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Sample records for reversibly bound analogues

  1. Fluoride complexes of aluminium or beryllium act on G-proteins as reversibly bound analogues of the gamma phosphate of GTP.

    PubMed Central

    Bigay, J; Deterre, P; Pfister, C; Chabre, M

    1987-01-01

    Fluoride activation of G proteins requires the presence of aluminium or beryllium and it has been suggested that AIF4- acts as an analogue of the gamma-phosphate of GTP in the nucleotide site. We have investigated the action of AIF4- or of BeF3- on transducin (T), the G protein of the retinal rods, either indirectly through the activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase, or more directly through their effects on the conformation of transducin itself. In the presence of AIF4- or BeF3-, purified T alpha subunit of transducin activates purified cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the absence of photoactivated rhodopsin. Activation is totally reversed by elution of fluoride or partially reversed by addition of excess T beta gamma. Activation requires that GDP or a suitable analogue be bound to T alpha: T alpha-GDP and T alpha-GDP alpha S are activable by fluorides, but not T alpha-GDP beta S, nor T alpha that has released its nucleotide upon binding to photoexcited rhodopsin. Analysis of previous works on other G proteins and with other nucleotide analogues confirm that in all cases fluoride activation requires that a GDP unsubstituted at its beta phosphate be bound in T alpha. By contrast with alumino-fluoride complexes, which can adopt various coordination geometries, all beryllium fluoride complexes are tetracoordinated, with a Be-F bond length of 1.55 A, and strictly isomorphous to a phosphate group. Our study confirms that fluoride activation of transducin results from a reversible binding of the metal-fluoride complex in the nucleotide site of T alpha, next to the beta phosphate of GDP, as an analogue of the gamma phosphate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2826123

  2. Design and synthesis of biotin analogues reversibly binding with streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Aoki, Kiyoshi; Sugiyama, Akira; Doi, Hirofumi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-04-01

    Two new biotin analogues, biotin carbonate 5 and biotin carbamate 6, have been synthesized. These molecules were designed to reversibly bind with streptavidin by replacing the hydrogen-bond donor NH group(s) of biotin's cyclic urea moiety with oxygen. Biotin carbonate 5 was synthesized from L-arabinose (7), which furnishes the desired stereochemistry at the 3,4-cis-dihydroxy groups, in 11% overall yield (over 10 steps). Synthesis of biotin carbamate 6 was accomplished from L-cysteine-derived chiral aldehyde 33 in 11% overall yield (over 7 steps). Surface plasmon resonance analysis of water-soluble biotin carbonate analogue 46 and biotin carbamate analogue 47 revealed that KD values of these compounds for binding to streptavidin were 6.7×10(-6)  M and 1.7×10(-10)  M, respectively. These values were remarkably greater than that of biotin (KD =10(-15)  M), and thus indicate the importance of the nitrogen atoms for the strong binding between biotin and streptavidin. PMID:25691069

  3. Reversible lipidization of somatostatin analogues for the liver targeting.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liyun; Wang, Jeff; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2008-10-01

    Tyr(3)-octreotide (TOC), a somatostatin analogue, is reversibly lipidized for passive delivery to the liver with the aim of increasing its association with hepatocytes. The reversibly lipidized TOC (REAL-TOC) was formed by the conjugation of the N-palmitoyl cysteinyl moiety to the cysteinyl residues of reduced TOC through disulfide linkages and characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF) analysis. The measured mass of REAL-TOC (M+H)(+) is 1752.31 Da (calculated mass: 1752.78), confirming that two molecules of N-palmitoyl cysteines are linked to TOC via disulfide bonds. TOC and REAL-TOC were radioiodinated and administered to mice. Their biodistribution and intrahepatic distribution were subsequently investigated. The area under the curve (AUC) of (125)I-REAL-TOC in the liver was 3.8-fold greater than that of (125)I-TOC, with 20.5% and 5.8% of the injected dose (ID)/g of (125)I-REAL-TOC remaining in the liver at 2 and 24h post injection, respectively. Within the liver, TOC was primarily distributed to parenchymal cells (PC). Nevertheless, TOC was quickly excreted out and only 2.4% ID per 100mg protein remained in the PC at 2h post injection. (125)I-REAL-TOC was retained in PC for up to 2h with a constant concentration of around 6% ID/100mg protein. (125)I-REAL-TOC was also highly associated with nonparenchymal cells (NPC) at significantly higher levels than (125)I-TOC at 10min, 1h and 2h post injection. Since somatostatin analogues have been evaluated for treating late-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the reversibly lipidized conjugates may possess enhanced therapeutic efficacy due to the liver-targeting effect. PMID:18614343

  4. Structure of Mandelate Racemase with Bound Intermediate Analogues Benzohydroxamate and Cupferron

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzan, Adam D.; Nagar, Mitesh; Pellmann, Elise A.; Bourque, Jennifer R.; Bearne, Stephen L.; Maurice, Martin St.

    2012-05-09

    Mandelate racemase (MR, EC 5.1.2.2) from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes the Mg{sup 2+}-dependent interconversion of the enantiomers of mandelate, stabilizing the altered substrate in the transition state by 26 kcal/mol relative to the substrate in the ground state. To understand the origins of this binding discrimination, we determined the X-ray crystal structures of wild-type MR complexed with two analogues of the putative aci-carboxylate intermediate, benzohydroxamate and Cupferron, to 2.2-{angstrom} resolution. Benzohydroxamate is shown to be a reasonable mimic of the transition state and/or intermediate because its binding affinity for 21 MR variants correlates well with changes in the free energy of transition state stabilization afforded by these variants. Both benzohydroxamate and Cupferron chelate the active site divalent metal ion and are bound in a conformation with the phenyl ring coplanar with the hydroxamate and diazeniumdiolate moieties, respectively. Structural overlays of MR complexed with benzohydroxamate, Cupferron, and the ground state analogue (S)-atrolactate reveal that the para carbon of the substrate phenyl ring moves by 0.8-1.2 {angstrom} between the ground state and intermediate state, consistent with the proposal that the phenyl ring moves during MR catalysis while the polar groups remain relatively fixed. Although the overall protein structure of MR with bound intermediate analogues is very similar to that of MR with bound (S)-atrolactate, the intermediate-Mg{sup 2+} distance becomes shorter, suggesting a tighter complex with the catalytic Mg{sup 2+}. In addition, Tyr 54 moves closer to the phenyl ring of the bound intermediate analogues, contributing to an overall constriction of the active site cavity. However, site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that the role of Tyr 54 in MR catalysis is relatively minor, suggesting that alterations in enzyme structure that contribute to discrimination between the altered substrate in the

  5. Stationary bound states of massless scalar fields around black holes and black hole analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benone, Carolina L.; Crispino, Luís C. B.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen

    2015-06-01

    We discuss stationary bound states, a.k.a. clouds, for a massless test scalar field around Kerr black holes (BHs) and spinning acoustic BH analogues. In view of the absence of a mass term, the trapping is achieved via enclosing the BH — scalar field system in a cavity and imposing Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions. We discuss the variation of these bounds states with the discrete parameters that label them, as well as their spatial distribution, complementing results in our previous work [C. L. Benone, L. C. B. Crispino, C. Herdeiro and E. Radu, Phys. Rev. D91 (2015) 104038].

  6. Modified symmetrical reversible variable length code and its theoretical bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chien-Wu; Wu, Ja-Ling; Liu, Shu-Wei

    2000-04-01

    The reversible variable length codes (RVLCs) have been adopted in the emerging video coding standards -- H.263+ and MPEG- 4, to enhance their error-resilience capability which is important and essential in the error-prone environments. The most appealing advantage of symmetrical RVLCs compared with asymmetrical RVLCs is that only one code table is required to forward and backward decoding, however, two code tables are required for asymmetrical RVLCs. In this paper, we propose a simple and efficient algorithm that can produce a symmetrical RVLC from a given Huffman code, and we also discuss theoretical bounds of the proposed symmetrical RVLCs.

  7. Specificity of neomycin analogues bound to the packaging region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA.

