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Sample records for reversible phosphatidylserine exposure

  1. Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Nagata, S; Suzuki, J; Segawa, K; Fujii, T

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) is a phospholipid that is abundant in eukaryotic plasma membranes. An ATP-dependent enzyme called flippase normally keeps PtdSer inside the cell, but PtdSer is exposed by the action of scramblase on the cell's surface in biological processes such as apoptosis and platelet activation. Once exposed to the cell surface, PtdSer acts as an 'eat me' signal on dead cells, and creates a scaffold for blood-clotting factors on activated platelets. The molecular identities of the flippase and scramblase that work at plasma membranes have long eluded researchers. Indeed, their identity as well as the mechanism of the PtdSer exposure to the cell surface has only recently been revealed. Here, we describe how PtdSer is exposed in apoptotic cells and in activated platelets, and discuss PtdSer exposure in other biological processes. PMID:26891692

  2. Stimulation of erythrocyte phosphatidylserine exposure by mercury ions

    SciTech Connect

    Eisele, Kerstin; Lang, Philipp A.; Kempe, Daniela S.; Klarl, Barbara A.; Niemoeller, Olivier; Wieder, Thomas; Huber, Stephan M.; Duranton, Christophe; Lang, Florian . E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de

    2006-01-15

    The sequelae of mercury intoxication include induction of apoptosis. In nucleated cells, Hg{sup 2+}-induced apoptosis involves mitochondrial damage. The present study has been performed to elucidate effects of Hg{sup 2+} in erythrocytes which lack mitochondria but are able to undergo apoptosis-like alterations of the cell membrane. Previous studies have documented that activation of a Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive erythrocyte scramblase leads to exposure of phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface, a typical feature of apoptotic cells. The erythrocyte scramblase is activated by osmotic shock, oxidative stress and/or energy depletion which increase cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} activity and/or activate a sphingomyelinase leading to formation of ceramide. Ceramide sensitizes the scramblase to Ca{sup 2+}. The present experiments explored the effect of Hg{sup 2+} ions on erythrocytes. Phosphatidylserine exposure after mercury treatment was estimated from annexin binding as determined in FACS analysis. Exposure to Hg{sup 2+} (1 {mu}M) indeed significantly increased annexin binding from 2.3 {+-} 0.5% (control condition) to 23 {+-} 6% (n = 6). This effect was paralleled by activation of a clotrimazole-sensitive K{sup +}-selective conductance as measured by patch-clamp recordings and by transient cell shrinkage. Further experiments revealed also an increase of ceramide formation by {approx}66% (n = 7) after challenge with mercury (1 {mu}M). In conclusion, mercury ions activate a clotrimazole-sensitive K{sup +}-selective conductance leading to transient cell shrinkage. Moreover, Hg{sup 2+} increases ceramide formation. The observed mechanisms could similarly participate in the triggering of apoptosis in nucleated cells by Hg{sup 2+}.

  3. Fertilization Induces a Transient Exposure of Phosphatidylserine in Mouse Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Curia, Claudio A.; Ernesto, Juan I.; Stein, Paula; Busso, Dolores; Schultz, Richard M.; Cuasnicu, Patricia S.; Cohen, Débora J.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is normally localized to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane and the requirement of PS translocation to the outer leaflet in cellular processes other than apoptosis has been demonstrated recently. In this work we investigated the occurrence of PS mobilization in mouse eggs, which express flippase Atp8a1 and scramblases Plscr1 and 3, as determined by RT-PCR; these enzyme are responsible for PS distribution in cell membranes. We find a dramatic increase in binding of flouresceinated-Annexin-V, which specifically binds to PS, following fertilization or parthenogenetic activation induced by SrCl2 treatment. This increase was not observed when eggs were first treated with BAPTA-AM, indicating that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration was required for PS exposure. Fluorescence was observed over the entire egg surface with the exception of the regions overlying the meiotic spindle and sperm entry site. PS exposure was also observed in activated eggs obtained from CaMKIIγ null females, which are unable to exit metaphase II arrest despite displaying Ca2+ spikes. In contrast, PS exposure was not observed in TPEN-activated eggs, which exit metaphase II arrest in the absence of Ca2+ release. PS exposure was also observed when eggs were activated with ethanol but not with a Ca2+ ionophore, suggesting that the Ca2+ source and concentration are relevant for PS exposure. Last, treatment with cytochalasin D, which disrupts microfilaments, or jasplakinolide, which stabilizes microfilaments, prior to egg activation showed that PS externalization is an actin-dependent process. Thus, the Ca2+ rise during egg activation results in a transient exposure of PS in fertilized eggs that is not associated with apoptosis. PMID:23951277

  4. Phosphatidylserine exposure is required for ADAM17 sheddase function

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Anselm; Kordowski, Felix; Büch, Joscha; Maretzky, Thorsten; Evers, Astrid; Andrä, Jörg; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Michalek, Matthias; Lorenzen, Inken; Somasundaram, Prasath; Tholey, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Kunzelmann, Karl; Heinbockel, Lena; Nehls, Christian; Gutsmann, Thomas; Grötzinger, Joachim; Bhakdi, Sucharit; Reiss, Karina

    2016-01-01

    ADAM17, a prominent member of the ‘Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase' (ADAM) family, controls vital cellular functions through cleavage of transmembrane substrates. Here we present evidence that surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) is pivotal for ADAM17 to exert sheddase activity. PS exposure is tightly coupled to substrate shedding provoked by diverse ADAM17 activators. PS dependency is demonstrated in the following: (a) in Raji cells undergoing apoptosis; (b) in mutant PSA-3 cells with manipulatable PS content; and (c) in Scott syndrome lymphocytes genetically defunct in their capacity to externalize PS in response to intracellular Ca2+ elevation. Soluble phosphorylserine but not phosphorylcholine inhibits substrate cleavage. The isolated membrane proximal domain (MPD) of ADAM17 binds to PS but not to phosphatidylcholine liposomes. A cationic PS-binding motif is identified in this domain, replacement of which abrogates liposome-binding and renders the protease incapable of cleaving its substrates in cells. We speculate that surface-exposed PS directs the protease to its targets where it then executes its shedding function. PMID:27161080

  5. Phosphatidylserine exposure is required for ADAM17 sheddase function.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Anselm; Kordowski, Felix; Büch, Joscha; Maretzky, Thorsten; Evers, Astrid; Andrä, Jörg; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Michalek, Matthias; Lorenzen, Inken; Somasundaram, Prasath; Tholey, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Kunzelmann, Karl; Heinbockel, Lena; Nehls, Christian; Gutsmann, Thomas; Grötzinger, Joachim; Bhakdi, Sucharit; Reiss, Karina

    2016-01-01

    ADAM17, a prominent member of the 'Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase' (ADAM) family, controls vital cellular functions through cleavage of transmembrane substrates. Here we present evidence that surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) is pivotal for ADAM17 to exert sheddase activity. PS exposure is tightly coupled to substrate shedding provoked by diverse ADAM17 activators. PS dependency is demonstrated in the following: (a) in Raji cells undergoing apoptosis; (b) in mutant PSA-3 cells with manipulatable PS content; and (c) in Scott syndrome lymphocytes genetically defunct in their capacity to externalize PS in response to intracellular Ca(2+) elevation. Soluble phosphorylserine but not phosphorylcholine inhibits substrate cleavage. The isolated membrane proximal domain (MPD) of ADAM17 binds to PS but not to phosphatidylcholine liposomes. A cationic PS-binding motif is identified in this domain, replacement of which abrogates liposome-binding and renders the protease incapable of cleaving its substrates in cells. We speculate that surface-exposed PS directs the protease to its targets where it then executes its shedding function. PMID:27161080

  6. Thrombotic Role of Blood and Endothelial Cells in Uremia through Phosphatidylserine Exposure and Microparticle Release

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chunyan; Xie, Rui; Yu, Chengyuan; Ma, Ruishuang; Dong, Weijun; Meng, Huan; Zhang, Yan; Si, Yu; Zhang, Zhuo; Novakovic, Valerie; Zhang, Yong; Kou, Junjie; Bi, Yayan; Li, Baoxin; Xie, Rujuan; Gilbert, Gary E.; Zhou, Jin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to an increased risk of thrombosis in uremia are complex and require clarification. There is scant morphological evidence of membrane-dependent binding of factor Xa (FXa) and factor Va (FVa) on endothelial cells (EC) in vitro. Our objectives were to confirm that exposed phosphatidylserine (PS) on microparticle (MP), EC, and peripheral blood cell (PBC) has a prothrombotic role in uremic patients and to provide visible and morphological evidence of PS-dependent prothrombinase assembly in vitro. We found that uremic patients had more circulating MP (derived from PBC and EC) than controls. Additionally, patients had more exposed PS on their MPs and PBCs, especially in the hemodialysis group. In vitro, EC exposed more PS in uremic toxins or serum. Moreover, reconstitution experiments showed that at the early stages, PS exposure was partially reversible. Using confocal microscopy, we observed that PS-rich membranes of EC and MP provided binding sites for FVa and FXa. Further, exposure of PS in uremia resulted in increased generation of FXa, thrombin, and fibrin and significantly shortened coagulation time. Lactadherin, a protein that blocks PS, reduced 80% of procoagulant activity on PBC, EC, and MP. Our results suggest that PBC and EC in uremic milieu are easily injured or activated, which exposes PS and causes a release of MP, providing abundant procoagulant membrane surfaces and thus facilitating thrombus formation. Blocking PS binding sites could become a new therapeutic target for preventing thrombosis. PMID:26580207

  7. TMEM16F is required for phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release in activated mouse platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Sakata, Asuka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Eto, Koji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of activated platelets requires the action of a phospholipid scramblase(s), and serves as a scaffold for the assembly of the tenase and prothrombinase complexes involved in blood coagulation. Here, we found that the activation of mouse platelets with thrombin/collagen or Ca2+ ionophore at 20 °C induces PtdSer exposure without compromising plasma membrane integrity. Among five transmembrane protein 16 (TMEM16) members that support Ca2+-dependent phospholipid scrambling, TMEM16F was the only one that showed high expression in mouse platelets. Platelets from platelet-specific TMEM16F-deficient mice exhibited defects in activation-induced PtdSer exposure and microparticle shedding, although α-granule and dense granule release remained intact. The rate of tissue factor-induced thrombin generation by TMEM16F-deficient platelets was severely reduced, whereas thrombin-induced clot retraction was unaffected. The imaging of laser-induced thrombus formation in whole animals showed that PtdSer exposure on aggregated platelets was TMEM16F-dependent in vivo. The phenotypes of the platelet-specific TMEM16F-null mice resemble those of patients with Scott syndrome, a mild bleeding disorder, indicating that these mice may provide a useful model for human Scott syndrome. PMID:26417084

  8. Getting to the Outer Leaflet: Physiology of Phosphatidylserine Exposure at the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Bevers, Edouard M; Williamson, Patrick L

    2016-04-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is a major component of membrane bilayers whose change in distribution between inner and outer leaflets is an important physiological signal. Normally, members of the type IV P-type ATPases spend metabolic energy to create an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids between the two leaflets, with PS confined to the cytoplasmic membrane leaflet. On occasion, membrane enzymes, known as scramblases, are activated to facilitate transbilayer migration of lipids, including PS. Recently, two proteins required for such randomization have been identified: TMEM16F, a scramblase regulated by elevated intracellular Ca(2+), and XKR8, a caspase-sensitive protein required for PS exposure in apoptotic cells. Once exposed at the cell surface, PS regulates biochemical reactions involved in blood coagulation, and bone mineralization, and also regulates a variety of cell-cell interactions. Exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells, PS controls their recognition and engulfment by other cells. This process is exploited by parasites to invade their host, and in specialized form is used to maintain photoreceptors in the eye and modify synaptic connections in the brain. This review discusses what is known about the mechanism of PS exposure at the surface of the plasma membrane of cells, how actors in the extracellular milieu sense surface exposed PS, and how this recognition is translated to downstream consequences of PS exposure. PMID:26936867

  9. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  10. Extracellular protein disulfide isomerase regulates coagulation on endothelial cells through modulation of phosphatidylserine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Narcis I.; Lupu, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the cellular receptor for plasma protease factor VIIa (FVIIa), and the TF-FVIIa complex initiates coagulation in both hemostasis and thrombosis. Cell surface-exposed TF is mainly cryptic and requires activation to fully exhibit the procoagulant potential. Recently, the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been hypothesized to regulate TF decryption through the redox switch of an exposed disulfide in TF extracellular domain. In this study, we analyzed PDI contribution to coagulation using an in vitro endothelial cell model. In this model, extracellular PDI is detected by imaging and flow cytometry. Inhibition of cell surface PDI induces a marked increase in TF procoagulant function, whereas exogenous addition of PDI inhibits TF decryption. The coagulant effects of PDI inhibition were sensitive to annexin V treatment, suggesting exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), which was confirmed by prothrombinase assays and direct labeling. In contrast, exogenous PDI addition enhanced PS internalization. Analysis of fluorescent PS revealed that PDI affects both the apparent flippase and floppase activities on endothelial cells. In conclusion, we identified a new mechanism for PDI contribution to coagulation on endothelial cells, namely, the regulation of PS exposure, where PDI acts as a negative regulator of coagulation. PMID:20448108

  11. Indolic Uremic Solutes Enhance Procoagulant Activity of Red Blood Cells through Phosphatidylserine Exposure and Microparticle Release

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-01-01

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process. PMID:26516916

  12. Indolic uremic solutes enhance procoagulant activity of red blood cells through phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-11-01

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process. PMID:26516916

  13. A homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for phosphatidylserine exposure on apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Jean-Philippe; Hehl, Michaela; Millward, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    A simple, "mix-and-measure" microplate assay for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of apoptotic cells is described. The assay exploits the fact that annexin V, a protein with high affinity and specificity for PtdSer, forms trimers and higher order oligomers on binding to membranes containing PtdSer. The transition from soluble monomer to cell-bound oligomer is detected using time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer from europium chelate-labeled annexin V to Cy5-labeled annexin V. PtdSer detection is achieved by a single addition of a reagent mix containing labeled annexins and calcium ions directly to cell cultures in a 96-well plate, followed by a brief incubation before fluorescence measurement. The assay can be used to quantify PtdSer exposure on both suspension cells and adherent cells in situ. This method is simpler and faster than existing annexin V binding assays based on flow cytometry or microscopy, and it yields precise data with Z' values of 0.6-0.7. PMID:18835236

  14. Hydroxytyrosol inhibits phosphatidylserine exposure and suicidal death induced by mercury in human erythrocytes: Possible involvement of the glutathione pathway.

    PubMed

    Officioso, Arbace; Alzoubi, Kousi; Lang, Florian; Manna, Caterina

    2016-03-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) is a phenolic antioxidant naturally occurring in virgin olive oil. In this study, we investigated the possible protective effects of HT on programmed suicidal death (eryptosis) induced by mercury (Hg) treatment in intact human erythrocytes (RBC). Our study confirms that the Hg-eryptosis is characterized by phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure at the cell surface, with cell shrinkage and ATP and glutathione depletion; calcium influx is also a key event that triggers eryptosis. Here we report that cell preconditioning with an optimal dose (1-5 μM) of HT prior to exposure to 2.5 μM HgCl2 causes a noteworthy decrease in PS-exposing RBC, almost restoring ATP and GSH content. Conversely, HT shows no effect against decrease in cell volume nor against influx of extracellular calcium. Taken together our data provide the first experimental evidence of the efficacy of HT in modulating the programmed suicidal death in non nucleated cells; the reported findings also confirm that the prevention of Hg toxicity should be regarded as an additional mechanism responsible for the health-promoting potential of this dietary phenol. Finally, virgin olive oil would appear to be a promising healthy food to reduce the adverse effects of chronic mercury exposure in humans. PMID:26774912

  15. Unconventional apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN): staurosporine delays exposure of phosphatidylserine and prevents phagocytosis by MΦ-2 macrophages of PMN.

    PubMed

    Franz, S; Muñoz, L E; Heyder, P; Herrmann, M; Schiller, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and subsequent 'silent' removal represents an important check-point for the resolution of inflammation. Failure in PMN clearance resulting in secondary necrosis-driven tissue damage has been implicated in conditions of chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Apoptotic PMN undergo profound biophysical changes that warrant their efficient recognition and uptake by phagocytes before fading to secondary necrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that staurosporine (STS), a non-selective but potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase and protein kinase C, exerts a drastic impact on PMN apoptosis. PMN treated with STS underwent an unconventional form of cell death characterized by a delayed exposure of aminophospholipids, including phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine and an increased exposure of neo-glycans. STS caused an impaired cellular fragmentation and accelerated DNA fragmentation. Phagocytosis of STS-treated PMN lacking PS on their surfaces was decreased significantly, which highlights the importance of PS for the clearance of apoptotic PMN. Specific opsonization with immune complexes completely restored phagocytosis of STS-treated PMN, demonstrating the efficiency of back-up clearance pathways in the absence of PS exposure. PMID:24995908

  16. Unconventional apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN): staurosporine delays exposure of phosphatidylserine and prevents phagocytosis by MΦ-2 macrophages of PMN

    PubMed Central

    Franz, S; Muñoz, L E; Heyder, P; Herrmann, M; Schiller, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and subsequent ‘silent’ removal represents an important check-point for the resolution of inflammation. Failure in PMN clearance resulting in secondary necrosis-driven tissue damage has been implicated in conditions of chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Apoptotic PMN undergo profound biophysical changes that warrant their efficient recognition and uptake by phagocytes before fading to secondary necrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that staurosporine (STS), a non-selective but potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase and protein kinase C, exerts a drastic impact on PMN apoptosis. PMN treated with STS underwent an unconventional form of cell death characterized by a delayed exposure of aminophospholipids, including phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine and an increased exposure of neo-glycans. STS caused an impaired cellular fragmentation and accelerated DNA fragmentation. Phagocytosis of STS-treated PMN lacking PS on their surfaces was decreased significantly, which highlights the importance of PS for the clearance of apoptotic PMN. Specific opsonization with immune complexes completely restored phagocytosis of STS-treated PMN, demonstrating the efficiency of back-up clearance pathways in the absence of PS exposure. PMID:24995908

  17. Thresholds for Phosphatidylserine Externalization in Chinese Hamster Ovarian Cells following Exposure to Nanosecond Pulsed Electrical Fields (nsPEF)

    PubMed Central

    Vincelette, Rebecca L.; Roth, Caleb C.; McConnell, Maureen P.; Payne, Jason A.; Beier, Hope T.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2013-01-01

    High-amplitude, MV/m, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) have been hypothesized to cause nanoporation of the plasma membrane. Phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization has been observed on the outer leaflet of the membrane shortly after nsPEF exposure, suggesting local structural changes in the membrane. In this study, we utilized fluorescently-tagged Annexin V to observe the externalization of PS on the plasma membrane of isolated Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells following exposure to nsPEF. A series of experiments were performed to determine the dosimetric trends of PS expression caused by nsPEF as a function of pulse duration, τ, delivered field strength, ED, and pulse number, n. To accurately estimate dose thresholds for cellular response, data were reduced to a set of binary responses and ED50s were estimated using Probit analysis. Probit analysis results revealed that PS externalization followed the non-linear trend of (τ*ED2)−1 for high amplitudes, but failed to predict low amplitude responses. A second set of experiments was performed to determine the nsPEF parameters necessary to cause observable calcium uptake, using cells preloaded with calcium green (CaGr), and membrane permeability, using FM1-43 dye. Calcium influx and FM1-43 uptake were found to always be observed at lower nsPEF exposure parameters compared to PS externalization. These findings suggest that multiple, higher amplitude and longer pulse exposures may generate pores of larger diameter enabling lateral diffusion of PS; whereas, smaller pores induced by fewer, lower amplitude and short pulse width exposures may only allow extracellular calcium and FM1-43 uptake. PMID:23658665

  18. Thresholds for phosphatidylserine externalization in Chinese hamster ovarian cells following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electrical fields (nsPEF).

    PubMed

    Vincelette, Rebecca L; Roth, Caleb C; McConnell, Maureen P; Payne, Jason A; Beier, Hope T; Ibey, Bennett L

    2013-01-01

    High-amplitude, MV/m, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) have been hypothesized to cause nanoporation of the plasma membrane. Phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization has been observed on the outer leaflet of the membrane shortly after nsPEF exposure, suggesting local structural changes in the membrane. In this study, we utilized fluorescently-tagged Annexin V to observe the externalization of PS on the plasma membrane of isolated Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells following exposure to nsPEF. A series of experiments were performed to determine the dosimetric trends of PS expression caused by nsPEF as a function of pulse duration, τ, delivered field strength, ED, and pulse number, n. To accurately estimate dose thresholds for cellular response, data were reduced to a set of binary responses and ED50s were estimated using Probit analysis. Probit analysis results revealed that PS externalization followed the non-linear trend of (τ*ED (2))(-1) for high amplitudes, but failed to predict low amplitude responses. A second set of experiments was performed to determine the nsPEF parameters necessary to cause observable calcium uptake, using cells preloaded with calcium green (CaGr), and membrane permeability, using FM1-43 dye. Calcium influx and FM1-43 uptake were found to always be observed at lower nsPEF exposure parameters compared to PS externalization. These findings suggest that multiple, higher amplitude and longer pulse exposures may generate pores of larger diameter enabling lateral diffusion of PS; whereas, smaller pores induced by fewer, lower amplitude and short pulse width exposures may only allow extracellular calcium and FM1-43 uptake. PMID:23658665

  19. LABCG2, a New ABC Transporter Implicated in Phosphatidylserine Exposure, Is Involved in the Infectivity and Pathogenicity of Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    González-Rey, Elena; Delgado, Mario; Castanys, Santiago; Pérez-Victoria, José M.; Gamarro, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected disease produced by the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania. In the present study, we show that LABCG2, a new ATP-binding cassette half-transporter (ABCG subfamily) from Leishmania, is involved in parasite virulence. Down-regulation of LABCG2 function upon expression of an inactive mutant version of this half-transporter (LABCG2K/M) is shown to reduce the translocation of short-chain analogues of phosphatidylserine (PS). This dominant-negative phenotype is specific for the headgroup of the phospholipid, as the movement of phospholipid analogues of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine or sphingomyelin is not affected. In addition, promastigotes expressing LABCG2K/M expose less endogenous PS in the stationary phase than control parasites. Transient exposure of PS at the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane is known to be one of the mechanisms used by Leishmania to infect macrophages and to silence their immune response. Stationary phase/metacyclic promastigotes expressing LABCG2K/M are less infective for macrophages and show decreased pathogenesis in a mouse model of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Thus, mice infected with parasites expressing LABCG2K/M did not develop any lesion and showed significantly lower inflammation and parasite burden than mice infected with control parasites. Our results indicate that LABCG2 function is required for the externalization of PS in Leishmania promastigotes, a process that is involved in the virulence of the parasite. PMID:23638200

  20. Trivalent methylated arsenical-induced phosphatidylserine exposure and apoptosis in platelets may lead to increased thrombus formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Lim, Kyung-Min; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2009-09-01

    Trivalent methylated metabolites of arsenic, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}), have been found highly reactive and toxic in various cells and in vivo animal models, suggesting their roles in the arsenic-associated toxicity. However, their effects on cardiovascular system including blood cells, one of the most important targets for arsenic toxicity, remain poorly understood. Here we found that MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III} could induce procoagulant activity and apoptosis in platelets, which play key roles in the development of various cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) through excessive thrombus formation. In freshly isolated human platelets, treatment of MMA{sup III} resulted in phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, a hallmark of procoagulant activation, accompanied by distinctive apoptotic features including mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation. These procoagulant activation and apoptotic features were found to be mediated by the depletion of protein thiol and intracellular ATP, and flippase inhibition by MMA{sup III}, while the intracellular calcium increase or reactive oxygen species generation was not involved. Importantly, increased platelet procoagulant activity by MMA{sup III} resulted in enhanced blood coagulation and excessive thrombus formation in a rat in vivo venous thrombosis model. DMA{sup III} also induced PS-exposure with apoptotic features mediated by protein thiol depletion, which resulted in enhanced thrombin generation. In summary, we believe that this study provides an important evidence for the role of trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites in arsenic-associated CVDs, giving a novel insight into the role of platelet apoptosis in toxicant-induced cardiovascular toxicity.

  1. Enhanced exposure of phosphatidylserine in human gastric carcinoma cells overexpressing the half-size ABC transporter BCRP (ABCG2).

    PubMed Central

    Woehlecke, Holger; Pohl, Antje; Alder-Baerens, Nele; Lage, Hermann; Herrmann, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Members of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter super-family are emerging to be involved in lipid transport. In the present study, we studied the organization of phospholipids in the plasma membrane of EPG85-257 human gastric carcinoma cells overexpressing BCRP (breast cancer resistance protein, ABCG-2), a half-size transporter belonging to the ABCG subfamily. A significantly increased plasma membrane association of the PS (phosphatidylserine)-binding probe FITC-Annexin V in comparison with control cells was observed. Treatment of BCRP -overexpressing cells with the inhibitor Tryprostatin A decreased FITC-Annexin V binding almost to the control level. This suggests an enhanced exposure of PS in BCRP -overexpressing cells, which is dependent on functional BCRP. A role of BCRP in the transverse distribution of lipids in the plasma membrane is supported by the increased outward transport of the lipid analogue C6- N -(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-PS in BCRP -overexpressing EPG85-257 cells and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. As shown for BCRP -overexpressing EPG85-257 cells, enhanced outward redistribution of the lipid analogue is inhibited by Tryprostatin A as well as by reduction of BCRP expression on transfection with an anti- BCRP -ribozyme. We also observed an enhanced outward transport of C6- N -(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-phosphatidylcholine in BCRP -overexpressing EPG85-257 cells, suggesting that the influence of BCRP on transverse lipid organization is not highly specific. PMID:12946267

  2. Distinct Modes of Macrophage Recognition for Apoptotic and Necrotic Cells Are Not Specified Exclusively by Phosphatidylserine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cocco, Regina E.; Ucker, David S.

    2001-01-01

    The distinction between physiological (apoptotic) and pathological (necrotic) cell deaths reflects mechanistic differences in cellular disintegration and is of functional significance with respect to the outcomes that are triggered by the cell corpses. Mechanistically, apoptotic cells die via an active and ordered pathway; necrotic deaths, conversely, are chaotic and passive. Macrophages and other phagocytic cells recognize and engulf these dead cells. This clearance is believed to reveal an innate immunity, associated with inflammation in cases of pathological but not physiological cell deaths. Using objective and quantitative measures to assess these processes, we find that macrophages bind and engulf native apoptotic and necrotic cells to similar extents and with similar kinetics. However, recognition of these two classes of dying cells occurs via distinct and noncompeting mechanisms. Phosphatidylserine, which is externalized on both apoptotic and necrotic cells, is not a specific ligand for the recognition of either one. The distinct modes of recognition for these different corpses are linked to opposing responses from engulfing macrophages. Necrotic cells, when recognized, enhance proinflammatory responses of activated macrophages, although they are not sufficient to trigger macrophage activation. In marked contrast, apoptotic cells profoundly inhibit phlogistic macrophage responses; this represents a cell-associated, dominant-acting anti-inflammatory signaling activity acquired posttranslationally during the process of physiological cell death. PMID:11294896

  3. Facilitating roles of murine platelet glycoprotein Ib and αIIbβ3 in phosphatidylserine exposure during vWF–collagen-induced thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, Marijke J E; Schulte, Valerie; Oury, Cécile; Lindhout, Theo; Broers, Jos; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2004-01-01

    Vessel wall damage exposes collagen fibres, to which platelets adhere directly via the collagen receptors glycoprotein (GP) VI and integrin α2β1 and indirectly by collagen-bound von Willebrand factor (vWF) via the GPIb-V-IX and integrin αIIbβ3 receptor complexes. Platelet–collagen interaction under shear stimulates thrombus formation in two ways, by integrin-dependent formation of platelet aggregates and by surface exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine (PS). GPVI is involved in both processes, complemented by α2β1. In mouse blood flowing over collagen, we investigated the additional role of platelet–vWF binding via GPIb and αIIbβ3. Inhibition of GPIb as well as blocking of vWF binding to collagen reduced stable platelet adhesion at high shear rate. This was accompanied by delayed platelet Ca2+ responses and reduced PS exposure, while microaggregates were still formed. Inhibition of integrin αIIbβ3 with JON/A antibody, which blocks αIIbβ3 binding to both vWF and fibrinogen, reduced PS exposure and aggregate formation. The JON/A effects were not enhanced by combined blocking of GPIb–vWF binding, suggesting a function for αIIbβ3 downstream of GPIb. Typically, with blood from FcR γ-chain +/− mutant mice, expressing 50% of normal platelet GPVI levels, GPIb blockage almost completely abolished platelet adhesion and PS exposure. Together, these data indicate that, under physiological conditions of flow, both adhesive receptors GPIb and αIIbβ3 facilitate GPVI-mediated PS exposure by stabilizing platelet binding to collagen. Hence, these glycoproteins have an assistant procoagulant role in collagen-dependent thrombus formation, which is most prominent at reduced GPVI activity and is independent of the presence of thrombin. PMID:15155790

  4. Activated microglia cause reversible apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells, inducing their cell death by phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hornik, Tamara C.; Vilalta, Anna; Brown, Guy C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some apoptotic processes, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, are potentially reversible and do not necessarily lead to cell death. However, phosphatidylserine exposure can induce phagocytosis of a cell, resulting in cell death by phagocytosis: phagoptosis. Phagoptosis of neurons by microglia might contribute to neuropathology, whereas phagoptosis of tumour cells by macrophages might limit cancer. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which BV-2 microglia killed co-cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells that were either undifferentiated or differentiated into neuronal cells. We found that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharide rapidly phagocytosed PC12 cells. Activated microglia caused reversible phosphatidylserine exposure on and reversible caspase activation in PC12 cells, and caspase inhibition prevented phosphatidylserine exposur and decreased subsequent phagocytosis. Nitric oxide was necessary and sufficient to induce the reversible phosphatidylserine exposure and phagocytosis. The PC12 cells were not dead at the time they were phagocytised, and inhibition of their phagocytosis left viable cells. Cell loss was inhibited by blocking phagocytosis mediated by phosphatidylserine, MFG-E8, vitronectin receptors or P2Y6 receptors. Thus, activated microglia can induce reversible apoptosis of target cells, which is insufficient to cause apoptotic cell death, but sufficient to induce their phagocytosis and therefore cell death by phagoptosis. PMID:26567213

  5. Binding of Alphaherpesvirus Glycoprotein H to Surface α4β1-Integrins Activates Calcium-Signaling Pathways and Induces Phosphatidylserine Exposure on the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Gramatica, Andrea; Herrmann, Andreas; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular signaling connected to integrin activation is known to induce cytoplasmic Ca2+ release, which in turn mediates a number of downstream signals. The cellular entry pathways of two closely related alphaherpesviruses, equine herpesviruses 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), are differentially regulated with respect to the requirement of interaction of glycoprotein H (gH) with α4β1-integrins. We show here that binding of EHV-1, but not EHV-4, to target cells resulted in a rapid and significant increase in cytosolic Ca2+ levels. EHV-1 expressing EHV-4 gH (gH4) in lieu of authentic gH1 failed to induce Ca2+ release, while EHV-4 with gH1 triggered significant Ca2+ release. Blocking the interaction between gH1 and α4β1-integrins, inhibiting phospholipase C (PLC) activation, or blocking binding of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) to its receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) abrogated Ca2+ release. Interestingly, phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the plasma membrane in response to cytosolic calcium increase after EHV-1 binding through a scramblase-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of both Ca2+ release from the ER and scramblase activation blocked PS scrambling and redirected virus entry to the endocytic pathway, indicating that PS may play a role in facilitating virus entry directly at the plasma membrane. PMID:26489864

  6. Brief Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Reversibly Impairs Endothelial Vasodilatory Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to determine the effects of brief exposures to low concentrations of tobacco secondhand smoke (SHS) on arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD, a nitric oxide-dependent measure of vascular endothelial function), in a controlled animal model never before exposed to smoke. In humans, SHS exposure for 30min impairs FMD. It is important to gain a better understanding of the acute effects of exposure to SHS at low concentrations and for brief periods of time. Methods: We measured changes in FMD in rats exposed to a range of real-world levels of SHS for durations of 30min, 10min, 1min, and 4 breaths (roughly 15 s). Results: We observed a dose-response relationship between SHS particle concentration over 30min and post-exposure impairment of FMD, which was linear through the range typically encountered in smoky restaurants and then saturated at higher concentrations. One min of exposure to SHS at moderate concentrations was sufficient to impair FMD. Conclusions: Brief SHS exposure at real-world levels reversibly impairs FMD. Even 1min of SHS exposure can cause reduction of endothelial function. PMID:24302638

  7. Beyond apoptosis: the mechanism and function of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in the membrane of activating mast cells.

    PubMed

    Rysavy, Noel M; Shimoda, Lori M N; Dixon, Alyssa M; Speck, Mark; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen; Umemoto, Eric Y

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry is a hallmark of apoptosis, but lipid bilayer asymmetry and loss of asymmetry can contribute to numerous cellular functions and responses that are independent of programmed cell death. Exofacial exposure of phosphatidylserine occurs in lymphocytes and mast cells after antigenic stimulation and in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that there is a functional requirement for phosphatidylserine exposure in immunocytes. In this review we examine current ideas as to the nature of this functional role in mast cell activation. Mechanistically, there is controversy as to the candidate proteins responsible for phosphatidylserine translocation from the internal to external leaflet, and here we review the candidacies of mast cell PLSCR1 and TMEM16F. Finally we examine the potential relationship between functionally important mast cell membrane perturbations and phosphatidylserine exposure during activation. PMID:25759911

  8. Beyond apoptosis: The mechanism and function of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in the membrane of activating mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Rysavy, Noel M.; Shimoda, Lori M. N.; Dixon, Alyssa M.; Speck, Mark; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen; Umemoto, Eric Y.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry is a hallmark of apoptosis, but lipid bilayer asymmetry and loss of asymmetry can contribute to numerous cellular functions and responses that are independent of programmed cell death. Exofacial exposure of phosphatidylserine occurs in lymphocytes and mast cells after antigenic stimulation and in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that there is a functional requirement for phosphatidylserine exposure in immunocytes. In this review we examine current ideas as to the nature of this functional role in mast cell activation. Mechanistically, there is controversy as to the candidate proteins responsible for phosphatidylserine translocation from the internal to external leaflet, and here we review the candidacies of mast cell PLSCR1 and TMEM16F. Finally we examine the potential relationship between functionally important mast cell membrane perturbations and phosphatidylserine exposure during activation. PMID:25759911

  9. Oxidized Phosphatidylserine: Production and Bioactivities

    PubMed Central

    Matsura, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Recent development of analytical methods for lipid hydroperoxides and preparation of highly pure lipid hydroperoxides have revealed the important new pathophysiological roles of oxidized phospholipids. Generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative stress leads to random oxidation of membrane phospholipids. However, recent studies have reported that anionic phospholipid molecules such as phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin are preferentially oxidized during apoptosis, resulting in efficient apoptosis execution and apoptotic cell clearance by phagocytes. This review is exclusively focused on selective production of oxidized PS (oxPS) during apoptosis as well as the novel roles of oxPS under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25901098

  10. SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE Recessive Suppressor That Circumvents Phosphatidylserine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Katharine D.

    1984-01-01

    Phenotypic reversion of six independent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cho1 mutants was shown to be due predominantly to mutation of an unlinked gene, eam1. The eam1 gene was located very close to ino1 on chromosome X by meiotic tetrad analysis. Recessive eam1 mutations did not correct the primary cho1 defect in phosphatidylserine synthesis but made endogenous ethanolamine available for sustained nitrogenous phospholipid synthesis. A novel biochemical contribution to nitrogenous lipid synthesis is indicated by the eam1 mutants. PMID:17246236

  11. Phosphatidylserine and FVa Regulate FXa Structure

    PubMed Central

    Srivasatava, Kinshuk Raj; Majumder, Rinku; Kane, William H.; Quinn-Allen, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Human coagulation factor Xa (FXa) plays a key role in blood coagulation by activating prothrombin to thrombin on “stimulated” platelet membranes in the presence of its cofactor factor Va (FVa). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure on activated platelet membranes promotes prothrombin activation by FXa by allosterically regulating FXa. To identify the structural basis of this allosteric regulation, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to monitor changes in FXa length in response 1] to soluble PS (dicaproyl-phosphatidylserine; C6PS), 2] to PS membranes, and 3] to FVa in the presence of C6PS and membranes. We incorporated a FRET pair with donor (fluorescein) at the active site and acceptor (Alexa fluor 555) at FXa N-terminus near the membrane. The results demonstrated that FXa structure changes upon binding of C6PS to two sites, a regulatory site (Reg site) at the N-terminus (previously identified as involving the Gla and EGFN domains) and a presumptive protein-recognition site in the catalytic domain (Prot site). Binding of C6PS to the regulatory site increased the inter-probe distance by ~ 3 Å, while saturation of both sites further increased the distance by ~ 6.4 Å. FXa binding to a membrane produced a smaller length increase (~1.4 Å), indicating that FXa has a somewhat different structure on a membrane than when bound to C6PS in solution. However, when both FVa2 (a FVa glycoform) and either C6PS or PS-containing membranes bound to FXa, the overall change in length was comparable (~ 5.6–5.8 Å), indicating that C6PS and PS-containing membranes in conjunction with FVa2 have comparable regulatory effects on FXa. We conclude that the similar functional regulation of FXa by C6PS or membranes in conjunction with FVa2 correlates with similar structural regulation. The results demonstrate the usefulness of FRET in analyzing structure-function relationships in FXa and in the FXa.FVa2 complex. PMID:24467409

  12. Phosphatidylserine biosynthesis in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. I. Inhibition of de novo phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by exogenous phosphatidylserine and its efficient incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishijima, M.; Kuge, O.; Akamatsu, Y.

    1986-05-05

    The effect of phosphatidylserine exogenously added to the medium on de novo biosynthesis of phosphatidylserine was investigated in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. When cells were cultured for several generations in medium supplemented with phosphatidylserine and /sup 32/Pi, the incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into cellular phosphatidylserine was remarkably inhibited, the degree of inhibition being dependent upon the concentration of added phosphatidylserine. /sup 32/Pi uptake into cellular phosphatidylethanolamine was also partly reduced by the addition of exogenous phosphatidylserine, consistent with the idea that phosphatidylethanolamine is biosynthesized via decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine. However, incorporation of /sup 32/Pi into phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylinositol was not significantly affected. In contrast, the addition of either phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylethanolamine, or phosphatidylinositol to the medium did not inhibit endogenous biosynthesis of the corresponding phospholipid. Radiochemical and chemical analyses of the cellular phospholipid composition revealed that phosphatidylserine in cells grown with 80 microM phosphatidylserine was almost entirely derived from the added phospholipid. Phosphatidylserine uptake was also directly determined by using (/sup 3/H)serine-labeled phospholipid. Pulse and pulse-chase experiments with L-(U-/sup 14/C) serine showed that when cells were cultured with 80 microM phosphatidylserine, the rate of synthesis of phosphatidylserine was reduced 3-5-fold. Enzyme assaying of extracts prepared from cells grown with and without phosphatidylserine indicated that the inhibition of de novo phosphatidylserine biosynthesis by the added phosphatidylserine appeared not to be caused by a reduction in the level of the enzyme involved in the base-exchange reaction between phospholipids and serine.

  13. Piperlongumine-Induced Phosphatidylserine Translocation in the Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bissinger, Rosi; Malik, Abaid; Warsi, Jamshed; Jilani, Kashif; Lang, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Piperlongumine, a component of Piper longum fruit, is considered as a treatment for malignancy. It is effective by inducing apoptosis. Mechanisms involved in the apoptotic action of piperlongumine include oxidative stress and activation of p38 kinase. In analogy to apoptosis of nucleated cells, erythrocytes may undergo eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Signaling involved in eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i), formation of ceramide, oxidative stress and activation of p38 kinase. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin V binding, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3 fluorescence, reactive oxygen species from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein-diacetate fluorescence, and ceramide abundance from binding of fluorescent antibodies in flow cytometry. Results: A 48 h exposure to piperlongumine (30 µM) was followed by significant decrease of forward scatter and increase of annexin-V-binding. Piperlongumine did not significantly modify [Ca2+]i and the effect was not dependent on presence of extracellular Ca2+. Piperlongumine significantly increased ROS formation and ceramide abundance. Conclusions: Piperlongumine triggers cell membrane scrambling, an effect independent from entry of extracellular Ca2+ but at least partially due to ROS and ceramide formation. PMID:25317837

  14. PROcEED: Probabilistic reverse dosimetry approaches for estimating exposure distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    As increasing amounts of biomonitoring survey data become available, a new discipline focused on converting such data into estimates of chemical exposures has developed. Reverse dosimetry uses a pharmacokinetic model along with measured biomarker concentrations to determine the p...

  15. PROcEED: Probabilistic reverse dosimetry approaches for estimating exposure distributions

    PubMed Central

    Grulke, Christopher M; Holm, Kathleen; Goldsmith, Michael-Rock; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2013-01-01

    As increasing amounts of biomonitoring survey data become available, a new discipline focused on converting such data into estimates of chemical exposures has developed. Reverse dosimetry uses a pharmacokinetic model along with measured biomarker concentrations to determine the plausible exposure concentrations-- a critical step to incorporate ground-truthing experimental data into a distribution of probable exposures that reduces model uncertainty and variability. At the population level, probabilistic reverse dosimetry can utilize a distribution of measured biomarker concentrations to identify the most likely exposure concentrations (or intake doses) experienced by the study participants. PROcEED is software that provides access to probabilistic reverse dosimetry approaches for estimating exposure distributions via a simple user interface. Availability PROcEED along with installation instructions is freely available for download from http://www.epa.gov/heasd/products/proceed/proceed.html PMID:23930024

  16. Product-to-parent reversion processes: Stream-hyporheic spiraling increases ecosystem exposure and environmental persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. S.; Cwiertny, D. M.; Kolodziej, E. P.

    2014-12-01

    The product-to-parent reversion of metabolites of trenbolone acetate (TBA), a steroidal growth promoter used widely in beef cattle production, was recently observed to occur in environmental waters. The rapid forward reaction is by direct photolysis (i.e., photohydration), with the much slower reversion reaction occurring via dehydration in the dark. The objective of this study is to quantify the potential effect of this newly discovered reversible process on TBA metabolite concentrations and total bioactivity exposure in fluvial systems. Here, we demonstrate increased persistence of TBA metabolites in the stream and hyporheic zone due to the reversion process, increasing chronic and acute exposure to these endocrine-active compounds along a stream. The perpetually dark hyporheic zone is a key location for reversion in the system, ultimately providing a source of the parent compound to the stream and increasing mean in-stream concentration of 17α-trenbolone (17α-TBOH) by 40% of the input concentration under representative fluvial conditions. As such, regulatory frameworks for compounds undergoing product-to-parent reversion will require new approaches for assessing total exposure to bioactive compounds. Further, we demonstrate generalized cases for prediction of exposure for species with product-to-parent reversion in stream-hyporheic systems.

  17. PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone reverses perinatal nicotine exposure-induced asthma in rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    In a rat model, downregulation of homeostatic mesenchymal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) signaling following perinatal nicotine exposure contributes to offspring asthma, which can be effectively prevented by concomitant administration of PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone (RGZ). However, whether perinatal nicotine exposure-induced asthma can be reversed is not known. We hypothesized that perinatal nicotine exposure-induced asthma would be reversed by PPAR-γ agonist RGZ. Pregnant rat dams received either placebo or nicotine from embryonic day 6 until term. Following spontaneous delivery at term, dams were continued on the assigned treatments, up to postnatal day 21 (PND21). However, at delivery, pups were divided into two groups; one group received placebo, and the other group received RGZ from PND1 to PND21. At PND21, pulmonary function and the expression of mesenchymal markers of airway contractility (α-smooth muscle actin, calponin, fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen III) were determined by immunoblotting and immunostaining for the evidence of reversibility of perinatal nicotine exposure-induced lung effects. Compared with controls, perinatal nicotine exposure caused 1) a significant increase in airway resistance and a decrease in airway compliance following methacholine challenge, 2) a significant increase in acetylcholine-induced tracheal constriction, and 3) increased pulmonary and tracheal expression of the mesenchymal markers of contractility. Treatment with RGZ, starting on PND1, reversed all of the nicotine-induced molecular and functional pulmonary effects, virtually normalizing the pulmonary phenotype of the treated animals. We conclude that perinatal nicotine exposure-induced functional and molecular alterations in upper and lower airways can be reversed by PPAR-γ agonist RGZ, allowing an effective intervention even when started postnatally. PMID:25659902

  18. Phosphatidylserine in the Brain: Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Huang, Bill X.; Spector, Arthur A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the major anionic phospholipid class particularly enriched in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in neural tissues. PS is synthesized from phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine by exchanging the base head group with serine in reactions are catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase 1 and phosphatidylserine synthase 2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of Akt, Raf-1 and protein kinase C signaling, which supports neuronal survival and differentiation, requires interaction of these proteins with PS localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, neurotransmitter release by exocytosis and a number of synaptic receptors and proteins are modulated by PS present in the neuronal membranes. Brain is highly enriched with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and brain PS has a high DHA content. By promoting PS synthesis, DHA can uniquely expand the PS pool in neuronal membranes and thereby influence PS-dependent signaling and protein function. Ethanol decreases DHA-promoted PS synthesis and accumulation in neurons, which may contribute to the deleterious effects of ethanol intake. Improvement of some memory functions has been observed in cognitively impaired subjects as a result of PS supplementation, but the mechanism is unclear. PMID:24992464

  19. Effects of Repeated Cocaine Exposure on Habit Learning and Reversal by N-Acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Corbit, Laura H; Chieng, Billy C; Balleine, Bernard W

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to drugs of abuse can result in a loss of control over both drug- and nondrug-related actions by accelerating the transition from goal-directed to habitual control, an effect argued to reflect changes in glutamate homeostasis. Here we examined whether exposure to cocaine accelerates habit learning and used in vitro electrophysiology to investigate its effects on measures of synaptic plasticity in the dorsomedial (DMS) and dorsolateral (DLS) striatum, areas critical for actions and habits, respectively. We then administered N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in an attempt to normalize glutamate homeostasis and hence reverse the cellular and behavioral effects of cocaine exposure. Rats received daily injections of cocaine (30 mg/kg) for 6 days and were then trained to lever press for a food reward. We used outcome devaluation and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to assess the behavioral and cellular effects of cocaine exposure. We then examined the ability of NAC to reverse the effects of cocaine exposure on these measures. Cocaine treatment produced a deficit in goal-directed action, as assessed by outcome devaluation, and increased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in the DMS but not in the DLS. Importantly, NAC treatment both normalized EPSC frequency and promoted goal-directed control in cocaine-treated rats. The promotion of goal-directed control has the potential to improve treatment outcomes in human cocaine addicts. PMID:24531561

  20. Postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure reversibly alters parasympathetic regulation of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Woerman, Amanda L; Mendelowitz, David

    2013-08-01

    Perinatal sulfur dioxide exposure disrupts parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Here, we examine the relative risks of prenatal versus postnatal exposure to the air pollutant and the reversibility of the cardiovascular effects. Two groups of animals were used for this study. For prenatal exposure, pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide for 1 hour daily throughout gestation and with their pups after birth to medical-grade air through 6 days postnatal. For postnatal exposure, dams were exposed to air, and after delivery along with their pups to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide through postnatal day 6. ECGs were recorded from pups on postnatal day 5 to examine changes in heart rate. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine changes in neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons in the nucleus ambiguus on sulfur dioxide exposure. Postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure diminished glutamatergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons by 40.9% and increased heart rate, whereas prenatal exposure altered neither of these properties. When postnatal exposure concluded on postnatal day 5, excitatory neurotransmission remained decreased through day 6 and returned to basal levels by day 7. ECGs showed that heart rate remained elevated through day 6 and recovered by day 7. On activation of the parasympathetic diving reflex, the response was significantly blunted by postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure through day 7 but recovered by day 8. Postnatal, but not prenatal, exposure to sulfur dioxide can disrupt parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Neonates can recover from these effects within 2 to 3 days of discontinued exposure. PMID:23774227

  1. Postnatal Sulfur Dioxide Exposure Reversibly Alters Parasympathetic Regulation of Heart Rate

    PubMed Central

    Woerman, Amanda L.; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal sulfur dioxide exposure disrupts parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Here, we examine the relative risks of prenatal versus postnatal exposure to the air pollutant, and the reversibility of the cardiovascular effects. Two groups of animals were used for this study. For prenatal exposure, pregnant Sprague-Dawley dams were exposed to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide for 1 hour daily throughout gestation, and with their pups upon birth to medical-grade air through 6 days postnatal. For postnatal exposure, dams were exposed to air, and upon delivery along with their pups to 5 parts per million sulfur dioxide through postnatal day 6. Electrocardiograms were recorded from pups on postnatal day 5 to examine changes in heart rate. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine changes in neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons upon sulfur dioxide exposure. Postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure diminished glutamatergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons by 40.9% and increased heart rate, whereas prenatal exposure altered neither of these properties. When postnatal exposure concluded on postnatal day 5, excitatory neurotransmission remained decreased through day 6, and returned to basal levels by day 7. Electrocardiograms showed that heart rate remained elevated through day 6 and recovered by day 7. Upon activation of the parasympathetic diving reflex, the response was significantly blunted by postnatal sulfur dioxide exposure through day 7 but recovered by day 8. Postnatal, but not prenatal, exposure to sulfur dioxide can disrupt parasympathetic regulation of cardiovascular activity. Neonates can recover from these effects within 2–3 days of discontinued exposure. PMID:23774227

  2. Elevated Human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene expression in blood cells associated with chronic and arsenic exposure in Inner Mongolia, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Arsenic exposure is associated with human cancer. Telomerase containing the catalytic subunit, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of chromosomes, delay senescence and promoting cell proliferation leading to tumorigenesis. OBJECTIVE:...

  3. The phosphatidylserine receptor from Hydra is a nuclear protein with potential Fe(II) dependent oxygenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Cikala, Mihai; Alexandrova, Olga; David, Charles N; Pröschel, Matthias; Stiening, Beate; Cramer, Patrick; Böttger, Angelika

    2004-01-01

    Background Apoptotic cell death plays an essential part in embryogenesis, development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis in metazoan animals. The culmination of apoptosis in vivo is the phagocytosis of cellular corpses. One morphological characteristic of cells undergoing apoptosis is loss of plasma membrane phospholipid asymmetry and exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet. Surface exposure of phosphatidylserine is recognised by a specific receptor (phosphatidylserine receptor, PSR) and is required for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages and fibroblasts. Results We have cloned the PSR receptor from Hydra in order to investigate its function in this early metazoan. Bioinformatic analysis of the Hydra PSR protein structure revealed the presence of three nuclear localisation signals, an AT-hook like DNA binding motif and a putative 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-and Fe(II)-dependent oxygenase activity. All of these features are conserved from human PSR to Hydra PSR. Expression of GFP tagged Hydra PSR in hydra cells revealed clear nuclear localisation. Deletion of one of the three NLS sequences strongly diminished nuclear localisation of the protein. Membrane localisation was never detected. Conclusions Our results suggest that Hydra PSR is a nuclear 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-and Fe(II)-dependent oxygenase. This is in contrast with the proposed function of Hydra PSR as a cell surface receptor involved in the recognition of apoptotic cells displaying phosphatidylserine on their surface. The conservation of the protein from Hydra to human infers that our results also apply to PSR from higher animals. PMID:15193161

  4. Prenatal cocaine exposure impairs selective attention: evidence from serial reversal and extradimensional shift tasks.

    PubMed

    Garavan, H; Morgan, R E; Mactutus, C F; Levitsky, D A; Booze, R M; Strupp, B J

    2000-08-01

    This study assessed the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on cognitive functioning, using an intravenous (IV) rodent model that closely mimics the pharmacokinetics seen in humans after smoking or IV injection and that avoids maternal stress and undernutrition. Cocaine-exposed males were significantly impaired on a 3-choice, but not 2-choice, olfactory serial reversal learning task. Both male and female cocaine-exposed rats were significantly impaired on extradimensional shift tasks that required shifting from olfactory to spatial cues; however, they showed no impairment when required to shift from spatial to olfactory cues. In-depth analyses of discrete learning phases implicated deficient selective attention as the basis of impairment in both tasks. These data provide clear evidence that prenatal cocaine exposure produces long-lasting cognitive dysfunction, but they also underscore the specificity of the impairment. PMID:10959532

  5. Phosphatidylserine-selective targeting and anticancer effects of SapC-DOPS nanovesicles on brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Víctor M; Chu, Zhengtao; Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K; Kendler, Ady; Rixe, Olivier; Warnick, Ronald E; Franco, Robert S; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-08-30

    Brain tumors, either primary (e.g., glioblastoma multiforme) or secondary (metastatic), remain among the most intractable and fatal of all cancers. We have shown that nanovesicles consisting of Saposin C (SapC) and dioleylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) are able to effectively target and kill cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. These actions are a consequence of the affinity of SapC-DOPS for phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid abundantly present in the outer membrane of a variety of tumor cells and tumor-associated vasculature. In this study, we first characterize SapC-DOPS bioavailability and antitumor effects on human glioblastoma xenografts, and confirm SapC-DOPS specificity towards phosphatidylserine by showing that glioblastoma targeting is abrogated after in vivo exposure to lactadherin, which binds phosphatidylserine with high affinity. Second, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS selectively targets brain metastases-forming cancer cells both in vitro, in co-cultures with human astrocytes, and in vivo, in mouse models of brain metastases derived from human breast or lung cancer cells. Third, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS have cytotoxic activity against metastatic breast cancer cells in vitro, and prolong the survival of mice harboring brain metastases. Taken together, these results support the potential of SapC-DOPS for the diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors. PMID:25051370

  6. Phosphatidylserine-selective targeting and anticancer effects of SapC-DOPS nanovesicles on brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Víctor M.; Chu, Zhengtao; Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D.; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K.; Kendler, Ady; Rixe, Olivier; Warnick, Ronald E.; Franco, Robert S.; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumors, either primary (e.g., glioblastoma multiforme) or secondary (metastatic), remain among the most intractable and fatal of all cancers. We have shown that nanovesicles consisting of Saposin C (SapC) and dioleylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) are able to effectively target and kill cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. These actions are a consequence of the affinity of SapC-DOPS for phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid abundantly present in the outer membrane of a variety of tumor cells and tumor-associated vasculature. In this study, we first characterize SapC-DOPS bioavailability and antitumor effects on human glioblastoma xenografts, and confirm SapC-DOPS specificity towards phosphatidylserine by showing that glioblastoma targeting is abrogated after in vivo exposure to lactadherin, which binds phosphatidylserine with high affinity. Second, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS selectively targets brain metastases-forming cancer cells both in vitro, in co-cultures with human astrocytes, and in vivo, in mouse models of brain metastases derived from human breast or lung cancer cells. Third, we demonstrate that SapC-DOPS nanovesicles have cytotoxic activity against metastatic breast cancer cells in vitro, and prolong the survival of mice harboring brain metastases. Taken together, these results support the potential of SapC-DOPS for the diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors. PMID:25051370

  7. Reversible suppression of protein synthesis in concert with polysome disaggregation during anoxia exposure in Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Larade, Kevin; Storey, Kenneth B

    2002-03-01

    Many marine invertebrates can live without oxygen for long periods of time, a capacity that is facilitated by the ability to suppress metabolic rate in anoxia to a value that is typically less than 10% of the normal aerobic rate. The present study demonstrates that a reduction in the rate of protein synthesis is one factor in the overall anoxia-induced metabolic suppression in the marine snail, Littorina littorea. The rate of [3H]leucine incorporation into newly translated protein in hepatopancreas isolated from 48 h anoxic snails was determined to be 49% relative to normoxic controls. However, protein concentration in hepatopancreas did not change during anoxia, suggesting a coordinated suppression of net protein turnover. Analysis of hepatopancreas samples from snails exposed to 24-72 h anoxia showed a gradual disaggregation of polysomes into monosomes. A re-aggregation of monosomes into polysomes was observed after 3 h of aerobic recovery. Analysis of fractions from the ribosome profile using radiolabeled probe to detect alpha-tubulin transcripts confirmed a general decrease in protein translation during anoxia exposure (transcript association with polysomes decreased) with a reversal during aerobic recovery. Western blotting of hepatopancreas samples from normoxic, 24 h anoxic, and 1 h aerobic recovered snails demonstrated that eIF-2alpha is substantially phosphorylated during anoxia exposure and dephosphorylated during normoxia and aerobic recovery, suggesting a decrease in translation initiation during anoxia exposure. These results suggest that metabolic suppression during anoxia exposure in L. littorea involves a decrease in protein translation. PMID:12030368

  8. Product-to-parent reversion increases ecosystem exposure to and environmental persistence of 17α-trenbolone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Adam; Cwiertny, David; Kolodziej, Edward; Brehm, Colleen

    2016-04-01

    The product-to-parent reversion of metabolites of trenbolone acetate (TBA), a steroidal growth promoter used widely in beef cattle production, was recently observed to occur in environmental waters. The rapid forward reaction is by direct photolysis (i.e., photohydration), with the much slower reversion reaction occurring via dehydration in the dark. The objective of this study is to quantify the potential effect of this newly discovered reversible process on TBA metabolite concentrations and total bioactivity exposure in fluvial systems. Here, we demonstrate increased persistence of TBA metabolites in the stream and hyporheic zone due to the reversion process, increasing chronic and acute exposure to these endocrine-active compounds along a stream. The perpetually dark hyporheic zone is a key location for reversion in the system, ultimately providing a source of the parent compound to the stream and increasing mean in-stream concentration of 17α-trenbolone (17α‑TBOH) by 40% of the input concentration under representative fluvial conditions. We demonstrate generalized cases for prediction of exposure for species with product-to-parent reversion in stream-hyporheic systems. Recognizing this risk, regulatory frameworks for compounds undergoing product-to-parent reversion will require new approaches for assessing total exposure to bioactive compounds. We discuss the role of regulating "joint" or "mixture" bioactivity as an emerging paradigm for more meaningful management of micropollutants.

