rate of 0.2 h(-1) and 0.5 h(-1) , respectively. Fermentation conditions characterized by complete absence of oxygen limitation and without formation of overflow metabolites could be obtained for dilution rates from 0.1 h(-1) - 0.5 h(-1) . Thus, sequential operation of three membranes minimizes oscillations in the DOT signal providing a nearly homogenous culture over time. PMID:25202924

  10. Effect of flow rate and concentration difference on reverse electrodialysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kilsugn; Han, Jaesuk; Kim, Daejoong

    2013-11-01

    Various energy conversion technologies have been developed to reduce dependency on limited fossil fuels, including wind power, solar power, hydropower, ocean power, and geothermal power. Among them, reverse electrodialysis (RED), which is one type of salinity gradient power (SGP), has received much attention due to high reliability and simplicity without moving parts. Here, we experimentally evaluated the RED performance with several parameters like flow rate of concentrated and dilute solution, concentration difference, and temperature. RED was composed of endplates, electrodes, spacers, anion exchange membrane, and cation exchange membrane. Endplates are made by a polypropylene. It included the electrodes, flow field for the electrode rinse solution, and path to supply a concentrated and dilute solution. Titanium coated by iridium and ruthenium was used as the electrode. The electrode rinse solution based on hexacyanoferrate system is used to reduce the power loss generated by conversion process form ionic current to electric current. Maximum power monotonously increases as increasing flow rate and concentration difference. Net power has optimal point because pumping power consumption increases with flow rate. This work was supported by Basic Science Research Program (Grat No. NRF-2011-0009993) through the National Research Foundation of Korea.

  11. The Impact of RELAP5 Pipe Break Flow Rates Associated With Reverse Flow Limiter Removal for Steam Generator Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Zheng; Jarvis, Julie M.; Vieira, Allen T.

    2006-07-01

    Pipe break flow rates are calculated for a main feedwater line break (FWLB) in the main steam valve vault (MSVV) for a PWR Steam Generator Replacement (SGR). A reverse flow limiter is installed in the original steam generator (OSG) feedwater nozzle to limit the blowdown flowrate in the event of a postulated FWLB. This feature is not incorporated in the replacement steam generator (RSG) design. The change in RSG nozzle design in conjunction with new operating conditions results in increased FWLB mass and energy releases which can impact environmental temperatures and pressures and flooding levels. In the United States, benchmarking for safety related analyses is necessary in consideration of 10CFR50.59 requirements. RELAP5/MOD3 is used to model the pipe break flowrates for a FWLB at different break locations. The benchmark FWLB blowdown releases are larger than the OSG design basis blowdown releases due to differences in RELAP5/MOD3 versions which are found to have different algorithms for subcooled choked flow. The SGR FWLB blowdown release rates are determined to have minimal impact on the compartment temperature and pressure response. However, the flooding levels and associated equipment qualification are potentially impacted. Modeling techniques used to minimize the impact of the SGR blowdown releases on MSVV flooding levels include modeling flashing effects, more realistic RSG temperature distribution, inventory depletion and Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) flow initiation time, and considering loss of offsite power scenarios. A detailed flooding hazard evaluation is needed, which considers the actual main feedwater isolation times to ensure that environmentally qualified safety related components, required to mitigate the effects of a FWLB inside the MSVV, can perform their safety function prior to being submerged. (authors)

  12. Analysis of the flow field generated near an aircraft engine operating in reverse thrust. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledwith, W. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A computer solution is developed to the exhaust gas reingestion problem for aircraft operating in the reverse thrust mode on a crosswind-free runway. The computer program determines the location of the inlet flow pattern, whether the exhaust efflux lies within the inlet flow pattern or not, and if so, the approximate time before the reversed flow reaches the engine inlet. The program is written so that the user is free to select discrete runway speeds or to study the entire aircraft deceleration process for both the far field and cross-ingestion problems. While developed with STOL applications in mind, the solution is equally applicable to conventional designs. The inlet and reversed jet flow fields involved in the problem are assumed to be noninteracting. The nacelle model used in determining the inlet flow field is generated using an iterative solution to the Neuman problem from potential flow theory while the reversed jet flow field is adapted using an empirical correlation from the literature. Sample results obtained using the program are included.

  13. CO2 Dissociation by Low Current Gliding Discharge in the Reverse Vortex Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsol, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    If performed with high energy efficiency, plasma-chemical dissociation of carbon dioxide can be a way of converting and storing energy when there is an excess of electric energy, for example generated by solar elements of wind turbines. CO2 dissociation with efficiency of up to 90% was reported earlier for low pressure microwave discharge in supersonic flow. A new plasma-chemical system uses a low current gliding discharge in the reverse vortex flow of plasma gas. The system is a development of the Gliding Arc in Tornado reactor. The system was used to study dissociation of CO2 in wide ranges of the following experimental parameters: reactor pressure (15-150 kPa), discharge current (50-500 mA), gas flow rate (3-30 liters per minute), and electrode gap length (1-10 cm). Additionally, the effect of thermal energy recuperation on CO2 dissociation efficiency was tested. Plasma chemical efficiency of CO2 dissociation is very low (about 3%) in a short discharge at low pressures (about 15 kPa) when it is defined by electronic excitation. The highest efficiency (above 40%) was reached at pressures 50-70 kPa in a long discharge with thermal energy recuperation. It means that the process is controlled by thermal dissociation with subsequent effective quenching. Plasma chemical efficiency was determined from the data of chromatographic analysis and oscilloscope electric power integration, and also was checked calorimetrically by the thermal balance of the system.

  14. Numerical and experimental visualization of reverse flow in an inclined isothermal tube

    SciTech Connect

    Mare, Thierry; Voicu, Ionut; Miriel, Jacques

    2005-10-01

    Combined forced and free convection in the entrance region of tubes occurs in many engineering installations such as heat exchangers, nuclear reactors, solar collectors, etc. The secondary flow induced by the buoyancy force and its effects on the hydrodynamic and thermal fields have therefore been investigated both experimentally and numerically. The present study considers the three dimensional developing laminar flow of water with constant viscosity and conductivity in an isothermal pipe inclined of 60{sup o} from horizontal. At first, the elliptical partial differential equations modelling mixed convection, have been numerically solved using a control volume based finite difference solver for Re=90, Pr=7 and Gr=3.3x10{sup 5}. The axial evolution of the velocity and fluid temperature profiles has shown that the upstream diffusion has an important effect near the inlet of the heating region. The shape and size of the region with negative velocities are detailed. Secondly, an experimental set up is described. The techniques used are based on PIV technology employing micrometer Nylon particles placed in a laser light-sheet and results are recorded by using a CDD camera. Analysed pictures have confirmed the existence of the reverse flow region in accordance with numerical results as obtained for an inclination of 60{sup o}.

  15. Embolisation of the Gastroduodenal Artery is Not Necessary in the Presence of Reversed Flow Before Yttrium-90 Radioembolisation

    SciTech Connect

    Daghir, Ahmed A.; Gungor, Hatice; Haydar, Ali A.; Wasan, Harpreet S.; Tait, Nicholas P.

    2012-08-15

    Introduction: The gastroduodenal artery (GDA) is usually embolised to avoid nontarget dispersal before yttrium-90 (Y{sup 90}) radioembolisation to treat liver metastases. In a minority of patients, there is retrograde flow in the GDA. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is any increased risk from maintaining a patent GDA in patients with reversed flow. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients undergoing Y{sup 90} radioembolisation at our institution. The incidence of toxicities arising from nontarget radioembolisation by way of the GDA (gastric/duodenal ulceration, gastric/duodenal bleeding, and pancreatitis) and death occurring within 2 months of treatment were compared between the reversed and the antegrade GDA groups. Results: Ninety-two patients underwent preliminary angiography. Reversed GDA flow was found on angiography in 14.1% of cases; the GDA was not embolised in these patients. The GDA was coiled in 55.7% of patients with antegrade GDA flow to prevent inadvertent dispersal of radioembolic material. There was no increased toxicity related to nontarget dispersal by way of the GDA, or increased early mortality, in patients with reversed GDA flow (P > 0.05). Conclusion: In patients with reversed GDA flow, maintenance of a patent GDA before administration of Y{sup 90} radioembolisation does not increase the risk of toxicity from nontarget dispersal. Therapeutic injection, with careful monitoring to identify early vascular stasis, may be safely performed beyond the origin of the patent GDA. A patent GDA with reversed flow provides forward drive for infused particles and may allow alternative access to the hepatic circulation.

  16. Microfluidic system with integrated electroosmotic pumps, concentration gradient generator and fish cell line (RTgill-W1)--towards water toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Glawdel, Tomasz; Elbuken, Caglar; Lee, Lucy E J; Ren, Carolyn L

    2009-11-21

    This study presents a microfluidic system that incorporates electroosmotic pumps, a concentration gradient generator and a fish cell line (rainbow trout gill) to perform toxicity testing on fish cells seeded in the system. The system consists of three mechanical components: (1) a toxicity testing chip containing a microfluidic gradient generator which creates a linear concentration distribution of toxicant in a cell test chamber, (2) an electroosmotic (EO) pump chip that controls the flow rate and operation of the toxicity chip, and (3) indirect reservoirs that connect the two chips allowing for the toxicant solution to be pumped separately from the electroosmotic pump solution. The flow rate and stability of the EO pumps was measured and tested by monitoring the gradient generator using fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, a lethality test was performed with this system setup using a rainbow trout gill cell line (RTgill-W1) as the test cells and sodium dodecyl sulfate as a model toxicant. A gradient of sodium dodecyl sulfate, from 0 to 50 microg mL(-1), was applied for 1 hr to the attached cells, and the results were quantified using a Live/Dead cell assay. This work is a preliminary study on the application of EO pumps in a living cell assay, with the potential to use the pumps in portable water quality testing devices with RTgill-W1 cells as the biosensors. PMID:19865731

  17. Formation of reverse shocks in magnetized high energy density supersonic plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergey

    2013-10-01

    There has been considerable effort in developing experiments for studies of both collisionless and radiative shocks in high energy density plasmas (HEDP), but there is still very limited experimental information the concerning properties of HEDP shocks in the presence of a magnetic field. A new experimental platform, based on the use of supersonic ablation plasma flows in inverse wire array z-pinches, was developed for studies of shocks in magnetized HEDP plasmas in a well-defined and diagnosable 1-D interaction geometry. The mechanism of flow generation ensures that the plasma flow (MA ~ 5 - 6 , Vflow 100 km/s, ni ~ 1017 cm-3) has a frozen-in magnetic field at a level sufficient to affect the shocks formed in the interaction with conducting obstacles. Experiments show that in addition to the formation of a ``standard'' reverse shock in a stagnated HEDP plasma, the presence of the magnetic field leads to the formation of an additional shock-like feature in the upstream plasma. This shock is triggered by the pile-up of magnetic flux diffusing into the upstream flow, despite a relatively small initial level of the frozen-in magnetic field (the flow ram pressure being much greater than the magnetic field pressure). The thickness of this shock is much smaller than the m.f.p. for the ion-ion collisions, the shock is formed at a distance of ~c/ωpi from the foil and remains stationary for the duration of the experiment (~100 ns). The plasma parameters in the flow and in the shock are measured using optical Thomson scattering, two-color laser interferometry, monochromatic X-ray radiography and miniature magnetic probes. The quantitative data from this experiment, especially the spatial profiles of the density and of the flow velocity measured simultaneously in the upstream and downstream of the shock, will allow detailed verification of MHD and PIC codes used by the HEDP community. Supported by EPSRC Grant EP/G001324/1 and by the OFES under DOE Cooperative Agreement DESC

  18. Steady shear rheometry of dissipative particle dynamics models of polymer fluids in reverse Poiseuille flow

    PubMed Central

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Polymer fluids are modeled with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as undiluted bead-spring chains and their solutions. The models are assessed by investigating their steady shear-rate properties. Non-Newtonian viscosity and normal stress coefficients, for shear rates from the lower to the upper Newtonian regimes, are calculated from both plane Couette and plane Poiseuille flows. The latter is realized as reverse Poiseuille flow (RPF) generated from two Poiseuille flows driven by uniform body forces in opposite directions along two-halves of a computational domain. Periodic boundary conditions ensure the RPF wall velocity to be zero without density fluctuations. In overlapping shear-rate regimes the RPF properties are confirmed to be in good agreement with those calculated from plane Couette flow with Lees–Edwards periodic boundary conditions (LECs), the standard virtual rheometer for steady shear-rate properties. The concentration and the temperature dependence of the properties of the model fluids are shown to satisfy the principles of concentration and temperature superposition commonly employed in the empirical correlation of real polymer-fluid properties. The thermodynamic validity of the equation of state is found to be a crucial factor for the achievement of time-temperature superposition. With these models, RPF is demonstrated to be an accurate and convenient virtual rheometer for the acquisition of steady shear-rate rheological properties. It complements, confirms, and extends the results obtained with the standard LEC configuration, and it can be used with the output from other particle-based methods, including molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, smooth particle hydrodynamics, and the lattice Boltzmann method. PMID:20405981

  19. A rapid and reversible skull optical clearing method for monitoring cortical blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Yanjie; Shi, Rui; Zhu, Dan

    2016-03-01

    In vivo cortex optical imaging is of great important for revealing both structural and functional architecture of brain with high temporal-spatial resolution. To reduce the limitation of turbid skull, researchers had to establish various skull windows or directly expose cortex through craniotomy. Here we developed a skull optical clearing method to make skull transparent. Laser speckle contrast imaging technique was used to monitor the cortical blood flow after topical treatment with the optical clearing agents. The results indicated that the image contrast increased gradually, and then maintained at a high level after 15 min for adult mice, which made the image quality and resolution of micro-vessels nearly approximate to those of exposed cortex. Both the cortical blood flow velocity almost kept constant after skull became transparent. Besides, the treatment of physiological saline on the skull could make skull return to the initial state again and the skull could become transparent again when SOCS retreated it. Thus, we could conclude that the skull optical clearing method was rapid, valid, reversible and safe, which provided us available approach for performing the cortical structural and functional imaging at high temporal-spatial resolution.

  20. Study of an electroosmotic pump for liquid delivery and its application in capillary column liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingxin; Ma, Jiping; Guan, Yafeng

    2004-03-01

    A packed-bed electroosmotic pump (EOP) was constructed and evaluated. The EOP consisted of three capillary columns packed in parallel, a gas-releasing device, Pt electrodes and a high-voltage power supply. The EOP could generate output pressure above 5.0 MPa and constant flow rate in the range of nl/min to a few microl/min for pure water, pure methanol, 2 mM potassium dihydrogenphosphate buffer, the buffer-methanol mixture and the pure water-methanol mixture at applied potentials less than 20 kV. The composition of solvent before/after pumping was quantitatively determined by using a gas chromatograph equipped with both flame ionization detector and thermal conductivity detector. It was found that there were no apparent changes in composition and relative concentrations after pumping process for a methanol-ethanol-acetonitrile mixture and a methanol-water mixture. Theoretical aspect of the EOP was discussed in detail. An capillary HPLC system consisting of the EOP, an injection valve, a 15 cm x 320 microm i.d., 5 microm Spherigel C18 stainless steel analytical column, and an on-column UV detector was connected to evaluate the performance of the EOP. A comparative study was also carried out with a mechanical capillary HPLC pump on the same system. The results demonstrated that the reproducibility of flow rate and the pulsation-free flow property of the EOP are superior to that of mechanical pump in capillary HPLC application. PMID:14989475

  1. Nongassing long-lasting electro-osmotic pump with polyaniline-wrapped aminated graphene electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rudra; Jahan, Kousar; Nagarale, Rajaram K; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2015-01-14

    An efficient nongassing electro-osmotic pump (EOP) with long-lasting electrodes and exceptionally stable operation is developed by using novel flow-through polyaniline (PANI)-wrapped aminated graphene (NH2-G) electrodes. The NH2-G/PANI electrode combines the excellent oxidation/reduction capacity of PANI with the exceptional conductivity and inertness of NH2-G. The flow rate varies linearly with voltage but is highly dependent on the electrode composition. The flow rates at a potential of 5 V for pristine NH2-G and PANI electrodes are 71 and 100 μL min(-1) cm(-2), respectively, which increase substantially by the use of NH2-G/PANI electrode. It increased from 125 to 182 μL min(-1) cm(-2) as the fraction of aniline increased from 66.63 to 90.90%. The maximum flux obtained is 40 μL min(-1) V(-1) cm(-2) with NH2-G/PANI-90.9 electrodes. The assembled EOP remained exceptionally stable until the electrode columbic capacity was fully utilized. The prototype shown here delivered 8.0 μL/min at a constant applied voltage of 2 V for over 7 h of continuous operation. The best EOP produces a maximum stall pressure of 3.5 kPa at 3 V. These characteristics make it suitable for a variety of microfluidic/device applications. PMID:25478894

  2. Preliminary experiments with an electro-osmotic heat pipe laboratory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenassen, D.; Bunk, P. B.

    1983-04-01

    A laboratory model of an electro-osmotic heat pipe filled with ethanol was tested. The heat transport through the pipe and the temperature distribution along the pipe wall and the temperature difference across the pipe were measured. The heat pipe performed like a CCHP under wick limited operation conditions. Superheating of the ethanol in the evaporator caused relatively large variations of the heat transport. With the electro-osmotic pump in operation, the heat pipe showed a fast gas production and corrosion of the electrodes of the electro-osmotic pump, whereas no measurable effect on the heat transport was observed.

  3. Electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water and methanol in polymer electrolytes at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, D.; Wainright, J.S.; Landau, U.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    The electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water in two polymer electrolytes was experimentally determined as a function of water activity and current density for temperatures up to 200 C. The results show that the electro-osmotic drag coefficient varies from 0.2 to 0.6 in Nafion{reg_sign}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} membrane electrolyte, but is essentially zero in phosphoric acid-doped PBI (polybenzimidazole) membrane electrolyte over the range of water activity considered. The near-zero electro-osmotic drag coefficient found in PBI indicates that this electrolyte should lessen the problems associated with water redistribution in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  4. Effect of Temperature Reversion on Hot Ductility and Flow Stress-Strain Curves of C-Mn Continuously Cast Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhihua; Li, Wei; Long, Mujun; Gui, Lintao; Chen, Dengfu; Huang, Yunwei; Vitos, Levente

    2015-08-01

    The influence of temperature reversion in secondary cooling and its reversion rate on hot ductility and flow stress-strain curve of C-Mn steel has been investigated. Tensile specimens were cooled at various regimes. One cooling regime involved cooling at a constant rate of 100 °C min-1 to the test temperature, while the others involved temperature reversion processes at three different reversion rates before deformation. After hot tensile test, the evolution of mechanical properties of steel was analyzed at various scales by means of microstructure observation, ab initio prediction, and thermodynamic calculation. Results indicated that the temperature reversion in secondary cooling led to hot ductility trough occurring at higher temperature with greater depth. With increasing temperature reversion rate, the low temperature end of ductility trough extended toward lower temperature, leading to wider hot ductility trough with slightly reducing depth. Microstructure examinations indicated that the intergranular fracture related to the thin film-like ferrite and (Fe,Mn)S particles did not changed with varying cooling regimes; however, the Widmanstatten ferrite surrounding austenite grains resulted from the temperature reversion process seriously deteriorated the ductility. In addition, after the temperature reversion in secondary cooling, the peak stress on the flow curve slightly declined and the peak of strain to peak stress occurred at higher temperature. With increasing temperature reversion rate, the strain to peak stress slightly increased, while the peak stress showed little variation. The evolution of plastic modulus and strain to peak stress of austenite with varying temperature was in line with the theoretical prediction on Fe.

  5. Effect of small flow reversals on aerosol mixing in the alveolar region of the human lung.

    PubMed

    Darquenne, Chantal; Prisk, G Kim

    2004-12-01

    It has been suggested that irreversibility of alveolar flow combined with a stretched and folded pattern of streamlines can lead to a sudden increase in mixing in the lung. To determine whether this phenomenon is operative in the human lung in vivo, we performed a series of bolus studies with a protocol designed to induce complex folding patterns. Boli of 0.5- and 1-microm-diameter particles were inhaled at penetration volumes (V(p)) of 300 and 1,200 ml in eight subjects during short periods of microgravity aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Microgravity Research Aircraft. Inspiration was from residual volume to 1 liter above 1 G functional residual capacity. This was followed by a 10-s breathhold, during which up to seven 100-ml flow reversals (FR) were imposed at V(p) = 300 ml and up to four 500-ml FR at V(p) = 1,200 ml, and by an expiration to residual volume. Bolus dispersion and deposition were calculated from aerosol concentration and flow rate continuously monitored at the mouth. There was no significant increase in dispersion and deposition with increasing FR except for dispersion between 0 and 7 FR at V(p) = 300 ml with 0.5-microm-diameter particles, and this increase was small. This suggested that either the phenomenon of stretch and fold did not occur within the number of FR we performed or that it had already occurred during the one breathing cycle included in the basic maneuver. We speculate that the phenomenon occurred during the basic maneuver, which is consistent with the high degree of dispersion and deposition observed previously in microgravity. PMID:15298988

  6. Heat pump system and heat pump device using a constant flow reverse stirling cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.S.

    1993-08-31

    A constant flow reverse Stirling cycle heat pump system is described comprising: a constant flow isothermal compression means for compressing a working gas, the compression means including a drive means, an inlet, and an outlet, and further including a cooling means to remove heat of compression from the working gas; a constant flow isothermal expansion means for expanding the working gas, the expansion means including an inlet, an outlet, and a heat source means to provide isothermal expansion of the working gas while removing heat from said heat source means; and a constant volume regenerative heat exchange means for transferring heat from compressed working gas to expanded working gas, the constant volume regenerative heat exchange means comprising: an enclosure, the enclosure containing a high pressure portion with an inlet receiving compressed working gas from the compression means outlet and with an outlet discharging cooled working gas to the expansion means inlet, a low pressure portion with an inlet receiving expanded working gas from the expansion means outlet and with an outlet discharging heated working gas to the compression means inlet, a slotted rotor in a central portion of the enclosure, the rotor containing a plurality of radially extending slots, and a plurality of radially sliding vanes mounted in the slots and extending to seal against a wall of the enclosure, wherein a first portion of the wall having a constant first radial distance from the rotor cooperates with the vanes to form a first constant volume channel defining the high pressure portion and a second portion of the wall having a constant second radial distance from the rotor cooperates with the vanes to form a second constant volume channel defining the low pressure portion; and heat transfer means in thermal contact with the high pressure portion and the low pressure portion for transferring heat from the compressed working gas to the expanded working gas.

  7. Determination of gallic acid with rhodanine by reverse flow injection analysis using simplex optimization.

    PubMed

    Phakthong, Wilaiwan; Liawruangrath, Boonsom; Liawruangrath, Saisunee

    2014-12-01

    A reversed flow injection (rFI) system was designed and constructed for gallic acid determination. Gallic acid was determined based on the formation of chromogen between gallic acid and rhodanine, resulting in a colored product with a λmax at 520 nm. The optimum conditions for determining gallic acid were also investigated. Optimizations of the experimental conditions were carried out based on the so-call univariate method. The conditions obtained were 0.6% (w/v) rhodanine, 70% (v/v) ethanol, 0.9 mol L(-1) NaOH, 2.0 mL min(-1) flow rate, 75 μL injection loop and 600 cm mixing tubing length, respectively. Comparative optimizations of the experimental conditions were also carried out by multivariate or simplex optimization method. The conditions obtained were 1.2% (w/v) rhodanine, 70% (v/v) ethanol, 1.2 mol L(-1) NaOH, flow rate 2.5 mL min(-1), 75 μL injection loop and 600 cm mixing tubing length, respectively. It was found that the optimum conditions obtained by the former optimization method were mostly similar to those obtained by the latter method. The linear relationship between peak height and the concentration of gallic acid was obtained over the range of 0.1-35.0 mg L(-1) with the detection limit 0.081 mg L(-1). The relative standard deviations were found to be in the ranges 0.46-1.96% for 1, 10, 30 mg L(-1) of gallic acid (n=11). The method has the advantages of simplicity extremely high selectivity and high precision. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of gallic acid in longan samples without interferent effects from other common phenolic compounds that might be present in the longan samples collected in northern Thailand. PMID:25159449

  8. Effect of divalent ions on electroosmotic transport in a sodium chloride aqueous solution confined in an amorphous silica nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlisk, A. T.; Zambrano, Harvey; Cevheri, Necmettin; Yoda, Minami; Computational Micro-; Nanofluidics Lab Team; The Fluids, Optical; Interfacial Diagnostics Lab Team

    2012-11-01

    A critical enabling technology for the next generation of nanoscale devices, such as nanoscale ``lab on a chip'' systems, is controlling electroosmotic flow (EOF) in nanochannels. In this work, we control EOF in an aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution confined in a silica nanochannel by systematically adding different amounts of divalent ions. Multivalent ions have a different affinity for the silica surface and different hydration characteristics in comparison to monovalent ions. Therefore by adding Mg++ and Ca++ to the sodium chloride solution, the electroosmotic velocity and the structure of the electrical double layer will be modified. The effects of adding Mg++ and Ca++ will be compared using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the EOF at different electric fields of a NaCl solution in a silica nanochannel with different fractions of Ca++ and Mg++ ions. In general, the wall zeta-potential magnitude, and hence the EOF velocity, decreases as the Ca++ or Mg++ concentration increases. The system responds linearly with electric field. We will compare the computational results with the experimental data of Cevheri and Yoda (2012). This work is supported by Army Research Office (ARO) grant number W911NF1010290.

  9. On-line concentration of neutral analytes for micellar electrokinetic chromatography. 3. Stacking with reverse migrating micelles.

    PubMed

    Quirino, J P; Terabe, S

    1998-01-01

    On-line concentration of neutral analytes by sample stacking in reversed migration micellar electrokinetic chromatography is presented. Micellar separation solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate are prepared with acidic buffers to reverse the direction of the migration velocity of neutral analytes owing to a reduced electroosmotic flow. Samples are prepared in nonmicellar matrixes of low conductivity (i.e., water, diluted buffer, or dilute organic/aqueous solvent) to achieve field enhancement in the sample zone. Without polarity switching inherent in large-volume sample stacking, narrowing of analyte bands, removal of sample matrix, and separation of focused analyte bands are achieved. A model is proposed to describe the stacking technique and is supported by experimental results. In addition, equations are derived to describe band broadening associated with the technique. Detector response improvements reaching a 100-fold are confirmed experimentally. Concentration detection limits on the order of low-ppb levels (S/N = 3) are realized with model steroidal compounds. PMID:21644608

  10. Electroosmotic pump performance is affected by concentration polarizations of both electrodes and pump

    PubMed Central

    Suss, Matthew E.; Mani, Ali; Zangle, Thomas A.; Santiago, Juan G.

    2010-01-01

    Current methods of optimizing electroosmotic (EO) pump performance include reducing pore diameter and reducing ionic strength of the pumped electrolyte. However, these approaches each increase the fraction of total ionic current carried by diffuse electric double layer (EDL) counterions. When this fraction becomes significant, concentration polarization (CP) effects become important, and traditional EO pump models are no longer valid. We here report on the first simultaneous concentration field measurements, pH visualizations, flow rate, and voltage measurements on such systems. Together, these measurements elucidate key parameters affecting EO pump performance in the CP dominated regime. Concentration field visualizations show propagating CP enrichment and depletion fronts sourced by our pump substrate and traveling at order mm/min velocities through millimeter-scale channels connected serially to our pump. The observed propagation in millimeter-scale channels is not explained by current propagating CP models. Additionally, visualizations show that CP fronts are sourced by and propagate from the electrodes of our system, and then interact with the EO pump-generated CP zones. With pH visualizations, we directly detect that electrolyte properties vary sharply across the anode enrichment front interface. Our observations lead us to hypothesize possible mechanisms for the propagation of both pump- and electrode-sourced CP zones. Lastly, our experiments show the dynamics associated with the interaction of electrode and membrane CP fronts, and we describe the effect of these phenomena on EO pump flow rates and applied voltages under galvanostatic conditions. PMID:21516230

  11. Determination of nitrate and nitrite in Hanford defense waste(HDW) by reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE)method

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, S.G.

    1998-06-10

    This paper describes the first application of reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE) for rapid and accurate determination of nitrate and nitrite in Hanford Defense Waste (HDW). The method development was carried out by using Synthetic Hanford Waste (SHW), followed by the analysis of 4 real HDW samples. Hexamethonium bromide (HMB) was used as electroosmotic flow modifier in borate buffer at pH 9.2 to decrease the electroosmotic flow (EOF) in order to enhance the speed of analysis and the resolution of nitrate and nitrite in high ionic strength HDW samples. The application of this capillary zone electrophoresis method, when compared with ion chromatography for two major components of HDW, nitrate and nitrite slightly reduced analysis time, eliminated most pre-analysis handling of the highly radioactive sample, and cut analysis wastes by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The analysis of real HDW samples that were validated by using sample spikes showed a concentration range of 1.03 to 1.42 M for both nitrate. The migration times of the real HDW and the spiked HDW samples were within a precision of less than 3% relative standard deviation. The selectivity ratio test used for peak confirmation of the spiked samples was within 96% of the real sample. Method reliability was tested by spiking the matrix with 72.4 mM nitrate and nitrite. Recoveries for these spiked samples were 93-103%.

  12. Laser Doppler velocimetry investigation and numerical prediction of the flowfield in an annular reverse-flow combustor sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. T. C.; Cusworth, R. A.; Sislian, J. P.

    A two-component argon-ion laser Doppler velocimetry system operating in the dual-beam, forward scatter mode, was used to measure the mean velocity components and the corresponding normal/shear stresses of a toroidal vortex reverse-flow annular combustor sector. Measurements were obtained for cold flow with or without fuel injection, and for hot flow conditions. The effects of heat addition by combustion on the flow field and the viability of the developed two-dimensional computer code for steady, turbulent compressible flows are discussed, using a two-equation turbulence model for predicting complex combustor flow field. The measured data are useful for further evaluation of combustor modeling computer codes and mathematical modeling of processes inside a practical combustor.