    PubMed

    McPike, Mark P; Goodisman, Jerry; Dabrowiak, James C

    2004-04-15

    -neo must be directed away from the binding pocket when these analogues are bivalently bound to RNA. This study showed how variations in the structure of aminoglycosides lead to different binding specificity to part of the packaging region of HIV-1. Such knowledge will be important in design of drugs to target this region. PMID:15051052

  8. The reversible DNA-alkylating activity of duocarmycin and its analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Asai, A; Nagamura, S; Saito, H; Takahashi, I; Nakano, H

    1994-01-01

    Intact drugs with spirocyclopropylhexadienone moieties can be regenerated from the covalent DNA adducts induced by antitumor antibiotics duocarmycin (DUM) A, SA and some DUMA analogues in neutral aqueous solution. We detected the reversible nature of DUMs by determination of the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of DUM-DNA adducts. All of the adducts selectively inhibited the growth of a sensitive strain of Bacillus but not that of the wild type strain, a property of parent DUM and its analogues. Most of the DNA adducts were also cytotoxic to HeLa S3. These results suggested that active drugs can be released from their covalent DNA adducts under these biological assay conditions. Regeneration of intact drugs was quantitatively analyzed by HPLC and the amount of free drug released from DNA adducts revealed that the rate and efficiency of this reversal were dependent on structural variables among the drugs. The differences in rates of reversibility were correlated with the biological activity of DUMs. The effect of pH, temperature and salt concentration on the regeneration of drugs from their DNA adducts suggest a catalytic role of double-helical DNA on the reversal pathway. Images PMID:8127659

  9. Two Active Site Divalent Ions in the Crystal Structure of the Hammerhead Ribozyme Bound to a Transition State Analogue.

    PubMed

    Mir, Aamir; Golden, Barbara L

    2016-02-01

    The crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to the pentavalent transition state analogue vanadate reveals significant rearrangements relative to the previously determined structures. The active site contracts, bringing G10.1 closer to the cleavage site and repositioning a divalent metal ion such that it could, ultimately, interact directly with the scissile phosphate. This ion could also position a water molecule to serve as a general acid in the cleavage reaction. A second divalent ion is observed coordinated to O6 of G12. This metal ion is well-placed to help tune the pKA of G12. On the basis of this crystal structure as well as a wealth of biochemical studies, we propose a mechanism in which G12 serves as the general base and a magnesium-bound water serves as a general acid. PMID:26551631

  10. Chlorpheniramine Analogues Reverse Chloroquine Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum by Inhibiting PfCRT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and spread of malaria parasites that are resistant to chloroquine (CQ) has been a disaster for world health. The antihistamine chlorpheniramine (CP) partially resensitizes CQ-resistant (CQR) parasites to CQ but possesses little intrinsic antiplasmodial activity. Mutations in the parasite’s CQ resistance transporter (PfCRT) confer resistance to CQ by enabling the protein to transport the drug away from its site of action, and it is thought that resistance-reversers such as CP exert their effect by blocking this CQ transport activity. Here, a series of new structural analogues and homologues of CP have been synthesized. We show that these compounds (along with other in vitro CQ resistance-reversers) inhibit the transport of CQ via a resistance-conferring form of PfCRT expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Furthermore, the level of PfCRT-inhibition was found to correlate well with both the restoration of CQ accumulation and the level of CQ resensitization in CQR parasites. PMID:24900883

  11. Semi-synthetic ocotillol analogues as selective ABCB1-mediated drug resistance reversal agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Si, Rui; Patel, Bhargav A.; Xu, Jinyi; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of ATP-Binding Cassette transporters leads to multidrug resistance in cancer cells and results in the failure of chemotherapy. In this in-vitro study, we investigated whether or not (20S, 24R/S)-epoxy-12β, 25-dihydroxy-dommarane-3β-amine (ORA and OSA), a pair of semi-synthetic ocotillol analogue epimers, could inhibit the ABCB1 transporter. ORA (1 μM and 3 μM) significantly reversed the resistance to paclitaxel and vincristine in ABCB1-overexpressing SW620/Ad300 and HEK/ABCB1 cells, whereas OSA had no significant effects. In addition, ORA (3 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-paclitaxel by suppressing the efflux function of ABCB1. Meanwhile, both ORA (3 μM) and OSA (3 μM) did not significantly alter the expression level or the subcellular location of ABCB1 protein. Moreover, the ABCB1 ATPase study suggested that ORA had a stronger stimulatory effect on the ATPase activity than OSA. ORA also exhibited a higher docking score as compared with OSA inside transmembrane domain of ABCB1. Overall, we concluded that ORA reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR by competitively inhibiting the ABCB1 drug efflux function. PMID:26296969

  12. Semi-synthetic ocotillol analogues as selective ABCB1-mediated drug resistance reversal agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Zhang, Hengyuan; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J; Si, Rui; Patel, Bhargav A; Xu, Jinyi; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-09-15

    Overexpression of ATP-Binding Cassette transporters leads to multidrug resistance in cancer cells and results in the failure of chemotherapy. In this in-vitro study, we investigated whether or not (20S, 24R/S)-epoxy-12β, 25-dihydroxy-dommarane-3β-amine (ORA and OSA), a pair of semi-synthetic ocotillol analogue epimers, could inhibit the ABCB1 transporter. ORA (1 μM and 3 μM) significantly reversed the resistance to paclitaxel and vincristine in ABCB1-overexpressing SW620/Ad300 and HEK/ABCB1 cells, whereas OSA had no significant effects. In addition, ORA (3 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-paclitaxel by suppressing the efflux function of ABCB1. Meanwhile, both ORA (3 μM) and OSA (3 μM) did not significantly alter the expression level or the subcellular location of ABCB1 protein. Moreover, the ABCB1 ATPase study suggested that ORA had a stronger stimulatory effect on the ATPase activity than OSA. ORA also exhibited a higher docking score as compared with OSA inside transmembrane domain of ABCB1. Overall, we concluded that ORA reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR by competitively inhibiting the ABCB1 drug efflux function. PMID:26296969

  13. Naloxone reverses L-dopa induced overstimulation effects in a Parkinson's disease animal model analogue.

    PubMed

    Carey, R J

    1991-01-01

    Chronic L-DOPA treatment of Parkinson's disease frequently leads to the development of motoric overstimulation and hyperkinetic movements. To investigate this problem in the laboratory, rats surgically altered by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions (6-OHDA) were chronically treated with one L-DOPA (10 mg/kg i.p.) injection per day for 20 days. In this 6-OHDA rotation model, the unilateral dopamine denervation results in a profound contralateral sensory-motor neglect and the animals spontaneously rotate in a direction ipsilateral to the dopamine depleted hemisphere. Initially, the L-DOPA treatment did not alter the response bias but after several weeks, the response bias was reversed and the animals rotated in the formerly akinetic direction, contralaterally, at a significantly higher level. Using this overstimulation effect as an analogue of the clinically observed L-DOPA overstimulation, animals were given naloxone in conjunction with the L-DOPA treatment. Naloxone (0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg i.p.) produced a dose related decrease in the L-DOPA induced contralateral rotation. Consistent with an expected selective effect on the L-DOPA induced rotation, a dose related increase in ipsilateral rotation was observed. These results suggest that naloxone can attenuate the overstimulation effect of L-DOPA and that this effect is not attributable to non-specific response suppression effects. PMID:1900558

  14. Characterization of the Pseudocapacitive Nature of Surface Bound Prussian Blue Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Hampton, Jennifer

    With the increased use of intermittent renewable energy sources, more efficient methods of energy storage must be explored. Electrochemical capacitors provide a larger volumetric charge density than physical capacitors while maintaining fast charge and discharge rates. Prussian Blue analogues (nickel and cobalt hexacyanoferrate) are ideal pseudocapacitors for frequent charge and discharge cycles since the crystalline structure does not physically change during switching, causing less stress on the film. This project examines the charge transfer and diffusion coefficients for nickel and nickel-cobalt thin films modified with potassium hexacyanoferrate. The films were examined using a scanning electron microscope, an atomic force microscope and an electrochemical workstation to determine their composition, topography and psuedocapacitive nature. Preliminary data suggest that nickel-cobalt films have a larger quantity of charge and have a lower diffusion coefficient per charge than nickel films. This work is supported by the Hope College Nyenhuis Faculty Development Fund, the Hope College Department of Physics Guess Research Fund, and the National Science Foundation under Grants RUI-DMR-1104725, MRI-CHE-0959282, and MRI-CHE-1126462.