  9. Behavioral training reverses global cortical network dysfunction induced by perinatal antidepressant exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Lu, Jordan Y-F; Darling, Ryan D; Simpson, Kimberly L; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Fang; Yu, Liping; Sun, Xinde; Merzenich, Michael M; Lin, Rick C S

    2015-02-17

    Abnormal cortical circuitry and function as well as distortions in the modulatory neurological processes controlling cortical plasticity have been argued to underlie the origin of autism. Here, we chemically distorted those processes using an antidepressant drug-exposure model to generate developmental neurological distortions like those characteristics expressed in autism, and then intensively trained altered young rodents to evaluate the potential for neuroplasticity-driven renormalization. We found that young rats that were injected s.c. with the antidepressant citalopram from postnatal d 1-10 displayed impaired neuronal repetition-rate following capacity in the primary auditory cortex (A1). With a focus on recovering grossly degraded auditory system processing in this model, we showed that targeted temporal processing deficits induced by early-life antidepressant exposure within the A1 were almost completely reversed through implementation of a simple behavioral training strategy (i.e., a modified go/no-go repetition-rate discrimination task). Degraded parvalbumin inhibitory GABAergic neurons and the fast inhibitory actions that they control were also renormalized by training. Importantly, antidepressant-induced degradation of serotonergic and dopaminergic neuromodulatory systems regulating cortical neuroplasticity was sharply reversed. These findings bear important implications for neuroplasticity-based therapeutics in autistic patients. PMID:25646455

  10. Phosphatidylserine directly and positively regulates fusion of myoblasts into myotubes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaemin; Conboy, Irina M

    2011-10-14

    Cell membrane consists of various lipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Among them, PS is a molecular marker of apoptosis, because it is located to the inner leaflet of plasma membrane generally but it is moved to the outer leaflet during programmed cell death. The process of apoptosis has been implicated in the fusion of muscle progenitor cells, myoblasts, into myotubes. However, it remained unclear whether PS regulates muscle cell differentiation directly. In this paper, localization of PS to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane in proliferating primary myoblasts and during fusion of these myoblasts into myotubes is validated using Annexin V. Moreover, we show the presence of PS clusters at the cell-cell contact points, suggesting the importance of membrane ruffling and PS exposure for the myogenic cell fusion. Confirming this conclusion, experimentally constructed PS, but not PC liposomes dramatically enhance the formation of myotubes from myoblasts, thus demonstrating a direct positive effect of PS on the muscle cell fusion. In contrast, myoblasts exposed to PC liposomes produce long myotubes with low numbers of myonuclei. Moreover, pharmacological masking of PS on the myoblast surface inhibits fusion of these cells into myotubes in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:21910971

  11. Phosphatidylserine receptors: enhancers of enveloped virus entry and infection

    PubMed Central

    Moller-Tank, Sven; Maury, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    A variety of both RNA and DNA viruses envelop their capsids in a lipid bilayer. One of the more recently appreciated benefits this envelope is incorporation of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). Surface exposure of PtdSer disguises viruses as apoptotic bodies; tricking cells into engulfing virions. This mechanism is termed apoptotic mimicry. Several PtdSer receptors have been identified to enhance virus entry and we have termed this group of proteins PtdSer-mediated virus entry enhancing receptors or PVEERs. These receptors enhance entry of a broad range of enveloped viruses. Internalization of virions by PVEERs provides a broad mechanism of entry with little investment by the virus itself and may allow some viruses to attach to cells, thereby making viral glycoprotein/cellular receptor interactions more probable. Alternatively, other viruses may rely entirely on PVEERs for internalization into endosomes. This review provides an overview of PtdSer receptors that serve as PVEERs and the biology behind virion/PVEER interaction. PMID:25277499

  12. Incomplete Reversibility of Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate Decline Following Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sophie; Hamzah, Lisa; Campbell, Lucy J.; Hill, Teresa; Fisher, Martin; Leen, Clifford; Gilson, Richard; Walsh, John; Nelson, Mark; Hay, Phillip; Johnson, Margaret; Chadwick, David; Nitsch, Dorothea; Jones, Rachael; Sabin, Caroline A.; Post, Frank A.; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Anderson, Jane; Babiker, Abdel; Chadwick, David; Delpech, Valerie; Dunn, David; Fisher, Martin; Gazzard, Brian; Gilson, Richard; Gompels, Mark; Hay, Phillip; Hill, Teresa; Johnson, Margaret; Kegg, Stephen; Leen, Clifford; Nelson, Mark; Orkin, Chloe; Palfreeman, Adrian; Phillips, Andrew; Pillay, Deenan; Post, Frank; Sabin, Caroline; Sachikonye, Memory; Schwenk, Achim; Walsh, John; Hill, Teresa; Huntington, Susie; Josie, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Sabin, Caroline; Thornton, Alicia; Dunn, David; Glabay, Adam; Orkin, C.; Garrett, N.; Lynch, J.; Hand, J.; de Souza, C.; Fisher, M.; Perry, N.; Tilbury, S.; Churchill, D.; Gazzard, B.; Nelson, M.; Waxman, M.; Asboe, D.; Mandalia, S.; Delpech, V.; Anderson, J.; Munshi, S.; Korat, H.; Poulton, M.; Taylor, C.; Gleisner, Z.; Campbell, L.; Babiker, Abdel; Dunn, David; Glabay, Adam; Gilson, R.; Brima, N.; Williams, I.; Schwenk, A.; Ainsworth, J.; Wood, C.; Miller, S.; Johnson, M.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Grabowska, H.; Chaloner, C.; Puradiredja, D.; Walsh, J.; Weber, J.; Ramzan, F.; Mackie, N.; Winston, A.; Leen, C.; Wilson, A.; Gompels, M.; Allan, S.; Palfreeman, A.; Moore, A.; Chadwick, D.; Wakeman, K.; Kegg, Stephen; Main, Paul; Mitchell; Hunter; Sachikonye, Memory; Hay, Phillip; Dhillon, Mandip

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) has been linked to renal impairment, but the extent to which this impairment is reversible is unclear. We aimed to investigate the reversibility of renal decline during TDF therapy. Methods. Cox proportional hazards models assessed factors associated with discontinuing TDF in those with an exposure duration of >6 months. In those who discontinued TDF therapy, linear piecewise regression models estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slopes before initiation of, during, and after discontinuation of TDF therapy. Factors associated with not achieving eGFR recovery 6 months after discontinuing TDF were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Results. We observed declines in the eGFR during TDF exposure (mean slopes, −15.7 mL/minute/1.73 m2/year [95% confidence interval {CI}, −20.5 to −10.9] during the first 3 months and −3.1 mL/minute/1.73 m2/year [95% CI, −4.6 to −1.7] thereafter) and evidence of eGFR increases following discontinuation of TDF therapy (mean slopes, 12.5 mL/minute/1.73 m2/year [95% CI, 8.9–16.1] during the first 3 months and 0.8 mL/minute/1.73 m2/year [95% CI, .1–1.5] thereafter). Following TDF discontinuation, 38.6% of patients with a decline in the eGFR did not experience recovery. A higher eGFR at baseline, a lower eGFR after discontinuation of TDF therapy, and more-prolonged exposure to TDF were associated with an increased risk of incomplete recovery 6 months after discontinuation of TDF therapy. Conclusions. This study shows that a decline in the eGFR during TDF therapy was not fully reversible in one third of patients and suggests that prolonged TDF exposure at a low eGFR should be avoided. PMID:24585896

  13. Thymosin α1 Interacts with Exposed Phosphatidylserine in Membrane Models and in Cells and Uses Serum Albumin as a Carrier.

    PubMed

    Mandaliti, Walter; Nepravishta, Ridvan; Sinibaldi Vallebona, Paola; Pica, Francesca; Garaci, Enrico; Paci, Maurizio

    2016-03-15

    Thymosin α1 is a peptidic hormone with pleiotropic activity and is used in the therapy of several diseases. It is unstructured in water solution and interacts with negative regions of vesicles by assuming two tracts of helical conformation with a structural break between them. This study reports on Thymosin α1's interaction with mixed phospholipids phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine, the negative component of the membranes, by ¹H and natural abundance ¹⁵N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The results indicate that interaction occurs when the membrane is negatively charged by exposing phosphatidylserine. Moreover, the direct interaction of Thymosin α1 with K562 cells with an overexposure of phosphatidylserine as a consequence of resveratrol-induced apoptosis was conducted. Thymosin α1's interaction with human serum albumin was also investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Steady-state saturation transfer, transfer nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy methodologies all reveal that the C-terminal region of Thymosin α1 is involved in the interaction with serum albumin. These results may shed more light on Thymosin α1's mechanism of action by its insertion in negative regions of membranes due to the exposure of phosphatidylserine. Once Thymosin α1's N-terminus has been inserted into the membrane, the rest may interact with nearby proteins and/or receptors acting as effectors and causing a biological signaling cascade, thus exerting thymosin α1's pleiotropy. PMID:26909491

  14. Molecular substrates of social avoidance seen following prenatal ethanol exposure and its reversal by social enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Frank A.; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Mooney, Sandra M.

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure is associated with, and is a risk factor for, developmental disorders with abnormal social behaviors, including autism spectrum disorders. We hypothesize that the specific effects on social behavior are defined by the timing of the exposure as well as subsequent changes in brain regions such as the amygdala and ventral striatum. We recently reported that in utero ethanol exposure on gestational day (G)12 alters social behaviors of weanling (postnatal day (P)28), adolescent (P42), and young adult (P75) rats. Male, but not female, offspring of the ethanol-exposed dams showed significant decreases in social investigation (sniffing of a social partner), contact behavior (grooming or crawling over/under the partner), and play fighting (following, chasing, nape attacks, or pinning) at all ages tested (with maximal effects at P28 and P42). Furthermore, both males and females showed evidence of social avoidance at P42 and P75. The present study sought to test whether a form of social enrichment could normalize any of the social deficits and what the molecular mechanisms of such effects might be. We found that housing rats with non-manipulated control rats normalized the social avoidance phenotype normally seen when they are housed with sex-matched prenatal ethanol-exposed littermates. There was no mitigation of the other ethanol-induced behavioral deficits. Conversely, male control-treated rats housed with non-littermates showed deficits in play fighting, social investigation and contact behavior. Molecular analyses of the amygdala and ventral striatum of adolescent rats following fetal ethanol exposure indicated several specific neurotransmitter systems and pathways that might underlie the social avoidance phenotype as well as its reversal. PMID:22572756

  15. Effects of perinatal PCB exposure on discrimination-reversal learning in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schantz, S L; Levin, E D; Bowman, R E; Heironimus, M P; Laughlin, N K

    1989-01-01

    Monkeys exposed to PCB mixtures during gestation and lactation were tested on two-choice discrimination-reversal learning (DR). In Experiment 1, offspring of mothers fed 1.0 ppm Aroclor 1248, and offspring born 1.5 years after maternal exposure to 2.5 ppm Aroclor 1248 ended did not differ from controls on spatial, color or shape DR problems. In Experiment 2, offspring of mothers fed 0.25 or 1.0 ppm Aroclor 1016 and offspring born 3 years after maternal exposure to 2.5 ppm Aroclor 1248 ended were tested on the same spatial, color and shape problems, but a spatial problem with color and shape as irrelevant cues was inserted after the initial spatial problem. Performance of the high dose Aroclor 1016 offspring was impaired on the initial spatial problem, and facilitated on the shape problem. Performance of the Aroclor 1248 postexposure offspring was facilitated on the shape problem. This apparently facilitatory effect may represent a failure of PCB-exposed monkeys to learn the irrelevancy of the shape cue when it was initially presented. PMID:2502707

  16. Phosphatidylserine directly and positively regulates fusion of myoblasts into myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jaemin; Conboy, Irina M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} PS broadly and persistently trans-locates to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane during myoblast fusion into myotubes. {yields} Robust myotubes are formed when PS liposomes are added exogenously. {yields} PS increases the width of de novo myotubes and the numbers of myonuclei, but not the myotube length. {yields} Annexin V or PS antibody inhibits myotube formation by masking exposed PS. -- Abstract: Cell membrane consists of various lipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Among them, PS is a molecular marker of apoptosis, because it is located to the inner leaflet of plasma membrane generally but it is moved to the outer leaflet during programmed cell death. The process of apoptosis has been implicated in the fusion of muscle progenitor cells, myoblasts, into myotubes. However, it remained unclear whether PS regulates muscle cell differentiation directly. In this paper, localization of PS to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane in proliferating primary myoblasts and during fusion of these myoblasts into myotubes is validated using Annexin V. Moreover, we show the presence of PS clusters at the cell-cell contact points, suggesting the importance of membrane ruffling and PS exposure for the myogenic cell fusion. Confirming this conclusion, experimentally constructed PS, but not PC liposomes dramatically enhance the formation of myotubes from myoblasts, thus demonstrating a direct positive effect of PS on the muscle cell fusion. In contrast, myoblasts exposed to PC liposomes produce long myotubes with low numbers of myonuclei. Moreover, pharmacological masking of PS on the myoblast surface inhibits fusion of these cells into myotubes in a dose-dependent manner.

  17. Paint thinner exposure inhibits testosterone synthesis and secretion in a reversible manner in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bayram; Canpolat, Sinan; Sandal, Suleyman; Akpolat, Nusret; Kutlu, Selim; Ilhan, Necip; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2006-11-01

    Occupational exposure and sniffing of toluene-based organic solvents is an important public health problem. In this study, we have investigated the effects of paint thinner inhalation on testosterone synthesis and secretion in the male rat. A control group inhaled normal air ventilation. The remaining animals were divided into three groups and exposed to paint thinner in a glassy cage for 15 and 30 days (2 h/day). A group of rats was allowed to recover for 15 days after 30 days of exposure. Toluene concentration (the largest constituent in thinner, 66%) was set at 1500 ppm in the inhaled air. At the end, all animals were decapitated and blood samples obtained. Testes and seminal vesicles were removed and weighed out. Serum total testosterone levels were determined by chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay. Testicular tissue specimens were processed for semi-quantitative evaluation of immunohistochemical testosterone staining and light microscopy. Intensity of immunostaining was evaluated on a scale between 0 (no staining), 1 (minimal), 2 (mild), 3 (moderate) and 4 (strong staining). Serum testosterone levels (ng/ml) were decreased by 15-day (3.31+/-0.61) and 30-day (1.17+/-0.54, p<0.02) thinner exposure compared to the controls (3.91+/-1.03). Another group of rats exposed to thinner for 30 days and then allowed to recover for a period of 15 days had significantly elevated levels of testosterone values (3.77+/-1.1; p<0.05). Immunohistochemical testosterone staining of the cytoplasm of Leydig cells was moderate (3+) and mild (2+) in 15 and 30 days thinner inhalation groups, respectively. Strong staining (4+) was restored following the recovery period. Testicular weight was significantly reduced in all test groups compared to the control values (p<0.01). Diameters of seminiferous tubules were significantly decreased in the solvent exposed groups with enlarged connective tissue. The present findings suggest that paint thinner inhalation inhibits testosterone synthesis

  18. Reversibility of endocrine disruption in zebrafish (Danio rerio) after discontinued exposure to the estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Lisa; Knörr, Susanne; Keiter, Susanne; Rehberger, Kristina; Volz, Sina; Schiller, Viktoria; Fenske, Martina; Holbech, Henrik; Segner, Helmut; Braunbeck, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the persistence of the feminizing effects of discontinued 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) exposure on zebrafish (Danio rerio). An exposure scenario covering the sensitive phase of sexual differentiation, as well as final gonad maturation was chosen to examine the estrogenic effects on sexual development of zebrafish. Two exposure scenarios were compared: continuous exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations (0.1–10 ng/L EE2) up to 100 days post-hatch (dph) and developmental exposure up to 60 dph, followed by 40 days of depuration in clean water. The persistence of effects was investigated at different biological organization levels from mRNA to population-relevant endpoints to cover a broad range of important parameters. EE2 had a strong feminizing and inhibiting effect on the sexual development of zebrafish. Brain aromatase (cyp19b) mRNA expression showed no clear response, but vitellogenin levels were significantly elevated, gonad maturation and body growth were inhibited in both genders, and sex ratios were skewed towards females and undifferentiated individuals. To a large extent, all of these effects were reversed after 40 days of recovery, leading to the conclusion that exposure to the estrogen EE2 results in very strong, but reversible underdevelopment and feminization of zebrafish. The present study is the first to show this reversibility at different levels of organization, which gives better insight into the mechanistic basis of estrogenic effects in zebrafish. - Highlights: • Zebrafish were exposed to 17α-ethinylestradiol during their sexual differentiation. • Reversibility of effects was investigated after depuration of 40 days. • Morphological and physiological parameters were compared. • Zebrafish were able to recover at all different levels from mRNA to population.

  19. Exposure to silica nanoparticles causes reversible damage of the spermatogenic process in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Wang, Na; Yu, Yang; Li, Yang; Li, Yan-Bo; Yu, Yong-Bo; Zhou, Xian-Qing; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure to nanomaterials is inevitable, as nanomaterials have become part of our daily life now. In this study, we firstly investigated the effects of silica nanoparticles on the spermatogenic process according to their time course in male mice. 48 male mice were randomly divided into control group and silica nanoparticle group with 24 mice per group, with three evaluation time points (15, 35 and 60 days after the first dose) per group. Mice were exposed to the vehicle control and silica nanoparticles at a dosage of 20 mg/kg every 3 days, five times over a 13-day period, and were sacrificed at 15, 35 and 60 days after the first dose. The results showed that silica nanoparticles caused damage to the mitochondrial cristae and decreased the levels of ATP, resulting in oxidative stress in the testis by days 15 and 35; however, the damage was repaired by day 60. DNA damage and the decreases in the quantity and quality of epididymal sperm were found by days 15 and 35; but these changes were recovered by day 60. In contrast, the acrosome integrity and fertility in epididymal sperm, the numbers of spermatogonia and sperm in the testes, and the levels of three major sex hormones were not significantly affected throughout the 60-day period. The results suggest that nanoparticles can cause reversible damage to the sperms in the epididymis without affecting fertility, they are more sensitive than both spermatogonia and spermatocytes to silica nanoparticle toxicity. Considering the spermatogenesis time course, silica nanoparticles primarily influence the maturation process of sperm in the epididymis by causing oxidative stress and damage to the mitochondrial structure, resulting in energy metabolism dysfunction. PMID:25003337

  20. The effects of synthetic estrogen exposure on premating and postmating episodes of selection in sex-role-reversed Gulf pipefish

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Emily; Paczolt, Kimberly A; Jones, Adam G

    2013-01-01

    Environmental estrogens have been shown to affect populations of aquatic organisms in devastating ways, including feminization of males, alterations in mating behaviors, and disruption of sexual selection. Studies have shown 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) exposure to induce female-like secondary sexual traits in male Gulf pipefish, changing how females perceive affected males. We aimed to understand the effects of EE2 exposure on the sex-role-reversed mating system and the strength of selection in Gulf pipefish. We used artificial Gulf pipefish breeding aggregations and microsatellite-based parentage analysis to determine maternity. We then calculated the opportunity for selection and selection differentials on body size for both sexes during three consecutive episodes of selection. Exposure to EE2 did not affect the strength of selection, likely due to the unusual sex-role-reversed mating system found in this species. With respect to multiply mated females, EE2-exposed females produced more eggs with higher embryo survivorship than nonexposed females. Thus, short-term exposure to low concentrations (2.0 ng/L) of EE2 in Gulf pipefish enhanced female reproductive success. However, higher EE2 concentrations (5.0 ng/L) caused complete reproductive failure in Gulf pipefish males. These results call for more work on the long-term effects of EE2 exposure in Gulf pipefish in artificial and natural populations. PMID:24478798

  1. Brief exposure of embryos to steroids or aromatase inhibitor induces sex reversal in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Gennotte, Vincent; Mafwila Kinkela, Patrick; Ulysse, Bernard; Akian Djétouan, Dieudonné; Bere Sompagnimdi, Frédéric; Tomson, Thomas; Mélard, Charles; Rougeot, Carole

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop sex reversal procedures targeting the embryonic period as tools to study the early steps of sex differentiation in Nile tilapia with XX, XY, and YY sexual genotypes. XX eggs were exposed to masculinizing treatments with androgens (17α-methyltestosterone, 11-ketotestosterone) or aromatase inhibitor (Fadrozole), whereas XY and YY eggs were subjected to feminizing treatments with estrogen analog (17α-ethynylestradiol). All treatments consisted of a single or double 4-hr immersion applied between 1 and 36 hour post-fertilization (hpf). Concentrations of active substances were 1000 or 2000 μg l(-1) in XX and XY, and 2000 or 6500 μg l(-1) in YY. Masculinizing treatments of XX embryos achieved a maximal sex reversal rate of 10% with an exposure at 24 hpf to 1000 μg l(-1) of 11-ketotestosterone or to 2000 μg l(-1) of Fadrozole. Feminization of XY embryos was more efficient and induced up to 91% sex reversal with an exposure to 2000 μg l(-1) of 17α-ethynylestradiol. Interestingly, similar treatments failed to reverse YY fish to females, suggesting either that a sex determinant linked to the Y chromosome prevents the female pathway when present in two copies, or that a gene present on the X chromosome is needed for the development of a female phenotype. PMID:25376842

  2. The Effects of Synthetic Estrogen Exposure on the Sexually Dimorphic Liver Transcriptome of the Sex-Role-Reversed Gulf Pipefish

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Emily; Flanagan, Sarah P.; Jones, Adam G.

    2015-01-01

    Species exhibiting sex-role reversal provide an unusual perspective on the evolution of sex roles and sex differences. However, the proximate effects of sex-role reversal are largely unknown. Endocrine disruptors provide an experimental mechanism to address hormonal regulation of sexually dimorphic gene expression in sex-role-reversed taxa. Here, we investigate gene expression patterns in the liver of the sex-role-reversed Gulf pipefish, because the liver is known to be sexually dimorphic and estrogen-regulated in species with conventional sex roles. Using next-generation RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), we detected sexually dimorphic hepatic gene expression patterns, with a total of 482 differentially expressed genes between the sexes in Gulf pipefish. Two-thirds of these genes were over-expressed in females, and the sex-specific transcriptomes of this sex-role-reversed pipefish’s liver were superficially similar to those of fishes with conventional sex-roles. We exposed females, pregnant males, and non-pregnant males to 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) at ecologically relevant concentrations of 5ng/L and compared gene expression patterns in the livers of exposed fish to control fish. Several genes that were up-regulated in EE2-exposed males relative to control males were also found to be female-biased in control animals. These genes included several of the classic estrogen biomarkers, such as vitellogenin, choriogenin, and zona pellucida. Thus, estrogen exposure induced feminization of the male liver transcriptome in a sex-role-reversed pipefish. These results suggest that the ancestral state of estrogen-regulated female reproductive physiology has been retained in all sex-role-reversed vertebrates thus far studied, despite substantial evolution of the hormonal regulation of ornamentation and mating behavior in these interesting taxa. PMID:26448558

  3. On the coordination of La3+ by phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed Central

    Petersheim, M; Sun, J

    1989-01-01

    In a recent study by Bentz, J., D. Alford, J. Cohen, and N. Düzgünes (1988. Biophys. J. 53:593-607), La3+ was found to be more effective than Ca2+ in causing nonleaky fusion of phosphatidylserine vesicles. It was proposed that this difference in fusion efficiency may be due, in part, to a difference in coordination of the two cations. That is, Ca2+ was presumed to bind to the lipid phosphate, whereas La3+ was proposed to be coordinated by the serine carboxylate and amine. 31P and 13C NMR results presented here demonstrate that the lanthanides, Tb3+ and La3+, are coordinated by the phosphodiester and carboxylate moieties of phosphatidylserine. Tb3+-Phosphatidylserine optical experiments suggest that the serine amine does not coordinate the lanthanide below pH 10, at least not while the membrane has a net negative surface charge. Although these observations disagree with the structural details proposed by Bentz et al. (1988), they are not in conflict with their general fusion mechanism. The work presented here also demonstrates that La3+ affects the inner surface phosphodiesters differently than those on the outer surface of phosphatidylserine vesicles. The vesicles studied are of an intermediate size, having diameters on the order of 150-200 nm. The cation appears to have a more immediate effect on the packing of the crowded headgroups on the inner surface. Higher levels of bound La3+ on the outer surface may be required to induce the same changes in headgroup conformation. PMID:2720062

  4. Cooperative binding of Annexin A5 to phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janko, Christina; Jeremic, Ivica; Biermann, Mona; Chaurio, Ricardo; Schorn, Christine; Muñoz, Luis E.; Herrmann, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Healthy cells exhibit an asymmetric plasma membrane with phosphatidylserine (PS) located on the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane bilayer. Annexin A5-FITC, a PS binding protein, is commonly used to evaluate apoptosis in flow cytometry. PS exposed by apoptotic cells serves as a major ‘eat-me’ signal for phagocytes. Although exposition of PS has been observed after alternative stimuli, no clearance of viable, PS exposing cells has been detected. Thus, besides PS exposure, membranes of viable and apoptotic cells might exhibit specific characteristics. Here, we show that Annexin A5 binds in a cooperative manner to different types of dead cells. Shrunken apoptotic cells thereby showed the highest Hill coefficient values. Contrarily, parafomaldehyde fixation of apoptotic cells completely abrogates the cooperativity effect seen with dead and dying cells. We tend to speculate that the cooperative binding of Annexin A5 to the membranes of apoptotic cells reflects higher fluidity of the exposed membranes facilitating PS clustering.

  5. Brief Daily Exposures to Asian Females Reverses Perceptual Narrowing for Asian Faces in Caucasian Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anzures, Gizelle; Wheeler, Andrea; Quinn, Paul C.; Pascalis, Olivier; Slater, Alan M.; Heron-Delaney, Michelle; Tanaka, James W.; Lee, Kang

    2012-01-01

    Perceptual narrowing in the visual, auditory, and multisensory domains has its developmental origins during infancy. The current study shows that experimentally induced experience can reverse the effects of perceptual narrowing on infants' visual recognition memory of other-race faces. Caucasian 8- to 10-month-olds who could not discriminate…

  6. Brief daily exposures to Asian females reverses perceptual narrowing for Asian faces in Caucasian infants

    PubMed Central

    Anzures, Gizelle; Wheeler, Andrea; Quinn, Paul C.; Pascalis, Olivier; Slater, Alan M.; Heron-Delaney, Michelle; Tanaka, James W.; Lee, Kang

    2012-01-01

    Perceptual narrowing in the visual, auditory, and multisensory domains has its developmental origins in infancy. The present study shows that experimentally induced experience can reverse the effects of perceptual narrowing on infants’ visual recognition memory of other-race faces. Caucasian 8- to 10-month-olds who could not discriminate between novel and familiarized Asian faces at the beginning of testing were given brief daily experience with Asian female faces in the experimental condition and Caucasian female faces in the control condition. At the end of three weeks, only infants who received daily experience with Asian females showed above-chance recognition of novel Asian female and male faces. Further, infants in the experimental condition showed greater efficiency in learning novel Asian females compared to infants in the control condition. Thus, visual experience with a novel stimulus category can reverse the effects of perceptual narrowing in infancy via improved stimulus recognition and encoding. PMID:22625845

  7. Mercury induces the externalization of phosphatidyl-serine in human renal proximal tubule (HK-2) cells.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Dwayne J; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2007-06-01

    The underlying mechanism for the biological activity of inorganic mercury is believed to be the high affinity binding of divalent mercuric cations to thiols of sulfhydryl groups of proteins. A comprehensive analysis of published data indicates that inorganic mercury is one of the most environmentally abundant toxic metals, is a potent and selective nephrotoxicant that preferentially accumulates in the kidneys, and is known to produce cellular injury in the kidneys. Binding sites are present in the proximal tubules, and it is in the epithelial cells of these tubules that toxicants such as inorganic mercury are reabsorbed. This can affect the enzymatic activity and the structure of various proteins. Mercury may alter protein and membrane structure and function in the epithelial cells and this alteration may result in long term residual effects. This research was therefore designed to evaluate the dose-response relationship in human renal proximal tubule (HK-2) cells following exposure to inorganic mercury. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay for cell viability. The Annexin-V assay was performed by flow cytometry to determine the extent of phosphatidylserine externalization. Cells were exposed to mercury for 24 hours at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 microg/mL. Cytotoxicity experiments yielded a LD50 value of 4.65 +/- 0.6 microg/mL indicating that mercury is highly toxic. The percentages of cells undergoing early apoptosis were 0.70 +/- 0.03%, 10.0 +/- 0.02%, 11.70 +/- 0.03%, 15.20 +/- 0.02%, 16.70 +/- 0.03%, 24.20 +/-0.02%, and 25.60 +/- 0.04% at treatments of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 microg/mL of mercury respectively. This indicates a dose-response relationship with regard to mercury-induced cytotoxicity and the externalization of phosphatidylserine in HK-2 cells. PMID:17617677

  8. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA selectively activates PKC-epsilon, possibly binding to the phosphatidylserine binding site.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Hi, Rika; Mukasa, Takeshi; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Nagata, Tetsu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the effect of 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA), a newly synthesized linoleic acid derivative with cyclopropane rings instead of cis-double bonds, on protein kinase C (PKC) activity. In the in situ PKC assay with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, DCP-LA significantly activated PKC in PC-12 cells in a concentration-dependent (10 nM-100 microM) manner, with the maximal effect at 100 nM, and the DCP-LA effect was blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor, or a selective inhibitor peptide of the novel PKC isozyme PKC-epsilon. Furthermore, DCP-LA activated PKC in HEK-293 cells that was inhibited by the small, interfering RNA against PKC-epsilon. In the cell-free PKC assay, of the nine isozymes examined here, DCP-LA most strongly activated PKC-epsilon, with >7-fold potency over other PKC isozymes, in the absence of dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol; instead, the DCP-LA action was inhibited by dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine. DCP-LA also activated PKC-gamma, a conventional PKC, but to a much lesser extent compared with that for PKC-epsilon, by a mechanism distinct from PKC-epsilon activation. Thus, DCP-LA serves as a selective activator of PKC-epsilon, possibly by binding to the phosphatidylserine binding site on PKC-epsilon. These results may provide fresh insight into lipid signaling in PKC activation. PMID:16520488

  9. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji; Kang, Yu-Xia; Pan, Wen; Lei, Wan; Feng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%–8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:27331813

  10. Effects of postnatal exposure to a PCB mixture in monkeys on nonspatial discrimination reversal and delayed alternation performance.

    PubMed

    Rice, D C; Hayward, S

    1997-01-01

    Behavioral impairment as a consequence of PCB exposure beginning in utero has been reported in both humans and animals. The present study assessed the behavioral consequences of postnatal exposure to PCBs. Male monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were dosed from birth to 20 weeks of age with 7.5 micrograms/kg/day of a PCB mixture representative of the PCBs typically found in human breast milk (8 monkeys) or vehicle (5 monkeys). At 20 weeks of age, PCB levels in fat and blood of treated monkeys were 1.7-3.6 ppm and 2-3 ppb respectively. Beginning at three years of age, monkeys were tested on a series of nonspatial discrimination reversal problems followed by a spatial delayed alternation task. Treated monkeys exhibited decreased median response latencies and variable increases in mean response latencies across the three tasks of the nonspatial discrimination reversal. There were no group differences on accuracy of performance, although some treated individuals made more mistakes at the beginning of the experiment than did control monkeys. On the delayed alteration task, the PCB-exposed group displayed retarded acquisition of the task and increased errors at short delay values, which were tested at the beginning of the experiment. There was no increase in the total number of errors in treated monkeys at long delay values. Treated monkeys engaged in more perseverative responding than controls over the entire course of the experiment, in some instances even in the absence of an increase in overall error rate. These findings are interpreted as a learning/performance decrement rather than an effect on spatial memory per se. The results of this study suggest that PCB exposure which is limited to the early postnatal period and results in environmentally-relevant body burdens produces long-term behavioral impairment. PMID:9291496

  11. Phosphatidylserine externalization and procoagulant activation of erythrocytes induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor pyocyanin.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Syed M; Donkor, David A; Bhakta, Varsha; Eltringham-Smith, Louise J; Dwivedi, Dhruva J; Moore, Jane C; Pepler, Laura; Ivetic, Nikola; Nazi, Ishac; Fox-Robichaud, Alison E; Liaw, Patricia C; Sheffield, William P

    2016-04-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a wide range of infections in multiple hosts by releasing an arsenal of virulence factors such as pyocyanin. Despite numerous reports on the pleiotropic cellular targets of pyocyanin toxicity in vivo, its impact on erythrocytes remains elusive. Erythrocytes undergo an apoptosis-like cell death called eryptosis which is characterized by cell shrinkage and phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization; this process confers a procoagulant phenotype on erythrocytes as well as fosters their phagocytosis and subsequent clearance from the circulation. Herein, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa pyocyanin-elicited PS exposure and cell shrinkage in erythrocyte while preserving the membrane integrity. Mechanistically, exposure of erythrocytes to pyocyanin showed increased cytosolic Ca(2+) activity as well as Ca(2+) -dependent proteolytic processing of μ-calpain. Pyocyanin further up-regulated erythrocyte ceramide abundance and triggered the production of reactive oxygen species. Pyocyanin-induced increased PS externalization in erythrocytes translated into enhanced prothrombin activation and fibrin generation in plasma. As judged by carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl-ester labelling, pyocyanin-treated erythrocytes were cleared faster from the murine circulation as compared to untreated erythrocytes. Furthermore, erythrocytes incubated in plasma from patients with P. aeruginosa sepsis showed increased PS exposure as compared to erythrocytes incubated in plasma from healthy donors. In conclusion, the present study discloses the eryptosis-inducing effect of the virulence factor pyocyanin, thereby shedding light on a potentially important mechanism in the systemic complications of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:26781477

  12. Ethanol increases affinity of protein kinase C for phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C is a calcium-dependent enzyme that requires phospholipid for its activation. It is present in relatively high concentration in the brain and may be involved in neuronal function. The present experiments test whether the membrane disorder induced by ethanol affects the activity of kinase C by changing its interaction with membrane lipid. Fractions rich in kinase C were purified from rat brain cytosol by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Enzyme activity was assayed by measuring the phosphorylation of histone H1. As expected, phosphatidylserine activated the enzyme, and the stimulation was further increased by the addition of calcium and/or diacylglycerol. At low concentration of free calcium (0.5-1..mu..M), ethanol (800 mM0 enhanced kinase C activity if the presence of phospholipid. similar results were observed in the absence of calcium. Double reciprocal plots of the data showed that ethanol increased the affinity of the enzyme for phosphatidylserine without affecting the V/sub max. The stimulation of kinase C activity by ethanol was not observed at high calcium concentrations. These experiments suggest that ethanol may activated protein kinase C at physiological levels of calcium by facilitating its transfer into the hydrophobic membrane environment.

  13. Toxicant Exposure and Bioaccumulation: A Common and Potentially Reversible Cause of Cognitive Dysfunction and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, Stephen J.; Kelln, Kasie L.

    2015-01-01

    Juxtaposed alongside the ongoing rise in the incidence and prevalence of dementia, is the surge of recent research confirming widespread exposure and bioaccumulation of chemical toxicants. Evidence from sources such as the Centers for Disease Control reveals that most people have accrued varying degrees of assorted toxic pollutants including heavy metals, flame retardants, and pesticide residues within their bodies. It has been well established that many of these toxicants have neurodegenerative as well as neurodevelopmental impact as a result of various pathophysiologic mechanisms including neuronal mitochondrial toxicity and disruption of neurotransmitter regulation. Elimination of stockpiled toxicants from the body may diminish adverse toxicant impact on human biology and allow restoration of normal physiological function. Incorporating a review of medical literature on toxicant exposure and dementia with a case history of a lead-exposed individual diagnosed with dementia, this paper will discuss a much overlooked and potentially widespread cause of declining brain function and dementia. PMID:25722540

  14. Reverse osmosis membrane composition, structure and performance modification by bisulphite, iron(III), bromide and chlorite exposure.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, O; Gibert, O; Cortina, J L

    2016-10-15

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane exposure to bisulphite, chlorite, bromide and iron(III) was assessed in terms of membrane composition, structure and performance. Membrane composition was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and membrane performance was assessed by water and chloride permeation, using a modified version of the solution-diffusion model. Iron(III) dosage in presence of bisulphite led to an autooxidation of the latter, probably generating free radicals which damaged the membrane. It comprised a significant raise in chloride passage (chloride permeation coefficient increased 5.3-5.1 fold compared to the virgin membrane under the conditions studied) rapidly. No major differences in terms of water permeability and membrane composition were observed. Nevertheless, an increase in the size of the network pores, and a raise in the fraction of aggregate pores of the polyamide (PA) layer were identified, but no amide bond cleavage was observed. These structural changes were therefore, in accordance with the transport properties observed. PMID:27470468

  15. MiADMSA reverses impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism and neuronal apoptotic cell death after arsenic exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, Nidhi; Mehta, Ashish; Yadav, Abhishek; Binukumar, B.K.; Gill, Kiran Dip; Flora, Swaran J.S.

    2011-11-15

    Arsenicosis, due to contaminated drinking water, is a serious health hazard in terms of morbidity and mortality. Arsenic induced free radicals generated are known to cause cellular apoptosis through mitochondrial driven pathway. In the present study, we investigated the effect of arsenic interactions with various complexes of the electron transport chain and attempted to evaluate if there was any complex preference of arsenic that could trigger apoptosis. We also evaluated if chelation with monoisoamyl dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA) could reverse these detrimental effects. Our results indicate that arsenic exposure induced free radical generation in rat neuronal cells, which diminished mitochondrial potential and enzyme activities of all the complexes of the electron transport chain. Moreover, these complexes showed differential responses towards arsenic. These early events along with diminished ATP levels could be co-related with the later events of cytosolic migration of cytochrome c, altered bax/bcl{sub 2} ratio, and increased caspase 3 activity. Although MiADMSA could reverse most of these arsenic-induced altered variables to various extents, DNA damage remained unaffected. Our study for the first time demonstrates the differential effect of arsenic on the complexes leading to deficits in bioenergetics leading to apoptosis in rat brain. However, more in depth studies are warranted for better understanding of arsenic interactions with the mitochondria. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic impairs mitochondrial energy metabolism leading to neuronal apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic differentially affects mitochondrial complexes, I - III and IV being more sensitive than complex II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic-induced apoptosis initiates through ROS generation or impaired [Ca{sup 2+}]i homeostasis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiADMSA reverses arsenic toxicity via intracellular arsenic- chelation, antioxidant

  16. Phosphatidylserine index as a marker of the procoagulant phenotype of acute myelogenous leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Recht, Olivia; Gruber, András; Levine, Ross L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are at risk for thrombotic complications. Risk to develop thrombosis is closely tied to leukemia subtype, and studies have shown an association between leukocytosis and thrombosis in AML M3. We evaluated the relative roles of cell count and the surface expression of tissue factor (TF) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in the procoagulant phenotype of AML cell lines. The TF-positive AML M3 cell lines, NB4 and HL60, and AML M2 cell line, AML14, exhibited both extrinsic tenase and prothrombinase activity in a purified system and promoted experimental thrombus formation. In contrast, the TF-negative AML cell line, HEL, exhibited only prothrombinase activity and did not affect the rate of occlusive thrombus formation. In plasma, NB4, HL60 and AML14 shortened clotting times in a cell-count, PS- and TF-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NB4, HL60, and AML14 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin increased their extrinsic tenase activity and PS expression. Clot initiation time inversely correlated with logarithm of PS index, defined as the product of multiplying leukocyte count with cell surface PS exposure. We propose that leukemia cell PS index may serve as a biomarker for procoagulant activity.

  17. L-Carnitine reverses maternal cigarette smoke exposure-induced renal oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long T; Stangenberg, Stefanie; Chen, Hui; Al-Odat, Ibrahim; Chan, Yik L; Gosnell, Martin E; Anwer, Ayad G; Goldys, Ewa M; Pollock, Carol A; Saad, Sonia

    2015-04-01

    Maternal smoking is associated with metabolic disorders, renal underdevelopment, and a predisposition to chronic kidney disease in offspring, yet the underlying mechanisms are unclear. By exposing female Balb/c mice to cigarette smoke for 6 wk premating and during gestation and lactation, we showed that maternal smoke exposure induced glucose intolerance, renal underdevelopment, inflammation, and albuminuria in male offspring. This was associated with increased renal oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction at birth and in adulthood. Importantly, we demonstrated that dietary supplementation of l-carnitine, an amino acid shown to increase antioxidant defenses and mitochondrial function in numerous diseases, in smoke-exposed mothers during pregnancy and lactation significantly reversed the detrimental maternal impacts on kidney pathology in these male offspring. It increased SOD2 and glutathione peroxidase 1, reduced ROS accumulation, and normalized levels of mitochondrial preprotein translocases of the outer membrane, and oxidative phosphorylation complexes I-V in the kidneys of mouse progeny after intrauterine cigarette smoke exposure. These findings support the hypothesis that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are closely linked to the adverse effects of maternal smoking on male offspring renal pathology. The results of our study suggest that l-carnitine administration in cigarette smoke-exposed mothers mitigates these deleterious renal consequences. PMID:25608965

  18. Reversible conformational change of tau2 epitope on exposure to detergent in glial cytoplasmic inclusions of multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Katsuhiko; Uchihara, Toshiki; Nakamura, Ayako; Ishiyama, Miyako; Yamaoka, Keiko; Yagishita, Saburo; Iwabuchi, Kiyoshi; Kosaka, Kenji

    2003-05-01

    Tau-like immunoreactivity (IR) on glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) of multiple system atrophy (MSA) was investigated with a panel of anti-tau antibodies and we found that tau2, one of the phosphorylation-independent antibodies, preferentially immunolabeled GCIs. Co-presence (0.03%) of polyethyleneglycol- p-isooctylphenyl ether (Triton X-100, TX) with tau2, however, abolished this IR on GCIs, but did not abolish tau2 IR on neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Tau2-immunoreactive bands on immunoblot of brain homogenates from MSA brains were retrieved mainly in a TRIS-saline-soluble fraction, as reported in normal brains. This was in contrast to SDS-soluble fractions from brain with Down's syndrome, which contained tau2-immunoreactive bands of higher molecular weight. It indicates that the appearance of tau2 IR on GCIs is not related to hyperphosphorylation of tau. These tau2-immunoreactive bands, except those from bovine brain, were similarly abolished in the presence of TX (0.06%), and repeated washing after exposure to TX restored the tau2 IR on immunohistochemistry and on immunoblot. These findings can be explained if the modified tau2 epitope undergoes a reversible conformational change on exposure to TX, which is reversible after washing. Because the conformation centered at Ser101 of bovine tau is crucial for its affinity to tau2, the Ser-like conformation mimicked by its human counterpart Pro may represent pathological modification of tau shared by GCIs and NFTs. The relative resistance of tau2 epitope on NFTs on exposure to TX suggests that tau woven into NFTs confers additional stability to the pathological conformation of tau2 epitope. The conformation of the tau2 epitope in GCIs is not as stable as in NFTs, suggesting that tau proteins are not the principal constituents of the fibrillary structures of GCIs, even though they were immunodecorated with tau2. The difference in the susceptibility of the tau2 epitope to TX may distinguish its conformational states

  19. Low-frequency sound exposure causes reversible long-term changes of cochlear transfer characteristics.

    PubMed

    Drexl, Markus; Otto, Larissa; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Marquardt, Torsten; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike

    2016-02-01

    Intense, low-frequency sound presented to the mammalian cochlea induces temporary changes of cochlear sensitivity, for which the term 'Bounce' phenomenon has been coined. Typical manifestations are slow oscillations of hearing thresholds or the level of otoacoustic emissions. It has been suggested that these alterations are caused by changes of the mechano-electrical transducer transfer function of outer hair cells (OHCs). Shape estimates of this transfer function can be derived from low-frequency-biased distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Here, we tracked the transfer function estimates before and after triggering a cochlear Bounce. Specifically, cubic DPOAEs, modulated by a low-frequency biasing tone, were followed over time before and after induction of the cochlear Bounce. Most subjects showed slow, biphasic changes of the transfer function estimates after low-frequency sound exposure relative to the preceding control period. Our data show that the operating point changes biphasically on the transfer function with an initial shift away from the inflection point followed by a shift towards the inflection point before returning to baseline values. Changes in transfer function and operating point lasted for about 180 s. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that intense, low-frequency sound disturbs regulatory mechanisms in OHCs. The homeostatic readjustment of these mechanisms after low-frequency offset is reflected in slow oscillations of the estimated transfer functions. PMID:26706707

  20. Phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin inhibits protein translocation across the ER membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-05-10

    Secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across and inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via translocon channels. To investigate the effect of the negatively-charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine on the translocation of nascent polypeptide chains through the translocon, we used the phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin C2-domain. Lactadherin inhibited targeting of nascent chain to the translocon by signal sequence and the initiation of translocation. Moreover, lactadherin inhibited the movement of the translocating polypeptide chain regardless of the presence or absence of positively-charged residues. Phosphatidylserine might be critically involved in translocon function, but it is not a major determinant for translocation arrest of positively-charged residues. PMID:23583395

  1. Persistence of a hyperthermic sign-reversal during nitrous oxide inhalation despite cue-exposure treatment with and without a drug-onset cue

    PubMed Central

    Kaiyala, Karl J.; Woods, Stephen C.; Ramsay, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    We asked whether chronic tolerance and the hyperthermic sign-reversal induced by repeated 60% N2O exposures could be extinguished using a cue-exposure paradigm. Rats received 18 N2O administrations in a total calorimetry system that simultaneously measures core temperature (Tc), metabolic heat production (HP), and body heat loss (HL). Each exposure entailed a 2-h baseline period followed by a 1.5-h N2O exposure. The 18 drug exposures induced a robust intra-administration hyperthermia in which the initial hypothermic effect of N2O inverted to a significant hyperthermic sign-reversal during N2O inhalation due primarily to an acquired robust increase in HP. The rats were then randomized to one of three extinction procedures (n=8/procedure) over a 20-d interval: 1) a N2O-abstinent home-cage group (HC) that received only the usual animal care; 2) a cue-exposure group (CEXP) in which the animals were placed in the calorimeter 8 times but received no N2O; and 3) a drug-onset-cue group (DOC) in which animals received a brief N2O exposure in the calorimeter that mimicked the first 3 min of an actual 60% N2O trial. Following the extinction sessions, all rats received a 60% N2O test trial and Tc, HP and HL were assessed. The hyperthermic sign-reversal remained fully intact during the test trial, with no significant differences observed among groups in any post-baseline change in any thermal outcome. These data suggest that cue exposure may not be an efficacious strategy to reduce sign-reversals that develop with chronic drug use. PMID:25938128

  2. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FAILS TO ALTER FLASH OR PATTERN REVERSAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Visual disturbances are often reported following exposure to xenobiotics, and cholinesterase-inhibiting compounds have been reported to alter visual functi...

  3. Asymmetric distribution of phosphatidylserine is generated in the absence of phospholipid flippases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mioka, Tetsuo; Fujimura-Kamada, Konomi; Tanaka, Kazuma

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, phosphatidylserine (PS) is predominantly located in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane; this asymmetry is generated by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we used the PS-specific probe mRFP-Lact-C2 to investigate the possible involvement of type 4 P-type ATPases, also called phospholipid flippases, in the generation of this asymmetry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PS was not found in the trans-Golgi Network in wild-type cells, but it became exposed when vesicle formation was compromised in the sec7 mutant, and it was also exposed on secretory vesicles (SVs), as reported previously. However, flippase mutations did not reduce the exposure of PS in either case, even at low levels that would only be detectable by quantitative analysis of mRFP-Lact-C2 fluorescence in isolated SVs. Furthermore, no reduction in the PS level was observed in a mutant with multiple flippase mutations. Because PS was not exposed in a mutant that accumulates ER or cis/medial-Golgi membranes, Golgi maturation seems to be a prerequisite for PS translocation. Our results suggest that an unknown mechanism, possibly a protein with flippase-like activity, acts in conjunction with known flippases to regulate PS translocation. PMID:25220349

  4. Decreased proliferation in the adult rat hippocampus after exposure to the Morris water maze and its reversal by fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Námestková, Katerina; Simonová, Zuzana; Syková, Eva

    2005-08-30

    Granular cell proliferation in the adult hippocampus decreases during aging and after chronic stress, while it can be increased by physical activity or treatment with the antidepressant fluoxetine. We investigated whether the physical and cognitive stimulation accompanied by stress in the commonly used Morris water maze affects the rate of proliferation and whether the induced changes can be influenced by antidepressant treatment with fluoxetine. Proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus were labeled by three injections of BrdU during the 24h preceding sacrifice. Early differentiation to neuronal progeny was studied by immunohistochemical staining for doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule binding protein expressed in newborn neurons. Acquisition learning in the water maze for 15 days caused a significant decrease in granular cell proliferation in the granular cell layer of the hippocampus. The decrease in the number of BrdU- and DCX-positive cells was reversed to control levels by the use of fluoxetine during the water maze training. Fluoxetine treatment alone increased the number of BrdU-positive cells, but did not increase the number of DCX-positive cells. We conclude that the exposure of adult male rats to water maze acquisition trials is a stressful experience that significantly suppresses the production of new granular cells and that this stressful effect can be blocked by the concomitant administration of the antidepressant fluoxetine. PMID:15941600

  5. Exposure to polymers reverses inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by serum, meconium, or cholesterol in the captive bubble surfactometer.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, Elena; Ospina, Olga Lucía; Echaide, Mercedes; Taeusch, H William; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    Dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant in the lungs is associated with respiratory pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or meconium aspiration syndrome. Serum, cholesterol, and meconium have been described as inhibitory agents of surfactant's interfacial activity once these substances appear in alveolar spaces during lung injury and inflammation. The deleterious action of these agents has been only partly evaluated under physiologically relevant conditions. We have optimized a protocol to assess surfactant inhibition by serum, cholesterol, or meconium in the captive bubble surfactometer. Specific measures of surface activity before and after native surfactant was exposed to inhibitors included i), film formation, ii), readsorption of material from surface-associated reservoirs, and iii), interfacial film dynamics during compression-expansion cycling. Results show that serum creates a steric barrier that impedes surfactant reaching the interface. A mechanical perturbation of this barrier allows native surfactant to compete efficiently with serum to form a highly surface-active film. Exposure of native surfactant to cholesterol or meconium, on the other hand, modifies the compressibility of surfactant films though optimal compressibility properties recover on repetitive compression-expansion cycling. Addition of polymers like dextran or hyaluronic acid to surfactant fully reverses inhibition by serum. These polymers also prevent surfactant inhibition by cholesterol or meconium, suggesting that the protective action of polymers goes beyond the mere enhancement of interfacial adsorption as described by depletion force theories. PMID:23062337

  6. Exposure to Polymers Reverses Inhibition of Pulmonary Surfactant by Serum, Meconium, or Cholesterol in the Captive Bubble Surfactometer

    PubMed Central

    López-Rodríguez, Elena; Ospina, Olga Lucía; Echaide, Mercedes; Taeusch, H. William; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant in the lungs is associated with respiratory pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or meconium aspiration syndrome. Serum, cholesterol, and meconium have been described as inhibitory agents of surfactant’s interfacial activity once these substances appear in alveolar spaces during lung injury and inflammation. The deleterious action of these agents has been only partly evaluated under physiologically relevant conditions. We have optimized a protocol to assess surfactant inhibition by serum, cholesterol, or meconium in the captive bubble surfactometer. Specific measures of surface activity before and after native surfactant was exposed to inhibitors included i), film formation, ii), readsorption of material from surface-associated reservoirs, and iii), interfacial film dynamics during compression-expansion cycling. Results show that serum creates a steric barrier that impedes surfactant reaching the interface. A mechanical perturbation of this barrier allows native surfactant to compete efficiently with serum to form a highly surface-active film. Exposure of native surfactant to cholesterol or meconium, on the other hand, modifies the compressibility of surfactant films though optimal compressibility properties recover on repetitive compression-expansion cycling. Addition of polymers like dextran or hyaluronic acid to surfactant fully reverses inhibition by serum. These polymers also prevent surfactant inhibition by cholesterol or meconium, suggesting that the protective action of polymers goes beyond the mere enhancement of interfacial adsorption as described by depletion force theories. PMID:23062337

  7. Imaging of Brain Tumors With Paramagnetic Vesicles Targeted to Phosphatidylserine

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Patrick M.; Pearce, John; Chu, Zhengtao; McPherson, Christopher M.; Takigiku, Ray; Lee, Jing-Huei; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate paramagnetic saposin C and dioleylphosphatidylserine (SapC-DOPS) vesicles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed by glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. Materials and Methods Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles were formulated, and the vesicle diameter and relaxivity were measured. Targeting of Gd-DTPA-BSA/ SapC-DOPS vesicles to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo was compared with nontargeted paramagnetic vesicles (lacking SapC). Mice with GBM brain tumors were imaged at 3, 10, 20, and 24 h postinjection to measure the relaxation rate (R1) in the tumor and the normal brain. Results The mean diameter of vesicles was 175 nm, and the relaxivity at 7 Tesla was 3.32 (s*mM)−1 relative to the gadolinium concentration. Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles targeted cultured cancer cells, leading to an increased R1 and gadolinium level in the cells. In vivo, Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles produced a 9% increase in the R1 of GBM brain tumors in mice 10 h postinjection, but only minimal changes (1.2% increase) in the normal brain. Nontargeted paramagnetic vesicles yielded minimal change in the tumor R1 at 10 h postinjection (1.3%). Conclusion These experiments demonstrate that Gd-DTPA-BSA/SapC-DOPS vesicles can selectively target implanted brain tumors in vivo, providing noninvasive mapping of the cancer biomarker PS. PMID:24797437

  8. Acyl Chain Length of Phosphatidylserine Is Correlated with Plant Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xuejun; Li, Weiqi

    2014-01-01

    Plant lifespan is affected by factors with genetic and environmental bases. The laws governing these two factors and how they affect plant lifespan are unclear. Here we show that the acyl chain length (ACL) of phosphatidylserine (PS) is correlated with plant lifespan. Among the detected eight head-group classes of membrane lipids with lipidomics based on triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry, the ACL of PS showed high diversity, in contrast to the ACLs of the other seven classes, which were highly conserved over all stages of development in all plant species and organs and under all conditions that we studied. Further investigation found that acyl chains of PS lengthened during development, senescence, and under environmental stresses and that increasing length was accelerated by promoted- senescence. The acyl chains of PS were limited to a certain carbon number and ceased to increase in length when plants were close to death. These findings suggest that the ACL of PS can count plant lifespan and could be a molecular scale ruler for measuring plant development and senescence. PMID:25058060

  9. Bovine brain phosphatidylserine attenuates scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Claro, Flavia T; Patti, Camilla L; Abílio, Vanessa C; Frussa-Filho, Roberto; Silva, Regina H

    2006-07-01

    This study verifies the effects of bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS) on passive avoidance (PA) and contextual fear conditioning (CFC) tests in scopolamine-treated mice. Mice received daily i.p. 50 mg/kg PS or 0.2 M Tris pH 7.4 (TRIS) for 5 days. On day 6, mice received saline (TRIS-SAL and PS-SAL) or 1 mg/kg SCO (TRIS-SCO and PS-SCO) i.p. After 20 min, the animals were submitted to PA (experiment 1) or CFC (experiment 2) training sessions, and tests were performed 24 h later. Latency in entering the dark chamber of the PA apparatus presented by TRIS-SCO (but not PS-SCO) group in the test was significantly higher than those presented by controls. Except for TRIS-SCO, all the groups presented higher latencies in the test compared to the training session. In experiment 2, the TRIS-SCO (but not PS-SCO) group presented significantly lower freezing duration than that presented by the TRIS-SAL group in the test. Animals treated with PS alone presented higher freezing duration than that presented by the TRIS-SAL group. The results demonstrate that PS attenuates SCO-induced amnesia in both PA and CFC tests. In addition, PS per se improves retention in the CFC test. PMID:16624469

  10. The phosphatidylserine receptor TIM-4 does not mediate direct signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Daeho; Hochreiter-Hufford, Amelia; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2009-02-24

    Engulfment of apoptotic cells is an active process coordinated by receptors on phagocytes and ligands on apoptotic cells [1]. Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) is a key ligand on apoptotic cells, and recently three PtdSer recognition receptors have been identified, namely, TIM-4, BAI1, and Stabilin-2 [1-6]. Whereas BAI1 is dependent on the ELMO1/Dock180/Rac signaling module, and Stablilin-2 appears to use the intracellular adaptor GULP [2, 3, 7], little is known about how TIM-4 transduces signals downstream of PtdSer recognition [8]. To test the role of known engulfment signaling pathways in TIM-4-mediated engulfment, we used a combination of dominant-negative mutants, knockdown of specific signaling proteins, and knockout cell lines. TIM-4 appears to be largely independent of the two known engulfment signaling pathways [7, 9-17], yet the TIM-4-mediated uptake is inhibited by cytoskeleton disrupting drugs. Remarkably, a version of TIM-4 lacking its cytoplasmic tail promoted corpse uptake via PtdSer recognition. Moreover, replacement of the transmembrane region of TIM-4 with a glycophosphatidylinositol anchor still promoted engulfment comparable to wild-type TIM-4. Thus, the transmembrane region and cytoplasmic tail of TIM-4 are dispensable for apoptotic cell engulfment, and we propose that TIM-4 is a PtdSer tethering receptor without any direct signaling of its own. PMID:19217291

  11. Internalization of paramagnetic phosphatidylserine-containing liposomes by macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays an important role in many pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases, neurological conditions and oncology, and is considered an important predictor for disease progression and outcome. In vivo imaging of inflammatory cells will improve diagnosis and provide a read-out for therapy efficacy. Paramagnetic phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing liposomes were developed for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and confocal microscopy imaging of macrophages. These nanoparticles also provide a platform to combine imaging with targeted drug delivery. Results Incorporation of PS into liposomes did not affect liposomal size and morphology up to 12 mol% of PS. Liposomes containing 6 mol% of PS showed the highest uptake by murine macrophages, while only minor uptake was observed in endothelial cells. Uptake of liposomes containing 6 mol% of PS was dependent on the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+. Furthermore, these 6 mol% PS-containing liposomes were mainly internalized into macrophages, whereas liposomes without PS only bound to the macrophage cell membrane. Conclusions Paramagnetic liposomes containing 6 mol% of PS for MR imaging of macrophages have been developed. In vitro these liposomes showed specific internalization by macrophages. Therefore, these liposomes might be suitable for in vivo visualization of macrophage content and for (visualization of) targeted drug delivery to inflammatory cells. PMID:22929153

  12. Identification of N-Acyl Phosphatidylserine Molecules in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ziqiang; Li, Shengrong; Smith, Dale C.; Shaw, Walter A.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    While profiling the lipidome of the mouse brain by mass spectrometry, we discovered a novel family of N-acyl phosphatidylserine (N-acyl-PS) molecules. These N-acyl-PS species were enriched by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, and they were then characterized by accurate mass measurements, tandem mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and comparison to an authentic standard. Mouse brain N-acyl-PS molecules are heterogeneous and constitute about 0.1 % of the total lipid. In addition to various ester-linked fatty acyl chains on their glycerol backbones, the complexity of the N-acyl-PS series is further increased by the presence of diverse amide-linked N-acyl chains, which include saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated species. N-acyl-PS molecular species were also detected in the lipids of pig brain, mouse RAW264.7 macrophage tumor cells and yeast, but not E. coli. N-acyl-PSs may be biosynthetic precursors of N-acyl serine molecules, such as the recently reported signaling lipid N-arachidonoyl serine from bovine brain. We suggest that a phospholipase D might cleave N-acyl-PS to generate N-acyl serine, in analogy to the biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anadamide) from N-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine. PMID:18031065

  13. Pharmacokinetic characterization of phosphatidylserine liposomes in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, P.; Viola, G.; Bigon, E.; Menegus, A. M.; Bruni, A.