  13. Reversed flow of Atlantic deep water during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Negre, César; Zahn, Rainer; Thomas, Alexander L; Masqué, Pere; Henderson, Gideon M; Martínez-Méndez, Gema; Hall, Ian R; Mas, José L

    2010-11-01

    The meridional overturning circulation (MOC) of the Atlantic Ocean is considered to be one of the most important components of the climate system. This is because its warm surface currents, such as the Gulf Stream, redistribute huge amounts of energy from tropical to high latitudes and influence regional weather and climate patterns, whereas its lower limb ventilates the deep ocean and affects the storage of carbon in the abyss, away from the atmosphere. Despite its significance for future climate, the operation of the MOC under contrasting climates of the past remains controversial. Nutrient-based proxies and recent model simulations indicate that during the Last Glacial Maximum the convective activity in the North Atlantic Ocean was much weaker than at present. In contrast, rate-sensitive radiogenic (231)Pa/(230)Th isotope ratios from the North Atlantic have been interpreted to indicate only minor changes in MOC strength. Here we show that the basin-scale abyssal circulation of the Atlantic Ocean was probably reversed during the Last Glacial Maximum and was dominated by northward water flow from the Southern Ocean. These conclusions are based on new high-resolution data from the South Atlantic Ocean that establish the basin-scale north to south gradient in (231)Pa/(230)Th, and thus the direction of the deep ocean circulation. Our findings are consistent with nutrient-based proxies and argue that further analysis of (231)Pa/(230)Th outside the North Atlantic basin will enhance our understanding of past ocean circulation, provided that spatial gradients are carefully considered. This broader perspective suggests that the modern pattern of the Atlantic MOC-with a prominent southerly flow of deep waters originating in the North Atlantic-arose only during the Holocene epoch. PMID:21048764

  14. A reverse flow cross finger pedicle skin flap from hemidorsum of finger.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Satyanarayan; Manisundaram, S

    2010-04-01

    A reverse-flow cross-finger pedicle skin flap raised from the hemidorsum has been used, which is a modification of the distally based dorsal cross-finger flap. The flap is raised from the hemidorsum at a plane above the paratenon, the distal-most location of the base being at the level of the distal interphalangeal joint. Thirty-two flaps were used from as many fingers of as many patients. Of these, 31 (97%) flaps survived fully; there was stiffness of finger in one (3%) patient and the two-point discrimination was 4-8mm (n=14). Follow-up period was 2 months to 3 years, the median being 1 year and 3 months. The advantages of this flap are that there is less disruption of veins and less visible disfigurement of the dorsum of the finger when compared to other pedicled cross-finger skin flaps. The disadvantage of this flap is its restricted width. It is recommended as the cross-finger pedicle skin flap of choice when the defect is not wide. PMID:19386561

  15. Reversible Information Flow across the Medial Temporal Lobe: The Hippocampus Links Cortical Modules during Memory Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Elisa; Henson, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    A simple cue can be sufficient to elicit vivid recollection of a past episode. Theoretical models suggest that upon perceiving such a cue, disparate episodic elements held in neocortex are retrieved through hippocampal pattern completion. We tested this fundamental assumption by applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while objects or scenes were used to cue participants' recall of previously paired scenes or objects, respectively. We first demonstrate functional segregation within the medial temporal lobe (MTL), showing domain specificity in perirhinal and parahippocampal cortices (for object-processing vs scene-processing, respectively), but domain generality in the hippocampus (retrieval of both stimulus types). Critically, using fMRI latency analysis and dynamic causal modeling, we go on to demonstrate functional integration between these MTL regions during successful memory retrieval, with reversible signal flow from the cue region to the target region via the hippocampus. This supports the claim that the human hippocampus provides the vital associative link that integrates information held in different parts of cortex. PMID:23986252

  16. Control and Reversal of the Electrophoretic Force on DNA in a Charged Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Binquan

    2011-01-01

    Electric field-driven transport of DNA through solid-state nanopores is the key process in nanopore-based DNA sequencing that promises dramatic reduction of genome sequencing costs. A major hurdle in the development of this sequencing method is that DNA transport through the nanopores occurs too quickly for the DNA sequence to be detected. By means of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate in this communication that velocity of DNA transport through a nanopore can be controlled by the charge state of the nanopore surface. In particular, we show that the charge density of the nanopore surface controls the magnitude and/or direction of the electro-osmotic flow through the nanopore and thereby can significantly reduce or even reverse the effective electrophoretic force on DNA. Our work suggests a physical mechanism to control DNA transport in a nanopore by chemical, electrical or electrochemical modification of the nanopore surface. PMID:21339610

  17. Effects of verapamil, nifedipine, and daflon on the viability of reverse-flow island flaps in rats.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Hidir; Aslan, Suleyman Serkan; Bilen, Bilge Turk; Eren, Ahmet Tuna; Karadag, Nese; Karabulut, Aysun Bay

    2013-11-01

    Reverse-flow flaps are preferable in reconstructive surgery due to their several advantages. However, they may have venous insufficiency and poor blood flow. In this study, effects of various pharmacological agents on the viability of reverse-flow flaps were investigated. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Superficial epigastric artery- and superficial epigastric vein-based reverse-flow island flaps were preferred. The rats were divided into 4 groups. Group 1 was considered as the control group. Group 2 was given verapamil 0.3 mg/kg per day, group 3 nifedipine 0.5 mg/kg per day, and group 4 Daflon 80 mg/kg per day for 7 days. On day 7, viable flap areas were measured, angiography was performed, serum nitric oxide levels were evaluated, and histopathological examination was done.The mean flap viability rate was 67.59% (±13.12259) in group 1, 77.38% (±4.12506) in group 2, 74.57% (±3.44780) in group 3, and 85.39% (±4.36125) in group 4 (P = 0.001). The mean nitric oxide level was 31.66 μmol/dL (±2.42212) in group 1, 51.00 μmol/dL (±2.96648) in group 2, 34.00 μmol/dL (±2.96648) in group 3, and 47.66 μmol/dL (±2.80476) in group 4 (P = 0.001). On angiography, there were vessel dilations and convolutions in group 2; capillaries became noticeable, and anastomotic vessels extended toward the more distal part of the flaps in group 4. Histological examinations showed severe inflammation in group 3 and minimal inflammation and venous vasodilatation in group 2.Verapamil and Daflon in therapeutic doses significantly increased the viability of reverse-flow island flaps. However, nifedipine did not make a significant contribution to the flap viability. The results of this study will contribute to the literature about the hemodynamics of reverse-flow island flaps and guide further studies on the issue. PMID:23407246

  18. [Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we summarize work on Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows. The work was primarily performed by post-doc Hue Hu, and partially by grad students Lei Li and Danish Chopra. The work includes studies on droplet evaporation and its effects on temperature and velocity fields in an evaporating droplet, new 3-D microscopic particle image velocimetry and direct visualization on wall slip in a surfactant solution. With the exception of the slip measurements, these projects were those proposed in the grant application. Instead of slip flow, the original grant proposed imaging electro-osmotic flows. However, shortly after the grant was issued, the PI became aware of work on electro-osmotic flows by the group of Saville in Princeton that was similar to that proposed, and we therefore elected to carry out work on imaging slip flows rather than electro-osmotic flows.

  19. Study on heat transfer of heat exchangers in the Stirling engine - Heat transfer in a heated tube under the periodically reversing flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaka, Mitsuo; Iwabuchi, Makio

    1992-11-01

    Heat transfer characteristics in heated tubes under periodically reversing flow conditions have been experimentally investigated, using a test apparatus that simulates heat exchangers for an actual Stirling engine. It is shown that the heat transfer characteristics under these conditions are greatly affected by the piston phase difference that generates the reversing flow of working fluid, and this phenomenon is peculiar to heat transfer under periodically reversing flow. The experimental correlation for the heat transfer coefficient under these conditions is obtained through the use of the working gas velocity evaluated from the Schmidt cycle model, which is one of the ideal Stirling cycles concerning the influence of the piston phase difference.

  20. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  1. Effects of discrete-electrode arrangement on traveling-wave electroosmotic pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiyu; Shao, Jinyou; Ren, Yukun; Wu, Yupan; Wang, Chunhui; Ding, Haitao; Jiang, Hongyuan; Ding, Yucheng

    2016-09-01

    Traveling-wave electroosmotic (TWEO) pumping arises from the action of an imposed traveling-wave (TW) electric field on its own induced charge in the diffuse double layer, which is formed on top of an electrode array immersed in electrolyte solutions. Such a traveling field can be merely realized in practice by a discrete electrode array upon which the corresponding voltages of correct phase are imposed. By employing the theory of linear and weakly nonlinear double-layer charging dynamics, a physical model incorporating both the nonlinear surface capacitance of diffuse layer and Faradaic current injection is developed herein in order to quantify the changes in TWEO pumping performance from a single-mode TW to discrete electrode configuration. Benefiting from the linear analysis, we investigate the influence of using discrete electrode array to create the TW signal on the resulting fluid motion, and several approaches are suggested to improve the pumping performance. In the nonlinear regime, our full numerical analysis considering the intervening isolation spacing indicates that a practical four-phase discrete electrode configuration of equal electrode and gap width exhibits stronger nonlinearity than expected from the idealized pump applied with a single-mode TW in terms of voltage-dependence of the ideal pumping frequency and peak flow rate, though it has a much lower pumping performance. For model validation, pumping of electrolytes by TWEO is achieved over a confocal spiral four-phase electrode array covered by an insulating microchannel; measurement of flow velocity indicates the modified nonlinear theory considering moderate Faradaic conductance is indeed a more accurate physical description of TWEO. These results offer useful guidelines for designing high-performance TWEO microfluidic pumps with discrete electrode array.

  2. Effects of flow-path variations on internal reversing flow in a tailpipe offtake configuration for ASTOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, Jack G.; Esker, Barbara S.

    1993-01-01

    A one-third-scale model of a generic tailpipe offtake system for an advanced short takeoff, vertical landing (ASTOVL) aircraft was tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center Powered Lift Facility. The basic model consisted of a tailpipe with a center body to form an annulus simulating turbine outflow with no swirl; twin offtake ducts with elbows at the ends to turn the flow to a downward direction; flow control nozzles at the ends of the elbows; and a blind flange at the end of the tailpipe to simulate a closed cruise nozzle. The offtake duct-to-tailpipe diameter ratio was 0.74. Modifications of a generic nature were then made to this basic configuration to measure the effects of flow-path changes on the flow and pressure-loss characteristics. The modifications included adding rounded entrances at the forward edges of the offtake openings, blocking the tailpipe just aft the openings instead of at the cruise nozzle, changing the location of the openings along the tailpipe, removing the center body, and varying the Mach number (flow rate) over a wide range in the tailpipe ahead of the openings by changing the size of the flow control nozzles. The tests were made with unheated air at tailpipe-to-ambient pressure ratios from 1.4 to 5. Results are presented and compared with performance graphs, total-pressure contour plots, paint streak flow visualization photographs, and a flow-angle probe traverse at the offtake entrance.

  3. Analysis of HRCT-derived xylem network reveals reverse flow in some vessels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow in xylem vessels is modeled based on constructions of three dimensional xylem networks derived from High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) images of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) stems. Flow in 6-14% of the vessels was found to be oriented in the opposite direction to the bulk flow under norma...

  4. Condition at birth of infants with previously absent or reverse umbilical artery end-diastolic flow velocities.

    PubMed

    Weiss, E; Ulrich, S; Berle, P

    1992-01-01

    In a case control study we assessed 47 fetuses with absent or reverse end-diastolic flow velocities (AREDFV) of the umbilical artery with respect to the mode of delivery, fetal acidosis, and abnormal neurological evaluations at the time of discharge from the department of pediatrics. We also studied a control group which was matched for gestational age and had normal umbilical artery flow velocity waveforms. Fetuses with AREDFV were delivered almost exclusively by cesarean section which was usually done for fetal distress. The number of fetuses with abnormal neurological signs was significantly increased compared to the control group. Fetuses with AREDFV showed an increased incidence of fetal acidosis. Forty per cent of these fetuses were delivered within one day of the first abnormal flow measurement; Sixty per cent were observed clinically for up to four weeks before delivery. PMID:1417086

  5. Modeling and experimental validation on pressure drop in a reverse-flow cyclone separator at high inlet solid loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuezhi; Liu, Jie; Xu, Xiang; Xiao, Yunhan

    2011-08-01

    High inlet solid loading is one of the most important features of cyclone separators in high density circulating fluidized beds (CFB). In this work, the effect of high solid loading on pressure drop in a reverse-flow cyclone was experimentally studied. The particles used were sand and γ-Al2O3. An extended range of inlet solid loadings ( M), up to 30 kg of solids/ kg of air was tested at different inlet air velocities ( V in=16˜24 m/s), well beyond the solid loading range reported before. The experiments showed that, in the tested range of solid loadings, the cyclone pressure drop decreased dramatically with increasing solid loading when M<7.5 kg/kg and then almost remained constant. A new semi-empirical model for predicting cyclone pressure drop was also developed. The calculated and experimental results showed good agreement for particle free flow and particle laden flow.

  6. In-situ monitoring the realkalisation process by neutron diffraction: Electroosmotic flux and portlandite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Castellote, Marta . E-mail: martaca@ietcc.csic.es; Llorente, Irene; Andrade, Carmen; Turrillas, Xavier; Alonso, Cruz; Campo, Javier

    2006-05-15

    Even though the electroosmotic flux through hardened cementitious materials during laboratory realkalisation trials had been previously noticed, it has never been in-situ monitored, analysing at the same time the establishment of the electroosmotic flux and the microstructure changes in the surroundings of the rebar. In this paper, two series of cement pastes, cast with CEM I and CEM I substituted in a 35% by fly ash, previously carbonated at 100% CO{sub 2}, were submitted to realkalisation treatments followed on line by simultaneous acquisition of neutron diffraction data. As a result, it has been possible to confirm the electroosmosis as the driving force of carbonates towards the rebar and to determine the range of pH in the anolyte in which most of the relevant electroosmotic phenomena takes place. On the other hand, the behaviour of the main crystalline phases involved in the process has been monitored during the treatment, with the precipitation of portlandite as main result.

  7. The electroosmotic droplet switch: countering capillarity with electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Michael J; Ehrhard, Peter; Steen, Paul H

    2005-08-23

    Electroosmosis, originating in the double-layer of a small liquid-filled pore (size R) and driven by a voltage V, is shown to be effective in pumping against the capillary pressure of a larger liquid droplet (size B) provided the dimensionless parameter sigmaR(2)/epsilon|zeta|VB is small enough. Here sigma is surface tension of the droplet liquid/gas interface, epsilon is the liquid dielectric constant, and zeta is the zeta potential of the solid/liquid pair. As droplet size diminishes, the voltage required to pump electroosmotically scales as V approximately R(2)/B. Accordingly, the voltage needed to pump against smaller higher-pressure droplets can actually decrease provided the pump poresize scales down with droplet size appropriately. The technological implication of this favorable scaling is that electromechanical transducers made of moving droplets, so-called "droplet transducers," become feasible. To illustrate, we demonstrate a switch whose bistable energy landscape derives from the surface energy of a droplet-droplet system and whose triggering derives from the electroosmosis effect. The switch is an electromechanical transducer characterized by individual addressability, fast switching time with low voltage, and no moving solid parts. We report experimental results for millimeter-scale droplets to verify key predictions of a mathematical model of the switch. With millimeter-size water droplets and micrometer-size pores, 5 V can yield switching times of 1 s. Switching time scales as B(3)/VR(2). Two possible "grab-and-release" applications of arrays of switches are described. One mimics the controlled adhesion of an insect, the palm beetle; the other uses wettability to move a particle along a trajectory. PMID:16091462

  8. Local measurements of tearing mode flows and the magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, D. A.; Gangadhara, S.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Fiksel, G.; Prager, S. C.; Craig, D.; Anderson, J. K.

    2010-08-15

    The first localized measurements of tearing mode flows in the core of a hot plasma are presented using nonperturbing measurements of the impurity ion flow. Emission from charge exchange recombination is collected by a novel high optical throughput duo spectrometer providing localized ({+-}1 cm) measurements of C{sup +6} impurity ion velocities resolved to <500 m/s with high bandwidth (100 kHz). Poloidal tearing mode flows in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch are observed to be localized to the mode resonant surface with a radial extent much broader than predicted by linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory but comparable to the magnetic island width. The relative poloidal flow amplitudes among the dominant core modes do not reflect the proportions of the magnetic amplitudes. The largest correlated flows are associated with modes having smaller magnetic amplitudes resonant near the midradius. The MHD dynamo due to these flows on the magnetic axis is measured to be adequate to balance the mean Ohm's law during reduced tearing activity and is significant but does not exclude other dynamo mechanisms from contributing during a surge in reconnection activity.

  9. Time-domain delay-and-sum beamforming for time-reversal detection of intermittent acoustic sources in flows.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarisoa, Ifanila; Fischer, Jeoffrey; Valeau, Vincent; Marx, David; Prax, Christian; Brizzi, Laurent-Emmanuel

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the identification of intermittent aeroacoustic sources in flows by using the time-domain beamforming technique. It is first shown that this technique can be seen as a time-reversal (TR) technique, working with approximate Green functions in the case of a shear flow. Some numerical experiments investigate the case of an array measurement of a generic acoustic pulse emitted in a wind-tunnel flow, with a realistic multi-arm spiral array. The results of the time-domain beamforming successfully match those given by a numerical TR technique over a wide range of flow speeds (reaching the transonic regime). It is shown how the results should be analyzed in a focusing plane parallel to the microphone array in order to estimate the location and emission time of the pulse source. An experimental application dealing with the aeroacoustic radiation of a bluff body in a wind-tunnel flow is also considered, and shows that some intermittent events can be clearly identified in the noise radiation. Time-domain beamforming is then an efficient tool for analyzing intermittent acoustic sources in flows, and is a computationally cheaper alternative to the numerical TR technique, which should be used for complex configurations where the Green function is not available. PMID:25373968

  10. Integration of continuous-flow sampling with microchip electrophoresis using poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based valves in a reversibly sealed device.

    PubMed

    Li, Michelle W; Martin, R Scott

    2007-07-01

    Here we describe a reversibly sealed microchip device that incorporates poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based valves for the rapid injection of analytes from a continuously flowing stream into a channel network for analysis with microchip electrophoresis. The microchip was reversibly sealed to a PDMS-coated glass substrate and microbore tubing was used for the introduction of gas and fluids to the microchip device. Two pneumatic valves were incorporated into the design and actuated on the order of hundreds of milliseconds, allowing analyte from a continuously flowing sampling stream to be injected into an electrophoresis separation channel. The device was characterized in terms of the valve actuation time and pushback voltage. It was also found that the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the buffer system greatly increased the reproducibility of the injection scheme and enabled the analysis of amino acids derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde/cyanide. Results from continuous injections of a 0.39 nL fluorescein plug into the optimized system showed that the injection process was reproducible (RSD of 0.7%, n = 10). Studies also showed that the device was capable of monitoring off-chip changes in concentration with a device lag time of 90 s. Finally, the ability of the device to rapidly monitor on-chip concentration changes was demonstrated by continually sampling from an analyte plug that was derivatized upstream from the electrophoresis/continuous flow interface. A reversibly sealed device of this type will be useful for the continuous monitoring and analysis of processes that occur either off-chip (such as microdialysis sampling) or on-chip from other integrated functions. PMID:17577199

  11. The Selective Myosin II Inhibitor Blebbistatin Reversibly Eliminates Gastrovascular Flow and Stolon Tip Pulsations in the Colonial Hydroid Podocoryna carnea

    PubMed Central

    Connally, Noah; Anderson, Christopher P.; Bolton, Jules E.; Bolton, Edward W.; Buss, Leo W.

    2015-01-01

    Blebbistatin reversibly disrupted both stolon tip pulsations and gastrovascular flow in the colonial hydroid Podocoryna carnea. Epithelial longitudinal muscles of polyps were unaffected by blebbistatin, as polyps contracted when challenged with a pulse of KCl. Latrunculin B, which sequesters G actin preventing F actin assembly, caused stolons to retract, exposing focal adhesions where the tip epithelial cells adhere to the substratum. These results are consistent with earlier suggestions that non-muscle myosin II provides the motive force for stolon tip pulsations and further suggest that tip oscillations are functionally coupled to hydrorhizal axial muscle contraction. PMID:26605798

  12. Spatially periodic reversing core in a twisted-fin generated swirling pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidun, Cyrus K.; Parsheh, Mehran

    2007-06-01

    Experimental results for swirling turbulent flow in a pipe, generated by a 180° twisted fin inside the pipe, are presented. The results show that the core region undergoes a spatially periodic change in direction of rotation from counter-rotating to co-rotating and back to counter-rotating flow relative to the main swirling flow. Up to four transitions in direction of rotation have been recorded with a two-component laser-Doppler velocimeter downstream of the swirl generating fin. The Reynolds number is varied from 25 000 to 85 000 and the average swirl number varies from 0.5 to 0.25 downstream of the fin. The underlying cause of the periodicity in the direction of rotation of flow in the core region is conjectured to be based on the secondary flows generated by a pair of co-rotating helical vortices forming upstream at the spiral-shaped swirl generating fin.

  13. Removal of volatile organic compounds from air streams by making use of a microwave plasma burner with reverse vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji H.; Ma, Suk H.; Cho, Chang H.; Hong, Yong C.; Ahn, Jae Y.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma burner for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from polluted air streams. This study focused on the destruction of the VOCs in the high flow rate polluted streams required for industrial use. Plasma flames were sustained by injecting liquefied natural gas (LNG), which is composed of CH4, into the microwave plasma torch. With its high temperature and high density of atomic oxygen, the microwave torch attained nearly complete combustion of LNG, thereby providing a large-volume, high-temperature plasma flame. The plasma flame was applied to reactors in which the polluted streams were in one of two vortex flows: a conventional vortex reactor (CVR) or a reverse vortex reactor (RVR). The RVR, using a plasma power of 2 kW and an LNG flow of 20 liters per minute achieved a destruction removal efficiency (DRE) of 98% for an air flow rate of 5 Nm3/min polluted with 550 pm of VOCs.. For the same experimental parameters, the CVR provided a DRE of 90.2%. We expect that this decontamination system will prove effective in purifying contaminated air at high flow rates.

  14. Particle Deformation and Concentration Polarization in Electroosmotic Transport of Hydrogels through Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report detection of deformable, hydrogel particles by the resistive-pulse technique using single pores in a polymer film. The hydrogels pass through the pores by electroosmosis and cause formation of a characteristic shape of resistive pulses indicating the particles underwent dehydration and deformation. These effects were explained via a non-homogeneous pressure distribution along the pore axis modeled by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. The local pressure drops are induced by the electroosmotic fluid flow. Our experiments also revealed the importance of concentration polarization in the detection of hydrogels. Due to the negative charges as well as branched, low density structure of the hydrogel particles, concentration of ions in the particles is significantly higher than in the bulk. As a result, when electric field is applied across the membrane, a depletion zone can be created in the vicinity of the particle observed as a transient drop of the current. Our experiments using pores with openings between 200 and 1600 nm indicated the concentration polarization dominated the hydrogels detection for pores wider than 450 nm. The results are of importance for all studies that involve transport of molecules, particles and cells through pores with charged walls. The developed inhomogeneous pressure distribution can potentially influence the shape of the transported species. The concentration polarization changes the interpretation of the resistive pulses; the observed current change does not necessarily reflect only the particle size but also the size of the depletion zone that is formed in the particle vicinity.

  15. X-ray Diffraction Studies of Forward and Reverse Plastic Flow in Nanoscale Layers during Thermal Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gram, Michael D; Carpenter, John S; Payzant, E Andrew; Misra, Amit; Anderson, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The biaxial stress-strain response of layers within Cu/Ni nanolaminates is determined from in-plane x-ray diffraction spectra during heating/cooling. Thinner (11 nm) Cu and Ni layers with coherent, cube-on-cube interfaces reach ~1.8 GPa (Cu) and ~2.9 GPa (Ni) without yielding. Thicker (21 nm) layers with semi-coherent interfaces exhibit unusual plastic phenomena, including extraordinary plastic work hardening rates, and forward vs. reverse plastic flow with small (~10%) changes in stress, and evidence that threshold plastic stress in Ni layers is altered by preceding plastic flow in Cu layers. Line energy, pinning strength, net interfacial dislocation density and hardness are provided.

  16. Efficient capture of magnetic microbeads by sequentially switched electroosmotic flow—an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debarun; Al-Rjoub, Marwan F.; Heineman, William R.; Banerjee, Rupak K.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetophoretic separation is a commonly used immunoassay technique in microfluidic platforms where magnetic microbeads (mMBs) coated with specific epitopes (antibodies) entrap target pathogens by antigen-antibody kinetics. The mMB-cell complexes are then separated from the continuous flow using an external magnetic field. The goal of this study was to design and test a microfluidic device for efficient separation of fluorescence-tagged mMBs driven by electroosmotic flow (EOF) under steady (time invariant) and switched (time varying) electric field conditions. The EOF was driven at electric fields of 100–180 V cm‑1. The mMBs were captured by a neodymium (NdFeB) permanent earth magnet. The capture efficiency (η c) of these mMBs was improved by sequential switching of the applied electric field driven-EOF. The fluorescent images of the captured mMBs, obtained using an inverted epifluorescence microscope, were quantified using image processing tools. In steady EOF, induced by constant electric field, the number of captured mMBs decreased by 72.3% when the electric field was increased from 100 V cm‑1 to 180 V cm‑1. However, alternating the direction of flow through sequential switching of EOF increased the η c by bringing the escaped mMBs back to the capture zone and increasing their residence time in the area of higher magnetic fields. The average increase in η c was 54.3% for an mMB concentration of 1  ×  106 beads ml‑1 (C 1) and 41.6% for a concentration of 2  ×  106 beads ml‑1 (C 2). These improvements were particularly significant at higher electric fields where the η c with switching was, on average, ~70% more compared to flow without switching. The technique of sequential switching demonstrates an efficient method for capture of mMBs for application in magnetophoretic immunoassay.

  17. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  18. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  19. Internal reversing flow in a tailpipe offtake configuration for SSTOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, Jack G.; Esker, Barbara S.; Rhodes, James A.

    1992-01-01

    A generic one-third scale model of a tailpipe offtake system for a supersonic short takeoff vertical landing (SSTOVL) aircraft was tested at LeRC Powered Lift Facility. The model consisted of a tailpipe with twin elbows, offtake ducts, and flow control nozzles, plus a small ventral nozzle and a blind flange to simulate a blocked cruise nozzle. The offtake flow turned through a total angle of 177 degrees relative to the tailpipe inlet axis. The flow split was 45 percent to each offtake and 10 percent to the ventral nozzle. The main test objective was to collect data for comparison to the performance of the same configuration predicted by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Only the experimental results are given - the analytical results are published in a separate paper. Performance tests were made with unheated air at tailpipe-to-ambient pressure ratios up to 5. The total pressure loss through the offtakes was as high as 15.5 percent. All test results are shown as graphs, contour plots, and wall pressure distributions. The complex flow patterns in the tailpipe and elbows at the offtake openings are described with traversing flow angle probe and paint streak flow visualization data.

  20. Feasibility of bloodless liver resection using Lumagel, a reverse thermoplastic polymer, to produce temporary, targeted hepatic blood flow interruption

    PubMed Central

    Pomposelli, James J; Akoad, Mohamed; Flacke, Sebastian; Benn, James J; Solano, Mauricio; Kalra, Aarti; Madras, Peter N

    2012-01-01

    Background Lumagel, a reverse thermosensitive polymer (RTP), provides targeted flow interruption to the kidney by reversibly plugging segmental branches of the renal artery, allowing blood-free partial nephrectomy. Extending this technology to the liver requires the development of techniques for temporary occlusion of the hepatic artery and selected portal vein branches. Methods A three-phased, 15 swine study was performed to determine feasibility, techniques and survival implications of using Lumagel for occlusion of inflow vessels to targeted portions of the liver. Lumagel was delivered using angiographic techniques to sites determined by pre-operative 3-D vascular reconstructions of arterial and venous branches. During resection, the targeted liver mass was resected without vascular clamping. Three survival swine were sacrificed at 3 weeks; the remainder at 6 weeks for pathological studies. Results Six animals (100%) survived, with normal growth, blood tests and no adverse events. Three left lateral lobe resections encountered no bleeding during resection; one right median resection bled; two control animals bled significantly. Pre-terminal angiography and autopsy showed no local pathology and no remote organ damage. Conclusions Targeted flow interruption to the left lateral lobe of the swine liver is feasible and allows resection without bleeding, toxicity or pathological sequelae. Targeting the remaining liver will require more elaborate plug deposition owing to the extensive collateral venous network. PMID:22221572

  1. An Improved Theoretical Model for A-TIG Welding Based on Surface Phase Transition and Reversed Marangoni Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sándor, T.; Mekler, C.; Dobránszky, J.; Kaptay, G.

    2013-01-01

    It is experimentally shown that a thin layer of silica flux leads to an increased depth of weld penetration during activated TIG (=A-TIG) welding of Armco iron. The oxygen-content is found higher in the solidified weld metal and it is linked to the increased depth of penetration through the reversed Marangoni convection. It is theoretically shown for the first time that the basic reason of the reversed Marangoni convection is the phenomenon called "surface phase transition" (SPT), leading to the formation of a nano-thin FeO layer on the surface of liquid iron. It is shown that the ratio of dissolved oxygen in liquid iron to the O-content of the silica flux is determined by the wettability of silica particles by liquid iron. It is theoretically shown that when the silica flux surface density is higher than 15 µg/mm2, reversed Marangoni flow will take place along more than 50 pct of the melted surface. Comparing the SPT line with the dissociation curves of a number of oxides, they can be positioned in the following order of their ability to serve as a flux for A-TIG welding of steel: anatase-TiO2 (best)-rutile-TiO2 (very good)-silica-SiO2 (good)-alumina-Al2O3 (does not work). Anatase (and partly rutile) are self-regulating fluxes, as they provide at any temperature just as much dissolved oxygen as needed for the reversed Marangoni convection, and not more. On the other hand, oxygen can be over-dosed if silica, and other, less stable oxides (such as iron oxides) are used.