  15. The role of thin, mechanical discontinuities on the propagation of reverse faults: insights from analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Emanuele; Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Seno, Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Fault-related folding kinematic models are widely used to explain accommodation of crustal shortening. These models, however, include simplifications, such as the assumption of constant growth rate of faults. This value sometimes is not constant in isotropic materials, and even more variable if one considers naturally anisotropic geological systems. , This means that these simplifications could lead to incorrect interpretations of the reality. In this study, we use analogue models to evaluate how thin, mechanical discontinuities, such as beddings or thin weak layers, influence the propagation of reverse faults and related folds. The experiments are performed with two different settings to simulate initially-blind master faults dipping at 30° and 45°. The 30° dip represents one of the Andersonian conjugate fault, and 45° dip is very frequent in positive reactivation of normal faults. The experimental apparatus consists of a clay layer placed above two plates: one plate, the footwall, is fixed; the other one, the hanging wall, is mobile. Motor-controlled sliding of the hanging wall plate along an inclined plane reproduces the reverse fault movement. We run thirty-six experiments: eighteen with dip of 30° and eighteen with dip of 45°. For each dip-angle setting, we initially run isotropic experiments that serve as a reference. Then, we run the other experiments with one or two discontinuities (horizontal precuts performed into the clay layer). We monitored the experiments collecting side photographs every 1.0 mm of displacement of the master fault. These images have been analyzed through PIVlab software, a tool based on the Digital Image Correlation method. With the "displacement field analysis" (one of the PIVlab tools) we evaluated, the variation of the trishear zone shape and how the master-fault tip and newly-formed faults propagate into the clay medium. With the "strain distribution analysis", we observed the amount of the on-fault and off-fault deformation

  16. Insights into the electronic structure of Cu(II) bound to an imidazole analogue of westiellamide.

    PubMed

    Comba, Peter; Dovalil, Nina; Hanson, Graeme R; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Noble, Christopher J; Riley, Mark J; Seibold, Bjoern

    2014-12-01

    Three synthetic analogues of westiallamide, H3L(wa), have previously been synthesized (H3L(1-3)) that have a common backbone (derived from l-valine) with H3L(wa) but differ in their heterocyclic rings (imidazole, oxazole, thiazole, and oxazoline). Herein we explore in detail through high-resolution pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) the geometric and electronic structures of the mono- and dinuclear Cu(II) complexes of these cyclic pseudo hexapeptides. Orientation-selective hyperfine sublevel correlation, electron nuclear double resonance, and three-pulse electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy of [Cu(II)(H2L(1))(MeOH)2](+) reveal delocalization of the unpaired electron spin onto the ligating and distal nitrogens of the coordinated heterocyclic rings and that they are magnetically inequivalent. DFT calculations confirm this and show similar spin densities on the distal heteroatoms in the heterocyclic rings coordinated to the Cu(II) ion in the other cyclic pseudo hexapeptide [Cu(II)(H2L(2,3,wa))(MeOH)2](+) complexes. The magnetic inequivalencies in [Cu(II)(H2L(1))(MeOH)2](+) arise from different orientations of the heterocyclic rings coordinated to the Cu(II) ion, and the delocalization of the unpaired electron onto the distal heteroatoms within these N-methylimidazole rings depends upon their location with respect to the Cu(II) d(x(2)-y(2)) orbital. A systematic study of DFT functionals and basis sets was undertaken to examine the ability to reproduce the experimentally determined spin Hamiltonian parameters. Inclusion of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) using MAG-ReSpect or ORCA with a BHLYP/IGLO-II Wachters setup with SOC corrections and ∼38% Hartree-Fock exchange gave the best predictions of the g and A((63)Cu) matrices. DFT calculations of the (14)N hyperfine and quadrupole parameters for the distal nitrogens of the coordinated heterocyclic

  17. Bound on Bell inequalities by fraction of determinism and reverse triangle inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P.; Horodecki, K.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, P.; Horodecki, R.; Li, Ben; Szarek, S. J.; Szarek, T.

    2015-09-01

    It is an established fact that entanglement is a resource. Sharing an entangled state leads to nonlocal correlations and to violations of Bell inequalities. Such nonlocal correlations illustrate the advantage of quantum resources over classical resources. In this paper, we quantitatively study Bell inequalities with 2 ×n inputs. As found in Gisin et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inform. 05, 525 (2007), 10.1142/S021974990700289X], quantum mechanical correlations cannot reach the algebraic bound for such inequalities. Here we uncover the heart of this effect, which we call the fraction of determinism. We show that any quantum statistics with two parties and 2 ×n inputs exhibit a nonzero fraction of determinism, and we supply a quantitative bound for it. We then apply it to provide an explicit universal upper bound for Bell inequalities with 2 ×n inputs. As our main mathematical tool, we introduce and prove a reverse triangle inequality, stating in a quantitative way that if some states are far away from a given state, then their mixture is also. The inequality is crucial in deriving the lower bound for the fraction of determinism, but is also of interest on its own.

  18. Treatment-limiting toxicities associated withnucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor therapy: A prospective, observational study**

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Rosario; Santos, Jesús; Camino, Xavier; Arazo, Piedad; Torres Perea, Rafael; Echevarrfa, Santiago; Ribera, Esteban; Sánchez de la Rosa, Rainel; Moreno Guillen, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Recover Study is an ongoing, prospective study designed 10 to assess toxicity associated with the use of nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (stavudine, zidovudine, lamivudine, didanosine, abacavir) in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in routine clinical practice. This project is being conducted at 120 HIV units at teaching hospitals across Spain. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the most common treatment-limiting 10 moderate to severe clinical and laboratory adverse effects (AEs), and the individual NRTIs involved in the development of these effects, in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART who discontinued use of an NRTI in the Recover Study. Methods: Patients eligible for participation in the Recover Study are aged10 ≥18 years; have virologically documented HIV-1 infection; have sustained viral suppression (viral load <200 cells/mL or stable, heavily experienced [ie, have received ≥3 antiretroviral regimens] patients with viral load <5000 cells/mL) for ≥6 months; are receiving HAART; are undergoing active follow-up; and have developed 2:1 NRTI-associated AE that, in the opinion of a study investigator and under the conditions of routine clinical practice, justified discontinuation of treatment with the offending drug (principal AE/offending NRTI). The present study included patients recruited for the Recover Study between September 2002 and May 2003. Results: A total of 1391 patients were enrolled (966 men, 425 women; mean 1 age, 42 years [range, 18–67 years]). Five hundred six patients (36.4%) had been diagnosed with AIDS. The mean duration of treatment with the offending NRTI was 74 months (range, 6–156 months). Seven hundred nine patients (51.0%) were receiving fourth-line (or more) therapy. Eight hundred twenty-one patients (59.0%) were receiving nonnucleoside analogues, and 552 patients (39.7%), protease inhibitors, as components of their HAART

  19. Backbone and ILV methyl resonance assignments of E. coli thymidylate synthase bound to cofactor and a nucleotide analogue

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Paul J.; Lee, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TSase) is a 62 kDa homodimeric enzyme required for de novo synthesis of thymidine monophosphate (dTMP) in most organisms. This makes the enzyme an excellent target for anticancer and microbial antibiotic drugs. In addition, TSase has been shown to exhibit negative cooperativity and half-the-sites reactivity. For these collective reasons, TSase is widely studied, and much is known about its kinetics and structure as it progresses through a multi-step catalytic cycle. Recently, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation has been instrumental in demonstrating the critical role of dynamics in enzyme function in small model systems. These studies raise questions about how dynamics affect function in larger enzymes with more complex reaction coordinates. TSase is an ideal candidate given its size, oligomeric state, cooperativity, and status as a drug target. Here, as a pre-requisite to spin relaxation studies, we present the backbone and ILV methyl resonance assignments of TSase from Escherichia coli bound to a substrate analogue and cofactor. PMID:23653343

  20. Solid-phase synthesis of quinazoline-2,4-diones and their analogues from resin-bound compounds with primary amines.

    PubMed

    Makino, Shingo

    2006-06-01

    Solid-phase organic synthesis of heterocyclic compounds on solid-support has been a focus of recent investigations because of the potential applicability of these compounds toward a variety of drug targets. Among the various heterocycles, we have been especially interested in quinazoline-2,4-diones because of the wide range of their bioactivities. Therefore, in this article we review methods for the solid-phase synthesis of quinazoline-2,4-diones and their analogues. Since all of these heterocycles can be speedily derivatized from resin-bound primary amines, incorporating the amines at the 3N-position of quinazoline-2,4-diones or corresponding positions of its analogues, it becomes possible to efficiently compare the bioactivities of these quinazoline-2,4-diones and their analogues. Various methods of solid-phase synthesis described herein should be practical and useful tools for the medicinal chemist in supporting drug discovery initiatives. PMID:16787372

  1. Observation of broken time-reversal symmetry with Andreev bound state tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, L. H.; Covington, M.; Aprili, M.; Badica, E.; Pugel, D. E.

    2000-05-01

    Quasiparticle (QP) planar tunneling spectroscopy is used to investigate the density of states (DoS) of YBa 2Cu 3O 7 (YBCO). Temperature, crystallographic orientation, doping, damage and magnetic field dependencies confirm that the observed zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) is an Andreev bound state (ABS), an intrinsic property of a d-wave superconducting order parameter (OP) at an interface. In zero applied field, the splitting of the ZBCP below ∼8 K confirms a near-surface phase transition into a superconducting state with spontaneously broken time-reversal symmetry (BTRS). Tunneling into the ABS provides a phase-sensitive spectroscopy that can be used to measure a variety of DoS properties in an unconventional superconductor.