    1991-01-01

    1. The plasma decay, tissue uptake and biotransformation of radiolabelled phosphatidylserine (PS) liposomes have been investigated in rats following bolus i.v. injection (2 mg kg-1). 2. PS plasma concentration showed a biexponential decay with half-lives of 0.85 and 40 min. The following interpretation of the biphasic decay is proposed: (1) The rapid initial decline is due to the irreversible uptake of PS liposomes by the mononuclear phagocyte system, as demonstrated by the almost exclusive accumulation of PS in liver and spleen. (2) The slow decay phase reflects the elimination of that fraction of PS that has been incorporated into high density plasma lipoproteins (HDL). A kinetic model has been developed to describe these phenomena and a good agreement has been observed between experimental data and theoretical values. 3. Evidence has been obtained that a large fraction of PS is hydrolyzed at the injection site, probably by phospholipase A2 and other hydrolytic enzymes released by platelets. Hydrolysis at the injection site has also been observed following intraperitoneal and intramuscular injections. 4. As shown by the comparative analysis of the biotransformation products found in tissues after administration of either [3H]-glycerol-PS or [14C]-serine-PS, parenterally administered PS follows two distinct metabolic pathways: (1) decarboxylation to phosphatidylethanolamine and (2) extensive hydrolytic degradation with release of the individual components of the molecule. These pathways probably reflect the two main mechanisms of PS uptake, incorporation into the plasma membrane and internalization by endocytosis, respectively. PMID:2015419

  14. Processing and topology of the yeast mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 1.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Susanne E; Böttinger, Lena; Vögtle, F-Nora; Wiedemann, Nils; Meisinger, Chris; Becker, Thomas; Daum, Günther

    2012-10-26

    The inner mitochondrial membrane plays a crucial role in cellular lipid homeostasis through biosynthesis of the non-bilayer-forming lipids phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the majority of cellular phosphatidylethanolamine is synthesized by the mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 1 (Psd1). The biogenesis of Psd1 involves several processing steps. It was speculated that the Psd1 precursor is sorted into the inner membrane and is subsequently released into the intermembrane space by proteolytic removal of a hydrophobic sorting signal. However, components involved in the maturation of the Psd1 precursor have not been identified. We show that processing of Psd1 involves the action of the mitochondrial processing peptidase and Oct1 and an autocatalytic cleavage at a highly conserved LGST motif yielding the α- and β-subunit of the enzyme. The Psd1 β-subunit (Psd1β) forms the membrane anchor, which binds the intermembrane space-localized α-subunit (Psd1α). Deletion of a transmembrane segment in the β-subunit results in mislocalization of Psd1 and reduced enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, autocatalytic cleavage does not depend on proper localization to the inner mitochondrial membrane. In summary, membrane integration of Psd1 is crucial for its functionality and for maintenance of mitochondrial lipid homeostasis. PMID:22984266

  15. Processing and Topology of the Yeast Mitochondrial Phosphatidylserine Decarboxylase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Susanne E.; Böttinger, Lena; Vögtle, F.-Nora; Wiedemann, Nils; Meisinger, Chris; Becker, Thomas; Daum, Günther

    2012-01-01

    The inner mitochondrial membrane plays a crucial role in cellular lipid homeostasis through biosynthesis of the non-bilayer-forming lipids phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the majority of cellular phosphatidylethanolamine is synthesized by the mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 1 (Psd1). The biogenesis of Psd1 involves several processing steps. It was speculated that the Psd1 precursor is sorted into the inner membrane and is subsequently released into the intermembrane space by proteolytic removal of a hydrophobic sorting signal. However, components involved in the maturation of the Psd1 precursor have not been identified. We show that processing of Psd1 involves the action of the mitochondrial processing peptidase and Oct1 and an autocatalytic cleavage at a highly conserved LGST motif yielding the α- and β-subunit of the enzyme. The Psd1 β-subunit (Psd1β) forms the membrane anchor, which binds the intermembrane space-localized α-subunit (Psd1α). Deletion of a transmembrane segment in the β-subunit results in mislocalization of Psd1 and reduced enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, autocatalytic cleavage does not depend on proper localization to the inner mitochondrial membrane. In summary, membrane integration of Psd1 is crucial for its functionality and for maintenance of mitochondrial lipid homeostasis. PMID:22984266

  16. Role of Phosphatidylserine in Phospholipid Flippase-Mediated Vesicle Transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Miyoko; Yamagami, Kanako

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes to generate and maintain phospholipid asymmetry. The genome of budding yeast encodes four heteromeric flippases (Drs2p, Dnf1p, Dnf2p, and Dnf3p), which associate with the Cdc50 family noncatalytic subunit, and one monomeric flippase Neo1p. Flippases have been implicated in the formation of transport vesicles, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We show here that overexpression of the phosphatidylserine synthase gene CHO1 suppresses defects in the endocytic recycling pathway in flippase mutants. This suppression seems to be mediated by increased cellular phosphatidylserine. Two models can be envisioned for the suppression mechanism: (i) phosphatidylserine in the cytoplasmic leaflet recruits proteins for vesicle formation with its negative charge, and (ii) phosphatidylserine flipping to the cytoplasmic leaflet induces membrane curvature that supports vesicle formation. In a mutant depleted for flippases, a phosphatidylserine probe GFP-Lact-C2 was still localized to endosomal membranes, suggesting that the mere presence of phosphatidylserine in the cytoplasmic leaflet is not enough for vesicle formation. The CHO1 overexpression did not suppress the growth defect in a mutant depleted or mutated for all flippases, suggesting that the suppression was dependent on flippase-mediated phospholipid flipping. Endocytic recycling was not blocked in a mutant lacking phosphatidylserine or depleted in phosphatidylethanolamine, suggesting that a specific phospholipid is not required for vesicle formation. These results suggest that flippase-dependent vesicle formation is mediated by phospholipid flipping, not by flipped phospholipids. PMID:24390140

  17. Effect of phosphatidylserine on the basal and GABA-activated Cl- permeation across single nerve membranes from rabbit Deiters' neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Rapallino, M.V.; Cupello, A.; Mainardi, P.; Besio, G.; Loeb, C.W. )

    1990-06-01

    The permeation of labeled Cl- ions across single plasma membranes from Deiters' neurons has been studied in the presence of various concentrations of phosphatidylserine (PS) on their extracellular side. PS reduces significantly basal Cl- permeation only at 10(-5) M on the membrane exterior. No effect was found at other concentrations. GABA activable 36Cl- permeation is heavily reduced and almost abolished at 10(-11) - 10(-5) M phosphatidylserine. This exogenous phosphatidylserine effect is difficult to interpret in relation to the function of the endogenous phospholipid. However, it may be involved in the epileptogenic effect in vivo of exogenous phosphatidylserine administration to rats.

  18. La3+-induced fusion of phosphatidylserine liposomes. Close approach, intermembrane intermediates, and the electrostatic surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, J; Alford, D; Cohen, J; Düzgüneş, N

    1988-01-01

    The fusion of large unilamellar phosphatidylserine liposomes (PS LUV) induced by La3+ has been monitored using the 1-aminoapthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid/p-xylenebis(pyridinium bromide) (ANTS/DPX) fluorescence assay for the mixing of aqueous contents. The fusion event is extensive and nonleaky, with up to 95% mixing of contents in the fused liposomes. However, addition of excess EDTA leads to disruption of the fusion products in a way that implies the existence of metastable intermembrane contact sites. The maximal fusion activity occurs between 10 and 100 microM La3+ and fusion can be terminated rapidly, without loss of contents, by the addition of excess La3+, e.g., 1 mM La3+ at pH 7.4. This observation is explained by the very large intrinsic binding constant (approximately 10(5) M-1) of La3+ to the PS headgroup, as measured by microelectrophoresis. Addition of 1 mM La3+ causes charge reversal of the membrane and a large positive surface potential. La3+ binding to PS causes the release of a proton. These data can be explained if La3+ can chelate to PS at two sites, with one of the sites being the primary amino group. This binding model successfully predicts that at pH 4.5 fusion occurs up to 2 mM La3+, due to reduced La3+ binding at low pH. We conclude that the general mechanism of membrane fusion includes three kinetic steps. In addition to (a) aggregation, there is (b) the close approach of the surfaces, or thinning of the hydration layer, and (c) the formation of intermembrane intermediates which determine the extent to which membrane destabilization leads to fusion (mixing of aqueous contents), as opposed to lysis. The lifetime of these intermembrane intermediates appears to depend upon La3+ binding to both PS sites. PMID:3382713

  19. Enzymatic synthesis of phosphatidylserine using bile salt mixed micelles.

    PubMed

    Pinsolle, Alexandre; Roy, Philippe; Buré, Corinne; Thienpont, Anne; Cansell, Maud

    2013-06-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids of the n-3 series was obtained by enzymatic synthesis with phospholipase D (PLD) and a marine lipid extract as substrate. Synthesis was performed using mixed micelles composed of either sodium deoxycholate (SDC) or sodium cholate (SC). To limit the use of surfactant and to monitor the performance of PLD, the mixed micelles were characterized both in terms of bile salt/lipid molar ratio in the aggregates and of mean diameter. A fractional factorial experiment was selected to study the effect of pH, temperature, enzyme, L-serine concentrations, bile salt/lipid molar ratio and Ca(2+) content (in the case of SC only) on PS synthesis. The amount of L-serine was the main factor governing the equilibrium between transphosphatidylation and hydrolysis reaction. Increasing the bile salt/lipid molar ratio decreased PS synthesis yield. In contrast, pH (6.5-8) and temperature (35-45°C) did not affect PLD activity in the tested conditions. This statistical approach allowed determining a combination of parameters (pH, temperature, bile salt/lipid molar ratio, enzyme and alcohol acceptor concentrations) for PS synthesis. After 24 h, the transphosphatidylation reaction led to 57±2% and 56±3% of PS in the phospholipid mixtures with SDC and SC, respectively. In both cases, about 10% of phosphatidic acid was present as a side-product. On the whole, this work provided fundamental basis for a possible development of enzymatic PLD technology using food-grade emulsifiers to produce PS complying with industrial constraints for nutritional applications. PMID:23434712

  20. From Protease to Decarboxylase: THE MOLECULAR METAMORPHOSIS OF PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE DECARBOXYLASE.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Duraisingh, Manoj T; Marti, Matthias; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Voelker, Dennis R

    2015-04-24

    Phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PSDs) play a central role in the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine in numerous species of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PSDs are unusual decarboxylase containing a pyruvoyl prosthetic group within the active site. The covalently attached pyruvoyl moiety is formed in a concerted reaction when the PSD proenzyme undergoes an endoproteolytic cleavage into a large β-subunit, and a smaller α-subunit, which harbors the prosthetic group at its N terminus. The mechanism of PSD proenzyme cleavage has long been unclear. Using a coupled in vitro transcription/translation system with the soluble Plasmodium knowlesi enzyme (PkPSD), we demonstrate that the post-translational processing is inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. Comparison of PSD sequences across multiple phyla reveals a uniquely conserved aspartic acid within an FFXRX6RX12PXD motif, two uniquely conserved histidine residues within a PXXYHXXHXP motif, and a uniquely conserved serine residue within a GS(S/T) motif, suggesting that PSDs belong to the D-H-S serine protease family. The function of the conserved D-H-S residues was probed using site-directed mutagenesis of PkPSD. The results from these mutagenesis experiments reveal that Asp-139, His-198, and Ser-308 are all essential for endoproteolytic processing of PkPSD, which occurs in cis. In addition, within the GS(S/T) motif found in all PSDs, the Gly-307 residue is also essential, but the Ser/Thr-309 is non-essential. These results define the mechanism whereby PSDs begin their biochemical existence as proteases that execute one autoendoproteolytic cleavage reaction to give rise to a mature PSD harboring a pyruvoyl prosthetic group. PMID:25724650

  1. Interactome map uncovers phosphatidylserine transport by oxysterol-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kenji; Anand, Kanchan; Chiapparino, Antonella; Kumar, Arun; Poletto, Mattia; Kaksonen, Marko; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2013-09-12

    The internal organization of eukaryotic cells into functionally specialized, membrane-delimited organelles of unique composition implies a need for active, regulated lipid transport. Phosphatidylserine (PS), for example, is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and then preferentially associates--through mechanisms not fully elucidated--with the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Lipids can travel via transport vesicles. Alternatively, several protein families known as lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) can extract a variety of specific lipids from biological membranes and transport them, within a hydrophobic pocket, through aqueous phases. Here we report the development of an integrated approach that combines protein fractionation and lipidomics to characterize the LTP-lipid complexes formed in vivo. We applied the procedure to 13 LTPs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: the six Sec14 homology (Sfh) proteins and the seven oxysterol-binding homology (Osh) proteins. We found that Osh6 and Osh7 have an unexpected specificity for PS. In vivo, they participate in PS homeostasis and the transport of this lipid to the plasma membrane. The structure of Osh6 bound to PS reveals unique features that are conserved among other metazoan oxysterol-binding proteins (OSBPs) and are required for PS recognition. Our findings represent the first direct evidence, to our knowledge, for the non-vesicular transfer of PS from its site of biosynthesis (the endoplasmic reticulum) to its site of biological activity (the plasma membrane). We describe a new subfamily of OSBPs, including human ORP5 and ORP10, that transfer PS and propose new mechanisms of action for a protein family that is involved in several human pathologies such as cancer, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23934110

  2. Characterization of osseointegrative phosphatidylserine and cholesterol orthopaedic implant coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, William Paul, III

    Total joint arthroplasties are one of the most successful surgeries available today for improving patients' quality of life. Increasing demand is driven largely by an ageing population and an increased occurrence of obesity. Current patient options have significant shortcomings. Nearly a third of patients require a revision surgery before the implant is 15 years old, and those who have revision surgeries are at an increased risk of requiring additional reoperations. A recent implant technology that has shown to be effective at improving bone to implant integration is the use of phosphatidylserine (DOPS) coatings. These coatings are challenging to analyze and measure due to their highly dynamic, soft, rough, thick, and optically diffractive properties. Previous work had difficulty investigating pertinent parameters for these coating's development due in large part to a lack of available analytical techniques and a dearth of understanding of the micro- and nano-structural configuration of the coatings. This work addresses the lack of techniques available for use with DOPS coatings through the development of original methods of measurement, including the use of scanning white light interferometry and nanoindentation. These techniques were then applied for the characterization of DOPS coatings and the study of effects from several factors: 1. influence of adding calcium and cholesterol to the coatings, 2. effects of composition and roughness on aqueous contact angles, and 3. impact of ageing and storage environment on the coatings. Using these newly developed, highly repeatable quantitative analysis methods, this study sheds light on the microstructural configuration of the DOPS coatings and elucidates previously unexplained phenomena of the coatings. Cholesterol was found to supersaturate in the coatings at high concentration and phase separate into an anhydrous crystalline form, while lower concentrations were found to significantly harden the coatings. Morphological

  3. Chronic cocaine exposure in adolescence: Effects on spatial discrimination reversal, delay discounting, and performance on fixed-ratio schedules in mice.

    PubMed

    Pope, Derek A; Boomhower, Steven R; Hutsell, Blake A; Teixeira, Kathryn M; Newland, M Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Adolescence is marked by the continued development of the neural pathways that support choice and decision-making, particularly those involving dopamine signaling. Cocaine exposure during adolescence may interfere with this development and manifest as increased perseveration and delay discounting in adulthood, behavioral processes that are related to drug addiction. Adolescent mice were exposed to 30mg/kg/day of cocaine (n=11) or saline vehicle (n=10) for 14days and behavior was assessed in adulthood. In Experiment 1, performance on a spatial-discrimination-reversal procedure was evaluated. In the first two sessions following the first reversal, cocaine-exposed mice produced more preservative errors relative to controls. In Experiment 2, cocaine-exposed mice displayed steeper delay discounting than saline-exposed mice, effects that were reversed by acute cocaine administration. Experiment 3 examined responding maintained by a range of fixed-ratio schedules of reinforcement. An analysis based on a theoretical framework called Mathematical Principles of Reinforcement (MPR) was applied to response-rate functions of individual mice. According to MPR, differences in response-rate functions in adulthood were due to a steepening of the delay-of-reinforcement gradient, disrupted motoric capacity (lower maximum response rates), and enhanced reinforcer efficacy for the adolescent cocaine- compared with saline-exposed mice. Overall, these experiments suggest that chronic exposure to cocaine during adolescence may impair different features of 'executive functions' in adulthood, and these may be related to distortions in the impact of reinforcing events. PMID:26868477

  4. Long term exposure to combination paradigm of environmental enrichment, physical exercise and diet reverses the spatial memory deficits and restores hippocampal neurogenesis in ventral subicular lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Kapgal, Vijayakumar; Prem, Neethi; Hegde, Preethi; Laxmi, T R; Kutty, Bindu M

    2016-04-01

    Subiculum is an important structure of the hippocampal formation and plays an imperative role in spatial learning and memory functions. We have demonstrated earlier the cognitive impairment following bilateral ventral subicular lesion (VSL) in rats. We found that short term exposure to enriched environment (EE) did not help to reverse the spatial memory deficits in water maze task suggesting the need for an appropriate enriched paradigm towards the recovery of spatial memory. In the present study, the efficacy of long term exposure of VSL rats to combination paradigm of environmental enrichment (EE), physical exercise and 18 C.W. diet (Combination Therapy - CT) in reversing the spatial memory deficits in Morris water maze task has been studied. Ibotenate lesioning of ventral subiculum produced significant impairment of performance in the Morris water maze and reduced the hippocampal neurogenesis in rats. Post lesion exposure to C.T. restored the hippocampal neurogenesis and improved the spatial memory functions in VSL rats. Our study supports the hypothesis that the combination paradigm is critical towards the development of an enhanced behavioral and cognitive experience especially in conditions of CNS insults and the associated cognitive dysfunctions. PMID:26851129

  5. Repeated nitrous oxide exposure in rats causes a thermoregulatory sign-reversal with concurrent activation of opposing thermoregulatory effectors

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Douglas S.; Woods, Stephen C.; Kaiyala, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    Initial administration of 60% nitrous oxide (N2O) to rats at an ambient temperature of 21°C decreases core temperature (Tc), primarily via increased heat loss (HL). Over repeated N2O administrations, rats first develop tolerance to this hypothermia and subsequently exhibit hyperthermia (a sign-reversal) due primarily to progressive increases in heat production (HP). When rats initially receive 60% N2O in a thermal gradient, they become hypothermic while selecting cooler ambient temperatures that facilitate HL. This study investigated whether rats repeatedly administered 60% N2O in a thermal gradient would use the gradient to behaviorally facilitate, or oppose, the development of chronic tolerance and a hyperthermic sign-reversal. Male Long-Evans rats (N=16) received twelve 3-h administrations of 60% N2O in a gas-tight, live-in thermal gradient. Hypothermia (Sessions 1-3), complete chronic tolerance (Sessions 4-6), and a subsequent transient hyperthermic sign-reversal (Sessions 7-12) sequentially developed. Despite the progressive recovery and eventual hyperthermic sign-reversal of Tc, rats consistently selected cooler ambient temperatures during all N2O administrations. A final 60% N2O administration in a total calorimeter indicated that the hyperthermic sign-reversal resulted primarily from increased HP. Thus, rats did not facilitate chronic tolerance development by moving to warmer locations in the gradient, and instead selected cooler ambient temperatures while simultaneously increasing autonomic HP. The inefficient concurrent activation of opposing effectors and the development of a sign-reversal are incompatible with homeostatic models of drug-adaptation and may be better interpreted using a model of drug-induced allostasis. PMID:25938127

  6. Identification of phosphatidylserine as a ligand for the CD300a immunoreceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahashi-Oda, Chigusa; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Honda, Shin-ichiro; Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 ; Shibuya, Kazuko; Shibuya, Akira; Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD300a is a new phosphatidylserine receptor expressed on myeloid cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphatidylserine delivers a signal for recruitment of SHP-1 by CD300a in mast cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CD300a/phosphatidylserine interaction is blocked by MFG-E8 or anti-CD300a antibody. -- Abstract: CD300a is a member of CD300 family molecules consisting of seven genes on human chromosome 17 and nine genes in mouse chromosome 11. CD300a has a long cytoplasmic region containing the consensus immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) sequence. Upon crosslinking with antibodies against CD300a, CD300a mediates an inhibitory signal in myeloid cells. However, the ligand for CD300a has not been identified and the physiological role of CD300a remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the chimeric fusion protein of CD300a extracellular domain with the Fc portion of human IgG specifically bound phosphatidylserine (PS), which is exposed on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of apoptotic cells. PS binding to CD300a induced SHP-1 recruitment by CD300a in mast cells in response to LPS. These results indicated that CD300a is a new PS receptor.

  7. Inflammation and pathological damage to the lungs of mice are only partially reversed following smoking cessation on subacute exposure to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    YAN, HENGYI; ZHAO, LI; WU, XIAOJIE; LIU, HONGBO; WU, CEN; LI, YU; ZHENG, WEI; JIANG, HONGFANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to observe the level of inflammation and the number of lesions in the airways and parenchyma of mouse lungs subsequent to smoking cessation following 4 weeks exposure to cigarette smoke. Enlargement of the regional airspaces, deposition of peribronchial collagen fibers and macrophage infiltration were assessed. In addition, the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were detected in the airways and lung parenchyma of C57BL/6 J mice. Mice, which were exposed to filtered air for 4 weeks or cigarette smoke for 8 weeks were used as control groups. A 4 week duration of smoke exposure induced the expansion of alveolar spaces ~100 μm from the terminal bronchioles, but without increased deposition of collagen around the small airways, which was not reversed following smoking cessation. Pulmonary infiltration of macrophages and the protein expression levels of MMP-12 and TGF-β1 increased in the airways following 4 weeks smoke exposure, however, there was no further increase at 8 weeks, and the expression levels of TGF-β1 in the lung parenchyma decreased. At 4 weeks post-smoking cessation, the expression levels of TGF-β1 in the airways and lung parenchyma returned to normal; whereas, 1 week after smoking cessation, the expression levels of MMP-12 were higher compared with the normal control group. Subacute exposure to cigarette smoke induced an inflammatory response and regional damage to the lung parenchyma, prior to deposition of collagen around the airways. Following smoking cessation, the pulmonary inflammatory reaction was partially reversed, however, macrophage infiltration and the expression levels of MMP-12 remained significantly higher compared with the control mice. These results suggested that regulation of the expression of MMP-12 and TGF-β1, particularly in the distribution in the airways and lung parenchyma, may be a strategy for the early treatment of chronic obstructive

  8. Exposure to Hypoxia at High Altitude (5380 m) for 1 Year Induces Reversible Effects on Semen Quality and Serum Reproductive Hormone Levels in Young Male Adults.

    PubMed

    He, Jiang; Cui, Jianhua; Wang, Rui; Gao, Liang; Gao, Xiaokang; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Qiong; Cao, Jinjun; Yu, Wuzhong

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of hypoxia at high altitude on the semen quality and the serum reproductive hormone levels in male adults. A total of 52 male soldiers were enrolled in this cohort study. They were exposed to hypoxia at high altitude (5380 m) for 12 months when undergoing a service. After exposure, they were followed up for 6 months. The samples of semen and peripheral blood were collected at 1 month before exposure (M0), 6 months of exposure (M6), 12 months of exposure (M12), and 6 months after exposure (M18). The semen quality was assessed with computer-assisted analysis system, and the serum levels of reproductive hormones, including prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and testosterone were analyzed by ELISA. Compared with those at M0, total sperm count, sperm density, motility, survival rate, and serum levels of LH, PRL and testosterone were significantly decreased, whereas the liquefaction time was significantly prolonged and serum FSH level was significantly increased at M6 (p<0.05). At M12, total sperm count and sperm density increased, whereas sperm motility, survival rate, and the liquefaction time further decreased. Sperm velocities, progression ratios, and lateral head displacements were also decreased. Serum FSH level decreased while serum LH, PRL, and testosterone levels increased. Compared with those at M6, the changes in these detected parameters of semen and hormone at M12 were significant (p<0.05). At M18, all these detected parameters except testosterone level returned to levels comparable to those before exposure. In conclusion, hypoxia at high altitude causes adverse effects on semen quality and reproductive hormones, and these effects are reversible. PMID:26288097

  9. Developmental exposure of aflatoxin B1 reversibly affects hippocampal neurogenesis targeting late-stage neural progenitor cells through suppression of cholinergic signaling in rats.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Mizukami, Sayaka; Hasegawa-Baba, Yasuko; Onda, Nobuhiko; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    To elucidate the maternal exposure effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and its metabolite aflatoxin M1, which is transferred into milk, on postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were provided a diet containing AFB1 at 0, 0.1, 0.3, or 1.0 ppm from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery on weaning. Offspring were maintained through postnatal day (PND) 77 without AFB1 exposure. Following exposure to 1.0 ppm AFB1, offspring showed no apparent systemic toxicity at weaning, whereas dams showed increased liver weight and DNA repair gene upregulation in the liver. In the hippocampal dentate gyrus of male PND 21 offspring, the number of doublecortin(+) progenitor cells were decreased, which was associated with decreased proliferative cell population in the subgranular zone at ≥ 0.3 ppm, although T-box brain 2(+) cells, tubulin beta III(+) cells, gamma-H2A histone family, member X(+) cells, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A(+) cells did not fluctuate in number. AFB1 exposure examined at 1.0 ppm also resulted in transcript downregulation of the cholinergic receptor subunit Chrna7 and dopaminergic receptor Drd2 in the dentate gyrus, although there was no change in transcript levels of DNA repair genes. In the hippocampal dentate hilus, interneurons expressing CHRNA7 or phosphorylated tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TRKB) decreased at ≥ 0.3 ppm. On PND 77, there were no changes in neurogenesis-related parameters. These results suggested that maternal AFB1 exposure reversibly affects hippocampal neurogenesis targeting type-3 progenitor cells. This mechanism likely involves suppression of cholinergic signals on hilar GABAergic interneurons and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-TRKB signaling from granule cells. The no-observed-adverse-effect level for offspring neurogenesis was determined to be 0.1 ppm (7.1-13.6 mg/kg body weight/day). PMID:26260870

  10. A lysine-rich motif in the phosphatidylserine receptor PSR-1 mediates recognition and removal of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hengwen; Chen, Yu-Zen; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhao, Xiang; Godfroy, James I.; Liang, Qian; Zhang, Man; Zhang, Tianying; Yuan, Quan; Royal, Mary Ann; Driscoll, Monica; Xia, Ning-Shao; Yin, Hang; Xue, Ding

    2014-01-01

    The conserved phosphatidylserine receptor (PSR) was first identified as a receptor for phosphatidylserine, an "eat-me" signal exposed by apoptotic cells. However, several studies suggest that PSR may also act as an arginine demethylase, a lysyl hydroxylase, or an RNA binding protein through its N-terminal JmjC domain. How PSR might execute drastically different biochemical activities, and whether they are physiologically significant, remain unclear. Here we report that a lysine-rich motif in the extracellular domain of PSR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans PSR, mediates specific phosphatidylserine binding in vitro and clearance of apoptotic cells in vivo. This motif also mediates phosphatidylserine-induced oligomerization of PSR-1, suggesting a mechanism by which PSR-1 activates phagocytosis. Mutations in the phosphatidylserine-binding motif, but not in its Fe(II) binding site critical for the JmjC activity, abolish PSR-1 phagocytic function. Moreover, PSR-1 enriches and clusters around apoptotic cells during apoptosis. These results establish that PSR-1 is a conserved, phosphatidylserine-recognizing phagocyte receptor. PMID:25564762

  11. The Interaction of Melittin with Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine-Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylserine Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2016-08-13

    We report that membrane-active peptides (MAPs), which interact directly with the lipid bilayer of a cell and include toxins and host defense peptides, display lipid composition-dependent activity. Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids are anionic lipids that are found throughout the cellular membranes of most eukaryotic organisms where they serve as both a functional component and as a precursor to phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. The inner leaflet of the plasma membrane contains more PS than the outer one, and the asymmetry is actively maintained. Here, the impact of the MAP melittin on the structure of lipid bilayer vesicles made of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine andmore » phosphatidylserine was studied. Small-angle neutron scattering of the MAP associated with selectively deuterium-labeled lipid bilayer vesicles revealed how the thickness and lipid composition of phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles change in response to melittin. The peptide thickens the lipid bilayer for concentrations up to P/L = 1/500, but membrane thinning results when P/L = 1/200. The thickness transition is accompanied by a large change in the distribution of DMPS between the leaflets of the bilayer. The change in composition is driven by electrostatic interactions, while the change in bilayer thickness is driven by changes in the interaction of the peptide with the headgroup region of the lipid bilayer. Lastly, the results provide new information about lipid-specific interactions that take place in mixed composition lipid bilayer membranes.« less

  12. Proteinase 3 Is a Phosphatidylserine-binding Protein That Affects the Production and Function of Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katherine R; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Yin, Min; Pederzoli-Ribeil, Magali; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Ceroi, Adam; Grauffel, Cédric; Benhamou, Marc; Reuter, Nathalie; Saas, Philippe; Frachet, Philippe; Boulanger, Chantal M; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-05-13

    Proteinase 3 (PR3), the autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is expressed at the plasma membrane of resting neutrophils, and this membrane expression increases during both activation and apoptosis. Using surface plasmon resonance and protein-lipid overlay assays, this study demonstrates that PR3 is a phosphatidylserine-binding protein and this interaction is dependent on the hydrophobic patch responsible for membrane anchorage. Molecular simulations suggest that PR3 interacts with phosphatidylserine via a small number of amino acids, which engage in long lasting interactions with the lipid heads. As phosphatidylserine is a major component of microvesicles (MVs), this study also examined the consequences of this interaction on MV production and function. PR3-expressing cells produced significantly fewer MVs during both activation and apoptosis, and this reduction was dependent on the ability of PR3 to associate with the membrane as mutating the hydrophobic patch restored MV production. Functionally, activation-evoked MVs from PR3-expressing cells induced a significantly larger respiratory burst in human neutrophils compared with control MVs. Conversely, MVs generated during apoptosis inhibited the basal respiratory burst in human neutrophils, and those generated from PR3-expressing cells hampered this inhibition. Given that membrane expression of PR3 is increased in patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, MVs generated from neutrophils expressing membrane PR3 may potentiate oxidative damage of endothelial cells and promote the systemic inflammation observed in this disease. PMID:26961880

  13. A method for assessment of the genotoxicity of mainstream cigarette-smoke by use of the bacterial reverse-mutation assay and an aerosol-based exposure system.

    PubMed

    Kilford, Joanne; Thorne, David; Payne, Rebecca; Dalrymple, Annette; Clements, Julie; Meredith, Clive; Dillon, Debbie

    2014-07-15

    To date there are no widely accepted methods for the toxicological testing of complex gaseous mixtures and aerosols, such as cigarette smoke, although some modifications to the standard regulatory methods have been developed and used. Historically, routine testing of cigarettes has primarily focused on the particulate fraction of cigarette smoke. However, this fraction may not accurately reflect the full toxicity and mutagenicity of the smoke aerosol as a whole, which contains semi-volatiles and short-lived products of combustion. In this study we have used a modified version of the bacterial reverse-mutation (Ames) assay for the testing of mainstream smoke generated from 3R4F reference cigarettes with a Vitrocell(®) VC 10 exposure system. This method has been evaluated in four strains of Salmonella typhimurium (TA98, TA100, YG1024 and YG1042) and one strain of Escherichia coli (WP2 uvrA pKM101) in the absence and presence of a metabolic activation system. Following exposure at four concentrations of diluted mainstream cigarette-smoke, concentration-related and reproducible increases in the number of revertants were observed in all four Salmonella strains. E. coli strain WP2 uvrA pKM101 was unresponsive at the four concentrations tested. To quantify the exposure dose and to enable biological response to be plotted as a function of deposited mass, quartz-crystal microbalances were included in situ in the smoke-exposure set-up. This methodology was further assessed by comparing the responses of strain YG1042 to mainstream cigarette-smoke on a second VC 10 Smoking Robot. In summary, the Ames assay can be successfully modified to assess the toxicological impact of mainstream cigarette-smoke. PMID:25344108

  14. Proteomic analysis reveals that treatment with tocotrienols reverses the effect of H₂O₂ exposure on peroxiredoxin expression in human lymphocytes from young and old individuals.

    PubMed

    Dahlan, Hasnizawati Mohamed; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Rahman, Mariati Abdul; Hamid, Noor Aini Abdul; Top, A Gapor Mat; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2012-07-01

    Vitamin E has been suggested to modulate age-associated changes by altering the redox balance resulting in altered gene and/or protein expression. Here we have utilized proteomics to determine whether such regulation in protein expression occurs in human lymphocytes from two different age groups stressed with H₂O₂ and then treated with vitamin E in the form of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF). In this study, lymphocytes obtained from young (30-49 years old) and old (>50 years old) volunteers were first challenged with 1 mM H₂O₂. They were then treated by exposure to 50, 100 and 200 μg/ml TRF. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight) tandem mass spectrometry was then performed on whole-cell protein extracts to identify proteins that have changed in expression. A total of 24 proteins were found to be affected by H₂O₂ and/or TRF treatment. These included proteins that were related to metabolism, antioxidants, structural proteins, protein degradation and signal transduction. Of particular interest was the regulation of a number of proteins involved in stress response--peroxiredoxin-2, peroxiredoxin-3 and peroxiredoxin-6-all of which were shown to be down-regulated with H₂O₂ exposure. The effect was reversed following TRF treatment. The expression of peroxiredoxin-2 and peroxiredoxin-6 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that TRF directly influenced the expression dynamics of the peroxiredoxin-2, thus improving the cells ability to resist damage caused by oxidative stress. PMID:21840697

  15. Live imaging of mitochondrial dynamics in CNS dopaminergic neurons in vivo demonstrates early reversal of mitochondrial transport following MPP(+) exposure.

    PubMed

    Dukes, April A; Bai, Qing; Van Laar, Victor S; Zhou, Yangzhong; Ilin, Vladimir; David, Christopher N; Agim, Zeynep S; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Cannon, Jason R; Watkins, Simon C; Croix, Claudette M St; Burton, Edward A; Berman, Sarah B

    2016-11-01

    Extensive convergent evidence collectively suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, changes in the dynamic properties of mitochondria have been increasingly implicated as a key proximate mechanism underlying neurodegeneration. However, studies have been limited by the lack of a model in which mitochondria can be imaged directly and dynamically in dopaminergic neurons of the intact vertebrate CNS. We generated transgenic zebrafish in which mitochondria of dopaminergic neurons are labeled with a fluorescent reporter, and optimized methods allowing direct intravital imaging of CNS dopaminergic axons and measurement of mitochondrial transport in vivo. The proportion of mitochondria undergoing axonal transport in dopaminergic neurons decreased overall during development between 2days post-fertilization (dpf) and 5dpf, at which point the major period of growth and synaptogenesis of the relevant axonal projections is complete. Exposure to 0.5-1.0mM MPP(+) between 4 and 5dpf did not compromise zebrafish viability or cause detectable changes in the number or morphology of dopaminergic neurons, motor function or monoaminergic neurochemistry. However, 0.5mM MPP(+) caused a 300% increase in retrograde mitochondrial transport and a 30% decrease in anterograde transport. In contrast, exposure to higher concentrations of MPP(+) caused an overall reduction in mitochondrial transport. This is the first time mitochondrial transport has been observed directly in CNS dopaminergic neurons of a living vertebrate and quantified in a PD model in vivo. Our findings are compatible with a model in which damage at presynaptic dopaminergic terminals causes an early compensatory increase in retrograde transport of compromised mitochondria for degradation in the cell body. These data are important because manipulation of early pathogenic mechanisms might be a valid therapeutic approach to PD. The novel transgenic lines and

  16. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLA-DR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Shelly R; Gunn, G Gibson; Mueller, Francis W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. CASE REPORT A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient's water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient's symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. CONCLUSIONS This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and may represent a treatable underlying disease etiology in a subset of genetically susceptible patients with RUC, CFS, and other immune disorders. PMID:27165859

  17. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLADR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Gibson Gunn, G.; Mueller, Francis W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Ulcerative colitis and chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms: Colitis • profound fatigue • multi-joint pain • cognitive impairment • corneal keratitis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: VIP replacement therapy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. Case Report: A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient’s water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient’s symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. Conclusions: This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and

  18. An extensive cocktail approach for rapid risk assessment of in vitro CYP450 direct reversible inhibition by xenobiotic exposure.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, Dany; Daali, Youssef; Rudaz, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Acute exposure to environmental factors strongly affects the metabolic activity of cytochrome P450 (P450). As a consequence, the risk of interaction could be increased, modifying the clinical outcomes of a medication. Because toxic agents cannot be administered to humans for ethical reasons, in vitro approaches are therefore essential to evaluate their impact on P450 activities. In this work, an extensive cocktail mixture was developed and validated for in vitro P450 inhibition studies using human liver microsomes (HLM). The cocktail comprised eleven P450-specific probe substrates to simultaneously assess the activities of the following isoforms: 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2J2 and subfamily 3A. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the developed UHPLC-MS/MS method were critical for the success of this methodology, whose main advantages are: (i) the use of eleven probe substrates with minimized interactions, (ii) a low HLM concentration, (iii) fast incubation (5min) and (iv) the use of metabolic ratios as microsomal P450 activities markers. This cocktail approach was successfully validated by comparing the obtained IC50 values for model inhibitors with those generated with the conventional single probe methods. Accordingly, reliable inhibition values could be generated 10-fold faster using a 10-fold smaller amount of HLM compared to individual assays. This approach was applied to assess the P450 inhibition potential of widespread insecticides, namely, chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion, methylparathion and profenofos. In all cases, P450 2B6 was the most affected with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. For the first time, mixtures of these four insecticides incubated at low concentrations showed a cumulative inhibitory in vitro effect on P450 2B6. PMID:27105555

  19. Contributions of phosphatidylserine-positive platelets and leukocytes and microparticles to hypercoagulable state in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfa; Ma, Ruishuang; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Muhua; Zhao, Liangliang; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Shi, Jialan; Zou, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    Hypercoagulability in gastric cancer is a common complication and a major contributor to poor prognosis. This study aimed to determine procoagulant activity of blood cells and microparticles (MPs) in gastric cancer patients. Phosphatidylserine-positive blood cells and MPs, and their procoagulant properties in particular, were assessed in 48 gastric cancer patients and 35 healthy controls. Phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in patients with tumor-node-metastasis stage III/IV gastric cancer were significantly higher than those in stage I/II patients or healthy controls. Moreover, procoagulant activity of platelets, leukocytes, and MPs in stage III/IV patients was significantly increased compared to the controls, as indicated by shorter clotting time, higher intrinsic and extrinsic factor tenase, and prothrombinase complex activity. Interestingly, lactadherin, which competes with factors V and VIII to bind phosphatidylserine, dramatically prolonged clotting time of the cells and MPs by inhibiting factor tenase and prothrombinase complex activity. Although anti-tissue factor antibody significantly attenuated extrinsic tenase complex activity of leukocytes and MPs, it only slightly prolonged clotting times. Meanwhile, treatment with radical resection reduced phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs, and prolonged the clotting times of the remaining cells and MPs. Our results suggest that phosphatidylserine-positive platelets, leukocytes, and MPs contribute to hypercoagulability and represent a potential therapeutic target to prevent coagulation in patients with stage III/IV gastric cancer. PMID:26700666

  20. Amelioration of scopolamine-induced amnesia by phosphatidylserine and curcumin in the day-old chick.

    PubMed

    Barber, Teresa A; Edris, Edward M; Levinsky, Paul J; Williams, Justin M; Brouwer, Ari R; Gessay, Shawn A

    2016-09-01

    In the one-trial taste-avoidance task in day-old chicks, acetylcholine receptor activation has been shown to be important for memory formation. Injection of scopolamine produces amnesia, which appears to be very similar in type to that of Alzheimer's disease, which is correlated with low levels of acetylcholine in the brain. Traditional pharmacological treatments of Alzheimer's disease, such as cholinesterase inhibitors and glutamate receptor blockers, improve memory and delay the onset of impairments in memory compared with placebo controls. These agents also ameliorate scopolamine-induced amnesia in the day-old chick trained on the one-trial taste-avoidance task. The present experiments examined the ability of two less traditional treatments for Alzheimer's disease, phosphatidylserine and curcumin, to ameliorate scopolamine-induced amnesia in day-old chicks. The results showed that 37.9 mmol/l phosphatidylserine and 2.7 mmol/l curcumin significantly improved retention in chicks administered scopolamine, whereas lower doses were not effective. Scopolamine did not produce state-dependent learning, indicating that this paradigm in day-old chicks might be a useful one to study the effects of possible Alzheimer's treatments. In addition, chicks administered curcumin or phosphatidylserine showed little avoidance of a bead associated with water reward, indicating that these drugs did not produce response inhibition. The current results extend the findings that some nontraditional memory enhancers can ameliorate memory impairment and support the hypothesis that these treatments might be of benefit in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27388114

  1. Splenic gene delivery system using self-assembling nano-complex with phosphatidylserine analog.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Nakasone, Chihiro; Kodama, Yukinobu; Egashira, Kanoko; Harasawa, Hitomi; Muro, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Hiroo; Kitahara, Takashi; Higuchi, Norihide; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Sasaki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of phosphatidylserine on the erythrocyte membrane mediates erythrophagocytosis by resident spleen macrophages. The application of phosphatidylserine to a gene vector may be a novel approach for splenic drug delivery. Therefore, we chose 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serin (DOPS) as an analogue of phosphatidylserine for splenic gene delivery of plasmid DNA (pDNA). In the present study, we successfully prepared a stable pDNA ternary complex using DOPS and polyethyleneimine (PEI) and evaluated its efficacy and safety. The pDNA/PEI complex had a positive charge and showed high transgene efficacy, although it caused cytotoxicity and agglutination. The addition of DOPS changed the ζ-potential of the pDNA/PEI complex to negative. It is known that anionic complexes are not taken up well by cells. Surprisingly, however, the pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex showed relatively high transgene efficacy in vitro. Fluorescence microscope observation revealed that the pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex internalized the cells while maintaining the complex formation. The injection of the pDNA/PEI complex killed most mice within 24 h at high doses, although all mice in the pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex group survived. The ternary complex with DOPS showed markedly better safety compared with the pDNA/PEI complex. The pDNA/PEI/DOPS complex showed high gene expression selectively in the spleen after intravenous injection into mice. Thus the ternary complex with DOPS can be used to deliver pDNA to the spleen, in which immune cells are abundant. It appears to have an excellent safety level, although further study to determine the mechanism of action is necessary. PMID:25744454

  2. The nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate crystals at protein and phosphatidylserine liposome surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nancollas, G H; Tsortos, A; Zieba, A

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of calcium phosphate crystal growth at the surfaces of proteins and phospholipids has been investigated using free drift and constant composition methods in supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions (relative supersaturations: with respect to hydroxyapatite, HAP, sigma HAP = 15.0, and with respect to octacalcium phosphate, OCP, sigma OCP = 1.9). Fibrinogen and collagen molecules adsorbed at hydrophobic surfaces as well as uncross-linked collagen fibrils induce ion binding and subsequent nucleation of calcium phosphate. The formation of OCP on phosphatidylserine vesicles introduced to highly supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions probably involves the interaction of the calcium ions with the ionized carboxylic groups of the phospholipid. PMID:9813627

  3. Developmental exposure to T-2 toxin reversibly affects postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis and reduces neural stem cells and progenitor cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Abe, Hajime; Kimura, Masayuki; Onda, Nobuhiko; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    To determine the developmental exposure effects of T-2 toxin on postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis, pregnant ICR mice were provided a diet containing T-2 toxin at 0, 1, 3, or 9 ppm from gestation day 6 to day 21 on weaning after delivery. Offspring were maintained through postnatal day (PND) 77 without T-2 toxin exposure. In the hippocampal dentate gyrus of male PND 21 offspring, GFAP(+) and BLBP(+) type-1 stem cells and PAX6(+) and TBR2(+) type-2 progenitor cells decreased in the subgranular zone (SGZ) at 9 and ≥3 ppm, respectively, in parallel with increased apoptosis at ≥3 ppm. In the dentate hilus, reelin(+) γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons increased at 9 ppm, suggesting reflection of neuronal mismigration. T-2 toxin decreased transcript levels of cholinergic and glutamate receptor subunits (Chrna4, Chrnb2 and Gria2) and glutamate transporter (Slc17a6) in the dentate gyrus, suggesting decreased cholinergic signals on hilar GABAergic interneurons innervating type-2 cells and decreased glutamatergic signals on type-1 and type-2 cells. T-2 toxin decreased SGZ cells expressing stem cell factor (SCF) and increased cells accumulating malondialdehydes. Neurogenesis-related changes disappeared on PND 77, suggesting that T-2 toxin reversibly affects neurogenesis by inducing apoptosis of type-1 and type-2 cells with different threshold levels. Decreased cholinergic and glutamatergic signals may decrease type-2 cells at ≥3 ppm. Additionally, decreased SCF/c-Kit interactions and increased oxidative stress may decrease type-1 and type-2 cells at 9 ppm. The no-observed-adverse-effect level for offspring neurogenesis was determined to be 1 ppm (0.14-0.49 mg/kg body weight/day). PMID:26314264

  4. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabbir A.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  5. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Shabbir A; Pendurthi, Usha R; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  6. Enhancement of cancer stem-like and epithelial−mesenchymal transdifferentiation property in oral epithelial cells with long-term nicotine exposure: Reversal by targeting SNAIL

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2013-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the major risk factors in the development and further progression of tumorigenesis, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Recent studies suggest that interplay cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and epithelial−mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) properties are responsible for the tumor maintenance and metastasis in OSCC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of long-term exposure with nicotine, a major component in cigarette, on CSCs and EMT characteristics. The possible reversal regulators were further explored in nicotine-induced CSCs and EMT properties in human oral epithelial (OE) cells. Long-term exposure with nicotine was demonstrated to up-regulate ALDH1 population in normal gingival and primary OSCC OE cells dose-dependently. Moreover, long-term nicotine treatment was found to enhance the self-renewal sphere-forming ability and stemness gene signatures expression and EMT regulators in OE cells. The migration/cell invasiveness/anchorage independent growth and in vivo tumor growth by nude mice xenotransplantation assay was enhanced in long-term nicotine-stimulated OE cells. Knockdown of Snail in long-term nicotine-treated OE cells was found to reduce their CSCs properties. Therapeutic delivery of Si-Snail significantly blocked the xenograft tumorigenesis of long-term nicotine-treated OSCC cells and largely significantly improved the recipient survival. The present study demonstrated that the enrichment of CSCs coupled EMT property in oral epithelial cells induced by nicotine is critical for the development of OSCC tumorigenesis. Targeting Snail might offer a new strategy for the treatment of OSCC patients with smoking habit. -- Highlights: ► Sustained nicotine treatment induced CSCs properties of oral epithelial cells. ► Long-term nicotine treatment enhance EMT properties of oral epithelial cells. ► Long-term nicotine exposure increased tumorigenicity of oral epithelial cells. ► Si

  7. Pharmacokinetics of the phosphatidylserine tracers 99mTc-lactadherin and 99mTc-annexin V in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylserine (PS) is a phospholipid normally located in the inner leaflet of the cell membrane. PS is translocated from the inner to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane during the early stages of apoptosis and in necrosis. In cell and animal studies, reversible PS externalisation to the outer membrane leaflet has been observed in viable cells. Hence, PS markers have been proposed as markers of both reversibly and irreversibly damaged cells. The purpose of this experimental study in pigs was to investigate the kinetics of the newly introduced PS marker technetium-99m-labelled lactadherin (99mTc-lactadherin) in comparison with the well-known PS tracer 99mTc-annexin V with special reference to the renal handling of the tracers. The effective dose for humans was estimated from the biodistribution in 24 mice. Methods Nine anaesthetised pigs randomly allocated into two treatment groups were administered a single injection of either 99mTc-lactadherin or 99mTc-annexin V. Renal perfusion was assessed by simultaneous injection of 51Cr-EDTA. Throughout the examinations, planar, dynamic scintigraphy of the trunk was performed, urine was collected and arterial and renal vein blood was sampled. The effective dose was estimated using the adult male phantom from the RADAR website. Results 99mTc-lactadherin was cleared four times faster from plasma than 99mTc-annexin V, 57 ± 13 ml/min (mean ± SD) versus 14 ± 2 ml/min. 99mTc-lactadherin had a predominant uptake in the liver, whereas 99mTc-annexin V was primarily taken up by the kidneys. The estimated effective human dose after single injection of 99mTc-lactadherin and 99mTc-annexin V was 5.8 and 11 μSv/MBq, respectively. Conclusions The high hepatic uptake of 99mTc-lactadherin compromises the use of 99mTc-lactadherin for imaging PS externalisation in the liver. Due to scatter from the liver, the use of in vivo visualisation of PS externalisation in the lower thorax and upper abdomen by 99m

  8. Phosphatidylserine Synthase Controls Cell Elongation Especially in the Uppermost Internode in Rice by Regulation of Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Cheng, Zhijun; Chen, Jun; Shen, Jinbo; Zhang, Baocai; Ren, Yulong; Ding, Yu; Zhou, Yihua; Zhang, Huan; Zhou, Kunneng; Wang, Jiu-Lin; Lei, Cailin; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Gao, He; Bao, Yiqun; Wan, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    The uppermost internode is one of the fastest elongating organs in rice, and is expected to require an adequate supply of cell-wall materials and enzymes to the cell surface to enhance mechanical strength. Although it has been reported that the phenotype of shortened uppermost internode 1 (sui1) is caused by mutations in PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE SYNTHASE (OsPSS), the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that the OsPSS-1, as a gene expressed predominantly in elongating cells, regulates post-Golgi vesicle secretion to intercellular spaces. Mutation of OsPSS-1 leads to compromised delivery of CESA4 and secGFP towards the cell surface, resulting in weakened intercellular adhesion and disorganized cell arrangement in parenchyma. The phenotype of sui1-4 is caused largely by the reduction in cellulose contents in the whole plant and detrimental delivery of pectins in the uppermost internode. We found that OsPSS-1 and its potential product PS (phosphatidylserine) localized to organelles associated with exocytosis. These results together suggest that OsPSS-1 plays a potential role in mediating cell expansion by regulating secretion of cell wall components. PMID:27055010

  9. Phosphatidylserine Synthase Controls Cell Elongation Especially in the Uppermost Internode in Rice by Regulation of Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jinbo; Zhang, Baocai; Ren, Yulong; Ding, Yu; Zhou, Yihua; Zhang, Huan; Zhou, Kunneng; Wang, Jiu-Lin; Lei, Cailin; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Gao, He; Bao, Yiqun; Wan, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    The uppermost internode is one of the fastest elongating organs in rice, and is expected to require an adequate supply of cell-wall materials and enzymes to the cell surface to enhance mechanical strength. Although it has been reported that the phenotype of shortened uppermost internode 1 (sui1) is caused by mutations in PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE SYNTHASE (OsPSS), the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that the OsPSS-1, as a gene expressed predominantly in elongating cells, regulates post-Golgi vesicle secretion to intercellular spaces. Mutation of OsPSS-1 leads to compromised delivery of CESA4 and secGFP towards the cell surface, resulting in weakened intercellular adhesion and disorganized cell arrangement in parenchyma. The phenotype of sui1-4 is caused largely by the reduction in cellulose contents in the whole plant and detrimental delivery of pectins in the uppermost internode. We found that OsPSS-1 and its potential product PS (phosphatidylserine) localized to organelles associated with exocytosis. These results together suggest that OsPSS-1 plays a potential role in mediating cell expansion by regulating secretion of cell wall components. PMID:27055010

  10. Complementary probes reveal that phosphatidylserine is required for the proper transbilayer distribution of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Masashi; Fairn, Gregory D

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component of metazoan cellular membranes and it helps to maintain the structural integrity and fluidity of the plasma membrane. Here, we developed a cholesterol biosensor, termed D4H, based on the fourth domain of Clostridium perfringens theta-toxin, which recognizes cholesterol in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane and organelles. The D4H probe disassociates from the plasma membrane upon cholesterol extraction and after perturbations in cellular cholesterol trafficking. When used in combination with a recombinant version of the biosensor, we show that plasmalemmal phosphatidylserine is essential for retaining cholesterol in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane. In vitro experiments reveal that 1-stearoy-2-oleoyl phosphatidylserine can induce phase separation in cholesterol-containing lipid bilayers and shield cholesterol from cholesterol oxidase. Finally, the altered transbilayer distribution of cholesterol causes flotillin-1 to relocalize to endocytic organelles. This probe should be useful in the future to study pools of cholesterol in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane and organelles. PMID:25663704

  11. Involvement of complex sphingolipids and phosphatidylserine in endosomal trafficking in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2012-12-01

    Sphingolipids play critical roles in many physiologically important events in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we found that csg2Δ mutant cells defective in the synthesis of mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide exhibited abnormal intracellular accumulation of an exocytic v-SNARE, Snc1, under phosphatidylserine synthase gene (PSS1)-repressive conditions, although in wild-type cells, Snc1 was known to cycle between plasma membranes and the late Golgi via post-Golgi endosomes. The mislocalized Snc1 was co-localized with an endocytic marker dye, FM4-64, upon labelling for a short time. The abnormal distribution of Snc1 was suppressed by deletion of GYP2 encoding a GTPase-activating protein that negatively regulates endosomal vesicular trafficking, or expression of GTP-restricted form of Ypt32 GTPase. Furthermore, an endocytosis-deficient mutant of Snc1 was localized to plasma membranes in PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells as well as wild-type cells. Thus, the PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells were indicated to be defective in the trafficking of Snc1 from post-Golgi endosomes to the late Golgi. In contrast, the vesicular trafficking pathways via pre-vacuolar endosomes in the PSS1-repressed csg2Δ mutant cells seemed to be normal. These results suggested that specific complex sphingolipids and phosphatidylserine are co-ordinately involved in specific vesicular trafficking pathway. PMID:23062277

  12. Characterization of Plasmodium phosphatidylserine decarboxylase expressed in yeast and application for inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Lawres, Lauren; Toh, Justin Y.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipid biosynthesis is critical for the development, differentiation and pathogenesis of several eukaryotic pathogens. Genetic studies have validated the pathway for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis from phosphatidylserine catalyzed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes (PSD) as a suitable target for development of antimicrobials; however no inhibitors of this class of enzymes have been discovered. We show that the Plasmodium falciparum PSD can restore the essential function of the yeast gene in strains requiring PSD for growth. Genetic, biochemical and metabolic analyses demonstrate that amino acids between positions 40 and 70 of the parasite enzyme are critical for proenzyme processing and decarboxylase activity. We used the essential role of Plasmodium PSD in yeast as a tool for screening a library of anti-malarials. One of these compounds is 7-chloro-N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-quinolinamine, an inhibitor with potent activity against P. falciparum, and low toxicity toward mammalian cells. We synthesized an analog of this compound and showed that it inhibits PfPSD activity and eliminates Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice. These results highlight the importance of 4-quinolinamines as a novel class of drugs targeting membrane biogenesis via inhibition of PSD activity PMID:26585333

  13. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Monticelli, Luca; Heberle, Frederick A; Kucerka, Norbert; Tieleman, D. Peter; Katsaras, John

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  14. Early apoptosis real-time detection by label-free SERS based on externalized phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibo; Wang, Qiqin; Yuan, Detian; Wang, Jinyong; Huang, Yang; Wu, Huihui; Jian, Jingyi; Yang, Danting; Huang, Ning; Haisch, Christoph; Jiang, Zhengjin; Chen, Shanze

    2016-07-21

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cellular process that plays an essential role in the development, aging, cancer biology, immune response, and pathogenesis of various diseases. Herein, we report a new SERS sensing strategy for in vitro sensitive detection of early apoptotic cells. The principle of this method is to in situ synthesize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the phosphatidylserine (PS) of the apoptotic cell membrane during the early apoptosis, which enables distinguishing normal and apoptotic cells. The total assay time of the presented method is only 10 min, thus being faster, cheaper and simpler than current techniques for the detection of apoptosis. The intrinsic mechanism was verified by different approaches based on externalized phosphatidylserine. In addition, the detection process is real-time and label-free; i.e., the intrinsic SERS spectra from the cellular membrane are directly employed for apoptosis real-time detection, which avoids using additional chemical or biological reagents as external signal indicators. Therefore, our SERS approach may serve as a potentially practical tool for sensitive and real-time detection of early cell apoptosis, complementing the state-of-the-art strategies, e.g. flow cytometry. While further investigation is required to better understand the intrinsic mechanism of the in situ coating method, the current results may provide another choice for real-time detection of early apoptosis. PMID:27181439

  15. In vivo detection and imaging of phosphatidylserine expression during programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Blankenberg, Francis G.; Katsikis, Peter D.; Tait, Jonathan F.; Davis, R. Eric; Naumovski, Louis; Ohtsuki, Katsuichi; Kopiwoda, Susan; Abrams, Michael J.; Darkes, Marilyn; Robbins, Robert C.; Maecker, Holden T.; Strauss, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    One of the earliest events in programmed cell death is the externalization of phosphatidylserine, a membrane phospholipid normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer. Annexin V, an endogenous human protein with a high affinity for membrane bound phosphatidylserine, can be used in vitro to detect apoptosis before other well described morphologic or nuclear changes associated with programmed cell death. We tested the ability of exogenously administered radiolabeled annexin V to concentrate at sites of apoptotic cell death in vivo. After derivatization with hydrazinonicotinamide, annexin V was radiolabeled with technetium 99m. In vivo localization of technetium 99m hydrazinonicotinamide-annexin V was tested in three models: fuminant hepatic apoptosis induced by anti-Fas antibody injection in BALB/c mice; acute rejection in ACI rats with transplanted heterotopic PVG cardiac allografts; and cyclophosphamide treatment of transplanted 38C13 murine B cell lymphomas. External radionuclide imaging showed a two- to sixfold increase in the uptake of radiolabeled annexin V at sites of apoptosis in all three models. Immunohistochemical staining of cardiac allografts for exogenously administered annexin V revealed intense staining of numerous myocytes at the periphery of mononuclear infiltrates of which only a few demonstrated positive apoptotic nuclei by the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling method. These results suggest that radiolabeled annexin V can be used in vivo as a noninvasive means to detect and serially image tissues and organs undergoing programmed cell death. PMID:9600968

  16. Oxidative lipidomics of γ-radiation-induced lung injury: mass spectrometric characterization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Tyurina, Yulia Y; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Kapralova, Valentyna I; Wasserloos, Karla; Mosher, Mackenzie; Epperly, Michael W; Greenberger, Joel S; Pitt, Bruce R; Kagan, Valerian E

    2011-05-01

    Oxidative damage plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of γ-radiation-induced lung injury. Endothelium is a preferred target for early radiation-induced damage and apoptosis. Given the newly discovered role of oxidized phospholipids in apoptotic signaling, we performed oxidative lipidomics analysis of phospholipids in irradiated mouse lungs and cultured mouse lung endothelial cells. C57BL/6NHsd female mice were subjected to total-body irradiation (10 Gy, 15 Gy) and euthanized 24 h thereafter. Mouse lung endothelial cells were analyzed 48 h after γ irradiation (15 Gy). We found that radiation-induced apoptosis in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by non-random oxidation of phospholipids. Cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine were the major oxidized phospholipids, while more abundant phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine) remained non-oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis revealed the formation of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine oxygenated molecular species in the irradiated lung and cells. Analysis of fatty acids after hydrolysis of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine by phospholipase A(2) revealed the presence of mono-hydroperoxy and/or mono-hydroxy/mono-epoxy, mono-hydroperoxy/mono-oxo molecular species of linoleic acid. We speculate that cyt c-driven oxidations of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine associated with the execution of apoptosis in pulmonary endothelial cells are important contributors to endothelium dysfunction in γ-radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:21338246

  17. Oxidative Lipidomics of γ-Radiation-Induced Lung Injury: Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Cardiolipin and Phosphatidylserine Peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralova, Valentyna I.; Wasserloos, Karla; Mosher, Mackenzie; Epperly, Michael W.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative damage plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of γ-radiation-induced lung injury. Endothelium is a preferred target for early radiation-induced damage and apoptosis. Given the newly discovered role of oxidized phospholipids in apoptotic signaling, we performed oxidative lipidomics analysis of phospholipids in irradiated mouse lungs and cultured mouse lung endothelial cells. C57BL/6NHsd female mice were subjected to total-body irradiation (10 Gy, 15 Gy) and euthanized 24 h thereafter. Mouse lung endothelial cells were analyzed 48 h after γ irradiation (15 Gy). We found that radiation-induced apoptosis in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by non-random oxidation of phospholipids. Cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine were the major oxidized phospholipids, while more abundant phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine) remained non-oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis revealed the formation of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine oxygenated molecular species in the irradiated lung and cells. Analysis of fatty acids after hydrolysis of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine by phospholipase A2 revealed the presence of mono-hydroperoxy and/or mono-hydroxy/mono-epoxy, mono-hydroperoxy/mono-oxo molecular species of linoleic acid. We speculate that cyt c-driven oxidations of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine associated with the execution of apoptosis in pulmonary endothelial cells are important contributors to endothelium dysfunction in γ-radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:21338246

  18. Structural and functional characterization of protein 4.1R-phosphatidylserine interaction: potential role in 4.1R sorting within cells.