  2. The influence of the Kennebec River discharge on estuarine and reverse estuarine flow in eastern Casco Bay, Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, M.; Laine, E.; Roesler, C.; Teegarden, G.

    2008-12-01

    Harpswell Sound and the New Meadows estuary are narrow coastal embayments on the eastern side of Casco Bay, in the Gulf of Maine. Hourly oceanographic data was collected at both locations, including ADCP profiles of current velocity vs. depth. It was found that net circulation in both inlets displays both estuarine and inverse estuarine characteristics at various times. During periods of low discharge from the neighboring Kennebec River there is little connection between the two inlets, with New Meadows developing a three- layered circulation regime and Harpswell Sound having periods of negligible net flow punctuated by brief wind-driven events. However, when the discharge of the Kennebec River is high both inlets experience considerable freshening of surface water with corresponding increases in vertical stratification. In addition both inlets act in concert, experiencing near-simultaneous alternation between estuarine and inverse estuarine current regimes of relatively high strength. It is hypothesized that this coordinated reverse estuarine flow is caused by the passage of the leading edge of a bolus of fresher Kennebec discharge past the entrances of the inlets. Water flowing down the sloping surface of this bolus is deflected by the Coriolis force, running into the inlets at the surface and triggering a compensating outflow at depth. Conversely, coordinated estuarine flow is caused by the passage of the trailing edge of the bolus past the entrances, causing the sea surface slope to switch direction.

  3. The formation of reverse shocks in magnetized high energy density supersonic plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, S. V. E-mail: l.suttle10@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Swadling, G. F.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Grouchy, P. de; Hall, G. N.; Hare, J. D.; Kalmoni, N.; Niasse, N.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Burgess, D.; Clemens, A.; Ciardi, A.; Sheng, L.; Yuan, J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    A new experimental platform was developed, based on the use of supersonic plasma flow from the ablation stage of an inverse wire array z-pinch, for studies of shocks in magnetized high energy density physics plasmas in a well-defined and diagnosable 1-D interaction geometry. The mechanism of flow generation ensures that the plasma flow (Re{sub M} ∼ 50, M{sub S} ∼ 5, M{sub A} ∼ 8, V{sub flow} ≈ 100 km/s) has a frozen-in magnetic field at a level sufficient to affect shocks formed by its interaction with obstacles. It is found that in addition to the expected accumulation of stagnated plasma in a thin layer at the surface of a planar obstacle, the presence of the magnetic field leads to the formation of an additional detached density jump in the upstream plasma, at a distance of ∼c/ω{sub pi} from the obstacle. Analysis of the data obtained with Thomson scattering, interferometry, and local magnetic probes suggests that the sub-shock develops due to the pile-up of the magnetic flux advected by the plasma flow.

  4. Is Gene Flow Promoting the Reversal of Pleistocene Divergence in the Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli)?

    PubMed Central

    Manthey, Joseph D.; Klicka, John; Spellman, Garth M.

    2012-01-01

    The Pleistocene glacial cycles left a genetic legacy on taxa throughout the world; however, the persistence of genetic lineages that diverged during these cycles is dependent upon levels of gene flow and introgression. The consequences of secondary contact among taxa may reveal new insights into the history of the Pleistocene’s genetic legacy. Here, we use phylogeographic methods, using 20 nuclear loci from regional populations, to infer the consequences of secondary contact following divergence in the Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli). Analysis of nuclear data identified two geographically-structured genetic groups, largely concordant with results from a previous mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) study. Additionally, the estimated multilocus divergence times indicate a Pleistocene divergence, and are highly concordant with mtDNA. The previous mtDNA study showed a paucity of sympatry between clades, while nuclear patterns of gene flow show highly varied patterns between populations. The observed pattern of gene flow, from coalescent-based analyses, indicates southern populations in both clades exhibit little gene flow within or between clades, while northern populations are experiencing higher gene flow within and between clades. If this pattern were to persist, it is possible the historical legacy of Pleistocene divergence may be preserved in the southern populations only, and the northern populations would become a genetically diverse hybrid species. PMID:23152877

  5. Hydrogen production from continuous flow, microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater.

    PubMed

    Watson, Valerie J; Hatzell, Marta; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-11-01

    A microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC) was used to produce hydrogen gas from fermentation wastewater without the need for additional electrical energy. Increasing the number of cell pairs in the reverse electrodialysis stack from 5 to 10 doubled the maximum current produced from 60 A/m(3) to 120 A/m(3) using acetate. However, more rapid COD removal required a decrease in the anolyte hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 24 to 12 h to stabilize anode potentials. Hydrogen production using a fermentation wastewater (10 cell pairs, HRT=8 h) reached 0.9±0.1 L H2/Lreactor/d (1.1±0.1 L H2/g-COD), with 58±5% COD removal and a coulombic efficiency of 74±5%. These results demonstrated that consistent rates of hydrogen gas production could be achieved using an MREC if effluent anolyte COD concentrations are sufficient to produce stable anode potentials. PMID:26051523

  6. Experimental Observations About The Behavior of The Sheet Flow On Sand Bed Streams and The Reversal Gradation Effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, A.; Aguilar, C.; Roquer, R.; Andreatta, A.; Velasco, D.

    In our land, Catalonia, exists a lot of torrential ephemeral streams. Which are char- acterized by a great floods during typical convective storms. Sediment transport rates are very important in this gravel/sand torrent. Usually, near the cities, they show a 2- 3% slope bed profile. Engineering works or actuations have to deal with this kind of dynamic systems. The stabilization of this torrents is one of the aim of our research at the Polytechnic University of Catalonia (Hydraulic, Marine and environmental De- partment). Typical experiments in a hydraulic flume was normally used to observe the behavior of stabilization structures. The first step in the research is to know the general evolution of the bed profile. Agradation and degradation experiments in a laboratory flume of 20 m length was car- ried out to study the behavior of the steady and unsteady flow with sediment transport. The hydraulic regime of the experiments was set to be supercritical flat bed; sand flow rates about 300gr/s which gives near a 2% equilibrium slope. The most interesting results of those experiments was the reversal gradation of the sand sizes measured along the flume in the final steady state. This kind of effect was reported by Luca Solari and Gary Parker 2000. A 1-D numerical model to solve the Exner and Saint_Venant implicit system of equation were used to compare the evolu- tion of the different experiments. The sheet sand flow produces a great resistance to flow, the experiments shows the influence exhorted by the sand discharge in the flow resistance factor.

  7. Geometry is a major determinant of flow reversal in proximal aorta.

    PubMed

    Bensalah, Mourad Z; Bollache, Emilie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Giron, Alain; De Cesare, Alain; Macron, Laurent; Lefort, Muriel; Redheuil, Alban; Redheuill, Alban; Mousseaux, Elie

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this study is to quantify aortic backward flow (BF) using phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (PC-CMR) and to study its associations with age, indexes of arterial stiffness, and geometry. Although PC-CMR blood flow studies showed a simultaneous presence of BF and forward flow (FF) in the ascending aorta (AA), the relationship between aortic flows and aging as well as arterial stiffness and geometry in healthy volunteers has never been reported. We studied 96 healthy subjects [47 women, 39 ± 15 yr old (19-79 yr)]. Aortic stiffness [arch pulse wave velocity (PWVAO), AA distensibility], geometry (AA diameter and arch length), and parameters related to AA BF and FF (volumes, peaks, and onset times) were estimated from CMR. Applanation tonometry carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWVCF), carotid augmentation index, and time to return of the reflected pressure wave were assessed. Whereas FF parameters remained unchanged, BF onset time shortened significantly (R(2) = 0.18, P < 0.0001) and BF volume and BF-to-FF peaks ratio increased significantly (R(2) = 0.38 and R(2) = 0.44, respectively, P < 0.0001) with aging. These two latter BF indexes were also related to stiffness indexes (PWVCF, R(2) > 0.30; PWVAO, R(2) > 0.24; and distensibility, R(2) > 0.20, P < 0.001), augmentation index (R(2) > 0.20, P < 0.001), and aortic geometry (AA diameter, R(2) > 0.58; and arch length, R(2) > 0.31, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, aortic diameter was the strongest independent correlate of BF beyond age effect. In conclusion, AA BF estimated using PC-CMR increased significantly in terms of magnitude and volume and appeared earlier with aging and was mostly determined by aortic geometry. Thus BF indexes could be relevant markers of subclinical arterial wall alterations. PMID:24705557

  8. One- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation using experimentally generated reversing flow turbuulence models

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.F.

    1990-08-01

    The activities described in this report do not constitute a continuum but rather a series of linked smaller investigations in the general area of one- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation. The initial impetus for these investigations was the development and construction of the Mechanical Engineering Test Rig (METR) under a grant awarded by NASA to Dr. Terry Simon at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota. The purpose of the METR is to provide experimental data on oscillating turbulent flows in Stirling machine working fluid flow path components (heater, cooler, regenerator, etc.) with particular emphasis on laminar/turbulent flow transitions. Hence, the initial goals for the grant awarded by NASA were, broadly, to provide computer simulation backup for the design of the METR and to analyze the results produced. This was envisaged in two phases: First, to apply an existing one-dimensional Stirling machine simulation code to the METR and second, to adapt a two-dimensional fluid mechanics code which had been developed for simulating high Rayleigh number buoyant cavity flows to the METR. The key aspect of this latter component was the development of an appropriate turbulence model suitable for generalized application to Stirling simulation. A final-step was then to apply the two-dimensional code to an existing Stirling machine for which adequate experimental data exist. The work described herein was carried out over a period of three years on a part-time basis. Forty percent of the first year`s funding was provided as a match to the NASA funds by the Underground Space Center, University of Minnesota, which also made its computing facilities available to the project at no charge.

  9. Statistical methods and software for the analysis of highthroughput reverse genetic assays using flow cytometry readouts

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Florian; Arlt, Dorit; Sauermann, Mamatha; Majety, Meher; Poustka, Annemarie; Wiemann, Stefan; Huber, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Highthroughput cell-based assays with flow cytometric readout provide a powerful technique for identifying components of biologic pathways and their interactors. Interpretation of these large datasets requires effective computational methods. We present a new approach that includes data pre-processing, visualization, quality assessment, and statistical inference. The software is freely available in the Bioconductor package prada. The method permits analysis of large screens to detect the effects of molecular interventions in cellular systems. PMID:16916453

  10. Electroosmotic Push–Pull Perfusion: Description and Application to Qualitative Analysis of the Hydrolysis of Exogenous Galanin in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate here a method that perfuses a small region of an organotypic hippocampal culture with a solution containing an enzyme substrate, a neuropeptide. Perfusate containing hydrolysis products is continually collected and subsequently analyzed for the products of the enzymatic degradation of the peptide substrate. The driving force for perfusion is an electric field. The fused silica capillaries used as “push” and “pull” or “source” and “collection” capillaries have a ζ-potential that is negative and greater in magnitude than the tissue’s ζ-potential. Thus, depending on the magnitudes of particular dimensions, the electroosmotic flow in the capillaries augments the fluid velocity in the tissue. The flow rate is not directly measured; however, we determine it using a finite-element approach. We have determined the collection efficiency of the system using an all d-amino acid internal standard. The flow rates are low, in the nL/min range, and adjustable by controlling the current or voltage in the system. The collection efficiency of the d-amino acid peptide internal standard is variable, increasing with increased current and thus electroosmotic flow rate. The collection efficiency can be rationalized in the context of a Peclet number. Electroosmotic push–pull perfusion of the neuropeptide galanin (gal1–29) through the extracellular space of an organotypic hippocampal culture results in its hydrolysis by ectopeptidase reactions occurring in the extracellular space. The products of hydrolysis were identified by MALDI-MS. Experiments at two levels of current (8–12 μA and 19–40 μA) show that the probability of seeing hydrolysis products (apparently from aminopeptidases) is greater in the Cornu Ammonis area 3 (CA3) than in the Cornu Ammonis area 1 (CA1) in the higher current experiments. In the lower current experiments, shorter peptide products of aminopeptidases (gal13–29 to gal20–19) are seen with greater frequency in CA3 than

  11. Pacemaker wire central venous stenosis and one more reason to not run central venous catheters for dialysis in reverse flow.

    PubMed

    Ash, Stephen R; Ugianskis, Erika J

    2013-01-01

    A 75-year-old man on chronic peritoneal dialysis had unrecognized stenosis of the superior vena cava (SVC) due to pacemaker wires placed 5 years earlier. The patient was placed on hemodialysis after hernia surgery. When a tunneled central venous catheter for dialysis was placed from the right internal jugular (IJ) vein, the venous lumen extended through the stenotic area but not the arterial lumen. Probably due to a subsequent clot at the arterial lumen port the patient developed SVC syndrome and when the catheter was run in the reversed flow direction he developed hypovolemic shock. The stenosis and SVC syndrome resolved with angioplasty of the SVC stenosis, removal of the IJ catheter and use of a femoral vein catheter. The patient eventually returned to peritoneal dialysis and the femoral catheter was removed. PMID:22860886

  12. Flow reversal at low voltage and low frequency in a microfabricated ac electrokinetic pump.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Misha Marie; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Brask, Anders; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bruus, Henrik

    2007-11-01

    Microfluidic chips have been fabricated in Pyrex glass to study electrokinetic pumping generated by a low-voltage ac bias applied to an in-channel asymmetric metallic electrode array. A measurement procedure has been established and followed carefully resulting in a high degree of reproducibility of the measurements over several days. A large coverage fraction of the electrode array in the microfluidic channels has led to an increased sensitivity allowing for pumping measurements at low bias voltages. Depending on the ionic concentration a hitherto unobserved reversal of the pumping direction has been measured in a regime, where both the applied voltage and the frequency are low, V(rms)<1.5 V and f<20 kHz , compared to previously investigated parameter ranges. The impedance spectrum has been thoroughly measured and analyzed in terms of an equivalent circuit diagram to rule out trivial circuit explanations of our findings. Our observations agree qualitatively, but not quantitatively, with theoretical electrokinetic models published in the literature. PMID:18233754

  13. Reverse roll-coating flow: a computational investigation towards high-speed defect free coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belblidia, F.; Tamaddon-Jahromi, H. R.; Echendu, S. O. S.; Webster, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    A finite element Taylor-Galerkin pressure-correction algorithm is employed to simulate a high-speed defect-free roll-coating flow, which substantiates a coating process with a free meniscus surface. Findings are applicable across a wide range of coating sectors in optimisation of coating performance, which targets adaptive and intelligent process control. Industrially, there is a major drive towards using new material products and raising coating line-speeds, to address increased efficiency and productivity. This study has sought to attack these issues by developing an effective predictive toolset for high-speed defect-free coatings. Here, time-stepping/finite element methods are deployed to model this free-surface problem that involves the transfer of a coating fluid from a roller to a substrate (of prescribed wet-film thickness). This procedure is used in conjunction with a set of constitutive equations capable of describing the relevant fluid-film rheology in appropriate detail. Quantities of pressure, lift and drag have been calculated streamwise across the flow domain, and streamline patterns reveal a large recirculating vortex around the meniscus region. Such pressure distributions across the domain display a positive peak which decreases as nip-gap size increases. Further analysis has been conducted, mimicking the presence of a wetting line, whilst varying boundary conditions at the nip. Observation has shown that such inclusion would serve as a relief mechanism to the positive peak pressures generated around the nip zone. Here, through an elasto-hydrodynamic formulation, the elastic deformation of a rubber roll cover (elastomer) has also been introduced, which offers fresh insight into the process with respect to nip-flow behaviour, and allows for the analysis of both positive and negative nip-gaps.

  14. Vascularised fibular graft using reverse peroneal flow in the treatment of congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia.

    PubMed

    Townsend, P L

    1990-05-01

    Pseudarthrosis of the tibia represents one of the more difficult conditions to treat, often resulting in delayed amputation or shortening. A technique is described where the central segment of the fibula containing the nutrient artery can be mobilised based on retrograde peroneal artery flow. This can then be transposed and slotted into the tibial defect after resection of the pseudarthrosis, allowing bone replacement and correction of length. In the initial two cases presented the bone behaved in the same way as a successful microvascular transfer. PMID:2350630

  15. An in situ Measurement of Extracellular Cysteamine, Homocysteine and Cysteine Concentrations in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures by Integration of Electroosmotic Sampling and Microfluidic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juanfang; Xu, Kerui; Landers, James P.; Weber, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an all-electric sampling/derivatization/separation/detection system for the quantitation of thiols in tissue cultures. Extracellular fluid collected from rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) by electroosmotic flow through an11 cm (length) × 50 μm (ID) sampling capillary is introduced to a simple microfluidic chip for derivatization, continuous flow-gated injection, separation and detection.With the help of a fluorogenic, thiol-specific reagent, ThioGlo-1, we have successfully separated and detected the extracellular levels of free reduced cysteamine, homocysteineand cysteinefrom OHSCs within 25 s in a 23 mm separation channel with a confocal laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detector. Attention to the conductivities of the fluids being transported is required for successful flow-gated injections.When the sample conductivity is much higher than the run buffer conductivities, the electroosmotic velocities are such that there is less fluid coming by electroosmosis into the cross from the sample/reagent channel than is leaving by electroosmosis into the separation and waste channels. The resulting decrease in the internal fluid pressure in the injection cross pulls flow from the gated channel. This process may completely shut down the gated injection. Using a glycylglycine buffer with physiological osmolarity but only 62% of physiological conductivity and augmenting the conductivity of the run buffers solved this problem. Quantitation is by standard additions. Concentrations of cysteamine, homocysteine and cysteine in the extracellular space of OHSCs are10.6±1.0 nM (n=70), 0.18±0.01 μM (n=53) and 11.1±1.2 μM (n=70), respectively. This is the first in situquantitative estimation of endogenous cysteamine in brain. Extracellular levels of homocysteine and cysteine are comparable with other reported values. PMID:23330713

  16. Stimulus-induced reversal of information flow through a cortical network for animacy perception.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sarah; van den Honert, Rebecca N; Engell, Andrew D; McCarthy, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research have demonstrated that a region of the right fusiform gyrus (FG) and right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) responds preferentially to static faces and biological motion, respectively. Despite this view, both regions activate in response to both stimulus categories and to a range of other stimuli, such as goal-directed actions, suggesting that these regions respond to characteristics of animate agents more generally. Here we propose a neural model for animacy detection composed of processing streams that are initially differentially sensitive to cues signaling animacy, but that ultimately act in concert to support reasoning about animate agents. We use dynamic causal modeling, a measure of effective connectivity, to demonstrate that the directional flow of information between the FG and pSTS is initially dependent on the characteristics of the animate agent presented, a key prediction of our proposed network for animacy detection. PMID:24625785

  17. In situ enhancement of pulmonary surfactant function using temporary flow reversal

    PubMed Central

    Glindmeyer, Henry W.; Smith, Bradford J.

    2012-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a pulmonary disease with a mortality rate of ∼40% and 75,000 deaths annually in the United States. Mechanical ventilation restores airway patency and gas transport but leads to ventilator-induced lung injury. Furthermore, surfactant replacement therapy is ineffective due to surfactant delivery difficulties and deactivation by vascular proteins leaking into the airspace. Here, we demonstrated that surfactant function can be substantially improved (up to 50%) in situ in an in vitro pulmonary airway model using unconventional flows that incorporate a short-term retraction of the air-liquid interface, leading to a net decrease in cellular damage. Computational fluid dynamic simulations provided insights into this method and demonstrated the physicochemical hydrodynamic foundation for the improved surfactant microscale transport and mobility. This study may provide a starting point for developing novel ventilation waveforms to improve surfactant function in edematous airways. PMID:21998268

  18. Stimulus-induced reversal of information flow through a cortical network for animacy perception

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sarah; van den Honert, Rebecca N.; Engell, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research have demonstrated that a region of the right fusiform gyrus (FG) and right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) responds preferentially to static faces and biological motion, respectively. Despite this view, both regions activate in response to both stimulus categories and to a range of other stimuli, such as goal-directed actions, suggesting that these regions respond to characteristics of animate agents more generally. Here we propose a neural model for animacy detection composed of processing streams that are initially differentially sensitive to cues signaling animacy, but that ultimately act in concert to support reasoning about animate agents. We use dynamic causal modeling, a measure of effective connectivity, to demonstrate that the directional flow of information between the FG and pSTS is initially dependent on the characteristics of the animate agent presented, a key prediction of our proposed network for animacy detection. PMID:24625785

  19. Flow mechanism of self-induced reversed limit-cycle wing rock for a chined forebody configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Deng, Xueying; Wang, Yankui; Li, Qian

    2015-11-01

    The wing rock phenomenon reduces the maneuverability and affects the flight safety of modern advanced fighters, such as the F-35, which have chined forebodies. Understanding the flow mechanism is critical to suppressing this phenomenon. In this study, experiments were conducted to reveal the motion and flow behavior over a chined forebody configuration. The tests were performed in a wind tunnel at an angle of attack of 50∘ with a Reynolds number of 1.87 × 105. Reversed limit-cycle oscillation was discovered in the free-to-roll tests. The unstable rolling moment around zero roll angle in the static case suggests that the model tends to be driven away from zero roll angle. Thus, the model cannot maintain its equilibrium at zero roll angle during free-to-roll motion. The unstable rolling moment is generated by the wing vortex structure above the upward wing, which is induced by the forebody asymmetric vortices. During wing rock, the wing vortex structure appears above the upward wing at a large roll angle after crossing zero roll angle owing to a time lag in the forebody vortex position, which is conducive to the motion. The forebody asymmetric vortices are thus the key to induce and maintain the motion.

  20. Industrial contamination of a municipal water-supply lake by induced reversal of ground-water flow, Managua, Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect

    Bethune, D.N.; Farvolden, R.N.; Ryan, M.C.; Guzman, A.L.

    1996-07-01

    Laguna Asososca, a large ground-water-fed volcanic crater, is an important source of municipal water supply for the city of Managua. In 1990, after 65 years of pumping at increasing rates from the crater, the gradient between the Laguna and the highly contaminated Lake Managua had potentially reversed, leading to a scenario where the Laguna was possibly drawing in contaminated ground water from Lake Managua and/or a highly contaminated aquifer below an industrial area located between the Laguna and Lake Managua. A drilling and sampling program undertaken between 1990 and 1992 found: (1) four synthetic organic chemicals in the Laguna (methylene chloride, chloroform, 1,3-dichlorobenzene and 1,4-dichlorobenzene), (2) numerous other synthetic organic chemicals near Laguna Asososca in the ground water below the industrial area, and (3) no evidence of Laguna Asososca drawing water from Lake Managua. It appears that the Laguna Asososca capture zone extended into the industrial area but not as far as Lake Managua. Ground-water flow modeling of the regional ground-water flow system was consistent with the field interpretation. Estimates of the relative mobilities of the synthetic organic chemicals indicated that the chemicals found in the water of Laguna Asososca likely represented the mobile leading edge of a contaminant plume emanating from the industrial area. The simplest and most effective solution to mitigate contamination of Laguna Asososca is to maintain its water level above that of Lake Managua by reducing its pumpage to about 50% of the 1990 rate.

  1. Analysis of dynamic stall using unsteady boundary-layer theory. [effect of pitch rate on the delay in forward movement of the rear flow reversal point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scruggs, R. M.; Nash, J. F.; Singleton, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The unsteady turbulent boundary layer and potential flow about a pitching airfoil are analyzed using numerical methods to determine the effect of pitch rate on the delay in forward movement of the rear flow reversal point. An explicit finite difference scheme is used to integrate the unsteady boundary layer equations, which are coupled at each instant of time to a fully unsteady and nonlinear potential flow analysis. A substantial delay in forward movement of the reversal point is demonstrated with increasing pitch rate, and it is shown that the delay results partly from the alleviation of the gradients in the potential flow, and partly from the effects of unsteadiness in the boundary layer itself. The predicted delay in flow-reversal onset, and its variation with pitch rate, are shown to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data relating to the delay in dynamic stall. From the comparisons it can be concluded (a) that the effects of time-dependence are sufficient to explain the failure of the boundary layer to separate during the dynamic overshoot, and (b) that there may be some link between forward movement of the reversal point and dynamic stall.

  2. Electrode kinetic and electro-kinetic effects in electroosmotic dewatering of clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Vijh, A.K.

    1997-05-01

    Lockhart`s remarks on the author`s previous interpretation of the electrochemical aspects of the electroosmotic dewatering (EOD) of clay suspensions are analyzed to provide some further clarification. Based on Lockhart`s excellent work, the authors put forward here novel electrochemical interpretations of some features of the following experimental observations: (1) Galvani dewatering; (2) the dewatering efficiency; and (3) high voltage needed for dewatering Al-kaolinite and aluminum electrode effect.

  3. Electromagnetic Treatment to Old Alzheimer's Mice Reverses β-Amyloid Deposition, Modifies Cerebral Blood Flow, and Provides Selected Cognitive Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Arendash, Gary W.; Mori, Takashi; Dorsey, Maggie; Gonzalez, Rich; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated physiologic and cognitive effects of “long-term" electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure in humans or animals. Our recent studies have provided initial insight into the long-term impact of adulthood EMF exposure (GSM, pulsed/modulated, 918 MHz, 0.25–1.05 W/kg) by showing 6+ months of daily EMF treatment protects against or reverses cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's transgenic (Tg) mice, while even having cognitive benefit to normal mice. Mechanistically, EMF-induced cognitive benefits involve suppression of brain β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation/deposition in Tg mice and brain mitochondrial enhancement in both Tg and normal mice. The present study extends this work by showing that daily EMF treatment given to very old (21–27 month) Tg mice over a 2-month period reverses their very advanced brain Aβ aggregation/deposition. These very old Tg mice and their normal littermates together showed an increase in general memory function in the Y-maze task, although not in more complex tasks. Measurement of both body and brain temperature at intervals during the 2-month EMF treatment, as well as in a separate group of Tg mice during a 12-day treatment period, revealed no appreciable increases in brain temperature (and no/slight increases in body temperature) during EMF “ON" periods. Thus, the neuropathologic/cognitive benefits of EMF treatment occur without brain hyperthermia. Finally, regional cerebral blood flow in cerebral cortex was determined to be reduced in both Tg and normal mice after 2 months of EMF treatment, most probably through cerebrovascular constriction induced by freed/disaggregated Aβ (Tg mice) and slight body hyperthermia during “ON" periods. These results demonstrate that long-term EMF treatment can provide general cognitive benefit to very old Alzheimer's Tg mice and normal mice, as well as reversal of advanced Aβ neuropathology in Tg mice without brain heating. Results further underscore the potential for EMF

  4. An Investigation of Physics and Control of Flow Passing a NACA 0015 in Fully-Reversed Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Christopher J.

    Flow control experiments were performed on a NACA 0015 airfoil in fully-reversed condition, which is anticipated to occur on the retreating blade side of advanced helicopters such as slowed-rotor compound rotorcraft. Control was achieved using nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (NS-DBD) plasma actuators. The Reynolds number based on a chord length of 203 mm was fixed at 5.0 · 105, corresponding to a freestream velocity of ˜38 m/s. Two angles of attack were considered: α = 0° and 15°, each of which is relevant to a particular implementation of slowed-rotor technology. At α = 0°, the flow resembles that of a flow behind a cylinder. A von Karman vortex street formed in the wake where alternating vortex shedding occurred at a Strouhal number of 0.12. Excitation was performed using an NS-DBD on one side of the airfoil, with plasma formation just upstream of the separation line. However, there was no discernible influence upon the baseline behavior. At α = 15°, fully separated flow on the suction side extended well beyond the airfoil with naturally shed vortices at a Strouhal number of 0.19. Plasma actuation was evaluated at both the aerodynamic leading-edge (ALE) and aerodynamic trailing-edge (ATE) of the airfoil. The flow responded to the plasma actuation at the ALE by generating organized coherent structures in the shear layer over the separated region. Moderate excitation around the natural shedding Strouhal number had the most significant effects: synchronizing the shedding from the ALE and ATE, creating moderately sized structures that convected far downstream, greatly reducing the separation area, increasing lift, and decreasing drag. Excitation at much higher Strouhal numbers resulted in the flow returning to its natural shedding state, but with less coherent structures that diffused in the wake. This reduced the separation area and significantly reduced drag. Plasma actuation at the ATE caused a reduction in the magnitude of the fundamental and

  5. Electro-osmotic pumping and ionic conductance measurements in porous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajandar, Saumitra K.