  2. Snapshot of the equilibrium dynamics of a drug bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Daniel G.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Challa, J. Reddy; Patel, Disha; Troxler, Thomas; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    The anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine undergoes conformational changes to bind HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and retain potency against drug-resistance mutations. Our discovery that water molecules play an essential role in the drug binding is reported. Femtosecond experiments and theory expose molecular level dynamics of rilpivirine bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. The two nitrile substituents (-CN), one on each arm of the drug, have vibrational spectra consistent with their protein environments being similar in crystals and in solutions. Two-dimensional vibrational-echo spectroscopy reveals a dry environment for one nitrile while unexpectedly the other is hydrogen-bonded to a mobile water molecule, not identified in earlier X-ray structures. Ultrafast nitrile-water dynamics are confirmed by simulations. A higher (1.51 Å) resolution X-ray structure indeed reveals a water-drug interaction network. Maintenance of a crucial anchoring hydrogen bond, despite the enlargement and structural variation of the binding pocket, may help retain the potency of rilpivirine against the pocket mutations. PMID:23422558

  3. 8-Modified-2′-Deoxyadenosine Analogues Induce Delayed Polymerization Arrest during HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Marwan; Smyth, Redmond; Ben Gaied, Nouha; Barhoum, Patrick; Laumond, Géraldine; Bec, Guillaume; Götte, Matthias; Mak, Johnson; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Burger, Alain; Marquet, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of resistant viruses to any of the anti-HIV-1 compounds used in the current therapies against AIDS underlies the urge for the development of new drug targets and/or new drugs acting through novel mechanisms. While all anti-HIV-1 nucleoside analogues in clinical use and in clinical trials rely on ribose modifications for activity, we designed nucleosides with a natural deoxyribose moiety and modifications of position 8 of the adenine base. Such modifications might induce a steric clash with helix αH in the thumb domain of the p66 subunit of HIV-1 RT at a distance from the catalytic site, causing delayed chain termination. Eleven new 2′-deoxyadenosine analogues modified on position 8 of the purine base were synthesized and tested in vitro and in cell-based assays. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that chemical modifications on position 8 of 2′-deoxyadenosine induce delayed chain termination in vitro, and also inhibit DNA synthesis when incorporated in a DNA template strand. Furthermore, one of them had moderate anti-HIV-1 activity in cell-culture. Our results constitute a proof of concept indicating that modification on the base moiety of nucleosides can induce delayed polymerization arrest and inhibit HIV-1 replication. PMID:22087320

  4. Snapshot of the equilibrium dynamics of a drug bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Daniel G.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Challa, J. Reddy; Patel, Disha; Troxler, Thomas; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-03-01

    The anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine undergoes conformational changes to bind HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), which is an essential enzyme for the replication of HIV. These changes allow it to retain potency against mutations that otherwise would render the enzyme resistant. Here we report that water molecules play an essential role in this binding process. Femtosecond experiments and theory expose the molecular level dynamics of rilpivirine bound to HIV-1 RT. Two nitrile substituents, one on each arm of the drug, are used as vibrational probes of the structural dynamics within the binding pocket. Two-dimensional vibrational echo spectroscopy reveals that one nitrile group is unexpectedly hydrogen-bonded to a mobile water molecule, not identified in previous X-ray structures. Ultrafast nitrile-water dynamics are confirmed by simulations. A higher (1.51 Å) resolution X-ray structure also reveals a water-drug interaction network. Maintenance of a crucial anchoring hydrogen bond may help retain the potency of rilpivirine against pocket mutations despite the structural variations they cause.

  5. The glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue exendin-4 reverses impaired intracellular Ca(2+) signalling in steatotic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Eunüs S; Hua, Jin; Wilson, Claire H; Tallis, George A; Zhou, Fiona H; Rychkov, Grigori Y; Barritt, Greg J

    2016-09-01

    The release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and subsequent replenishment of ER Ca(2+) by Ca(2+) entry through store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCE) play critical roles in the regulation of liver metabolism by adrenaline, glucagon and other hormones. Both ER Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) entry are severely inhibited in steatotic hepatocytes. Exendin-4, a slowly-metabolised glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, is known to reduce liver glucose output and liver lipid, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether exendin-4 alters intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in steatotic hepatocytes, and to evaluate the mechanisms involved. Exendin-4 completely reversed lipid-induced inhibition of SOCE in steatotic liver cells, but did not reverse lipid-induced inhibition of ER Ca(2+) release. The action of exendin-4 on Ca(2+) entry was rapid in onset and was mimicked by GLP-1 or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. In steatotic liver cells, exendin-4 caused a rapid decrease in lipid (half time 6.5min), inhibited the accumulation of lipid in liver cells incubated in the presence of palmitate plus the SOCE inhibitor BTP-2, and enhanced the formation of cyclic AMP. Hormone-stimulated accumulation of extracellular glucose in glycogen replete steatotic liver cells was inhibited compared to that in non-steatotic cells, and this effect of lipid was reversed by exendin-4. It is concluded that, in steatotic hepatocytes, exendin-4 reverses the lipid-induced inhibition of SOCE leading to restoration of hormone-regulated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signalling. The mechanism may involve GLP-1 receptors, cyclic AMP, lipolysis, decreased diacylglycerol and decreased activity of protein kinase C. PMID:27178543

  6. Determination of free and reversibly bound sulphite in foods by reverse-phase, ion-pairing high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Warner, C R; Daniels, D H; Fitzgerald, M C; Joe, F L; Diachenko, G W

    1990-01-01

    The reaction of sulphite with formaldehyde to form hydroxymethylsulphonate (HMS), which is very stable under the controlled conditions of this assay, was used as the first step in an analytical procedure to determine foodborne sulphite. The effect of mobile-phase pH on the stability of HMS during high-performance liquid chromatography was studied. It was found that on-column HMS dissociation to formaldehyde and bisulphite increased with the pH of the mobile phase; therefore the relatively low pH 4.7, at which the dissociation of HMS was approximately 2%, was selected for the analysis. In addition, the release of sulphite from its reversibly bound forms in wine and other foods was examined as a function of the pH of the extraction medium by following the appearance of HMS formed from the reaction of the freed sulphite with formaldehyde. The rate of dissociation of the reversibly bound sulphite was relatively slow at pH 3 but very rapid at pH 7. This difference in kinetics was exploited to develop a procedure to determine free and reversibly bound sulphite in food. The method was challenged by post-reagent spiking studies, i.e. adding the sulphite spike after the food has been blended with the sulphite-protective formaldehyde solution but before proceeding with the remainder of the assay. An average recovery of 100% with a standard deviation of 5.2% (n = 45) was realized at levels of 5, 10 and 20 ppm by weight as sulphur dioxide. Recovery of the sulphite added as the bisulphite addition product of acetaldehyde, a model compound for reversibly bound sulphite, was 95%. PMID:2174807

  7. Extracting the internal representation of faces from human brain activity: an analogue to reverse correlation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bruce C; Thompson, Benjamin; Hess, Robert F; Ellemberg, Dave

    2010-05-15

    Much of the debate surrounding the precise functional role of brain mechanisms implicated in the processing of human faces can be explained when considering that studies into early-stage neural representations of the spatial arrangement of facial features are potentially contaminated by "higher-level" cognitive attributes associated with human faces. One way to bypass such attributes would be to employ ambiguous stimuli that are not biased toward any particular object class and analyze neural activity in response to those stimuli in a manner similar to traditional reverse correlation for mapping visual receptive fields. Accordingly, we sought to derive whole face representations directly from neural activity in the human brain using electroencephalography (EEG). We presented ambiguous fractal noise stimuli to human participants and asked them to rate each stimulus along a "face not present" to "face present" continuum while simultaneously recording EEGs. All EEGs were subjected to a time-frequency analysis near 170 ms (negative amplitudes near 170 ms post-stimulus onset have been linked to early face processing) for five different frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma) on a trial-by-trial basis, independent of the behavioral responses. Images containing apparent face-like structure were obtained for theta through gamma frequency bands for strong negative amplitudes near 170 ms post-stimulus onset. The presence of the face-like structure in the spatial images derived from brain signals was objectively verified using both Fourier methods and trained neural networks. The results support the use of a modified reverse correlation technique with EEG as a non-biased assessment of brain processes involved in the complex integration of spatial information into objects such as human faces. PMID:20156567

  8. A thiamin-bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit induces large scale disorder-to-order transformations in the enzyme and reveals novel structural features in the covalently bound adduct.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Sax, Martin; Brunskill, Andrew; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Nemeria, Natalia; Zhang, Sheng; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2006-06-01