    PubMed

    An, X L; Takakuwa, Y; Manno, S; Han, B G; Gascard, P; Mohandas, N

    2001-09-21

    Erythrocyte protein 4.1R is a multifunctional protein that binds to various membrane proteins and to phosphatidylserine. In the present study, we report two important observations concerning 4.1R-phosphatidylserine interaction. Biochemically, a major finding of the present study is that 4.1R binding to phosphatidylserine appears to be a two-step process in which 4.1R first interacts with serine head group of phosphatidylserine through the positively charged amino acids YKRS and subsequently forms a tight hydrophobic interaction with fatty acid moieties. 4.1R failed to dissociate from phosphatidylserine liposomes under high ionic strength but could be released specifically by phospholipase A(2) but not by phospholipase C or D. Biochemical analyses showed that acyl chains were associated with 4.1R released by phospholipase A(2). Importantly, the association of acyl chains with 4.1R impaired its ability to interact with calmodulin, band 3, and glycophorin C. Removal of acyl chains restored 4.1R binding. These data indicate that acyl chains of phosphatidylserine play an important role in its interaction with 4.1R and on 4.1R function. In terms of biological significance, we have obtained evidence that 4.1R-phosphatidylserine interaction may play an important role in cellular sorting of 4.1R. PMID:11423550

  19. Suppression of atopic dermatitis in mice model by reducing inflammation utilizing phosphatidylserine-coated biodegradable microparticles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Purnima; Hosain, Md Zahangir; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Takeo, Masafumi; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Controlling inflammatory response is important to avoid chronic inflammation in many diseases including atopic dermatitis (AD). In this research, we tried using a phosphatidylserine (PS)-coated microparticles in the AD mouse model for achieving the modulation of the macrophage phenotype to an anti-inflammatory state. Here, we prepared poly (D,L-lactic acid) microparticle coated with PS on the outside shell. We confirmed the cellular uptake of the PS-coated microparticle, which leads to the significant downregulation of the inflammatory cytokine production. In the mouse model of AD, the PS-coated microparticle was injected subcutaneously for a period of 12 days. The mice showed significant reduction in the development of AD symptoms comparing with the mice treated with the PC-coated microparticle. PMID:26414796

  20. Leishmania Promastigotes Lack Phosphatidylserine but Bind Annexin V upon Permeabilization or Miltefosine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Gonzaga dos Santos, Marcos; Schiller, Jürgen; Pomorski, Thomas Günther

    2012-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Leishmania is an intracellular pathogen infecting and replicating inside vertebrate host macrophages. A recent model suggests that promastigote and amastigote forms of the parasite mimic mammalian apoptotic cells by exposing phosphatidylserine (PS) at the cell surface to trigger their phagocytic uptake into host macrophages. PS presentation at the cell surface is typically analyzed using fluorescence-labeled annexin V. Here we show that Leishmania promastigotes can be stained by fluorescence-labeled annexin V upon permeabilization or miltefosine treatment. However, combined lipid analysis by thin-layer chromatography, mass spectrometry and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed that Leishmania promastigotes lack any detectable amount of PS. Instead, we identified several other phospholipid classes such phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylethanolamine; phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol as candidate lipids enabling annexin V staining. PMID:22870283

  1. The intrinsic pKa values for phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine in phosphatidylcholine host bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, F C; Ojcius, D M; Hubbell, W L

    1986-01-01

    Potentiometric titrations and surface potential measurements have been used to determine the intrinsic pKa values of both the carboxyl and amino groups of phosphatidylserine (PS) in mixed vesicles of PS and phosphatidylcholine (PC), and also of the amino group of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in mixed PE-PC vesicles. The pKa of the carboxyl group of PS in liposomes with different PS/PC lipid ratios measured by the two different methods is 3.6 +/- 0.1, and the pKa of its amino group is 9.8 +/- 0.1. The pKa of the amino group of PE in PE-PC vesicles, determined solely by surface potential measurements, is 9.6 +/- 0.1. These pKa values are independent of the aqueous phase ionic strength and of the effect of the liposome's surface potential due to the presence of these partially charged lipids. PMID:3955180

  2. The TAM family: phosphatidylserine sensing receptor tyrosine kinases gone awry in cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, Douglas K; DeRyckere, Deborah; Davies, Kurtis D; Earp, H Shelton

    2014-12-01

    The TYRO3, AXL (also known as UFO) and MERTK (TAM) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are aberrantly expressed in multiple haematological and epithelial malignancies. Rather than functioning as oncogenic drivers, their induction in tumour cells predominately promotes survival, chemoresistance and motility. The unique mode of maximal activation of this RTK family requires an extracellular lipid–protein complex. For example, the protein ligand, growth arrest-specific protein 6 (GAS6), binds to phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) that is externalized on apoptotic cell membranes, which activates MERTK on macrophages. This triggers engulfment of apoptotic material and subsequent anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization. In tumours, autocrine and paracrine ligands and apoptotic cells are abundant, which provide a survival signal to the tumour cell and favour an anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive microenvironment. Thus, TAM kinase inhibition could stimulate antitumour immunity, reduce tumour cell survival, enhance chemosensitivity and diminish metastatic potential. PMID:25568918

  3. The Prion Protein N1 and N2 Cleavage Fragments Bind to Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidic Acid; Relevance to Stress-Protection Responses

    PubMed Central

    Haigh, Cathryn L.; Tumpach, Carolin; Drew, Simon C.; Collins, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Internal cleavage of the cellular prion protein generates two well characterised N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2. These fragments have been shown to bind to anionic phospholipids at low pH. We sought to investigate binding with other lipid moieties and queried how such interactions could be relevant to the cellular functions of these fragments. Both N1 and N2 bound phosphatidylserine (PS), as previously reported, and a further interaction with phosphatidic acid (PA) was also identified. The specificity of this interaction required the N-terminus, especially the proline motif within the basic amino acids at the N-terminus, together with the copper-binding region (unrelated to copper saturation). Previously, the fragments have been shown to be protective against cellular stresses. In the current study, serum deprivation was used to induce changes in the cellular lipid environment, including externalisation of plasma membrane PS and increased cellular levels of PA. When copper-saturated, N2 could reverse these changes, but N1 could not, suggesting that direct binding of N2 to cellular lipids may be part of the mechanism by which this peptide signals its protective response. PMID:26252007

  4. Mercury-induced externalization of phosphatidylserine and caspase 3 activation in human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Dwayne J; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2006-03-01

    Apoptosis arises from the active initiation and propagation of a series of highly orchestrated specific biochemical events leading to the demise of the cell. It is a normal physiological process, which occurs during embryonic development as well as in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Diverse groups of molecules are involved in the apoptosis pathway and it functions as a mechanism to eliminate unwanted or irreparably damaged cells. However, inappropriate induction of apoptosis by environmental agents has broad ranging pathologic implications and has been associated with several diseases including cancer. The toxicity of several heavy metals such as mercury has been attributed to their high affinity to sulfhydryl groups of proteins and enzymes, and their ability to disrupt cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis in various tissues. The aim of this study was to assess the potential for mercury to induce early and late-stage apoptosis in human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The Annexin-V and Caspase 3 assays were performed by flow cytometric analysis to determine the extent of phosphatidylserine externalization and Caspase 3 activation in mercury-treated HepG2 cells. Cells were exposed to mercury for 10 and 48 hours respectively at doses of 0, 1, 2, and 3 microg/mL based on previous cytotoxicity results in our laboratory indicating an LD50 of 3.5 +/- 0.6 microg/mL for mercury in HepG2 cells. The study data indicated a dose response relationship between mercury exposure and the degree of early and late-stage apoptosis in HepG2 cells. The percentages of cells undergoing early apoptosis were 0.03 +/- 0.03%, 5.19 +/- 0.04%, 6.36 +/- 0.04%, and 8.84 +/- 0.02% for 0, 1, 2, and 3 microg/mL of mercury respectively, indicating a gradual increase in apoptotic cells with increasing doses of mercury. The percentages of Caspase 3 positive cells undergoing late apoptosis were 3.58 +/- 0.03%, 17.06 +/- 0.05%, 23.32 +/- 0.03%, and 34.51 +/- 0.01% for 0, 1, 2, and 3 microg/mL of

  5. Differentiation-dependent expression of phosphatidylserine in mammalian plasma membranes: quantitative assessment of outer-leaflet lipid by prothrombinase complex formation.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, J; Bucana, C; Fidler, I J; Schroit, A J

    1989-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is asymmetrically distributed in mammalian cell membranes, being preferentially localized in the inner leaflet. Some studies have suggested that a disturbance in the normal asymmetric distribution of PS--e.g., PS exposure in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, which can occur upon platelet activation as well as in certain pathologic red cells--serves as a potent procoagulant surface and as a signal for triggering their recognition by macrophages. These studies suggest that the regulation of PS distribution in cell membranes may be critical in controlling coagulation and in determining the survival of pathologic cells in the circulation. In this paper we describe a sensitive technique, based on PS-dependent prothrombinase complex activity, for assessing the amount of PS on the external leaflet of intact viable cells. Our results indicate that tumorigenic, undifferentiated murine erythroleukemic cells express 7- to 8-fold more PS in their outer leaflet than do their differentiated, nontumorigenic counterparts. Increased expression of PS in the tumorigenic cells directly correlated with their ability to be recognized and bound by macrophages. PMID:2717615

  6. The Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Receptor CD300a Binds Dengue Virus and Enhances Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carnec, Xavier; Meertens, Laurent; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Kitaura, Jiro; Ramdasi, Rasika; Schwartz, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) is the etiological agent of the major human arboviral disease. We previously demonstrated that the TIM and TAM families of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors involved in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells mediate DENV entry into target cells. We show here that human CD300a, a recently identified phospholipid receptor, also binds directly DENV particles and enhances viral entry. CD300a facilitates infection of the four DENV serotypes, as well as of other mosquito-borne viruses such as West Nile virus and Chikungunya virus. CD300a acts as an attachment factor that enhances DENV internalization through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. CD300a recognizes predominantly phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEth) and to a lesser extent PtdSer associated with viral particles. Mutation of residues in the IgV domain critical for phospholipid binding abrogate CD300a-mediated enhancement of DENV infection. Finally, we show that CD300a is expressed at the surface of primary macrophages and anti-CD300a polyclonal antibodies partially inhibited DENV infection of these cells. Overall, these data indicate that CD300a is a novel DENV binding receptor that recognizes PtdEth and PtdSer present on virions and enhance infection. IMPORTANCE Dengue disease, caused by dengue virus (DENV), has emerged as the most important mosquito-borne viral disease of humans and is a major global health concern. The molecular bases of DENV-host cell interactions during virus entry are poorly understood, hampering the discovery of new targets for antiviral intervention. We recently discovered that the TIM and TAM proteins, two receptor families involved in the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-dependent phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells, interact with DENV particles-associated PtdSer through a mechanism that mimics the recognition of apoptotic cells and mediate DENV infection. In this study, we show that CD300a, a novel identified phospholipid receptor, mediates DENV infection. CD300a

  7. Evaluation of Phosphatidylserine-Binding Peptides Radiolabeled with Fluorine 18 for in vivo Imaging of Apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapty, Janice Sarah

    We currently do not have a clinical method to directly assess apoptosis induced by cancer therapies. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an attractive target for imaging apoptosis since it is on the exterior of the apoptotic cells and PS externalization is an early marker of apoptosis. PS-binding peptides are an attractive option for developing an imaging probe to detect apoptosis using positron emission tomography. In this study we evaluated binding characteristics of PS-binding peptides for ability to bind to PS, radiolabeled PS-binding peptides with fluorine-18, and performed in vitro and in vivo analysis of 18F radiolabeled PS-binding peptides including biodistribution analysis and dynamic PET imaging in a murine tumor model of apoptosis. Four peptides were evaluated for PS binding characteristics using a plate based assay system, a liposome mimic of cell membrane PS presentation, and a cell assay of apoptosis. The results indicate that all four peptides bind to PS and are specific to apoptotic cells. The widely used 18 F prosthetic group N-succinimidyl-4-[18F]fluorobenzoate ([18F]SFB) and the recently developed N-[6-(4-[ 18F]fluorobenzylidene) aminooxyhexyl]maleimide ([18F]FBAM) were investigated for radiolabeling of two representative phosphatidylserine-binding peptides. The prosthetic groups were compared with respect to required reaction conditions for optimum labeling, radiolabeling yield and chemoselectivity. The N-terminus labeled product produced by reaction of [18F]SFB with binding peptide LIKKPF was produced in 18% radiochemical yield while no N-terminus labeled product could be isolated following [18F]SFB reaction with PDGLSR. When the peptides were modified by addition of a cysteine residue at the N-terminus they provided almost quantitative radiochemical yields with [18F]FBAM. Results indicate that for the peptides in this study, [18F]FBAM is a more useful prosthetic group compared to [18F]SFB due to its excellent chemo-selectivity and high radiochemical

  8. Phosphatidylserine flipping enhances membrane curvature and negative charge required for vesicular transport

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Chi, Richard J.; Burd, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicle-mediated protein transport between organelles of the secretory and endocytic pathways is strongly influenced by the composition and organization of membrane lipids. In budding yeast, protein transport between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and early endosome (EE) requires Drs2, a phospholipid translocase in the type IV P-type ATPase family. However, downstream effectors of Drs2 and specific phospholipid substrate requirements for protein transport in this pathway are unknown. Here, we show that the Arf GTPase-activating protein (ArfGAP) Gcs1 is a Drs2 effector that requires a variant of the ArfGAP lipid packing sensor (+ALPS) motif for localization to TGN/EE membranes. Drs2 increases membrane curvature and anionic phospholipid composition of the cytosolic leaflet, both of which are sensed by the +ALPS motif. Using mutant forms of Drs2 and the related protein Dnf1, which alter their ability to recognize phosphatidylserine, we show that translocation of this substrate to the cytosolic leaflet is essential for +ALPS binding and vesicular transport between the EE and the TGN. PMID:24019533

  9. Phosphatidylserine is a global immunosuppressive signal in efferocytosis, infectious disease, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Birge, R B; Boeltz, S; Kumar, S; Carlson, J; Wanderley, J; Calianese, D; Barcinski, M; Brekken, R A; Huang, X; Hutchins, J T; Freimark, B; Empig, C; Mercer, J; Schroit, A J; Schett, G; Herrmann, M

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is an evolutionarily conserved and tightly regulated cell death modality. It serves important roles in physiology by sculpting complex tissues during embryogenesis and by removing effete cells that have reached advanced age or whose genomes have been irreparably damaged. Apoptosis culminates in the rapid and decisive removal of cell corpses by efferocytosis, a term used to distinguish the engulfment of apoptotic cells from other phagocytic processes. Over the past decades, the molecular and cell biological events associated with efferocytosis have been rigorously studied, and many eat-me signals and receptors have been identified. The externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) is arguably the most emblematic eat-me signal that is in turn bound by a large number of serum proteins and opsonins that facilitate efferocytosis. Under physiological conditions, externalized PS functions as a dominant and evolutionarily conserved immunosuppressive signal that promotes tolerance and prevents local and systemic immune activation. Pathologically, the innate immunosuppressive effect of externalized PS has been hijacked by numerous viruses, microorganisms, and parasites to facilitate infection, and in many cases, establish infection latency. PS is also profoundly dysregulated in the tumor microenvironment and antagonizes the development of tumor immunity. In this review, we discuss the biology of PS with respect to its role as a global immunosuppressive signal and how PS is exploited to drive diverse pathological processes such as infection and cancer. Finally, we outline the rationale that agents targeting PS could have significant value in cancer and infectious disease therapeutics. PMID:26915293

  10. Phosphatidylserine enhances IKBKAP transcription by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Donyo, Maya; Hollander, Dror; Abramovitch, Ziv; Naftelberg, Shiran; Ast, Gil

    2016-04-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a genetic disorder manifested due to abnormal development and progressive degeneration of the sensory and autonomic nervous system. FD is caused by a point mutation in the IKBKAP gene encoding the IKAP protein, resulting in decreased protein levels. A promising potential treatment for FD is phosphatidylserine (PS); however, the manner by which PS elevates IKAP levels has yet to be identified. Analysis of ChIP-seq results of the IKBKAP promoter region revealed binding of the transcription factors CREB and ELK1, which are regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. We show that PS treatment enhanced ERK phosphorylation in cells derived from FD patients. ERK activation resulted in elevated IKBKAP transcription and IKAP protein levels, whereas pretreatment with the MAPK inhibitor U0126 blocked elevation of the IKAP protein level. Overexpression of either ELK1 or CREB activated the IKBKAP promoter, whereas downregulation of these transcription factors resulted in a decrease of the IKAP protein. Additionally, we show that PS improves cell migration, known to be enhanced by MAPK/ERK activation and abrogated in FD cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PS activates the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, resulting in activation of transcription factors that bind the promoter region of IKBKAP and thus enhancing its transcription. Therefore, compounds that activate the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway could constitute potential treatments for FD. PMID:26769675

  11. Phosphatidylserine transport by Ups2-Mdm35 in respiration-active mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Non; Watanabe, Yasunori; Tamura, Yasushi; Endo, Toshiya; Kuge, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is an essential phospholipid for mitochondrial functions and is synthesized mainly by phosphatidylserine (PS) decarboxylase at the mitochondrial inner membrane. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PS is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), such that mitochondrial PE synthesis requires PS transport from the ER to the mitochondrial inner membrane. Here, we provide evidence that Ups2-Mdm35, a protein complex localized at the mitochondrial intermembrane space, mediates PS transport for PE synthesis in respiration-active mitochondria. UPS2- and MDM35-null mutations greatly attenuated conversion of PS to PE in yeast cells growing logarithmically under nonfermentable conditions, but not fermentable conditions. A recombinant Ups2-Mdm35 fusion protein exhibited phospholipid-transfer activity between liposomes in vitro. Furthermore, UPS2 expression was elevated under nonfermentable conditions and at the diauxic shift, the metabolic transition from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that Ups2-Mdm35 functions as a PS transfer protein and enhances mitochondrial PE synthesis in response to the cellular metabolic state. PMID:27354379

  12. Calcium transport in vesicles from carrot cells: Stimulation by calmodulin and phosphatidylserine. [Daucus carota cv. Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Wenling Hsieh; Sze, Heven )

    1991-05-01

    The transport properties of Ca-pumping ATPases from carrot (Daucus carota cv. Danvers) tissue culture cells were studied. ATP dependent Ca transport in vesicles that comigrated with an ER marker, was stimulated 3-4 fold by calmodulin. Cyclopiazonic acid (a specific inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase) partially inhibited oxalate-stimulated Ca transport activity; however, it had little or not effect on calmodulin-stimulated Ca uptake. The results suggested the presence of two types of Ca ATPases, and ER- and a plasma membrane-type. Incubation of membranes with (gamma{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the formation of a single acyl ({sup 32}P) phosphoprotein of 120 kDa. Formation of this phosphoprotein was dependent on Ca, and enhanced by La {sup 3+}, characteristic of the plasma membrane CaATPase. Acidic phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, stimulated Ca transport, similar to their effect on the erythrocyte plasma membrane CaATPase. These results would indicate that the calmodulin-stimulated Ca transport originated in large part from a plasma membrane-type Ca pump of 120 kDa.

  13. Phosphatidylserine is a global immunosuppressive signal in efferocytosis, infectious disease, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Birge, R B; Boeltz, S; Kumar, S; Carlson, J; Wanderley, J; Calianese, D; Barcinski, M; Brekken, R A; Huang, X; Hutchins, J T; Freimark, B; Empig, C; Mercer, J; Schroit, A J; Schett, G; Herrmann, M

    2016-06-01

    Apoptosis is an evolutionarily conserved and tightly regulated cell death modality. It serves important roles in physiology by sculpting complex tissues during embryogenesis and by removing effete cells that have reached advanced age or whose genomes have been irreparably damaged. Apoptosis culminates in the rapid and decisive removal of cell corpses by efferocytosis, a term used to distinguish the engulfment of apoptotic cells from other phagocytic processes. Over the past decades, the molecular and cell biological events associated with efferocytosis have been rigorously studied, and many eat-me signals and receptors have been identified. The externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) is arguably the most emblematic eat-me signal that is in turn bound by a large number of serum proteins and opsonins that facilitate efferocytosis. Under physiological conditions, externalized PS functions as a dominant and evolutionarily conserved immunosuppressive signal that promotes tolerance and prevents local and systemic immune activation. Pathologically, the innate immunosuppressive effect of externalized PS has been hijacked by numerous viruses, microorganisms, and parasites to facilitate infection, and in many cases, establish infection latency. PS is also profoundly dysregulated in the tumor microenvironment and antagonizes the development of tumor immunity. In this review, we discuss the biology of PS with respect to its role as a global immunosuppressive signal and how PS is exploited to drive diverse pathological processes such as infection and cancer. Finally, we outline the rationale that agents targeting PS could have significant value in cancer and infectious disease therapeutics. PMID:26915293

  14. Structural and Biological Interaction of hsc-70 Protein with Phosphatidylserine in Endosomal Microautophagy.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Kateryna; Clement, Cristina C; Kaushik, Susmita; Stiller, Barbara; Arias, Esperanza; Ahmad, Atta; Rauch, Jennifer N; Chatterjee, Victor; Melis, Chiara; Scharf, Brian; Gestwicki, Jason E; Cuervo, Ana-Maria; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-08-26

    hsc-70 (HSPA8) is a cytosolic molecular chaperone, which plays a central role in cellular proteostasis, including quality control during protein refolding and regulation of protein degradation. hsc-70 is pivotal to the process of macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy, and endosomal microautophagy. The latter requires hsc-70 interaction with negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) at the endosomal limiting membrane. Herein, by combining plasmon resonance, NMR spectroscopy, and amino acid mutagenesis, we mapped the C terminus of the hsc-70 LID domain as the structural interface interacting with endosomal PS, and we estimated an hsc-70/PS equilibrium dissociation constant of 4.7 ± 0.1 μm. This interaction is specific and involves a total of 4-5 lysine residues. Plasmon resonance and NMR results were further experimentally validated by hsc-70 endosomal binding experiments and endosomal microautophagy assays. The discovery of this previously unknown contact surface for hsc-70 in this work elucidates the mechanism of hsc-70 PS/membrane interaction for cytosolic cargo internalization into endosomes. PMID:27405763

  15. Cluster headache: incorporation of (1-14C)oleic acid into phosphatidylserine in polymorphonuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Y D; Stovner, L J; Bjerve, K S; Sjaastad, O

    1989-09-01

    As recently demonstrated by our group, polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) from cluster headache patients have an increased ability to incorporate arachidonic acid (AA) and L-serine into phosphatidylserine (PS). To evaluate whether there is an increased incorporation into PS also from fatty acids not involved in eicosanoid metabolism, PMNs from controls (n = 14) and cluster headache patients (n = 12) were incubated with (1-14C)oleic acid. After 1 h 2.7% +/- 1.1 (mean value +/- SD) of the glycerophospholipid radioactivity was found in PS in controls, whereas 4.2% +/- 1.2 was found in cluster headache patients (p less than 0.005). For phosphatidylcholine (PC) the corresponding figures were 74.2 +/- 5.4 in controls and 66.7 +/- 7.6 in cluster headache patients (p less than 0.01). The results suggest that the de novo biosynthesis of PS is increased and the biosynthesis of PC is decreased in cluster headache. The results may have an effect on the role of PS as an obligate protein kinase C activator. PMID:2507162

  16. Lipid flip-flop in binary membranes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Brown, Krystal L; Conboy, John C

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of lipid flip-flop in bilayers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (DPPS) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) were studied using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. The kinetics of DSPC and DPPS flip-flop were examined as a function of temperature and bilayer composition. The rate of DSPC flip-flop did not exhibit any significant dependence on bilayer composition while the rate of DPPS flip-flop was inversely dependent on the mole fraction of DPPS. The transition-state thermodynamics for DSPC and DPPS lipids in these mixed bilayers were determined in order to identify the energetic impact of the phosphatidylserine headgroup on lipid flip-flop. The thermodynamics for the DSPC component remained statistically identical to bilayers composed entirely of DSPC. The activation energy for the DPPS component showed a linear correlation with the mole fraction of DPPS for all bilayer compositions. The enthalpy and entropy for DPPS flip-flop did not increase linearly with the fraction of DPPS but did directly correlate with the molecular area. The DPPS component also exhibited enthalpy-entropy compensation which suggests that lipid hydration may play a significant role in membrane dynamics. PMID:24200035

  17. The influence of soy-derived phosphatidylserine on cognition in age-associated memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Jorissen, B L; Brouns, F; Van Boxtel, M P; Ponds, R W; Verhey, F R; Jolles, J; Riedel, W J

    2001-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is a phospholipid widely sold as a nutritional supplement. PS has been claimed to enhance neuronal membrane function and hence cognitive function, especially in the elderly. We report the results of a clinical trial of soybean-derived PS (S-PS) in aging subjects with memory complaints. Subjects were 120 elderly (> 57 years) of both sexes who fulfilled the more stringent criteria for age-associated memory impairment (AAMI); some also fulfilled the criteria for age-associated cognitive decline. Subjects were allocated at random to one of the three treatment groups: placebo, 300mg S-PS daily, or 600mg S-PS daily. Assessments were carried out at baseline, after 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, and after a wash-out period of 3 weeks. Tests of learning and memory, choice reaction time, planning and attentional functions were administered at each assessment. Delayed recall and recognition of a previously learned word list comprised the primary outcome measures. No significant differences were found in any of the outcome variables between the treatment groups. There were also no significant interactions between treatment and 'severity of memory complaints'. In conclusion, a daily supplement of S-PS does not affect memory or other cognitive functions in older individuals with memory complaints. PMID:11842880

  18. Effect of phosphatidylserine on memory in patients and rats with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Y; Yang, L Q; Guo, L M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of phosphatidylserine (PS) on memory of patients and rats with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In total, 57 AD patients were recruited from our hospital, and were divided into two groups: 25 in the control group and 32 in the observation group. Next, 300 mg/d of PS was given to the rats in the observation group for 12 continuous weeks based on the control group. AD rats were divided into three groups: control group, PS 30 mg/kg group, and PS 15 mg/kg group. Learning memory ability and free radical levels in the brain were detected after treatment. In AD patients, vocabulary and picture matching scores in the two treatment groups increased after treatment (P < 0.05). Moreover, the scores in the treated group were significantly greater than the control group (P < 0.05). In AD rats, PS treatment reduced the escape latent period of AD rats, increased SOD and OH(-), and decreased acetylcholinesterase levels (P < 0.05). Compared with PS 15 mg/kg, PS 30 mg/kg group was significantly more efficacious (P < 0.05). Compared with the AD model group, hippocampal cells showed normal arrangement, karyopyknosis decreased, and the pathological changes in the two PS groups were considerable. In conclusion, PS decreased cholinesterase, improved memory, and improved hippocampal inflammation injury in AD brains by increasing SOD and OH(-) levels. PMID:26345866

  19. Transport through recycling endosomes requires EHD1 recruitment by a phosphatidylserine translocase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shoken; Uchida, Yasunori; Wang, Jiao; Matsudaira, Tatsuyuki; Nakagawa, Takatoshi; Kishimoto, Takuma; Mukai, Kojiro; Inaba, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Molday, Robert S; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    P4-ATPases translocate aminophospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine (PS), to the cytosolic leaflet of membranes. PS is highly enriched in recycling endosomes (REs) and is essential for endosomal membrane traffic. Here, we show that PS flipping by an RE-localized P4-ATPase is required for the recruitment of the membrane fission protein EHD1. Depletion of ATP8A1 impaired the asymmetric transbilayer distribution of PS in REs, dissociated EHD1 from REs, and generated aberrant endosomal tubules that appear resistant to fission. EHD1 did not show membrane localization in cells defective in PS synthesis. ATP8A2, a tissue-specific ATP8A1 paralogue, is associated with a neurodegenerative disease (CAMRQ). ATP8A2, but not the disease-causative ATP8A2 mutant, rescued the endosomal defects in ATP8A1-depleted cells. Primary neurons from Atp8a2−/− mice showed a reduced level of transferrin receptors at the cell surface compared to Atp8a2+/+ mice. These findings demonstrate the role of P4-ATPase in membrane fission and give insight into the molecular basis of CAMRQ. PMID:25595798

  20. Antibodies to Phosphatidylserine/Prothrombin Complex in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Analytical and Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa K; Willis, Rohan; Harris, E Nigel; Branch, Ware D; Tebo, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy-related morbidity accompanied by persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Current laboratory criteria for APS classification recommend testing for lupus anticoagulant as well as IgG and IgM anticardiolipin, and beta-2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodies. However, there appears to be a subset of patients with classical APS manifestations who test negative for the recommended criteria aPL tests. While acknowledging that such patients may have clinical features that are not of an autoimmune etiology, experts also speculate that these "seronegative" patients may test negative for relevant autoantibodies as a result of a lack of harmonization and/or standardization. Alternatively, they may have aPL that target other antigens involved in the pathogenesis of APS. In the latter, autoantibodies that recognize a phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (PS/PT) complex have been reported to be associated with APS and may have diagnostic relevance. This review highlights analytical and clinical attributes associated with PS/PT antibodies, taking into consideration the performance characteristics of criteria aPL tests in APS with specific recommendations for harmonization and standardization efforts. PMID:26975968

  1. Efficient identification of phosphatidylserine-binding proteins by ORF phage display

    SciTech Connect

    Caberoy, Nora B.; Zhou, Yixiong; Alvarado, Gabriela; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Wei

    2009-08-14

    To efficiently elucidate the biological roles of phosphatidylserine (PS), we developed open-reading-frame (ORF) phage display to identify PS-binding proteins. The procedure of phage panning was optimized with a phage clone expressing MFG-E8, a well-known PS-binding protein. Three rounds of phage panning with ORF phage display cDNA library resulted in {approx}300-fold enrichment in PS-binding activity. A total of 17 PS-binding phage clones were identified. Unlike phage display with conventional cDNA libraries, all 17 PS-binding clones were ORFs encoding 13 real proteins. Sequence analysis revealed that all identified PS-specific phage clones had dimeric basic amino acid residues. GST fusion proteins were expressed for 3 PS-binding proteins and verified for their binding activity to PS liposomes, but not phosphatidylcholine liposomes. These results elucidated previously unknown PS-binding proteins and demonstrated that ORF phage display is a versatile technology capable of efficiently identifying binding proteins for non-protein molecules like PS.

  2. Long-Time Cooling before Cryopreservation Decreased Translocation of Phosphatidylserine (Ptd-L-Ser) in Human Ovarian Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To translocation (externalization) of phosphatidylserine lead at least the five negative effects observed during cells cryopreservation: hypoxia, increasing of intracellular Ca2+, osmotic disruption of cellular membranes, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation. The aim of this study was to test the intensiveness of the phosphatidylserine translocation immediately after thawing and after 45 d xenografting of human ovarian tissue, which was either frozen just after operative removal from patient or cooled before cryopreservation to 5°C for 24 h and then frozen. Materials and Methods Ovarian fragments from twelve patients were divided into small pieces in form of cortex with medulla, and randomly divided into the following four groups. Pieces of Group 1 (n=30) were frozen immediately after operation, thawed and just after thawing their quality was analyzed. Group 2 pieces (n=30) after operation were cooled to 5°C for 24 h, then frozen after 24 h pre-cooling to 5°C, thawed and just after thawing their quality was analyzed. Group 3 pieces (n=30) were frozen immediately after operation without pre-cooling, thawed, transplanted to SCID mice and then, after 45 d of culture their quality was analyzed. Group 4 pieces (n=30) were frozen after 24 h pre-cooling to 5°C, thawed, transplanted to SCID mice and then, after 45 d their quality was analyzed. The effectiveness of the pre-freezing cooling of tissuewas evaluated by the development of follicles (histology) and by intensiveness of translocation of phosphatidylserine (FACS with FITC-Annexin V and Propidium Iodide). Results For groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 the mean densities of follicles per 1 mm3 was 19.0, 20.2, 12.9, and 12.2, respectively (P1-2, 3-4 >0.1). For these groups, 99%, 98%, 88% and 90% preantral follicles, respectively were morphologically normal (P1-2, 3-4 >0.1). The FACS analysis showed significantly decreased intensiveness of translocation of phosphatidylserine after pre

  3. Multidrug resistance reversal and apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cells by some flavonoids present in citrus plants.

    PubMed

    Wesołowska, Olga; Wiśniewski, Jerzy; Sroda-Pomianek, Kamila; Bielawska-Pohl, Aleksandra; Paprocka, Maria; Duś, Danuta; Duarte, Noélia; Ferreira, Maria-José U; Michalak, Krystyna

    2012-11-26

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells constitutes one of the main reasons for chemotherapy failure. The search for nontoxic modulators that reduce MDR is a task of great importance. An ability to enhance apoptosis of resistant cells would also be beneficial. In the present study, the MDR reversal and apoptosis-inducing potency of three flavonoids produced by Citrus plants, namely, naringenin (1a), aromadendrin (2), and tangeretin (3), and the methylated naringenin derivatives (1b, 1c), have been studied in sensitive (LoVo) and multidrug-resistant (LoVo/Dx) human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity of methoxylated flavonoids was higher as compared to hydroxylated analogues. Only 3 turned out to inhibit P-glycoprotein, as demonstrated by a rhodamine 123 accumulation assay. It also increased doxorubicin accumulation in LoVo/Dx cells and enabled doxorubicin to enter cellular nuclei. In addition, 3 was found to be an effective MDR modulator in resistant cells by sensitizing them to doxorubicin. Tangeretin-induced caspase-3 activation and elevated surface phosphatidylserine exposure demonstrated its apoptosis-inducing activity in LoVo/Dx cells, while the other flavonoids evaluated were not active. Additionally, 3 was more toxic to resistant rather than to sensitive cancer cells. Its apoptosis-inducing activity was also higher in LoVo/Dx than in LoVo cells. It was concluded that the activity of 3 against multidrug-resistant cancer cells may be enhanced by its apoptosis-inducing activity. PMID:23137376

  4. Enhanced eryptosis following gramicidin exposure.

    PubMed

    Malik, Abaid; Bissinger, Rosi; Liu, Guoxing; Liu, Guilai; Lang, Florian

    2015-05-01

    The peptide antibiotic and ionophore gramicidin has previously been shown to trigger apoptosis of nucleated cells. In analogy to apoptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes or eryptosis involves cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include oxidative stress, increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i), and ceramide. The present study explored, whether gramicidin triggers eryptosis. To this end phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, red blood cell distribution width (RDW) from electronic particle counting, reactive oxidant species (ROS) from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3- and Fluo4 fluorescence, and ceramide abundance from binding of specific antibodies. As a result, a 24 h exposure of human erythrocytes to gramicidin significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥1 µg/mL), forward scatter (≥0.5 µg/mL) and hemolysis. Gramicidin enhanced ROS activity, [Ca2+]i and ceramide abundance at the erythrocyte surface. The stimulation of annexin-V-binding by gramicidin was significantly blunted but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. In conclusion, gramicidin stimulates phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least partially due to induction of oxidative stress, increase of [Ca2+]i and up-regulation of ceramide abundance. Despite increase of [Ca2+]i, gramicidin increases cell volume and slightly reduces RWD. PMID:25915718

  5. Enhanced Eryptosis Following Gramicidin Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Abaid; Bissinger, Rosi; Liu, Guoxing; Liu, Guilai; Lang, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The peptide antibiotic and ionophore gramicidin has previously been shown to trigger apoptosis of nucleated cells. In analogy to apoptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes or eryptosis involves cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include oxidative stress, increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i), and ceramide. The present study explored, whether gramicidin triggers eryptosis. To this end phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, red blood cell distribution width (RDW) from electronic particle counting, reactive oxidant species (ROS) from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3- and Fluo4 fluorescence, and ceramide abundance from binding of specific antibodies. As a result, a 24 h exposure of human erythrocytes to gramicidin significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥1 µg/mL), forward scatter (≥0.5 µg/mL) and hemolysis. Gramicidin enhanced ROS activity, [Ca2+]i and ceramide abundance at the erythrocyte surface. The stimulation of annexin-V-binding by gramicidin was significantly blunted but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. In conclusion, gramicidin stimulates phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least partially due to induction of oxidative stress, increase of [Ca2+]i and up-regulation of ceramide abundance. Despite increase of [Ca2+]i, gramicidin increases cell volume and slightly reduces RWD. PMID:25915718

  6. Neuritin reverses deficits in murine novel object associative recognition memory caused by exposure to extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian-Ru; Lu, Jun-Mei; Yao, Jin-Jing; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Ling, Chen; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that electromagnetic field exposure may interfere with the activity of brain cells, thereby generating behavioral and cognitive disturbances. However, the underlying mechanisms and possible preventions are still unknown. In this study, we used a mouse model to examine the effects of exposure to extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields (ELF MFs) on a recognition memory task and morphological changes of hippocampal neurons. The data showed that ELF MFs exposure (1 mT, 12 h/day) induced a time-dependent deficit in novel object associative recognition memory and also decreased hippocampal dendritic spine density. This effect was observed without corresponding changes in spontaneous locomotor activity and was transient, which has only been seen after exposing mice to ELF MFs for 7-10 days. The over-expression of hippocampal neuritin, an activity-dependent neurotrophic factor, using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector significantly increased the neuritin level and dendritic spine density. This increase was paralleled with ELF MFs exposure-induced deficits in recognition memory and reductions of dendritic spine density. Collectively, our study provides evidence for the association between ELF MFs exposure, impairment of recognition memory, and resulting changes in hippocampal dendritic spine density. Neuritin prevented this ELF MFs-exposure-induced effect by increasing the hippocampal spine density. PMID:26138388

  7. Depletion of Bcl-2 by an antisense oligonucleotide induces apoptosis accompanied by oxidation and externalization of phosphatidylserine in NCI-H226 lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koty, Patrick P; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Li, Shang-Xi; Kagan, Valerian E

    2002-01-01

    Oxidant-induced apoptosis involves oxidation of many different and essential molecules including phospholipids. As a result of this non-specific oxidation, any signaling role of a particular phospholipid-class of molecules is difficult to elucidate. To determine whether preferential oxidation of phosphatidylserine (PS) is an early event in apoptotic signaling related to PS externalization and is independent of direct oxidant exposure, we chose a genetic-based induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced in the lung cancer cell line NCI-H226 by decreasing the amount of Bcl-2 protein expression by preventing the translation of bcl-2 mRNA using an antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide. Peroxidation of phospholipids was assayed using a fluorescent technique based on metabolic integration of an oxidation-sensitive and fluorescent fatty acid, cis-parinaric acid (PnA), into cellular phospholipids and subsequent HPLC separation of cis-PnA-labeled phospholipids. We found a decrease in Bcl-2 was associated with a selective oxidation of PS in a sub-population of the cells with externalized PS. No significant difference in oxidation of cis-PnA-labeled phospholipids was observed in cells treated with medium alone or a nonsense oligonucleotide. Treatment with either nonsensc or antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotides was not associated with changes in the pattern of individual phospholipid classes as determined by HPTLC. These metabolic and topographical changes in PS arrangement in plasma membrane appear to be early responses to antisense bcl-2 exposure that trigger a PS-dependent apoptotic signaling pathway. This observed externalization of PS may facilitate the 'labeling' of apoptotic cells for recognition by macrophage scavenger receptors and subsequent phagocytic clearance. PMID:12162425

  8. Are DNA-damaging effects induced by herbicide formulations (Roundup® and Garlon®) in fish transient and reversible upon cessation of exposure?

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S; Santos, M A; Gaivão, I; Pacheco, M

    2014-10-01

    Owing to the seasonality of crop cultivation and subsequent periodic/seasonal application of herbicides, their input to the aquatic systems is typically intermittent. Consequently, exposure of fish to this type of contaminants can be short and followed by a period of permanence in non-contaminated areas. Thus, the assessment of genotoxic endpoints in fish after removal of the contamination source appears as a crucial step to improve the knowledge on the dynamics of herbicide genotoxicity, as well as to determine the actual magnitude of risk posed by these agrochemicals. Therefore, the present study intended to shed light on the ability of fish to recover from the DNA damage induced by short-term exposures to the herbicide formulations Roundup(®) (glyphosate-based) and Garlon(®) (triclopyr-based) upon the exposure cessation. European eel (Anguilla anguilla) was exposed to the above commercial formulations for 3 days, and allowed to recover for 1, 7 and 14 days (post-exposure period). The comet assay was used to identify the DNA damage in blood cells during both exposure and post-exposure periods. As an attempt to clarify the DNA damaging mechanisms involved, an extra-step including the incubation of the nucleotides with DNA lesion-specific repair enzyme was added to the standard comet. The genotoxic potential of both herbicides was confirmed, concerning the exposure period. In addition, the involvement of oxidative DNA damage on the action of Roundup(®) (pointed out as pyrimidine bases oxidation) was demonstrated, while for Garlon(®) this damaging mechanism was less evident. Fish exposed to Garlon(®), though presenting some evidence towards a tendency of recovery, did not achieve a complete restoration of DNA integrity. In what concerns to Roundup(®), a recovery was evident when considering non-specific DNA damage on day 14 post-exposure. In addition, this herbicide was able to induce a late oxidative DNA damage (day 14). Blood cells of A. anguilla exposed to

  9. Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Bind to Protein Z Cooperatively and with Equal Affinity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Tanusree; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Protein Z (PZ) is an anticoagulant that binds with high affinity to Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) and accelerates the rate of ZPI-mediated inhibition of factor Xa (fXa) by more than 1000-fold in the presence of Ca2+ and phospholipids. PZ promotion of the ZPI-fXa interaction results from the anchoring of the Gla domain of PZ onto phospholipid surfaces and positioning the bound ZPI in close proximity to the Gla-anchored fXa, forming a ternary complex of PZ/ZPI/fXa. Although interaction of PZ with phospholipid membrane appears to be absolutely crucial for its cofactor activity, little is known about the binding of different phospholipids to PZ. The present study was conceived to understand the interaction of different phospholipids with PZ. Experiments with both soluble lipids and model membranes revealed that PZ binds to phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) with equal affinity (Kd~48 μM); further, PS and PE bound to PZ synergistically. Equilibrium dialysis experiments revealed two lipid-binding sites for both PS and PE. PZ binds with weaker affinity to other phospholipids, e.g., phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and binding of these lipids is not synergistic with respect to PS. Both PS and PE -containing membranes supported the formation of a fXa-PZ complex. PZ protection of fXa from antithrombin inhibition were also shown to be comparable in presence of both PS: PC and PE: PC membranes. These findings are particularly important and intriguing since they suggest a special affinity of PZ, in vivo, towards activated platelets, the primary membrane involved in blood coagulation process. PMID:27584039

  10. A simple flow cytometry method improves the detection of phosphatidylserine-exposing extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Arraud, N; Gounou, C; Linares, R; Brisson, A R

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasma contains cell-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), which participate in physiopathological processes and have potential applications as disease biomarker. However, the enumeration of EVs faces major problems, due to their sub-micrometer size and to intrinsic limitations in methods of characterization, mainly flow cytometry (FCM). Objectives Our objective is to enumerate EVs in plasma, by taking as the prototype the population of phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposing EVs, which constitute one of the major EV populations and are responsible for thrombotic disorders. Methods The concentration of PS-exposing EVs in platelet-free plasma (PFP) of healthy subjects was measured by FCM using either light scattering or fluorescence as the trigger and fluorescent Annexin-5 (Anx5) as the specific label. In addition, PS-exposing EVs were enumerated by electron microscopy (EM) after labeling with Anx5 gold nanoparticles and sedimentation on EM grids. Results We show that about 50× more Anx5-positive EVs are detected by FCM when detection is triggered on fluorescence as compared with light scattering. By fluorescence triggering, concentrations of 22 000–30 000 Anx5-positive EVs per μL PFP were determined, using two different flow cytometers. The limit of detection of the fluorescence triggering method was estimated at about 1000–2500 Anx5 molecules. Results from EM suggest that EVs down to 100–150 nm diameter are detected by fluorescence triggering. Conclusion This study presents a simple method for enumerating EVs. We believe that this method is applicable in a general context and will improve our understanding of the roles of EVs in pathophysiological situations, which will open avenues for the development of EV-based diagnosis assays. PMID:25348269

  11. The Effects of Phosphatidylserine and Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Containing Supplement on Late Life Depression

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Teruhisa

    2015-01-01

    Late life depression is often associated with a poor response to antidepressants; therefore an alternative strategy for therapy is required. Although several studies have reported that phosphatidylserine (PS) may be effective for late life depression and that omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA have also proven beneficial for many higher mental functions, including depression, no concrete conclusion has been reached. This study was performed to clarify the effect of PS and omega-3 fatty acid-containing supplement for late life depression by not only clinical evaluation but also salivary cortisol levels. Eighteen elderly subjects with major depression were selected for the study. In all, insufficient improvement had been obtained by antidepressant therapy for at least 6 months. The exclusion criteria from prior brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) included the presence of structural MRI findings compatible with stroke or other gross brain lesions or malformations, but not white matter hypersensitivities. They took a supplement containing PS 100 mg, DHA 119 mg and EPA 70 mg three times a day for 12 weeks. The effects of the supplement were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton depression scale (HAM-D17) and the basal levels and circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol. The study adopted them as indices because: salivary cortisol levels are high in patients with depression, their circadian rhythm related to salivary cortisol is often irregular, and these symptoms are alleviated as depression improves. The mean HAM-D17 in all subjects taking the supplement was significantly improved after 12 weeks of taking the supplement. These subjects were divided into 10 non-responders and 8 responders. The basal levels and circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol were normalized in the responders while not in non-responders. PS and omega-3 fatty acids, or other elements of the supplement, may be effective for late life depression, associated with the correction of basal levels and circadian

  12. Phosphatidylserine-Dependent Catalysis of Stalk and Pore Formation by Synaptobrevin JMR-TMD Peptide.

    PubMed

    Tarafdar, Pradip K; Chakraborty, Hirak; Bruno, Michael J; Lentz, Barry R

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of a SNARE complex in neurotransmitter release is widely accepted, there exist different views on how the complex promotes fusion. One hypothesis is that the SNARE complex's ability to bring membranes into contact is sufficient for fusion, another points to possible roles of juxtamembrane regions (JMRs) and transmembrane domains (TMDs) in catalyzing lipid rearrangement, and another notes the complex's presumed ability to bend membranes near the point of contact. Here, we performed experiments with highly curved vesicles brought into contact using low concentrations of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to investigate the influence of the synaptobrevin (SB) TMD with an attached JMR (SB-JMR-TMD) on the rates of stalk and pore formation during vesicle fusion. SB-JMR-TMD enhanced the rates of stalk and fusion pore (FP) formation in a sharply sigmoidal fashion. We observed an optimal influence at an average of three peptides per vesicle, but only with phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing vesicles. Approximately three SB-JMR-TMDs per vesicle optimally ordered the bilayer interior and excluded water in a similar sigmoidal fashion. The catalytic influences of hexadecane and SB-JMR-TMD on fusion kinetics showed little in common, suggesting different mechanisms. Both kinetic and membrane structure measurements support the hypotheses that SB-JMR-TMD 1) catalyzes initial intermediate formation as a result of its basic JMR disrupting ordered interbilayer water and permitting closer interbilayer approach, and 2) catalyzes pore formation by forming a membrane-spanning complex that increases curvature stress at the circumference of the hemifused diaphragm of the prepore intermediate state. PMID:26536263

  13. The C-Terminal Acidic Region of Calreticulin Mediates Phosphatidylserine Binding and Apoptotic Cell Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva Joseph; Bedi, Sukhmani Kaur; Huynh, David; Raghavan, Malini

    2016-05-01

    Calreticulin is a calcium-binding chaperone that is normally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Calreticulin is detectable on the surface of apoptotic cells under some apoptosis-inducing conditions, where it promotes the phagocytosis and immunogenicity of dying cells. However, the precise mechanism by which calreticulin, a soluble protein, localizes to the outer surface of the plasma membrane of dying cells is unknown, as are the molecular mechanisms that are relevant to calreticulin-induced cellular phagocytosis. Calreticulin comprises three distinct structural domains: a globular domain, an extended arm-like P-domain, and a C-terminal acidic region containing multiple low-affinity calcium binding sites. We show that calreticulin, via its C-terminal acidic region, preferentially interacts with phosphatidylserine (PS) compared with other phospholipids and that this interaction is calcium dependent. Additionally, exogenous calreticulin binds apoptotic cells via a higher-affinity calcium-dependent mode that is acidic region dependent. Exogenous calreticulin also binds live cells, including macrophages, via a second, lower-affinity P-domain and globular domain-dependent, but calcium-independent binding mode that likely involves its generic polypeptide binding site. Truncation constructs lacking the acidic region or arm-like P-domain of calreticulin are impaired in their abilities to induce apoptotic cell phagocytosis by murine peritoneal macrophages. Taken together, the results of this investigation provide the first molecular insights into the phospholipid binding site of calreticulin as a key anchor point for the cell surface expression of calreticulin on apoptotic cells. These findings also support a role for calreticulin as a PS-bridging molecule that cooperates with other PS-binding factors to promote the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. PMID:27036911

  14. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei; Fairn, Gregory D; Hancock, John F

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  15. Engagement of phospholipid scramblase 1 in activated cells: implication for phosphatidylserine externalization and exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Smrz, Daniel; Lebduska, Pavel; Dráberová, L'ubica; Korb, Jan; Dráber, Petr

    2008-04-18

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) in quiescent cells is predominantly confined to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Externalization of PS is a marker of apoptosis, exocytosis, and some nonapoptotic activation events. It has been proposed that PS externalization is regulated by the activity of PLSCR1 (phospholipid scramblase 1), a Ca(2+)-dependent endofacial plasma membrane protein, which is tyrosine-phosphorylated in activated cells. It is, however, unclear how the phosphorylation of PLSCR1 is related to its membrane topography, PS externalization, and exocytosis. Using rat basophilic leukemia cells as a model, we show that nonapoptotic PS externalization induced through the high affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonRI) or the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein Thy-1 does not correlate with enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLSCR1. In addition, PS externalization in FcepsilonRI- or Thy-1-activated cells is not associated with alterations of PLSCR1 fine topography as detected by electron microscopy on isolated plasma membrane sheets. In contrast, activation by calcium ionophore A23187 induces changes in the cellular distribution of PLSCR1. We also show for the first time that in pervanadate-activated cells, exocytosis occurs even in the absence of PS externalization. Finally, we document here that tyrosine-phosphorylated PLSCR1 is preferentially located in detergent-insoluble membranes, suggesting its involvement in the formation of membrane-bound signaling assemblies. The combined data indicate that changes in the topography of PLSCR1 and its tyrosine phosphorylation, PS externalization, and exocytosis are independent phenomena that could be distinguished by employing specific conditions of activation. PMID:18281686

  16. Snake Cytotoxins Bind to Membranes via Interactions with Phosphatidylserine Head Groups of Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Konshina, Anastasia G.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Utkin, Yuri N.; Omel'kov, Anton V.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2011-01-01

    The major representatives of Elapidae snake venom, cytotoxins (CTs), share similar three-fingered fold and exert diverse range of biological activities against various cell types. CT-induced cell death starts from the membrane recognition process, whose molecular details remain unclear. It is known, however, that the presence of anionic lipids in cell membranes is one of the important factors determining CT-membrane binding. In this work, we therefore investigated specific interactions between one of the most abundant of such lipids, phosphatidylserine (PS), and CT 4 of Naja kaouthia using a combined, experimental and modeling, approach. It was shown that incorporation of PS into zwitterionic liposomes greatly increased the membrane-damaging activity of CT 4 measured by the release of the liposome-entrapped calcein fluorescent dye. The CT-induced leakage rate depends on the PS concentration with a maximum at approximately 20% PS. Interestingly, the effects observed for PS were much more pronounced than those measured for another anionic lipid, sulfatide. To delineate the potential PS binding sites on CT 4 and estimate their relative affinities, a series of computer simulations was performed for the systems containing the head group of PS and different spatial models of CT 4 in aqueous solution and in an implicit membrane. This was done using an original hybrid computational protocol implementing docking, Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. As a result, at least three putative PS-binding sites with different affinities to PS molecule were delineated. Being located in different parts of the CT molecule, these anion-binding sites can potentially facilitate and modulate the multi-step process of the toxin insertion into lipid bilayers. This feature together with the diverse binding affinities of the sites to a wide variety of anionic targets on the membrane surface appears to be functionally meaningful and may adjust CT action against different types of

  17. Computing membrane-AQP5-phosphatidylserine binding affinities with hybrid steered molecular dynamics approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liao Y

    2015-01-01

    In order to elucidate how phosphatidylserine (PS6) interacts with AQP5 in a cell membrane, we develop a hybrid steered molecular dynamics (hSMD) method that involves (1) simultaneously steering two centers of mass of two selected segments of the ligand and (2) equilibrating the ligand-protein complex with and without biasing the system. Validating hSMD, we first study vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) in complex with N-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-((pyridin-4-ylmethyl)amino)benzamide (8ST), for which the binding energy is known from in vitro experiments. In this study, our computed binding energy well agrees with the experimental value. Knowing the accuracy of this hSMD method, we apply it to the AQP5-lipid-bilayer system to answer an outstanding question relevant to AQP5’s physiological function: Will the PS6, a lipid having a single long hydrocarbon tail that was found in the central pore of the AQP5 tetramer crystal, actually bind to and inhibit AQP5’s central pore under near-physiological conditions, namely, when AQP5 tetramer is embedded in a lipid bilayer? We find, in silico, using the CHARMM 36 force field, that binding PS6 to AQP5 is a factor of 3 million weaker than “binding” it in the lipid bilayer. This suggests that AQP5’s central pore will not be inhibited by PS6 or a similar lipid in a physiological environment. PMID:25955791

  18. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  19. Phosphatidylserine translocation to the mitochondrion is an ATP-dependent process in permeabilized animal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voelker, D.R. )

    1989-12-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were pulse labeled with ({sup 3}H)serine, and the synthesis of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine from phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine during the subsequent chase was used as a measure of lipid translocation to the mitochondria. When the CHO-K1 cells were pulse labeled and subsequently permeabilized with 50 {mu}g of saponin per ml, there was no significant turnover of nascent phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine to form phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine during an ensuring chase. Supplementation of the permeabilized cells with 2 mM ATP resulted in significant phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine synthesis (83% of that found in intact cells) from phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine during a subsequent 2-hr chase. Phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine synthesis essentially ceased after 2 hr in the permeabilized cells. The translocation-dependent synthesis of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine was a saturable process with respect to ATP concentration in permeabilized cells. The conversion of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)serine to phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine did not occur in saponin-treated cultures supplemented with 2 mM AMP, 2 mM 5{prime}-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, or apyrase plus 2 mM ATP. ATP was the most effective nucleotide, but the addition of GTP, CTP, UTP, and ADP also supported the translocation-dependent synthesis of phosphatidyl({sup 3}H)ethanolamine albeit to a lesser extent. These data provide evidence that the interorganelle translocation of phosphatidylserine requires ATP and is largely independent of soluble cytosolic proteins.

  20. A unique antioxidant activity of phosphatidylserine on iron-induced lipid peroxidation of phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Dacaranhe, C D; Terao, J

    2001-10-01

    The relationship between the antioxidant effect of acidic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylserine (PS), on iron-induced lipid peroxidation of phospholipid bilayers and their abilities to bind iron ion was examined in egg yolk phosphatidylcholine large unilamellar vesicles (EYPC LUV). The effect of each acidic phospholipid added to the vesicles at 10 mol% was assessed by measuring phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides (PC-OOH) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. The addition of dipalmitoyl PS (DPPS) showed a significant inhibitory effect, although the other two acidic phospholipids, dipalmitoyl PA (DPPA) and dipalmitoyl PG (DPPG), did not exert the inhibition. Neither dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC) nor dipalmitoyl phophatidylethanolamine (DPPE) showed any remarkable inhibition on this system. None of the tested phospholipids affected the lipid peroxidation rate remarkably when the vesicles were exposed to a water-soluble radical generator. The iron-binding ability of each phospholipid was estimated on the basis of the amounts of iron recovered in the chloroform/methanol phase after separation of the vesicle solution to water/methanol and chloroform/methanol phases. EYPC LUV containing DPPS, DPPA, and DPPG had higher amounts of bound iron than those containing DPPC and DPPE, indicating that these three acidic phospholipids possess an iron-binding ability at a similar level. Nevertheless, only DPPS suppressed iron-dependent decomposition of PC-OOH significantly. Therefore, it is likely that these three acidic phospholipids possess a significant iron-binding ability, although this ability per se does not warrant them antioxidative activities. The ability to suppress the iron-dependent decomposition of PC-OOH may explain the unique antioxidant activity of PS. PMID:11768154

  1. Temporal changes in phosphatidylserine expression and glucose metabolism after myocardial infarction: an in vivo imaging study in mice.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Sebastian; Todica, Andrei; Brunner, Stefan; Uebleis, Christopher; Wang, Hao; Wängler, Carmen; Herbach, Nadja; Herrler, Tanja; Böning, Guido; Laubender, Rüdiger Paul; Cumming, Paul; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Franz, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) for in vivo monitoring of phosphatidylserine externalization and glucose metabolism can potentially provide early predictors of outcome of cardioprotective therapies after myocardial infarction. We performed serial [⁶⁸Ga]annexin A5 PET (annexin-PET) and [¹⁸F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) after myocardial infarction to determine the time of peak phosphatidylserine externalization in relation to impaired glucose metabolism in infracted tissue. Annexin- and FDG-PET recordings were obtained in female (C57BL6/N) mice on days 1 to 4 after ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. [⁶⁸Ga]annexin A5 uptake (%ID/g) in the LAD artery territory increased from 1.7 ± 1.1 on day 1 to 5.0 ± 3.3 on day 2 and then declined to 2.0 ± 1.4 on day 3 (p  =  .047 vs day 2) and 1.6 ± 1.4 on day 4 (p  =  .014 vs day 2). These results matched apoptosis rates as estimated by autoradiography and fluorescein staining. FDG uptake (%ID/g) declined from 28 ± 14 on day 1 to 14 ± 3.5 on day 4 (p < .0001 vs day 1). Whereas FDG-PET revealed continuous loss of cell viability after permanent LAD artery occlusion, annexin-PET indicated peak phosphatidylserine expression at day 2, which might be the optimal time point for therapy monitoring. PMID:23084247

  2. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  3. Structure and Fluctuations of Charged Phosphatidylserine Bilayers in the Absence of Salt

    PubMed Central

    Petrache, Horia I.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Gawrisch, Klaus; Harries, Daniel; Parsegian, V. Adrian; Nagle, John F.