    Electro-osmotic (EO) pumps directly convert electrical energy into fluids' kinetic energy, which have many advantages such as a simple and compact structure, no mechanical moving parts, and easy integration. In general, it is easy for EO pumps to generate enough pressure but it has been a challenge for EO pumps to produce a high flowrate. EO pumps have found applications in various micro-/nano-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) and have the potential to impact a variety of engineering fields including microelectronics cooling and bio-analytical systems. This dissertation focuses on the design, fabrication and characterization of EO pumps based on two novel porous membrane materials: SiO2-coated anodic porous alumina and SiNx-coated porous silicon. High quality porous alumina membranes of controllable pore diameters in the range of 30-100 nm and pore lengths of 60-100 mum were fabricated by electrochemical anodization. The pores are straight, uniform and hexagonally close-packed with a high porosity of up to 50%. The inner surface of the pore was coated with a thin layer (˜5 nm) of SiO2 conformally to achieve a high zeta potential. The EO pumping flowrate of the fabricated anodic alumina membranes, coated and uncoated, was experimentally measured. Results indicate that the high zeta potential of the SiO2 coating increases the pumping flowrate even though the coating reduces the porosity of the membrane. The nanostructured SiO2-coated porous anodic alumina membranes can provide a normalized flowrate of 0.125 ml/min/V/cm2 under a low effective applied voltage of 3 V, which sets a record high normalized flowrate under low applied voltage. To realize field effect control of EO pumping, we designed and fabricated SiNx-coated porous silicon membranes with the silicon core as the electrode to apply a transverse gate potential. The gate potential will modulate the zeta potential of the pore wall and thereby provide control over the EO flowrate. The membranes were

  6. Optimization of reverse-flow, two-temperature, dilute-acid pretreatment to enhance biomass conversion to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Torget, R.; Hatzis, C.; Hayward, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    A reverse-flow, two-temperature dilute-acid prehydrolysis process of commercial yellow poplar sawdust using two percolation reactors was designed to simulate countercurrent flow of the biomass solids and prehydrolysis liquor, and to exploit the xylan biphasic kinetics. Lower temperatures (150-174{degrees}C) are initially applied to hydrolyze the easily hydrolyzable xylan, and higher temperatures (180-204{degrees}C) are applied to hydrolyze the remaining xylan. Two reactors were used to optimize each temperature range, using varying concentrations of sulfuric acid from 0.073-0.73 wt% and reaction times. Yields of soluble xylose, as high as 97% of theoretical, expressed as monomeric and oligomeric xylose, have been achieved with only 2.9% of the xylan being degraded to furfural, at concentrations of total potential sugar between 2.4 and 3.7 wt% before flashing. Depending on the combined severity of the acid concentration, residence time of the solids and liquor, and temperature of prehydrolysis, 81-100% of the hemicellulose, 3-32% of the glucans, and up to 46% of the Klason lignin could be solubilized. The lignocellulosic substrate produced from the pretreatment is readily converted to ethanol at a yield of approximately 91% of theoretical, with ethanol concentrations of up to 4.0 wt% in 55 h via a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process. In terms of xylose recovery and ethanol production level and rate, the present results are far superior to those previously reported using a single-temperature, dilute-acid pretreatment. 42 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Evidence for a new geomagnetic reversal from lava flows in Idaho: discussion of short polarity reversals in the Brunhes and late Matuyama Polarity Chrons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Champion, D.E.; Lanphere, M.A.; Kuntz, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    K-Ar ages and paleomagnetic data for basalt samples from a new core hole (site E) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) indicate that the age of the reversed polarity event recorded in Snake River Plain lavas is older than 465 ?? 50 ka (1000 years before present) reported previously by Champion et al. (1981). A review of data documenting short reversal records from volcanic and sedimentary rocks shows that there is evidence for eight polarity subchrons in the Brunhes and two besides the Jaramillo in the late Matuyama. These 10 short subchrons begin to indicate the many short events that Cox (1968) hypothesized must exist if polarity interval lengths have a Poisson distribution. The mean sustained polarity interval length since late Matuyama Chron time is 90 000 years. The similarity of this number with the 105-year period of the Earth's orbital eccentricity suggests anew that linkage between geomagnetic, paleoclimatic, and possible underlying Earth orbital parameters should be evaluated. -from Authors

  8. Rapid detection of measles virus using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification coupled with a disposable lateral flow device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changping; Feng, Yan; Chen, Yin; Gao, Jian; Lu, Yiyu

    2016-06-01

    The measles virus (MeV) causes a highly contagious disease and efforts to reduce its spread are critical. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay coupled with a disposable lateral flow device (RT-LAMP-LFD) was developed for the rapid detection of MeV. The assay was performed in 40 min at an optimal temperature of 58 °C, with endpoint results visualized directly. A probe that was complementary to the RT-LAMP amplicon was designed to enhance assay specificity. Detection limit of the assay was 8.8 copies/μL synthetic RNA, which equals the sensitivity of real-time RT-PCR. Clinical specimens were used to validate the RT-LAMP-LFD in provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (n = 245) and six municipal CDCs (n = 249). The results obtained using RT-LAMP-LFD and real-time RT-PCR were highly concordant. The RT-LAMP-LFD is rapid, stable, and does not require expensive equipment, which can be used for routine MeV monitoring in CDC laboratories. PMID:27117517

  9. Label-free viscosity measurement of complex fluids using reversal flow switching manipulation in a microfluidic channel

    PubMed Central

    Jun Kang, Yang; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    The accurate viscosity measurement of complex fluids is essential for characterizing fluidic behaviors in blood vessels and in microfluidic channels of lab-on-a-chip devices. A microfluidic platform that accurately identifies biophysical properties of blood can be used as a promising tool for the early detections of cardiovascular and microcirculation diseases. In this study, a flow-switching phenomenon depending on hydrodynamic balancing in a microfluidic channel was adopted to conduct viscosity measurement of complex fluids with label-free operation. A microfluidic device for demonstrating this proposed method was designed to have two inlets for supplying the test and reference fluids, two side channels in parallel, and a junction channel connected to the midpoint of the two side channels. According to this proposed method, viscosities of various fluids with different phases (aqueous, oil, and blood) in relation to that of reference fluid were accurately determined by measuring the switching flow-rate ratio between the test and reference fluids, when a reverse flow of the test or reference fluid occurs in the junction channel. An analytical viscosity formula was derived to measure the viscosity of a test fluid in relation to that of the corresponding reference fluid using a discrete circuit model for the microfluidic device. The experimental analysis for evaluating the effects of various parameters on the performance of the proposed method revealed that the fluidic resistance ratio (RJL/RL, fluidic resistance in the junction channel (RJL) to fluidic resistance in the side channel (RL)) strongly affects the measurement accuracy. The microfluidic device with smaller RJL/RL values is helpful to measure accurately the viscosity of the test fluid. The proposed method accurately measured the viscosities of various fluids, including single-phase (Glycerin and plasma) and oil-water phase (oil vs. deionized water) fluids, compared with conventional methods. The proposed

  10. An electro-osmotic instability in biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonetti, M.; Dubois-Violette, E.

    1997-01-01

    The development of ionic currents during the growth of biological cells contributes to the generation of spatial order. A new instability is proposed to describe such phenomenon. The mechanism triggering the instability is based on electro-osmosis flow which generates aggregation of channels or pumps. The onset of unstable modes and the dispersion relation are determined and a comparison with a biological cell is provided.

  11. Low-Power, Low-Voltage Electroosmotic Actuator for an Implantable Micropumping System Intended for Drug Delivery Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getpreecharsawas, Jirachai

    An electroosmotic (EO) actuator offers a low-power, low-voltage alternative in a diaphragm-based periodic displacement micropump intended for an implantable drug delivery system. The actuator utilizes an electroosmosis mechanism to transport liquid across a membrane to deflect the pumping diaphragms in a reciprocating manner. In the study, the membrane made of porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si) tens of nanometers in thickness was used as the promising EO generator with low power consumption and small package size. This ultrathin membrane provides the opportunity for electrode integration such that the very high electric field can be generated across the membrane with the applied potential under 1 volt for low flow rate applications like drug delivery. Due to such a low applied voltage, the challenge, however, imposes on the capability of generating the pumping pressure high enough to deflect the pumping diaphragms and overcome the back pressure normally encountered in the biological tissue and organ. This research identified the cause of weak pumping pressure that the electric field inside the orifice-like nanopores of the ultrathin membrane is weaker than conventional theory would predict. It no longer scales uniformly with the thickness of membrane, but with the pore length-to-diameter aspect ratio for each nanopore. To enhance the pumping performance, the pnc-Si membrane was coated with an ultrathin Nafion film. As a result, the induced concentration difference across the Nafion film generates the osmotic pressure against the back pressure allowing the EO actuator to maintain the target pumping flow rate under 1 volt.

  12. Rotation profile flattening and toroidal flow shear reversal due to the coupling of magnetic islands in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, B.; Chen, M.; Classen, I. G. J.; Domier, C. W.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Luhmann, N. C.; Muscatello, C. M.; Okabayashi, M.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.

    2016-05-01

    The electromagnetic coupling of helical modes, even those having different toroidal mode numbers, modifies the distribution of toroidal angular momentum in tokamak discharges. This can have deleterious effects on other transport channels as well as on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and disruptivity. At low levels of externally injected momentum, the coupling of core-localized modes initiates a chain of events, whereby flattening of the core rotation profile inside successive rational surfaces leads to the onset of a large m/n = 2/1 tearing mode and locked-mode disruption. With increased torque from neutral beam injection, neoclassical tearing modes in the core may phase-lock to each other without locking to external fields or structures that are stationary in the laboratory frame. The dynamic processes observed in these cases are in general agreement with theory, and detailed diagnosis allows for momentum transport analysis to be performed, revealing a significant torque density that peaks near the 2/1 rational surface. However, as the coupled rational surfaces are brought closer together by reducing q95, additional momentum transport in excess of that required to attain a phase-locked state is sometimes observed. Rather than maintaining zero differential rotation (as is predicted to be dynamically stable by single-fluid, resistive MHD theory), these discharges develop hollow toroidal plasma fluid rotation profiles with reversed plasma flow shear in the region between the m/n = 3/2 and 2/1 islands. The additional forces expressed in this state are not readily accounted for, and therefore, analysis of these data highlights the impact of mode coupling on torque balance and the challenges associated with predicting the rotation dynamics of a fusion reactor—a key issue for ITER.

  13. Impact of higher alginate expression on deposition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in radial stagnation point flow and reverse osmosis systems.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Moshe; Rezene, Tesfalem Zere; Ziemba, Christopher; Gillor, Osnat; Mathee, Kalai

    2009-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have major impact on biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. On one hand, EPS can reduce membrane permeability and on the other, EPS production by the primary colonizers may influence their deposition and attachment rate and subsequently affect the biofouling propensity of the membrane. The role of bacterial exopolysaccharides in bacterial deposition followed by the biofouling potential of an RO membrane was evaluated using an alginate overproducing (mucoid) Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The mucoid P. aeruginosa PAOmucA22 was compared with its isogenic nonmucoid prototypic parent PAO1 microscopically in a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) system for their bacterial deposition characteristics. Then, biofouling potential of PAO1 and PAOmucA22 was determined in a crossflow rectangular plate-and-frame membrane cell, in which the strains were cultivated on a thin-film composite, polyamide, flat RO membrane coupon (LFC-1) under laminar flow conditions. In the RSPF system, the observed deposition rate of the mucoid strain was between 5- and 10-fold lower than of the wild type using either synthetic wastewater medium (with ionic strength of 14.7 mM and pH 7.4) or 15 mM KCl solution (pH of 6.2). The slower deposition rate of the mucoid strain is explained by 5- to 25-fold increased hydrophilicity of the mucoid strain as compared to the isogenic wild type, PAO1. Corroborating with these results, a significant delay in the onset of biofouling of the RO membrane was observed when the mucoid strain was used as the membrane colonizer, in which the observed time for the induced permeate flux decline was delayed (ca. 2-fold). In conclusion, the lower initial cell attachment of the mucoid strain decelerated biofouling of the RO membrane. Bacterial deposition and attachment is a critical step in biofilm formation and governed by intimate interactions between outer membrane proteins of the bacteria and the surface. Shielding these

  14. Reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis analysis of nitrate and nitrite in natural water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, S.G.

    1998-06-11

    This paper describes the application of reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis (RPCE) for rapid and accurate determination of nitrate and nitrite in natural water samples. Using hexamethonium bromide (HMB) as an electroosmotic flow modifier in a borate buffer at pH 9.2, the resolution of nitrate and nitrite was accomplished in less than 3 minutes. RPCE was compared with ion chromatographic (IC) and cadmium reduction flow injection analysis (Cd-FIA) methods which are the two most commonly used standard methods for the analysis of natural water samples for nitrate and nitrite. When compared with the ion chromatographic method for the determination of nitrate and nitrite, RPCE reduced analysis time, decreased detection limits by a factor of 10, cut laboratory wastes by more than two orders of magnitude, and eliminated interferences commonly associated with IC. When compared with the cadmium reduction method, RPCE had the advantage of simultaneous determination of nitrate and nitrite, could be used in the presence of various metallic ions that normally interfere in cadmium reduction, and decreased detection limits by a factor of 10.

  15. On two-liquid AC electroosmotic system for thin films.

    PubMed

    Navarkar, Abhishek; Amiroudine, Sakir; Demekhin, Evgeny A

    2016-03-01

    Lab-on-chip devices employ EOF for transportation and mixing of liquids. However, when a steady (DC) electric field is applied to the liquids, there are undesirable effects such as degradation of sample, electrolysis, bubble formation, etc. due to large magnitude of electric potential required to generate the flow. These effects can be averted by using a time-periodic or AC electric field. Transport and mixing of nonconductive liquids remain a problem even with this technique. In the present study, a two-liquid system bounded by two rigid plates, which act as substrates, is considered. The potential distribution is derived by assuming a Boltzmann charge distribution and using the Debye-Hückel linearization. Analytical solution of this time-periodic system shows some effects of viscosity ratio and permittivity ratio on the velocity profile. Interfacial electrostatics is also found to play a significant role in deciding velocity gradients at the interface. High frequency of the applied electric field is observed to generate an approximately static velocity profile away from the Electric Double Layer (EDL). PMID:26773725

  16. [Prognostic factors of perinatal short-term outcome in severe placental insufficiency using Doppler sonography to assess end-diastolic absent and reverse blood flow in umbilical arteries].

    PubMed

    Frauenschuh, I; Wirbelauer, J; Karl, S; Girschick, G; Rehn, M; Zollner, U; Frambach, T; Dietl, J; Müller, T

    2015-02-01

    Significant placental insufficiency, indicated by Doppler ultrasound findings of absent or reverse end-diastolic flow velocities (AREDV), is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Analysis of blood flow in the ductus venosus should assist in early intrauterine recognition of threatened foetuses. 58 high-risk pregnancies with umbilical AREDV were repeatedly examined (n=364). Doppler findings were correlated with neonatal signs of deterioration (ratio of normoblasts to leukocytes, pH, base excess, Apgar score), as well as short-term morbidity [need for intubation, duration of assisted respiration, evidence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH grade III+IV)] against the analysis of the blood flow findings (normal or increased pulsitility, absence or reverse end-diastolic flow) in the umbilical arteries (AU), the middle cerebral arteries (ACM) and ductus venosus (DV) relating these to birth weight and the duration of the pregnancy. The median period of observation was 12.8 days, 48% of the foetuses showed an abnormal ductus venosus flow and 26% an absent venous or reverse end-diastolic flow. The median date of delivery was 30 weeks, with a mean birth weight of 816 g. 93% were live births with 12% dying postnatally. Although the criteria for postnatal morbidity (BPD, NEC, IVH III+IV) and mortality did not correlate with changes in arterial and venous Doppler parameters in our group, there was a significant relationship between the normoblast count, known to be a marker of chronic hypoxia. The Apgar 10 minte score, umbilical arterial pH and base excess were correlated with changes in the DV flow curves. Healthy survival started, irrespective of arterial or venous blood flow criteria, from 27+0 weeks of pregnancy. If born between 27.0 and 30+6 weeks, the infants were more likely to be healthy the less the blood flow had been compromised. A birth weight

  17. Fabrication and study of AC electro-osmotic micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin

    In this thesis, microelectrode arrays of micropumps have been designed, fabricated and characterized for transporting microfluid by AC electro-osmosis (ACEO). In particular, the 3D stepped electrode design which shows superior performance to others in literature is adopted for making micropumps, and the performance of such devices has been studied and explored. A novel fabrication process has also been developed in the work, realizing 3D stepped electrodes on a flexible substrate, which is suitable for biomedical use, for example glaucoma implant. There are three major contributions to ACEO pumping in the work. First, a novel design of 3D "T-shaped" discrete electrode arrays was made using PolyMUMPsRTM process. The breakthrough of this work was discretizing the continuous 3D stepped electrodes which were commonly seen in the past research. The "T-shaped" electrodes did not only create ACEO flows on the top surfaces of electrodes but also along the side walls between separated electrodes. Secondly, four 3D stepped electrode arrays were designed, fabricated and tested. It was found from the experiment that PolyMUMPsRTM ACEO electrodes usually required a higher driving voltage than gold electrodes for operation. It was also noticed that a simulation based on the modified model taking into account the surface oxide of electrodes showed a better agreement with the experimental results. It thus demonstrated the possibility that the surface oxide of electrodes had impact on fluidic pumping. This methodology could also be applied to metal electrodes with a native oxide layer such as titanium and aluminum. Thirdly, a prototype of the ACEO pump with 3D stepped electrode arrays was first time realized on a flexible substrate using Kapton polyimide sheets and packaged with PDMS encapsulants. Comprehensive experimental testing was also conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties as well as the pumping performance. The experimental findings indicated that this fabrication

  18. Experimental localization of an acoustic sound source in a wind-tunnel flow by using a numerical time-reversal technique.

    PubMed

    Padois, Thomas; Prax, Christian; Valeau, Vincent; Marx, David

    2012-10-01

    The possibility of using the time-reversal technique to localize acoustic sources in a wind-tunnel flow is investigated. While the technique is widespread, it has scarcely been used in aeroacoustics up to now. The proposed method consists of two steps: in a first experimental step, the acoustic pressure fluctuations are recorded over a linear array of microphones; in a second numerical step, the experimental data are time-reversed and used as input data for a numerical code solving the linearized Euler equations. The simulation achieves the back-propagation of the waves from the array to the source and takes into account the effect of the mean flow on sound propagation. The ability of the method to localize a sound source in a typical wind-tunnel flow is first demonstrated using simulated data. A generic experiment is then set up in an anechoic wind tunnel to validate the proposed method with a flow at Mach number 0.11. Monopolar sources are first considered that are either monochromatic or have a narrow or wide-band frequency content. The source position estimation is well-achieved with an error inferior to the wavelength. An application to a dipolar sound source shows that this type of source is also very satisfactorily characterized. PMID:23039435

  19. Flow-injection in-line complexation for ion-pair reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography of some metal-4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol chelates.

    PubMed

    Srijaranai, Supalax; Chanpaka, Saiphon; Kukusamude, Chutima; Grudpan, Kate

    2006-02-28

    Flow injection (FI) was coupled to ion-pair reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (IP-RPHPLC) for the simultaneous analysis of some metal-4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) chelates. A simple reverse flow injection (rFI) set-up was used for in-line complexation of metal-PAR chelates prior to their separation by IP-RPHPLC. The rFI conditions were: injection volume of PAR 85muL, flow rate of metal stream 4.5mLmin(-1), concentration of PAR 1.8x10(-4)molL(-1) and the mixing coil length of 150cm. IP-RPHPLC was carried out using a C(18)muBondapak column with the mobile phase containing 37% acetonitrile, 3.0mmolL(-1) acetate buffer pH 6.0 and 6.2mmolL(-1) tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBABr) at a flow rate of 1.0mLmin(-1) and visible detection at 530 and 440nm. The analysis cycle including in-line complexation and separation by IP-RPHPLC was 16min, which able to separate Cr(VI) and the PAR chelates of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II). PMID:18970520

  20. Simultaneous chiral discrimination of multiple profens by cyclodextrin-modified capillary electrophoresis in normal and reversed polarity modes.

    PubMed

    La, Sookie; Kim, Jiyung; Kim, Jung-Han; Goto, Junichi; Kim, Kyoung-Rae

    2003-08-01

    Simultaneous enantioseparations of nine profens for their accurate chiral discrimination were achieved by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in the normal polarity (NP) mode with a single cyclodextrin (CD) system and in the reversed polarity (RP) mode with a dual CD system. The single CD system in the NP mode employed heptakis(2,3,6-tri-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (TMbetaCD) added at 75 mM-100 mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid buffer (pH 6.0) as the optimum run buffer. The dual CD system operated in the RP mode used 30 mM TMbetaCD and 1.0% anionic carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin dissolved in pH 3.0, 100 mM phosphoric acid-triethanolamine buffer containing 0.01% hexadimethrine bromide added to reverse the electroosmotic flow. Fairly good enantiomeric resolutions and the opposite enantiomer migration orders were achieved in the two modes. Relative migration times to internal standard under respective optimum conditions were characteristic of each enantiomer with good precision (< 2% relative standard deviation, RSD), thereby enabling to crosscheck the chemical identification of profens and also their accurate chiralities. The method linearity in the two modes was found to be adequate (r > or = 0.9991) for the chiral assay of the profens investigated. Simultaneous enantiomeric purity test of ibuprofen, ketoprofen and flurbiprofen in a mixture was feasible in a single analysis by the present method. PMID:12900877

  1. Structural and Temporal Requirements for Geomagnetic Field Reversal Deduced From 40Ar/39Ar Dated Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.; Hoffman, K. A.; Coe, R. S.; Brown, L. L.; Jicha, B. R.; Pringle, M. S.; Chauvin, A.

    2004-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of lavas on Tahiti, long thought to record the primary part of the Matuyama-Bruhnes (M-B) reversa1, gives an age of 795+/- 7 ka, indistinguishable from that of transitional lavas in Chile and La Palma, but older than the accepted age for the reversal. Only the transitional lavas on Maui and one from La Palma (dated at 776 +/- 2 ka), agree with the astronomical age for the M-B reversal. Virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) associated with the Tahitian and Chilean lavas cluster near Australia, as do VGPs recorded on Tahiti during the Big Lost and Punaruu events, two apparently unsuccessful reversals. These findings, suggestive of a recurring, mantle-held flux pattern at the outer core surface during reversal attempts, are also theoretically equivalent to the situation that would arise today if the axial dipole were to continue to weaken and vanish. Hence, we propose that the 795 ka lavas record the onset of a dynamo process--one which only on occasion would result in polarity change. This initial instability, associated with the first of two decreases in field intensity, began 18 kyrs prior to the actual polarity switch. These data may provide the first observational support to the claim that complete reversals require a significant interval of time for magnetic flux to escape from the solid inner core and sufficiently weaken its stabilizing effect.

  2. Amazon river flow regime and flood recessional agriculture: Flood stage reversals and risk of annual crop loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coomes, Oliver T.; Lapointe, Michel; Templeton, Michael; List, Geneva

    2016-08-01

    The annual flood cycle is an important driver of ecosystem structure and function in large tropical rivers such as the Amazon. Riparian peasant communities rely on river fishing and annual floodplain agriculture, closely adapted to the recession phase of the flood pulse. This article reports on a poorly documented but important challenge facing farmers practicing flood recessional agriculture along the Amazon river: frequent, unpredictable stage reversals (repiquetes) which threaten to ruin crops growing on channel bars. We assess the severity of stage reversals for rice production on exposed river mud bars (barreales) near Iquitos, Peru. Crop loss risk is estimated based on a quantitative analysis of 45 years of daily Amazon stage data and field data from floodplain communities nearby in the Muyuy archipelago, upstream of Iquitos. Rice varieties selected, elevations of silt rich bars where rice is sown, as well as planting and harvest dates are analyzed in the light of the timing, frequencies and amplitudes of observed stage reversals that have the potential to destroy growing rice. We find that unpredictable stage reversals can produce substantial crop losses and shorten significantly the length of average growing seasons on lower elevation river bars. The data reveal that local famers extend planting down to lower bar elevations where the mean probabilities of re-submergence before rice maturity (due to reversals) approach 50%, below which they implicitly consider that the risk of crop loss outweighs the potential reward of planting.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of electrokinetic flow of an aqueous electrolyte solution in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-06-01

    Electrokinetic flows of an aqueous NaCl solution in nanochannels with negatively charged surfaces are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The four transport coefficients that characterize the response to weak electric and pressure fields, namely, the coefficients for the electrical current in response to the electric field (Mjj) and the pressure field (Mjm), and those for the mass flow in response to the same fields (Mmj and Mmm), are obtained in the linear regime using a Green-Kubo approach. Nonequilibrium simulations with explicit external fields are also carried out, and the current and mass flows are directly obtained. The two methods exhibit good agreement even for large external field strengths, and Onsager's reciprocal relation (Mjm = Mmj) is numerically confirmed in both approaches. The influence of the surface charge density on the flow is also considered. The values of the transport coefficients are found to be smaller for larger surface charge density, because the counter-ions strongly bound near the channel surface interfere with the charge and mass flows. A reversal of the streaming current and of the reciprocal electro-osmotic flow, with a change of sign of Mmj due to the excess co-ions, takes places for very high surface charge density.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of electrokinetic flow of an aqueous electrolyte solution in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-06-01

    Electrokinetic flows of an aqueous NaCl solution in nanochannels with negatively charged surfaces are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The four transport coefficients that characterize the response to weak electric and pressure fields, namely, the coefficients for the electrical current in response to the electric field (M(jj)) and the pressure field (M(jm)), and those for the mass flow in response to the same fields (M(mj) and M(mm)), are obtained in the linear regime using a Green-Kubo approach. Nonequilibrium simulations with explicit external fields are also carried out, and the current and mass flows are directly obtained. The two methods exhibit good agreement even for large external field strengths, and Onsager's reciprocal relation (M(jm) = M(mj)) is numerically confirmed in both approaches. The influence of the surface charge density on the flow is also considered. The values of the transport coefficients are found to be smaller for larger surface charge density, because the counter-ions strongly bound near the channel surface interfere with the charge and mass flows. A reversal of the streaming current and of the reciprocal electro-osmotic flow, with a change of sign of M(mj) due to the excess co-ions, takes places for very high surface charge density. PMID:24908029

  5. Electrophoretic mobilities of neutral analytes and electroosmotic flow markers in aqueous solutions of Hofmeister salts.

    PubMed

    Křížek, Tomáš; Kubíčková, Anna; Hladílková, Jana; Coufal, Pavel; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Small neutral organic compounds have traditionally the role of EOF markers in electrophoresis, as they are expected to have zero electrophoretic mobility in external electric fields. The BGE contains, however, ions that have unequal affinities to the neutral molecules, which in turn results in their mobilization. In this study we focused on two EOF markers-thiourea and DMSO, as well as on N-methyl acetamide (NMA) as a model of the peptide bond. By means of CE and all atom molecular dynamics simulations we explored mobilization of these neutral compounds in large set of Hofmeister salts. Employing a statistical mechanics approach, we were able to reproduce by simulations the experimental electrophoretic mobility coefficients. We also established the role of the chemical composition of marker and the BGE on the measured electrophoretic mobility coefficient. For NMA, we interpreted the results in terms of the relative affinities of cations versus anions to the peptide bond. PMID:24338984

  6. Adsorption of buffer ion pairs can alter long-term electroosmotic flow stability.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ashley L; Harrison, Christopher R

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic capillary coatings have become widespread due to their efficacy in modifying the EOF in capillary electrophoretic separations and ability to limit unwanted analyte-surface interactions. However, our understanding of exactly what types of interactions are taking place at the surface of a capillary when these dynamic additives are present is limited. In this work, we have chosen a simple, small molecule additive, tetramethylammonium to examine its influence on the EOF under typical separation conditions. What we have revealed is that this simple compound does not interact with the capillary surface in a very simple manner. Our initial hypothesis of a direct ionic interaction with the silanol surface has evolved with evidence of complex ion pairing between the silanols, the tetramethylammonium, and the buffer ions. This ion pairing can result in drastic changes in the EOF over time, and that the EOF can only be restored to initial levels with harsh rinses containing sodium hydroxide. PMID:23775812

  7. Large eddy simulation of premixed and non-premixed combustion in a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Undapalli, Satish

    A new combustor referred to as Stagnation Point Reverse Flow (SPRF) combustor has been developed at Georgia Tech to meet the increasingly stringent emission regulations. The combustor incorporates a novel design to meet the conflicting requirements of low pollution and high stability in both premixed and non-premixed modes. The objective of this thesis work is to perform Large Eddy Simulations (LES) on this lab-scale combustor and elucidate the underlying physics that has resulted in its excellent performance. To achieve this, numerical simulations have been performed in both the premixed and non-premixed combustion modes, and velocity field, species field, entrainment characteristics, flame structure, emissions, and mixing characteristics have been analyzed. Simulations have been carried out first for a non-reactive case to resolve relevant fluid mechanics without heat release by the computational grid. The computed mean and RMS quantities in the non-reacting case compared well with the experimental data. Next, the simulations were extended for the premixed reactive case by employing different sub-grid scale combustion chemistry closures: Eddy Break Up (EBU), Artificially Thickened Flame (TF) and Linear Eddy Mixing (LEM) models. Results from the EBU and TF models exhibit reasonable agreement with the experimental velocity field. However, the computed thermal and species fields have noticeable discrepancies. Only LEM with LES (LEMLES), which is an advanced scalar approach, has been able to accurately predict both the velocity and species fields. Scalar mixing plays an important role in combustion, and this is solved directly at the sub-grid scales in LEM. As a result, LEM accurately predicts the scalar fields. Due to the two way coupling between the super-grid and sub-grid quantities, the velocity predictions also compare very well with the experiments. In other approaches, the sub-grid effects have been either modeled using conventional approaches (EBU) or need

  8. [Umbilical Absent and Reverse End-Diastolic Flow Velocity Waveforms Already Present Prior to Viability do not Exclude Long-Term Foetal Surveillance: A Report of Two Cases].

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Wirbelauer, J; Frauenschuh, I; Frambach, T; Zollner, U; Dietl, J

    2015-04-01

    The finding of absent or reverse end-diastolic flow velocities (AREDV) in the umbilical artery already prior to viability corresponds to the most severe end of the clinical spectrum of placental insufficiency. However, there is little or no experience or published literature with regard to perinatal outcome. We report 2 cases in which structurally and chromosomally normal foetuses showed severe early onset retardation but were continuing to grow. These gestations could be prolonged by 62 and 64 days, respectively. Perinatal outcome was good in both following Caesarean section at 32+3 and 31+5 gestational weeks respectively. PMID:25901870

  9. Analysis of traveling-wave electro-osmotic pumping with double-sided electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hung-Chun; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Luo, Win-Jet

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, a series of numerical simulations was performed to investigate the pumping performance of electro-osmotic micropumps containing electrode arrays patterned on the upper and lower sides of a microchannel. The simulations have been analyzed with a linear electro-osmotic model based upon the Debye-Hückel theory of the double layer. The potential drop across the diffuse layer is assumed to be less than 25 mV (kBT/e), and there is a linear response between the surface charge and the voltage drop across the double layer. The double layer is not resolved but is lumped into effective parameters that are imported from the Debye-Hückel and Stern layers. We examined the effects of the relative positioning of the electrodes in the opposing arrays (i.e., symmetrical or staggered), and the phase lag and the angular frequency of the alternating current (ac) signals applied to the electrodes within the two arrays. A critical height of the microchannel was observed, below which the interactions of the applied electrical potentials on the walls became significant. The optimum pumping effect was obtained when the electrode arrays were symmetrical to one another around the centerline of the channel and were activated by ac potentials with a 0° phase shift. The corresponding angular frequency of the maximum pumping velocity for different phase shifts of the applied ac signals was also determined. Overall, the simulation results presented in this paper provide a useful insight into the optimal design parameters and operating conditions for micropumps containing two arrays of microelectrodes on the microchannel walls.