    The crystal structure of the E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) has been determined with phosphonolactylthiamin diphosphate (PLThDP) in its active site. PLThDP serves as a structural and electrostatic analogue of the natural intermediate alpha-lactylthiamin diphosphate (LThDP), in which the carboxylate from the natural substrate pyruvate is replaced by a phosphonate group. This represents the first example of an experimentally determined, three-dimensional structure of a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme containing a covalently bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue and should serve as a model for the corresponding intermediates in other ThDP-dependent decarboxylases. Regarding the PDHc-specific reaction, the presence of PLThDP induces large scale conformational changes in the enzyme. In conjunction with the E1-PLThDP and E1-ThDP structures, analysis of a H407A E1-PLThDP variant structure shows that an interaction between His-407 and PLThDP is essential for stabilization of two loop regions in the active site that are otherwise disordered in the absence of intermediate analogue. This ordering completes formation of the active site and creates a new ordered surface likely involved in interactions with the lipoyl domains of E2s within the PDHc complex. The tetrahedral intermediate analogue is tightly held in the active site through direct hydrogen bonds to residues His-407, Tyr-599, and His-640 and reveals a new, enzyme-induced, strain-related feature that appears to aid in the decarboxylation process. This feature is almost certainly present in all ThDP-dependent decarboxylases; thus its inclusion in our understanding of general thiamin catalysis is important. PMID:16531404

  9. Reversible and formaldehyde-mediated covalent binding of a bis-amino mitoxantrone analogue to DNA.

    PubMed

    Konda, Shyam K; Kelso, Celine; Pumuye, Paul P; Medan, Jelena; Sleebs, Brad E; Cutts, Suzanne M; Phillips, Don R; Collins, J Grant

    2016-05-18

    The ability of a bis-amino mitoxantrone anticancer drug (named WEHI-150) to form covalent adducts with DNA, after activation by formaldehyde, has been studied by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and HPLC. Mass spectrometry results showed that WEHI-150 could form covalent adducts with d(ACGCGCGT)2 that contained one, two or three covalent links to the octanucleotide, whereas the control drugs (daunorubicin and the anthracenediones mitoxantrone and pixantrone) only formed adducts with one covalent link to the octanucleotide. HPLC was used to examine the extent of covalent bond formation of WEHI-150 with d(CGCGCG)2 and d(CG(5Me)CGCG)2. Incubation of WEHI-150 with d(CG(5Me)CGCG)2 in the presence of formaldehyde resulted in the formation of significantly greater amounts of covalent adducts than was observed with d(CGCGCG)2. In order to understand the observed increase of covalent adducts with d(CG(5Me)CGCG)2, an NMR study of the reversible interaction of WEHI-150 at both CpG and (5Me)CpG sites was undertaken. Intermolecular NOEs were observed in the NOESY spectra of d(ACGGCCGT)2 with added WEHI-150 that indicated that the drug selectively intercalated at the CpG sites and from the major groove. In particular, NOEs were observed from the WEHI-150 H2,3 protons to the H1' protons of G3 and G7 and from the H6,7 protons to the H5 protons of C2 and C6. By contrast, intermolecular NOEs were observed between the WEHI-150 H2,3 protons to the H2'' proton of the (5Me)C3 in d(CG(5Me)CGCG)2, and between the drug aliphatic protons and the H1' proton of G4. This demonstrated that WEHI-150 preferentially intercalates at (5Me)CpG sites, compared to CpG sequences, and predominantly via the minor groove at the (5Me)CpG site. The results of this study demonstrate that WEHI-150 is likely to form interstrand DNA cross-links, upon activation by formaldehyde, and consequently exhibit greater cytotoxicity than other current anthracenedione drugs. PMID:27142235

  10. Oxygen exchange reactions catalyzed by vacuolar H(+)-translocating pyrophosphatase. Evidence for reversible formation of enzyme-bound pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Baykov, A A; Kasho, V N; Bakuleva, N P; Rea, P A

    1994-08-22

    Vacuolar membrane-derived vesicles isolated from Vigna radiata catalyze oxygen exchange between medium phosphate and water. On the basis of the inhibitor sensitivity and cation requirements of the exchange activity, it is almost exclusively attributable to the vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (V-PPase). The invariance of the partition coefficient and the results of kinetic modeling indicate that exchange proceeds via a single reaction pathway and results from the reversal of enzyme-bound pyrophosphate synthesis. Comparison of the exchange reactions catalyzed by V-PPase and soluble PPases suggests that the two classes of enzyme mediate P(i)-HOH exchange by the same mechanism and that the intrinsic reversibility of the V-PPase is no greater than that of soluble PPases. PMID:8070586

  11. Efficiency Statistics and Bounds for Systems with Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jian-Hua; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Segal, Dvira

    2015-07-01

    Universal properties of the statistics of stochastic efficiency for mesoscopic time-reversal symmetry broken energy transducers are revealed in the Gaussian approximation. We also discuss how the second law of thermodynamics restricts the statistics of stochastic efficiency. The tight-coupling limit becomes unfavorable, characterized by an infinitely broad distribution of efficiency at all times, when time-reversal symmetry breaking leads to an asymmetric Onsager response matrix. The underlying physics is demonstrated through the quantum Hall effect and further elaborated in a triple-quantum-dot three-terminal thermoelectric engine.

  12. Efficiency Statistics and Bounds for Systems with Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Hua; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Segal, Dvira

    2015-07-24

    Universal properties of the statistics of stochastic efficiency for mesoscopic time-reversal symmetry broken energy transducers are revealed in the Gaussian approximation. We also discuss how the second law of thermodynamics restricts the statistics of stochastic efficiency. The tight-coupling limit becomes unfavorable, characterized by an infinitely broad distribution of efficiency at all times, when time-reversal symmetry breaking leads to an asymmetric Onsager response matrix. The underlying physics is demonstrated through the quantum Hall effect and further elaborated in a triple-quantum-dot three-terminal thermoelectric engine. PMID:26252673

  13. Copper(I)/S(8) reversible reactions leading to an end-on bound dicopper(II) disulfide complex: nucleophilic reactivity and analogies to copper-dioxygen chemistry.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Debabrata; Woertink, Julia S; Vance, Michael A; Milligan, Ashley E; Sarjeant, Amy A Narducci; Solomon, Edward I; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2007-07-18

    Elemental sulfur (S8) reacts reversibly with the copper(I) complex [(TMPA')CuI](+) (1), where TMPA' is a TMPA (tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine) analogue with a 6-CH2OCH3 substituent on one pyridyl ligand arm, affording a spectroscopically pure end-on bound disulfido-dicopper(II) complex [{(TMPA')Cu(II)}2(mu-1,2-S2(2-))](2+) (2) {nu(S-S) = 492 cm(-1); nu(Cu-S)sym = 309 cm(-1)}; by contrast, [(TMPA)Cu(I)(CH3CN)](+) (3)/S8 chemistry produces an equilibrium mixture of at least three complexes. The reaction of excess PPh3 with 2 leads to formal "release" of zerovalent sulfur and reduction of copper ion to give the corresponding complex [(TMPA')Cu(I)(PPh3)](+) (11) along with S=PPh3 as products. Dioxygen displaces the disulfur moiety from 2 to produce the end-on Cu2O2 complex, [{(TMPA')Cu(II)}2(mu-1,2-O2(2-)](2+) (9). Addition of the tetradentate ligand TMPA to 2 generates the apparently more thermodynamically stable [{(TMPA)Cu(II)}2(mu-1,2-S2(2-))](2+) (4) and expected mixture of other species. Bubbling 2 with CO leads to the formation of the carbonyl adduct [(TMPA')CuI(CO)](+) (8). Carbonylation/sulfur-release/CO-removal cycles can be repeated several times. Sulfur atom transfer from 2 also occurs in a near quantitative manner when it is treated with 2,6-dimethylphenyl isocyanide (ArNC), leading to the corresponding isothiocyanate (ArNCS) and [(TMPA')Cu(I)(CNAr)](+) (12). Complex 2 readily reacts with PhCH2Br: [{(TMPA')Cu(II)}2(mu-1,2-S(2)(2-)](2+) (2) + 2 PhCH2Br --> [{(TMPA')Cu(II)(Br)}2](2+) (6) + PhCH2SSCH2Ph. The unprecedented substrate reactivity studies reveal that end-on bound mu-1,2-disulfide-dicopper(II) complex 2 provides a nucleophilic S2(2-) moiety, in striking contrast to the electrophilic behavior of a recently described side-on bound mu-eta(2):eta(2)-disulfido-dicopper(II) complex, [{(N3)Cu(II)}(2)(mu-eta(2):eta(2)-S2(2-))](2+) (5) with tridentate N3 ligand. The investigation thus reveals striking analogies of copper/sulfur and copper/dioxygen chemistries