    2004-01-01

    Using x-ray diffraction and NMR spectroscopy, we present structural and material properties of phosphatidylserine (PS) bilayers that may account for the well documented implications of PS headgroups in cell activity. At 30°C, the 18-carbon monounsaturated DOPS in the fluid state has a cross-sectional area of 65.3 Å2 which is remarkably smaller than the area 72.5 Å2 of the DOPC analog, despite the extra electrostatic repulsion expected for charged PS headgroups. Similarly, at 20°C, the 14-carbon disaturated DMPS in the gel phase has an area of 40.8 Å2 vs. 48.1 Å2 for DMPC. This condensation of area suggests an extra attractive interaction, perhaps hydrogen bonding, between PS headgroups. Unlike zwitterionic lipids, stacks of PS bilayers swell indefinitely as water is added. Data obtained for osmotic pressure versus interbilayer water spacing for fluid phase DOPS are well fit by electrostatic interactions calculated for the Gouy-Chapman regime. It is shown that the electrostatic interactions completely dominate the fluctuational pressure. Nevertheless, the x-ray data definitively exhibit the effects of fluctuations in fluid phase DOPS. From our measurements of fluctuations, we obtain the product of the bilayer bending modulus KC and the smectic compression modulus B. At the same interbilayer separation, the interbilayer fluctuations are smaller in DOPS than for DOPC, showing that B and/or KC are larger. Complementing the x-ray data, 31P-chemical shift anisotropy measured by NMR suggest that the DOPS headgroups are less sensitive to osmotic pressure than DOPC headgroups, which is consistent with a larger KC in DOPS. Quadrupolar splittings for D2O decay less rapidly with increasing water content for DOPS than for DOPC, indicating greater perturbation of interlamellar water and suggesting a greater interlamellar hydration force in DOPS. Our comparisons between bilayers of PS and PC lipids with the same chains and the same temperature enable us to focus on the

  4. Phosphatidylserine-induced Factor Xa Dimerization and Binding to Factor Va Are Competing Processes in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Rinku; Koklic, Tilen; Rezaie, Alireza R.; Lentz, Barry R.

    2013-01-01

    A soluble, short chain phosphatidylserine, 1,2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (C6PS), binds to discrete sites on FXa, FVa, and prothrombin to alter their conformations, to promote FXa dimerization (Kd ~ 14 nM), and to enhance both the catalytic activity of FXa and the cofactor activity of FVa. In the presence of calcium, C6PS binds to two sites on FXa, one in the epidermal growth factor like (EGF) domain and one in the catalytic domain; the latter interaction is sensitive to Na+ binding and probably represents a protein recognition site. Here we ask whether dimerization of FXa and its binding to FVa in the presence of C6PS are competitive processes. We monitored FXa activity at 5, 20 and 50 nM FXa while titrating with FVa in the presence of 400 µM C6PS and 3 or 5 mM Ca2+ to show that the apparent Kd of FVa-FXa interaction increased with increasing FXa concentration at 5 mM Ca2+, but the Kd was only slightly affected at 3 mM Ca2+. A mixture of 50 nM FXa and 50 nM FVa in the presence of 400 µM C6PS yielded both Xa homodimers and Xa ·Va heterodimers but no FXa dimers bound to FVa. A mutant FXa (R165A) that has reduced prothrombinase activity showed both reduced dimerization (Kd~147 nM) and reduced FVa binding (apparent Kd, = 58, 92 and 128 nM, respectively for 5, 20 and 50 nM R165A FXa). Native gel electrophoresis showed that the GLA-EGFNC fragment of FXa (lacking the catalytic domain) neither dimerized nor formed a complex with FVa in the presence of 400 µM C6PS and 5 mM Ca2+. Our results demonstrate that the dimerization site and FVa binding site are both located in the catalytic domain of FXa and that these sites are linked thermodynamically. PMID:23214401

  5. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  6. Vascular Imaging of Solid Tumors in Rats with a Radioactive Arsenic-Labeled Antibody that Binds Exposed Phosphatidylserine

    PubMed Central

    Jennewein, Marc; Lewis, Matthew A.; Zhao, Dawen; Tsyganov, Edward; Slavine, Nikolai; He, Jin; Watkins, Linda; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; O'Kelly, Sean; Kulkarni, Padmakar; Antich, Peter P.; Hermanne, Alex; Roösch, Frank; Mason, Ralph P.; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We recently reported that anionic phospholipids, principally phosphatidylserine, become exposed on the external surface of vascular endothelial cells in tumors, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that a chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds phosphatidylserine could be labeled with radioactive arsenic isotopes and used for molecular imaging of solid tumors in rats. Experimental Design Bavituximab was labeled with 74As (β+,T1/2 17.8 days) or 77As (β−,T1/2 1.6 days) using a novel procedure. The radionuclides of arsenic were selected because their long half-lives are consistent with the long biological half lives of antibodies in vivo and because their chemistry permits stable attachment to antibodies. The radiolabeled antibodies were tested for the ability to image subcutaneous Dunning prostate R3227-AT1 tumors in rats. Results Clear images of the tumors were obtained using planar γ-scintigraphy and positron emission tomography. Biodistribution studies confirmed the specific localization of bavituximab to the tumors. The tumor-to-liver ratio 72 h after injection was 22 for bavituximab compared with 1.5 for an isotype-matched control chimeric antibody of irrelevant specificity. Immunohistochemical studies showed that the bavituximab was labeling the tumor vascular endothelium. Conclusions These results show that radioarsenic-labeled bavituximab has potential as a new tool for imaging the vasculature of solid tumors. PMID:18316558

  7. Phosphatidylserine stimulation of Drs2p·Cdc50p lipid translocase dephosphorylation is controlled by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Aurore; Montigny, Cédric; Hennrich, Hanka; Barry, Raphaëlle; le Maire, Marc; Jaxel, Christine; Holthuis, Joost; Champeil, Philippe; Lenoir, Guillaume

    2012-04-13

    Here, Drs2p, a yeast lipid translocase that belongs to the family of P(4)-type ATPases, was overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae together with Cdc50p, its glycosylated partner, as a result of the design of a novel co-expression vector. The resulting high yield allowed us, using crude membranes or detergent-solubilized membranes, to measure the formation from [γ-(32)P]ATP of a (32)P-labeled transient phosphoenzyme at the catalytic site of Drs2p. Formation of this phosphoenzyme could be detected only if Cdc50p was co-expressed with Drs2p but was not dependent on full glycosylation of Cdc50p. It was inhibited by orthovanadate and fluoride compounds. In crude membranes, the phosphoenzyme formed at steady state at 4 °C displayed ADP-insensitive but temperature-sensitive decay. Solubilizing concentrations of dodecyl maltoside left this decay rate almost unaltered, whereas several other detergents accelerated it. Unexpectedly, the dephosphorylation rate for the solubilized Drs2p·Cdc50p complex was inhibited by the addition of phosphatidylserine. Phosphatidylserine exerted its anticipated accelerating effect on the dephosphorylation of Drs2p·Cdc50p complex only in the additional presence of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate. These results explain why phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate tightly controls Drs2p-catalyzed lipid transport and establish the functional relevance of the Drs2p·Cdc50p complex overexpressed here. PMID:22351780

  8. Rat exposure in mice with neuropathic pain induces fear and antinociception that is not reversed by 5-HT2C receptor activation in the dorsal periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Furuya-da-Cunha, Elke Mayumi; Souza, Rimenez Rodrigues de; Canto-de-Souza, Azair

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that serotonin 5-HT2C receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) mediate both anxiety and antinociception in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze. The present study examined the effects of intra-dPAG infusion of the serotonin 5-HT2C receptor agonist (MK-212) in the defensive reactions and antinociception in mice with neurophatic pain confronted by a predator. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, and predator confrontation was performed using the rat exposure test (RET). Our results demonstrated that both sham-operated and CCI mice exhibited intense defensive reactions when confronted by rats. However, rat-exposed CCI mice showed reduced pain reactivity in comparison to CCI mice exposed to a toy rat. Intra-dPAG infusion of MK-212 prior to predator exposure did not significantly alter defensive or antinociceptive responses. To our knowledge, our results represent the first evidence of RET-induced antinociception in mice. Moreover, the results of the present study suggest that 5-HT2C receptor activation in the dPAG is not critically involved in the control of predator-evoked fearful or antinociceptive responses. PMID:27059332

  9. In vivo chronic nicotine exposure differentially and reversibly affects upregulation and stoichiometry of α4β2 nicotinic receptors in cortex and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, F; Moretti, M; Zoli, M; Pistillo, F; Crespi, A; Clementi, F; Mc Clure-Begley, T; Marks, M J; Gotti, C

    2016-09-01

    Studies with heterologous expression systems have shown that the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype can exist in two stoichiometries (with two [(α4)2(β2)3] or three [(α4)3(β2)2] copies of the α subunit in the receptor pentamer) which have different pharmacological and functional properties and are differently regulated by chronic nicotine treatment. However, the effects of nicotine treatment in vivo on native α4β2 nAChR stoichiometry are not well known. We investigated in C57BL/6 mice the in vivo effect of 14-day chronic nicotine treatment and subsequent withdrawal, on the subunit expression and β2/α4 subunit ratio of (3)H-epibatidine labeled α4β2*-nAChR in total homogenates of cortex and thalamus. We found that in basal conditions the ratio of the β2/α4 subunit in the cortex and thalamus is different indicating a higher proportion in receptors with (α4)2(β2)3 subunit stoichiometry in the thalamus. For cortex exposure to chronic nicotine elicited an increase in receptor density measured by (3)H-epibatidine binding, an increase in the α4 and β2 protein levels, and an increase in β2/α4 subunit ratio, that indicates an increased proportion of receptors with the (α4)2(β2)3 stoichiometry. For thalamus we did not find a significant increase in receptor density, α4 and β2 protein levels, or changes in β2/α4 subunit ratio. All the changes elicited by chronic nicotine in cortex were transient and returned to basal levels with an average half-life of 2.8 days following nicotine withdrawal. These data suggest that chronic nicotine exposure in vivo favors increased assembly of α4β2 nAChR containing three β2 subunits. A greater change in stoichiometry was observed for cortex (which has relatively low basal expression of (α4)2(β2)3 nAChR) than in thalamus (which has a relatively high basal expression of (α4)2(β2)3 nAChR). PMID:27157710

  10. Methyl isobutyl ketone exposure-related increases in specific measures of α2u-globulin (α2u) nephropathy in male rats along with in vitro evidence of reversible protein binding.

    PubMed

    Borghoff, S J; Poet, T S; Green, S; Davis, J; Hughes, B; Mensing, T; Sarang, S S; Lynch, A M; Hard, G C

    2015-07-01

    Chronic exposure to methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) resulted in an increase in the incidence of renal tubule adenomas and occurrence of renal tubule carcinomas in male, but not female Fischer 344 rats. Since a number of chemicals have been shown to cause male rat renal tumors through the α2u nephropathy-mediated mode of action, the objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of MIBK to induce measures of α2u nephropathy including renal cell proliferation in male and female F344 rats following exposure to the same inhalation concentrations used in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) cancer bioassay (0, 450, 900, or 1800ppm). Rats were exposed 6h/day for 1 or 4 weeks and kidneys excised approximately 18h post exposure to evaluate hyaline droplet accumulation (HDA), α2u staining of hyaline droplets, renal cell proliferation, and to quantitate renal α2u concentration. There was an exposure-related increase in all measures of α2u nephropathy in male, but not female rat kidneys. The hyaline droplets present in male rat kidney stained positively for α2u. The changes in HDA and α2u concentration were comparable to d-limonene, an acknowledged inducer of α2u nephropathy. In a separate in vitro study using a two-compartment vial equilibration model to assess the interaction between MIBK and α2u, the dissociation constant (Kd) was estimated to be 1.27×10(-5)M. This Kd is within the range of other chemicals known to bind to α2u and cause nephropathy. Together, the exposure-related increase in measures of α2u nephropathy, sustained increase in renal cell proliferation along with an indication of reversible binding of MIBK to α2u, support the inclusion of MIBK in the category of chemicals exerting renal effects through a protein droplet α2u nephropathy-mediated mode of action (MoA). PMID:25797582

  11. Aspirin induces cell death and caspase-dependent phosphatidylserine externalization in HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, E; Dalmau, M; Barragán, M; Pueyo, G; Bartrons, R; Gil, J

    1999-01-01

    The induction of cell death by aspirin was analysed in HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. Aspirin induced two hallmarks of apoptosis: nuclear chromatin condensation and increase in phosphatidylserine externalization. However, aspirin did not induce either oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA, decrease in DNA content or nuclear fragmentation. The effect of aspirin on Annexin V binding was inhibited by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk, indicating the involvement of caspases in the apoptotic action of aspirin. However, aspirin did not induce proteolysis of PARP, suggesting that aspirin does not increase nuclear caspase 3-like activity in HT-29 cells. This finding may be related with the ‘atypical’ features of aspirin-induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10496355

  12. Modulated mechanism of phosphatidylserine on the catalytic activity of Naja naja atra phospholipase A2 and Notechis scutatus scutatus notexin.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Yi-Ling; Lin, Shinne-Ren; Hu, Wan-Ping; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-12-15

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization is a hallmark for apoptotic death of cells. Previous studies showed that Naja naja atra phospholipase A2 (NnaPLA2) and Notechis scutatus scutatus notexin induced apoptosis of human cancer cells. However, NnaPLA2 and notexin did not markedly disrupt the integrity of cellular membrane as evidenced by membrane permeability of propidium iodide. These findings reflected that the ability of NnaPLA2 and notexin to hydrolyze membrane phospholipids may be affected by PS externalization. To address that question, this study investigated the membrane-interacted mode and catalytic activity of NnaPLA2 and notexin toward outer leaflet (phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin/cholesterol, PC/SM/Chol) and inner leaflet (phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine/cholesterol, PS/PE/Chol) of plasma membrane-mimicking vesicles. PS incorporation promoted enzymatic activity of NnaPLA2 and notexin on PC and PC/SM vesicles, but suppressed NnaPLA2 and notexin activity on PC/SM/Chol and PE/Chol vesicles. PS incorporation increased the membrane fluidity of PC vesicles but reduced membrane fluidity of PC/SM, PC/SM/Chol and PE/Chol vesicles. PS increased the phospholipid order of all the tested vesicles. Moreover, PS incorporation did not greatly alter the binding affinity of notexin and NnaPLA2 with phospholipid vesicles. Acrylamide quenching studies and trinitrophenylation of Lys residues revealed that membrane-bound mode of notexin and NnaPLA2 varied with the targeted membrane compositions. The fine structure of catalytic site in NnaPLA2 and notexin in all the tested vesicles showed different changes. Collectively, the present data suggest that membrane-inserted PS modulates PLA2 interfacial activity via its effects on membrane structure and membrane-bound mode of NnaPLA2 and notexin, and membrane compositions determine the effect of PS on PLA2 activity. PMID:25449100

  13. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures. PMID:3811050

  14. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2003-12-09

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  15. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2006-04-25

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  16. Reversibility of skeletal fluorosis.

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, P; Thomsen, G

    1983-01-01

    At two x ray examinations in 1957 and 1967, 17 cases of skeletal fluorosis were identified among long term cryolite workers in Copenhagen. In 1982 four of these patients were alive, eight to 15 years after exposure had ended. Radiographs were obtained, and the urinary fluoride excretion was measured. A similar picture emerged in all four cases: extensive fading of the sclerosis of trabecular bone in ribs, vertebral bodies, and pelvis, whereas cortical bone thickening and calcification of muscle insertions and ligaments remained virtually unchanged. The fluoride excretion was increased in three cases (with the shortest exposure free period). These findings indicate that with continuous remodelling of bone tissue trabecular sclerosis is slowly reversible and the excess fluoride is excreted in the urine. Images PMID:6626475

  17. Reversibility of skeletal fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, P; Thomsen, G

    1983-11-01

    At two x ray examinations in 1957 and 1967, 17 cases of skeletal fluorosis were identified among long term cryolite workers in Copenhagen. In 1982 four of these patients were alive, eight to 15 years after exposure had ended. Radiographs were obtained, and the urinary fluoride excretion was measured. A similar picture emerged in all four cases: extensive fading of the sclerosis of trabecular bone in ribs, vertebral bodies, and pelvis, whereas cortical bone thickening and calcification of muscle insertions and ligaments remained virtually unchanged. The fluoride excretion was increased in three cases (with the shortest exposure free period). These findings indicate that with continuous remodelling of bone tissue trabecular sclerosis is slowly reversible and the excess fluoride is excreted in the urine. PMID:6626475

  18. Live-cell imaging to detect phosphatidylserine externalization in brain endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation: implications for the treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Johnson, Michael S; Chen, Biyi; Grace, Michael; Ukath, Jaysree; Lee, Vivienne S; McRobb, Lucinda S; Sedger, Lisa M; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established intervention for brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The processes of AVM vessel occlusion after SRS are poorly understood. To improve SRS efficacy, it is important to understand the cellular response of blood vessels to radiation. The molecular changes on the surface of AVM endothelial cells after irradiation may also be used for vascular targeting. This study investigates radiation-induced externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on endothelial cells using live-cell imaging. METHODS An immortalized cell line generated from mouse brain endothelium, bEnd.3 cells, was cultured and irradiated at different radiation doses using a linear accelerator. PS externalization in the cells was subsequently visualized using polarity-sensitive indicator of viability and apoptosis (pSIVA)-IANBD, a polarity-sensitive probe. Live-cell imaging was used to monitor PS externalization in real time. The effects of radiation on the cell cycle of bEnd.3 cells were also examined by flow cytometry. RESULTS Ionizing radiation effects are dose dependent. Reduction in the cell proliferation rate was observed after exposure to 5 Gy radiation, whereas higher radiation doses (15 Gy and 25 Gy) totally inhibited proliferation. In comparison with cells treated with sham radiation, the irradiated cells showed distinct pseudopodial elongation with little or no spreading of the cell body. The percentages of pSIVA-positive cells were significantly higher (p = 0.04) 24 hours after treatment in the cultures that received 25- and 15-Gy doses of radiation. This effect was sustained until the end of the experiment (3 days). Radiation at 5 Gy did not induce significant PS externalization compared with the sham-radiation controls at any time points (p > 0.15). Flow cytometric analysis data indicate that irradiation induced growth arrest of bEnd.3 cells, with cells accumulating in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. CONCLUSIONS Ionizing radiation

  19. Fluorescent detection of apoptotic cells using a family of zinc coordination complexes with selective affinity for membrane surfaces that are enriched with phosphatidylserine.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Bradley D.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Lakshmi, C.; Hanshaw, Roger, G.

    2005-03-01

    The appearance of phosphatidylserine on the membrane surface of apoptotic cells (Jurkat, CHO, HeLa) is monitored by using a family of bis(Zn{sup 2+}-2,2{prime}-dipicolylamine) coordination compounds with appended fluorescein or biotin groups as reporter elements. The phosphatidylserine affinity group is also conjugated directly to a CdSe/CdS quantum dot to produce a probe suitable for prolonged observation without photobleaching. Apoptosis can be detected under a wide variety of conditions, including variations in temperature, incubation time, and binding media. Binding of each probe appears to be restricted to the cell membrane exterior, because no staining of organelles or internal membranes is observed.

  20. p85α recruitment by the CD300f phosphatidylserine receptor mediates apoptotic cell clearance required for autoimmunity suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Linjie; Choi, Seung-Chul; Murakami, Yousuke; Allen, Joselyn; Morse, Herbert C., III; Qi, Chen-Feng; Krzewski, Konrad; Coligan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell (AC) clearance is essential for immune homeostasis. Here we show that mouse CD300f (CLM-1) recognizes outer membrane-exposed phosphatidylserine, and regulates the phagocytosis of ACs. CD300f accumulates in phagocytic cups at AC contact sites. Phosphorylation within CD300f cytoplasmic tail tyrosine-based motifs initiates signals that positively or negatively regulate AC phagocytosis. Y276 phosphorylation is necessary for enhanced CD300f-mediated phagocytosis through the recruitment of the p85α regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). CD300f-PI3K association leads to activation of downstream Rac/Cdc42 GTPase and mediates changes of F-actin that drive AC engulfment. Importantly, primary macrophages from CD300f-deficient mice have impaired phagocytosis of ACs. The biological consequence of CD300f deficiency is predisposition to autoimmune disease development, as FcγRIIB-deficient mice develop a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease at a markedly accelerated rate if CD300f is absent. In this report we identify the mechanism and role of CD300f in AC phagocytosis and maintenance of immune homeostasis.

  1. Phosphatidylserine (PS) Is Exposed in Choroidal Neovascular Endothelium: PS-Targeting Antibodies Inhibit Choroidal Angiogenesis In Vivo and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Aredo, Bogale; Zhang, Kaiyan; Zhong, Xin; Pulido, Jose S.; Wang, Shusheng; He, Yu-Guang; Huang, Xianming; Brekken, Rolf A.; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) accounts for 90% of cases of severe vision loss in patients with advanced age-related macular degeneration. Identifying new therapeutic targets for CNV may lead to novel combination therapies to improve outcomes and reduce treatment burden. Our goal was to test whether phosphatidylserine (PS) becomes exposed in the outer membrane of choroidal neovascular endothelium, and whether this could provide a new therapeutic target for CNV. Methods Choroidal neovascularization was induced in C57BL/6J mice using laser photocoagulation. Choroidal neovascularization lesions costained for exposed PS and for intercellular adhesion molecule 2 (or isolectin B4) were imaged in flat mounts and in cross sections. The laser CNV model and a choroidal sprouting assay were used to test the effect of PS-targeting antibodies on choroidal angiogenesis. Choroidal neovascularization lesion size was determined by intercellular adhesion molecule 2 (ICAM-2) staining of flat mounts. Results We found that PS was exposed in CNV lesions and colocalized with vascular endothelial staining. Treatment with PS-targeting antibodies led to a 40% to 80% reduction in CNV lesion area when compared to treatment with a control antibody. The effect was the same as that seen using an equal dose of an anti-VEGF antibody. Results were confirmed using the choroid sprouting assay, an ex vivo model of choroidal angiogenesis. Conclusions We demonstrated that PS is exposed in choroidal neovascular endothelium. Furthermore, targeting this exposed PS with antibodies may be of therapeutic value in CNV. PMID:26529048

  2. Phosphatidylserine containing liposomes reduce immunogenicity of recombinant human factor VIII (rFVIII) in a murine model of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Karthik; Miclea, Razvan D; Purohit, Vivek S; Mager, Donald E; Straubinger, Robert M; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2008-04-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is a multidomain protein that is deficient in hemophilia A, a clinically important bleeding disorder. Replacement therapy using recombinant human FVIII (rFVIII) is the main therapy. However, approximately 15-30% of patients develop inhibitory antibodies that neutralize rFVIII activity. Antibodies to epitopes in C2 domain, which is involved in FVIII binding to phospholipids, are highly prevalent. Here, we investigated the effect of phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing liposomes, which bind to C2 domain with high affinity and specificity, upon the immunogenicity of rFVIII. Circular dichroism studies showed that PS-containing liposomes interfered with aggregation of rFVIII. Immunogenicity of free- versus liposomal-rFVIII was evaluated in a murine model of hemophilia A. Animals treated with s.c. injections of liposomal-rFVIII had lower total- and inhibitory titers, compared to animals treated with rFVIII alone. Antigen processing by proteolytic enzymes was reduced in the presence of liposomes. Animals treated with s.c. injections of liposomal-rFVIII showed a significant increase in rFVIII plasma concentration compared to animals that received rFVIII alone. Based on these studies, we hypothesize that specific molecular interactions between PS-containing bilayers and rFVIII may provide a basis for designing lipidic complexes that improve the stability, reduce the immunogenicity of rFVIII formulations, and permit administration by s.c. route. PMID:17705286

  3. Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) Binds to Phosphatidylserine Exposing Cells with Implications in the Phagocytosis of Apoptotic Cells and Activated Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Daniela; Assinger, Alice; Einfinger, Katrin; Sokolikova, Barbora; Geiger, Margarethe

    2014-01-01

    Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS) is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10–30% of cells). PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal. PMID:25000564

  4. Melanoma cell surface-expressed phosphatidylserine as a therapeutic target for cationic anticancer peptide, temporin-1CEa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Che; Chen, Yin-Wang; Zhang, Liang; Gong, Xian-Ge; Zhou, Yang; Shang, De-Jing

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that temporin-1CEa, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, exerts preferential cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. However, the exact molecular mechanism for this cancer-selectivity is still largely unknown. Here, we found that the negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed on cancer cell surface serves as a target for temporin-1CEa. Our results indicate that human A375 melanoma cells express 50-fold more PS than non-cancerous HaCaT cells. The expression of cell surface PS in various cancer cell lines closely correlated with their ability to be recognized, bound and killed by temporin-1CEa. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of temporin-1CEa against A375 cells can be ameliorated by annexin V, which binds to cell surface PS with high affinity. Moreover, the data of isothermal titration calorimetry assay further confirmed a direct binding of temporin-1CEa to PS, at a ratio of 1:5 (temporin-1CEa:PS). Interestingly, the circular dichroism spectra analysis using artificial biomembrane revealed that PS not only provides electrostatic attractive sites for temporin-1CEa but also confers the membrane-bound temporin-1CEa to form α-helical structure, therefore, enhances the affinity and membrane disrupting ability of temporin-1CEa. In summary, these findings suggested that the melanoma cells expressed PS may serve as a promising target for temporin-1CEa or other cationic anticancer peptides. PMID:26596643

  5. Targeted detection of phosphatidylserine in biomimetic membranes and in vitro cell systems using annexin V-containing cubosomes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lake, Vanessa; Le Brun, Anton P; James, Michael; Duff, Anthony P; Peng, Yong; McLean, Keith M; Hartley, Patrick G

    2013-11-01

    In this work we have formulated Annexin V (ANX) decorated phosphatidylserine containing phytantriol (PSPhy) cubosomes to act as probes for the enhanced detection of apoptotic membranes in both model and in vitro cell systems. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) indicated that ANX-containing PSPhy (ANX-PSPhy) cubosomes retain the Pn3m cubic symmetry and cubic phase nanoparticle characteristics of PSPhy cubosomes. The interaction of ANX-PSPhy cubosomes with apoptotic model and cellular membranes was also investigated using both quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and confocal microscopy which confirmed that ANX-PSPhy cubosomes can selectively bind to apoptotic cells and model membranes. Neutron reflectometry has also been used to show strong binding of ANX-PSPhy cubosomes to a model apoptotic membrane, and in addition reveals changes in both the bilayer structure and in the internal structure of the cubosome in a region adjacent to the membrane as a result of material exchange. This material exchange between cubosome and apoptotic model bilayer was further demonstrated using Cryo-TEM. We have demonstrated that lipid bound protein, in this case Annexin V, can be used to target cubosome systems to biological surfaces in vitro. PMID:23899446

  6. Deoxygenation-induced and Ca(2+) dependent phosphatidylserine externalisation in red blood cells from normal individuals and sickle cell patients.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Erwin; Cytlak, Urszula M; Rees, David C; Osei, Anna; Gibson, John S

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is usually confined to the inner leaflet of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane. It may become externalised in various conditions, however, notably in RBCs from patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) where exposed PS may contribute to anaemic and ischaemic complications. PS externalisation requires both inhibition of the aminophospholipid translocase (or flippase) and activation of the scramblase. Both may follow from elevation of intracellular Ca(2+). Flippase inhibition occurs at low [Ca(2+)](i), about 1μM, but [Ca(2+)](i) required for scrambling is reported to be much higher (around 100μM). In this work, FITC-labelled lactadherin and FACS were used to measure externalised PS, with [Ca(2+)](i) altered using bromo-A23187 and EGTA/Ca(2+) mixtures. Two components of Ca(2+)-induced scrambling were apparent, of high (EC(50) 1.8±0.3μM) and low (306±123μM) affinity, in RBCs from normal individuals and the commonest SCD genotypes, HbSS and HbSC. The high affinity component was lost in the presence of unphysiologically high [Mg(2+)] but was unaffected by high K(+) (90mM) or vanadate (1mM). The high affinity component accounted for PS scrambling in ≥2/3rd RBCs. It is likely to be most significant in vivo and may be involved in the pathophysiology of SCD or other conditions involving eryptosis. PMID:22197026

  7. p85α recruitment by the CD300f phosphatidylserine receptor mediates apoptotic cell clearance required for autoimmunity suppression

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Linjie; Choi, Seung-Chul; Murakami, Yousuke; Allen, Joselyn; Morse, Herbert C.; Qi, Chen-Feng; Krzewski, Konrad; Coligan, John E

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell (AC) clearance is essential for immune homeostasis. Here we show that mouse CD300f (CLM-1) recognizes outer membrane-exposed phosphatidylserine, and regulates the phagocytosis of ACs. CD300f accumulates in phagocytic cups at AC contact sites. Phosphorylation within CD300f cytoplasmic tail tyrosine-based motifs initiates signals that positively or negatively regulate AC phagocytosis. Y276 phosphorylation is necessary for enhanced CD300f-mediated phagocytosis through the recruitment of the p85α regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). CD300f-PI3K association leads to activation of downstream Rac/Cdc42 GTPase and mediates changes of F-actin that drive AC engulfment. Importantly, primary macrophages from CD300f-deficient mice have impaired phagocytosis of ACs. The biological consequence of CD300f deficiency is predisposition to autoimmune disease development, as FcγRIIB-deficient mice develop a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease at a markedly accelerated rate if CD300f is absent. In this report we identify the mechanism and role of CD300f in AC phagocytosis and maintenance of immune homeostasis. PMID:24477292

  8. Identification of the minimum pharmacophore of lipid-phosphatidylserine (PS) binding peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1D1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspal; Shukla, Satya Prakash; Desai, Tanvi J; Udugamasooriya, D Gomika

    2016-09-15

    We previously reported a unique peptide-peptoid hybrid, PPS1 that specifically recognizes lipid-phosphatidylserine (PS) and a few other negatively charged phospholipids, but not neutral phospholipids, on the cell membrane. The dimeric version of PPS1, i.e., PPS1D1 triggers strong cancer cell cytotoxicity and has been validated in lung cancer models both in vitro and in vivo. Given that PS and other negatively charged phospholipids are abundant in almost all tumor microenvironments, PPS1D1 is an attractive drug lead that can be developed into a globally applicable anti-cancer agent. Therefore, it is extremely important to identify the minimum pharmacophore of PPS1D1. In this study, we have synthesized alanine/sarcosine derivatives as well as truncated derivatives of PPS1D1. We performed ELISA-like competitive binding assay to evaluate the PS-recognition potential and standard MTS cell viability assay on HCC4017 lung cancer cells to validate the cell cytotoxicity effects of these derivatives. Our studies indicate that positively charged residues at the second and third positions, as well as four hydrophobic residues at the fifth through eighth positions, are imperative for the binding and activity of PPS1D1. Methionine at the first position was not essential, whereas the positively charged Nlys at the fourth position was minimally needed, as two derivatives that were synthesized replacing this residue were almost as active as PPS1D1. PMID:27485601

  9. Comparative Study of EPA-enriched Phosphatidylcholine and EPA-enriched Phosphatidylserine on Lipid Metabolism in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Wang, Dan; Zhou, Miaomiao; Du, Lei; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Wang, Yuming

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that EPA enriched PLs have beneficial effects on lipid metabolism. Our previous study has demonstrated that the anti-obesity and hypolipidemic effects of EPA-PL were superior to DHA-PL. In the present study, we comparatively evaluated the effects of EPA-enriched phosphatidylcholine (EPA-PC) and EPA-enriched phosphatidylserine (EPA-PS) on lipid metabolism in mice. Both 2% dietary EPA-PC and EPA-PS significantly improved serum and hepatic lipid levels in mice. The HDL-c level in mice on EPA-PC diet was significantly higher than the other two groups. The level of DHA in hepatic TG and PL were significantly increased in both EPA-PC and EPA-PS fed groups (98.3 and 117.8%, respectively; p < 0.05). Notably, the proportion of DHA in EPA-PS group was significantly higher than the EPA-PC group. EPA-PC and EPA-PS suppressed hepatic SREBP-1c mediated lipogenesis and activated PPARα mediated fatty acid β-oxidation in the liver. These data are the first to indicate that EPA-PS has beneficial effects on lipid metabolism. PMID:27321119

  10. Gem1 and ERMES Do Not Directly Affect Phosphatidylserine Transport from ER to Mitochondria or Mitochondrial Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tammy T; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Choi, Jae-Yeon; Markgraf, Daniel F; Junker, Mirco; Bilgin, Mesut; Ejsing, Christer S; Voelker, Dennis R; Rapoport, Tom A; Shaw, Janet M

    2012-01-01

    In yeast, a protein complex termed the ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure (ERMES) tethers mitochondria to the endoplasmic reticulum. ERMES proteins are implicated in a variety of cellular functions including phospholipid synthesis, mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial attachment to actin, polarized mitochondrial movement into daughter cells during division, and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The mitochondrial-anchored Gem1 GTPase has been proposed to regulate ERMES functions. Here, we show that ERMES and Gem1 have no direct role in the transport of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the ER to mitochondria during the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), as PS to PE conversion is not affected in ERMES or gem1 mutants. In addition, we report that mitochondrial inheritance defects in ERMES mutants are a secondary consequence of mitochondrial morphology defects, arguing against a primary role for ERMES in mitochondrial association with actin and mitochondrial movement. Finally, we show that ERMES complexes are long-lived, and do not depend on the presence of Gem1. Our findings suggest that the ERMES complex may have primarily a structural role in maintaining mitochondrial morphology. PMID:22409400

  11. Deciphering the role of individual acyl chains in the interaction network between phosphatidylserines and a single-spanning membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Mousson, Florence; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Baleux, Françoise; Beswick, Veronica; Sanson, Alain; Neumann, Jean-Michel

    2002-11-19

    PMP1 is a small single-spanning membrane protein functioning as a regulatory subunit of the yeast plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. This protein forms a unique helix and exhibits a positively charged cytoplasmic domain that is able to specifically segregate phosphatidylserines (PSs). A marked groove formed at the helix surface is thought to play a major role in the related lipid-protein interaction network. Mutational analysis and (1)H NMR experiments were therefore performed on a synthetic PMP1 fragment using DPC-d(38) micelles as a membrane-like environment, in the presence of small amounts of POPS. A mutation designed for altering the helix groove was shown to disfavor the POPS binding specificity as much as that affecting the electrostatic interaction network. From POPS titration experiments monitored by a full set of one- and two-dimensional NOESY spectra, the association between the phospholipids and the PMP1 peptide has been followed. Our data reveal that the clustering of POPS molecules is promoted from a stabilized framework obtained by coupling the PMP1 helix groove to a POPS sn-2 chain. To our knowledge, the NOE-based titration plots displayed in this report constitute the first NMR data that directly distinguish the role of the sn-1 and sn-2 acyl chains in a lipid-protein interaction. The results are discussed while taking into account our accurate knowledge of the yeast plasma membrane composition and its ability to form functional lipid rafts. PMID:12427022

  12. Reversible Photoswitching of Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Syamantak; Verma, Navneet Chandra; Gupta, Abhishek; Nandi, Chayan Kanti

    2015-01-01

    We present a method of reversible photoswitching in carbon nanodots with red emission. A mechanism of electron transfer is proposed. The cationic dark state, formed by the exposure of red light, is revived back to the bright state with the very short exposure of blue light. Additionally, the natural on-off state of carbon dot fluorescence was tuned using an electron acceptor molecule. Our observation can make the carbon dots as an excellent candidate for the super-resolution imaging of nanoscale biomolecules within the cell. PMID:26078266

  13. Phosphatidylserine-containing membranes alter the thermal stability of prothrombin's catalytic domain: a differential scanning calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Lentz, B R; Zhou, C M; Wu, J R

    1994-05-10

    Denaturation profiles of bovine prothrombin and its isolated fragments were examined in the presence of Na2EDTA, 5 mM CaCl2, and CaCl2 plus membranes containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-sn-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) in combination with bovine brain phosphatidylserine (PS). We have shown previously [Lentz, B. R., Wu, J. R., Sorrentino, A. M., & Carleton, J. A. (1991) Biophys. J. 60, 70] that binding to PS/POPC (25/75) large unilamellar vesicles resulted in an enthalpy loss in the main endotherm of prothrombin denaturation (Tm approximately 57-58 degrees C) and a comparable enthalpy gain in a minor endotherm (Tm approximately 59 degrees C) accompanying an upward shift in peak temperature (Tm approximately 73 degrees C). This minor endotherm was also responsive to Ca2+ binding and, in the absence of PS/POPC membranes, corresponded to melting of the N-terminal, Ca2+ and membrane binding domain (fragment 1). Peak deconvolution analysis of the prothrombin denaturation profile and extensive studies of the denaturation of isolated prothrombin domains in the presence and absence of PS/POPC vesicles suggested that membrane binding induced changes in the C-terminal catalytic domain of prothrombin (prethrombin 2) and in a domain that links fragment 1 with the catalytic domain (fragment 2). Specifically, the results have confirmed that the fragment 2 domain interacts with the stabilizes the prethrombin 2 domain and also have shown that fragment 2 interacts directly with the membrane. In addition, the results have demonstrated a heretofore unrecognized interaction between the catalytic and membrane binding domains. This interaction can account for another portion of the denaturation enthalpy that appears at high temperatures in the presence of membranes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8180168

  14. Histamine H1-receptor antagonists against Leishmania (L.) infantum: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation using phosphatidylserine-liposomes.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Erika G; da Costa-Silva, Thais A; Tempone, Andre Gustavo

    2014-09-01

    Considering the limited and toxic therapeutic arsenal available for visceral leishmaniasis (VL), the drug repositioning approach could represent a promising tool to the introduction of alternative therapies. Histamine H1-receptor antagonists are drugs belonging to different therapeutic classes, including antiallergics and anxyolitics. In this work, we described for the first time the activity of H1-antagonists against L. (L.) infantum and their potential effectiveness in an experimental hamster model. The evaluation against promastigotes demonstrated that chlorpheniramine, cinnarizine, hydroxyzine, ketotifen, loratadine, quetiapine and risperidone exerted a leishmanicidal effect against promastigotes, with IC50 values in the range of 13-84μM. The antihistaminic drug cinnarizine demonstrated effectiveness against the intracellular amastigotes, with an IC50 value of 21μM. The mammalian cytotoxicity was investigated in NCTC cells, resulting in IC50 values in the range of 57-229μM. Cinnarizine was in vivo studied as a free formulation and entrapped into phosphatidylserine-liposomes. The free drug was administered for eight consecutive days at 50mg/kg by intraperitoneal route (i.p.) and at 100mg/kg by oral route to L. infantum-infected hamsters, but showed lack of effectiveness in both regimens, as detected by real time PCR. The liposomal formulation was administered by i.p. route at 3mg/kg for eight days and reduced the parasite burden to 54% in liver when compared to untreated group; no improvement was observed in the spleen of infected hamsters. Cinnarizine is the first antihistaminic drug with antileishmanial activity and could be used as scaffold for drug design studies for VL. PMID:24905294

  15. Killing of melanoma cells and their metastases by human lactoferricin derivatives requires interaction with the cancer marker phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Sabrina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2014-10-01

    Despite favorable advancements in therapy cancer is still not curative in many cases, which is often due to inadequate specificity for tumor cells. In this study derivatives of a short cationic peptide derived from the human host defense peptide lactoferricin were optimized in their selective toxicity towards cancer cells. We proved that the target of these peptides is the negatively charged membrane lipid phosphatidylserine (PS), specifically exposed on the surface of cancer cells. We have studied the membrane interaction of three peptides namely LF11-322, its N-acyl derivative 6-methyloctanoyl-LF11-322 and its retro repeat derivative R(etro)-DIM-P-LF11-322 with liposomes mimicking cancerous and non-cancerous cell membranes composed of PS and phosphatidylcholine (PC), respectively. Calorimetric and permeability studies showed that N-acylation and even more the repeat derivative of LF11-322 leads to strongly improved interaction with the cancer mimic PS, whereas only the N-acyl derivative also slightly affects PC. Tryptophan fluorescence of selective peptide R-DIM-P-LF11-322 revealed specific peptide penetration into the PS membrane interface and circular dichroism showed change of its secondary structure by increase of proportion of β-sheets just in the presence of the cancer mimic. Data correlated with in vitro studies with cell lines of human melanomas, their metastases and melanocytes, revealing R-DIM-P-LF11-322 to exhibit strongly increased specificity for cancer cells. This indicates the need of high affinity to the target PS, a minimum length and net positive charge, an adequate but moderate hydrophobicity, and capability of adoption of a defined structure exclusively in presence of the target membrane for high antitumor activity. PMID:24838743

  16. Human lactoferricin derived di-peptides deploying loop structures induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells through targeting membranous phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Sabrina; Leber, Regina; Rinner, Beate; Schaider, Helmut; Lohner, Karl; Zweytick, Dagmar

    2015-11-01

    Host defense-derived peptides have emerged as a novel strategy for the development of alternative anticancer therapies. In this study we report on characteristic features of human lactoferricin (hLFcin) derivatives which facilitate specific killing of cancer cells of melanoma, glioblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma compared with non-specific derivatives and the synthetic peptide RW-AH. Changes in amino acid sequence of hLFcin providing 9-11 amino acids stretched derivatives LF11-316, -318 and -322 only yielded low antitumor activity. However, the addition of the repeat (di-peptide) and the retro-repeat (di-retro-peptide) sequences highly improved cancer cell toxicity up to 100% at 20 μM peptide concentration. Compared to the complete parent sequence hLFcin the derivatives showed toxicity on the melanoma cell line A375 increased by 10-fold and on the glioblastoma cell line U-87mg by 2-3-fold. Reduced killing velocity, apoptotic blebbing, activation of caspase 3/7 and formation of apoptotic DNA fragments proved that the active and cancer selective peptides, e.g. R-DIM-P-LF11-322, trigger apoptosis, whereas highly active, though non-selective peptides, such as DIM-LF11-318 and RW-AH seem to kill rapidly via necrosis inducing membrane lyses. Structural studies revealed specific toxicity on cancer cells by peptide derivatives with loop structures, whereas non-specific peptides comprised α-helical structures without loop. Model studies with the cancer membrane mimic phosphatidylserine (PS) gave strong evidence that PS only exposed by cancer cells is an important target for specific hLFcin derivatives. Other negatively charged membrane exposed molecules as sialic acid, heparan and chondroitin sulfate were shown to have minor impact on peptide activity. PMID:26239537

  17. Screening, purification, and identification of annexin B1 mutants with high phosphatidylserine-binding activity and reduced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Luo, Quan-Yong; He, Ying; Sun, Shu-Han

    2007-06-01

    Annexin B1 has many potential biomedical applications based on its high affinity for negatively charged phospholipid (phosphatidylserine, PS) in the presence of physiological concentrations of calcium. Low immunogenicity is prerequisite for the in vivo application of a nonhuman protein as a novel-imaging agent. In the present study, three sequence-deleted mutants with different numbers of functional domains were designed and expressed according to the predicted three-dimensional structure of annexin B1. The mutants of annexin B1, as well as the wild-type annexin B1, were expressed as Glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fusion proteins. Two mutants with their purity above 80% could be obtained after one-step primary purification procedure on basis of the PS-binding activity. The immunogenicity of the two mutants was evaluated in mice by detecting the titers of elicited antigen-specific IgG. A member of three mutants of annexin B1, M12, which involved N-terminal amino-acid sequence and double functional domain I and II of annexin B1, was finally selected to detect apoptosis that is due to its lowest immunogenicity among the candidate mutants. Flourescein isothiocyanate-labeled M12 could bind the outer membranes of apoptotic cells and discriminate apoptotic cells in the early stage from necrotic cells when used with propidium iodide. (99m)Tc-labeled M12 could recognize the apoptotic hepatocytes induced by anti-Fas antibody treatment. Our data in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that M12 could be applied as a promising agent for the detection of apoptosis. PMID:17384946

  18. The intrinsic pKa values for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine in monolayers deposited on mercury electrodes.

    PubMed Central

    Moncelli, M R; Becucci, L; Guidelli, R

    1994-01-01

    The intrinsic pKa values of the phosphate groups of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and of the phosphate and carboxyl groups of phosphatidylserine (PS) in self-organized monolayers deposited on a hanging mercury drop electrode were determined by a novel procedure based on measurements of the differential capacity C of this lipid-coated electrode. In view of the Gouy-Chapman theory, plots of 1/C at constant bulk pH and variable KCl concentration against the reciprocal of the calculated diffuse-layer capacity Cd,0 at zero charge exhibit slopes that decrease from an almost unit value to vanishingly low values as the absolute value of the charge density on the lipid increases from zero to approximately 2 microC cm-2. The intrinsic pKa values so determined are 0.5 for PE and 0.8 for PC. The plots of 1/C against 1/Cd,0 for pure PS exhibit slopes that pass from zero to a maximum value and then back to zero as pH is varied from 7.5 to 3, indicating that the charge density of the lipid film passes from slight negative to slight positive values over this pH range. An explanation for this anomalous behavior, which is ascribed to the phosphate group of PS, is provided. Interdispersion of PS and PC molecules in the film decreases the "formal" pKa value of the latter group by about three orders of magnitude. PMID:8075331

  19. In vitro modeling of matrix vesicle nucleation: synergistic stimulation of mineral formation by annexin A5 and phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Genge, Brian R; Wu, Licia N Y; Wuthier, Roy E

    2007-09-01

    Annexins A5, A2, and A6 (Anx-A5, -A2, and -A6) are quantitatively major proteins of the matrix vesicle nucleational core that is responsible for mineral formation. Anx-A5 significantly activated the induction and propagation of mineral formation when incorporated into synthetic nucleation complexes made of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and Anx-A5 or of phosphatidylserine (PS) plus ACP (PS-CPLX) and Anx-A5. Incorporation of Anx-A5 markedly shortened the induction time, greatly increasing the rate and overall amount of mineral formed when incubated in synthetic cartilage lymph. Constructed by the addition of Ca(2+) to PS, emulsions prepared in an intracellular phosphate buffer matched in ionic composition to the intracellular fluid of growth plate chondrocytes, these biomimetic PS-CPLX nucleators had little nucleational activity. However, incorporation of Anx-A5 transformed them into potent nucleators, with significantly greater activity than those made from ACP without PS. The ability of Anx-A5 to enhance the nucleation and growth of mineral appears to stem from its ability to form two-dimensional crystalline arrays on PS-containing monolayers. However, some stimulatory effect also may result from its ability to exclude Mg(2+) and HCO(-)(3) from nucleation sites. Comparing the various annexins for their ability to activate PS-CPLX nucleation yields the following: avian cartilage Anx-A5 > human placental Anx-A5 > avian liver Anx-A5 > or = avian cartilage Anx-A6 > cartilage Anx-A2. The stimulatory effect of human placental Anx-A5 and avian cartilage Anx-A6 depended on the presence of PS, since in its absence they either had no effect or actually inhibited the nucleation activity of ACP. Anx-A2 did not significantly enhance mineralization. PMID:17613532

  20. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the association of basic proteins with multilayers of diacyl phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Smith, R; Cornell, B A; Keniry, M A; Separovic, F

    1983-08-10

    Lysozyme, cytochrome c, poly(L-lysine), myelin basic protein and ribonuclease were used to form multilayer dispersions containing about 50% protein (by weight) with bovine brain diacyl phosphatidylserine (PS). 31P nuclear magnetic resonance shift anisotropies, spin-spin (T2) and spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times for the lipid headgroup phosphorus were measured at 36.44 MHz. At pH 7.5, lysozyme, cytochrome c, poly(L-lysine) and ribonuclease were shown to increase the chemical shift anisotropy of PS by between 12-20%. Myelin basic protein altered the shape of the phosphate resonance, suggesting the presence of two lipid components, one of which had a modified headgroup conformation. The presence of cytochrome c led to the formation of a narrow spike at the isotropic shift position of the spectrum. Of the various proteins or peptides we have studied, only poly(L-lysine) and cytochrome c had any effect on the T1 of PS (1050 ms). Both caused a 20-30% decrease in T1 of the lamellar-phase phosphate peak. The narrow peak in the presence of cytochrome c had a very short T1 of 156 ms. The possibility is considered that the cytochrome Fe3+ contributes to the phosphate relaxation in this case. The effect of all proteins on the T2 of the phosphorus resonance was to cause an increase from the value for pure PS (1.6 ms) to between 2 and 5 ms. The results obtained with proteins are compared with the effects of small ions and intrinsic membrane proteins on the order and motion of the headgroups of lipids in bilayers. PMID:6191774

  1. Reversible surface aggregation in pore formation by pardaxin.

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, D; Peled, R; Nir, S; Shai, Y

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of leakage induced by surface active peptides is not yet fully understood. To gain insight into the molecular events underlying this process, the leakage induced by the peptide pardaxin from phosphatidylcholine/ phosphatidylserine/cholesterol large unilamellar vesicles was studied by monitoring the rate and extent of dye release and by theoretical modeling. The leakage occurred by an all-or-none mechanism: vesicles either leaked or retained all of their contents. We further developed a mathematical model that includes the assumption that certain peptides become incorporated into the vesicle bilayer and aggregate to form a pore. The current experimental results can be explained by the model only if the surface aggregation of the peptide is reversible. Considering this reversibility, the model can explain the final extents of calcein leakage for lipid/peptide ratios of > 2000:1 to 25:1 by assuming that only a fraction of the bound peptide forms pores consisting of M = 6 +/- 3 peptides. Interestingly, less leakage occurred at 43 degrees C, than at 30 degrees C, although peptide partitioning into the bilayer was enhanced upon elevation of the temperature. We deduced that the increased leakage at 30 degrees C was due to an increase in the extent of reversible surface aggregation at the lower temperature. Experiments employing fluorescein-labeled pardaxin demonstrated reversible aggregation of the peptide in suspension and within the membrane, and exchange of the peptide between liposomes. In summary, our experimental and theoretical results support reversible surface aggregation as the mechanism of pore formation by pardaxin. Images FIGURE 7 PMID:8744290

  2. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  3. Reversible tuning of photonic crystal cavities using photochromic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Deepak; Waks, Edo; Solomon, Glenn; Fourkas, John T.

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate reversible tuning of a photonic crystal cavity resonance using a thin photochromic film composed of spiropyran and polymethylmethacrylate that serves as a photosensitive cladding layer. Exposure of spiropyran to ultraviolet light results in smooth redshift of the cavity resonance that can be reversed by exposure to visible wavelength light. We achieve a reversible resonance shift of up to 2.7 nm, which can be performed locally on individual cavities. The resonance shift over multiple successive UV and visible light exposures is studied to determine the repeatability of the photochromic film.

  4. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  5. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  6. Mass-spectrometric analysis of hydroperoxy- and hydroxy-derivatives of cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine in cells and tissues induced by pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Tungekar, Muhammad A.; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Bayir, Hülya; Greenberger, Joel S.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Shvedova, Anna A.; Pitt, Bruce; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidation of two anionic phospholipids - cardiolipin (CL) in mitochondria and phosphatidylserine (PS) in extramitochondrial compartments - are important signaling events, particularly during the execution of programmed cell death and clearance of apoptotic cells. Quantitative analysis of CL and PS oxidation products is central to understanding their molecular mechanisms of action. We combined the identification of diverse phospholipid molecular species by ESI-MS with quantitative assessments of lipid hydroperoxides using a fluorescence HPLC-based protocol. We characterized CL and PS oxidation products formed in a model system (cyt c/H2O2), in apoptotic cells (neurons, pulmonary artery endothelial cells) and mouse lung under inflammatory/oxidative stress conditions (hyperoxia, inhalation of single walled carbon nanotubes). Our results demonstrate the usefulness of this approach for quantitative assessments, identification of individual molecular species and structural characterization of anionic phospholipids that are involved in oxidative modification in cells and tissues. PMID:19328050

  7. Removal of spermatozoa with externalized phosphatidylserine from sperm preparation in human assisted medical procreation: effects on viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    de Vantéry Arrighi, Corinne; Lucas, Hervé; Chardonnens, Didier; de Agostini, Ariane

    2009-01-01

    Background Externalization of phosphatidylserine (EPS) occurs in apoptotic-like spermatozoa and could be used to remove them from sperm preparations to enhance sperm quality for assisted medical procreation. We first characterized EPS in sperms from infertile patients in terms of frequency of EPS spermatozoa as well as localization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on spermatozoa. Subsequently, we determined the impact of depleting EPS spermatozoa on sperm quality. Methods EPS were visualized by fluorescently-labeled annexin V binding assay. Double staining with annexin V and Hoechst differentiates apoptotic from necrotic spermatozoa. We used magnetic-activated cell sorting using annexin V-conjugated microbeads (MACS-ANMB) technique to remove EPS spermatozoa from sperm prepared by density gradient centrifugation (DGC). The impact of this technique on sperm quality was evaluated by measuring progressive motility, viability, and the integrity of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by Rhodamine 123. Results Mean percentages of EPS spermatozoa were 14% in DGC sperm. Four subpopulations of spermatozoa were identified: 70% alive, 3% early apoptotic, 16% necrotic and 11% late apoptotic or necrotic. PS were localized on head and/or midpiece or on the whole spermatozoa. MACS efficiently eliminates EPS spermatozoa. MACS combined with DGC allows a mean reduction of 70% in EPS and of 60% in MMP-disrupted spermatozoa with a mean increase of 50% in sperm survival at 24 h. Conclusion Human ejaculates contain EPS spermatozoa which can mostly be eliminated by DGC plus MACS resulting in improved sperm long term viability, motility and MMP integrity. EPS may be used as an indicator of sperm quality and removal of EPS spermatozoa may enhance fertility potential in assisted medical procreation. PMID:19133142

  8. Soluble Phosphatidylserine Binds to Two Sites on Human Factor IXa in a Ca2+ Dependent Fashion to Specifically Regulate Structure and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Rinku; Cole, Daud; Chattopadhyay, Rima; Biswas, Subir; Monroe, Dougald; Lentz, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated a correlation between elevated levels of FIX and the risk of coronary heart disease, while reduced plasma FIX causes hemophilia B. FIXa interacts with FVIIIa in the presence of Ca2+ and phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes to form a factor X-activating complex (Xase) that is key to propagation of the initiated blood coagulation process in human. We test the hypothesis that PS in these membranes up-regulates the catalytic activity of this essential enzyme. We used a soluble form of phosphatidylserine, 1, 2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (C6PS), as a tool to do so. C6PS and PS in membranes are reported to regulate the homologous FXa nearly identically. FIXa binds a molecule of C6PS at each of with two sites with such different affinities (∼100-fold) that these appear to be independent. A high affinity C6PS binding site (Kd∼1.4 µM) regulates structure, whereas a low-affinity binding site (Kd∼140 µM) regulates activity. Equilibrium dialysis experiments were analyzed globally with four other data sets (proteolytic and amidolytic activities, intrinsic fluorescence, ellipticity) to unequivocally demonstrate stoichiometries of one for both sites. Michaelis-Menten parameters for FIXa proteolytic activity were the same in the presence of C6PS or PS/PC membranes. We conclude that the PS molecule and not a membrane surface is the key regulator of both factors Xa and IXa. Despite some minor differences in the details of regulation of factors Xa and IXa, the similarities we found suggest that lipid regulation of these two proteases may be similar, a hypothesis that we continue to test. PMID:24979705

  9. Long-term exposure of HIV type 1-infected cell cultures to combinations of the novel quinoxaline GW420867X with lamivudine, abacavir, and a variety of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E; Carbonez, A; Burt, V; Kleim, J P

    2000-04-10

    The novel quinoxaline GW420867X has been combined with a variety of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in HIV-1(IIIB)-infected CEM cell cultures. Whereas the antiviral efficacy of combinations of GW420867X with the NRTIs lamivudine (3TC) and abacavir (ABC) proved additive when administered to HIV-1-infected cells in a short-term (4-day) infection experiment, combination of GW420867X with the NRTIs 3TC and ABC resulted in a marked delay of virus breakthrough compared with the single drugs alone in a long-term (2-month) infection experiment. Delay of virus breakthrough was less pronounced for combinations of GW420867X with the NNRTIs. Combination of GW420867X with the NRTIs and NNRTIs resulted in additive inhibitory effects on recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase as evident from isobolograms. Lamivudine plus GW420867X selected for the 3TC-specific M184I mutation and a number of NNRTI-characteristic mutations (i.e., V106A, V108I, and Y188H). Abacavir plus GW420867X selected only for NNRTI-specific mutations (i.e., K101E, K103R, V106A, and Y181C), including the novel L100V mutation. Combination of GW420867X with five different NNRTIs selected solely for NNRTI-specific mutations, and also for the L100V mutation in the combined presence of efavirenz, nevirapine, or emivirine, respectively. Five single-, two double-, and two triple-mutated HIV-1 strains that emerged from this study were evaluated for their sensitivity/resistance to AZT, lamivudine, and seven different NNRTIs. In all cases, efavirenz, GW420867X, and UC-781 retained pronounced antiviral potency. Our data suggest that combinations of GW420867X with 3TC, ABC, and NNRTIs (e.g., efavirenz) would be worth pursuing as therapeutic modalities against HIV-1 infections. PMID:10777142

  10. The Grammar of Action and Reversal Errors in Children's Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simner, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Studies predictions about letter reversals made by Goodnow's "grammar of action." Two samples of right- and left-handed children in nursery school through first grade printed from memory immediately after exposure to each of 41 reversible letters and numbers. Results challenge "grammar of action" proposals about the inappropriate applications of…

  11. Reverse Transfer in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    This article considers national Australian data on reverse transfer--the transfer of students from bachelor programs or higher to sub baccalaureate programs, institutions and sectors. It finds that previous studies have overstated the prevalence and perhaps also the significance of reverse transfer. The data are not good, but the best conclusion…

  12. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cubitt, Toby; Kastoryano, Michael; Montanaro, Ashley; Temme, Kristan

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  13. Justice and Reverse Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alan H.

    Defining reverse discrimination as hiring or admissions decisions based on normally irrelevant criteria, this book develops principles of rights, compensation, and equal opportunity applicable to the reverse discrimination issue. The introduction defines the issue and discusses deductive and inductive methodology as applied to reverse…

  14. Reverse Discrimination: Recent Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhilber, August W.

    This paper discusses reverse discrimination cases with particular emphasis on Bakke v. Regents of University of California and those cases which preceded it. A brief history is given of court cases used by opponents and proponents in the discussion of reverse discrimination. Legal theory and a discussion of court cases that preceded Bakke follow.…

  15. Ultrasonic Time Reversal Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael

    2004-11-01

    For more than ten years, time reversal techniques have been developed in many different fields of applications including detection of defects in solids, underwater acoustics, room acoustics and also ultrasound medical imaging and therapy. The essential property that makes time reversed acoustics possible is that the underlying physical process of wave propagation would be unchanged if time were reversed. In a non dissipative medium, the equations governing the waves guarantee that for every burst of sound that diverges from a source there exists in theory a set of waves that would precisely retrace the path of the sound back to the source. If the source is pointlike, this allows focusing back on the source whatever the medium complexity. For this reason, time reversal represents a very powerful adaptive focusing technique for complex media. The generation of this reconverging wave can be achieved by using Time Reversal Mirrors (TRM). It is made of arrays of ultrasonic reversible piezoelectric transducers that can record the wavefield coming from the sources and send back its time-reversed version in the medium. It relies on the use of fully programmable multi-channel electronics. In this paper we present some applications of iterative time reversal mirrors to target detection in medical applications.