  10. Effects of heating power on divertor in-out asymmetry and scrape-off layer flow in reversed field on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S. C. Wang, H. Q.; Gan, K. F.; Xia, T. Y.; Xu, G. S.; Liu, Z. X.; Chen, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, R.; Shao, L. M.; Ding, S.; Hu, G. H.; Liu, Y. L.; Zhao, N.; Li, Y. L.; Gong, X. Z.; Gao, X.; Guo, H. Y.; Wang, L.; Xu, X. Q.; and others

    2014-12-15

    The dependence of divertor asymmetry and scrape-off layer (SOL) flow on heating power has been investigated in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Divertor plasma exhibits an outboard-enhanced in-out asymmetry in heat flux in lower single null configuration for in reversed (ion ∇B drift direction toward the upper X-point) field directions. Upper single null exhibits an inboard-favored asymmetry in low heating power condition, while exhibits an outboard-favored asymmetry when increasing the heating power. Double null has the strongest in-out asymmetry in heat flux, favoring the outer divertor. The in-out asymmetry ratios of q{sub t,out}/q{sub t,in} and P{sub out}/P{sub total} increase with the power across the separatrix P{sub loss}, which is probably induced by the enhanced radial particle transport due to a large pressure gradient. The characteristics of the measured SOL parallel flow under various discharge conditions are consistent with the Pfirsch-Schlüter (PS) flow with the parallel Mach number M{sub ∥} decreasing with the line averaged density but increasing with P{sub loss}, in the same direction as the PS flow. The contributions of both poloidal E×B drift and parallel flow on poloidal particle transport in SOL on EAST are also assessed.

  11. Effect of ionic strength on perfusive flow in capillary electrochromatography columns packed with wide-pore stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Dearie, H S; Smith, N W; Moffatt, F; Wren, S A C; Evans, K P

    2002-02-01

    The use of wide-pore stationary phases in capillary electrochromatography has shown exceptional increases in separation efficiency in conjunction with high electroosmotic flow. These effects are due to the perfusive flow mechanism which is primarily controlled by the ionic strength of the mobile phase. Good correlation between calculated values of electrochemical double-layer thickness and efficiency data have also been obtained. Reduced plate height values of <0.5 have been observed with pore sizes of 4000 A. In addition, electroosmotic flow mobility twice that of 3 microm Spherisorb ODS-1 has been obtained. PMID:11862987

  12. Geometric Effects on Power Generation by Reverse Electrodialysiswith Self-induced Electrolyte Flow in Ion-Selective Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Kim, Dong-Kwon; Lee, Seung-Hyun

    2012-11-01

    Recently, solid-state nanofluidic channels or nanopores have been demonstrated experimentally to serve as ion-selective membranes for small reverse electrodialysis systems. Ions of opposite charge to that of the surface (counter-ions) are attracted toward the surface while ions of like charge (co-ions) are repelled from the surface. As a result, the counter-ions are preferentially transported over the co-ions in the charged nanochannels. Under a concentration gradient, the ions diffuse spontaneously across the nanochannels, and a portion of the Gibbs free energy of mixing can be harvested continuously from the nanochannels by means of the net diffusion current. In the present study, power generation by reverse eletrodialysis in ion-selective nanochannels is numerically investigated by solving the Nernst-Planck equation for the ionic concentrations, the Poisson equation for the electric potential, and the Navier-Stokes equation for the electrolyte velocity simultaneously. We elucidated the effect of various parameters on power generation such as geometry of channel cross section, channel length, hydraulic diameter and the surface charge density etc. Corresponding Author.

  13. Heat exchange in a laminar channel flow with temperature gradients at the walls: possibility for heat transfer reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Manuel; Rebollo, Daniel; Campo, Antonio

    This paper presents a detailed numerical study of the heat exchange between two parallel plates with prescribed temperature gradients along the plates and a fluid circulating between them. The interplay between the bulk temperature, the heat flow and the Nusselt number has been clarified.

  14. Experimental validation benchmark data for CFD of transient convection from forced to natural with flow reversal on a vertical flat plate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2016-06-23

    Transient convection has been investigated experimentally for the purpose of providing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation benchmark data. A specialized facility for validation benchmark experiments called the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel was used to acquire thermal and velocity measurements of flow over a smooth, vertical heated plate. The initial condition was forced convection downward with subsequent transition to mixed convection, ending with natural convection upward after a flow reversal. Data acquisition through the transient was repeated for ensemble-averaged results. With simple flow geometry, validation data were acquired at the benchmark level. All boundary conditions (BCs) were measured and their uncertainties quantified.more » Temperature profiles on all four walls and the inlet were measured, as well as as-built test section geometry. Inlet velocity profiles and turbulence levels were quantified using Particle Image Velocimetry. System Response Quantities (SRQs) were measured for comparison with CFD outputs and include velocity profiles, wall heat flux, and wall shear stress. Extra effort was invested in documenting and preserving the validation data. Details about the experimental facility, instrumentation, experimental procedure, materials, BCs, and SRQs are made available through this paper. As a result, the latter two are available for download and the other details are included in this work.« less

  15. Control of ion gyroscale fluctuations via electrostatic biasing and sheared E×B flow in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.; Ruskov, E.; Deng, B. H.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.; Gota, H.; Tuszewski, M.

    2016-03-01

    Control of radial particle and thermal transport is instrumental for achieving and sustaining well-confined high-β plasma in a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Radial profiles of low frequency ion gyro-scale density fluctuations (0.5≤kρs≤40), consistent with drift- or drift-interchange modes, have been measured in the scrape-off layer (SOL) and core of the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC), together with the toroidal E×B velocity. It is shown here that axial electrostatic SOL biasing controls and reduces gyro-scale density fluctuations, resulting in very low FRC core fluctuation levels. When the radial E×B flow shearing rate decreases below the turbulence decorrelation rate, fluctuation levels increase substantially, concomitantly with onset of the n=2 instability and rapid loss of diamagnetism. Low turbulence levels, improved energy/particle confinement and substantially increased FRC life times are achieved when E×B shear near the separatrix is maintained via axial SOL biasing using an annular washer gun.

  16. The semi-sewer river: hydraulic backwater effects and combined sewer overflow reverse flows in Central Brussels reduce deoxygenation impact further downstream.

    PubMed

    Le, H M; Petrovic, D; Verbanck, M A

    2014-01-01

    In 2011 and 2012 the dissolved oxygen content in the low-discharge river Zenne was monitored continuously, every 5 minutes, downstream of Brussels city centre, making it possible to document the complex mechanisms by which combined sewer overflow (CSO) spills affect both the hydraulics and the oxygen balance of the hydrosystem. In addition to oxygen demand impacts, proportions of water volumes are such that the oxygen-devoid sewage water discharged from CSOs contributes significantly to the oxygen deficit observed in the river further downstream. It is shown that ensuing unexpected hydraulic behaviour, such as a full river-flow reversal, can explain the dual nature of oxygen sag following major CSO events. At times the semi-sewer river plays the role of an in-stream stormwater tank, effectively attenuating the environmental impacts of Brussels CSOs. PMID:24569294

  17. In situ microscopy reveals reversible cell wall swelling in kelp sieve tubes: one mechanism for turgor generation and flow control?

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Jan; Tepler Drobnitch, Sarah; Peters, Winfried S; Knoblauch, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Kelps, brown algae (Phaeophyceae) of the order Laminariales, possess sieve tubes for the symplasmic long-distance transport of photoassimilates that are evolutionarily unrelated but structurally similar to the tubes in the phloem of vascular plants. We visualized sieve tube structure and wound responses in fully functional, intact Bull Kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana [K. Mertens] Postels & Ruprecht 1840). In injured tubes, apparent slime plugs formed but were unlikely to cause sieve tube occlusion as they assembled at the downstream side of sieve plates. Cell walls expanded massively in the radial direction, reducing the volume of the wounded sieve elements by up to 90%. Ultrastructural examination showed that a layer of the immediate cell wall characterized by circumferential cellulose fibrils was responsible for swelling and suggested that alginates, abundant gelatinous polymers of the cell wall matrix, were involved. Wall swelling was rapid, reversible and depended on intracellular pressure, as demonstrated by pressure-injection of silicon oil. Our results revive the concept of turgor generation and buffering by swelling cell walls, which had fallen into oblivion over the last century. Because sieve tube transport is pressure-driven and controlled physically by tube diameter, a regulatory role of wall swelling in photoassimilate distribution is implied in kelps. PMID:26991892

  18. Nonambipolar Magnetic-Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Plasma Flow in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Craig, D.; Deng, B. H.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Svidzinski, V.

    2007-08-03

    First direct measurements of nonambipolar magnetic fluctuation-induced charge transport in the interior of a high-temperature plasma are reported. Global resistive tearing modes drive the charge transport which is measured in the vicinity of the resonant surface for the dominant core resonant mode. Finite charge transport has two important consequences. First, it generates a potential well along with locally strong electric field and electric field shear at the resonant surface. Second, this electric field induces a spontaneous ExB driven zonal flow.

  19. Band spreading in two-dimensional microchannel turns for electrophoretic or electroosmotic species transport

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    2000-03-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are employed to investigate species transport by electrophoretic or electroosmotic motion in the curved geometry of a two-dimensional turn. Closed-form analytical solutions describing the turn-induced diffusive and dispersive spreading of a species band are presented for both the low and high Peclet number limits. The authors find that the spreading due to dispersion is proportional to the product of the turn included angle and the Peclet number at low Peclet numbers. It is proportional to the square of the included angle and independent of the Peclet number when the Peclet number is large. A composite solution applicable to all Peclet numbers is constructed from these limiting behaviors. Numerical solutions for species transport in a turn are also presented over a wide range of the included angle and the mean turn radius. Based on comparisons between the analytical and numerical results, the authors find that the analytical solutions provide very good estimates of both dispersive and diffusive spreading provided that the mean turn radius exceeds the channel width. These new solutions also agree well with data from a previous study. Optimum conditions minimizing total spreading in a turn are presented and discussed.

  20. Potential of the reversed-inject differential flow modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of essential oils of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Cobelli, Luigi; Stani, Gianluca; Miliazza, Armando; Giardina, Matthew; Firor, Roger; Bicchi, Carlo

    2015-10-23

    In this study, the first capillary flow technology reverse-inject differential flow modulator was implemented with different column configurations (lengths, diameters and stationary phase coupling) and detector combinations (mass spectrometry--MS and flame ionization detection--FID) to evaluate its potential in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of medium-to-highly complex essential oils. In particular, a parallel dual-secondary column dual-detection configuration that has shown to improve the information potential also with thermally modulated GC × GC platforms (MS identification reliability and accurate FID quantitation), was tested. Several system performance parameters (separation measure SGC × GC, modulation ratio MR, separation space used and peak symmetry) were evaluated by analyzing a mixture of volatiles of interest in the flavor and fragrance field. The systems demonstrating the best chromatographic performance were selected for quantitative profiling of lavender and mint essential oils and fingerprinting of vetiver essential oil. Experimental results demonstrate that careful tuning of column dimensions and system configurations yields improved: (a) selectivity; (b) operable carrier gas linear velocities at close-to-optimal values; (c) (2)D separation power by extending the modulation period and (d) handling of overloaded peaks without dramatic losses in resolution and quantitative accuracy. PMID:26387790

  1. A novel microfluidic flow focusing method

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai; Weng, Xuan; Li, Dongqing

    2014-01-01

    A new microfluidic method that allows hydrodynamic focusing in a microchannel with two sheath flows is demonstrated. The microchannel network consists of a T-shaped main channel and two T-shaped branch channels. The flows of the sample stream and the sheath streams in the microchannel are generated by electroosmotic flow-induced pressure gradients. In comparison with other flow focusing methods, this novel method does not expose the sample to electrical field, and does not need any external pumps, tubing, and valves. PMID:25538810

  2. Detection of shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a lateral flow dipstick.

    PubMed

    Puthawibool, Teeranart; Senapin, Saengchan; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Flegel, Timothy W

    2009-03-01

    Infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) has caused a slowly progressive disease with cumulative mortalities of up to 70% or more in cultured Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei in Northeast Brazil and Indonesia. Rapid detection of viruses by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of genomic material with high specificity and sensitivity can be applied for diagnosis, monitoring and control of diseases in shrimp aquaculture. Using an IMNV template, successful detection was achieved after a 60-min RT-LAMP reaction using biotin-labeled primers followed by 5min hybridization with an FITC-labeled DNA probe and 5min assay using a chromatographic lateral flow dipstick (LFD). Thus, the combined system of RT-LAMP and LFD required a total assay interval of less than 75min, excluding the RNA extraction time. The sensitivity of detection was comparable to that of other commonly used methods for nested RT-PCR detection of IMNV. In addition to reducing amplicon detection time when compared to electrophoresis, LFD confirmed amplicon identity by hybridization and eliminated the need to handle carcinogenic ethidium bromide. The RT-LAMP-LFD method gave negative test results with nucleic acid extracts from normal shrimp and from shrimp infected with other viruses including infectious hypodermal hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV), monodon baculovirus (MBV), a hepatopancreatic parvovirus from P. monodon (PmDNV), white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), yellow head virus (YHV), Taura syndrome virus (TSV), Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and gill associated virus (GAV). PMID:19022295

  3. Inner shelf circulation patterns and nearshore flow reversal under downwelling and stratified conditions off a curved coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanay, Rosario; Yankovsky, Alexander; Voulgaris, George

    2008-08-01

    The role of a curved coastline and associated bathymetry in the development of downwelling circulation in a stratified inner shelf is examined through a number of numerical experiments. Different scenarios include constant versus variable wind-forcing and variations in bottom friction. The three-dimensional response of the shelf within the domain (embayment enclosed by capes) is associated with the generation of a velocity/pycnocline disturbance at the upstream cape and its subsequent downstream advection. This disturbance is more pronounced under variable wind conditions. Its downstream advection through the bay exhibits different patterns depending on the competition between inertia and bottom friction near the cape. When inertia dominates, the disturbance separates from the cape and travels downwind with an enhanced downstream flow offshore and a countercurrent inshore. The separation occurs at a low Rossby number (Ro ˜ 0.15), which is attributed to the positive curvature of the coastline forming the cape. When friction dominates, the advection path is constrained along the coastline, resulting in an alongshore temperature gradient and a transient thermal front running almost perpendicular to the coast/isobaths. Simulations with spatially variable bottom friction, with higher friction toward the coast, result in the generation of eddy-like features. The numerical results are in agreement with both observations and surface temperature imagery from Long Bay, South Carolina, an embayment enclosed by two capes, and emphasize the role that coastline and associated shelf morphology can play in enhancing cross-shelf transport and exchange.

  4. Reversible Shape Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Qiaoxi; Turner, Sara; Brosnan, Sarah; Tippets, Cary; Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Nykypnachuk, Dmytro; Gang, Oleg; Dobrynin, Andrey; Lopez, Rene; Ashby, Valerie; Sheiko, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Reversible shape memory has been achieved on various shapes, e.g. hairpin, origami, coil, robotic gripper and flow rate control device, allowing for multiple switching between encoded shapes without applying any external force. Also, the reversible photonic structure molded in dielectric elastomers has been designed. Maximum reversibility can be achieved by tuning the crosslinking density and the degree of crystallinity of semi-crystalline elastomers. Different crystallization protocols including isothermal and cooling crystallization have been applied to develop a universal picture integrating different shape memory (SM) behaviors: conventional one-way SM, two-way reversible SM, and one-way reversible SM. Acknowledge financial support from the NSF DMR-1122483, DMR- 1004576, and DMR-1206957.

  5. [Magnetic Fe₃O₄Microparticles Conditioning-Pressure Electro-osmotic Dewatering (MPEOD) of Sewage Sludge].

    PubMed

    Qian, Xu; Wang, Yi-li; Zhao, Li

    2016-05-15

    For magnetic Fe₃O₄ microparticles conditioning--pressure electro-osmotic dewatering (MPEOD) process of activated sludge (AS), the effects of operating parameters (optimal dosage of Fe₃O₄, electric field duration, mechanical pressure and voltage) on the dewatering efficiency and energy consumption were investigated, and the optimal conditions were determined. Moreover, the properties of supernatant and sludge along MPEOD process were studied as well as the interaction force between the sludge biosolids. Taking the energy consumption into consideration, the results showed that the optimal dewatering effect for AS could be achieved with a magnetic Fe₃O₄ microparticles dosage of 0.15 g · g⁻¹, an electric field duration of 2 h, a mechanical pressure of 400-600 kPa and a voltage of 30-50 V. When MPEOD was conducted at 400 kPa and 50 V for 2 h, the sludge reduction rate reached 98.30%, the percentage of water removal was 99.34% and the moisture content of AS decreased from 99.18% to 44.46%. The corresponding consumption of energy was 0.013 3 kW · h · kg⁻¹. The coagulation mechanism played a slight role in the AS conditioning with magnetic Fe₃O₄ micro-particles. In fact, magnetic Fe₃O₄micro-particles could greatly decrease the acid-base interaction (WA) between AS biosolids, cause floc growth and enlarge pores in AS aggregates, which will be beneficial to AS dewatering. Compared to DLVO theory, the extended DLVO theory could accurately describe the aggregation and dispersion behavior of sludge particles. PMID:27506042

  6. Reverse Phase-ultra Flow Liquid Chromatography-diode Array Detector Quantification of Anticancerous and Antidiabetic Drug Mangiferin from 11 Species of Swertia from India

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Parthraj R.; Gaikwad, Nikhil B.; Panda, Subhasis; Hegde, Harsha V.; Pai, Sandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Genus Swertia is valued for its great medicinal potential, mainly Swertia chirayita (Roxb. ex Fleming) H. Karst. is used in traditional medicine for a wide range of diseases. Mangiferin one of xanthoids is referred with enormous pharmacological potentials. Objective: The aim of the study was to quantify and compare the anticancerous and antidiabetic drug mangiferin from 11 Swertia species from India. The study also evaluates hierarchical relationships between the species based on mangiferin content using multivariate analysis. Materials and Methods: The reverse phase-ultra flow liquid chromatography-diode array detector analyses was performed and chromatographic separation was achieved on a Lichrospher 100, C18e (5 μm) column (250–4.6 mm). Mobile phase consisting of 0.2% triethylamine (pH-4 with O-phosphoric acid) and acetonitrile (85:15) was used for separation with injection volume 20 μL and detection wave length at 257 nm. Results: Results indicated that concentration of mangiferin has been found to vary largely between Swertia species collected from different regions. Content of mangiferin was found to be highest in Swertia minor compared to other Swertia species studied herein from the Western Ghats and Himalayan region also. The same was also evident in the multivariate analysis, wherein S. chirayita, S. minor and Swertia paniculata made a separate clade. Conclusion: Conclusively, the work herein provides insights of mangiferin content from 11 Swertia species of India and also presents their hierarchical relationships. To best of the knowledge this is the first report of higher content of mangiferin from any Swertia species. SUMMARY The present study quantifies and compares mangiferin in 11 species of Swertia from India. The study also evaluates hierarchical relationships between the species based on mangiferin content using multivariate analysis. The mangiferin content was highest in S. minor compared to the studied Swertia species. To the

  7. Determination of alternative and conventional chelating agents as copper(II) complexes by capillary zone electrophoresis--the first use of didecyldimethylammonium bromide as a flow reversal reagent.

    PubMed

    Laamanen, Pirkko-Leena; Matilainen, Rose

    2007-02-12

    A capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method for analyzing 11 chelating agents [beta-alaninediacetic acid (beta-ADA), trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine-N,N',N'-triacetic acid (HEDTA), N-(2-hydroxyethyl)iminodiacetic acid (HEIDA), iminodiacetic acid (IDA), methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), 1,3-diaminopropane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (PDTA) and triethylenetetraaminehexaacetic acid (TTHA)] as negatively charged copper(II) complexes has been established. Both conventional and alternative chelating agents were included in this study, because they are used side by side in industrial applications. In this study, didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMDDAB) was successfully used as a flow reversal reagent for the first time in an aqueous CZE method based on phosphate BGE with UV spectrophotometric detection. In addition this new flow modifier was compared to common TTAB. Method development was done using a fused silica capillary (61 cm x 50 microm i.d.). The optimized BGE was a 105 mmol L(-1) phosphate buffer with TTAB or DMDDAB in the concentration 0.5 mmol L(-1) at pH 7.1. The measurements were done with -20 kV voltage using direct UV detection at 254 nm. In both CZE methods all 11 analyte zones were properly separated (resolutions > or =2.4), and the calibrations gave excellent correlation coefficients (> or =0.998; linear range tested 0.5-2.0 mmol L(-1)). The limits of detection were < or =34 and < or =49 micromol L(-1) with the method of DMDDAB and TTAB, respectively. A clear benefit of both methods was the short analysis time; all 11 complexes were detected in less than 6 and 5.5 min with the methods of TTAB and DMDDAB, respectively. The two methods were tested with dishwashing detergents and paper mill wastewater samples and proved to be suitable for practical use. PMID:17386596

  8. Rapid and sensitive detection of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a vertical flow visualization strip.

    PubMed

    Gou, Hongchao; Deng, Jieru; Wang, Jiaying; Pei, Jingjing; Liu, Wenjun; Zhao, Mingqiu; Chen, Jinding

    2015-02-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is an important pathogen that causes vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration, leading to serious damage to the swine industry worldwide. The establishment of effective diagnostic methods is imperative. However, traditional methods are often unsuitable. In this study, reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) was combined with a vertical flow (VF) nucleic acid detection strip to detect PEDV. Parameters that affect the RT-LAMP reaction were optimized. The RT-LAMP-VF assay that we established was performed at 62 °C for 40 min, and then directly evaluated on the VF visualization strip cassette. The method demonstrated high specificity for PEDV. The detection limit was 10 pg of ribonucleic acid, consistent with RT-PCR, RT-LAMP detected products on agarose gels and by direct calcein fluorescence. Application of this method to clinical samples yielded a positivity rate that was comparable to that obtained for RT-PCR. This technique saves time and is efficient, and is thus expected to be useful for the diagnosis of PEDV infection in the field. PMID:25444939

  9. Reversed phase liquid chromatography hyphenated to continuous flow-extractive desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for analysis and charge state manipulation of undigested proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yang, Samuel H; Vidova, Veronika; Rice, Elisa M; Wijeratne, Aruna B; Havlíček, Vladimír; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    The application of continuous flow-extractive desorption electrospray ionization (CF-EDESI), an ambient ionization source demonstrated previously for use with intact protein analysis, is expanded here for the coupling of reversed phase protein separations to mass spectrometry. This configuration allows the introduction of charging additives to enhance detection without affecting the chromatographic separation mechanism. Two demonstrations of the advantages of CF-EDESI are presented in this work. First, a proof-of- principle is presented to demonstrate the applicability of hyphenation of liquid chromatography (LC) to CF- EDESI. LC-CF-EDESI-MS has good sensitivity compared to LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry. Second, the supercharging mechanism investigated in CF-EDESI provides an insight into a highly debated supercharging process in ESI. The results indicate that the mechanism of protein charging seen in HPLC-CF-EDESI is different from supercharging phenomena in conventional ESI. The surface tension mechanism and binding mechanism may both contribute to protein supercharging in ESI. PMID:26307717

  10. Visual Detection of West Nile Virus Using Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Combined with a Vertical Flow Visualization Strip

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zengguo; Wang, Hualei; Wang, Lina; Li, Ling; Jin, Hongli; Xu, Changping; Feng, Na; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Lu, Yiyu; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes a severe zoonosis, which can lead to a large number of casualties and considerable economic losses. A rapid and accurate identification method for WNV for use in field laboratories is urgently needed. Here, a method utilizing reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a vertical flow visualization strip (RT-LAMP-VF) was developed to detect the envelope (E) gene of WNV. The RT-LAMP-VF assay could detect 102 copies/μl of an WNV RNA standard using a 40 min amplification reaction followed by a 2 min incubation of the amplification product on the visualization strip, and no cross-reaction with other closely related members of the Flavivirus genus was observed. The assay was further evaluated using cells and mouse brain tissues infected with a recombinant rabies virus expressing the E protein of WNV. The assay produced sensitivities of 101.5 TCID50/ml and 101.33 TCID50/ml for detection of the recombinant virus in the cells and brain tissues, respectively. Overall, the RT-LAMP-VF assay developed in this study is rapid, simple and effective, and it is therefore suitable for clinical application in the field. PMID:27148234

  11. The global monsoon definition using the difference of local minimum and maximum pentad precipitation rates associated with cross-equatorial flow reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Weihong; Jiang, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Since most previous attempts to establish monsoon indices have been limited to specific regions, they have lacked the applicability to universally describe the global monsoon domain. In this paper, we first review the history of global monsoon study and then identify the climatology of global precipitation associated with major systems of the atmospheric general circulation. A new index, based on the annual and semiannual harmonic precipitation rate difference between two local calendar maximal and minimal precipitation pentads, is used to identify the global monsoon domain focusing on where experienced and what caused the climatic dry-wet alteration. The global monsoon domain is defined by the regions where two pentad-mean precipitation difference exceeds 4 mm ṡday-1, which is also influenced by the low-level prevailing wind reversal associated with the cross-equatorial flow. This definition not only confirmed previous results of the classical global monsoon domain from the tropical Africa to Asia-Australia and non-classical monsoon region in the tropical America but also solved an issue of missing local summer monsoon spots.

  12. Field Effect Flow Control in a Polymer T-Intersection Microfluidic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Chang, Richard; Beamesderfer, Mike; Lee, Cheng S.; DeVoe, Don L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a study of induced pressure pumping in a polymer microchannel due to differential electroosmotic flow @OF) rates via field-effect flow control (FEFC). The experimental results demonstrate that the induced pressure pumping is dependent on the distance of the FEFC gate from the cathodic gate. A proposed flow model based on a linearly-decaying zeta potential profile is found to successfully predict experimental trends.

  13. Use of a partial filling technique and reverse migrating micelles in the study of N-methylcarbamate pesticides by micellar electrokinetic chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, M; Wiedmer, S K; Jussila, M; Silva, M; Riekkola, M L

    2001-08-24

    This study describes three ways to couple micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) on-line with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the analysis of N-methylcarbamate pesticides. The methods involved the use of a partial filling (PF) technique under basic conditions and the use of reverse migrating micelles (RMMs) under acidic and basic conditions. The use of RMMs in basic electrolyte solutions required coated capillaries with low electroosmotic flows, and capillaries coated with anionic poly(sodium 2-acrylamide-2-methylpropanesulfonate) were selected for the purpose. Before the on-line MEKC-ESI-MS coupling, the MEKC and MS conditions were separately optimized under off-line conditions. The methods were compared in terms of detection limits and the stability of the electrospray process. The PF method offered good separation but poorer stability of the electrospray relative to the other methods. A more stable electrospray performance was obtained with use of RMMs in acidic electrolyte solutions, but some of the analytes were protonated and could not be detected due to the increase in their retention factors. However, with the use of anionic polymer-coated capillaries and RMMs at pH 8.5, all analytes were successfully separated. The high-salt stacking method was applied to improve the sensitivity of MEKC-ESI-MS and the detection limits were in the range of 0.04-2.0 microg/ml. PMID:11572389

  14. Reversible Ising dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1985-01-01

    The author discusses a reversible deterministic dynamics for Ising spins. The algorithm is a variation of microcanonical Monte Carlo techniques and is easily implemented with simple bit manipulation. This provides fast programs to study non-equilibrium phenomena such as heat flow.

  15. EFFECT OF AQUEOUS PHASE PROPERTIES ON CLAY PARTICLE ZETA POTENTIAL AND ELECTRO-OSMOTIC PERMEABILITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRO-KINETIC SOIL REMEDIATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of aqueous phase properties (pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration) on clay particle zeta potential and packed-bed electro-osmotic permeability was quantified. Although pH strongly altered the zeta potential of a Georgia kaolinite, it did not signi...

  16. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  17. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  18. Mechanistic Study of Electroosmotic Transport Across Hydrated Nail Plates: Effects of pH and Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    HAO, JINSONG; LI, S. KEVIN

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pH and ionic strength on electroosmotic transport in transungual iontophoresis. Transungual iontophoretic transport of model neutral permeants mannitol (MA) and urea (UR) across fully hydrated human nail plates in phosphate-buffered saline of different pH and ionic strengths were investigated in vitro. Two protocols were involved in the transport experiments with each protocol divided into stages including passive and iontophoresis transport at 0.1 and/or 0.3 mA. Nail plate electrical resistance and water uptake of nail clippings were measured at various pH and ionic strengths. In the pH study, electroosmosis enhanced the anodal transport of MA at pH 9 and cathodal transport at pH 3. The Peclet numbers of MA were more than two times higher than those of UR under these conditions. No significant electroosmosis enhancement was observed for MA and UR at pH 5. In the ionic strength study, a decrease in solution ionic strength from 0.7 to 0.04 M enhanced electroosmotic transport. Nail electrical resistance increased with decreasing the ionic strength of the equilibrating solution, but reached a plateau when the ionic strength was less than approximately 0.07 M. Solution pH and ionic strength had no significant effect on nail hydration. Under the studied pH and ionic strength conditions, the effects of electroosmosis were small compared to the direct-field effects in transungual iontophoretic transport of small to moderate size permeants. PMID:18386836

  19. Moving wall, continuous flow electronphoresis apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates generally to electrophoresis devices and more particularly to a moving wall, continuous flow device in which an electrophoresis chamber is angularly positionable with respect to the direction of moving belt walls. A frame with an electrophoresis chamber is rotatably supported between two synchronously driven belt walls. This allows the chamber to be angularly positionable with respect to the direction of belt travel, which compensates for electroosmotic flow within the electrophoresis chamber. Injection of a buffer solution via an opening and a homogenous sample stream via another opening is performed at the end of a chamber, and collection of buffer and the fractionated species particles is done by a conventional collection array at an opposite end of the chamber. Belts are driven at a rate which exactly matches the flow of buffer and sample through the chamber, which entrains the buffer to behave as a rigid electrophoretic medium, eliminating flow distortions (Poiseuille effect). Additionally, belt material for each belt is stored at one end of the device and is taken up by drive wheels at an opposite end. The novelty of this invention particularly lies in the electrophoresis chamber being angularly positionable between two moving belt walls in order to compensate for electroosmotic flow. Additionally, new belt material is continuously exposed within the chamber, minimizing flow distortion due to contamination of the belt material by the sample.