  14. Determination of free and reversibly-bound sulfite in selected foods by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Stephen Wai Cheung; Chan, Benny T P; Chan, Andy C M

    2008-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for measuring low part-per-million levels of free and reversibly-bound sulfites in selected foods by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorometric detection was developed. Sulfites were extracted with sodium tetrachloromercurate solution and determined by HPLC-fluorescence spectrometry. During the HPLC analysis, the sample extract was reacted with sodium hydroxide to liberate the reversibly-bound sulfite and subsequently separated from other interferences by a size exclusion column. The effluent was then reacted with o-phthalaldehydelammonium chloride reagent to form a fluorescing 1-sulfonatoisoindole derivative and analyzed by a fluorescence detector. The method has been applied to a variety of foods and food products, with no significant interference encountered in matrixes such as soy products, cabbage, broccoli, brassica, ginger, fungus, mushroom, mandarin peel, potato chips, and biscuits. It was shown to have a broad linear range of 0.01 to 0.4 mg/L as SO2. The spike recoveries of sodium sulfite, sodium metabisulfite, and formaldehyde-sodium bisulfite adduct at the 5 to 10 mg/kg level in the tested food matrix were within 80-120%, and the limit of detection was 5 mg/kg. Laboratory of Government Chemist Reference Material LGC7111 (potato powder) was used to assess the accuracy of the method. The expanded measurement uncertainty of the method at 95% confidence level was estimated to be 17%. PMID:18376591

  15. Bounds on Time Reversal Violation From Polarized Neutron Capture With Unpolarized Targets

    PubMed Central

    Davis, E. D.; Gould, C. R.; Mitchell, G. E.; Sharapov, E. I.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed constraints on parity-odd time-reversal noninvariant interactions derived from measurements of the energy dependence of parity-violating polarized neutron capture on unpolarized targets. As previous authors found, a perturbation in energy dependence due to a parity (P)-odd time (T)-odd interaction is present. However, the perturbation competes with T-even terms which can obscure the T-odd signature. We estimate the magnitudes of these competing terms and suggest strategies for a practicable experiment. PMID:27308172

  16. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor -thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, D.; Maegley, K; Pauly, T; Bauman, J; Das, K; Dharia, C; Clark, Jr., A; Ryan, K; Hickey, M; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, such as RNH, should be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 {angstrom} and 2.04 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, {beta}-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. {beta}-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that {beta}-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with noncompetitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate.

  17. Reversible dissociation of flavin mononucleotide from the mammalian membrane-bound NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I)

    PubMed Central

    Gostimskaya, Irina S.; Grivennikova, Vera G.; Cecchini, Gary; Vinogradov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Conditions for the reversible dissociation of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) from the membrane-bound mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) are described. The catalytic activities of the enzyme, i.e. rotenone-insensitive NADH:hexaammineruthenium III reductase and rotenone-sensitive NADH:quinone reductase decline when bovine heart submitochondrial particles are incubated with NADH in the presence of rotenone or cyanide at alkaline pH. FMN protects and fully restores the NADH-induced inactivation whereas riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide do not. The data show that the reduction of complex I significantly weakens the binding of FMN to protein thus resulting in its dissociation when the concentration of holoenzyme is comparable with Kd (~10−8 M at pH 10.0). PMID:18037377

  18. Mutation V111I in HIV-2 Reverse Transcriptase Increases the Fitness of the Nucleoside Analogue-Resistant K65R and Q151M Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Deuzing, Ilona P.; Charpentier, Charlotte; Wright, David W.; Matheron, Sophie; Paton, Jack; Frentz, Dineke; van de Vijver, David A.; Coveney, Peter V.; Descamps, Diane; Boucher, Charles A. B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with HIV-2 can ultimately lead to AIDS, although disease progression is much slower than with HIV-1. HIV-2 patients are mostly treated with a combination of nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and protease inhibitors designed for HIV-1. Many studies have described the development of HIV-1 resistance to NRTIs and identified mutations in the polymerase domain of RT. Recent studies have shown that mutations in the connection and RNase H domains of HIV-1 RT may also contribute to resistance. However, only limited information exists regarding the resistance of HIV-2 to NRTIs. In this study, therefore, we analyzed the polymerase, connection, and RNase H domains of RT in HIV-2 patients failing NRTI-containing therapies. Besides the key resistance mutations K65R, Q151M, and M184V, we identified a novel mutation, V111I, in the polymerase domain. This mutation was significantly associated with mutations K65R and Q151M. Sequencing of the connection and RNase H domains of the HIV-2 patients did not reveal any of the mutations that were reported to contribute to NRTI resistance in HIV-1. We show that V111I does not strongly affect drug susceptibility but increases the replication capacity of the K65R and Q151M viruses. Biochemical assays demonstrate that V111I restores the polymerization defects of the K65R and Q151M viruses but negatively affects the fidelity of the HIV-2 RT enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze the structural changes mediated by V111I. This showed that V111I changed the flexibility of the 110-to-115 loop region, which may affect deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) binding and polymerase activity. IMPORTANCE Mutation V111I in the HIV-2 reverse transcriptase enzyme was identified in patients failing therapies containing nucleoside analogues. We show that the V111I change does not strongly affect the sensitivity of HIV-2 to nucleoside analogues but increases the fitness of viruses with drug

  19. The HEPT Analogue WPR-6 Is Active against a Broad Spectrum of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Drug-Resistant HIV-1 Strains of Different Serotypes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weisi; Zhao, Jianxiong; Sun, Jianping; Yin, Qianqian; Wang, Yan; Jiao, Yang; Liu, Junyi; Jiang, Shibo; Shao, Yiming; Wang, Xiaowei; Ma, Liying

    2015-08-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are important components of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) used to treat human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1). However, because of the emergence of drug resistance and the adverse effects of current anti-HIV drugs, it is essential to develop novel NNRTIs with an excellent safety profile, improved activity against NNRTI-resistant viruses, and enhanced activity against clinical isolates of different subtypes. Here, we have identified 1-[(benzyloxy)methyl]-6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-5-iodopyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione (WPR-6), a novel NNRTI with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 2 to 4 nM against laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strain SF33 and an EC50 of 7 to 14 nM against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain 7391 with a therapeutic index of >1 × 10(4). A panel of five representative clinical virus isolates of different subtypes circulating predominantly in China was highly sensitive to WPR-6, with EC50s ranging from 1 to 6 nM. In addition, WPR-6 showed excellent antiviral potency against the most prevalent NNRTI-resistant viruses containing the K103N and Y181C mutations. To determine whether WPR-6 selects for novel resistant mutants, in vitro resistance selection was conducted with laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strain SF33 on MT-4 cells. The results demonstrated that V106I and Y188L were the two dominant NNRTI-associated resistance mutations detected in the breakthrough viruses. Taken together, these in vitro data indicate that WPR-6 has greater efficacy than the reference HEPT analogue TNK651 and the marketed drug nevirapine against HIV-1. However, to develop it as a new NNRTI, further improvement of its pharmacological properties is warranted. PMID:26055365

  20. Reversibly bound chloride in the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor hormone-binding domain: Possible allosteric regulation and a conserved structural motif for the chloride-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Haruo; Qiu, Yue; Philo, John S; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Ogata, Craig M; Misono, Kunio S

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(−)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(−) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(−) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis. PMID:20066666

  1. Reversibly Bound Chloride in the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Hormone Binding Domain: Possible Allosteric Regulation and a Conserved Structural Motif for the Chloride-binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.; Qiu, Y; Philo, J; Arakawa, T; Ogata, C; Misono, K

    2010-01-01

    The binding of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to its receptor requires chloride, and it is chloride concentration dependent. The extracellular domain (ECD) of the ANP receptor (ANPR) contains a chloride near the ANP-binding site, suggesting a possible regulatory role. The bound chloride, however, is completely buried in the polypeptide fold, and its functional role has remained unclear. Here, we have confirmed that chloride is necessary for ANP binding to the recombinant ECD or the full-length ANPR expressed in CHO cells. ECD without chloride (ECD(-)) did not bind ANP. Its binding activity was fully restored by bromide or chloride addition. A new X-ray structure of the bromide-bound ECD is essentially identical to that of the chloride-bound ECD. Furthermore, bromide atoms are localized at the same positions as chloride atoms both in the apo and in the ANP-bound structures, indicating exchangeable and reversible halide binding. Far-UV CD and thermal unfolding data show that ECD(-) largely retains the native structure. Sedimentation equilibrium in the absence of chloride shows that ECD(-) forms a strongly associated dimer, possibly preventing the structural rearrangement of the two monomers that is necessary for ANP binding. The primary and tertiary structures of the chloride-binding site in ANPR are highly conserved among receptor-guanylate cyclases and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The chloride-dependent ANP binding, reversible chloride binding, and the highly conserved chloride-binding site motif suggest a regulatory role for the receptor bound chloride. Chloride-dependent regulation of ANPR may operate in the kidney, modulating ANP-induced natriuresis.