  16. STYRENE IMPAIRS SERIAL SPATIAL REVERSAL LEARNING IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occupational exposure to styrene monomer has been implicated in the etiology of solvent-induced cognitive dysfunction. o evaluate the effects of styrene exposure on learning, rats were trained on a series of reversals of a spatial discrimination, permitting repeated evaluation of...

  17. Reversible Shape Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Qiaoxi; Turner, Sara; Brosnan, Sarah; Tippets, Cary; Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Nykypnachuk, Dmytro; Gang, Oleg; Dobrynin, Andrey; Lopez, Rene; Ashby, Valerie; Sheiko, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Reversible shape memory has been achieved on various shapes, e.g. hairpin, origami, coil, robotic gripper and flow rate control device, allowing for multiple switching between encoded shapes without applying any external force. Also, the reversible photonic structure molded in dielectric elastomers has been designed. Maximum reversibility can be achieved by tuning the crosslinking density and the degree of crystallinity of semi-crystalline elastomers. Different crystallization protocols including isothermal and cooling crystallization have been applied to develop a universal picture integrating different shape memory (SM) behaviors: conventional one-way SM, two-way reversible SM, and one-way reversible SM. Acknowledge financial support from the NSF DMR-1122483, DMR- 1004576, and DMR-1206957.

  18. TELOMERASE AND CHRONIC ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with increased risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer in humans. The mechanisms of carcinogenesis are not well understood. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein containing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of eukary...

  19. Particle exposures and infections.

    PubMed

    Ghio, A J

    2014-06-01

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Cigarette smoking, burning of biomass, dust storms, mining, agricultural work, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), wood stoves, traffic-related emissions, gas stoves, and ambient air pollution are all particle-related exposures associated with an increased risk for respiratory infections. In addition, cigarette smoking, burning of biomass, dust storms, mining, and ETS can result in an elevated risk for tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infections, and meningitis. One of the mechanisms for particle-related infections includes an accumulation of iron by surface functional groups of particulate matter (PM). Since elevations in metal availability are common to every particle exposure, all PM potentially contributes to these infections. Therefore, exposures to wood stove emissions, diesel exhaust, and air pollution particles are predicted to increase the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infections, and meningitis, albeit these elevations are likely to be small and detectable only in large population studies. Since iron accumulation correlates with the presence of surface functional groups and dependent metal coordination by the PM, the risk for infection continues as long as the particle is retained. Subsequently, it is expected that the cessation of exposure will diminish, but not totally reverse, the elevated risk for infection. PMID:24488331

  20. Reversible shape memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; Zhou, Jing; White, Sarah; Ashby, Valerie

    2012-02-01

    An ``Achilles' heel'' of shape memory materials is that shape transformations triggered by an external stimulus are usually irreversible. Here we present a new concept of reversible transitions between two well-defined shapes by controlling hierarchic crystallization of a dual-network elastomer. The reversibility was demonstrated for different types of shape transformations including rod bending, winding of a helical coil, and widening an aperture. The distinct feature of the reversible shape alterations is that both counter-shapes are infinitely stable at a temperature of exploitation. Shape reversibility is highly desirable property in many practical applications such as non-surgical removal of a previously inserted catheter and handfree wrapping up of an earlier unraveled solar sail on a space shuttle.

  1. Tubal ligation reversal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fernandez H, Gervaise A. Tubal anastomosis after tubal sterilization: a review. Arch Gynecol Obstet . 2011 May;283( ... Berger GS, Zerden ML. Pregnancy success after hysteroscopic sterilization reversal. Obstet Gynecol . 2014 Dec;124(6):1183- ...

  2. Giant rodlike reversed micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.J.; Neuman, R.D. )

    1994-05-04

    Herein we report that sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate, which is similar in structure to the classical surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), forms very large rodlike reversed micelles and that their size can be even much larger if water is removed from the apolar solution. We further suggest that long-range electrostatic interactions are the primary driving force for the formation of giant reversed micelles. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Binding of basic peptides to membranes produces lateral domains enriched in the acidic lipids phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate: an electrostatic model and experimental results.

    PubMed Central

    Denisov, G; Wanaski, S; Luan, P; Glaser, M; McLaughlin, S

    1998-01-01

    Direct fluorescence digital imaging microscopy observations demonstrate that a basic peptide corresponding to the effector region of the myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) self-assembles into membrane domains enriched in the acidic phospholipids phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). We show here that pentalysine, which corresponds to the first five residues of the MARCKS effector region peptide and binds to membranes through electrostatic interactions, also forms domains enriched in PS and PIP2. We present a simple model of domain formation that represents the decrease in the free energy of the system as the sum of two contributions: the free energy of mixing of neutral and acidic lipids and the electrostatic free energy. The first contribution is always positive and opposes domain formation, whereas the second contribution may become negative and, at low ionic strength, overcome the first contribution. Our model, based on Gouy-Chapman-Stern theory, makes four predictions: 1) multivalent basic ligands, for which the membrane binding is a steep function of the mole fraction of acidic lipid, form domains enriched in acidic lipids; domains break up at high concentrations of either 2) basic ligand or 3) monovalent salt; and 4) if multivalent anionic lipids (e.g., PIP2) are present in trace concentrations in the membrane, they partition strongly into the domains. These predictions agree qualitatively with experimental data obtained with pentalysine and spermine, another basic ligand. PMID:9533686

  4. Non-invasive detection of macrophages in atheroma using a radiocontrast-loaded phosphatidylserine-containing liposomal contrast agent for computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Patrick; Bagalkot, Vaishali; Johnson, Evan; Danila, Delia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Macrophage plays an important role in plaque destabilization in atherosclerosis. By harnessing the affinity of macrophages to certain phospholipid species, a liposomal contrast agent containing phosphatidylserine (PS) and computed tomographic (CT) contrast agent was prepared and evaluated for CT imaging of plaque-associated macrophages in rabbit models of atherosclerosis. Procedures Liposomes containing PS and iodixanol were evaluated for their physicochemical characteristics, in vitro macrophage uptake, in vivo blood pool clearance and organ distribution. Plaque enhancement in the aorta was imaged with computed tomography (CT) in two atherosclerotic rabbit models. Results In vitro macrophage uptake of PS-liposomes increased with increasing amount of PS in the liposomes. Overall clearance of PS-liposomes was more rapid than control liposomes. Smaller PS-liposomes (d = 112 ± 4 nm) were more effective than control liposomes of similar size or larger control and PS-liposomes (d = 172 ± 17 nm) in enhancing aortic plaques in both rabbit models. Conclusions Proper liposomal surface modification and appropriate sizing are important determinant for CT-based molecular imaging of macrophages in atheroma. PMID:25301703

  5. Glycation of the muscle-specific enolase by reactive carbonyls: effect of temperature and the protection role of carnosine, pyridoxamine and phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Pietkiewicz, Jadwiga; Bronowicka-Szydełko, Agnieszka; Dzierzba, Katarzyna; Danielewicz, Regina; Gamian, Andrzej

    2011-03-01

    Reactive carbonyls such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), trans-2-nonenal (T2 N), acrolein (ACR) can react readily with nucleophilic protein sites forming of advanced glycation end-products (AGE). In this study, the human and pig muscle-specific enolase was used as a protein model for in vitro modification by 4-HNE, T2 N and ACR. While the human enolase interaction with reactive α-oxoaldehyde methylglyoxal (MOG) was demonstrated previously, the effect of 4-HNE, T2N and ACR has not been identified yet. Altering in catalytic function were observed after the enzyme incubation with these active compounds for 1-24 h at 25, 37 and 45 °C. The inhibition degree of enolase activity occurred in following order: 4-HNE > ACR > MOG > T2N and inactivation of pig muscle-specific enolase was more effective relatively to human enzyme. The efficiency of AGE formation depends on time and incubation temperature with glycating agent. More amounts of insoluble AGE were formed at 45 °C. We found that pyridoxamine and natural dipeptide carnosine counteracted AGE formation and protected enolase against the total loss of catalytic activity. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that phosphatidylserine may significantly protect enolase against decrease of catalytic activity in spite of AGE production. PMID:21347838

  6. Synergy between phenotypic modulation and ROS neutralization in reduction of inflammatory response of hypoxic microglia by using phosphatidylserine and antioxidant containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Hosain, Md Zahangir; Mori, Takeshi; Kishimura, Akihiro; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation caused by microglial activation is a key contributing factor in neurological disorders such as those involving ischaemia. Excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) stimulates the inflammatory response during ischaemia, significantly damaging cells. Inhibition of inflammatory activation of microglia is a promising potential treatment approach for neurological diseases. In this study, we introduce α-tocopherol and phosphatidylserine (PS) containing liposomes (PST-liposomes) to inhibit the microglial inflammatory response. PS is known to have anti-inflammatory effects on microglia by modulating the microglial phenotype, while α-tocopherol is an antioxidant, known to neutralize ROS. We found that both PS-containing liposomes (PS-liposomes) and PST-liposomes, as compared with phosphatidylcholine containing liposomes, significantly increased viability of hypoxia-treated microglia. The PST-liposomes functioned better than the PS-liposomes and we attribute this superior effect to a synergy between PS and α-tocopherol. This synergic action of PST-liposomes was illustrated in their ability, when incubated with microglia, to reduce NO and pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) production and increase anti-inflammatory cytokine (TGF-β1) production. Thus, the improved viability of hypoxia-treated microglia when treated with PST-liposomes involved anti-inflammatory effects, including ROS neutralization, as well as induction of a microglial phenotypic change. Our results suggest that PST-liposomes represent a potential therapeutic approach to reducing ischaemic injury in the brain. PMID:26689775

  7. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  8. Military Exposures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... for Providers Diagnosis and Treatment of Exposure Health Effects More Provider Resources » return to top Get Email ...

  9. Diet-induced obesity resistance of adult female mice selectively bred for increased wheel-running behavior is reversed by single perinatal exposure to a high-energy diet.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Stefano; Meyer, Neele; Przybyt, Ewa; Scheurink, Anton J W; Harmsen, Martin C; Garland, Theodore; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2016-04-01

    Female mice from independently bred lines previously selected over 50 generations for increased voluntary wheel-running behavior (S1, S2) resist high energy (HE) diet-induced obesity (DIO) at adulthood, even without actual access to running wheels, as opposed to randomly bred controls (CON). We investigated whether adult S mice without wheels remain DIO-resistant when exposed - via the mother - to the HE diet during their perinatal stage (from 2 weeks prior to conception until weaning on post-natal day 21). While S1 and S2 females subjected to HE diet either perinatally or from weaning onwards (post-weaning) resisted increased adiposity at adulthood (as opposed to CON females), they lost this resistance when challenged with HE diet during these periods combined over one single cycle of breeding. When allowed one-week access to wheels (at week 6-8 and at 10 months), however, tendency for increased wheel-running behavior of S mice was unaltered. Thus, the trait for increased wheel-running behavior remained intact following combined perinatal and post-weaning HE exposure, but apparently this did not block HE-induced weight gain. At weaning, perinatal HE diet increased adiposity in all lines, but this was only associated with hyperleptinemia in S lines irrespective of gender. Because leptin has multiple developmental effects at adolescence, we argue that a trait for increased physical activity may advance maturation in times of plenty. This would be adaptive in nature where episodes of increased nutrient availability should be exploited maximally. Associated disturbances in glucose homeostasis and related co-morbidities at adulthood are probably pleiotropic side effects. PMID:26850290

  10. Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2013-10-15

    Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

  11. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  12. Time reversal communication system

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  13. Justice and Reverse Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Kenneth A.

    1976-01-01

    Although this article does not necessarily recommend policies of reverse discrimination, arguments indicating that such policies are not contradictory to accepted concepts of justice are presented. The necessity of dispersing any consequent injury to society as a whole rather than to individuals is stressed. (RW)

  14. Reversing Discrimination: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pati, Gopal; Reilly, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the debate over affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and discusses how and why the present dilemma has developed. Suggests that organizations can best address the problem through an honest, in-depth analysis of their organizational structure and management practices. (JG)

  15. Andexanet: Effectively Reversing Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2016-06-01

    Despite direct oral anticoagulants becoming a mainstay of anticoagulant therapy, the effective, timely, and safe reversal of their anticoagulant effect remains challenging. Emerging evidence attests that andexanet, a recombinant and inactive variant of native factor X (FXa), competitively inhibits and counteracts the anticoagulant effect of many inhibitors of native activated FXa. PMID:27048885

  16. Reversible Ising dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1985-01-01

    The author discusses a reversible deterministic dynamics for Ising spins. The algorithm is a variation of microcanonical Monte Carlo techniques and is easily implemented with simple bit manipulation. This provides fast programs to study non-equilibrium phenomena such as heat flow.

  17. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    In this Letter we define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by feedback classical communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted capacity for some interesting channels.

  18. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-04-01

    We define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by classical feedback communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This protocol family leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted entanglement distribution capacity for some interesting channels.

  19. Trimethylation Enhancement Using (13)C-Diazomethane ((13)C-TrEnDi): Increased Sensitivity and Selectivity of Phosphatidylethanolamine, Phosphatidylcholine, and Phosphatidylserine Lipids Derived from Complex Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Canez, Carlos R; Shields, Samuel W J; Bugno, Magdalena; Wasslen, Karl V; Weinert, Hillary P; Willmore, William G; Manthorpe, Jeffrey M; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2016-07-19

    Significant sensitivity enhancements in the tandem mass spectrometry-based analysis of complex mixtures of several phospholipid classes has been achieved via (13)C-TrEnDi. (13)C-TrEnDi-modified phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids extracted from HeLa cells demonstrated greater sensitivity via precursor ion scans (PISs) than their unmodified counterparts. Sphingomyelin (SM) species exhibited neither an increased nor decreased sensitivity following modification. The use of isotopically labeled diazomethane enabled the distinction of modified PE and modified PC species that would yield isobaric species with unlabeled diazomethane. (13)C-TrEnDi created a PE-exclusive PIS of m/z 202.1, two PS-exclusive PISs of m/z 148.1 and m/z 261.1, and a PIS of m/z 199.1 for PC species (observed at odd m/z values) and SM species (observed at even m/z values). The standardized average area increase after TrEnDi modification was 10.72-fold for PE species, 2.36-fold for PC, and 1.05-fold for SM species. The sensitivity increase of PS species was not quantifiable, as there were no unmodified PS species identified prior to derivatization. (13)C-TrEnDi allowed for the identification of 4 PE and 7 PS species as well as the identification and quantitation of an additional 4 PE and 4 PS species that were below the limit of detection (LoD) prior to modification. (13)C-TrEnDi also pushed 24 PE and 6 PC lipids over the limit of quantitation (LoQ) that prior to modification were above the LoD only. PMID:27275841

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate decreases the concentration of Ca2+, phosphatidylserine and diacylglycerol required for protein kinase C α to reach maximum activity.

    PubMed

    Egea-Jiménez, Antonio L; Pérez-Lara, Angel; Corbalán-García, Senena; Gómez-Fernández, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    The C2 domain of PKCα possesses two different binding sites, one for Ca(2+) and phosphatidylserine and a second one that binds PIP2 with very high affinity. The enzymatic activity of PKCα was studied by activating it with large unilamellar lipid vesicles, varying the concentration of Ca(2+) and the contents of dioleylglycerol (DOG), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphadidylserine (POPS) in these model membranes. The results showed that PIP2 increased the Vmax of PKCα and, when the PIP2 concentration was 5 mol% of the total lipid in the membrane, the addition of 2 mol% of DOG did not increase the activity. In addition PIP2 decreases K0.5 of Ca(2+) more than 3-fold, that of DOG almost 5-fold and that of POPS by a half. The K0.5 values of PIP2 amounted to only 0.11 µM in the presence of DOG and 0.39 in its absence, which is within the expected physiological range for the inner monolayer of a mammalian plasma membrane. As a consequence, PKCα may be expected to operate near its maximum capacity even in the absence of a cell signal producing diacylglycerol. Nevertheless, we have shown that the presence of DOG may also help, since the K0.5 for PIP2 notably decreases in its presence. Taken together, these results underline the great importance of PIP2 in the activation of PKCα and demonstrate that in its presence, the most important cell signal for triggering the activity of this enzyme is the increase in the concentration of cytoplasmic Ca(2+). PMID:23874859

  1. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Varela Chavez, Carolina; Haustant, Georges Michel; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Chenal, Alexandre; Pauillac, Serge; Blondel, Arnaud; Popoff, Michel-Robert

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT) family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP)-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat) into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain) recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases. PMID:27023605

  2. Induction of caspase- and reactive oxygen species-independent phosphatidylserine externalization in primary human neutrophils: role in macrophage recognition and engulfment

    PubMed Central

    Jitkaew, Siriporn; Witasp, Erika; Zhang, Shouting; Kagan, Valerian E.; Fadeel, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage recognition and disposal of neutrophils are important steps in the resolution of inflammation. Externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the cell surface serves as a common recognition signal for macrophages and is associated with the apoptosis program in neutrophils. Here, we report that macrophage-differentiated PLB-985 cells induce rapid, caspase-independent PS externalization in human neutrophils. A similar degree of PS externalization was seen when neutrophils were cocultured with gp91phox-deficient PLB-985 macrophages, thus demonstrating that macrophage-induced PS externalization was NADPH oxidase-independent. Macrophage-induced PS externalization required cell-to-cell contact and kinase activation and was shown to correlate with neutrophil degranulation. Of note, the degree of engulfment of such PS-positive neutrophils by activated human monocyte-derived macrophages was considerably lower than for neutrophils undergoing constitutive apoptosis, indicating that PS externalization alone is not sufficient for macrophage disposal of neutrophils. However, addition of recombinant milk fat globule epidermal growth factor 8, a PS-binding protein, restored engulfment of the macrophage-cocultured target cells. Finally, neutrophils undergoing spontaneous apoptosis but not macrophage-cocultured neutrophils displayed surface expression and release of annexin I, and the addition of N-t-Boc-Phe-D-Leu-Phe-D-Leu-Phe (Boc1), a formyl peptide receptor/lipoxin receptor antagonist, suppressed clearance of apoptotic neutrophils. Conditioned medium from apoptotic neutrophils also promoted the engulfment of macrophage-cocultured neutrophils, and Boc1 blocked this process. Taken together, these studies highlight a novel pathway of PS externalization in primary human neutrophils and also provide evidence for an auxiliary function of annexin I in macrophage clearance of neutrophils. PMID:19106181

  3. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with (111)In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of (111)In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  4. Surface Phosphatidylserine Is Responsible for the Internalization on Microvesicles Derived from Hypoxia-Induced Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaozhong; Wang, Lisheng; Xiao, Fengjun; Zhang, Hongchao

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous data have proven that microvesicles derived from hypoxia-induced mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-MVs) can be internalized into endothelial cells, enhancing their proliferation and vessel structure formation and promoting in vivo angiogenesis. However, there is a paucity of information about how the MSC-MVs are up-taken by endothelial cells. Methods MVs were prepared from the supernatants of human bone marrow MSCs that had been exposed to a hypoxic and/or serum-deprivation condition. The incorporation of hypoxia-induced MSC-MVs into human umbilical cord endothelial cells (HUVECs) was observed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy in the presence or absence of recombinant human Annexin-V (Anx-V) and antibodies against human CD29 and CD44. Further, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted at Anx-V and PSR was delivered into HUVECs, or HUVECs were treated with a monoclonal antibody against phosphatidylserine receptor (PSR) and the cellular internalization of MVs was re-assessed. Results The addition of exogenous Anx-V could inhibit the uptake of MVs isolated from hypoxia-induced stem cells by HUVECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner, while the anti-CD29 and CD44 antibodies had no effect on the internalization process. The suppression was neither observed in Anx-V siRNA-transfected HUVECs, however, addition of anti-PSR antibody and PSR siRNA-transfected HUVECs greatly blocked the incorporation of MVs isolated from hypoxia-induced stem cells into HUVECs. Conclusion PS on the MVs isolated from hypoxia-induced stem cells is the critical molecule in the uptake by HUVECs. PMID:26808539

  5. Cognitive effects of a dietary supplement made from extract of Bacopa monnieri, astaxanthin, phosphatidylserine, and vitamin E in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: a noncomparative, exploratory clinical study.

    PubMed

    Zanotta, Danilo; Puricelli, Silvana; Bonoldi, Guido

    2014-01-01

    A prospective cohort, noncomparative, multicenter trial was conducted to explore the potential of a phytotherapeutic compound, available as a dietary supplement and containing extracts of Bacopa monnieri and Haematococcus pluvialis (astaxanthin) plus phosphatidylserine and vitamin E, in improving cognition in subjects diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment. Enrolled subjects (n=104) were aged 71.2±9.9 years and had a mini-mental state examination score of 26.0±2.0 (mean ± standard deviation). They underwent the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) test and the clock drawing test at baseline and upon completion of a 60-day period of dietary supplementation with one tablet daily of the tested compound. In 102 assessable subjects, total ADAS-cog scores improved from 13.7±5.8 at baseline to 9.7±4.9 on day 60, and the clock drawing test scores improved from 8.5±2.3 to 9.1±1.9. Both changes were statistically significant (P<0.001). Memory tasks were the individual components of ADAS-cog showing the largest improvements. In a multivariate analysis, larger improvements in total ADAS-cog score were associated with less compromised baseline mini-mental state examination scores. Perceived efficacy was rated as excellent or good by 62% of study subjects. The tested compound was well tolerated; one nonserious adverse event was reported in the overall study population, and perceived tolerability was rated excellent or good by 99% of the subjects. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with the tested compound shows potential for counteracting cognitive impairment in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and warrants further investigation in adequately controlled, longer-term studies. PMID:24523587

  6. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with 111In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, 111In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of 111In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  7. The exocytotic signaling pathway induced by nerve growth factor in the presence of lyso-phosphatidylserine in rat peritoneal mast cells involves a type D phospholipase.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Westenberger, K; Elgeti, T; Ziegler, A; Schütze, S

    2001-12-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been previously shown to induce exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) in the presence of lyso-phosphatidylserine (lysoPS) by interacting with high-affinity NGF receptors of the TrkA-type. In RPMCs, type D phosphatidylcholine-selective phospholipases (PLDs) have been postulated to be involved in some exocytotic signaling pathways induced by different agonists. The aim of the present study was to assess a putative functional role of PLD for NGF/lysoPS-induced exocytosis in RPMCs. In 1-[14C]palmitoyl-2-lyso-3-phosphatidylcholine-labelled RPMCs, NGF/lysoPS stimulated the formation of diacylglycerol (DAG) and, in the presence of ethanol (1% [v/v]), phosphatidylethanol (PEtOH). These data indicate PLD-activation by NGF/lysoPS in RPMCs. Preincubation of RPMCs for 2 min with ethanol, an inhibitor of PLD-derived DAG-formation, dose-dependently (IC(50): 0.6% [v/v]) and agonist-selectively inhibited the NGF/lysoPS induced release of [3H]serotonin ([3H]5-HT) in [3H]5-HT-loaded RPMCs, confirming the functional importance of PLD-action. Exocytosis and PEtOH-production was potently inhibited by the broad-spectrum serine/threonine kinase inhibitor staurosporine and activated by the protein kinase C(PKC)-activator PMA (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate) suggesting a role for PKC as mediator for NGF/lysoPS-induced activation of PLD. PMID:11730981

  8. Vibrio cholerae Proteome-Wide Screen for Immunostimulatory Proteins Identifies Phosphatidylserine Decarboxylase as a Novel Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Thanawastien, Ann; Montor, Wagner R.; LaBaer, Joshua; Mekalanos, John J.; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of conserved bacterial components provides immediate and efficient immune responses and plays a critical role in triggering antigen-specific adaptive immunity. To date, most microbial components that are detected by host innate immune system are non-proteinaceous structural components. In order to identify novel bacterial immunostimulatory proteins, we developed a new high-throughput approach called “EPSIA”, Expressed Protein Screen for Immune Activators. Out of 3,882 Vibrio cholerae proteins, we identified phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PSD) as a conserved bacterial protein capable of activating host innate immunity. PSD in concentrations as low as 100 ng/ml stimulated RAW264.7 murine macrophage cells and primary peritoneal macrophage cells to secrete TNFα and IL-6, respectively. PSD-induced proinflammatory response was dependent on the presence of MyD88, a known adaptor molecule for innate immune response. An enzymatically inactive PSD mutant and heat-inactivated PSD induced ∼40% and ∼15% of IL-6 production compared to that by native PSD, respectively. This suggests that PSD induces the production of IL-6, in part, via its enzymatic activity. Subsequent receptor screening determined TLR4 as a receptor mediating the PSD-induced proinflammatory response. Moreover, no detectable IL-6 was produced in TLR4-deficient mouse macrophages by PSD. PSD also exhibited a strong adjuvant activity against a co-administered antigen, BSA. Anti-BSA response was decreased in TLR4-deficient mice immunized with BSA in combination with PSD, further proving the role of TLR4 in PSD signaling in vivo. Taken together, these results provide evidence for the identification of V. cholerae PSD as a novel TLR4 agonist and further demonstrate the potential application of PSD as a vaccine adjuvant. PMID:19696891

  9. Differences in intracellular calcium dynamics cause differences in α-granule secretion and phosphatidylserine expression in platelets adhering on glass and TiO2.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Swati; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the activation of purified human platelets due to their adhesion on glass and TiO2 in the absence of extracellular calcium was investigated. Differences in α-granule secretion between platelets adhering on the two surfaces were detected by examining the expression and secretion of the α-granule markers P-selectin (CD62P) and β-thromboglobulin. Similarly, differences in the expression of phosphatidylserine (PS), and in the activation of the major integrin GPIIb/IIIa, on the surfaces of the adhering platelets, were also observed. While all of these activation markers were expressed in platelets adhering on glass, the surface markers were not expressed in platelets adhering on TiO2, and β-thromboglobulin secretion levels were substantially reduced. Differences in marker expression and secretion correlated with differences in the intracellular calcium dynamics. Calcium ionophore treatment triggered α-granule secretion and PS expression in TiO2-adhering platelets but had no effect on the activation of GPIIb/IIIa. These results demonstrate specificity in the way surfaces of artificial materials activate platelets, link differences in the intracellular calcium dynamics observed in the platelets adhering on the two surfaces to the differences in some of the platelet responses (α-granule secretion and PS expression), but also highlight the involvement of synergistic, calcium-independent pathways in platelet activation. The ability to control activation in surface-adhering platelets makes this an attractive model system for studying platelet signaling pathways and for tissue engineering applications. PMID:27124595

  10. PMP1 18-38, a yeast plasma membrane protein fragment, binds phosphatidylserine from bilayer mixtures with phosphatidylcholine: a (2)H-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Roux, M; Beswick, V; Coïc, Y M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Sanson, A; Neumann, J M

    2000-11-01

    PMP1 is a 38-residue plasma membrane protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that regulates the activity of the H(+)-ATPase. The cytoplasmic domain conformation results in a specific interfacial distribution of five basic side chains, thought to strongly interact with anionic phospholipids. We have used the PMP1 18-38 fragment to carry out a deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H-NMR) study for investigating the interactions between the PMP1 cytoplasmic domain and phosphatidylserines. For this purpose, mixed bilayers of 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine (POPS) were used as model membranes (POPC/POPS 5:1, m/m). Spectra of headgroup- and chain-deuterated POPC and POPS phospholipids, POPC-d4, POPC-d31, POPS-d3, and POPS-d31, were recorded at different temperatures and for various concentrations of the PMP1 fragment. Data obtained from POPS deuterons revealed the formation of specific peptide-POPS complexes giving rise to a slow exchange between free and bound PS lipids, scarcely observed in solid-state NMR studies of lipid-peptide/protein interactions. The stoichiometry of the complex (8 POPS per peptide) was determined and its significance is discussed. The data obtained with headgroup-deuterated POPC were rationalized with a model that integrates the electrostatic perturbation induced by the cationic peptide on the negatively charged membrane interface, and a "spacer" effect due to the intercalation of POPS/PMP1f complexes between choline headgroups. PMID:11053135

  11. PMP1 18-38, a yeast plasma membrane protein fragment, binds phosphatidylserine from bilayer mixtures with phosphatidylcholine: a (2)H-NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, M; Beswick, V; Coïc, Y M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Sanson, A; Neumann, J M

    2000-01-01

    PMP1 is a 38-residue plasma membrane protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that regulates the activity of the H(+)-ATPase. The cytoplasmic domain conformation results in a specific interfacial distribution of five basic side chains, thought to strongly interact with anionic phospholipids. We have used the PMP1 18-38 fragment to carry out a deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H-NMR) study for investigating the interactions between the PMP1 cytoplasmic domain and phosphatidylserines. For this purpose, mixed bilayers of 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine (POPS) were used as model membranes (POPC/POPS 5:1, m/m). Spectra of headgroup- and chain-deuterated POPC and POPS phospholipids, POPC-d4, POPC-d31, POPS-d3, and POPS-d31, were recorded at different temperatures and for various concentrations of the PMP1 fragment. Data obtained from POPS deuterons revealed the formation of specific peptide-POPS complexes giving rise to a slow exchange between free and bound PS lipids, scarcely observed in solid-state NMR studies of lipid-peptide/protein interactions. The stoichiometry of the complex (8 POPS per peptide) was determined and its significance is discussed. The data obtained with headgroup-deuterated POPC were rationalized with a model that integrates the electrostatic perturbation induced by the cationic peptide on the negatively charged membrane interface, and a "spacer" effect due to the intercalation of POPS/PMP1f complexes between choline headgroups. PMID:11053135

  12. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  13. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  14. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  15. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants shall be maintained in a safe and suitable condition for service. Reverse lever latch shall be...

  16. Reverse genetics of mononegavirales.

    PubMed

    Conzelmann, K K

    2004-01-01

    "Reverse genetics" or de novo synthesis of nonsegmented negative-sense RNA viruses (Mononegavirales) from cloned cDNA has become a reliable technique to study this group of medically important viruses. Since the first generation of a negative-sense RNA virus entirely from cDNA in 1994, reverse genetics systems have been established for members of most genera of the Rhabdo-, Paramyxo-, and Filoviridae families. These systems are based on intracellular transcription of viral full-length RNAs and simultaneous expression of viral proteins required to form the typical viral ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP). These systems are powerful tools to study all aspects of the virus life cycle as well as the roles of virus proteins in virus-host interplay and pathogenicity. In addition, recombinant viruses can be designed to have specific properties that make them attractive as biotechnological tools and live vaccines. PMID:15298166

  17. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  18. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ali; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-09-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by recurrent thunderclap headache, with or without neurologic symptoms, and reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. RCVS affects patients in various racial and ethnic groups and in all age groups, although most commonly in the fourth decade of life. Many conditions and exposures have been linked to RCVS, including vasoactive drugs and the peripartum period. Disturbance of the cerebral vascular tone is thought to contribute to the disease's pathophysiology. RCVS generally follows a monophasic course. Associated strokes and cerebral hemorrhages are not uncommon. In this review we will attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of RCVS, with emphasis on the controversies in the field and the newest findings in the reported literature. PMID:25138149

  19. Field reversed ion rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.; Omelchenko, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp region into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. Assuming the characteristic ionization time is much shorter than the long ({ital t}{approx_gt}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}}) beam evolution time scale, we investigate the formation of an ion ring in the background plasma followed by field reversal, using a 21/2-D hybrid, PIC code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. We show that beam bunching and trapping occurs downstream in a ramped magnetic field for an appropriate set of experimental parameters. We find that a compact ion ring is formed and a large field reversal {zeta}={delta}{ital B}/{ital B}{approx_gt}1 on axis develops. We also observe significant deceleration of the ring on reflection due to the transfer of its axial momentum to the background ions, which creates favorable trapping conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Tevatron reverse injection

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-25

    In the new injection scenario antiprotons are injected onto a helical orbit in the Tevatron in order to avoid the detrimental effects of the beam-beam interaction at 150 GeV. The new scenario required changes in the tuning procedure. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning, therefore the antiproton injection line has to be tuned with protons by reverse injecting them from the Tevatron into the Main Pang (MR). Previously, the reverse injection was performed in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS dock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus marking it possible to inject 6 proton batches and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR.

  1. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  2. [Reverse Chaddock sign].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Kunio

    2011-08-01

    It is widely accepted that the Babinski reflex is the most well-known and important pathological reflex in clinical neurology. Among many other pathological reflexes that elicit an upgoing great toe, such as Chaddock, Oppenheim, Gordon, Schaefer, and Stransky, only the Chaddock reflex is said to be as sensitive as the Babinski reflex. The optimal receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes are the lateral plantar surface and the external inframalleolar area of the dorsum, respectively. It has been said that the Babinski reflex, obtained by stroking the sole, is by far the best and most reliable method of eliciting an upgoing great toe. However, the Chaddock reflex, the external malleolar sign, is also considered sensitive and reliable according to the literature and everyday neurological practice. The major problems in eliciting the Babinski reflex by stroking the lateral part of the sole are false positive or negative responses due to foot withdrawal, tonic foot response, or some equivocal movements. On the other hand, according to my clinical experience, the external inframalleolar area, which is the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex, is definitely suitable for eliciting the upgoing great toe. In fact, the newly proposed method to stimulate the dorsum of the foot from the medial to the lateral side, which I term the "reversed Chaddock method," is equally sensitive to demonstrate pyramidal tract involvement. With the "reversed Chaddock method", the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex may be postulated to be in the territory of the sural nerve, which could be supported by the better response obtained on stimulation of the postero-lateral calf than the anterior shin. With regard to the receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes, the first sacral dermatome (S1) is also considered a reflexogenous zone, but since the dermatome shows marked overlapping, the zones vary among individuals. As upgoing toe responses are consistently observed in

  3. Affirmative Action, or Reverse Discrimination?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansby, Ike

    1996-01-01

    Determines the impact of affirmative action programs in response to charges that they are policies of reverse discrimination. Reviewing affirmative action programs submitted by Michigan State departments, researchers determined no reverse discrimination was apparent based on low numbers of reverse discrimination complaints filed by whites. (GR)

  4. Specificity of Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Towards Oxidized Phosphatidylserines: LC-ESI-MS Characterization of Products and Computer Modeling of Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Macphee, Colin H.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ independent lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is a member of the phospholipase A2 superfamily with a distinguishing characteristic of high specificity for oxidatively modified sn-2 fatty acid residues in phospholipids which has been especially well characterized for peroxidized species of phosphatidylcholines (PC). The ability of Lp-PLA2 to hydrolyze peroxidized species of phosphatidylserine (PS) – acting as a recognition signal for clearance of apoptotic cells by professional phagocytes - as well as the products of the reaction have not been investigated. We performed LC-MS-ESI-based structural characterization of oxygenated/hydrolyzed molecular species of PS - containing linoleic acid in either sn-2 position (C18:0/C18:2) or in both sn-1 and sn-2 positions (C18:2/C18:2) - formed in cytochrome c/ H2O2 driven enzymatic oxidation reaction. Cytochrome c has been chosen as a catalyst of peroxidation reactions due to its likely involvement in PS oxidation in apoptotic cells. We found that Lp-PLA2 catalyzed the hydrolysis of both non-truncated and truncated (oxidatively fragmented) species of oxidized PS species albeit with different efficiencies and performed detailed characterization of the major reaction products – oxygenated derivatives of linoleic acid as well as non-oxygenated and oxygenated species of lyso-PS. Among linoleic acid products, derivatives oxygenated at the C9 position, including 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HODE) – a potent ligand of G protein-coupled receptor G2A - were the most abundant. Computer modeling of interactions of Lp-PLA2 with different PS oxidized species indicated that they are able to bind in proximity (<5Å) to Ser273 and His351 of the catalytic triad. For 9-hydroxy- and 9-hydroperoxy- derivatives of oxidized PS, the sn-2 ester bond was positioned within the very close proximity (<3Å) from the Ser273 residue - a nucleophile directly attacking the sn-2 bond – thus favoring the hydrolysis reaction. We

  5. Laboratory evaluation of anti-phospholipid syndrome: a preliminary prospective study of phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies in an at-risk patient cohort

    PubMed Central

    Heikal, N M; Jaskowski, T D; Malmberg, E; Lakos, G; Branch, D W; Tebo, A E

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM autoantibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) were evaluated individually and in combination with criteria anti-phospholipid (aPL) tests in a prospectively ascertained cohort of patients at risk for anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS). One hundred and sixty (160) consecutive requests for lupus anti-coagulant (LAC) from the University of Utah Health Sciences Center were identified during 8 weeks. Of these, 104 unique patients had additional requests for cardiolipin (aCL) and/or beta2 glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI) IgG and/or IgM; samples were retained and analysed for aPS/PT, aCL and/or aβ2GPI IgG and IgM antibodies. Following testing, a comprehensive chart review was performed and patients categorized according to their clinical diagnosis. Individual and combined sensitivities, specificities, odd ratios (OR), diagnostic accuracy for specific tests or combinations by receiver operating characteristic (ROC), area under the curve (AUC) analyses and correlations between test results were determined. The sensitivities of aPS/PT IgG/IgM (54·6/45·5%) were lower than LAC (81·8%) but higher relative to aCL IgG/IgM (27·3/0%) or aβ2GPI IgG/IgM (27·3/0%). The best correlation between LAC and any aPL test was observed with aPS/PT (P = 0·002). There was no significant difference in the diagnostic accuracies for any panel with LAC: LAC/aβ2GPI IgG/aCL IgG [AUC 0·979, OR 475·4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 23·1–9056·5, P = 0·0001 and LAC/aβ2GPI IgG/aPS/PT IgG or LAC/aPS/PT IgG/aCL IgG (AUC 0·962, OR 265·3, 14·2–4958·2, P = 0·0001). The high correlation between LAC and aPS/PT IgG/IgM in this preliminary study suggest that this marker may be useful in the evaluation of APS. More studies to determine the optimal aPL antibody tests combination are needed. PMID:25522978

  6. Laboratory evaluation of anti-phospholipid syndrome: a preliminary prospective study of phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies in an at-risk patient cohort.

    PubMed

    Heikal, N M; Jaskowski, T D; Malmberg, E; Lakos, G; Branch, D W; Tebo, A E

    2015-05-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM autoantibodies to phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT) were evaluated individually and in combination with criteria anti-phospholipid (aPL) tests in a prospectively ascertained cohort of patients at risk for anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS). One hundred and sixty (160) consecutive requests for lupus anti-coagulant (LAC) from the University of Utah Health Sciences Center were identified during 8 weeks. Of these, 104 unique patients had additional requests for cardiolipin (aCL) and/or beta2 glycoprotein I (aβ2 GPI) IgG and/or IgM; samples were retained and analysed for aPS/PT, aCL and/or aβ2 GPI IgG and IgM antibodies. Following testing, a comprehensive chart review was performed and patients categorized according to their clinical diagnosis. Individual and combined sensitivities, specificities, odd ratios (OR), diagnostic accuracy for specific tests or combinations by receiver operating characteristic (ROC), area under the curve (AUC) analyses and correlations between test results were determined. The sensitivities of aPS/PT IgG/IgM (54·6/45·5%) were lower than LAC (81·8%) but higher relative to aCL IgG/IgM (27·3/0%) or aβ2 GPI IgG/IgM (27·3/0%). The best correlation between LAC and any aPL test was observed with aPS/PT (P = 0·002). There was no significant difference in the diagnostic accuracies for any panel with LAC: LAC/aβ2 GPI IgG/aCL IgG [AUC 0·979, OR 475·4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 23·1-9056·5, P = 0·0001 and LAC/aβ2 GPI IgG/aPS/PT IgG or LAC/aPS/PT IgG/aCL IgG (AUC 0·962, OR 265·3, 14·2-4958·2, P = 0·0001). The high correlation between LAC and aPS/PT IgG/IgM in this preliminary study suggest that this marker may be useful in the evaluation of APS. More studies to determine the optimal aPL antibody tests combination are needed. PMID:25522978

  7. Kinetic study of the aggregation and lipid mixing produced by alpha-sarcin on phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylserine vesicles: stopped-flow light scattering and fluorescence energy transfer measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Mancheño, J. M.; Gasset, M.; Lacadena, J.; Ramón, F.; Martínez del Pozo, A.; Oñaderra, M.; Gavilanes, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    alpha-Sarcin is a fungal cytotoxic protein that inactivates the eukaryotic ribosomes. A kinetic study of the aggregation and lipid mixing promoted by this protein on phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles has been performed. Egg yolk PG, bovine brain PS, dimyristoyl-PG (DMPG) and dimyristoyl-PS (DMPS) vesicles have been considered. The initial rates of the vesicle aggregation induced by the protein have been measured by stopped-flow 90 degrees light scattering. The formation of a vesicle dimer as the initial step of this process was deduced from the second-order dependence of the initial rates on phospholipid concentration. The highest alpha-sarcin concentration studied did not inhibit the vesicle aggregation, indicating that many protein molecules are involved in the vesicle cross-linking. These are common characteristics of the initial steps of the aggregation produced by alpha-sarcin in the four types of phospholipid vesicles considered. However, the kinetics of the scattering values revealed that more complex changes occurred in the later steps of the aggregation process of egg PG and brain PS vesicles than in those of their synthetic counterparts. alpha-Sarcin produced lipid mixing in vesicles composed of DMPG or DMPS, which was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays. A delay in the onset of the process, dependent on the protein concentration, was observed. Measurement of the rates of lipid mixing revealed that the process is first order on phospholipid concentration. Egg PG and brain PS vesicles did not show lipid mixing, although they avidly aggregated. However, alpha-sarcin was able to promote lipid mixing in heterogeneous systems composed of egg PG+DMPG or brain PS+DMPS vesicles. The dilution of the fluorescence probes was faster when these were incorporated into the bilayers made of synthetic phospholipids than were present in those made of natural phospholipids. The bilayer destabilization produced by the

  8. Reversible brazing process

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Jim D.; Stephens, John J.; Walker, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of reversibly brazing surfaces together. An interface is affixed to each surface. The interfaces can be affixed by processes such as mechanical joining, welding, or brazing. The two interfaces are then brazed together using a brazing process that does not defeat the surface to interface joint. Interfaces of materials such as Ni-200 can be affixed to metallic surfaces by welding or by brazing with a first braze alloy. The Ni-200 interfaces can then be brazed together using a second braze alloy. The second braze alloy can be chosen so that it minimally alters the properties of the interfaces to allow multiple braze, heat and disassemble, rebraze cycles.

  9. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  10. Reverse Quantum Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Jeffrey

    2010-02-01

    As preposterous as it might sound, if quantum waves travel in the reverse direction from subatomic particles, then most of quantum physics can be explained without quantum weirdness or Schr"odinger's cat. Quantum mathematics is unchanged. The diffraction pattern on the screen of the double slit experiment is the same. This proposal is not refuted by the Innsbruck experiments; this is NOT a hidden local variable theory. Research evidence will be presented that is consistent with the idea waves travel in the opposite direction as neutrons. If one's thinking shifts from forwards to backwards quantum waves, the world changes so drastically it is almost unimaginable. Quantum waves move from the mathematical to the real world, multiply in number, and reverse in direction. Wave-particle duality is undone. In the double slit experiment every part of the target screen is emitting such quantum waves in all directions. Some pass through the two slits. Interference occurs on the opposite side of the barrier than is usually imagined. They impinge on ``S'' and an electron is released at random. Because of the interference it is more likely to follow some waves than others. It follows one and only one wave backward; hitting the screen where it's wave originated. )

  11. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1982-01-01

    It is found by a statistical study of 58 reversed-polarity regions (RPRs) covering the 11-year period 1969-1979 that RPRs (1) have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions, (2) do not show a tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment, and (3) have stable configurations that do not suggest stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. As in normal regions, RPR magnetic complexity is found to be the primary factor in flare productivity. Weak-field RPRs produce no flares, and regions with complex spots produce more flares than regions with non-complex spots by a factor of five. The main difference between RPRs and normal regions lies in complex spot frequency, with less that 17% of normal active regions having such spots and fewer than 1.8% having long-lived complex ones, while 41% of RPRs have complex spots and 24% have long-lived complex spots.

  12. A reversible molecular valve

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thoi D.; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Celestre, Paul C.; Flood, Amar H.; Liu, Yi; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2005-01-01

    In everyday life, a macroscopic valve is a device with a movable control element that regulates the flow of gases or liquids by blocking and opening passageways. Construction of such a device on the nanoscale level requires (i) suitably proportioned movable control elements, (ii) a method for operating them on demand, and (iii) appropriately sized passageways. These three conditions can be fulfilled by attaching organic, mechanically interlocked, linear motor molecules that can be operated under chemical, electrical, or optical stimuli to stable inorganic porous frameworks (i.e., by self-assembling organic machinery on top of an inorganic chassis). In this article, we demonstrate a reversibly operating nanovalve that can be turned on and off by redox chemistry. It traps and releases molecules from a maze of nanoscopic passageways in silica by controlling the operation of redox-activated bistable [2]rotaxane molecules tethered to the openings of nanopores leading out of a nanoscale reservoir. PMID:16006520

  13. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  14. Reverse slapper detonator

    DOEpatents

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

  15. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  16. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.

  17. Biochemical Reversal of Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-03-01

    We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

  18. Reducing Reversals in Reading and Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heydorn, Bernard L.

    1984-01-01

    Reversals can be remediated in a variety of ways that focus on single symbol reversals (e.g., by tracing overlarge letters or numerals) or whole word reversals (e.g., by using flash cards for identified reverse words). (CL)

  19. On time reversal mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannjiang, Albert C.

    2009-09-01

    The concept of time reversal (TR) of a scalar wave is reexamined from basic principles. Five different time-reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and their relations are analyzed. For the boundary behavior, it is shown that for a paraxial wave only the monopole TR scheme satisfies the exact boundary condition while for the spherical wave only the MD-mode TR scheme satisfies the exact boundary condition. The asymptotic analysis of the near-field focusing property is presented for two dimensions and three dimensions. It is shown that to have a subwavelength focal spot, the TRM should consist of dipole transducers. The transverse resolution of the dipole TRM is linearly proportional to the distance between the point source and the TRM. The mixed mode TRM has the similar (linear) behavior in three dimensions, but in two dimensions the transverse resolution behaves as the square root of the distance between the point source and the TRM. The monopole TRM is ineffective in focusing below the wavelength. Contrary to the matched field processing and the phase processor, both of which resemble TR, TR in a weak- or non-scattering medium is usually biased in the longitudinal direction, especially when TR is carried out on a single plane with a finite aperture. This is true for all five TR schemes. On the other hand, the TR focal spot has been shown repeatedly in the literature, both theoretically and experimentally, to be centered at the source point when the medium is multiple scattering. A reconciliation of the two seemingly conflicting results is found in the random fluctuations in the intensity of the Green function for a multiple scattering medium and the notion of scattering-enlarged effective aperture.

  20. Reverse Engineering Podkletnov's Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, B. T.

    Experiments reported by Podkletnov et al. suggest that gravity modification is within reach in our lifetimes. Solomon used process models to introduced the concept of non-inertia Ni fields and derived the massless gravitational acceleration formula g = τc2 that is consistent with Hooft's finding that absence of matter no longer guarantees local flatness. Solomon had also shown that many photon experimental results could be modeled without the use of quantum theory. This would imply that neither a quantum nor a relativistic type theory would be indispensible to formulating a theory on gravity modification. This paper, therefore, explores the use of Ni fields and process models to reverse engineer Podkletnov's experiments from first principles to determine a possible theoretical or at least an engineering basis for the observed gravity shielding effects. This paper scrutinizes and documents Podkletnov's papers for detailed experimental clues and applies them to new process models. The paper shows that it is possible to infer gravity modifying effects using non-inertia Ni fields, without taking into consideration the quantum mechanical properties of the ceramic superconducting disc. That is without considering how or why these fields are produced. The modeling suggests that there are two similar but different phenomena present, the stationary disc and spinning disc effects. The observed weight loss with the stationary disc is due to the asymmetric magnetic field and the observed weight loss with the spinning disc is due to the electromagnetic Ni field. There are several keys to reproducing Podkletnov's experimental results, asymmetric fields, dual layer disc, and the presence of both electric and magnetic fields. Finally the paper shows that if the magnetic field was not superconducting, but a regular magnetic field, that the observed weight change should be reversed, and therefore, a non-superconducting disc would lend itself to simpler and easier experimental

  1. Criminal exposure.

    PubMed

    1999-08-01

    A 39-year-old man who had sex with a 16-year-old boy, was sentenced to five years in prison. The defendant pleaded guilty to statutory rape and criminal exposure to HIV. The boy discovered that the man was taking HIV medications, and the man subsequently disclosed his treatment after being arrested. PMID:11367003

  2. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This proceedings chapter will discuss the state-of-the-science regarding the evaluation of exposure as it relates to water quality criteria (WQC), sediment quality guidelines (SQG), and wildlife criteria (WC). Throughout this discussion, attempts are made to identify the methods ...

  3. Hypotonic exposures.

    PubMed

    Flynn, W J; Hill, R M

    1984-03-01

    Even without a contact lens, the cornea can suffer adverse physiological changes from hypotonic exposure, as well as the associated subjective phenomena (e.g., halo and rainbows). The contact lens adds a dimension to this problem that should be viewed against a background of normal (non-wearing) susceptibilities. PMID:6715776

  4. Magnetic reversals and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a study of reversals of the earth's magnetic field over the past 165 Myr are presented. A stationary periodicity of 30 Myr emerges which predicts pulses of increased reversal activity centered at 10, 40, 70, . . . Myr before the present. The correlation between the reversal intensity and biological extinctions is examined, and a nontrivial discrepancy is found between the magnetic and extinction periodicity.

  5. Geomagnetic Reversals during the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed

    McElhinny, M W

    1971-04-01

    An antalysis of worldwide paleomagnetic measurements suggests a periodicity of 350 x 10(6) years in the polarity of the geomagnetic field. During the Mesozoic it is predominantly normal, whereas during the Upper Paleozoic it is predominantly reversed. Although geomagnetic reversals occur at different rates throughout the Phanerozoic, there appeaars to be no clear correlation between biological evolutionary rates and reversal frequency. PMID:17735224

  6. Erythrocyte Shrinkage and Cell Membrane Scrambling after Exposure to the Ionophore Nonactin.

    PubMed

    Peter, Thomas; Bissinger, Rosi; Lang, Florian

    2016-02-01

    The ionophore antibiotic nonactin permeabilizes cell membranes to NH4+ and K(+) . Treatment of erythrocytes with nonactin is expected to trigger cellular K(+) loss with subsequent cell shrinkage, which in turn is known to trigger suicidal death of a wide variety of cells including erythrocytes. This study explored whether nonactin exposure induces eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and translocation of cell membrane phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Signalling of eryptosis includes increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) activity [(Ca(2+) )i ] and stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Phosphatidylserine abundance at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter (FSC) and (Ca(2+) )i from Fluo3-fluorescence. A 48-hr treatment of human erythrocytes with nonactin significantly decreased FSC (≥10 ng/ml) and significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥10 ng/ml), effects paralleled by increase in (Ca(2+) )i (≥50 ng/ml) and virtually abrogated by increase in extracellular K(+) concentration to 120 mM at the expense of Na(+) . The up-regulation of annexin-V-binding after nonactin treatment was significantly blunted but not abolished by the removal of extracellular Ca(2+) and by addition of either PKC inhibitor staurosporine (0.4 μM) or p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 (2 μM). In conclusion, exposure of erythrocytes to the K(+) ionophore nonactin induces erythrocyte shrinkage and subsequent erythrocyte membrane scrambling, effects involving cellular K(+) loss, Ca(2+) entry and activation of staurosporine as well as SB203580-sensitive kinases. PMID:26280658

  7. ASYMMETRIC SOLAR POLAR FIELD REVERSALS

    SciTech Connect

    Svalgaard, Leif; Kamide, Yohsuke

    2013-01-20

    The solar polar fields reverse because magnetic flux from decaying sunspots moves toward the poles, with a preponderance of flux from the trailing spots. If there is a strong asymmetry, in the sense that most activity is in the northern hemisphere, then that excess flux will move toward the north pole and reverse that pole first. If there is more activity in the south later on, then that flux will help to reverse the south pole. In this way, two humps in the solar activity and a corresponding difference in the time of reversals develop (in the ideal case). Such a difference was originally noted in the very first observation of polar field reversal just after the maximum of the strongly asymmetric solar cycle 19, when the southern hemisphere was most active before sunspot maximum and the south pole duly reversed first, followed by the northern hemisphere more than a year later, when that hemisphere became most active. Solar cycles since then have had the opposite asymmetry, with the northern hemisphere being most active before solar maximum. We show that polar field reversals for these cycles have all happened in the north first, as expected. This is especially noteworthy for the present solar cycle 24. We suggest that the association of two or more peaks of solar activity when separated by hemispheres with correspondingly different times of polar field reversals is a general feature of the cycle, and that asymmetric polar field reversals are simply a consequence of the asymmetry of solar activity.

  8. Visually induced self-motion sensation adapts rapidly to left-right visual reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, C. M.; Bock, O. L.; Huang, J.-K.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental demonstration of a reversal of the circularvection (CV) phenomenon is reported. After one to three hours of active movement while wearing vision-reversing goggles, 9 of 12 stationary human subjects viewing a moving stripe display experienced a self-rotation illusion in the same direction as the seen stripe motion. In addition, the subjects showed a 17% reduction in vestibulo-ocular reflex slow phase gain over their brief exposure period. It is noted that whether a subject demonstrated reversed CV within the allowed exposure period appeared to be correlated with CV strength produced with a narrow field stimulus.

  9. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schmutzhard, E

    2016-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In another hypothesis, endothelial dysfunction triggered by numerous factors including preeclampsia, immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutics, sepsis, or autoimmune disorders is thought to be the key pathomechanism. Endo- or exogenic toxic agents including pharmacological substances, cytokines, or bacterial toxins are supposed to trigger endothelial activation and dysfunction resulting in the release of vasoconstrictors, pro-inflammatory mediators, and vascular leakage. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical and neuroimaging findings that frequently show a bilateral, symmetric, and parietooccipital pattern. However, the diagnosis can often only be confirmed during the course of disease after excluding important differential diagnoses. Currently, there is no specific treatment available. Lowering of arterial blood pressure and eliminating the underlying cause usually leads to an improvement of clinical and neuroradiological findings. Admission to a critical care unit is required in about 40 % of patients due to complicating conditions including status epilepticus, cerebral vasoconstriction, ischemia, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Prognosis is favorable; in the majority of patients neurological deficits and imaging findings resolve completely. PMID:27272329

  10. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  11. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  12. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  13. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  14. Reversible Energy-Transfer Switching on a DNA Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We show that FRET between Pacific Blue (PB) and Alexa488 (A488) covalently attached to a DNA scaffold can be reversibly controlled by photochromic switching of a spiropyran derivative. With the spiropyran in the closed spiro isomeric form, FRET occurs freely between PB and A488. UV-induced isomerization to the open merocyanine form shuts down the FRET process by efficient quenching of the PB excited state. The process is reversed by exposure to visible light, triggering the isomerization to the spiro isomer. PMID:25687828

  15. Reverse genetics of avian metapneumoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An overview of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infection in turkeys and development of a reverse genetics system for aMPV subgroup C (aMPV-C) virus will be presented. By using reverse genetics technology, we generated recombinant aMPV-C viruses containing a different length of glycoprotein (G) gene or...

  16. Preference Reversal in Multiattribute Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity…

  17. Reverse Transfer Project, Summer 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Elizabeth

    In 1986, a Reverse Transfer Project was initiated at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) in order to promote the summer school attendance at MVCC of "reverse transfer" students (i.e., students who attended another institution during the regular academic year). A mailing, containing a cover letter, informational brochure, summer catalog, and…

  18. Reversal of novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Abo-Salem, Elsayed; Becker, Richard C

    2016-04-01

    The development of a new generation of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants represents a potential breakthrough in the management of patients with thrombotic diseases, disorders and conditions. While a large and growing body of evidence from large-scale clinical trials and registries supports a favorable safety profile, having a means to rapidly reverse their anticoagulant effects represents an unmet need among practicing clinicians. Several targeted reversal agents are currently in development and the early results are promising. Idarucizumab is a monoclonal antibody that can immediately and specifically reverse dabigatran. Andexanet alfa is a recombinant modified factor Xa that can bind and reverse oral and parenteral factor Xa inhibitors, including rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and low molecular weight heparin. Aripazine is a small molecule that can reverse the action of factor Xa inhibitors and possibly dabigatran as well through non-covalent binding and charge-charge interactions. PMID:26939028

  19. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  20. Parkinson's disease managing reversible neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted; McDougall, Beth; Westaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the Parkinson's disease (PD) symptom course has been classified as an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease. This paper documents 29 PD and treatment-induced systemic depletion etiologies which cause and/or exacerbate the seven novel primary relative nutritional deficiencies associated with PD. These reversible relative nutritional deficiencies (RNDs) may facilitate and accelerate irreversible progressive neurodegeneration, while other reversible RNDs may induce previously undocumented reversible pseudo-neurodegeneration that is hiding in plain sight since the symptoms are identical to the symptoms being experienced by the PD patient. Documented herein is a novel nutritional approach for reversible processes management which may slow or halt irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease and correct reversible RNDs whose symptoms are identical to the patient's PD symptoms. PMID:27103805

  1. Protein kinase C activity in the spleen of trout (Salmo gairdneri) and the rectal gland of dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula), and the effects of phosphatidylserine and diacylglycerol containing (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bell, M V; Sargent, J R

    1987-01-01

    1. High speed supernatant fractions of trout spleen and dogfish rectal gland contained 22.5 and 7.2 nmol/min/g tissue of protein kinase C activity respectively. 2. The effect of Ca2+ concentration on the activities with phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) alone, diacylglycerol (DAG) alone and PtdSer and DAG together were determined. Both enzymes required Ca2+ but activity was independent of Ca2+ concentration within the physiological range of 0.1-10 microns. 3. The effect of PtdSer and DAG containing (n - 3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on the activity of protein kinase C from both tissues was examined. Both enzymes were active with all lipids tested and showed little or no discrimination between lipids differing in their contents of (n-3) or (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:3665435

  2. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  3. Reverse osmosis reverses conventional wisdom with Superfund cleanup success

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M. ); Miller, K. )

    1994-09-01

    Although widely recognized as the most efficient means of water purification, reverse osmosis has not been considered effective for remediating hazardous wastewater. Scaling and fouling, which can cause overruns and downtime, and require membrane replacement, have inhibited success in high-volume wastewater applications. Despite this background, a reverse osmosis technology developed in Europe recently was used successfully to treat large volumes of contaminated water at a major Superfund site in Texas. The technology's success there may increase the chances for reverse osmosis to find wider use in future cleanups and other waste treatment applications.