  20. Records of geomagnetic reversals from volcanic islands of French Polynesia: 2. Paleomagnetic study of a flow sequence (1.2-0.6 Ma) from the Island of Tahiti and discussion of reversal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, Annick; Roperch, Pierrick; Duncan, Robert A.

    1990-03-01

    A volcanic sequence almost 700 meters thick has been sampled in the Punaruu valley on the island of Tahiti, southern central Pacific Ocean. Detailed paleomagnetic results have been obtained from 123 sites. Three reversals are recorded in this sequence. Age determinations (K-Ar) indicate that the youngest reversal corresponds to the Matuyama-Brunhes transition while the two other transitions limit the Jaramillo normal polarity subchron. An apparent R-T-R excursion has been identified lower in the volcanic sequence and K-Ar age determinations around 1.1 Ma suggest that it corresponds to the Cobb Mountain subchron, but no normal paleomagnetic directions were discovered. The Matuyama-Brunhes and the lower Jaramillo transition are defined by only a few intermediate directions while many intermediate directions are observed for the upper Jaramillo transition and the Cobb Mountain excursion. We attribute these differences to variations in the rate of eruption of the volcanic rocks. The lower Jaramillo record is characterized by a steepening of the inclination at the beginning of the reversal suggesting a possible axisymmetric control of the field at this stage. However, the transition path for the most detailed record (upper Jaramillo) is characterized by large loops; this prevents simple modeling of the transition by low order zonal harmonics at all stages of a reversal. Paleointensity determinations were attempted on 48 samples with reliable results obtained for 26 of them. Paleointensities for the transitional field range from 3 to 8 μT. Such very low field strengths were first suggested by the low intensity of the natural remanent magnetization associated with intermediate directions. An analysis of the variation of the intensity of magnetization with the angular departure from the central axial field, including all other available data from Polynesia, indicates that (1) a paleomagnetic direction should be considered as intermediate when it is more than 30° from the

  1. A computer program for determining the electrophoretic mobility of cells in a rectangular chamber during asymmetric electroosmotic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    In the field of cell electrophoresis, computer programs have been used for the estimation of zeta potential and surface charge density of specific charged chemical species from electrophoretic mobility data. The union of computer and microscope cell electrophoresis in the laboratory has yielded several satisfying results. The method organizes and error checks these data and stores them on permanent file for future reference or reanalysis. This computer analysis, accomplished in two steps by two main programs and a major subroutine, provides a quick, useful and realistic presentation of mobility data in histogram form, and is appropriate for any microelectrophoretic work using rectangular chambers. Computer program 1 is the first step of two in the analysis of mobility data. Program 2 consists of the main program, POLY2, which fits a least squares parabola to the apparent mobility data generated by Program 1, and the subroutine EXTRA which determines actual cell mobilities using the regression curve equation.

  2. Remarkable electrokinetic features of charge-stratified soft nanoparticles: mobility reversal in monovalent aqueous electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Mariam; Caillet, Céline; Town, Raewyn M; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2015-05-26

    The electrokinetic behavior of G6.5 carboxylate-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) starburst dendrimers (8 ± 1 nm diameter) is investigated over a broad range of pH values (3-9) and NaNO3 concentrations (c(∞ )= 2-200 mM). The dependence of nanodendrimer electrophoretic mobility μ on pH and c(∞) is marked by an unconventional decrease of the point of zero mobility (PZM) from 5.4 to 5.5 to 3.8 upon increase in salt concentration, with PZM defined as the pH value at which a reversal of the mobility sign is reached. The existence of a common intersection point is further evidenced for series of mobility versus pH curves measured at different NaNO3 concentrations. Using soft particle electrokinetic theory, this remarkable behavior is shown to originate from the zwitterionic functionality of the PAMAM-COOH particles. The dependence of PZM on c(∞) results from the coupling between electroosmotic flow and dendrimeric interphase defined by a nonuniform distribution of amine and carboxylic functional groups. In turn, μ reflects the sign and distribution of particle charges located within an electrokinetically active region, the dimension of which is determined by the Debye length, varied here in the range 0.7-6.8 nm. In agreement with theory, the electrokinetics of smaller G4.5 PAMAM-COOH nanoparticles (5 ± 0.5 nm diameter) further confirms that the PZM is shifted to higher pH with decreasing dendrimer size. Depending on pH, a mobility extremum is obtained under conditions where the Debye length and the particle radius are comparable. This results from changes in particle structure compactness following salt- and pH-mediated modulations of intraparticle Coulombic interactions. The findings solidly evidence the possible occurrence of particle mobility reversal in monovalent salt solution suggested by recent molecular dynamic simulations and anticipated from earlier mean-field electrokinetic theory. PMID:25939023

  3. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures. PMID:3811050

  4. Microfluidic device and methods for focusing fluid streams using electroosmotically induced pressures

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Stephen C.; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2010-06-01

    A microfabricated device employing a bridging membrane and methods for electrokinetic transport of a liquid phase biological or chemical material using the same are described. The bridging membrane is deployed in or adjacent to a microchannel and permits either electric current flow or the transport of gas species, while inhibiting the bulk flow of material. The use of bridging membranes in accordance with this invention is applicable to electrokinetically inducing fluid flow to confine a selected material in a region of a microchannel that is not influenced by an electric field. Other structures for inducing fluid flow in accordance with this invention include nanochannel bridging membranes and alternating current fluid pumping devices. Applications of the bridging membranes according to this invention include the separation of species from a sample material, valving of fluids in a microchannel network, mixing of different materials in a microchannel, and the pumping of fluids.

  5. Simulation of an ac electro-osmotic pump with step microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Rezazadeh, Soghra; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2011-05-01

    Pumps with step microelectrodes subjected to an ac voltage are known to have faster pumping rates than those with planar asymmetric microelectrodes. The driving force for pumping in these systems is ac electro-osmosis. This paper aims to understand the flow behaviors of pumps with step microelectrodes by using a realistic model applicable to high external voltages. This model takes the steric effect due to the finite sizes of ions into account and copes with the exponential sensitivity of the counterion concentration to voltage. The effects on the pumping flow rate of varying the pump parameters were investigated. The geometrical parameters were optimized, and the effects of varying the ac frequency and amplitude were examined. The electrical potential of the fluid and the electrical charge at the electrode surface were solved simultaneously, and the Stokes equation was used to describe the fluid flow.

  6. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  7. Integrated Electroosmotic Perfusion of Tissue with Online Microfluidic Analysis to Track the Metabolism of Cystamine, Pantethine and Coenzyme A

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juanfang; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an approach that integrates electroosmotic perfusion of tissue with a substrate-containing solution and online microfluidic analysis of products, in this case thiols. Using this approach we have tracked the metabolism of cystamine, pantethine and CoA in the extracellular space of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). Currently, little is known about coenzyme A (CoA) biodegradation and even less is known about the regulation and kinetic characteristics for this sequential multi-enzyme reaction. We found that the steady state percentage yields of cysteamine from cystamine and pantethine during the transit through OHSCs were 91% ± 4% (SEM) and 0.01%–0.03%, respectively. The large difference in the yields of cysteamine can be used to explain the drugs’ different toxicities and clinical effectiveness against cystinosis. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the ectoenzyme pantetheinase are KM,C/α = 4.4 ± 1.1 mM and Vmax,C = 29 ± 3 nM/s, where α is the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange. We estimate that the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange is approximately 0.5%. Based on the formation rate of cysteamine in the OHSCs, we obtained the overall apparent Michaelis constant and maximum reaction rate for sequential, extracellular CoA degradation in an in situ environment, which are K′M = 16 ± 4 μM, V′max = 7.1 ± 0.5 nM/s. Kinetic parameters obtained in situ, although difficult to measure, are better representations of the biochemical flux in the living organism than those from isolated enzymes in vitro. PMID:24215585

  8. Integrated electroosmotic perfusion of tissue with online microfluidic analysis to track the metabolism of cystamine, pantethine, and coenzyme A.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juanfang; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G

    2013-12-17

    We have developed an approach that integrates electroosmotic perfusion of tissue with a substrate-containing solution and online microfluidic analysis of products, in this case thiols. Using this approach we have tracked the metabolism of cystamine, pantethine and CoA in the extracellular space of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). Currently, little is known about coenzyme A (CoA) biodegradation and even less is known about the regulation and kinetic characteristics for this sequential multienzyme reaction. We found that the steady state percentage yields of cysteamine from cystamine and pantethine during the transit through OHSCs were 91% ± 4% (SEM) and 0.01%-0.03%, respectively. The large difference in the yields of cysteamine can be used to explain the drugs' different toxicities and clinical effectiveness against cystinosis. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the ectoenzyme pantetheinase are KM,C/α = 4.4 ± 1.1 mM and Vmax,C = 29 ± 3 nM/s, where α is the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange. We estimate that the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange is approximately 0.5%. Based on the formation rate of cysteamine in the OHSCs, we obtained the overall apparent Michaelis constant and maximum reaction rate for sequential, extracellular CoA degradation in an in situ environment, which are K'M = 16 ± 4 μM, V'max = 7.1 ± 0.5 nM/s. Kinetic parameters obtained in situ, although difficult to measure, are better representations of the biochemical flux in the living organism than those from isolated enzymes in vitro. PMID:24215585

  9. A detailed examination of a X-line region in the distant tail: ISEE-3 observations of jet flow and B(sub z) reversals and a pair of slow shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    We report an observation of Petschek-type magnetic reconnection at a distant neutral line (X = -230 R(sub e)) with a full set of signatures of the magnetic merging process. These features include a reversal of plasma flows from earthward to tailward, a pair of slow shocks and the magnetic field X-type line. These two slow shocks are shown to satisfy the shock criteria used by Feldman et al. (1987). The spacecraft first crosses a slow shock to enter the earthward flowing plasmasheet with velocity of about 440 km/s. The embedded magnetic field has a positive B(sub z) component. The spacecraft next enters a region of tailward plasma flow with speed approximately 670 km/s and an embedded negative B(sub z), indicating entry into the plasmasheet tailward of the X-line. These observed velocities are comparable to calculated velocities based on Rankine-Hugoniot conservation relationships. The spacecraft subsequently returns into the south tail lobe by crossing another slow shock. Coplanarity analyses shows that the two slow shocks have orientations consistent with that predicted by the Petschek reconnection model. We note that this event occurs during northward interplanetary magnetic fields. Thus, a magnetic stress built-up in the distant tail may be responsible for this reconnection process.

  10. Field-effect flow control in a polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Buch, J S; Wang, P C; DeVoe, D L; Lee, C S

    2001-10-01

    The application of the field-effect for direct control of electroosmosis in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic system, constructed on a silicon wafer with a 2.0 microm electrically insulating layer of silicon dioxide, is demonstrated. This microfluidic system consists of a 2.0 cm open microchannel fabricated on a PDMS slab, which can reversibly adhere to the silicon wafer to form a hybrid microfluidic device. Aside from mechanically serving as a robust bottom substrate to seal the channel and support the microfluidic system, the silicon wafer is exploited to achieve field-effect flow control by grounding the semiconductive silicon medium. When an electric field is applied through the channel, a radial electric potential gradient is created across the silicon dioxide layer that allows for direct control of the zeta potential and the resulting electroosmotic flow (EOF). By configuring this microfluidic system with two power supplies at both ends of the microchannel, the applied electric potentials can be varied for manipulating the polarity and the magnitude of the radial electric potential gradient across the silicon dioxide layer. At the same time, the longitudinal potential gradient through the microchannel, which is used to induce EOF, is held constant. The results of EOF control in this hybrid microfluidic system are presented for phosphate buffer at pH 3 and pH 5. It is also demonstrated that EOF control can be performed at higher solution pH of 6 and 7.4 by modifying the silicon wafer surface with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) prior to assembly of the hybrid microfluidic system. Results of EOF control from this study are compared with those reported in the literature involving the use of other microfluidic devices under comparable solution conditions. PMID:11700719

  11. Assessment of Tissue Viability Following Electroosmotic Push–Pull Perfusion from Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a novel sampling technique that allows both introduction and removal of fluid from the extracellular space of living tissue. This method is based on the fluidics of push–pull perfusion but flow is driven by electroosmosis. We have applied this method to organotypic hippocampal cultures. A source capillary is inserted into the tissue and a collection capillary is in contact with the tissue surface through a thin layer of fluid. A voltage is applied across the proximal ends of source and collection capillary. In the applied field, fluid will move from source, into the tissue, and then be collected. In this process, damage to cells may occur. To understand better what sampling conditions influence damage most, we tested various sampling geometries and applied voltages, quantifying damage 16–24 h later using propidium iodide as a cell death marker. We found that damage correlates with both voltage drop and power dissipated in the tissue, but that voltage drop is a better indicator of damage when comparing models in which capillary arrangement and length are different. PMID:23639590

  12. STOL landing thrust: Reverser jet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis tools and modeling concepts for jet flow fields encountered upon use of thrust reversers for high performance military aircraft are described. A semi-empirical model of the reverser ground wall jet interaction with the uniform cross flow due to aircraft forward velocity is described. This ground interaction model is used to demonstrate exhaust gas ingestion conditions. The effects of control of exhaust jet vector angle, lateral splay, and moving versus fixed ground simulation are discussed. The Adler/Baron jet-in-cross flow model is used in conjunction with three dimensional panel methods to investigate the upper surface jet induced flow field.

  13. Electro-Convective and Non-Equilibrium Electro-Osmotic Instability of Electric Conduction from an Electrolyte Solution into a Charge Selective Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Isaak

    2006-03-01

    Electro-convection is reviewed as a mechanism of mixing in the diffusion layer of a strong electrolyte adjacent to a charge-selective solid, such as an ion exchange (electrodialysis) membrane or an electrode. Two types of electro-convection in strong electrolytes may be distinguished: bulk electro-convection , due to the action of the electric field upon the residual space charge of a quasi-electro-neutral bulk solution, and convection induced by electro-osmotic slip, due to electric forces acting in the thin electric double layer of either quasi-equilibrium or non-equilibrium type near the solid/liquid interface. According to recent studies, the latter appears to be the likely source of mixing in the diffusion layer, leading to `over-limiting' conductance in electrodialysis. Electro-convection near a uniform charge selective solid/liquid interface sets on as a result of hydrodynamic instability of one-dimensional steady state electric conduction through such an interface. We discuss instabilities of this kind appearing in the full electro-convective and limiting non-equilibrium electro-osmotic formulations. The short- and long-wave aspects of these instabilities are discussed along with the wave-number selection principles and possible sources of low frequency excess electric noise experimentally observed in these systems.

  14. Sol-gel modified poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices with high electroosmotic mobilities and hydrophilic channel wall characteristics.

    PubMed

    Roman, Gregory T; Hlaus, Tyler; Bass, Kevin J; Seelhammer, Todd G; Culbertson, Christopher T

    2005-03-01

    Using a sol-gel method, we have fabricated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchips with SiO2 particles homogeneously distributed within the PDMS polymer matrix. These particles are approximately 10 nm in diameter. To fabricate such devices, PDMS (Sylgard 184) was cast against SU-8 molds. After curing, the chips were carefully removed from the mold and sealed against flat, cured pieces of PDMS to form enclosed channel manifolds. These chips were then solvated in tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), causing them to expand. Subsequently, the chips were placed in an aqueous solution containing 2.8% ethylamine and heated to form nanometer-sized SiO2 particles within the cross-linked PDMS polymer. The water contact angle for the PDMS-SiO2 chips was approximately 90.2 degrees compared to a water contact angle for Sylgard 184 of approximately 108.5 degrees . More importantly, the SiO2 modified PDMS chips showed no rhodamine B absorption after 4 h, indicating a substantially more hydrophilic and nonabsorptive surface than native PDMS. Initial electroosmotic mobilities (EOM) of (8.3+/-0.2)x10(-4) cm2/(V.s) (RSD=2.6% (RSD is relative standard deviation); n=10) were measured. This value was approximately twice that of native Sylgard 184 PDMS chips (4.21+/-0.09)x10(-4) cm2/(V.s) (RSD=2.2%; n=10) and 55% greater than glass chips (5.3+/-0.4)x10(-4) cm2/(V.s) (RSD=7.7%; n=5). After 60 days of dry storage, the EOM was (7.6+/-0.3)x10(-4) cm2/(V.s) (RSD=3.9%; n=3), a decrease of only 8% below that of the initially measured value. Separations performed on these devices generated 80,000-100,000 theoretical plates in 6-14 s for both tetramethylrhodamine succidimidyl ester and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate derivatized amino acids. The separation distance was 3.5 cm. Plots of peak variance vs analyte migration times gave diffusion coefficients which indicate that the separation efficiencies are within 15% of the diffusion limit. PMID:15732926

  15. Antibody-guided irradiation of hepatic metastases using intrahepatically administered radiolabelled anti-CEA antibodies with simultaneous and reversible hepatic blood flow stasis using biodegradable starch microspheres.

    PubMed

    Epenetos, A A; Courtenay-Luck, N; Dhokia, B; Snook, D; Hooker, G; Lavender, J P; Hemmingway, A; Carr, D; Paraharalambous, M; Bosslet, K

    1987-12-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were radiolabelled with 131I and used for the treatment of hepatic metastases in a patient who had a primary colonic carcinoma. Approximately 100 mCi of 131I-labelled antibody were administered via the hepatic artery on two occasions. On the second occasion, radiolabelled antibody was given concurrently with biodegradable starch microspheres in an attempt to enhance tumour uptake of antibody by achieving temporary stasis or delay of hepatic blood flow. The procedure was carried out uneventfully. There was clinical improvement and a fall in circulating CEA levels after each course of treatment. Furthermore, after the second course of therapy the clinical improvement was sustained for a longer period (more than 3 months) and there was evidence of diminution in the size of some of the liver metastases. Regional administration of 131I-labelled anti-CEA antibody concurrently with biodegradable starch microspheres appears to be a promising new method for the treatment of hepatic metastases from colonic carcinoma. PMID:3449789

  16. A reversible molecular valve

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thoi D.; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Celestre, Paul C.; Flood, Amar H.; Liu, Yi; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2005-01-01

    In everyday life, a macroscopic valve is a device with a movable control element that regulates the flow of gases or liquids by blocking and opening passageways. Construction of such a device on the nanoscale level requires (i) suitably proportioned movable control elements, (ii) a method for operating them on demand, and (iii) appropriately sized passageways. These three conditions can be fulfilled by attaching organic, mechanically interlocked, linear motor molecules that can be operated under chemical, electrical, or optical stimuli to stable inorganic porous frameworks (i.e., by self-assembling organic machinery on top of an inorganic chassis). In this article, we demonstrate a reversibly operating nanovalve that can be turned on and off by redox chemistry. It traps and releases molecules from a maze of nanoscopic passageways in silica by controlling the operation of redox-activated bistable [2]rotaxane molecules tethered to the openings of nanopores leading out of a nanoscale reservoir. PMID:16006520

  17. Reverse-osmosis membrane separation characteristics of various organics: prediction of separation by surface force - pore flow model and solute surface concentration by finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Jevtitch, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    An aromatic polyamide membrane was used to study the separation of selected carboxylic acids, chlorophenols, nitrophenols and sodium chloride. An application for actual treatment of a coal-liquefaction waste water was also performed. Prediction of separation and flux data were obtained using the surface force pore flow (SFPF) model previously reported in the literature. Methods for the determination of pore size distribution of polyamide thin-film composite membrane and a cellulose acetate ultrafiltration membrane, solute concentration at the membrane wall are described. The pore distribution data and wall concentration data were further used with solute separation data at a particular pressure to obtain the solute-solvent-membrane wall forces parameter involved. From the knowledge of the interaction forces, the solute separation and flux data (for nonionized organic solutes and sodium chloride) were predicted over a wide range of pressures and showed excellent agreement with experimental data. The prediction of rejection and flux for carboxylic acids, chlorophenol and nitrophenol systems by the SFPF model were further extended to multicomponent systems. The polyamide membrane used in this study had 97-99% standard NaCl rejections and 24-30 gfd pure water flux at 20.7 x 10/sup 5/ N/m/sup 2/. For ionizable organics such as phenol, chlorophenol, dichlorophenol..., the rejection and flux drops were highly dependent on operating pH values. Membranes experimental results showed 99.5-99.8% rejection at pH 11 of phenol, 2-CP and 2,4-DCP. Under no ionization conditions the flux drop observed for nitrophenol and chlorophenol systems was not caused by osmotic pressure effect and was related to physicochemical nature of the solute-solvent-membrane system.

  18. Reducing spurious flow in simulations of electrokinetic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempfer, Georg; Davies, Gary B.; Holm, Christian; de Graaf, Joost

    2016-07-01

    Electrokinetic transport phenomena can strongly influence the behaviour of macromolecules and colloidal particles in solution, with applications in, e.g., DNA translocation through nanopores, electro-osmotic flow in nanocapillaries, and electrophoresis of charged macromolecules. Numerical simulations are an important tool to investigate these electrokinetic phenomena, but are often plagued by spurious fluxes and spurious flows that can easily exceed physical fluxes and flows. Here, we present a method that reduces one of these spurious currents, spurious flow, by several orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the effectiveness and generality of our method for both the electrokinetic lattice-Boltzmann and finite-element-method based algorithms by simulating a charged sphere in an electrolyte solution and flow through a nanopore. We also show that previous attempts to suppress these spurious currents introduce other sources of error.

  19. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  20. Summary of Scale-Model Thrust-Reverser Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H; Steffen, Fred W; Mcardle, Jack G

    1957-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the characteristics of several basic types of thrust-reverser. Models of three types, target, tailpipe cascade, and ring cascade, were tested with unheated air. The effects of design variables on reverse-thrust performance, reversed-flow boundaries, and thrust modulation characteristics were determined.

  1. A simple method for assessment and minimization of errors in determination of electrophoretic or electroosmotic mobilities and velocities associated with the axial electric field distortion.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Paweł Mateusz; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2015-12-01

    It is commonly accepted that the modern CE instruments equipped with efficient cooling system enable accurate determination of electrophoretic or electroosmotic mobilities. It is also often assumed that velocity of migration in a given buffer is constant throughout the capillary length. It is simultaneously neglected that the noncooled parts of capillary produce extensive Joule heating leading to an axial electric field distortion, which contributes to a difference between the effective and nominal electric field potentials and between velocities in the cooled and noncooled parts of capillary. This simplification introduces systematic errors, which so far were however not investigated experimentally. There was also no method proposed for their elimination. We show a simple and fast method allowing for estimation and elimination of these errors that is based on combination of a long-end and short-end injections. We use it to study the effects caused by variation of temperature, electric field, capillary length, and pH. PMID:26383237

  2. Reducing current reversal time in electric motor control

    SciTech Connect

    Bredemann, Michael V

    2014-11-04

    The time required to reverse current flow in an electric motor is reduced by exploiting inductive current that persists in the motor when power is temporarily removed. Energy associated with this inductive current is used to initiate reverse current flow in the motor.

  3. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  4. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Blodmer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady state reverse and forward to reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original quiet, clean, short haul, experimental engine four segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30 deg half angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30 deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress, and approximately a 20 percent improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35 percent of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff to reverse thrust transients.

  5. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Bloomer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady-state reverse and forward-to-reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original QCSEE 4-segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30-deg half-angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30-deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress and approximately a 20% improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35% of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff-to-reverse thrust transients.

  6. Oscillating laminar electrokinetic flow in infinitely extended rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Bhattacharyya, A; Masliyah, J H; Kwok, D Y

    2003-05-01

    This paper has addressed analytically the problem of laminar flow in microchannels with rectangular cross-section subjected to a time-dependent sinusoidal pressure gradient and a sinusoidal electric field. The analytical solution has been determined based on the Debye-Hückel approximation of a low surface potential at the channel wall. We have demonstrated that Onsager's principle of reciprocity is valid for this problem. Parametric studies of streaming potential have shown the dependence of the electroviscous effect not only on the Debye length, but also on the oscillation frequency and the microchannel width. Parametric studies of electroosmosis demonstrate that the flow rate decreases due to an increase in frequency. The obtained solutions for both the streaming potential and electroosmotic flows become those for flow between two parallel plates in the limit of a large aspect ratio. PMID:12725820

  7. Field-effect Flow Control in Polymer Microchannel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sniadecki, Nathan; Lee, Cheng S.; Beamesderfer, Mike; DeVoe, Don L.

    2003-01-01

    A new Bio-MEMS electroosmotic flow (EOF) modulator for plastic microchannel networks has been developed. The EOF modulator uses field-effect flow control (FEFC) to adjust the zeta potential at the Parylene C microchannel wall. By setting a differential EOF pumping rate in two of the three microchannels at a T-intersection with EOF modulators, the induced pressure at the intersection generated pumping in the third, field-free microchannel. The EOF modulators are able to change the magnitude and direction of the pressure pumping by inducing either a negative or positive pressure at the intersection. The flow velocity is tracked by neutralized fluorescent microbeads in the microchannels. The proof-of-concept of the EOF modulator described here may be applied to complex plastic ,microchannel networks where individual microchannel flow rates are addressable by localized induced-pressure pumping.

  8. Reversed flow fluidized-bed combustion apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Mei, Joseph S.; Wilson, John S.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a fluidized-bed combustion apparatus provided with a U-shaped combustion zone. A cyclone is disposed in the combustion zone for recycling solid particulate material. The combustion zone configuration and the recycling feature provide relatively long residence times and low freeboard heights to maximize combustion of combustible material, reduce nitrogen oxides, and enhance sulfur oxide reduction.

  9. Reverse gas-flow bag filter

    SciTech Connect

    Noddin, E.L.

    1981-01-13

    A description is given of a bag filter having a self-sealing cuff at the upper open end thereof, a bottom support at the closed end to tension the bag and prevent flapping and a plurality of spaced anticollapse rings each of which encircles an annular outer surface of the bag to which it is attached between the ends of the bag to prevent bag collapse.

  10. Reversal Transition Records from Intrusions: Implications for the Reversal Process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M. D.; Williams, I. S.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of reversals of the geomagnetic field and the details of the transition fields remain controversial. However, reversal records from the Agno batholith and Tatoosh intrusion confirm the suggestion of Valet et al., (2012) from studies of lava records, that there is a threefold division in reversal transition directions. In the Agno, the first phase, or precursor, consists of a CCW loop of the VGP moving from high southerly latitude reverse poles to reach North America. The second phase takes the VGP along a half CCW loop from the tip of South America to northern latitudes at the intensity minimum. The third phase, or rebound is a smaller CCW loop and the main intensity recovery begins. The first and third phases appear to be paleosecular variation loops analogous to present London-Paris secular variation loops. The Tatoosh intrusion gives a similar, but less complete record with the VGPs again confined to the East Pacific and the Americas. Away from the reversal region, secular variation loops in the Tatoosh were shown to be comparable in duration to the precursor in the transition record, consistent with the first phase being a paleosecular variation loop in the Agno. Using westward drift estimates from the present field, this should last about1800 years. This gives ~3300 for phase 2, in an intensity low of >16,000 years. A feature of R to N reversal field models is a low latitude magnetic field flux concentration of the same sign as the polar vortex of the south geographic pole. This is followed by northward flux flow, e.g. Shao et al., (1999). The reversal is achieved by northward motion of this flux feature. The feature is locked in longitudinal mantle coordinates and similarly the VGPs in the Agno and Tatoosh records are confined to the longitudes of the eastern Pacific and the Americas. Whether we are approaching a reversal remains to be seen, although judging by these intrusion records the field intensity would need to decrease much further before

  11. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  12. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  13. Preliminary Validation of Direct Detection of Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus within Clinical Samples Using Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Coupled with a Simple Lateral Flow Device for Detection

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Ryan A.; Fowler, Veronica L.; Armson, Bryony; Nelson, Noel; Gloster, John; Paton, David J.; King, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid, field-based diagnostic assays are desirable tools for the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). Current approaches involve either; 1) Detection of FMD virus (FMDV) with immuochromatographic antigen lateral flow devices (LFD), which have relatively low analytical sensitivity, or 2) portable RT-qPCR that has high analytical sensitivity but is expensive. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) may provide a platform upon which to develop field based assays without these drawbacks. The objective of this study was to modify an FMDV-specific reverse transcription–LAMP (RT-LAMP) assay to enable detection of dual-labelled LAMP products with an LFD, and to evaluate simple sample processing protocols without nucleic acid extraction. The limit of detection of this assay was demonstrated to be equivalent to that of a laboratory based real-time RT-qPCR assay and to have a 10,000 fold higher analytical sensitivity than the FMDV-specific antigen LFD currently used in the field. Importantly, this study demonstrated that FMDV RNA could be detected from epithelial suspensions without the need for prior RNA extraction, utilising a rudimentary heat source for amplification. Once optimised, this RT-LAMP-LFD protocol was able to detect multiple serotypes from field epithelial samples, in addition to detecting FMDV in the air surrounding infected cattle, pigs and sheep, including pre-clinical detection. This study describes the development and evaluation of an assay format, which may be used as a future basis for rapid and low cost detection of FMDV. In addition it provides providing “proof of concept” for the future use of LAMP assays to tackle other challenging diagnostic scenarios encompassing veterinary and human health. PMID:25165973

  14. Reverse osmosis water purification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, H. G.; Hames, P. S.; Menninger, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    A reverse osmosis water purification system, which uses a programmable controller (PC) as the control system, was designed and built to maintain the cleanliness and level of water for various systems of a 64-m antenna. The installation operates with other equipment of the antenna at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. The reverse osmosis system was designed to be fully automatic; with the PC, many complex sequential and timed logic networks were easily implemented and are modified. The PC monitors water levels, pressures, flows, control panel requests, and set points on analog meters; with this information various processes are initiated, monitored, modified, halted, or eliminated as required by the equipment being supplied pure water.