  2. Two-sided bounds on minimum-error quantum measurement, on the reversibility of quantum dynamics, and on maximum overlap using directional iterates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, Jon

    2010-09-01

    In a unified framework, we estimate the following quantities of interest in quantum information theory: (1) the minimum-error distinguishability of arbitrary ensembles of mixed quantum states; (2) the approximate reversibility of quantum dynamics in terms of entanglement fidelity (This is referred to as "channel-adapted quantum error recovery" when applied to the composition of an encoding operation and a noise channel.); (3) the maximum overlap between a bipartite pure quantum state and a bipartite mixed-state that may be achieved by applying a local quantum operation to one part of the mixed-state; and (4) the conditional min-entropy of bipartite quantum states. A refined version of the author's techniques [J. Tyson, J. Math. Phys. 50, 032016 (2009)] for bounding the first quantity is employed to give two-sided estimates of the remaining three quantities. We obtain a closed-form approximate reversal channel. Using a state-dependent Kraus decomposition, our reversal may be interpreted as a quadratically weighted version of that of Barnum and Knill [J. Math. Phys. 43, 2097 (2002)]. The relationship between our reversal and Barnum and Knill's is therefore similar to the relationship between Holevo's asymptotically optimal measurement [A. S. Kholevo, Theor. Probab. Appl. 23, 411 (1978)] and the "pretty good" measurement of Belavkin [Stochastics 1, 315 (1975)] and Hausladen and Wootters [J. Mod. Opt. 41, 2385 (1994)]. In particular, we obtain relatively simple reversibility estimates without negative matrix-powers at no cost in tightness of our bounds. Our recovery operation is found to significantly outperform the so-called "transpose channel" in the simple case of depolarizing noise acting on half of a maximally entangled state. Furthermore, our overlap results allow the entangled input state and the output target state to differ, thus obtaining estimates in a somewhat more general setting. Using a result of König et al. [IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 55, 4337 (2009

  3. Prodrugs of reverse fosmidomycin analogues.

    PubMed

    Brücher, Karin; Gräwert, Tobias; Konzuch, Sarah; Held, Jana; Lienau, Claudia; Behrendt, Christoph; Illarionov, Boris; Maes, Louis; Bacher, Adelbert; Wittlin, Sergio; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Fischer, Markus; Kurz, Thomas

    2015-02-26

    Fosmidomycin inhibits IspC (Dxr, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase), a key enzyme in nonmevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis that is essential in Plasmodium falciparum. The drug has been used successfully to treat malaria patients in clinical studies, thus validating IspC as an antimalarial target. However, improvement of the drug's pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics is desirable. Here, we show that the conversion of the phosphonate moiety into acyloxymethyl and alkoxycarbonyloxymethyl groups can increase the in vitro activity against asexual blood stages of P. falciparum by more than 1 order of magnitude. We also synthesized double prodrugs by additional esterification of the hydroxamate moiety. Prodrugs with modified hydroxamate moieties are subject to bioactivation in vitro. All prodrugs demonstrated improved antiplasmodial in vitro activity. Selected prodrugs and parent compounds were also tested for their cytotoxicity toward HeLa cells and in vivo in a Plasmodium berghei malaria model as well as in the SCID mouse P. falciparum model. PMID:25633870

  4. Designer DNA-binding drugs: the crystal structure of a meta-hydroxy analogue of Hoechst 33258 bound to d(CGCGAATTCGCG)2.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, G R; Squire, C J; Gray, E J; Leupin, W; Neidle, S

    1996-01-01

    An analogue of the DNA binding compound Hoechst 33258, which has the para hydroxyl group altered to be at the meta position, together with the replacement of one benzimidazole group by pyridylimidazole, has been cocrystallized with the dodecanucleotide sequence d(CGCGAATTCGCG)2. The X-ray structure has been determined at 2.2 A resolution and refined to an R factor of 20.1%. The ligand binds in the minor groove at the sequence 5'-AATTC with the bulky piperazine group extending over the CxG base pair. This binding is stabilised by hydrogen bonding and numerous close van der Waals contacts to the surface of the groove walls. The meta-hydroxyl group was found in two distinct orientations, neither of which participates in direct hydrogen bonds to the exocyclic amino group of a guanine base. The conformation of the drug differs from that found previously in other X-ray structures of Hoechst 33258-DNA complexes. There is significant variation between the minor groove widths in the complexes of Hoechst 33258 and the meta-hydroxyl derivative as a result of these conformational differences. Reasons are discussed for the inability of this derivative to actively recognise guanine. PMID:9017011

  5. Detection and Time Course of Formation of Major Thiamin Diphosphate-Bound Covalent Intermediates Derived from a Chromophoric Substrate Analogue on Benzoylformate Decarboxylase†

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Balakrishnan, Anand; Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Yep, Alejandra; McLeish, Michael J.; Kenyon, George L.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; Jordan, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of the enzyme benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC), which carries out a typical thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent nonoxidative decarboxylation reaction, was studied with the chromophoric alternate substrate (E)-2-oxo-4(pyridin-3-yl)-3-butenoic acid (3-PKB). Addition of 3-PKB resulted in the appearance of two transient intermediates formed consecutively, the first one to be formed a predecarboxylation ThDP-bound intermediate with λmax at 477 nm, and the second one corresponding to the first postdecarboxylation intermediate the enamine with λmax at 437 nm. The time course of formation/depletion of the PKB–ThDP covalent complex and of the enamine showed that decarboxylation was slower than formation of the PKB–ThDP covalent adduct. When the product of decarboxylation 3-(pyridin-3-yl)acrylaldehyde (PAA) was added to BFDC, again an absorbance with λmax at 473 nm was formed, corresponding to the tetrahedral adduct of PAA with ThDP. Addition of well-formed crystals of BFDC to a solution of PAA resulted in a high resolution (1.34 Å) structure of the BFDC-bound adduct of ThDP with PAA confirming the tetrahedral nature at the C2α atom, rather than of the enamine, and supporting the assignment of the λmax at 473 nm to the PAA–ThDP adduct. The structure of the PAA–ThDP covalent complex is the first example of a product–ThDP adduct on BFDC. Similar studies with 3-PKB indicated that decarboxylation had taken place. Evidence was also obtained for the slow formation of the enamine intermediate when BFDC was incubated with benzaldehyde, the product of the decarboxylation reaction thus confirming its presence on the reaction pathway. PMID:19140682

  6. Detection and Time Course of Formation of Major Thiamin Diphosphate-Bound Covalent Intermediates Derived from a Chromophoric Substrate Analogue on Benzoylformate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Sumit; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Balakrishnan, Anand; Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Yep, Alejandra; McLeish, Michael J.; Kenyon, George L.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; Jordan, Frank

    2009-04-02

    The mechanism of the enzyme benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC), which carries out a typical thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent nonoxidative decarboxylation reaction, was studied with the chromophoric alternate substrate (E)-2-oxo-4(pyridin-3-yl)-3-butenoic acid (3-PKB). Addition of 3-PKB resulted in the appearance of two transient intermediates formed consecutively, the first one to be formed a predecarboxylation ThDP-bound intermediate with {lambda}{sub max} at 477 nm, and the second one corresponding to the first postdecarboxylation intermediate the enamine with {lambda}{sub max} at 437 nm. The time course of formation/depletion of the PKB-ThDP covalent complex and of the enamine showed that decarboxylation was slower than formation of the PKB-ThDP covalent adduct. When the product of decarboxylation 3-(pyridin-3-yl)acrylaldehyde (PAA) was added to BFDC, again an absorbance with {lambda}{sub max} at 473 nm was formed, corresponding to the tetrahedral adduct of PAA with ThDP. Addition of well-formed crystals of BFDC to a solution of PAA resulted in a high resolution (1.34 {angstrom}) structure of the BFDC-bound adduct of ThDP with PAA confirming the tetrahedral nature at the C2{alpha} atom, rather than of the enamine, and supporting the assignment of the {lambda}{sub max} at 473 nm to the PAA-ThDP adduct. The structure of the PAA-ThDP covalent complex is the first example of a product-ThDP adduct on BFDC. Similar studies with 3-PKB indicated that decarboxylation had taken place. Evidence was also obtained for the slow formation of the enamine intermediate when BFDC was incubated with benzaldehyde, the product of the decarboxylation reaction thus confirming its presence on the reaction pathway.