  4. Periodic reversal of direction allows Myxobacteria to swarm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yilin; Kaiser, A. Dale; Jiang, Yi; Alber, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Many bacteria can rapidly traverse surfaces from which they are extracting nutrient for growth. They generate flat, spreading colonies, called swarms because they resemble swarms of insects. We seek to understand how members of any dense swarm spread efficiently while being able to perceive and interfere minimally with the motion of others. To this end, we investigate swarms of the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus. Individual M. xanthus cells are elongated; they always move in the direction of their long axis; and they are in constant motion, repeatedly touching each other. Remarkably, they regularly reverse their gliding directions. We have constructed a detailed cell- and behavior-based computational model of M. xanthus swarming that allows the organization of cells to be computed. By using the model, we are able to show that reversals of gliding direction are essential for swarming and that reversals increase the outflow of cells across the edge of the swarm. Cells at the swarm edge gain maximum exposure to nutrient and oxygen. We also find that the reversal period predicted to maximize the outflow of cells is the same (within the errors of measurement) as the period observed in experiments with normal M. xanthus cells. This coincidence suggests that the circuit regulating reversals evolved to its current sensitivity under selection for growth achieved by swarming. Finally, we observe that, with time, reversals increase the cell alignment, and generate clusters of parallel cells. PMID:19164578

  5. Criminal exposure.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    In August, an HIV-positive man plead guilty to sexually assaulting a 14-year-old boy. The sleeping boy awoke to find [name removed] sexually assaulting him, while watching a pornographic video. [Name removed] plead guilty to the assault with intent to rape a child. In addition, [name removed] received three counts of indecent assault and battery on a child, and exposure of pornographic material to a minor. [Name removed] will remain on probation for five years, although the prosecution had recommended sentencing [name removed] to four or five years in prison. The boy continues to be tested for HIV. PMID:11366904

  6. How decision reversibility affects motivation.

    PubMed

    Bullens, Lottie; van Harreveld, Frenk; Förster, Jens; Higgins, Tory E

    2014-04-01

    The present research examined how decision reversibility can affect motivation. On the basis of extant findings, it was suggested that 1 way it could affect motivation would be to strengthen different regulatory foci, with reversible decision making, compared to irreversible decision making, strengthening prevention-related motivation relatively more than promotion-related motivation. If so, then decision reversibility should have effects associated with the relative differences between prevention and promotion motivation. In 5 studies, we manipulated the reversibility of a decision and used different indicators of regulatory focus motivation to test these predictions. Specifically, Study 1 tested for differences in participants' preference for approach versus avoidance strategies toward a desired end state. In Study 2, we used speed and accuracy performance as indicators of participants' regulatory motivation, and in Study 3, we measured global versus local reaction time performance. In Study 4, we approached the research question in a different way, making use of the value-from-fit hypothesis (Higgins, 2000, 2002). We tested whether a fit between chronic regulatory focus and focus induced by the reversibility of the decision increased participants' subjective positive feelings about the decision outcome. Finally, in Study 5, we tested whether regulatory motivation, induced by decision reversibility, also influenced participants' preference in specific product features. The results generally support our hypothesis showing that, compared to irreversible decisions, reversible decisions strengthen a prevention focus more than a promotion focus. Implications for research on decision making are discussed. PMID:23815456

  7. HIV post exposure prophylaxis induced bicytopenia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Long and short term side effects of antiretroviral drugs are not fully understood yet. Here a case of reversible blood count changes following post exposure prophylaxis with tenofovir/emtricitabin and lopinavir/ritonavir is reported. We propose that antiretroviral drugs used in post exposure prophylaxis may have a significant impact on hematopoiesis. PMID:24506969

  8. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  9. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  10. Molecularly Regulated Reversible DNA Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Niancao; Shi, Xuechen; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Natural polymers are synthesized and decomposed under physiological conditions. However, it is challenging to develop synthetic polymers whose formation and reversibility can be both controlled under physiological conditions. Here we show that both linear and branched DNA polymers can be synthesized via molecular hybridization in aqueous solutions, on the particle surface, and in the extracellular matrix (ECM) without the involvement of any harsh conditions. More importantly, these polymers can be effectively reversed to dissociate under the control of molecular triggers. Since nucleic acids can be conjugated with various molecules or materials, we anticipate that molecularly regulated reversible DNA polymerization holds potential for broad biological and biomedical applications. PMID:27100911

  11. Environmental toxicants--induced epigenetic alterations and their reversers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minju; Bae, Minji; Na, Hyunkyung; Yang, Mihi

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics has been emphasized in the postgenome era to clarify obscure health risks of environmental toxicants including endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In addition, mixed exposure in real life can modify health consequences of the toxicants. Particularly, some nutritional and dietary materials modify individual susceptibility through changes in the epigenome. Therefore, we focused on some environmental toxicants that induce epigenetic alterations, and introduced chemopreventive materials to reverse the toxicants-induced epigenetic alterations. Methodologically, we used global and specific DNA methylation as epigenetic end points and searched epigenetic modulators in food. We reviewed various epigenetic end points induced by environmental toxicants including alcohol, asbestos, nanomaterials, benzene, EDCs, metals, and ionizing radiation. The epigenetic end points can be summarized into global hypomethylation and specific hypermethylation at diverse tumor suppress genes. Exposure timing, dose, sex, or organ specificity should be considered to use the epigenetic end points as biomarkers for exposure to the epimutagenic toxicants. Particularly, neonatal exposure to the epimutagens can influence their future adult health because of characteristics of the epimutagens, which disrupt epigenetic regulation in imprinting, organogenesis, development, etc. Considering interaction between epimutagenic toxicants and their reversers in food, we suggest that multiple exposures to them can alleviate or mask epigenetic toxicity in real life. Our present review provides useful information to find new end points of environmental toxicants and to prevention from environment-related diseases. PMID:23167630

  12. Ferroelectric polarization reversal in single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, Henry L.

    1992-01-01

    Research on the reversal of polarization in ferroelectric crystals is reviewed. Particular attention is given to observation methods for polarization reversal, BaTiO3 polarization reversal, crystal thickness dependence of polarization reversal, and domain wall movement during polarization reversal in TGS.

  13. Hepatotoxicity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Montessori, Valentina; Harris, Marianne; Montaner, Julio S G

    2003-05-01

    Hepatotoxicity is an adverse effect of all available classes of antiretrovirals, including nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). A syndrome of hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis has been recognized as a rare, potentially fatal complication since the advent of NRTI monotherapy in the early 1990s. Today, NRTI remain the backbone of antiretroviral combination regimens, and, with the success of current treatment strategies, exposure to two or more of these agents may occur over a number of years. Hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis are accordingly being observed more frequently, along with a more recently recognized syndrome of chronic hyperlactatemia. These as well as other adverse effects of NRTI are mediated by inhibition of human DNA polymerase gamma, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver and other tissues. Early recognition and intervention are essential to avert serious outcomes. PMID:12800069

  14. Reversal of phenol and naphthalene effects on ciliate chemoattraction

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, S.G.; Ting, R.S.; Roberts, R.O. ); Mills, B.A. ); Stewart, K.C. )

    1990-02-01

    In an effort to address research needs in the area of rapid screening tests for aquatic toxicology, the authors engaged in a study of pollutant effects on protozoan chemoattraction. Among pollutants tested were metals and hydrocarbons. To ascertain whether inhibition observed after brief exposures to certain concentrations of the pollutants were irreversible, they examined the possibility of nullifying the inhibitory effect by removing protozoa from the toxicants after short exposures. Earlier work showed that inhibitory effects of metals could be removed, and they report here the nullification and reversibility of effects of phenol and naphthalene on certain ciliates.

  15. Improving reversal median computation using commuting reversals and cycle information.

    PubMed

    Arndt, William; Tang, Jijun

    2008-10-01

    In the past decade, genome rearrangements have attracted increasing attention from both biologists and computer scientists as a new type of data for phylogenetic analysis. Methods for reconstructing phylogeny from genome rearrangements include distance-based methods, MCMC methods, and direct optimization methods. The latter, pioneered by Sankoff and extended with the software suites GRAPPA and MGR, is the most accurate approach, but is very limited due to the difficulty of its scoring procedure--it must solve multiple instances of the reversal median problem to compute the score of a given tree. The reversal median problem is known to be NP-hard and all existing solvers are extremely slow when the genomes are distant. In this paper, we present a new reversal median heuristic for unichromosomal genomes. The new method works by applying sets of reversals in a batch where all such reversals both commute and do not break the cycle of any other. Our testing using simulated datasets shows that this method is much faster than the leading solver for difficult datasets with only a slight accuracy penalty, yet retains better accuracy than other heuristics with comparable speed, and provides the additional option of searching for multiple medians. This method dramatically increases the speed of current direct optimization methods and enables us to extend the range of their applicability to organellar and small nuclear genomes with more than 50 reversals along each edge. PMID:18774904

  16. Polarity-adjustable reversed phase ultrathin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hall, J Z; Taschuk, M T; Brett, M J

    2012-11-30

    Reversed phase thin layer chromatography (TLC) or high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) plates modified with C18, C8 or C2 to provide the silica-gel stationary phase with different polarities are available on the market, however, reversed phase plates with tunable polarity have not been reported. Given the limited variety of reversed phase plates, mobile phase composition optimization is necessary to obtain better separation of analytes with similar characteristics, which is often a time consuming step. We present polarity-adjustable reversed phase ultrathin-layer chromatography (UTLC) plates, which simplifies the mobile phase screening process and greatly expands the selection of reversed phase plates. The plates were fabricated on glass substrates with SiO(2) nanopillars deposited using the glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique. SiO(2) nanopillars were functionalized with octadecyltrichlorosilane to generate a super hydrophobic stationary phase. Unlike commercial silica-gel based stationary phases, the isolated nanopillar architecture presented here exposes a high surface area to post-fabrication surface treatments. In our work, an O(2) plasma treatment at different powers, pressures and exposure times was used to shorten the silane carbon chain and introduce COOH groups to the surface, producing plates with finely tunable polarities. Separation of a model dye mixture of Sudan blue and Sudan IV confirmed the tuning of surface polarities by measurement of retention behavior changes. The dye elution order reversed as a result of the change in surface polarity. When the same plasma treatment process was tested on commercial reversed phase plates, separation behavior did not change because the disordered and tortuous silica gel restricts the accessible surface area. Plasma treatment of GLAD structures with highly accessible surfaces improved control over interfacial properties, producing better reverse phase separations. PMID:23116804

  17. Magnetization reversal in exchange biased nanocap arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhr, I. L.; van Dijken, S.; Malinowski, G.; Fischer, P.; Springer, F.; Hellwig, O.; Albrecht, M.

    2007-05-01

    Arrays of self-assembled polystyrene spheres with various particle sizes have been used as a substrate to study the exchange bias effect along the out-of-plane direction of Pt/Co multilayers capped with IrMn layers. The evolution of the reversal process of the resulting magnetic nanocaps was investigated by magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy (M-TXM). Tip-sample interaction-induced irreversible and reversible switching events have been observed during multiple scanning cycles in MFM imaging which are ascribed to the so-called training effect. During M-TXM imaging a drastic change in morphology has been found due to the x-ray exposure, leading to the formation of much larger spherical particles. Interestingly, these merged particles reveal again an exchange coupled single-domain magnetic cap with magnetic behaviour similar to magnetic films deposited directly on spheres of similar size. This paper was presented at the Materials Research Society Fall 2006 Meeting, 27 November-1 December 2006, as part of Symposium P: Nanoscale Magnets-Synthesis, Self-assembly, Properties and Applications, organized by J Fassbender, J Chapman and C A Ross.

  18. Reverse degradation of nickel graphene junction by hydrogen annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenjun; Yang, Fan; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Lloyd, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    Metal contacts are fundamental building components for graphene based electronic devices and their properties are greatly influenced by interface quality during device fabrication, leading to resistance variation. Here we show that nickel graphene junction degrades after air exposure, due to interfacial oxidation, thus creating a tunneling barrier. Most importantly, we demonstrate that hydrogen annealing at moderate temperature (300 0C) is an effective technique to reverse the degradation.

  19. Reverse Discrimination and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    White subjects were aggressive toward Black opponents when contest results appeared to reflect elements of reverse discrimination; but they showed less aggressive behavior toward Black opponents when they thought their loss was due to their opponents' superior ability. (RL)

  20. The evolution of vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Ryan M; Pastuszak, Alexander W; Hakky, Tariq S; Chandrashekar, Aravind; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2015-06-01

    In the USA, about 500,000 vasectomies are performed each year, with up to 6% of men requesting reversal. The technique of vasectomy reversal has evolved from macrosurgical to the implementation of both microscopic and robotic technologies. The very earliest attempts at vasectomy reversal, the vasoepididymostomy and vasovasostomy, have remained central in the treatment of male infertility and will continue to be so for years to come. As seen throughout its history, urological microsurgery has consistently implemented advanced techniques and state-of-the art technology in its craft, and its continued refinement will allow for even more favorable outcomes in the lives of patients seeking restoration of fertility following vasectomy. Here, we review the evolution of vasectomy reversal and its current techniques. PMID:25980804

  1. Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are a major feature of the Earth's dynamo. Questions remain regarding the dynamical processes that give rise to reversals and the properties of the geomagnetic field during a polarity transition. A large number of paleomagnetic reversal records have been acquired during the past 50 years in order to better constrain the structure and geometry of the transitional field. In addition, over the past two decades, numerical dynamo simulations have also provided insights into the reversal mechanism. Yet despite the large paleomagnetic database, controversial interpretations of records of the transitional field persist; they result from two characteristics inherent to all reversals, both of which are detrimental to an ambiguous analysis. On the one hand, the reversal process is rapid and requires adequate temporal resolution. On the other hand, weak field intensities during a reversal can affect the fidelity of magnetic recording in sedimentary records. This paper is aimed at reviewing critically the main reversal features derived from paleomagnetic records and at analyzing some of these features in light of numerical simulations. We discuss in detail the fidelity of the signal extracted from paleomagnetic records and pay special attention to their resolution with respect to the timing and mechanisms involved in the magnetization process. Records from marine sediments dominate the database. They give rise to transitional field models that often lead to overinterpret the data. Consequently, we attempt to separate robust results (and their subsequent interpretations) from those that do not stand on a strong observational footing. Finally, we discuss new avenues that should favor progress to better characterize and understand transitional field behavior.

  2. Reversible Shape Memory Optical Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiaoxi; Tippets, Cary; Fu, Yulan; Donev, Eugene; Turner, Sara; Ashby, Valerie; Lopez, Rene; Sheiko, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Recent advancements in the understanding of the mechanisms that control shape memory in semi-crystalline polymers, has led to the development of protocols that allow for reversibility in complex shape transformations. The shifting between two programmable shapes is reversible without applying any external force. This is made possible by thermodynamically driven relaxation of extended polymer chains on heating is then inverted by kinetically preferred pathways of polymer crystallization on cooling. Reversible shapeshifting was applied to modulation of photonic gratings to create hands-free reversibly tunable optical elements. We have fabricated a sub-micron ratio optical square grating that presents reversible magnitude changes of its diffraction intensity (up to about 38% modulation) when subject to changes in temperature. This result is attributed to programmable changes in the grating height due to reversible shape memory and is repeatable over multiple cycles. Besides, roughness-induced variations in scattering signal observed upon heating-cooling cycles may offer another way to monitor kinetics of polymer melting and crystallization. Grants: NSF DMR-1407645,

  3. Probabilistic exposure fusion.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingli; Tao, Dacheng; Chen, Chun; Bu, Jiajun; Luo, Jiebo; Zhang, Chengqi

    2012-01-01

    The luminance of a natural scene is often of high dynamic range (HDR). In this paper, we propose a new scheme to handle HDR scenes by integrating locally adaptive scene detail capture and suppressing gradient reversals introduced by the local adaptation. The proposed scheme is novel for capturing an HDR scene by using a standard dynamic range (SDR) device and synthesizing an image suitable for SDR displays. In particular, we use an SDR capture device to record scene details (i.e., the visible contrasts and the scene gradients) in a series of SDR images with different exposure levels. Each SDR image responds to a fraction of the HDR and partially records scene details. With the captured SDR image series, we first calculate the image luminance levels, which maximize the visible contrasts, and then the scene gradients embedded in these images. Next, we synthesize an SDR image by using a probabilistic model that preserves the calculated image luminance levels and suppresses reversals in the image luminance gradients. The synthesized SDR image contains much more scene details than any of the captured SDR image. Moreover, the proposed scheme also functions as the tone mapping of an HDR image to the SDR image, and it is superior to both global and local tone mapping operators. This is because global operators fail to preserve visual details when the contrast ratio of a scene is large, whereas local operators often produce halos in the synthesized SDR image. The proposed scheme does not require any human interaction or parameter tuning for different scenes. Subjective evaluations have shown that it is preferred over a number of existing approaches. PMID:21609883

  4. Visual hydrogen detector with variable reversibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muradov, Nazim (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods, processes and compositions are provided for a visual or chemochromic hydrogen-detector with variable or tunable reversible color change. The working temperature range for the hydrogen detector is from minus 100.degree. C. to plus 500.degree. C. A hydrogen-sensitive pigment, including, but not limited to, oxides, hydroxides and polyoxo-compounds of tungsten, molybdenum, vanadium, chromium and combinations thereof, is combined with nano-sized metal activator particles and preferably, coated on a porous or woven substrate. In the presence of hydrogen, the composition rapidly changes its color from white or light-gray or light-tan to dark gray, navy-blue or black depending on the exposure time and hydrogen concentration in the medium. After hydrogen exposure ceases, the original color of the hydrogen-sensitive pigment is restored, and the visual hydrogen detector can be used repeatedly. By changing the composition of the hydrogen-sensitive pigment, the time required for its complete regeneration is varied from a few seconds to several days.

  5. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  6. Reversal Transition Records from Intrusions: Implications for the Reversal Process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M. D.; Williams, I. S.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of reversals of the geomagnetic field and the details of the transition fields remain controversial. However, reversal records from the Agno batholith and Tatoosh intrusion confirm the suggestion of Valet et al., (2012) from studies of lava records, that there is a threefold division in reversal transition directions. In the Agno, the first phase, or precursor, consists of a CCW loop of the VGP moving from high southerly latitude reverse poles to reach North America. The second phase takes the VGP along a half CCW loop from the tip of South America to northern latitudes at the intensity minimum. The third phase, or rebound is a smaller CCW loop and the main intensity recovery begins. The first and third phases appear to be paleosecular variation loops analogous to present London-Paris secular variation loops. The Tatoosh intrusion gives a similar, but less complete record with the VGPs again confined to the East Pacific and the Americas. Away from the reversal region, secular variation loops in the Tatoosh were shown to be comparable in duration to the precursor in the transition record, consistent with the first phase being a paleosecular variation loop in the Agno. Using westward drift estimates from the present field, this should last about1800 years. This gives ~3300 for phase 2, in an intensity low of >16,000 years. A feature of R to N reversal field models is a low latitude magnetic field flux concentration of the same sign as the polar vortex of the south geographic pole. This is followed by northward flux flow, e.g. Shao et al., (1999). The reversal is achieved by northward motion of this flux feature. The feature is locked in longitudinal mantle coordinates and similarly the VGPs in the Agno and Tatoosh records are confined to the longitudes of the eastern Pacific and the Americas. Whether we are approaching a reversal remains to be seen, although judging by these intrusion records the field intensity would need to decrease much further before

  7. Noise exposure and public health.

    PubMed Central

    Passchier-Vermeer, W; Passchier, W F

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to noise constitutes a health risk. There is sufficient scientific evidence that noise exposure can induce hearing impairment, hypertension and ischemic heart disease, annoyance, sleep disturbance, and decreased school performance. For other effects such as changes in the immune system and birth defects, the evidence is limited. Most public health impacts of noise were already identified in the 1960s and noise abatement is less of a scientific but primarily a policy problem. A subject for further research is the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying noise-induced cardiovascular disorders and the relationship of noise with annoyance and nonacoustical factors modifying health outcomes. A high priority study subject is the effects of noise on children, including cognitive effects and their reversibility. Noise exposure is on the increase, especially in the general living environment, both in industrialized nations and in developing world regions. This implies that in the twenty-first century noise exposure will still be a major public health problem. Images Figure 2 PMID:10698728

  8. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Patel, Abhishek P; Smith, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42-60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%-6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery. PMID:26975488

  9. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Abhishek P; Smith, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42–60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%–6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery. PMID:26975488

  10. Oxidative stress due to aluminum exposure induces eryptosis which is prevented by erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Vota, Daiana M; Crisp, Renée L; Nesse, Alcira B; Vittori, Daniela C

    2012-05-01

    The widespread use of aluminum (Al) provides easy exposure of humans to the metal and its accumulation remains a potential problem. In vivo and in vitro assays have associated Al overload with anemia. To better understand the mechanisms by which Al affects human erythrocytes, morphological and biochemical changes were analyzed after long-term treatment using an in vitro model. The appearance of erythrocytes with abnormal shapes suggested metal interaction with cell surface, supported by the fact that high amounts of Al attached to cell membrane. Long-term incubation of human erythrocytes with Al induced signs of premature erythrocyte death (eryptosis), such as phosphatidylserine externalization, increased intracellular calcium, and band 3 degradation. Signs of oxidative stress, such as significant increase in reactive oxygen species in parallel with decrease in the amount of reduced glutathione, were also observed. These oxidative effects were completely prevented by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Interestingly, erythrocytes were also protected from the prooxidative action of Al by the presence of erythropoietin (EPO). In conclusion, results provide evidence that chronic Al exposure may lead to biochemical and morphological alterations similar to those shown in eryptosis induced by oxidant compounds in human erythrocytes. The antieryptotic effect of EPO may contribute to enhance the knowledge of its physiological role on erythroid cells. Irrespective of the antioxidant mechanism, this property of EPO, shown in this model of Al exposure, let us suggest potential benefits by EPO treatment of patients with anemia associated to altered redox environment. PMID:22174104

  11. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  12. Time-reversed, flow-reversed ballistics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E. J.; Scheffler, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of planar sheet jet formation are studied to examine the hydrodynamic issues involved when simulations are carried out in the inverse direction, that is, with reversed time and flow. Both a realistic copper equation of state and a shockless equation of state were used. These studies are an initial step in evaluating this technique as a ballistics design tool.

  13. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems. PMID:27338448

  14. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems. PMID:27338448

  15. Stagnation point reverse flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Ben T. (Inventor); Neumeier, Yedidia (Inventor); Seitzman, Jerry M. (Inventor); Jagoda, Jechiel (Inventor); Weksler, Yoav (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for combusting a combustible fuel includes providing a vessel having an opening near a proximate end and a closed distal end defining a combustion chamber. A combustible reactants mixture is presented into the combustion chamber. The combustible reactants mixture is ignited creating a flame and combustion products. The closed end of the combustion chamber is utilized for directing combustion products toward the opening of the combustion chamber creating a reverse flow of combustion products within the combustion chamber. The reverse flow of combustion products is intermixed with combustible reactants mixture to maintain the flame.

  16. Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics are being studied as part of a TRW program directed towards development of a high current battery cell bypass switch. The following are discussed: cell bypass switch; nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics; and nickel-hydrogen cell chemistry: discharge/reversal and overdischarge (reversal) with nickel and hydrogen precharge.

  17. Reversing: A Fundamental Idea in Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Ginat, David

    2008-01-01

    Reversing is the notion of thinking or working in reverse. Computer science textbooks and tutors recognize it primarily in the form of recursion. However, recursion is only one form of reversing. Reversing appears in the computer science curriculum in many other forms, at various intellectual levels, in a variety of fundamental courses. As such,…

  18. Reversibility of cadmium-induced health effects in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Nomiyama, K.; Nomiyama, H.

    1984-03-01

    Twenty-one male rabbits were divided into three groups: rabbits of two groups were given pelleted food containing cadmium chloride at a dose level of 300 ..mu..g Cd/g over periods of 44 or 19 weeks. Rabbits of the last group were given ordinary commercial pelleted food and served as controls. Cadmium increased urinary protein and amino acid by week 19 and increased it to a remarkably high level by week 44. After cessation of cadmium exposure, rabbits of the first group (44 weeks exposure group) showed only little recovery from cadmium health effects: proteinuria and aminoaciduria were slightly improved. Depressed hepatic functions were also slightly improved, but did not return to the control level in 24 weeks. Fat and bone metabolism also remained depressed below the control level. Anemia did not also readily recover. On the other hand, rabbits of the second group (19 weeks exposure) recovered from the effects of cadmium: proteinuria and aminoaciduria in most animals disappeared soon after the end of cadmium exposure, plasma GPT fell after 1 week, and hemoglobin and hematocrit returned to normal in 6-11 weeks. The above results show that after cessation of cadmium exposure, mild cadmium-induced health effects were reversible in a short period, while more severe effects were not readily reversible. High performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) profiles of renal and hepatic cadmium-thionein (Cd-MT) during and after exposure to cadmium showed no correlation to the degree of cadmium health effects, and therefore, did not help to elucidate mechanisms of the recovery from cadmium-induced health effects, probably because cadmium not bound with metallothionein (non-MT-Cd) is responsible for inducing renal effects. 31 references, 4 figures.

  19. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, N.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible computing has been studied since Rolf Landauer advanced the argument that has come to be known as Landauer's principle. This principle states that there is no minimum energy dissipation for logic operations in reversible computing, because it is not accompanied by reductions in information entropy. However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices. Another difficulty is that reversible logic gates must be both logically and physically reversible. Here we propose the first practical reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices and experimentally demonstrate the logical and physical reversibility of the gate. Additionally, we estimate the energy dissipation of the gate, and discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for reversible logic operations. It is expected that the results of this study will enable reversible computing to move from the theoretical stage into practical usage. PMID:25220698

  20. Reversible colour change in Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Umbers, Kate D L; Fabricant, Scott A; Gawryszewski, Felipe M; Seago, Ainsley E; Herberstein, Marie E

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms and functions of reversible colour change in arthropods are highly diverse despite, or perhaps due to, the presence of an exoskeleton. Physiological colour changes, which have been recorded in 90 arthropod species, are rapid and are the result of changes in the positioning of microstructures or pigments, or in the refractive index of layers in the integument. By contrast, morphological colour changes, documented in 31 species, involve the anabolism or catabolism of components (e.g. pigments) directly related to the observable colour. In this review we highlight the diversity of mechanisms by which reversible colour change occurs and the evolutionary context and diversity of arthropod taxa in which it has been observed. Further, we discuss the functions of reversible colour change so far proposed, review the limited behavioural and ecological data, and argue that the field requires phylogenetically controlled approaches to understanding the evolution of reversible colour change. Finally, we encourage biologists to explore new model systems for colour change and to engage scientists from other disciplines; continued cross-disciplinary collaboration is the most promising approach to this nexus of biology, physics, and chemistry. PMID:24495279

  1. Law: Reverse Discrimination, Legal Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Just as schools and colleges are starting to hire more black and female faculty members through affirmative action programs, there is a new battle cry on the civil rights front: "reverse discrimination." Qualified whites claim they are being shoved aside in the scramble for less-qualified blacks, Chicanos, American Indians, and members of other…

  2. Quotas Are Not Reverse Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Gabrielle K.

    1975-01-01

    The findings of the Morrow v. Crisler and NAACP v. Allen civil rights cases are discussed. It is concluded from these employment discrimination cases that quotas are not reverse discrimination because no one has the right to continue to receive the benefits of racial discrimination at the expense of others. (LBH)

  3. CAPSULE REPORT: REVERSE OSMOSIS PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A failure analysis has been completed for the reverse osmosis (RO) process. The focus was on process failures that result in releases of liquids and vapors to the environment. The report includes the following: 1) A description of RO and coverage of the principles behind the proc...

  4. [Neurobehavioral effects of exposure to anesthetic gases].

    PubMed

    Camerino, D; Cassitto, M G; Gilioli, R

    1992-01-01

    Neurobehavioral studies on operating room personnel exposed to anaesthetic gases in hospitals of the Region Lombardia have confirmed findings already reported in the literature. There was high subjective symptomatology and reduced efficiency at psychologic testing among exposed people with protracted exposure. In this group, reaction time was worse at the end of the workshift with respect to the beginning. These changes were reversible after removal from exposure. It was impossible to establish a clear dose/response relationship due to the difficulty to control an important confounding factor, such as stress, in field studies. PMID:1345723

  5. Cloning and Characterization of the Phosphatidylserine Synthase Gene of Agrobacterium sp. Strain ATCC 31749 and Effect of Its Inactivation on Production of High-Molecular-Mass (1→3)-β-d-Glucan (Curdlan)

    PubMed Central

    Karnezis, Tara; Fisher, Helen C.; Neumann, Gregory M.; Stone, Bruce A.; Stanisich, Vilma A.

    2002-01-01

    Genes involved in the production of the extracellular (1→3)-β-glucan, curdlan, by Agrobacterium sp. strain ATCC 31749 were described previously (Stasinopoulos et al., Glycobiology 9:31-41, 1999). To identify additional curdlan-related genes whose protein products occur in the cell envelope, the transposon TnphoA was used as a specific genetic probe. One mutant was unable to produce high-molecular-mass curdlan when a previously uncharacterized gene, pssAG, encoding a 30-kDa, membrane-associated phosphatidylserine synthase was disrupted. The membranes of the mutant lacked phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), whereas the phosphatidylcholine (PC) content was unchanged and that of both phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin was increased. In the mutant, the continued appearance of PC revealed that its production by this Agrobacterium strain is not solely dependent on PE in a pathway controlled by the PssAG protein at its first step. Moreover, PC can be produced in a medium lacking choline. When the pssAG::TnphoA mutation was complemented by the intact pssAG gene, both the curdlan deficiency and the phospholipid profile were restored to wild-type, demonstrating a functional relationship between these two characteristics. The effect of the changed phospholipid profile could occur through an alteration in the overall charge distribution on the membrane or a specific requirement for PE for the folding into or maintenance of an active conformation of any or all of the structural proteins involved in curdlan production or transport. PMID:12107128

  6. Reconstructing exposures from biomarkers using exposure-pharmacokinetic modeling--A case study with carbaryl.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathleen; Phillips, Martin; Grulke, Christopher; Yoon, Miyoung; Young, Bruce; McDougall, Robin; Leonard, Jeremy; Lu, Jingtao; Lefew, William; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for short half-life chemicals were characterized using computational models that link external exposures to biomarkers. Using carbaryl as an example, an exposure model, the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), was used to generate time-concentration profiles for 500 virtual individuals exposed to carbaryl. These exposure profiles were used as inputs into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict urinary biomarker concentrations. These matching dietary intake levels and biomarker concentrations were used to (1) compare three reverse dosimetry approaches based on their ability to predict the central tendency of the intake dose distribution; and (2) identify parameters necessary for a more accurate exposure reconstruction. This study illustrates the trade-offs between using non-iterative reverse dosimetry methods that are fast, less precise and iterative methods that are slow, more precise. This study also intimates the necessity of including urine flow rate and elapsed time between last dose and urine sampling as part of the biomarker sampling collection for better interpretation of urinary biomarker data of short biological half-life chemicals. Resolution of these critical data gaps can allow exposure reconstruction methods to better predict population-level intake doses from large biomonitoring studies. PMID:26545325

  7. ECOLOGICAL AND EVOLUTIONARY APPLICATIONS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SEX REVERSAL OF FISH.

    PubMed

    Mcnair, Alistair; Lokman, P Mark; Closs, Gerard P; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2015-03-01

    Environmental sex reversal (ESR), which results in a mismatch between genotypic and phenotypic sex, is well documented in numerous fish species and may be induced by chemical exposure. Historically, research involving piscine ESR has been carried out with a view to improving profitability in aquaculture or to elucidate the processes governing sex determination and sexual differentiation. However, recent studies in evolution and ecology suggest research on ESR now has much wider applications and ramifications. We begin with an overview of ESR in fish and a brief review of the traditional applications thereof. We then discuss ESR and its potential demographic consequences in wild populations. Theory even suggests sex-reversed fish may be purposefully released to manipulate population dynamics. We suggest new research directions that may prove fruitful in understanding how ESR at the individual level translates to population-level processes. In the latter portion of the review we focus on evolutionary applications of ESR. Sex-reversal studies from the aquaculture literature provide insight in to the evolvability of determinants of sexual phenotype. Additionally, induced sex reversal can provide information about the evolution of sex chromosomes and sex-linked traits. Recently, naturally occurring ESR has been implicated as a mechanism contributing to the evolution of sex chromosomes. PMID:26434164

  8. Liquid metal actuation-based reversible frequency tunable monopole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Pierce, Richard G.; Henderson, Rashaunda; Doo, Seok Joo; Yoo, Koangki; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2014-12-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a reversible resonant frequency tunable antenna based on liquid metal actuation. The antenna is composed of a coplanar waveguide fed monopole stub printed on a copper-clad substrate, and a tunnel-shaped microfluidic channel linked to the printed metal. The gallium-based liquid metal can be injected and withdrawn from the channel in response to an applied air pressure. The gallium-based liquid metal is treated with hydrochloric acid to eliminate the oxide layer, and associated wetting/sticking problems, that arise from exposure to an ambient air environment. Elimination of the oxide layer allows for reliable actuation and repeatable and reversible tuning. By controlling the liquid metal slug on-demand with air pressure, the liquid metal can be readily controllable to connect/disconnect to the monopole antenna so that the physical length of the antenna reversibly tunes. The corresponding reversible resonant frequency changes from 4.9 GHz to 1.1 GHz. The antenna properties based on the liquid metal actuation were characterized by measuring the reflection coefficient and agreed well with simulation results. Additionally, the corresponding time-lapse images of controlling liquid metal in the channel were studied.

  9. Reversal agents in anaesthesia and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Nibedita; Dongare, Pradeep A; Mishra, Rajeeb Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advent of short and ultra-short acting drugs, an in-depth knowledge of the reversal agents used is a necessity for any anaesthesiologist. Reversal agents are defined as any drug used to reverse the effects of anaesthetics, narcotics or potentially toxic agents. The controversy on the routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade still exists. The advent of newer reversal agents like sugammadex have made the use of steroidal neuromuscular blockers like rocuronium feasible in rapid sequence induction situations. We made a review of the older reversal agents and those still under investigation for drugs that are regularly used in our anaesthesia practice. PMID:26644615

  10. [Reverse genetics system for flaviviruses].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryosuke; Konishi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Flaviviruses such as Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus belong to a family Flaviviridae. These viruses are transmitted to vertebrates by infected mosquitoes or ticks, producing diseases, which have a serious impact on global public health. Reverse genetics is a powerful tool for studying the viruses. Although infectious full-length clones have been obtained for multiple flaviviruses, their early-stage development had the difficulty because of the instability problem of the viral cDNA in E. coli. Several strategies have been developed to circumvent the problem of infectious clone instability. The current knowledge accumulated on reverse genetics system of flaviviruses and its application are summarized in this review. PMID:24769573

  11. Reverse osmosis water purification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, H. G.; Hames, P. S.; Menninger, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    A reverse osmosis water purification system, which uses a programmable controller (PC) as the control system, was designed and built to maintain the cleanliness and level of water for various systems of a 64-m antenna. The installation operates with other equipment of the antenna at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. The reverse osmosis system was designed to be fully automatic; with the PC, many complex sequential and timed logic networks were easily implemented and are modified. The PC monitors water levels, pressures, flows, control panel requests, and set points on analog meters; with this information various processes are initiated, monitored, modified, halted, or eliminated as required by the equipment being supplied pure water.

  12. Reversing the Brazil Nut Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewig, F.; Vandewalle, N.

    2005-12-01

    We propose a lattice model for studying the Brazil Nut Effect (BNE), i.e. the phase segregation occuring when a granular material is vertically shaked. The model considers the tap intensity and the mobility μ of the grains as the main physical parameters. Different mobilities for different grain species lead to segregation (BNE) patterns, reverse segregation (RBNE) patterns, “sandwhich" layered structures or vertical domains. A phase diagram (decompaction χ, mobility difference between both species Δ μ) is obtained in which the different phases are emphasized. In a narrow region of the diagram, different phases coexist. It is shown that the BNE segregation could be reversed by increasing the tap intensity or the characteristics of the grains. Numerical results are compared with earlier experimental works.

  13. Scaling in reversible submonolayer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, T. J.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2013-06-01

    The scaling of island and monomer density, capture zone distributions (CZDs), and island size distributions (ISDs) in reversible submonolayer growth was studied using the Clarke-Vvedensky model. An approach based on rate-equation results for irreversible aggregation (IA) models is extended to predict several scaling regimes in square and triangular lattices, in agreement with simulation results. Consistently with previous works, a regime I with fractal islands is observed at low temperatures, corresponding to IA with critical island size i=1, and a crossover to a second regime appears as the temperature is increased to ɛR2/3˜1, where ɛ is the single bond detachment probability and R is the diffusion-to-deposition ratio. In the square (triangular) lattice, a regime with scaling similar to IA with i=3 (i=2) is observed after that crossover. In the triangular lattice, a subsequent crossover to an IA regime with i=3 is observed, which is explained by the recurrence properties of random walks in two-dimensional lattices, which is beyond the mean-field approaches. At high temperatures, a crossover to a fully reversible regime is observed, characterized by a large density of small islands, a small density of very large islands, and total island and monomer densities increasing with temperature, in contrast to IA models. CZDs and ISDs with Gaussian right tails appear in all regimes for R˜107 or larger, including the fully reversible regime, where the CZDs are bimodal. This shows that the Pimpinelli-Einstein approach for IA explains the main mechanisms for the large islands to compete for free adatom aggregation in the reversible model, and may be the reason for its successful application to a variety of materials and growth conditions.

  14. Reverse engineering of integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Chisholm, Gregory H.; Eckmann, Steven T.; Lain, Christopher M.; Veroff, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Software and a method therein to analyze circuits. The software comprises several tools, each of which perform particular functions in the Reverse Engineering process. The analyst, through a standard interface, directs each tool to the portion of the task to which it is most well suited, rendering previously intractable problems solvable. The tools are generally used iteratively to produce a successively more abstract picture of a circuit, about which incomplete a priori knowledge exists.

  15. Reversing Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ehninger, Dan; Li, Weidong; Fox, Kevin; Stryker, Michael P.; Silva, Alcino J.

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in brain development, thought to be irreversible in adults, have long been assumed to underlie the neurological and psychiatric symptoms associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Surprisingly, a number of recent animal model studies of neurodevelopmental disorders demonstrate that reversing the underlying molecular deficits can result in substantial improvements in function even if treatments are started in adulthood. These findings mark a paradigmatic change in the way we understand and envision treating neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:19109903

  16. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  17. Reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren A; Holliger, Philipp; Flors, Cristina

    2012-08-30

    We describe the engineering of reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA with high-density substitution, and its applications in advanced fluorescence microscopy methods. High-density labeling of DNA with cyanine dyes can be achieved by polymerase chain reaction using a modified DNA polymerase that has been evolved to efficiently incorporate Cy3- and Cy5-labeled cytosine base analogues into double-stranded DNA. The resulting biopolymer, "CyDNA", displays hundreds of fluorophores per DNA strand and is strongly colored and highly fluorescent, although previous observations suggest that fluorescence quenching at such high density might be a concern, especially for Cy5. Herein, we first investigate the mechanisms of fluorescence quenching in CyDNA and we suggest that two different mechanisms, aggregate formation and resonance energy transfer, are responsible for fluorescence quenching at high labeling densities. Moreover, we have been able to re-engineer CyDNA into a reversible fluorescence photoswitchable biopolymer by using the properties of the Cy3-Cy5 pair. This novel biopolymer constitutes a new class of photoactive DNA-based nanomaterial and is of great interest for advanced microscopy applications. We show that reversible fluorescence photoswitching in CyDNA can be exploited in optical lock-in detection imaging. It also lays the foundations for improved and sequence-specific super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of DNA. PMID:22861666

  18. Three distinct reversing modes in the geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    The data that describe the long-term reversing behavior of the geodynamo show strong and sudden changes in magnetic reversal frequency. This concerns both the onset and the end of superchrons and most probably the occurrence of episodes characterized by extreme geomagnetic reversal frequency (>10-15 rev./Myr). To account for the complexity observed in geomagnetic reversal frequency evolution, we propose a simple scenario in which the geodynamo operates in three distinct reversing modes: i—a "normal" reversing mode generating geomagnetic polarity reversals according to a stationary random process, with on average a reversal rate of ˜3 rev./Myr; ii—a non-reversing "superchron" mode characterizing long time intervals without reversal; iii—a hyper-active reversing mode characterized by an extreme geomagnetic reversal frequency. The transitions between the different reversing modes would be sudden, i.e., on the Myr time scale. Following previous studies, we suggest that in the past, the occurrence of these transitions has been modulated by thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary governed by mantle dynamics. It might also be possible that they were more frequent during the Precambrian, before the nucleation of the inner core, because of a stronger influence on geodynamo activity of the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary.

  19. Medium wave exposure characterisation using exposure quotients.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Jesús M; Rufo, Montaña; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia; Pinar, Iván

    2010-06-01

    One of the aspects considered in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines is that, in situations of simultaneous exposure to fields of different frequencies, exposure quotients for thermal and electrical stimulation effects should be examined. The aim of the present work was to analyse the electromagnetic radiation levels and exposure quotients for exposure to multiple-frequency sources in the vicinity of medium wave radio broadcasting antennas. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyser and a monopole antenna. Kriging interpolation was used to prepare contour maps and to estimate the levels in the towns and villages of the zone. The results showed that the exposure quotient criterion based on electrical stimulation effects to be more stringent than those based on thermal effects or power density levels. Improvement of dosimetry evaluations requires the spectral components of the radiation to be quantified, followed by application of the criteria for exposure to multiple-frequency sources. PMID:20159912

  20. Rapid evaluation of reverse-osmosis membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Simultaneous reverse-osmosis tests conducted with centrifuges having multiple compartment heads are discussed. Equipment for retaining reverse-osmosis membrane is illustrated. Method of conducting tests is described.

  1. Ancient Magnetic Reversals: Clues to the Geodynamo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the question posed by some that the earth's magnetic field may reverse. States that rocks magnetized by ancient fields may offer clues to the underlying reversal mechanism in the earth's core. (TW)

  2. VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION: A RELATIVE QUANTITATIVE EXPOSURE INDICATOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the development of a quantifiable exposure indicator for measuring the presence of environmental estrogens in aquatic systems. Synthetic oligonucleotides, designed specifically for the vitellogenin gene (Vg) transcription product, were used in a Reverse Transcription Po...

  3. Neurotoxicity and Immunotoxicity Outcomes following Gestational Exposure to Four Lab Drinking Water Concentrates

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate whether developmental exposure to drinking water concentrates altered other endpoints, standard neuro- and immunotoxicity tests were conducted on the offspring. Male and female offspring (10/sex/treatment) exposed to chlorinated concentrated water (CCW) or reverse os...

  4. Reversible histone methylation regulates brain gene expression and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Andreassi, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic chromatin remodeling, including reversible histone methylation, regulates gene transcription in brain development and synaptic plasticity. Aberrant chromatin modifications due to mutant chromatin enzymes or chemical exposures have been associated with neurological or psychiatric disorders such as mental retardation, schizophrenia, depression, and drug addiction. Some chromatin enzymes, such as histone demethylases JARID1C and UTX, are coded by X-linked genes which are not X-inactivated in females. The higher expression of JARID1C and UTX in females could contribute to sex differences in brain development and behavior. PMID:20816965

  5. Statistical Learning, Letter Reversals, and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treiman, Rebecca; Gordon, Jessica; Boada, Richard; Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    2014-01-01

    Reversal errors play a prominent role in theories of reading disability. We examined reversal errors in the writing of letters by 5- to 6-year-old children. Of the 130 children, 92 had a history of difficulty in producing speech sounds, a risk factor for reading problems. Children were more likely to reverse letter forms that face left, such as…

  6. Cleaning Our World through Reverse Graffiti

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randazzo, Gabe; LaJevic, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade artists have begun to experiment with "reverse pollution" techniques, such as reverse graffiti, which focuses on cleaning environmental surfaces. Having recently been introduced to the works of Moose, the artist known for inventing the reverse graffiti technique, the authors decided to design a curriculum to increase…

  7. 14 CFR 23.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reversing systems. 23.933 Section 23.933... systems. (a) For turbojet and turbofan reversing systems. (1) Each system intended for ground operation... flight and landing under any possible position of the thrust reverser. (2) Each system intended for...

  8. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reversing systems. 25.933 Section 25.933... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.933 Reversing systems. (a) For turbojet reversing systems— (1) Each system intended for ground operation only must be designed so that during...

  9. The 94- to 97-kDa mouse macrophage membrane protein that recognizes oxidized low density lipoprotein and phosphatidylserine-rich liposomes is identical to macrosialin, the mouse homologue of human CD68.

    PubMed Central

    Ramprasad, M P; Fischer, W; Witztum, J L; Sambrano, G R; Quehenberger, O; Steinberg, D

    1995-01-01

    We have previously reported the partial purification of a 94- to 97-kDa plasma membrane protein from mouse peritoneal macrophages that binds oxidatively modified low density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and phosphatidylserine-rich liposomes. We have now identified that protein as macrosialin, a previously cloned macrophage-restricted membrane protein in the lysosomal-associated membrane protein family (mouse homologue of human CD68). Early in the course of purification of the 94- to 97-kDa protein, a new OxLDL-binding band at 190-200 kDa appeared and copurified with the 94- to 97-kDa protein. The HPLC pattern of tryptic peptides from this higher molecular mass ligand-binding band closely matched that derived from the 94- to 97-kDa band. Specifically, the same three macrosialin-derived tryptic peptides (9, 9, and 15 residues) were present in the purified 94- to 97-kDa band and in the 190- to 200-kDa band and antisera raised against peptide sequences in macrosialin recognized both bands. An antiserum against macrosialin precipitated most of the 94- to 97-kDa OxLDL-binding material. We conclude that the binding of OxLDL to mouse macrophage membranes is in part attributable to macrosialin. Our previous studies show that OxLDL competes with oxidized red blood cells and with apoptotic thymocytes for binding to mouse peritoneal macrophages. Whether macrosialin plays a role in recognition of OxLDL and oxidatively damaged cells by intact macrophages remains uncertain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7568176

  10. Reverse genetics for mammalian reovirus.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karl W; Ikizler, Miné; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Dermody, Terence S

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian orthoreoviruses (reoviruses) are highly tractable models for studies of viral replication and pathogenesis. The versatility of reovirus as an experimental model has been enhanced by development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system. Infectious reovirus can be recovered from cells transfected with plasmids encoding cDNAs of each reovirus gene segment using a strategy that does not require helper virus and is independent of selection. In this system, transcription of each gene segment is driven by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, which can be supplied transiently by recombinant vaccinia virus (rDIs-T7pol) or by cells that constitutively express the enzyme. Reverse genetics systems have been developed for two prototype reovirus strains, type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D). Each reovirus cDNA was encoded on an independent plasmid for the first-generation rescue system. The efficiency of virus recovery was enhanced in a second-generation system by combining the cDNAs for multiple reovirus gene segments onto single plasmids to reduce the number of plasmids from 10 to 4. The reduction in plasmid number and the use of baby hamster kidney cells that express T7 RNA polymerase increased the efficiency of viral rescue, reduced the incubation time required to recover infectious virus, and eliminated potential biosafety concerns associated with the use of recombinant vaccinia virus. Reovirus reverse genetics has been used to introduce mutations into viral capsid and nonstructural components to study viral protein-structure activity relationships and can be exploited to engineer recombinant reoviruses for vaccine and oncolytic applications. PMID:21798351

  11. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian Eric

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  12. Reversible blunting of arousal from sleep in response to intermittent hypoxia in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Darnall, R A; McWilliams, S; Schneider, R W; Tobia, C M

    2010-12-01

    Arousal is an important survival mechanism when infants are confronted with hypoxia during sleep. Many sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) infants are exposed to repeated episodes of hypoxia before death and have impaired arousal mechanisms. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to hypoxia would cause a progressive blunting of arousal, and that a reversal of this process would occur if the hypoxia was terminated at the time of arousal. P5 (postnatal age of 5 days), P15, and P25 rat pups were exposed to either eight trials of hypoxia (3 min 5% O(2) alternating with room air) (group A), or three hypoxia trials as in group A, followed by five trials in which hypoxia was terminated at arousal (group B). In both groups A and B, latency increased over the first four trials of hypoxia, but reversed in group B animals during trials 5-8. Progressive arousal blunting was more pronounced in the older pups. The effects of intermittent hypoxia on heart rate also depended on age. In the older pups, heart rate increased with each hypoxia exposure. In the P5 pups, however, heart rate decreased during hypoxia and did not return to baseline between exposures, resulting in a progressive fall of baseline values over successive hypoxia exposures. In the group B animals, heart rate changes during trials 1-4 also reversed during trials 5-8. We conclude that exposure to repeated episodes of hypoxia can cause progressive blunting of arousal, which is reversible by altering the exposure times to hypoxia and the period of recovery between hypoxia exposures. PMID:20930126

  13. Understanding existing exposure situations.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J-F

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 removed the distinction between practices and interventions, and introduced three types of exposure situation: existing, planned, and emergency. It also emphasised the optimisation principle in connection with individual dose restrictions for all controllable exposure situations. Existing exposure situations are those resulting from sources, natural or man-made, that already exist when a decision on control has to be taken. They have common features to be taken into account when implementing general recommendations, such as: the source may be difficult to control; all exposures cannot be anticipated; protective actions can only be implemented after characterisation of the exposure situation; time may be needed to reduce exposure below the reference level; levels of exposure are highly dependent on individual behaviour and present a wide spread of individual dose distribution; exposures at work may be adventitious and not considered as occupational exposure; there is generally no potential for accident; many stakeholders have to be involved; and many factors need to be considered. ICRP is currently developing a series of reports related to the practical implementation of Publication 103 to various existing exposure situations, including exposure from radon, exposure from cosmic radiation in aviation, exposure from processes using naturally occurring radioactive material, and exposure from contaminated sites due to past activities. PMID:26975365

  14. DEMONSTRATION OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division (HEASD) of the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) conducts research on exposure measurements, human activity patterns, exposure and dose models, and cumulative exposures critical for the Agency to make scientificall...

  15. Kondorski reversal in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Ralph; Schubert, Eva; Enders, Axel; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetization reversal in nanowire systems, such as alnico-type permanent magnets, slanted columns produced by glancing-angle deposition, and nanowires embedded in alumina templates, is investigated by model calculations. The angular dependence of the domain-wall propagation is Kondorski-like, reminiscent of Kondorski pinning in bulk materials but with a somewhat different physics and consistent with Kerr hysteresis-loop measurements. Criss-cross patterning of alnicos improves the coercivity but reduces the remanence, with virtually zero net effect on energy product. Finally, we briefly discuss the wire-radius dependence of the coercivity in the context of "shape anisotropy" and the occurrence of interaction domains in alnico.

  16. Corrosion protected reversing heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Zawierucha, R.

    1984-09-25

    A reversing heat exchanger of the plate and fin type having multiple aluminum parting sheets in a stacked arrangement with corrugated fins separating the sheets to form multiple flow paths, means for closing the ends of the sheets, an input manifold arrangement of headers for the warm end of of the exchanger and an output manifold arrangement for the cold end of the exchanger with the input air feed stream header and the waste gas exhaust header having an alloy of zinc and aluminum coated on the inside surface for providing corrosion protection to the stack.

  17. Abamectin induces rapid and reversible hypoactivity within early zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Tara D; Volz, David C

    2015-01-01

    During early zebrafish embryogenesis, spontaneous tail contractions represent the first sign of locomotion and result from innervation of primary motoneuron axons to target axial muscles. Based on a high-content screen, we previously demonstrated that exposure of zebrafish embryos to abamectin--an avermectin insecticide--from 5-25 hours post-fertilization (hpf) abolished spontaneous activity in the absence of effects on survival and gross morphology. Therefore, the objective of this study was to begin investigating the mechanism of abamectin-induced hypoactivity in zebrafish. Similar to 384-well plates, static exposure of embryos to abamectin from 5-25 hpf in glass beakers resulted in elimination of activity at low micromolar concentrations. However, abamectin did not affect neurite outgrowth from spinal motoneurons and, compared with exposure from 5-25 hpf, embryos were equally susceptible to abamectin-induced hypoactivity when exposures were initiated at 10 and 23 hpf. Moreover, immersion of abamectin-exposed embryos in clean water resulted in complete recovery of spontaneous activity relative to vehicle controls, suggesting that abamectin reversibly activated ligand-gated chloride channels and inhibited neurotransmission. To test this hypothesis, we pretreated embryos to vehicle or non-toxic concentrations of fipronil or endosulfan--two insecticides that antagonize the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor--from 5-23 hpf, and then exposed embryos to vehicle or abamectin from 23-25 hpf. Interestingly, activity levels within abamectin-exposed embryos pretreated with either antagonist were similar to embryos exposed to vehicle alone. Using quantitative PCR and phylogenetic analyses, we then confirmed the presence of GABA receptor α1 and β2 subunits at 5, 10, and 23 hpf, and demonstrated that zebrafish GABA receptor subunits are homologous to mammalian GABA receptor subunits. Overall, our data collectively suggest that abamectin induces rapid and reversible

  18. Reversible subacute ethylene glycol monomethyl ether toxicity associated with microfilm production: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.

    1984-01-01

    The first reported case of a possible toxic effect of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) exposure in the microfilm manufacturing industry is described. Reversible subjective central nervous system complaints and asymptomatic hematopoietic effects occurred following inhalation and skin exposure to EGME. Hematopoietic changes occurred at airborne levels which have been associated with reproductive and teratogenic effects in other studies. This finding leads to a recommendation for further research to determine whether or not hematopoietic medical surveillance can provide an indication of not only EGME hematopoietic effects but also an indication of sufficient EGME exposure to affect human reproduction and fetal development.

  19. Steganography using reversible texture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Chung-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for steganography using a reversible texture synthesis. A texture synthesis process resamples a smaller texture image, which synthesizes a new texture image with a similar local appearance and an arbitrary size. We weave the texture synthesis process into steganography to conceal secret messages. In contrast to using an existing cover image to hide messages, our algorithm conceals the source texture image and embeds secret messages through the process of texture synthesis. This allows us to extract the secret messages and source texture from a stego synthetic texture. Our approach offers three distinct advantages. First, our scheme offers the embedding capacity that is proportional to the size of the stego texture image. Second, a steganalytic algorithm is not likely to defeat our steganographic approach. Third, the reversible capability inherited from our scheme provides functionality, which allows recovery of the source texture. Experimental results have verified that our proposed algorithm can provide various numbers of embedding capacities, produce a visually plausible texture images, and recover the source texture. PMID:25415988

  20. Necrotic Cells Actively Attract Phagocytes through the Collaborative Action of Two Distinct PS-Exposure Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zao; Venegas, Victor; Nagaoka, Yuji; Morino, Eri; Raghavan, Prashant; Audhya, Anjon; Nakanishi, Yoshinobu; Zhou, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Necrosis, a kind of cell death closely associated with pathogenesis and genetic programs, is distinct from apoptosis in both morphology and mechanism. Like apoptotic cells, necrotic cells are swiftly removed from animal bodies to prevent harmful inflammatory and autoimmune responses. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, gain-of-function mutations in certain ion channel subunits result in the excitotoxic necrosis of six touch neurons and their subsequent engulfment and degradation inside engulfing cells. How necrotic cells are recognized by engulfing cells is unclear. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an important apoptotic-cell surface signal that attracts engulfing cells. Here we observed PS exposure on the surface of necrotic touch neurons. In addition, the phagocytic receptor CED-1 clusters around necrotic cells and promotes their engulfment. The extracellular domain of CED-1 associates with PS in vitro. We further identified a necrotic cell-specific function of CED-7, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, in promoting PS exposure. In addition to CED-7, anoctamin homolog-1 (ANOH-1), the C. elegans homolog of the mammalian Ca2+-dependent phospholipid scramblase TMEM16F, plays an independent role in promoting PS exposure on necrotic cells. The combined activities from CED-7 and ANOH-1 ensure efficient exposure of PS on necrotic cells to attract their phagocytes. In addition, CED-8, the C. elegans homolog of mammalian Xk-related protein 8 also makes a contribution to necrotic cell-removal at the first larval stage. Our work indicates that cells killed by different mechanisms (necrosis or apoptosis) expose a common “eat me” signal to attract their phagocytic receptor(s); furthermore, unlike what was previously believed, necrotic cells actively present PS on their outer surfaces through at least two distinct molecular mechanisms rather than leaking out PS passively. PMID:26061275

  1. Particle exposures and infections

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Ci...

  2. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research collaborations between the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) and the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) centered on the development and application of exposure analysis tools in environmental epidemiology include the El Paso...

  3. CHAPTER ONE: EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining human exposure to suspended particualte concentrations requires measurements that quantify different particle properties in microenvironments where people live, work, and play. Particle mass, size, and chemical composition are important exposure variables, and these ...

  4. Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar, Joseph V.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring is the coordination of environmental (air, water, land, and crops) monitoring networks to collect systematically pollutant exposure data for a specific receptor, usually man. (Author/BB)

  5. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  6. DIETARY EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research constitutes the MCEARD base dietary exposure research program and is conducted to complement the NERL total human exposure program. The research builds on previous work to reduce the level of uncertainty in exposure assessment by improving NERL's ability to evaluat...

  7. GUIDELINES FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Guidelines for Exposure Assessment describe the general concepts of exposure assessment including definitions and associated units, and by providing guidance on the planning and conducting of an exposure assessment. Guidance is also provided on presenting the results of the e...

  8. HUMAN EXPOSURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  9. Palm reversal errors in native-signing children with autism.