  15. Coupled lattice Boltzmann method for simulating electrokinetic flows: A localized scheme for the Nernst-Plank model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    We present a coupled lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to solve a set of model equations for electrokinetic flows in micro-/nano-channels. The model consists of the Poisson equation for the electrical potential, the Nernst-Planck equation for the ion concentration, and the Navier-Stokes equation for the flows of the electrolyte solution. In the proposed LBM, the electrochemical migration and the convection of the electrolyte solution contributing to the ion flux are incorporated into the collision operator, which maintains the locality of the algorithm inherent to the original LBM. Furthermore, the Neumann-type boundary condition at the solid/liquid interface is then correctly imposed. In order to validate the present LBM, we consider an electro-osmotic flow in a slit between two charged infinite parallel plates, and the results of LBM computation are compared to the analytical solutions. Good agreement is obtained in the parameter range considered herein, including the case in which the nonlinearity of the Poisson equation due to the large potential variation manifests itself. We also apply the method to a two-dimensional problem of a finite-length microchannel with an entry and an exit. The steady state, as well as the transient behavior, of the electro-osmotic flow induced in the microchannel is investigated. It is shown that, although no external pressure difference is imposed, the presence of the entry and exit results in the occurrence of the local pressure gradient that causes a flow resistance reducing the magnitude of the electro-osmotic flow.

  16. Relaminarization of fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms of the relaminarization of turbulent flows are investigated with a view to establishing any general principles that might govern them. Three basic archetypes of reverting flows are considered: the dissipative type, the absorptive type, and the Richardson type exemplified by a turbulent boundary layer subjected to severe acceleration. A number of other different reverting flows are then considered in the light of the analysis of these archetypes, including radial Poiseuille flow, convex boundary layers, flows reverting by rotation, injection, and suction, as well as heated horizontal and vertical gas flows. Magnetohydrodynamic duct flows are also examined. Applications of flow reversion for turbulence control are discussed.

  17. Modeling Electrokinetic Flows by the Smoothed Profile Method

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xian; Beskok, Ali; Karniadakis, George Em

    2010-01-01

    We propose an efficient modeling method for electrokinetic flows based on the Smoothed Profile Method (SPM) [1–4] and spectral element discretizations. The new method allows for arbitrary differences in the electrical conductivities between the charged surfaces and the the surrounding electrolyte solution. The electrokinetic forces are included into the flow equations so that the Poisson-Boltzmann and electric charge continuity equations are cast into forms suitable for SPM. The method is validated by benchmark problems of electroosmotic flow in straight channels and electrophoresis of charged cylinders. We also present simulation results of electrophoresis of charged microtubules, and show that the simulated electrophoretic mobility and anisotropy agree with the experimental values. PMID:20352076

  18. Corrosion protected reversing heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Zawierucha, R.

    1984-09-25

    A reversing heat exchanger of the plate and fin type having multiple aluminum parting sheets in a stacked arrangement with corrugated fins separating the sheets to form multiple flow paths, means for closing the ends of the sheets, an input manifold arrangement of headers for the warm end of of the exchanger and an output manifold arrangement for the cold end of the exchanger with the input air feed stream header and the waste gas exhaust header having an alloy of zinc and aluminum coated on the inside surface for providing corrosion protection to the stack.

  19. Magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren C.

    1985-11-01

    The flow of plasma and magnetic flux toward a wall is examined in a slab geometry where the magnetic field is parallel to the wall. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow with a quasisteady approximation is assumed that reduces the problem to three coupled ordinary differential equations. The calculated behavior shows that a thin current sheath is established at the wall in which a variety of phenomena appear, including significant resistive heating and rapid deceleration of the plasma flow. The sheath physics determines the speed at which flux and plasma flow toward the wall. The model has been applied to the field-reversal phase of a field-reversed theta pinch, during which the reduced magnetic field near the wall drives an outward flow of plasma and magnetic flux. The analysis leads to approximate expressions for the instantaneous flow speed, the loss of magnetic flux during the field reversal phase, the integrated heat flow to the wall, and the highest possible magnetic flux retained after reversal. Predictions from this model are compared with previous time-dependent MHD calculations and with experimental results from the TRX-1 [Proceedings of the 4th Symposium on the Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids, 27-29 October 1981 (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 1982), p. 61] and TRX-2 [Proceedings of the 6th U.S. Symposium on Compact Toroid Research, 20-23 February, 1984 (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, 1984), p. 154] experiments.

  20. Reverse Transfer in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    This article considers national Australian data on reverse transfer--the transfer of students from bachelor programs or higher to sub baccalaureate programs, institutions and sectors. It finds that previous studies have overstated the prevalence and perhaps also the significance of reverse transfer. The data are not good, but the best conclusion…

  1. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cubitt, Toby; Kastoryano, Michael; Montanaro, Ashley; Temme, Kristan

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  2. Justice and Reverse Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alan H.

    Defining reverse discrimination as hiring or admissions decisions based on normally irrelevant criteria, this book develops principles of rights, compensation, and equal opportunity applicable to the reverse discrimination issue. The introduction defines the issue and discusses deductive and inductive methodology as applied to reverse…

  3. Reverse Discrimination: Recent Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhilber, August W.

    This paper discusses reverse discrimination cases with particular emphasis on Bakke v. Regents of University of California and those cases which preceded it. A brief history is given of court cases used by opponents and proponents in the discussion of reverse discrimination. Legal theory and a discussion of court cases that preceded Bakke follow.…

  4. Ultrasonic Time Reversal Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael

    2004-11-01

    For more than ten years, time reversal techniques have been developed in many different fields of applications including detection of defects in solids, underwater acoustics, room acoustics and also ultrasound medical imaging and therapy. The essential property that makes time reversed acoustics possible is that the underlying physical process of wave propagation would be unchanged if time were reversed. In a non dissipative medium, the equations governing the waves guarantee that for every burst of sound that diverges from a source there exists in theory a set of waves that would precisely retrace the path of the sound back to the source. If the source is pointlike, this allows focusing back on the source whatever the medium complexity. For this reason, time reversal represents a very powerful adaptive focusing technique for complex media. The generation of this reconverging wave can be achieved by using Time Reversal Mirrors (TRM). It is made of arrays of ultrasonic reversible piezoelectric transducers that can record the wavefield coming from the sources and send back its time-reversed version in the medium. It relies on the use of fully programmable multi-channel electronics. In this paper we present some applications of iterative time reversal mirrors to target detection in medical applications.

  5. Active water management at the cathode of a planar air-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell using an electroosmotic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, T.; O'Hayre, R.; Litster, S.; Prinz, F. B.; Santiago, J. G.

    In a typical air-breathing fuel cell design, ambient air is supplied to the cathode by natural convection and dry hydrogen is supplied to a dead-ended anode. While this design is simple and attractive for portable low-power applications, the difficulty in implementing effective and robust water management presents disadvantages. In particular, excessive flooding of the open-cathode during long-term operation can lead to a dramatic reduction of fuel cell power. To overcome this limitation, we report here on a novel air-breathing fuel cell water management design based on a hydrophilic and electrically conductive wick in conjunction with an electroosmotic (EO) pump that actively pumps water out of the wick. Transient experiments demonstrate the ability of the EO-pump to "resuscitate" the fuel cell from catastrophic flooding events, while longer term galvanostatic measurements suggest that the design can completely eliminate cathode flooding using less than 2% of fuel cell power, and lead to stable operation with higher net power performance than a control design without EO-pump. This demonstrates that active EO-pump water management, which has previously only been demonstrated in forced-convection fuel cell systems, can also be applied effectively to miniaturized (<5 W) air-breathing fuel cell systems.

  6. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS..

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride ...

  7. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS...

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride s...

  8. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

  9. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.

  10. Electrokinetic transport in unsteady flow through peristaltic microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Mulchandani, Janak; Jhalani, Shubham

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the electrokinetic transport of aqueous electrolyte fluids with Newtonian model in presence of peristalsis through microchannel. Debye-Hückel linearization is employed to simplify the problem. Low Reynolds number and large wavelength approximations are taken into account subjected to microfluidics applications. Electrical double layer (EDL) is considered very thin and electroosmotic slip velocity (i.e. Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity) at the wall is subjected to study the effect of applied electrical field. The solutions for axial velocity and pressure difference along the channel length are obtained analytically and the effects of adding and opposing the flow by applied electric field have been discussed. It is revealed that the axial velocity and pressure gradient enhances with adding electric field and an opposite behavior is found in the flow direction on opposing the electric field. These results may also help towards designing organ-on-a-chip like devices for better drug design.

  11. Electrokinetic flows through a parallel-plate channel with slipping stripes on walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Henry C. W.; Ng, Chiu-On

    2011-11-01

    Electrohydrodynamic flows through a periodically-micropatterned plane channel are considered. One unit of wall pattern consists of a slipping and non-slipping stripe, each with a distinct zeta potential. The problems are solved semi-analytically by eigenfunction expansion and point collocation. In the regime of linear response, the Onsager relation for the fluid and current fluxes are deduced as linear functions of the hydrodynamic and electric forcings. The phenomenological coefficients are explicitly expressed as functions of the channel height, the Debye parameter, the slipping area fraction of the wall, the intrinsic slip length, and the zeta potentials. We generalize the theoretical limits made in previous studies on electrokinetic flow over an inhomogeneously slipping surface. One should be cautious when applying these limits. First, when a surface is not 100% uniformly slipping but has a small fraction of area being covered by no-slip slots, the electroosmotic enhancement can be appreciably reduced. Second, when the electric double layer is only moderately thin, slipping-uncharged regions on a surface will have finite inhibition effect on the electroosmotic flow. Financial support by the RGC of the HKSAR, China: Project Nos. HKU715609E, HKU715510E; and the HKU under the Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research: Project Code 200911159024.

  12. Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

  13. Reversible shape memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; Zhou, Jing; White, Sarah; Ashby, Valerie

    2012-02-01

    An ``Achilles' heel'' of shape memory materials is that shape transformations triggered by an external stimulus are usually irreversible. Here we present a new concept of reversible transitions between two well-defined shapes by controlling hierarchic crystallization of a dual-network elastomer. The reversibility was demonstrated for different types of shape transformations including rod bending, winding of a helical coil, and widening an aperture. The distinct feature of the reversible shape alterations is that both counter-shapes are infinitely stable at a temperature of exploitation. Shape reversibility is highly desirable property in many practical applications such as non-surgical removal of a previously inserted catheter and handfree wrapping up of an earlier unraveled solar sail on a space shuttle.

  14. Tubal ligation reversal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fernandez H, Gervaise A. Tubal anastomosis after tubal sterilization: a review. Arch Gynecol Obstet . 2011 May;283( ... Berger GS, Zerden ML. Pregnancy success after hysteroscopic sterilization reversal. Obstet Gynecol . 2014 Dec;124(6):1183- ...

  15. Giant rodlike reversed micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.J.; Neuman, R.D. )

    1994-05-04

    Herein we report that sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate, which is similar in structure to the classical surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), forms very large rodlike reversed micelles and that their size can be even much larger if water is removed from the apolar solution. We further suggest that long-range electrostatic interactions are the primary driving force for the formation of giant reversed micelles. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  16. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  17. Interplay of induced charge electroosmosis, electrothermal flow, and dielectrophoresis at insulating constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingari, Naga Neehar; Wang, Qianru; Buie, Cullen

    2014-11-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study on the combined influence of induced charge electroosmotic flow (ICEO) and electrothermal flow on particle motion in an insulator based dielectrophoretic (iDEP) device. Strong electric fields used for particle trapping induce charges on the channel wall of low, but finite permittivity, and also induce strong temperature gradients because of Joule heating. Consequently, the background fluid flow near the constriction is a superposition of these two effects. Our analysis presents a hitherto unexplored interplay between these two effects and how they influence particles which also experience dielectrophoresis. From our analysis, we find that for channels of low surface permittivity and conductivity, electrothermal effects are stronger near the constriction compared to ICEO effects, while the opposite is true when the surface permittivity or conductivity (or both) are comparable to that of bulk fluid. The analysis also includes the pH and electrolyte concentration dependent contributions of the dynamic Stern layer on ICEO flow.

  18. Field Measurements of Electro-osmotic Transport of Ground Water Contaminants in a Lithologically Heterogeneous Alluvial-Fan Setting

    SciTech Connect

    McNab,W; Karachewski,J; Weismann,G

    2001-07-31

    Remediation of contaminated ground water by pump-and-treat approaches is often problematic because the heterogeneous distributions of lithologies, and hence hydraulic conductivities, characterizing many aquifers result in complex flow paths. Consequently, contaminants are removed readily from the most permeable regions of the subsurface but the less permeable sediments, rich in clay and silt, remain largely undisturbed. These continue to act as diffusion-limited sources for further contamination of the permeable sediments. Under certain circumstances, specialized technologies, such as electrokinetic approaches, may be useful for enhancing the removal of ground water from low-permeability sediments. These circumstances generally include high contaminant concentrations--hence posing a chronic source threat--and a relatively small area requiring treatment. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California, electro-osmosis (EO) is being evaluated as a means for extracting ground water containing trichloroethylene (TCE) and other chlorinated hydrocarbons from fine-grained sediments in a plume source area.

  19. Molecular Dynamics of Membrane-Spanning DNA Channels: Conductance Mechanism, Electro-Osmotic Transport, and Mechanical Gating.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2015-12-01

    DNA self-assembly has emerged as a new paradigm for design of biomimetic membrane channels. Several experimental groups have already demonstrated assembly and insertion of DNA channels into lipid bilayer membranes; however, the structure of the channels and their conductance mechanism have remained undetermined. Here, we report the results of molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the biophysical properties of the DNA membrane channels with atomic precision. We show that, while overall remaining stable, the local structure of the channels undergoes considerable fluctuations, departing from the idealized design. The transmembrane ionic current flows both through the central pore of the channel as well as along the DNA walls and through the gaps in the DNA structure. Surprisingly, we find that the conductance of DNA channels depend on the membrane tension, making them potentially suitable for force-sensing applications. Finally, we show that electro-osmosis governs the transport of druglike molecules through the DNA channels. PMID:26551518

  20. Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2013-10-15

    Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

  1. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  2. Thrust reverser for high bypass turbofan engine

    SciTech Connect

    Matta, R.K.; Bhutiani, P.K.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a thrust reverser for a gas turbine engine of the type which includes an outer wall spaced from the center body of a core engine to define a bypass duct therebetween. The thrust reverser comprising: circumferentially displaced blocker doors, each of the doors being movable between a normal position generally aligned with the outer wall and a thrust reversing position extending transversely of the bypass duct for blocking the exhaust of air through the bypass duct and directing the air through an opening in the outer wall for thrust reversal; each of the blocker doors being of lightweight construction and including a pit in the inner surface thereof in the normal position; means for covering the pit during normal flow of air through the bypass duct to reduce the pressure drop in the bypass duct and to reduce noise. The covering means including a pit cover hingedly mounted at one end thereof on the blocker door and means of biasing the pit cover away from the blocker door to a position providing smooth flow of air through the bypass duct during normal operation.

  3. Time reversal communication system

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  4. Justice and Reverse Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Kenneth A.

    1976-01-01

    Although this article does not necessarily recommend policies of reverse discrimination, arguments indicating that such policies are not contradictory to accepted concepts of justice are presented. The necessity of dispersing any consequent injury to society as a whole rather than to individuals is stressed. (RW)

  5. Reversing Discrimination: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pati, Gopal; Reilly, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the debate over affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and discusses how and why the present dilemma has developed. Suggests that organizations can best address the problem through an honest, in-depth analysis of their organizational structure and management practices. (JG)

  6. Andexanet: Effectively Reversing Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2016-06-01

    Despite direct oral anticoagulants becoming a mainstay of anticoagulant therapy, the effective, timely, and safe reversal of their anticoagulant effect remains challenging. Emerging evidence attests that andexanet, a recombinant and inactive variant of native factor X (FXa), competitively inhibits and counteracts the anticoagulant effect of many inhibitors of native activated FXa. PMID:27048885

  7. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    In this Letter we define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by feedback classical communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted capacity for some interesting channels.

  8. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-04-01

    We define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by classical feedback communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This protocol family leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted entanglement distribution capacity for some interesting channels.

  9. Heat and mass transfer in turbulent flow of the N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ /r reversible/ 2NO/sub 2/ /r reversible/ 2NO + O/sub 2/ system in a rod bundle contained in a hexagonal jacket

    SciTech Connect

    Besedina, T.V.; Tverkovkin, B.E.; Udot, A.V.; Yakushev, A.P.

    1988-08-01

    A model is proposed for heat and mass transfer in a flowing dissociating liquid coolant in a nuclear fuel rod bundle in a hexagonal jacket. The temperature pattern in the liquid and in a heat-conducting rod was determined from general solutions to the conduction equations for rods and shells. Calculations are specifically constructed for determining the longitudinal flow and heat transfer of a N/sub 2//sub 4/ coolant in the peripheral (lateral and corner) channels of the rod groups. The turbulent transfer coefficients were calculated from Buleev's model. The finite-element method was used to derive unknown quantities of the velocity and temperature. Expressions were also found for modeling heat transfer in the frozen and chemically reacting flow components of the coolant. The algorithm is intended for reducing the temperature nonuniformity in parametric fuel rod bundle design calculations.

  10. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  11. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  12. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  13. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  14. Reverse genetics of mononegavirales.

    PubMed

    Conzelmann, K K

    2004-01-01

    "Reverse genetics" or de novo synthesis of nonsegmented negative-sense RNA viruses (Mononegavirales) from cloned cDNA has become a reliable technique to study this group of medically important viruses. Since the first generation of a negative-sense RNA virus entirely from cDNA in 1994, reverse genetics systems have been established for members of most genera of the Rhabdo-, Paramyxo-, and Filoviridae families. These systems are based on intracellular transcription of viral full-length RNAs and simultaneous expression of viral proteins required to form the typical viral ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP). These systems are powerful tools to study all aspects of the virus life cycle as well as the roles of virus proteins in virus-host interplay and pathogenicity. In addition, recombinant viruses can be designed to have specific properties that make them attractive as biotechnological tools and live vaccines. PMID:15298166

  15. Dynamical similarity of geomagnetic field reversals.

    PubMed

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre; Courtillot, Vincent; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio

    2012-10-01

    No consensus has been reached so far on the properties of the geomagnetic field during reversals or on the main features that might reveal its dynamics. A main characteristic of the reversing field is a large decrease in the axial dipole and the dominant role of non-dipole components. Other features strongly depend on whether they are derived from sedimentary or volcanic records. Only thermal remanent magnetization of lava flows can capture faithful records of a rapidly varying non-dipole field, but, because of episodic volcanic activity, sequences of overlying flows yield incomplete records. Here we show that the ten most detailed volcanic records of reversals can be matched in a very satisfactory way, under the assumption of a common duration, revealing common dynamical characteristics. We infer that the reversal process has remained unchanged, with the same time constants and durations, at least since 180 million years ago. We propose that the reversing field is characterized by three successive phases: a precursory event, a 180° polarity switch and a rebound. The first and third phases reflect the emergence of the non-dipole field with large-amplitude secular variation. They are rarely both recorded at the same site owing to the rapidly changing field geometry and last for less than 2,500 years. The actual transit between the two polarities does not last longer than 1,000 years and might therefore result from mechanisms other than those governing normal secular variation. Such changes are too brief to be accurately recorded by most sediments. PMID:23038471

  16. Electrokinetic remediation using surfactant-coated ceramic casings

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, E.D.; Bowman, R.S.; Lindgren, E.R.

    2000-06-01

    Electrokinetic remediation is an emerging technique that can be used to remove metals from saturated or unsaturated soils. In unsaturated soils, control of the medium's water content is essential. Previously used electrode designs have caused detrimental soil wetting due to excess electroosmotic flow out of ceramic-encased anodes. The authors tested a method to reverse the electroosmotic flow at the anode by treating the ceramic casing with the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA). Laboratory tests showed the untreated ceramic had an electroosmotic permeability of 2.4 x 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Ceramic treated with HDTMA had an electroosmotic permeability of {minus}1.3 x 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Under an applied electric potential, electroosmotic flow was reversed in the HDTMA-treated ceramic, indicating a reversed zeta potential due to formation of an HDTMA bilayer on the ceramic surface. Field tests conducted over a 6-month period showed negligible water loss from HDTMA-treated ceramic compared to untreated ceramics. The results indicated that a surfactant treatment to the anode ceramic casing can greatly improve the application of electrokinetics in unsaturated environments.

  17. Field reversed ion rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.; Omelchenko, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp region into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. Assuming the characteristic ionization time is much shorter than the long ({ital t}{approx_gt}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}}) beam evolution time scale, we investigate the formation of an ion ring in the background plasma followed by field reversal, using a 21/2-D hybrid, PIC code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. We show that beam bunching and trapping occurs downstream in a ramped magnetic field for an appropriate set of experimental parameters. We find that a compact ion ring is formed and a large field reversal {zeta}={delta}{ital B}/{ital B}{approx_gt}1 on axis develops. We also observe significant deceleration of the ring on reflection due to the transfer of its axial momentum to the background ions, which creates favorable trapping conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Tevatron reverse injection

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-25

    In the new injection scenario antiprotons are injected onto a helical orbit in the Tevatron in order to avoid the detrimental effects of the beam-beam interaction at 150 GeV. The new scenario required changes in the tuning procedure. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning, therefore the antiproton injection line has to be tuned with protons by reverse injecting them from the Tevatron into the Main Pang (MR). Previously, the reverse injection was performed in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS dock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus marking it possible to inject 6 proton batches and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR.

  19. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  20. [Reverse Chaddock sign].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Kunio

    2011-08-01

    It is widely accepted that the Babinski reflex is the most well-known and important pathological reflex in clinical neurology. Among many other pathological reflexes that elicit an upgoing great toe, such as Chaddock, Oppenheim, Gordon, Schaefer, and Stransky, only the Chaddock reflex is said to be as sensitive as the Babinski reflex. The optimal receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes are the lateral plantar surface and the external inframalleolar area of the dorsum, respectively. It has been said that the Babinski reflex, obtained by stroking the sole, is by far the best and most reliable method of eliciting an upgoing great toe. However, the Chaddock reflex, the external malleolar sign, is also considered sensitive and reliable according to the literature and everyday neurological practice. The major problems in eliciting the Babinski reflex by stroking the lateral part of the sole are false positive or negative responses due to foot withdrawal, tonic foot response, or some equivocal movements. On the other hand, according to my clinical experience, the external inframalleolar area, which is the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex, is definitely suitable for eliciting the upgoing great toe. In fact, the newly proposed method to stimulate the dorsum of the foot from the medial to the lateral side, which I term the "reversed Chaddock method," is equally sensitive to demonstrate pyramidal tract involvement. With the "reversed Chaddock method", the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex may be postulated to be in the territory of the sural nerve, which could be supported by the better response obtained on stimulation of the postero-lateral calf than the anterior shin. With regard to the receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes, the first sacral dermatome (S1) is also considered a reflexogenous zone, but since the dermatome shows marked overlapping, the zones vary among individuals. As upgoing toe responses are consistently observed in

  1. Affirmative Action, or Reverse Discrimination?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansby, Ike

    1996-01-01

    Determines the impact of affirmative action programs in response to charges that they are policies of reverse discrimination. Reviewing affirmative action programs submitted by Michigan State departments, researchers determined no reverse discrimination was apparent based on low numbers of reverse discrimination complaints filed by whites. (GR)

  2. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saville, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective is to establish theoretically and confirm experimentally the ultimate capabilities of continuous flow electrophoresis chambers operating in an environment essentially free of particle sedimentation and buoyancy. The efforts are devoted to: (1) studying the effects of particle concentration on sample conductivity and dielectric constant. The dielectric constant and conductivity were identified as playing crucial roles in the behavior of the sample and on the resolving power and throughput of continuous flow devices; and (2) improving the extant mathematical models to predict flow fields and particle trajectories in continuous flow electrophoresis. A dielectric spectrometer was designed and built to measure the complex dielectric constant of a colloidal dispersion as a function of frequency between 500 Hz and 200 kHz. The real part of the signal can be related to the sample's conductivity and the imaginary part to its dielectric constant. Measurements of the dielectric constants of several different dispersions disclosed that the dielectric constants of dilute systems of the sort encountered in particle electrophoresis are much larger than would be expected based on the extant theory. Experiments were carried out to show that, in many cases, this behavior is due to the presence of a filamentary structure of small hairs on the particle surface. A technique for producing electrokinetically ideal synthetic latex particles by heat treating was developed. Given the ubiquitous nature of hairy surfaces with both cells and synthetic particles, it was deemed necessary to develop a theory to explain their behavior. A theory for electrophoretic mobility of hairy particles was developed. Finally, the extant computer programs for predicting the structure of electro-osmotically driven flows were extended to encompass flow channels with variable wall mobilities.

  3. The topology of intrasector reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1996-11-01

    A technique has been developed recently to determine the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields relative to their origins at the Sun by comparing energetic electron flow directions with local magnetic field directions. Here we use heat flux electrons from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) plasma detector on the ISEE 3 spacecraft to determine the field polarities. We examine periods within well-defined magnetic sectors when the field directions appear to be reversed from the normal spiral direction of the sector. About half of these intrasector field reversals (IFRs) are cases in which the polarities match those of the surrounding sectors, indicating that those fields have been folded back toward the Sun. The more interesting cases are those with polarity reversals. We find no clear cases of isolated reverse polarity fields, which suggests that islands of reverse polarity in the solar source dipole field probably do not exist. The IFRs with polarity reversals are strongly associated with periods of bidirectional electron flows, suggesting that those fields occur only in conjunction with closed fields. We propose that both those IFRs and the bidirectional flows are signatures of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In that case, many interplanetary CMEs are larger and more complex than previously thought, consisting of both open and closed field components.

  4. Reversible brazing process

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Jim D.; Stephens, John J.; Walker, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  5. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  6. Reversible airfoils for stopped rotors in high speed flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemiec, Robert; Jacobellis, George; Gandhi, Farhan

    2014-10-01

    This study starts with the design of a reversible airfoil rib for stopped-rotor applications, where the sharp trailing-edge morphs into the rounded leading-edge, and vice-versa. A NACA0012 airfoil is approximated in a piecewise linear manner and straight, rigid outer profile links used to define the airfoil contour. The end points of the profile links connect to control links, each set on a central actuation rod via an offset. Chordwise motion of the actuation rod moves the control and the profile links and reverses the airfoil. The paper describes the design methodology and evolution of the final design, based on which two reversible airfoil ribs were fabricated and used to assemble a finite span reversible rotor/wing demonstrator. The profile links were connected by Aluminum strips running in the spanwise direction which provided stiffness as well as support for a pre-tensioned elastomeric skin. An inter-rib connector with a curved-front nose piece supports the leading-edge. The model functioned well and was able to reverse smoothly back-and-forth, on application and reversal of a voltage to the motor. Navier-Stokes CFD simulations (using the TURNS code) show that the drag coefficient of the reversible airfoil (which had a 13% maximum thickness due to the thickness of the profile links) was comparable to that of the NACA0013 airfoil. The drag of a 16% thick elliptical airfoil was, on average, about twice as large, while that of a NACA0012 in reverse flow was 4-5 times as large, even prior to stall. The maximum lift coefficient of the reversible airfoil was lower than the elliptical airfoil, but higher than the NACA0012 in reverse flow operation.

  7. Reverse-Tangent Injection in a Centrifugal Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    Injection of working fluid into a centrifugal compressor in the reverse tangent direction has been invented as a way of preventing flow instabilities (stall and surge) or restoring stability when stall or surge has already commenced. The invention applies, in particular, to a centrifugal compressor, the diffuser of which contains vanes that divide the flow into channels oriented partly radially and partly tangentially. In reverse-tangent injection, a stream or jet of the working fluid (the fluid that is compressed) is injected into the vaneless annular region between the blades of the impeller and the vanes of the diffuser. As used here, "reverse" signifies that the injected flow opposes (and thereby reduces) the tangential component of the velocity of the impeller discharge. At the same time, the injected jet acts to increase the radial component of the velocity of the impeller discharge.

  8. Spurious behavior in volcanic records of geomagnetic field reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlut, Julie; Vella, Jerome; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Soler, Vicente; Legoff, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Very large directional variations of magnetization have been reported in several lava flows recording a geomagnetic reversal. Such behavior could reflect real geomagnetic changes or be caused by artifacts due to post-emplacement alteration and/or non-ideal magnetic behavior. More recently, a high resolution paleomagnetic record from sediments pleads also for an extremely rapid reversal process during the last reversal. Assuming that the geomagnetic field would have moved by tens of degrees during cooling of moderate thickness lava flows implies brief episodes of rapid changes by a few degrees per day that are difficult to reconcile with the rate of liquid motions at the core surface. Systematical mineralogical bias is a most likely explanation to promote such behavior as recently reconsidered by Coe et al., 2014 for the rapid field changes recorded at Steens Mountain. We resampled three lava flows at La Palma island (Canarias) that are sandwiched between reverse polarity and normal polarity flows associated with the last reversal. The results show an evolution of the magnetization direction from top to bottom. Thermal demagnetization experiments were conducted using different heating and cooling rates. Similarly, continuous demagnetization and measurements. In both cases, we did not notice any remagnetization associated with mineralogical transformations during the experiments. Magnetic grain sizes do not show any correlation with the amplitude of the deviations. Microscopic observations indicate poor exsolution, which could suggests post-cooling thermochemical remagnetization processes.

  9. Reverse Quantum Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Jeffrey

    2010-02-01

    As preposterous as it might sound, if quantum waves travel in the reverse direction from subatomic particles, then most of quantum physics can be explained without quantum weirdness or Schr"odinger's cat. Quantum mathematics is unchanged. The diffraction pattern on the screen of the double slit experiment is the same. This proposal is not refuted by the Innsbruck experiments; this is NOT a hidden local variable theory. Research evidence will be presented that is consistent with the idea waves travel in the opposite direction as neutrons. If one's thinking shifts from forwards to backwards quantum waves, the world changes so drastically it is almost unimaginable. Quantum waves move from the mathematical to the real world, multiply in number, and reverse in direction. Wave-particle duality is undone. In the double slit experiment every part of the target screen is emitting such quantum waves in all directions. Some pass through the two slits. Interference occurs on the opposite side of the barrier than is usually imagined. They impinge on ``S'' and an electron is released at random. Because of the interference it is more likely to follow some waves than others. It follows one and only one wave backward; hitting the screen where it's wave originated. )

  10. Reverse surface-polariton cherenkov radiation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The existence of reverse Cherenkov radiation for surface plasmons is demonstrated analytically. It is shown that in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited by an electron moving at a speed higher than the phase velocity of SPPs can generate Cherenkov radiation, which can be switched from forward to reverse direction by tuning the core thickness of the waveguide. Calculations are performed in both frequency and time domains, demonstrating that a radiation pattern with a backward-pointing radiation cone can be achieved at small waveguide core widths, with energy flow opposite to the wave vector of SPPs. Our study suggests the feasibility of generating and steering electron radiation in simple plasmonic systems, opening the gate for various applications such as velocity-selective particle detections. PMID:27477061

  11. Reverse surface-polariton cherenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu

    2016-08-01

    The existence of reverse Cherenkov radiation for surface plasmons is demonstrated analytically. It is shown that in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited by an electron moving at a speed higher than the phase velocity of SPPs can generate Cherenkov radiation, which can be switched from forward to reverse direction by tuning the core thickness of the waveguide. Calculations are performed in both frequency and time domains, demonstrating that a radiation pattern with a backward-pointing radiation cone can be achieved at small waveguide core widths, with energy flow opposite to the wave vector of SPPs. Our study suggests the feasibility of generating and steering electron radiation in simple plasmonic systems, opening the gate for various applications such as velocity-selective particle detections.

  12. Reverse surface-polariton cherenkov radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The existence of reverse Cherenkov radiation for surface plasmons is demonstrated analytically. It is shown that in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited by an electron moving at a speed higher than the phase velocity of SPPs can generate Cherenkov radiation, which can be switched from forward to reverse direction by tuning the core thickness of the waveguide. Calculations are performed in both frequency and time domains, demonstrating that a radiation pattern with a backward-pointing radiation cone can be achieved at small waveguide core widths, with energy flow opposite to the wave vector of SPPs. Our study suggests the feasibility of generating and steering electron radiation in simple plasmonic systems, opening the gate for various applications such as velocity-selective particle detections. PMID:27477061

  13. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1982-01-01

    It is found by a statistical study of 58 reversed-polarity regions (RPRs) covering the 11-year period 1969-1979 that RPRs (1) have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions, (2) do not show a tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment, and (3) have stable configurations that do not suggest stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. As in normal regions, RPR magnetic complexity is found to be the primary factor in flare productivity. Weak-field RPRs produce no flares, and regions with complex spots produce more flares than regions with non-complex spots by a factor of five. The main difference between RPRs and normal regions lies in complex spot frequency, with less that 17% of normal active regions having such spots and fewer than 1.8% having long-lived complex ones, while 41% of RPRs have complex spots and 24% have long-lived complex spots.

  14. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2003-12-09

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  15. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2006-04-25

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  16. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  17. Reverse slapper detonator

    DOEpatents

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

  18. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  19. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.

  20. Reversibility of skeletal fluorosis.

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, P; Thomsen, G

    1983-01-01

    At two x ray examinations in 1957 and 1967, 17 cases of skeletal fluorosis were identified among long term cryolite workers in Copenhagen. In 1982 four of these patients were alive, eight to 15 years after exposure had ended. Radiographs were obtained, and the urinary fluoride excretion was measured. A similar picture emerged in all four cases: extensive fading of the sclerosis of trabecular bone in ribs, vertebral bodies, and pelvis, whereas cortical bone thickening and calcification of muscle insertions and ligaments remained virtually unchanged. The fluoride excretion was increased in three cases (with the shortest exposure free period). These findings indicate that with continuous remodelling of bone tissue trabecular sclerosis is slowly reversible and the excess fluoride is excreted in the urine. Images PMID:6626475

  1. Reversibility of skeletal fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, P; Thomsen, G

    1983-11-01

    At two x ray examinations in 1957 and 1967, 17 cases of skeletal fluorosis were identified among long term cryolite workers in Copenhagen. In 1982 four of these patients were alive, eight to 15 years after exposure had ended. Radiographs were obtained, and the urinary fluoride excretion was measured. A similar picture emerged in all four cases: extensive fading of the sclerosis of trabecular bone in ribs, vertebral bodies, and pelvis, whereas cortical bone thickening and calcification of muscle insertions and ligaments remained virtually unchanged. The fluoride excretion was increased in three cases (with the shortest exposure free period). These findings indicate that with continuous remodelling of bone tissue trabecular sclerosis is slowly reversible and the excess fluoride is excreted in the urine. PMID:6626475

  2. Biochemical Reversal of Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-03-01

    We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

  3. Reducing Reversals in Reading and Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heydorn, Bernard L.

    1984-01-01

    Reversals can be remediated in a variety of ways that focus on single symbol reversals (e.g., by tracing overlarge letters or numerals) or whole word reversals (e.g., by using flash cards for identified reverse words). (CL)

  4. Visualization of relaminarizing flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanath, P. R.; Narasimha, R.; Prabhu, A.

    1978-01-01

    The experiments described in the present paper provided conclusive evidence for the feasibility of achieving reverse transition by several different mechanisms. Turbulent-to-laminar transition in water was visualized by injection of purple and green dyes. Air flows were visualized by colored schlieren photography.

  5. On time reversal mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannjiang, Albert C.

    2009-09-01

    The concept of time reversal (TR) of a scalar wave is reexamined from basic principles. Five different time-reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and their relations are analyzed. For the boundary behavior, it is shown that for a paraxial wave only the monopole TR scheme satisfies the exact boundary condition while for the spherical wave only the MD-mode TR scheme satisfies the exact boundary condition. The asymptotic analysis of the near-field focusing property is presented for two dimensions and three dimensions. It is shown that to have a subwavelength focal spot, the TRM should consist of dipole transducers. The transverse resolution of the dipole TRM is linearly proportional to the distance between the point source and the TRM. The mixed mode TRM has the similar (linear) behavior in three dimensions, but in two dimensions the transverse resolution behaves as the square root of the distance between the point source and the TRM. The monopole TRM is ineffective in focusing below the wavelength. Contrary to the matched field processing and the phase processor, both of which resemble TR, TR in a weak- or non-scattering medium is usually biased in the longitudinal direction, especially when TR is carried out on a single plane with a finite aperture. This is true for all five TR schemes. On the other hand, the TR focal spot has been shown repeatedly in the literature, both theoretically and experimentally, to be centered at the source point when the medium is multiple scattering. A reconciliation of the two seemingly conflicting results is found in the random fluctuations in the intensity of the Green function for a multiple scattering medium and the notion of scattering-enlarged effective aperture.

  6. Reverse Engineering Podkletnov's Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, B. T.

    Experiments reported by Podkletnov et al. suggest that gravity modification is within reach in our lifetimes. Solomon used process models to introduced the concept of non-inertia Ni fields and derived the massless gravitational acceleration formula g = τc2 that is consistent with Hooft's finding that absence of matter no longer guarantees local flatness. Solomon had also shown that many photon experimental results could be modeled without the use of quantum theory. This would imply that neither a quantum nor a relativistic type theory would be indispensible to formulating a theory on gravity modification. This paper, therefore, explores the use of Ni fields and process models to reverse engineer Podkletnov's experiments from first principles to determine a possible theoretical or at least an engineering basis for the observed gravity shielding effects. This paper scrutinizes and documents Podkletnov's papers for detailed experimental clues and applies them to new process models. The paper shows that it is possible to infer gravity modifying effects using non-inertia Ni fields, without taking into consideration the quantum mechanical properties of the ceramic superconducting disc. That is without considering how or why these fields are produced. The modeling suggests that there are two similar but different phenomena present, the stationary disc and spinning disc effects. The observed weight loss with the stationary disc is due to the asymmetric magnetic field and the observed weight loss with the spinning disc is due to the electromagnetic Ni field. There are several keys to reproducing Podkletnov's experimental results, asymmetric fields, dual layer disc, and the presence of both electric and magnetic fields. Finally the paper shows that if the magnetic field was not superconducting, but a regular magnetic field, that the observed weight change should be reversed, and therefore, a non-superconducting disc would lend itself to simpler and easier experimental

  7. The puzzle of the steady-state rotation of a reverse sprinkler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueckner, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The continuous rotation of the reverse sprinkler has been a puzzle for over two decades. This article presents a series of experiments that demonstrate that a properly designed reverse sprinkler experiences no steady-state torque and does not rotate. Ignoring transients when the flow starts and stops, if any sustained rotation of the reverse sprinkler occurs, it is because a force couple produces a torque accompanied by vortex flow inside the body of the sprinkler. No steady-state rotation occurs if the vortex is suppressed or prevented from forming in the first place. Demonstrative proof is given that an ideal reverse sprinkler does not rotate.

  8. Magnetic reversals and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a study of reversals of the earth's magnetic field over the past 165 Myr are presented. A stationary periodicity of 30 Myr emerges which predicts pulses of increased reversal activity centered at 10, 40, 70, . . . Myr before the present. The correlation between the reversal intensity and biological extinctions is examined, and a nontrivial discrepancy is found between the magnetic and extinction periodicity.

  9. Geomagnetic Reversals during the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed

    McElhinny, M W

    1971-04-01

    An antalysis of worldwide paleomagnetic measurements suggests a periodicity of 350 x 10(6) years in the polarity of the geomagnetic field. During the Mesozoic it is predominantly normal, whereas during the Upper Paleozoic it is predominantly reversed. Although geomagnetic reversals occur at different rates throughout the Phanerozoic, there appeaars to be no clear correlation between biological evolutionary rates and reversal frequency. PMID:17735224

  10. ASYMMETRIC SOLAR POLAR FIELD REVERSALS

    SciTech Connect

    Svalgaard, Leif; Kamide, Yohsuke

    2013-01-20

    The solar polar fields reverse because magnetic flux from decaying sunspots moves toward the poles, with a preponderance of flux from the trailing spots. If there is a strong asymmetry, in the sense that most activity is in the northern hemisphere, then that excess flux will move toward the north pole and reverse that pole first. If there is more activity in the south later on, then that flux will help to reverse the south pole. In this way, two humps in the solar activity and a corresponding difference in the time of reversals develop (in the ideal case). Such a difference was originally noted in the very first observation of polar field reversal just after the maximum of the strongly asymmetric solar cycle 19, when the southern hemisphere was most active before sunspot maximum and the south pole duly reversed first, followed by the northern hemisphere more than a year later, when that hemisphere became most active. Solar cycles since then have had the opposite asymmetry, with the northern hemisphere being most active before solar maximum. We show that polar field reversals for these cycles have all happened in the north first, as expected. This is especially noteworthy for the present solar cycle 24. We suggest that the association of two or more peaks of solar activity when separated by hemispheres with correspondingly different times of polar field reversals is a general feature of the cycle, and that asymmetric polar field reversals are simply a consequence of the asymmetry of solar activity.

  11. Experimental performance of cascade thrust reversers at forward velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. A.; Luidens, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    A series of static and wind tunnel tests were performed on four cowl cascade thrust reverser configurations which had various reversed jet emission patterns applicable to an externally blown flap STOL aircraft. The work was performed using a model fan which was 14.0 cm in diameter and passed a fan mass flow of 2.49 kg/sec at an approximate fan pressure ratio of 1.22 and fan corrected rotational speed of 35,800 rpm. The tests demonstrated that the reingestion of fan flow significantly reduced the reverser efficiency and that the thrust reverser efficiency was improved by reducing the reversed jet azimuthal emmission angle. The reverser efficiency at STOL landing speeds was as high as 0.95; however, configurations with lateral emission were adversely affected by yawing the nacelle at forward velocity. Measurements of the internal static pressure at the stator exit showed significant increases in the local static pressure for configurations with reduced jet emission angles.

  12. Time-reversal-symmetry breaking in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jucha, Jennifer; Xu, Haitao; Pumir, Alain; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-11-01

    In three-dimensional turbulent flows, the flux of energy from large to small scales breaks time symmetry. We show here that this irreversibility can be quantified by following the relative motion of several Lagrangian tracers. We find by analytical calculation, numerical analysis and experimental observation that the existence of the energy flux implies that, at short times, two particles separate temporally slower forwards than backwards, and the difference between forward and backward dispersion grows as t3. We also find the geometric deformation of material volumes, surrogated by four points spanning an initially regular tetrahedron, to show sensitivity to the time-reversal with an effect growing linearly in t. We associate this with the structure of the strain rate in the flow. We thank the support from Max Planck Society, the Humboldt Foundation, ANR, and PSMN at ENS-Lyon.

  13. Flow stress of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, O.B.

    1987-10-01

    The reverse microflow associated with the Bauschinger effect in copper strained into stage II is characterized experimentally and analyzed in terms of the theory of obstacle-controlled flow and established composite theory. The results are discussed in the light of observations by electron microscopy, deformation calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. It is suggested that the overall flow resistance arises from an interplay of two modes of obstacle controlled glide, none of which dominate the flow stress. One mode occurs inside regions of high local dislocation density (inclusions) where individual forest dislocations oppose glide on the primary slip system. The second mode is bowing of dislocations between the inclusions.

  14. MDR-reversal activity of chalcones.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Antoaneta; Batovska, Daniela; Engi, Helga; Parushev, Stoyan; Ocsovszki, Imre; Kostova, Ivanka; Molnar, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The ability of 11 chalcones with 3,4,5-trimethoxy substitution on ring A to inhibit the transport activity of P-glycoprotein was studied. Flow cytometry was applied in multidrug-resistant human mdr1 gene-transfected mouse lymphoma cells (L 5178 Y). The reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) was investigated by measuring the accumulation of rhodamine-123 in cancer cells. Verapamil was applied as a positive control. The majority of the tested compounds were proved to be effective inhibitors of the outward transport of rhodamine-123. In the MTT test, chalcones 2, 3, 5 and 7 exhibited the strongest antiproliferative effects, with 50% inhibitory dose (ID50) =0.19, 0.19, 0.29 and 0.14 microg/mL, respectively. The least effective compounds were 1, 4, 8 and 11, with ID50 values in the range of 1.5-3.5 microg/mL. The antiproliferative effect was shown to be affected by the type of substitution at the p-position on ring B. Chalcone 7, with a p-chloro group on ring B, was the most effective in MDR reversal, causing a marked increase in drug accumulation from 0.4 to 40 microg/mL. In combination with epirubicin, compound 7 displayed synergistic properties while compound 3 exhibited an additive effect. The data presented here indicated that some calcone derivatives can be regarded as effective compounds for reversal of MDR. PMID:18610751

  15. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schmutzhard, E

    2016-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In another hypothesis, endothelial dysfunction triggered by numerous factors including preeclampsia, immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutics, sepsis, or autoimmune disorders is thought to be the key pathomechanism. Endo- or exogenic toxic agents including pharmacological substances, cytokines, or bacterial toxins are supposed to trigger endothelial activation and dysfunction resulting in the release of vasoconstrictors, pro-inflammatory mediators, and vascular leakage. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical and neuroimaging findings that frequently show a bilateral, symmetric, and parietooccipital pattern. However, the diagnosis can often only be confirmed during the course of disease after excluding important differential diagnoses. Currently, there is no specific treatment available. Lowering of arterial blood pressure and eliminating the underlying cause usually leads to an improvement of clinical and neuroradiological findings. Admission to a critical care unit is required in about 40 % of patients due to complicating conditions including status epilepticus, cerebral vasoconstriction, ischemia, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Prognosis is favorable; in the majority of patients neurological deficits and imaging findings resolve completely. PMID:27272329

  16. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  17. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  18. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  19. The Reversal in Migration Patterns -- Some Rural Development Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Louis A.

    The reversal in migration patterns in the 1970's resulting in a net population flow from metropolitan (urban) to nonmetropolitan (rural) areas may have a variety of rural development consequences. Sizeable population increase in rural communities which traditionally have experienced net out-migration or very slow increases is evident in Maine…

  20. A model for 'reverse innovation' in health care.

    PubMed

    Depasse, Jacqueline W; Lee, Patrick T

    2013-01-01

    'Reverse innovation,' a principle well established in the business world, describes the flow of ideas from emerging to more developed economies. There is strong and growing interest in applying this concept to health care, yet there is currently no framework for describing the stages of reverse innovation or identifying opportunities to accelerate the development process. This paper combines the business concept of reverse innovation with diffusion of innovation theory to propose a model for reverse innovation as a way to innovate in health care. Our model includes the following steps: (1) identifying a problem common to lower- and higher-income countries; (2) innovation and spread in the low-income country (LIC); (3) crossover to the higher-income country (HIC); and (4) innovation and spread in the HIC. The crucial populations in this pathway, drawing from diffusion of innovation theory, are LIC innovators, LIC early adopters, and HIC innovators. We illustrate the model with three examples of current reverse innovations. We then propose four sets of specific actions that forward-looking policymakers, entrepreneurs, health system leaders, and researchers may take to accelerate the movement of promising solutions through the reverse innovation pipeline: (1) identify high-priority problems shared by HICs and LICs; (2) create slack for change, especially for LIC innovators, LIC early adopters, and HIC innovators; (3) create spannable social distances between LIC early adopters and HIC innovators; and (4) measure reverse innovation activity globally. PMID:24001367

  1. A model for ‘reverse innovation’ in health care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reverse innovation,’ a principle well established in the business world, describes the flow of ideas from emerging to more developed economies. There is strong and growing interest in applying this concept to health care, yet there is currently no framework for describing the stages of reverse innovation or identifying opportunities to accelerate the development process. This paper combines the business concept of reverse innovation with diffusion of innovation theory to propose a model for reverse innovation as a way to innovate in health care. Our model includes the following steps: (1) identifying a problem common to lower- and higher-income countries; (2) innovation and spread in the low-income country (LIC); (3) crossover to the higher-income country (HIC); and (4) innovation and spread in the HIC. The crucial populations in this pathway, drawing from diffusion of innovation theory, are LIC innovators, LIC early adopters, and HIC innovators. We illustrate the model with three examples of current reverse innovations. We then propose four sets of specific actions that forward-looking policymakers, entrepreneurs, health system leaders, and researchers may take to accelerate the movement of promising solutions through the reverse innovation pipeline: (1) identify high-priority problems shared by HICs and LICs; (2) create slack for change, especially for LIC innovators, LIC early adopters, and HIC innovators; (3) create spannable social distances between LIC early adopters and HIC innovators; and (4) measure reverse innovation activity globally. PMID:24001367

  2. Reverse genetics of avian metapneumoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infection in turkeys and development of a reverse genetics system for aMPV subgroup C (aMPV-C) virus will be presented. By using reverse genetics technology, we generated recombinant aMPV-C viruses containing a different length of glycoprotein (G) gene or...

  3. Preference Reversal in Multiattribute Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity…

  4. Reverse Transfer Project, Summer 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Elizabeth

    In 1986, a Reverse Transfer Project was initiated at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) in order to promote the summer school attendance at MVCC of "reverse transfer" students (i.e., students who attended another institution during the regular academic year). A mailing, containing a cover letter, informational brochure, summer catalog, and…

  5. Reversal of novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Abo-Salem, Elsayed; Becker, Richard C

    2016-04-01

    The development of a new generation of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants represents a potential breakthrough in the management of patients with thrombotic diseases, disorders and conditions. While a large and growing body of evidence from large-scale clinical trials and registries supports a favorable safety profile, having a means to rapidly reverse their anticoagulant effects represents an unmet need among practicing clinicians. Several targeted reversal agents are currently in development and the early results are promising. Idarucizumab is a monoclonal antibody that can immediately and specifically reverse dabigatran. Andexanet alfa is a recombinant modified factor Xa that can bind and reverse oral and parenteral factor Xa inhibitors, including rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and low molecular weight heparin. Aripazine is a small molecule that can reverse the action of factor Xa inhibitors and possibly dabigatran as well through non-covalent binding and charge-charge interactions. PMID:26939028

  6. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  7. Parkinson's disease managing reversible neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted; McDougall, Beth; Westaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the Parkinson's disease (PD) symptom course has been classified as an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease. This paper documents 29 PD and treatment-induced systemic depletion etiologies which cause and/or exacerbate the seven novel primary relative nutritional deficiencies associated with PD. These reversible relative nutritional deficiencies (RNDs) may facilitate and accelerate irreversible progressive neurodegeneration, while other reversible RNDs may induce previously undocumented reversible pseudo-neurodegeneration that is hiding in plain sight since the symptoms are identical to the symptoms being experienced by the PD patient. Documented herein is a novel nutritional approach for reversible processes management which may slow or halt irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease and correct reversible RNDs whose symptoms are identical to the patient's PD symptoms. PMID:27103805

  8. Thermodynamically reversible generalization of diffusion limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, R M; Margolus, N H

    1999-07-01

    We introduce a lattice gas model of cluster growth via the diffusive aggregation of particles in a closed system obeying a local, deterministic, microscopically reversible dynamics. This model roughly corresponds to placing the irreversible diffusion limited aggregation model (DLA) in contact with a heat bath. Particles release latent heat when aggregating, while singly connected cluster members can absorb heat and evaporate. The heat bath is initially empty, hence we observe the flow of entropy from the aggregating gas of particles into the heat bath, which is being populated by diffusing heat tokens. Before the population of the heat bath stabilizes, the cluster morphology (quantified by the fractal dimension) is similar to a standard DLA cluster. The cluster then gradually anneals, becoming more tenuous, until reaching configurational equilibrium when the cluster morphology resembles a quenched branched random polymer. As the microscopic dynamics is invertible, we can reverse the evolution, observe the inverse flow of heat and entropy, and recover the initial condition. This simple system provides an explicit example of how macroscopic dissipation and self-organization can result from an underlying microscopically reversible dynamics. We present a detailed description of the dynamics for the model, discuss the macroscopic limit, and give predictions for the equilibrium particle densities obtained in the mean field limit. Empirical results for the growth are then presented, including the observed equilibrium particle densities, the temperature of the system, the fractal dimension of the growth clusters, scaling behavior, finite size effects, and the approach to equilibrium. We pay particular attention to the temporal behavior of the growth process and show that the relaxation to the maximum entropy state is initially a rapid nonequilibrium process, then subsequently it is a quasistatic process with a well defined temperature. PMID:11969759

  9. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  10. Reverse osmosis reverses conventional wisdom with Superfund cleanup success

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M. ); Miller, K. )

    1994-09-01

    Although widely recognized as the most efficient means of water purification, reverse osmosis has not been considered effective for remediating hazardous wastewater. Scaling and fouling, which can cause overruns and downtime, and require membrane replacement, have inhibited success in high-volume wastewater applications. Despite this background, a reverse osmosis technology developed in Europe recently was used successfully to treat large volumes of contaminated water at a major Superfund site in Texas. The technology's success there may increase the chances for reverse osmosis to find wider use in future cleanups and other waste treatment applications.

  11. Viscous flow calculations in turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J.; Moore, J. G.

    The development of the computer program is reviewed which has been written to include many, but not all, of the physical processes occurring in centrifugal impellers. The program has been developed to calculate flows with progressively more complex physics and in progressively more complex geometries. Three flows in particular are described: these are flows in the rotating channel of Moore, the 90 deg accelerating elbow of Stanitz, and the centrifugal compressor of Eckardt. All three flows are steady and subsonic, and all three exhibit only small influences due to reverse flow and upstream viscous transport.

  12. How decision reversibility affects motivation.

    PubMed

    Bullens, Lottie; van Harreveld, Frenk; Förster, Jens; Higgins, Tory E

    2014-04-01

    The present research examined how decision reversibility can affect motivation. On the basis of extant findings, it was suggested that 1 way it could affect motivation would be to strengthen different regulatory foci, with reversible decision making, compared to irreversible decision making, strengthening prevention-related motivation relatively more than promotion-related motivation. If so, then decision reversibility should have effects associated with the relative differences between prevention and promotion motivation. In 5 studies, we manipulated the reversibility of a decision and used different indicators of regulatory focus motivation to test these predictions. Specifically, Study 1 tested for differences in participants' preference for approach versus avoidance strategies toward a desired end state. In Study 2, we used speed and accuracy performance as indicators of participants' regulatory motivation, and in Study 3, we measured global versus local reaction time performance. In Study 4, we approached the research question in a different way, making use of the value-from-fit hypothesis (Higgins, 2000, 2002). We tested whether a fit between chronic regulatory focus and focus induced by the reversibility of the decision increased participants' subjective positive feelings about the decision outcome. Finally, in Study 5, we tested whether regulatory motivation, induced by decision reversibility, also influenced participants' preference in specific product features. The results generally support our hypothesis showing that, compared to irreversible decisions, reversible decisions strengthen a prevention focus more than a promotion focus. Implications for research on decision making are discussed. PMID:23815456

  13. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  14. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  15. Streaming reversal of energetic particles in the magnetotail during a substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1984-01-01

    A case of reversal in the streaming anisotropy of energetic ions and in the plasma flow observed from the IMP 8 spacecraft during a substorm on February 8, 1978 is studied in detail using measurements of energetic particles, plasma, and magnetic field. Four new features emerge when high time resolution data are examined in detail. The times of streaming reversal of energetic particles in different energy ranges do not coincide with the time of plasma flow reversal. Qualitatively different velocity distributions are observed in earthward and tailward plasma flows during the observed flow reversal intervals. Strong tailward streaming of energetic particles can be detected during northward magnetic field environments and, conversely, earthward streaming in southward field environments. During the period of tailward streaming of energetic particles, earthward streaming fluxes are occasionally detected.

  16. Molecularly Regulated Reversible DNA Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Niancao; Shi, Xuechen; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Natural polymers are synthesized and decomposed under physiological conditions. However, it is challenging to develop synthetic polymers whose formation and reversibility can be both controlled under physiological conditions. Here we show that both linear and branched DNA polymers can be synthesized via molecular hybridization in aqueous solutions, on the particle surface, and in the extracellular matrix (ECM) without the involvement of any harsh conditions. More importantly, these polymers can be effectively reversed to dissociate under the control of molecular triggers. Since nucleic acids can be conjugated with various molecules or materials, we anticipate that molecularly regulated reversible DNA polymerization holds potential for broad biological and biomedical applications. PMID:27100911

  17. Ferroelectric polarization reversal in single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, Henry L.

    1992-01-01

    Research on the reversal of polarization in ferroelectric crystals is reviewed. Particular attention is given to observation methods for polarization reversal, BaTiO3 polarization reversal, crystal thickness dependence of polarization reversal, and domain wall movement during polarization reversal in TGS.

  18. Modeling of gaseous flows within proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Grot, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Development of a comprehensive mechanistic model has been helpful to understand PEM fuel cell performance. Both through-the-electrode and down-the-channel models have been developed to support our experimental effort to enhance fuel cell design and operation. The through-the-electrode model was described previously. This code describes the known transport properties and dynamic processes that occur within a membrane and electrode assembly. Key parameters include transport through the backing layers, water diffusion and electroosmotic transport in the membrane, and reaction electrochemical kinetics within the cathode catalyst layer. In addition, two geometric regions within the cathode layer are represented, the first region below saturation and second with liquid water present. Although processes at high gas stoichiometry are well represented by more simple codes, moderate stoichiometry processes require a two dimensional representation that include the gaseous composition and temperature along flow channel. Although usually PEM hardware utilizes serpentine flow channels, this code does not include such geometric features and thus the flow can be visualized along a single channel.

  19. Improving reversal median computation using commuting reversals and cycle information.

    PubMed

    Arndt, William; Tang, Jijun

    2008-10-01

    In the past decade, genome rearrangements have attracted increasing attention from both biologists and computer scientists as a new type of data for phylogenetic analysis. Methods for reconstructing phylogeny from genome rearrangements include distance-based methods, MCMC methods, and direct optimization methods. The latter, pioneered by Sankoff and extended with the software suites GRAPPA and MGR, is the most accurate approach, but is very limited due to the difficulty of its scoring procedure--it must solve multiple instances of the reversal median problem to compute the score of a given tree. The reversal median problem is known to be NP-hard and all existing solvers are extremely slow when the genomes are distant. In this paper, we present a new reversal median heuristic for unichromosomal genomes. The new method works by applying sets of reversals in a batch where all such reversals both commute and do not break the cycle of any other. Our testing using simulated datasets shows that this method is much faster than the leading solver for difficult datasets with only a slight accuracy penalty, yet retains better accuracy than other heuristics with comparable speed, and provides the additional option of searching for multiple medians. This method dramatically increases the speed of current direct optimization methods and enables us to extend the range of their applicability to organellar and small nuclear genomes with more than 50 reversals along each edge. PMID:18774904

  20. Characterization of the fouling phenomenon in reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, M.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation explores the application of a bench scale reverse osmosis test cell apparatus as a research tool. This versatile system was used to explore the response of a reverse osmosis membrane to various types of feedwaters. As a result of this research, an easy, accurate experimental method for predicting the rejection in any reverse osmosis system has been developed and demonstrated. The dissertation illustrates a simple procedure to identify if a precipitating feedwater solution will foul a reverse osmosis membrane. The research also presents evidence that suggests that the common practice of increasing feed flow rates to clean a membrane may not always be an acceptable method to revive a system. In addition to this information about the RO systems, the dissertation provides insight into the environment around the membrane surface. Statistically significant information about the nature and behavior of the membrane permeation coefficient is presented. Evidence is provided to demonstrate the negative effects on membrane performance of small amounts of grease contamination from the process equipment. Insight into the resistive nature of membranes, boundary layers, and fouling deposits is also presented. Throughout the course of this research, the relationship between concentration polarization and the permeate flux is illustrated. This is done first in the traditional terms of wall concentration, and later in terms of flow resistance. This dissertation also provides an experimental demonstration of both the detachment of a boundary layer from a membrane and the resistive nature of a precipitated fouling layer in a reverse osmosis system.