    PubMed

    Shield, Aaron; Meier, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who have native exposure to a sign language such as American Sign Language (ASL) have received almost no scientific attention. This paper reports the first studies on a sample of five native-signing children (four deaf children of deaf parents and one hearing child of deaf parents; ages 4;6 to 7;5) diagnosed with ASD. A domain-general deficit in the ability of children with ASD to replicate the gestures of others is hypothesized to be a source of palm orientation reversal errors in sign. In Study 1, naturalistic language samples were collected from three native-signing children with ASD and were analyzed for errors in handshape, location, movement and palm orientation. In Study 2, four native-signing children with ASD were compared to 12 typically developing deaf children (ages 3;7 to 6;9, all born to deaf parents) on a fingerspelling task. In both studies children with ASD showed a tendency to reverse palm orientation on signs specified for inward/outward orientation. Typically developing deaf children did not produce any such errors in palm orientation. We conclude that this kind of palm reversal has a perceptual rather than a motoric source, and is further evidence of a "self-other mapping" deficit in ASD. PMID:22981637

  10. Palm Reversal Errors in Native-Signing Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Shield, Aaron; Meier, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who have native exposure to a sign language such as American Sign Language (ASL) have received almost no scientific attention. This paper reports the first studies on a sample of five native-signing children (four deaf children of deaf parents and one hearing child of deaf parents; ages 4;6 to 7;5) diagnosed with ASD. A domain-general deficit in the ability of children with ASD to replicate the gestures of others is hypothesized to be a source of palm orientation reversal errors in sign. In Study 1, naturalistic language samples were collected from three native-signing children with ASD and were analyzed for errors in handshape, location, movement and palm orientation. In Study 2, four native-signing children with ASD were compared to 12 typically-developing deaf children (ages 3;7 to 6;9, all born to deaf parents) on a fingerspelling task. In both studies children with ASD showed a tendency to reverse palm orientation on signs specified for inward/outward orientation. Typically-developing deaf children did not produce any such errors in palm orientation. We conclude that this kind of palm reversal has a perceptual rather than a motoric source, and is further evidence of a “self-other mapping” deficit in ASD. PMID:22981637

  11. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: an under-recognized clinical emergency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2010-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by recurrent thunderclap headaches and reversible cerebral vasoconstrictions. RCVS is more common than previously thought and should be differentiated from aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage. RCVS can be spontaneous or evoked by pregnancy or exposure to vasoactive substances. Patients tend to be middle-aged women but pediatric patients have been seen. Up to 80% of sufferers have identifiable triggers. Thunderclap headaches tend to recur daily and last for a period of around 2 weeks, while the vasoconstrictions may last for months. About one-third of patients have blood pressure surges accompanying headache attacks. The potential complications of RCVS include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, ischemic strokes over watershed zones, cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance images including angiography and venography and lumbar punctures are the studies of choice, whereas catheter angiography should not be implemented routinely. Patients with a mean flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery greater than 120 cm/s shown by transcranial color-coded sonography have a greater risk of ischemic complications than those without. The pathophysiology of RCVS remains unknown; sympathetic hyperactivity may play a role. Open-label trials showed calcium channel blockers, such as nimodipine may be an effective treatment in prevention of thunderclap headache attacks. In severe cases, intra-arterial therapy may be considered. Most patients with RCVS recover without sequelae; however, relapse has been reported in a small proportion of patients. PMID:21179608

  12. On the reversibility of environmental contamination with persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Deuk; Wania, Frank

    2011-10-15

    An understanding of the factors that control the time trends of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the environment is required to evaluate the effectiveness of emission reductions and to predict future exposure. Using a regional contaminant fate model, CoZMo-POP 2, and a generic bell-shaped emission profile, we simulated time trends of hypothetical chemicals with a range of POP-like partitioning and degradation properties in different compartments of a generic warm temperate environment, with the objective of identifying the processes that may prevent the reversibility of environmental contamination with POPs after the end of primary emissions. Evaporation from soil and water can prevent complete reversibility of POP contamination of the atmosphere after the end of emissions. However, under the selected conditions, only for organic chemicals within a narrow range of volatility, that is, a logarithm of the octanol air equilibrium partition coefficient between 7 and 8, and with atmospheric degradation half-lives in excess of a few month can evaporation from environmental reservoirs sustain atmospheric levels that are within an order of magnitude of those resulting from primary emissions. HCB and α-HCH fulfill these criteria, which may explain, why their atmospheric concentrations have remained relatively high decades after their main primary emissions have been largely eliminated. Soil-to-water transfer is found responsible for the lack of reversibility of POP contamination of the aqueous environment after the end of emissions, whereas reversal of water-sediment exchange, although possible, is unlikely to contribute significantly. Differences in the reversibility of contamination in air and water suggests the possibility of changes in the relative importance of various exposure pathways after the end of primary emissions, namely an increase in the importance of the aquatic food chain relative to the agricultural one, especially if the former has a benthic

  13. Multiwire Thermocouples in Reversing Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements are recorded for multiwire thermocouples consisting of either two or three wires of unequal diameters. Signals from the multiwire probe are recorded for a reversing gas flow with both a periodic temperature and time constant fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the multiwire thermocouple requires no compensation provided omega/omega(sub 1) less than 2.3 for two wires or omega/omega(sub 1) less than 3.6 for three wires where omega(sub 1) (= 2(pi)f) is the natural frequency of the smaller wire based on the maximum gas velocity. The latter results were possible provided Fourier transformed data from the wires were used and knowledge of the gas velocity phase angle was available.

  14. Investigations of reversible thermochromic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, Douglas C.

    Three-component organic thermochromic systems have potential applications in reversible, rewritable thermal printing. In principle, such mixtures could maintain a coloured or non-coloured state at ambient temperature depending on their thermal treatment. These systems generally consist of a functional dye (1--3 mol%), a weakly acidic colour developer (5--25 mol%), and a high-melting organic solvent (75--90 mol%). Colour development occurs at the fusion temperature of the mixture, which triggers the interaction of the dye and developer. Slow cooling of the melt results in an equilibrium state with low colour density, whereas rapid cooling of the melt results in a metastable state with high colour density. The metastable state can be decoloured by heating to an intermediate decolourisation temperature at which the coloured state becomes unstable. Barriers to the widespread use of reversible, rewritable thermochromic materials include problems with colour contrast, colour stability, and decolourisation rates. Development is hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the interactions between components in these systems. In this study the developer-dye and developer-solvent interactions were examined for an archetypal dye/developer/solvent thermochromic system. Vibrational spectroscopy, NMR, and thermal analysis were used to examine compounds formed in developer/dye and developer/solvent binary mixtures. Rewritable thermochromic properties such as metastable colour density, equilibrium colour density, and decolourisation rates were examined and discussed in terms of the thermodynamics of the developer/dye and developer/solvent interactions. Observed thermochromic properties are shown to be strongly correlated to a competition between the dye and the solvent for interaction with the developer. Increasing the attractive interaction between the solvent and developer results in enhanced rewritable thermochromic properties.

  15. Effects of acute restraint stress on set-shifting and reversal learning in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Chester A.; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to acute stress alters cognition; however, few studies have examined the effects of acute stress on executive functions such as behavioral flexibility. The goal of the present experiments was to determine the effects of acute periods of stress on two distinct forms of behavioral flexibility: set-shifting and reversal learning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in an operant-chamber-based task. Some of the rats were exposed to acute restraint stress (30 min) immediately before either the set-shifting test day or the reversal learning test day. Acute stress had no effect on set-shifting, but it significantly facilitated reversal learning, as assessed by both trials to criterion and total errors. In a second experiment, the roles of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the acute-stress-induced facilitation of reversal learning were examined. Systemic administration of the GR-selective antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg) or the MR-selective antagonist spironolactone (50 mg/kg) 30 min prior to acute stress failed to block the facilitation on reversal learning. The present results demonstrate a dissociable effect of acute stress on set-shifting and reversal learning and suggest that the facilitation of reversal learning by acute stress may be mediated by factors other than corticosterone. PMID:23055093

  16. Process of forming compounds using reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion systems

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Bean, Roger M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for producing a nanometer-sized metal compound. The process comprises forming a reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system comprising a polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. A first reactant comprising a multi-component, water-soluble metal compound is introduced into the polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. This first reactant can be introduced into the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system during formation thereof or subsequent to the formation of the reverse micelle or microemulsion system. The water-soluble metal compound is then reacted in the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system to form the nanometer-sized metal compound. The nanometer-sized metal compound is then precipitated from the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system.

  17. Periodicity of the earth's magnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented from an attempt to perform a relatively comprehensive analysis of the evidence for a periodicity, with harmonics, of the observed regular reversals of the earth's magnetic field. The database considered covers 296 reversals over the past 165 Myr. Histograms with bins 1 Myr apart reveal only 30 Myr reversal patterns. The reversal dates are fitted to a linear periodic function and a spectrum is computed for the residuals at the adopted dates. The possible presence of multiple periodicities is evaluated and over various time intervals. The analysis shows that a recently observed 15 Myr periodicity is probably a harmonic of the 29.5-30.5 Myr period. The calculations do not confirm an inherent magnetic reversal property of the earth. The reversals may arise from tectonic events or from impacts from extraterrestrial objects.

  18. Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-01-01

    A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

  19. On the regimes of charge reversal.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2008-05-01

    Charge reversal of the planar electrical double layer is studied by means of a well known integral equation theory. By a numerical analysis, a diagram is constructed with the onset points of charge reversal in the space of the fundamental variables of the system. Within this diagram, two regimes of charge reversal are identified, which are referred to as oscillatory and nonoscillatory. We found that these two regimes can be distinguished through a simple formula. Furthermore, a symmetry between electrostatic and size correlations in charge reversal is exhibited. Agreement of our results with other theories and molecular simulations data is discussed. PMID:18465930

  20. Sickle cell disease and posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Cole, Catherine; Herkes, Geoffrey K; Barnett, Yael; Lin, Jamie; Needham, Merrilee

    2014-08-01

    Sickle cell disease can present with neurological manifestations. One such presentation is with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy also known as reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy. The condition is classically described as reversible over time; it commonly presents with oedematous changes involving the white matter of the occipital and parietal regions. Only a few patients with the association between sickle cell disease and posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy have been described in the adult literature. We present two patients from our institutions to emphasise the association between the two conditions and summarise the published cases in the literature. PMID:24656986

  1. Differential effect of maternal diet supplementation with α-Linolenic adcid or n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on glial cell phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine fatty acid profile in neonate rat brains

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) are of crucial importance for the development of neural tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a dietary supplementation in n-3 fatty acids in female rats during gestation and lactation on fatty acid pattern in brain glial cells phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in the neonates. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were fed during the whole gestation and lactation period with a diet containing either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 0.55%) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 0.75% of total fatty acids) or α-linolenic acid (ALA, 2.90%). At two weeks of age, gastric content and brain glial cell PE and PS of rat neonates were analyzed for their fatty acid and dimethylacetal (DMA) profile. Data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariate statistics. Results In the neonates from the group fed with n-3 LC-PUFA, the DHA level in gastric content (+65%, P < 0.0001) and brain glial cell PE (+18%, P = 0.0001) and PS (+15%, P = 0.0009) were significantly increased compared to the ALA group. The filtered correlation analysis (P < 0.05) underlined that levels of dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA), DHA and n-3 docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) were negatively correlated with arachidonic acid (ARA) and n-6 DPA in PE of brain glial cells. No significant correlation between n-3 and n-6 LC-PUFA were found in the PS dataset. DMA level in PE was negatively correlated with n-6 DPA. DMA were found to occur in brain glial cell PS fraction; in this class DMA level was correlated negatively with DHA and positively with ARA. Conclusion The present study confirms that early supplementation of maternal diet with n-3 fatty acids supplied as LC-PUFA is more efficient in increasing n-3 in brain glial cell PE and PS in the neonate than ALA. Negative correlation between n-6 DPA, a conventional marker of DHA deficiency, and DMA in PE suggests n-6 DPA that potentially be considered as a marker of tissue

  2. EXAMPLE EXPOSURE SCENARIOS ASSESSMENT TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure scenarios are a tool to help the assessor develop estimates of exposure, dose, and risk. An exposure scenario generally includes facts, data, assumptions, inferences, and sometimes professional judgment about how the exposure takes place. The human physiological and beh...

  3. Reversing expectations during discourse comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ming; Kuperberg, Gina

    2014-01-01

    In two ERP experiments, we asked whether comprehenders used the concessive connective, even so, to predict upcoming events. Participants read coherent and incoherent scenarios, with and without even so, e.g. “Elizabeth had a history exam on Monday. She took the test and aced/failed it. (Even so), she went home and celebrated wildly.”, as they rated coherence (Experiment 1) or simply answered intermittent comprehension questions (Experiment 2). The semantic function of even so was used to reverse real-world knowledge predictions, leading to an attenuated N400 to coherent versus incoherent target words (“celebrated”). Moreover, its pragmatic communicative function enhanced predictive processing, leading to more N400 attenuation to coherent targets in scenarios with than without even so. This benefit however, did not come for free: the detection of failed event predictions triggered a later posterior positivity and/or an anterior negativity effect, and costs of maintaining alternative likelihood relations manifest as a sustained negativity effect on sentence-final words. PMID:25914891

  4. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  5. High Performance Field Reversed Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binderbauer, Michl

    2014-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a prolate compact toroid with poloidal magnetic fields. FRCs could lead to economic fusion reactors with high power density, simple geometry, natural divertor, ease of translation, and possibly capable of burning aneutronic fuels. However, as in other high-beta plasmas, there are stability and confinement concerns. These concerns can be addressed by introducing and maintaining a significant fast ion population in the system. This is the approach adopted by TAE and implemented for the first time in the C-2 device. Studying the physics of FRCs driven by Neutral Beam (NB) injection, significant improvements were made in confinement and stability. Early C-2 discharges had relatively good confinement, but global power losses exceeded the available NB input power. The addition of axially streaming plasma guns, magnetic end plugs as well as advanced surface conditioning leads to dramatic reductions in turbulence driven losses and greatly improved stability. As a result, fast ion confinement significantly improved and allowed for build-up of a dominant fast particle population. Under such appropriate conditions we achieved highly reproducible, long-lived, macroscopically stable FRCs with record lifetimes. This demonstrated many beneficial effects of large orbit particles and their performance impact on FRCs Together these achievements point to the prospect of beam-driven FRCs as a path toward fusion reactors. This presentation will review and expand on key results and present context for their interpretation.

  6. Entropic uncertainty and measurement reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Mario; Wehner, Stephanie; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-07-01

    The entropic uncertainty relation with quantum side information (EUR-QSI) from (Berta et al 2010 Nat. Phys. 6 659) is a unifying principle relating two distinctive features of quantum mechanics: quantum uncertainty due to measurement incompatibility, and entanglement. In these relations, quantum uncertainty takes the form of preparation uncertainty where one of two incompatible measurements is applied. In particular, the ‘uncertainty witness’ lower bound in the EUR-QSI is not a function of a post-measurement state. An insightful proof of the EUR-QSI from (Coles et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 210405) makes use of a fundamental mathematical consequence of the postulates of quantum mechanics known as the non-increase of quantum relative entropy under quantum channels. Here, we exploit this perspective to establish a tightening of the EUR-QSI which adds a new state-dependent term in the lower bound, related to how well one can reverse the action of a quantum measurement. As such, this new term is a direct function of the post-measurement state and can be thought of as quantifying how much disturbance a given measurement causes. Our result thus quantitatively unifies this feature of quantum mechanics with the others mentioned above. We have experimentally tested our theoretical predictions on the IBM quantum experience and find reasonable agreement between our predictions and experimental outcomes.

  7. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors as microbicides.

    PubMed

    Lewi, Paul; Heeres, Jan; Ariën, Kevin; Venkatraj, Muthusamy; Joossens, Jurgen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Augustyns, Koen; Vanham, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The CAPRISA 004 study in South Africa has accelerated the development of vaginal and rectal microbicides containing antiretrovirals that target specific enzymes in the reproduction cycle of HIV, especially reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI). In this review we discuss the potential relevance of HIV-1 RTIs as microbicides, focusing in the nucleotide RTI tenofovir and six classes of nonnucleoside RTIs (including dapivirine, UC781, urea and thiourea PETTs, DABOs and a pyrimidinedione). Although tenofovir and dapivirine appear to be most advanced in clinical trials as potential microbicides, several issues remain unresolved, e.g., the importance of nonhuman primates as a "gatekeeper" for clinical trials, the emergence and spread of drug-resistant mutants, the combination of microbicides that target different phases of viral reproduction and the accessibility to microbicides in low-income countries. Thus, here we discuss the latest research on RTI as microbicides in the light of the continuing spread of the HIV pandemic from the point of view of medicinal chemistry, virological, and pharmaceutical studies. PMID:22264043

  8. Reverse Genetics in Ecological Research

    PubMed Central

    Schwachtje, Jens; Kutschbach, Susan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2008-01-01

    By precisely manipulating the expression of individual genetic elements thought to be important for ecological performance, reverse genetics has the potential to revolutionize plant ecology. However, untested concerns about possible side-effects of the transformation technique, caused by Agrobacterium infection and tissue culture, on plant performance have stymied research by requiring onerous sample sizes. We compare 5 independently transformed Nicotiana attenuata lines harboring empty vector control (EVC) T-DNA lacking silencing information with isogenic wild types (WT), and measured a battery of ecologically relevant traits, known to be important in plant-herbivore interactions: phytohormones, secondary metabolites, growth and fitness parameters under stringent competitive conditions, and transcriptional regulation with microarrays. As a positive control, we included a line silenced in trypsin proteinase inhibitor gene (TPI) expression, a potent anti-herbivore defense known to exact fitness costs in its expression, in the analysis. The experiment was conducted twice, with 10 and 20 biological replicates per genotype. For all parameters, we detected no difference between any EVC and WT lines, but could readily detect a fitness benefit of silencing TPI production. A statistical power analyses revealed that the minimum sample sizes required for detecting significant fitness differences between EVC and WT was 2–3 orders of magnitude larger than the 10 replicates required to detect a fitness effect of TPI silencing. We conclude that possible side-effects of transformation are far too low to obfuscate the study of ecologically relevant phenotypes. PMID:18253491

  9. Alteration of the aPA ELISA by UV exposure of polystyrene microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J S; Wagenknecht, D R; McIntyre, J A

    1996-01-01

    Interlaboratory inconsistencies in antiphospholipid antibody (aPA) solid phase assays have prompted controversy in clinical laboratory testing for aPA. We found that the aPA ELISA can be influenced by the type of microtiter plate utilized and by the conditions in which the plates are stored. By exposing 96-well, flat-bottom polystyrene microtiter plates to short wave UV light (254 nm), the aPA ELISA signal decreased in a UV dose-dependent manner. No effect was seen with long wave UV light (366 nm). These results were independent of the antibody isotype under study or the phospholipid (PL) antigen used: anionic phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL), or zwitterionic phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Purified human beta 2-glycoprotein I (beta 2 GPI), a known cofactor for anionic PL, and rabbit anti-beta 2 GPI antisera were used to demonstrate that beta 2 GPI bound equally to UV treated and untreated microtiter plates. In contrast, recognition of beta 2 GPI on an anionic PL surface was decreased on UV treated plates, suggesting that UV exposure alters the lipid binding properties of the microliter plate. To determine whether UV exposure inhibited PL binding directly or caused a change in the way the PL was bound, the amount of PL bound to UV treated and untreated plates was measured by using fluorescent labeled PS and a fluorimeter. PS binding was decreased by 53% in UV treated wells as compared to untreated wells. These data show that short wave UV exposure reduces PL binding to polystyrene microtiter plates, thereby reducing the amount of beta 2 GPI bound to PL coated ELISA plates. Thus by using UV exposed microtiter plates, decreased or false-negative a PA ELISA results may be obtained for aPA positive plasmas. PMID:8887002

  10. Differential effects of cocaine exposure on the abundance of phospholipid species in rat brain and blood*

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Brian S.; Pati, Sumitra; Sahin, Serap; Scholpa, Natalie E.; Monian, Prashant; Trinquero, Paul O.; Clark, Jason K.; Wagner, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lipid profiles in the blood are altered in human cocaine users, suggesting that cocaine-exposure can induce lipid remodeling. Methods Cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in rats was followed by shotgun lipidomics using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and determined changes in brain tissues. To determine if any lipidomic changes were also reflected in the blood, we performed principal component analysis (PCA) of lipidomic spectra isolated from cocaine-treated animals. Alterations in the abundance of phospholipid species were correlated with behavioral changes in the magnitude of either the initial response to drug or locomotor sensitization. Results Behavioral sensitization altered the relative abundance of several phospholipid species in the hippocampus and cerebellum, measured one week following the final exposure to cocaine. In contrast, relatively few effects on phospholipids in either the dorsal or the ventral striatum were observed. PCA analysis demonstrated that cocaine altered the relative abundance of several glycerophospholipid species as compared to saline-injected controls. Subsequent MS/MS analysis identified some of these lipids as phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylserines and phosphatidylcholines. The relative abundance of some of these phospholipid species were well correlated (R2 of 0.7 or higher) with either the initial response to cocaine or locomotor sensitization. Conclusion Taken together, these data demonstrate that a cocaine-conditioning experience results in the remodeling of specific phospholipids in rat brain tissue in a region-specific manner and also alters the intensities and types of phospholipid species in rat blood. These results further suggest that such changes may serve as biomarkers to assess the neuroadaptations occurring following repeated exposure to cocaine. PMID:25960140

  11. Skin Exposure and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Redlich, Carrie A.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous occupational and environmental exposures that increase asthma risk have been identified. Research and prevention have focused primarily on the respiratory tract. However, recent studies suggest that the skin may also be an important route of exposure and site of sensitization that contributes to asthma development. Factors that impair skin barrier function, such as filaggrin gene mutations or skin trauma, may facilitate allergen entry and promote Th2-like sensitization and subsequent asthma. Animal studies demonstrate that skin exposure to chemical and protein allergens is highly effective at inducing sensitization, with subsequent inhalation challenge eliciting asthmatic responses. A similar role for human skin exposure to certain sensitizing agents, such as isocyanates, is likely. Skin exposure methodologies are being developed to incorporate skin exposure assessment into epidemiology studies investigating asthma risk factors. PMID:20427586

  12. Low lead levels stunt neuronal growth in a reversible manner.

    PubMed Central

    Cline, H T; Witte, S; Jones, K W

    1996-01-01

    The developing brain is particularly susceptible to lead toxicity; however, the cellular effects of lead on neuronal development are not well understood. The effect of exposure to nanomolar concentrations of lead on several parameters of the developing retinotectal system of frog tadpoles was tested. Lead severely reduced the area and branchtip number of retinal ganglion cell axon arborizations within the optic tectum at submicromolar concentrations. These effects of lead on neuronal growth are more dramatic and occur at lower exposure levels than previously reported. Lead exposure did not interfere with the development of retinotectal topography. The deficient neuronal growth does not appear to be secondary to impaired synaptic transmission, because concentrations of lead that stunted neuronal growth were lower than those required to block synaptic transmission. Subsequent treatment of lead-exposed animals with the chelating agent 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid completely reversed the effect of lead on neuronal growth. These studies indicate that impaired neuronal growth may be responsible in part for lead-induced cognitive deficits and that chelator treatment counteracts this effect. PMID:8790431

  13. Large reverse saturable absorption under weak continuous incoherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Shuzo; Totani, Kenro; Yamashita, Takashi; Adachi, Chihaya; Vacha, Martin

    2014-10-01

    In materials showing reverse saturable absorption (RSA), the optical absorbance increases as the power of the light incident on them increases. To date, RSA has only been observed when very intense light sources, such as short-pulse lasers, are used. Here, we show that hydroxyl steroidal matrices embedding properly designed aromatic molecules as acceptors and transition-metal complexes as donors exhibit high RSA on exposure to weak incoherent light at room temperature and in air. Accumulation by photosensitization of long-lived room-temperature triplet excitons in acceptors with a large triplet-triplet absorption coefficient allows a nonlinear increase in absorbance also under low-power irradiation conditions. As a consequence, continuous exposure to weak light significantly decreases the transmittance of thin films fabricated with these compounds. These optical limiting properties may be used to protect eyes and light sensors from exposure to intense radiation generated by incoherent sources and for other light-absorption applications that have not been realized with conventional RSA materials.

  14. Reversible response to NO of copper phthalocyanine-based sensor at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Emelyanov, Yu.L.; Khatko, V.V.; Tomchenko, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, it have been reported that the NO{sub x} adsorption resulted in marked in the semiconducting properties of copper tetra-tert-butyl phthalocyanine Langmuir-Blodgett films (CuTTBPc LB films). However, the recovery time of these chemiresistors after NO{sub x} exposure was very long at room temperature. Because of this, the heating up to 150{degrees}C was needed for reasons of a reversibility. In the present paper, the authors report on the development of CuTTBPc-based sensor reversibly operating at low temperature (<50{degrees}C).

  15. Reversing Africa's Decline. Worldwatch Paper 65.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lester R.; Wolf, Edward C.

    This paper highlights some of the themes that any successful strategy to reverse the decline of Africa must embrace. Africa is a continent experiencing a breakdown in the relationship between people and their natural support systems. Famine and the threat of famine are among the manifestations of this breakdown. This decline can be reversed. To do…

  16. Sotalol-induced bradycardia reversed by glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, C. M.; Daya, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    Glucagon is considered the drug of choice for treating bradycardia and hypotension encountered during beta-blocker poisoning. Its potential usefulness in reversing adverse effects encountered during therapeutic dosing with beta-blockers has not been well characterized. We present a case of sotalol-induced bradycardia reversed by glucagon. PMID:7787496

  17. 32 CFR 701.37 - Reverse FOIA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reverse FOIA. 701.37 Section 701.37 National... DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.37 Reverse FOIA. When the “submitter” of... revealing the data to a third party in response to the latter's FOIA request....

  18. 32 CFR 701.37 - Reverse FOIA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reverse FOIA. 701.37 Section 701.37 National... DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.37 Reverse FOIA. When the “submitter” of... revealing the data to a third party in response to the latter's FOIA request....

  19. 32 CFR 701.37 - Reverse FOIA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reverse FOIA. 701.37 Section 701.37 National... DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.37 Reverse FOIA. When the “submitter” of... revealing the data to a third party in response to the latter's FOIA request....

  20. 32 CFR 701.37 - Reverse FOIA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reverse FOIA. 701.37 Section 701.37 National... DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.37 Reverse FOIA. When the “submitter” of... revealing the data to a third party in response to the latter's FOIA request....

  1. 32 CFR 701.37 - Reverse FOIA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reverse FOIA. 701.37 Section 701.37 National... DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC FOIA Definitions and Terms § 701.37 Reverse FOIA. When the “submitter” of... revealing the data to a third party in response to the latter's FOIA request....

  2. The Rate Laws for Reversible Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Edward L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the rate laws for reversible reactions. Indicates that although prediction of the form of the rate law for a reverse reaction given the rate law for the forward reaction is not certain, the number of possibilities is limited because of relationships described. (JN)

  3. Reverse Transfer Students: Characteristics, Motivations, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrey, Kathryn Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The reverse transfer literature contains studies investigating the demographic characteristics of postsecondary students that attended a community college after attending a four-year institution, and their proportion in the community college student population. A few researchers have investigated reverse transfer student motives for enrolling in…

  4. Reversible logic gates on Physarum Polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Andrew

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, we consider possibilities how to implement asynchronous sequential logic gates and quantum-style reversible logic gates on Physarum polycephalum motions. We show that in asynchronous sequential logic gates we can erase information because of uncertainty in the direction of plasmodium propagation. Therefore quantum-style reversible logic gates are more preferable for designing logic circuits on Physarum polycephalum.

  5. Neuronal Activation for Semantically Reversible Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Fiona M.; Thomas, Michael S. C.; Price, Cathy J.

    2010-01-01

    Semantically reversible sentences are prone to misinterpretation and take longer for typically developing children and adults to comprehend; they are also particularly problematic for those with language difficulties such as aphasia or Specific Language Impairment. In our study, we used fMRI to compare the processing of semantically reversible and…

  6. 14 CFR 25.507 - Reversed braking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reversed braking. 25.507 Section 25.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.507 Reversed braking. (a) The airplane must be in a three point static...

  7. 14 CFR 25.507 - Reversed braking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reversed braking. 25.507 Section 25.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.507 Reversed braking. (a) The airplane must be in a three point static...

  8. 14 CFR 25.507 - Reversed braking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reversed braking. 25.507 Section 25.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.507 Reversed braking. (a) The airplane must be in a three point static...

  9. 14 CFR 25.507 - Reversed braking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reversed braking. 25.507 Section 25.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.507 Reversed braking. (a) The airplane must be in a three point static...

  10. 14 CFR 25.507 - Reversed braking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reversed braking. 25.507 Section 25.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.507 Reversed braking. (a) The airplane must be in a three point static...

  11. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Thrust reversers. 33.97 Section 33.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If...

  12. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Thrust reversers. 33.97 Section 33.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If...

  13. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Thrust reversers. 33.97 Section 33.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If...

  14. 43 CFR 2641.5 - Reversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reversion. 2641.5 Section 2641.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) FAA AIRPORT GRANTS Procedures § 2641.5 Reversion....

  15. 43 CFR 2641.5 - Reversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reversion. 2641.5 Section 2641.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) FAA AIRPORT GRANTS Procedures § 2641.5 Reversion. A conveyance shall be made only on the...

  16. Genome exposure and regulation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Webb, P; Johnson, R

    1998-09-01

    A method of measurement of exposed DNA (i.e. hypersensitive to DNase I hydrolysis) as opposed to sequestered (hydrolysis resistant) DNA in isolated nuclei of mammalian cells is described. While cell cultures exhibit some differences in behavior from day to day, the general pattern of exposed and sequestered DNA is satisfactorily reproducible and agrees with results previously obtained by other methods. The general pattern of DNA hydrolysis exhibited by all cells tested consists of a curve which at first rises sharply with increasing DNase I, and then becomes almost horizontal, indicating that roughly about half of the nuclear DNA is highly sequestered. In 4 cases where transformed cells (Raszip6, CHO, HL60 and PC12) were compared, each with its more normal homolog (3T3, and the reverse transformed versions of CHO, HL60 and PC12, achieved by dibutyryl cyclic AMP [DBcAMP], retinoic acid, and nerve growth factor [NGF] respectively), the transformed form displayed less genome exposure than the nontransformed form at every DNase I dose tested. When Ca++ was excluded from the hydrolysis medium in both the Raszip6-3T3 and the CHO-DBcAMP systems, the normal cell forms lost their increased exposure reverting to that of the transformed forms. Therefore Ca++ appears necessary for maintenance of the DNA in the more highly exposed state characteristic of the nontransformed phenotype. LiCl increases the DNA exposure of all transformed cells tested. Dextran sulfate and heparin each can increase the DNA exposure of several different cancers. Colcemid prevents the increase of exposure of CHO by DBcAMP but it must be administered before or simultaneously with the latter compound. Measurements on mouse biopsies reveal large differences in exposure in different normal tissues. Thus, the exposure from adult liver cells was greater than that of adult brain, but both fetal liver and fetal brain had significantly greater exposure than their adult counterparts. Exposure in normal human

  17. Biomarkers of xenobiotic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, M.A.

    1988-07-01

    Direct measurement of xenobiotic (foreign) chemicals is not always feasible as an exposure assessment,--owing to rapid metabolism, sequestration into fatty tissues, or lack of suitable assay methods. Furthermore, suspect exposures often involve complex mixtures of organics. In these circumstances, indirect biomarkers of exposure can be most helpful. This paper reviews four urinary parameters that hold promise as biomarkers of exposure in occupational and environmental settings: glucaric acid (end-product of the glucuronidation pathway), thioethers (end-product of glutathione reaction with electrophilic or alkylating agents), porphyrin pattern (altered with disruption in heme biosynthesis), and the Ames mutagenicity test. 112 references.

  18. Exposure assessment of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C; Schaum, J

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews exposure information available for trichloroethylene (TCE) and assesses the magnitude of human exposure. The primary sources releasing TCE into the environment are metal cleaning and degreasing operations. Releases occur into all media but mostly into the air due to its volatility. It is also moderately soluble in water and can leach from soils into groundwater. TCE has commonly been found in ambient air, surface water, and groundwaters. The 1998 air levels in microg/m(3) across 115 monitors can be summarized as follows: range = 0.01-3.9, mean = 0.88. A California survey of large water utilities in 1984 found a median concentration of 3.0 microg/L. General population exposure to TCE occurs primarily by inhalation and water ingestion. Typical average daily intakes have been estimated as 11-33 microg/day for inhalation and 2-20 microg/day for ingestion. A small portion of the population is expected to have elevated exposures as a result of one or more of these pathways: inhalation exposures to workers involved in degreasing operations, ingestion and inhalation exposures occurring in homes with private wells located near disposal/contamination sites, and inhalation exposures to consumers using TCE products in areas of poor ventilation. More current and more extensive data on TCE levels in indoor air, water, and soil are needed to better characterize the distribution of background exposures in the general population and elevated exposures in special subpopulations. Images Figure 1 PMID:10807565

  19. Three component vibrational time reversal communication

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Ten Cate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Time reversal provides an optimal prefilter matched signal to apply to a communication signal before signal transmission. Time reversal allows compensation for wave speed dispersion and can function well in reverberant environments. Time reversal can be used to focus elastic energy to each of the three components of motion independently. A pipe encased in concrete was used to demonstrate the ability to conduct communications of information using three component time reversal. Furthermore, the ability of time reversal to compensate for multi-path distortion (overcoming reverberation) will be demonstrated and the rate of signal communication will be presented. [The U.S. Department ofmore » Energy, through the LANL/LDRD Program, is gratefully acknowledged for supporting this work.]« less

  20. Three component vibrational time reversal communication

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Ten Cate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Time reversal provides an optimal prefilter matched signal to apply to a communication signal before signal transmission. Time reversal allows compensation for wave speed dispersion and can function well in reverberant environments. Time reversal can be used to focus elastic energy to each of the three components of motion independently. A pipe encased in concrete was used to demonstrate the ability to conduct communications of information using three component time reversal. Furthermore, the ability of time reversal to compensate for multi-path distortion (overcoming reverberation) will be demonstrated and the rate of signal communication will be presented. [The U.S. Department of Energy, through the LANL/LDRD Program, is gratefully acknowledged for supporting this work.

  1. Parkinson’s disease managing reversible neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted; McDougall, Beth; Westaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptom course has been classified as an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease. This paper documents 29 PD and treatment-induced systemic depletion etiologies which cause and/or exacerbate the seven novel primary relative nutritional deficiencies associated with PD. These reversible relative nutritional deficiencies (RNDs) may facilitate and accelerate irreversible progressive neurodegeneration, while other reversible RNDs may induce previously undocumented reversible pseudo-neurodegeneration that is hiding in plain sight since the symptoms are identical to the symptoms being experienced by the PD patient. Documented herein is a novel nutritional approach for reversible processes management which may slow or halt irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease and correct reversible RNDs whose symptoms are identical to the patient’s PD symptoms. PMID:27103805

  2. Estimation and uncertainty of reversible Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Reversibility is a key concept in Markov models and master-equation models of molecular kinetics. The analysis and interpretation of the transition matrix encoding the kinetic properties of the model rely heavily on the reversibility property. The estimation of a reversible transition matrix from simulation data is, therefore, crucial to the successful application of the previously developed theory. In this work, we discuss methods for the maximum likelihood estimation of transition matrices from finite simulation data and present a new algorithm for the estimation if reversibility with respect to a given stationary vector is desired. We also develop new methods for the Bayesian posterior inference of reversible transition matrices with and without given stationary vector taking into account the need for a suitable prior distribution preserving the meta-stable features of the observed process during posterior inference. All algorithms here are implemented in the PyEMMA software — http://pyemma.org — as of version 2.0.

  3. Improving the Convergence of Reversible Samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Bellet, Luc; Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    In Monte-Carlo methods the Markov processes used to sample a given target distribution usually satisfy detailed balance, i.e. they are time-reversible. However, relatively recent results have demonstrated that appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations can accelerate convergence to equilibrium. In this paper we present some general design principles which apply to general Markov processes. Working with the generator of Markov processes, we prove that for some of the most commonly used performance criteria, i.e., spectral gap, asymptotic variance and large deviation functionals, sampling is improved for appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations of some initially given reversible sampler. Moreover we provide specific constructions for such reversible and irreversible perturbations for various commonly used Markov processes, such as Markov chains and diffusions. In the case of diffusions, we make the discussion more specific using the large deviations rate function as a measure of performance.

  4. Improving the Convergence of Reversible Samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Bellet, Luc; Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    In Monte-Carlo methods the Markov processes used to sample a given target distribution usually satisfy detailed balance, i.e. they are time-reversible. However, relatively recent results have demonstrated that appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations can accelerate convergence to equilibrium. In this paper we present some general design principles which apply to general Markov processes. Working with the generator of Markov processes, we prove that for some of the most commonly used performance criteria, i.e., spectral gap, asymptotic variance and large deviation functionals, sampling is improved for appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations of some initially given reversible sampler. Moreover we provide specific constructions for such reversible and irreversible perturbations for various commonly used Markov processes, such as Markov chains and diffusions. In the case of diffusions, we make the discussion more specific using the large deviations rate function as a measure of performance.

  5. Checking for reversibility of aggregation of UV-irradiated glycogen phosphorylase b under crowding conditions.

    PubMed

    Eronina, Tatiana B; Mikhaylova, Valeriya V; Chebotareva, Natalia A; Makeeva, Valentina F; Kurganov, Boris I

    2016-05-01

    It is believed that the initial stages of protein aggregation are reversible and can be reversed by simple dilution, whereas prolonged exposure to factors responsible for denaturing proteins (for example, to elevated temperatures) results in the formation of irreversible aggregates. A new approach has been developed to discriminate the stage of the formation of reversible aggregates. Aggregation of UV-irradiated glycogen phosphorylase b (UV-Phb) was studied at 10, 25 and 37°C in the presence of crowders (polyethylene glycol and Ficoll-70) using dynamic light scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation (pH 6.8; 0.1M NaCl). The dilution of the protein solution in the course of aggregation at 10°C results in the breakdown of protein aggregates suggesting that the aggregation process is reversible. When aggregation of UV-Phb is studied at 37°C, reversibility is lacking. Chemical chaperones (arginine, proline) induce the breakdown of protein aggregates of UV-Phb formed at 10°C. In the experiments carried out at 37°C in the presence of crowder the addition of arginine results in disintegration of protein aggregates only at early stages of the aggregation process. It is assumed that general pathway of protein aggregation includes the formation of reversible, completely dissociable, partly dissociable and irreversible aggregates. PMID:26853826

  6. MODEL DEVELOPMENT - EXPOSURE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to mixtures of chemicals from multiple pathways and routes. These exposures may result from a single event or may accumulate over time if multiple exposure events occur. The traditional approach of assessing risk from a single chemical and a single route of e...

  7. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  8. Environmental Exposures and Development

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose of Review Summarize recent studies exploring the relationship between paternal and maternal environmental exposures to chemicals before, at the time of and after conception to adverse developmental outcomes including; preterm birth, death, structural and functional abnormalities and growth restriction. Recent Findings Recent studies have demonstrated that human pregnancy and development is vulnerable to environmental exposures of the father and mother to chemical, biological and physical agents. Exposures associated with adverse developmental outcomes include; air and water pollution, chemicals in foods, occupational exposures, agricultural chemicals, metals, persistent and volatile organics. Developmental endpoints which are linked with these exposures include; growth restriction, functional abnormalities, structural abnormalities, preterm delivery and death. Despite this general understanding we still have incomplete knowledge concerning most exposures and the biological interactions responsible for impaired development and preterm delivery. Summary While single genes and individual chemical exposures are responsible for some instances of adverse pregnancy outcome or developmental disease, gene-environment interactions are responsible for the majority. These gene-environment interactions may occur in the father, mother, placenta or fetus suggesting that critical attention be given to maternal and paternal exposures and gene expression as they relate to the mode of action of the putative developmental toxicant both prior to and during pregnancy. PMID:20216314

  9. EXPOSURES TO ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The planned interagency National Children's Study (NCS) will be studying a number of exposure issues in the context of health and well-being of infants and young children from pre-conception to age 21. Some of the important environmental exposure questions for NCS, include: how c...

  10. Avian inhalation exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Briant, J.K.; Driver, C.J.

    1992-05-05

    An exposure system is designed for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder. 2 figs.

  11. Avian inhalation exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Briant, James K.; Driver, Crystal J.

    1992-01-01

    An exposure system for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder.

  12. Exposure Corrections for Macrophotography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, N. M.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a method for determining the exposure correction factors in close-up photography and macrophotography. The method eliminates all calculations during picture-taking, and allows the use of a light meter to obtain the proper f-stop/exposure time combinations. (Author/MLH)

  13. Dermal exposure assessment techniques.

    PubMed

    Fenske, R A

    1993-12-01

    Exposure of the skin to chemical substances can contribute significantly to total dose in many workplace situations, and its relative importance will increase when airborne occupational exposure limits are reduced, unless steps to reduce skin exposure are undertaken simultaneously. Its assessment employs personal sampling techniques to measure skin loading rates, and combines these measurements with models of percutaneous absorption to estimate absorbed dose. Knowledge of dermal exposure pathways is in many cases fundamental to hazard evaluation and control. When the skin is the primary contributor to absorbed dose, dermal exposure measurements and biological monitoring play complementary roles in defining occupational exposures. Exposure normally occurs by one of three pathways: (i) immersion (direct contact with a liquid or solid chemical substance); (ii) deposition of aerosol or uptake of vapour through the skin; or (iii) surface contact (residue transfer from contaminated surfaces). Sampling methods fall into three categories: surrogate skin; chemical removal; and fluorescent tracers. Surface sampling represents a supplementary approach, providing an estimate of dermal exposure potential. Surrogate skin techniques involve placing a chemical collection medium on the skin. Whole-body garment samplers do not require assumptions relating to distribution, an inherent limitation of patch sampling. The validity of these techniques rests on the ability of the sampling medium to capture and retain chemicals in a manner similar to skin. Removal techniques include skin washing and wiping, but these measure only what can be removed from the skin, not exposure: laboratory removal efficiency studies are required for proper interpretation of data. Fluorescent tracer techniques exploit the visual properties of fluorescent compounds, and combined with video imaging make quantification of dermal exposure patterns possible, but the need to introduce a chemical substance (tracer

  14. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Reversible hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Andrew A; Raivio, Taneli; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2016-06-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is characterized by lack of puberty and infertility. Traditionally, it has been considered a life-long condition yet cases of reversibility have been described wherein patients spontaneously recover function of the reproductive axis following treatment. Reversibility occurs in both male and female CHH cases and appears to be more common (~10-15%) than previously thought. These reversal patients span a range of GnRH deficiency from mild to severe and many reversal patients harbor mutations in genes underlying CHH. However, to date there are no clear factors for predicting reversible CHH. Importantly, recovery of reproductive axis function may not be permanent. Thus, CHH is not always life-long and the incidence of reversal warrants periodic treatment withdrawal with close monitoring and follow-up. Reversible CHH highlights the importance of environmental (epigenetic) factors such as sex steroid treatment on the reproductive axis in modifying the phenotype. This review provides an overview and an update on what is known about this phenomenon. PMID:26792935

  15. Partial spin reversal in magnetic deflagration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, S.; Subedi, P.; Macià, F.; Li, S.; Sarachik, M. P.; Tejada, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Christou, G.; Kent, A. D.

    2014-04-01

    The reversal of spins in a magnetic material as they relax toward equilibrium is accompanied by the release of Zeeman energy, which can lead to accelerated spin relaxation and the formation of a well-defined self-sustained propagating spin-reversal front known as magnetic deflagration. To date, studies of Mn12-acetate single crystals have focused mainly on deflagration in large longitudinal magnetic fields, and they found a fully spin-reversed final state. We report a systematic study of the effect of a transverse magnetic field on magnetic deflagration, and we demonstrate that in small longitudinal fields the final state consists of only partially reversed spins. Further, we measured the front speed as a function of applied magnetic field. The theory of magnetic deflagration, together with a modification that takes into account partial spin reversal, fits the transverse field dependence of the front speed but not its dependence on the longitudinal field. The most significant result of this study is the finding of a partially spin-reversed final state, which is evidence that the spins at the deflagration front are also only partially reversed.

  16. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  17. Why Contextual Preference Reversals Maximize Expected Value

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types—including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. PMID:27337391

  18. Reversibility and efficiency in coding protein information.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Boaz; Priel, Avner

    2010-12-21

    Why the genetic code has a fixed length? Protein information is transferred by coding each amino acid using codons whose length equals 3 for all amino acids. Hence the most probable and the least probable amino acid get a codeword with an equal length. Moreover, the distributions of amino acids found in nature are not uniform and therefore the efficiency of such codes is sub-optimal. The origins of these apparently non-efficient codes are yet unclear. In this paper we propose an a priori argument for the energy efficiency of such codes resulting from their reversibility, in contrast to their time inefficiency. Such codes are reversible in the sense that a primitive processor, reading three letters in each step, can always reverse its operation, undoing its process. We examine the codes for the distributions of amino acids that exist in nature and show that they could not be both time efficient and reversible. We investigate a family of Zipf-type distributions and present their efficient (non-fixed length) prefix code, their graphs, and the condition for their reversibility. We prove that for a large family of such distributions, if the code is time efficient, it could not be reversible. In other words, if pre-biotic processes demand reversibility, the protein code could not be time efficient. The benefits of reversibility are clear: reversible processes are adiabatic, namely, they dissipate a very small amount of energy. Such processes must be done slowly enough; therefore time efficiency is non-important. It is reasonable to assume that early biochemical complexes were more prone towards energy efficiency, where forward and backward processes were almost symmetrical. PMID:20868696

  19. Time reversibility in the quantum frame

    SciTech Connect

    Masot-Conde, Fátima

    2014-12-04

    Classic Mechanics and Electromagnetism, conventionally taken as time-reversible, share the same concept of motion (either of mass or charge) as the basis of the time reversibility in their own fields. This paper focuses on the relationship between mobile geometry and motion reversibility. The goal is to extrapolate the conclusions to the quantum frame, where matter and radiation behave just as elementary mobiles. The possibility that the asymmetry of Time (Time’s arrow) is an effect of a fundamental quantum asymmetry of elementary particles, turns out to be a consequence of the discussion.

  20. Biomechanics of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berliner, Jonathan L; Regalado-Magdos, Ashton; Ma, C Benjamin; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-01-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is an effective procedure for treatment of glenohumeral joint disease among patients with severe rotator cuff deficiency. Improvements in prosthetic design are the result of an evolved understanding of both shoulder and joint replacement biomechanics. Although modern generations of the reverse shoulder prosthesis vary in specific design details, they continue to adhere to Grammont's core principles demonstrated by his original Delta III prosthesis. This review article discusses the biomechanics of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty with a focus on elements of implant design and surgical technique that may affect stability, postoperative complications, and functional outcomes. PMID:25441574

  1. Cheaper Adjoints by Reversing Address Computations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hascoët, L.; Utke, J.; Naumann, U.

    2008-01-01

    The reverse mode of automatic differentiation is widely used in science and engineering. A severe bottleneck for the performance of the reverse mode, however, is the necessity to recover certain intermediate values of the program in reverse order. Among these values are computed addresses, which traditionally are recovered through forward recomputation and storage in memory. We propose an alternative approach for recovery that uses inverse computation based on dependency information. Address storage constitutes a significant portion of the overall storage requirements. An example illustrates substantial gains that the proposed approach yields, and we show use cases in practical applications.

  2. Quaternary naltrexone reverses radiogenic and morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Galbraith, J.A.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    The present study attempted to determine the relative role of the peripheral and central nervous system in the production of morphine-induced or radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the mouse. Toward this end, we used a quaternary derivative of an opiate antagonist (naltrexone methobromide), which presumably does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Quaternary naltrexone was used to challenge the stereotypic locomotor response observed in these mice after either an i.p. injection of morphine or exposure to 1500 rads /sup 60/Co. The quaternary derivative of naltrexone reversed the locomotor hyperactivity normally observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after an injection of morphine. It also significantly attenuated radiation-induced locomotion. The data reported here support the hypothesis of endorphin involvement in radiation-induced and radiogenic behaviors. However, these conclusions are contingent upon further research which more fully evaluates naltrexone methobromide's capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  3. Rational strategy for shaped nanomaterial synthesis in reverse micelle reactors

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zengyan; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The shape-controlled synthesis of nanoparticles was established in single-phase solutions by controlling growth directions of crystalline facets on seed nanocrystals kinetically; however, it was difficult to rationally predict and design nanoparticle shapes. Here we introduce a methodology to fabricate nanoparticles in smaller sizes by evolving shapes thermodynamically. This strategy enables a more rational approach to fabricate shaped nanoparticles by etching specific positions of atoms on facets of seed nanocrystals in reverse micelle reactors where the surface energy gradient induces desorption of atoms on specific locations on the seed surfaces. From seeds of 12 nm palladium nanocubes, the shape is evolved to concave nanocubes and finally hollow nanocages in the size ~10 nm by etching the center of {200} facets. The high surface area-to-volume ratio and the exposure of a large number of palladium atoms on ledge and kink sites of hollow nanocages are advantageous to enhance catalytic activity and recyclability. PMID:24828960

  4. Reversible cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, E.L.; Firestein, G.S.; Weiss, J.L.; Heuser, R.R.; Leitl, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Brinker, J.A.; Ciuffo, A.A.; Becker, L.C.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of peripheral cold exposure on myocardial perfusion and function were studied in 13 patients with scleroderma without clinically evident myocardial disease. Ten patients had at least one transient, cold-induced, myocardial perfusion defect visualized by thallium-201 scintigraphy, and 12 had reversible, cold-induced, segmental left ventricular hypokinesis by two-dimensional echocardiography. The 10 patients with transient perfusion defects all had anatomically corresponding ventricular wall motion abnormalities. No one in either of two control groups (9 normal volunteers and 7 patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms) had cold-induced abnormalities. This study is the first to show the simultaneous occurrence of cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in patients with scleroderma. The results suggest that cold exposure in such patients may elicit transient reflex coronary vasoconstriction resulting in reversible myocardial ischemia and dysfunction. Chronic recurrent episodes of coronary spasm may lead to focal myocardial fibrosis.

  5. Ethanol Reversal of Cellular Tolerance to Morphine in Rat Locus Coeruleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Llorente, Javier; Withey, Sarah; Rivero, Guadalupe; Cunningham, Margaret; Cooke, Alex; Saxena, Kunal; McPherson, Jamie; Oldfield, Sue; Dewey, William L.; Bailey, Chris P.; Kelly, Eamonn; Henderson, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of ethanol is a considerable risk factor for death in heroin overdose. We sought to determine whether a mildly intoxicating concentration of ethanol could alter morphine tolerance at the cellular level. In rat locus coeruleus (LC) neurons, tolerance to morphine was reversed by acute exposure of the brain slice to ethanol (20 mM). Tolerance to the opioid peptide [d-Ala2,N-MePhe4,Gly-ol]-enkephalin was not reversed by ethanol. Previous studies in LC neurons have revealed a role for protein kinase C (PKC)α in μ-opioid receptor (MOPr) desensitization by morphine and in the induction and maintenance of morphine tolerance, but we have been unable to demonstrate that 20 mM ethanol produces significant inhibition of PKCα. The ability of ethanol to reverse cellular tolerance to morphine in LC neurons was absent in the presence of the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, indicating that dephosphorylation is involved. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing the MOPr, ethanol reduced the level of MOPr phosphorylation induced by morphine. Ethanol reversal of tolerance did not appear to result from a direct effect on MOPr since acute exposure to ethanol (20 mM) did not modify the affinity of binding of morphine to the MOPr or the efficacy of morphine for G-protein activation as measured by guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding. Similarly, ethanol did not affect MOPr trafficking. We conclude that acute exposure to ethanol enhances the effects of morphine by reversing the processes underlying morphine cellular tolerance. PMID:23716621

  6. Visually induced self-motion sensation adapts rapidly to left-right reversal of vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, C. M.; Bock, O. L.

    1981-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted using 15 adult volunteers with no overt oculomotor or vestibular disorders. In all experiments, left-right vision reversal was achieved using prism goggles, which permitted a binocular field of vision subtending approximately 45 deg horizontally and 28 deg vertically. In all experiments, circularvection (CV) was tested before and immediately after a period of exposure to reversed vision. After one to three hours of active movement while wearing vision-reversing goggles, 10 of 15 (stationary) human subjects viewing a moving stripe display experienced a self-rotation illusion in the same direction as seen stripe motion, rather than in the opposite (normal) direction, demonstrating that the central neural pathways that process visual self-rotation cues can undergo rapid adaptive modification.

  7. Epigenetic reversion of breast carcinoma phenotype is accompaniedby DNA sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Sandal, Tone; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Spencer, Virginia A.; Folberg,Robert; Bissell, Mina J.; Maniotis, Andrew J.

    2006-07-19

    The importance of microenvironment and context in regulation of tissue-specific genes is finally well established. DNA exposure to, or sequestration from, nucleases can be used to detect differences in higher order chromatin structure in intact cells without disturbing cellular or tissue architecture. To investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and tumor phenotype, we utilized an established 3-D assay where normal and malignant human breast cells can be easily distinguished by the morphology of the structures they make (acinus-like vs tumor-like, respectively). We show that these phenotypes can be distinguished also by sensitivity to AluI digestion where the malignant cells are resistant to digestion relative to non-malignant cells. Reversion of the T4-2 breast cancer cells by either cAMP analogs, or a phospatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13K) inhibitor not only reverted the phenotype, but also the chromatin sensitivity to AluI. By using different cAMP-analogs, we show that the cAMP-induced phenotypic reversion, polarization, and shift in DNA organization act through a cAMP-dependent-protein-kinase A-coupled signaling pathway. Importantly, inhibitory antibody to fibronectin also reverted the malignant phenotype, polarized the acini, and changed chromatin sequestration. These experiments show not only that modifying the tumor microenvironment can alter the organization of tumor cells but also that architecture of the tissues and the global chromatin organization are coupled and yet highly plastic.

  8. Constraining the reversing and non-reversing modes of the geodynamo. New insights from magnetostratigraphy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V.; Shatsillo, A.; Hulot, G.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the evolution in the geomagnetic reversal frequency over hundreds of million years is not a trivial matter. Beyond the fact that there are long periods without reversals, known as superchrons, and periods with many reversals, the way the reversal frequency changes through time during reversing periods is still debated. A smooth evolution or a succession of stationary segments have both been suggested to account for the geomagnetic polarity time scale since the Middle-Late Jurassic. Sudden changes from a reversing mode to a non-reversing mode of the geodynamo may also well have happened, the switch between the two modes having then possibly been controlled by the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary. There is, nevertheless, a growing set of magnetostratigraphic data, which could help decipher a proper interpretation of the reversal history, in particular in the early Paleozoic and even during the Precambrian. Although yielding a fragmentary record, these data reveal the occurrence of both additional superchrons and periods characterized by extremely high, not to say extraordinary, magnetic reversal frequencies. In this talk, we will present a synthesis of these data, mainly obtained from Siberia, and discuss their implication for the magnetic reversal behavior over the past billion years.

  9. Occupational exposure in MRI.

    PubMed

    McRobbie, D W

    2012-04-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B(0), imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B(0) fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2-0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42 ± 24% of B(0), with time-averaged exposures of 5.2 ± 2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6-4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B(0) fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s(-1). Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  10. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways in Ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, meabolic, signaling) t...

  11. Pressure reversal study through tensile tests

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Wright, A.L.; Yahr, G.T.; Robertson, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    This paper is a summary of the results from a study of the variables related to pressure reversal and was sponsored by the US Department of Transportation, Office of Pipeline Safety. The circumferential pipe stress, which is the most significant variable in pressure reversal, was examined by using tensile specimens and then relating the results to pressurized pipe. A model is proposed that gives some insight into how pressure reversal can be minimized when a section of pipe is being hydrotested. Twenty tensile specimens from X-42 electric resistance welded (ERW) pipe and twenty specimens from X-52 ERW pipe were tested. Each specimen had a machined flaw. The flaw regions were monitored using strain gages and photoelasticity. These tensile tests represent the first phase of a research effort to examine and understand the variables related to pressure reversal. The second phase of this effort will be with pipe specimens and presently is in progress.

  12. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in ALL.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-07-01

    Investigators from Soochow University, Suzhou, China, studied the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) observed in 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after induction chemotherapy. PMID:26933594

  13. Chain friction system gives positive, reversible drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidsen, J. S.

    1964-01-01

    By cementing a strip of an elastomer to the smooth metal rim of the pulley and neoprene covered idlers providing suitable tension to the chain around the pulley, a positive reversible drive is accomplished more quietly and with less vibration.

  14. Reverse-osmosis membranes by plasma polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Thin allyl amine polymer films were developed using plasma polymerization. Resulting dry composite membranes effectively reject sodium chloride during reverse osmosis. Films are 98% sodium chloride rejective, and 46% urea rejective.

  15. Local heating realization by reverse thermal cloak

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Run; Wei, Xuli; Hu, Jinyan; Luo, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Transformation thermodynamics, as one of the important branches among the extensions of transformation optics, has attracted plentiful attentions and interests recently. The result of transformation thermodynamics, or called as “thermal cloak”, can realize isothermal region and hide objects from heat. In this paper, we presented the concept of “reverse thermal cloak” to correspond to the thermal cloak and made a simple engineering definition to identify them. By full-wave simulations, we verified that the reverse thermal cloak can concentrate heat and realize local heating. The performance of local heating depends on the anisotropic dispersion of the cloaking layer's thermal conductivity. Three-dimensional finite element simulations demonstrated that the reverse thermal cloak can be used to heat up objects. Besides pre-engineered metamaterials, such reverse thermal cloak can even be realized with homogenous materials by alternating spoke-like structure or Hashin coated-sphere structure. PMID:24398592

  16. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1995-10-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Uncertainties about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal has limited the reactor operating power to 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these uncertainties is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW.

  17. Local heating realization by reverse thermal cloak.

    PubMed

    Hu, Run; Wei, Xuli; Hu, Jinyan; Luo, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Transformation thermodynamics, as one of the important branches among the extensions of transformation optics, has attracted plentiful attentions and interests recently. The result of transformation thermodynamics, or called as "thermal cloak", can realize isothermal region and hide objects from heat. In this paper, we presented the concept of "reverse thermal cloak" to correspond to the thermal cloak and made a simple engineering definition to identify them. By full-wave simulations, we verified that the reverse thermal cloak can concentrate heat and realize local heating. The performance of local heating depends on the anisotropic dispersion of the cloaking layer's thermal conductivity. Three-dimensional finite element simulations demonstrated that the reverse thermal cloak can be used to heat up objects. Besides pre-engineered metamaterials, such reverse thermal cloak can even be realized with homogenous materials by alternating spoke-like structure or Hashin coated-sphere structure. PMID:24398592

  18. Biomonitoring - An Exposure Science Tool for Exposure and Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomonitoring studies of environmental stressors are useful for confirming exposures, estimating dose levels, and evaluating human health risks. However, the complexities of exposure-biomarker and biomarker-response relationships have limited the use of biomarkers in exposure sc...

  19. The hidden price of repeated traumatic exposure.

    PubMed

    Levy-Gigi, Einat; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2014-07-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated reduced hippocampal volume in trauma-exposed individuals without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the implications of such a deficit in this non-clinical population are still unclear. Animal and human models of PTSD suggest that hippocampal deficit may result in impaired learning and use of associations between contextual information and aversive events. Previous study has shown that individuals with PTSD have a selective impairment in reversing the negative outcome of context-related information. The aim of this study was to test whether non-PTSD individuals who are repeatedly exposed to traumatic events display similar impairment. To that end, we compared the performance of active-duty firefighters who are frequently exposed to traumatic events as part of their occupational routine and civilian matched-controls with no history of trauma-exposure. We used a novel cue-context reversal paradigm, which separately evaluates reversal of negative and positive outcomes of cue and context-related information. As predicted, we found that while both trauma-exposed firefighters and unexposed matched-controls were able to acquire and retain stimulus-outcome associations, firefighters struggled to learn that a previously negative context is later associated with a positive outcome. This impairment did not correlate with levels of PTSD, anxiety or depressive symptoms. The results suggest that similar to individuals with PTSD, highly exposed individuals fail to associate traumatic outcomes with their appropriate context. This impairment may reflect a possible hidden price of repeated traumatic exposure, which is not necessarily associated with PTSD diagnosis, and may affect the way highly exposed individuals interpret and react to their environment. PMID:24810272

  20. Occupational arsine gas exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Pullen-James, Shayla; Woods, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    Arsine gas exposure is a rare occupational event and can be completely prevented with the use of appropriate protective gear. Exposure often occurs when arsine gas is generated while arsenic-containing crude ores or metals are treated with acid. Cases of toxicity require an index of suspicion and a good history. In particular, it should be in the differential diagnosis in patients who present acutely with red/bronze skin and hemoglobinuria. Treatment is supportive and may include transfusions and dialysis in severe cases. Clinical severity is proportionate to the level of exposure, and severity is directly related to the onset of symptoms. Images Figure 2 PMID:17225850