  7. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Structure with RNase H Inhibitor dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl Hydrazone Bound at a Novel Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel,D.; Sarafianos, S.; Dharmasena, S.; Hossain, M.; McCoy-Simandle, K.; Ilina, T.; Clark, A.; Knight, J.; Julias, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), has limited the efficacy of anti-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) treatments, and new lead compounds that target novel binding sites are needed. We have determined the 3.15 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) complexed with dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone (DHBNH), an HIV-1 RT RNase H (RNH) inhibitor (RNHI). DHBNH is effective against a variety of drug-resistant HIV-1 RT mutants. While DHBNH has little effect on most aspects of RT-catalyzed DNA synthesis, at relatively high concentrations it does inhibit the initiation of RNA-primed DNA synthesis. Although primarily an RNHI, DHBNH binds >50 {angstrom} away from the RNH active site, at a novel site near both the polymerase active site and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) binding pocket. When DHBNH binds, both Tyr181 and Tyr188 remain in the conformations seen in unliganded HIV-1 RT. DHBNH interacts with conserved residues (Asp186, Trp229) and has substantial interactions with the backbones of several less well-conserved residues. On the basis of this structure, we designed substituted DHBNH derivatives that interact with the NNRTI-binding pocket. These compounds inhibit both the polymerase and RNH activities of RT.

  8. Phosphonate analogues of aminoacyl adenylates.

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, C C; Dixon, H B

    1978-01-01

    Phosphonomethyl analogues of glycyl phosphate and valyl phosphate, i.e. NH2-CHR-CO-CH2-PO(OH)2, were synthesized and esterified with adenosine to give analogues of aminoacyl adenylates. The interaction of these adenylate analogues with valyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli was studied by fluorescence titration. The analogue of valyl phosphate has an affinity for the enzyme comparable with that of valine, but that of valyl adenylate is bound much less tightly than either valyl adenylate or corresponding derivative of valinol. The affinity of the analogue of glycyl adenylate was too low to be measured. We conclude that this enzyme interacts specifically with both the side chain and the anhydride linkage of the adenylate intermediate. PMID:743207

  9. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  10. Spectroscopy of the Andreev Bound State of High-Temperature Superconductors: Measurements of Quasiparticle Scattering, Anisotropy and Broken Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, L. H.; Aprili, M.; Covington, M.; Badica, E.; Pugel, D. E.; Aubin, H.; Xia, Y.-M.; Salamon, M. B.; Jain, Sha; Hinks, D. G.

    2000-11-01

    Tunneling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies are used to investigate the quasiparticle (QP) density of states (DoS) of high-temperature superconductors. Planar tunnel junctions are formed on oriented thin films of Y 1Ba 2Cu 3O 7 (YBCO) and single crystals of Ba 2Sr 2Ca 1Cu 2O 8 (BSCCO). Data are obtained as a function of crystallographic orientation, temperature, doping, damage and applied magnetic field. These data demonstrate that the observed zero bias conductance peak (ZBCP) is composed of Andreev bound states (ABS) which nucleate at an ab-plane interface of a d-wave symmetry superconductor. Tunneling into doped or ion-damaged YBCO shows that the ZBCP is weakened at the same rate as the gap-like feature, and provides a measure of the QP scattering rate below T c. An applied field causes a splitting of the ZBCP, which is due to a Doppler shift arising from the scalar product between the QP velocity and superfluid momentum, vF· Ps. The dramatic hysteresis observed with increasing and decreasing applied field is consistent with the effects of strong vortex pinning at or near the interface. The magnitude of the splitting is strongly dependent on the direction of the applied magnetic field, demonstrating the highly-anisotropic transport properties of the ABS. In-plane tunneling into single crystal BSCCO also demonstrates crystallographic orientation dependence expected for a d-wave symmetry order parameter (OP). Temperature dependence in zero applied magnetic field shows the BBCP splits below ∼8K, consistent with a phase transition into a superconducting state with spontaneously-broken time-reversal symmetry (BTRS). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments are used to directly detect the spontaneous formation of the magnetic moments in the BTRS state.

  11. Cigarette smoke inhibits efferocytosis via deregulation of sphingosine kinase signaling: reversal with exogenous S1P and the S1P analogue FTY720.

    PubMed

    Tran, Hai B; Barnawi, Jameel; Ween, Miranda; Hamon, Rhys; Roscioli, Eugene; Hodge, Greg; Reynolds, Paul N; Pitson, Stuart M; Davies, Lorena T; Haberberger, Rainer; Hodge, Sandra

    2016-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and cigarette smokers are deficient in their ability to phagocytose apoptotic bronchial epithelial cells (efferocytosis). We hypothesized that the defect is mediated via inhibition of sphingosine kinases and/or their subcellular mislocalization in response to cigarette smoke and can be normalized with exogenous sphingosine-1-phosphate or FTY720 (fingolimod), a modulator of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling, which has been shown to be clinically useful in multiple sclerosis. Measurement of sphingosine kinase 1/2 activities by [(32)P]-labeled sphingosine-1-phosphate revealed a 30% reduction of sphingosine kinase 1 (P < 0.05) and a nonsignificant decrease of sphingosine kinase 2 in THP-1 macrophages after 1 h cigarette smoke extract exposure. By confocal analysis macrophage sphingosine kinase 1 protein was normally localized to the plasma membrane and cytoplasm and sphingosine kinase 2 to the nucleus and cytoplasm but absent at the cell surface. Cigarette smoke extract exposure (24 h) led to a retraction of sphingosine kinase 1 from the plasma membrane and sphingosine kinase 1/2 clumping in the Golgi domain. Selective inhibition of sphingosine kinase 2 with 25 µM ABC294640 led to 36% inhibition of efferocytosis (P < 0.05); 10 µM sphingosine kinase inhibitor/5C (sphingosine kinase 1-selective inhibitor) induced a nonsignificant inhibition of efferocytosis, but its combination with ABC294640 led to 56% inhibition (P < 0.01 vs. control and < 0.05 vs. single inhibitors). Cigarette smoke-inhibited efferocytosis was significantly (P < 0.05) reversed to near-control levels in the presence of 10-100 nM exogenous sphingosine-1-phosphate or FTY720, and FTY720 reduced cigarette smoke-induced clumping of sphingosine kinase 1/2 in the Golgi domain. These data strongly support a role of sphingosine kinase 1/2 in efferocytosis and as novel therapeutic targets in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID

  12. Clinical, virological and biochemical evidence supporting the association of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase polymorphism R284K and thymidine analogue resistance mutations M41L, L210W and T215Y in patients failing tenofovir/emtricitabine therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Thymidine analogue resistance mutations (TAMs) selected under treatment with nucleoside analogues generate two distinct genotypic profiles in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT): (i) TAM1: M41L, L210W and T215Y, and (ii) TAM2: D67N, K70R and K219E/Q, and sometimes T215F. Secondary mutations, including thumb subdomain polymorphisms (e.g. R284K) have been identified in association with TAMs. We have identified mutational clusters associated with virological failure during salvage therapy with tenofovir/emtricitabine-based regimens. In this context, we have studied the role of R284K as a secondary mutation associated with mutations of the TAM1 complex. Results The cross-sectional study carried out with >200 HIV-1 genotypes showed that virological failure to tenofovir/emtricitabine was strongly associated with the presence of M184V (P < 10-10) and TAMs (P < 10-3), while K65R was relatively uncommon in previously-treated patients failing antiretroviral therapy. Clusters of mutations were identified, and among them, the TAM1 complex showed the highest correlation coefficients. Covariation of TAM1 mutations and V118I, V179I, M184V and R284K was observed. Virological studies showed that the combination of R284K with TAM1 mutations confers a fitness advantage in the presence of zidovudine or tenofovir. Studies with recombinant HIV-1 RTs showed that when associated with TAM1 mutations, R284K had a minimal impact on zidovudine or tenofovir inhibition, and in their ability to excise the inhibitors from blocked DNA primers. However, the mutant RT M41L/L210W/T215Y/R284K showed an increased catalytic rate for nucleotide incorporation and a higher RNase H activity in comparison with WT and mutant M41L/L210W/T215Y RTs. These effects were consistent with its enhanced chain-terminated primer rescue on DNA/DNA template-primers, but not on RNA/DNA complexes, and can explain the higher fitness of HIV-1 having TAM1/R284K mutations. Conclusions Our study shows the association

  13. A detailed record of paleomagnetic field change from Searles Lake, California: 1. Long-term secular variation bounding the Gauss/Matuyama polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Liddicoat, Joseph C.; Coe, Robert S.

    1999-06-01

    More than 33 m of 2.5 Ma sediment from Searles Lake, California was studied in order to construct a record of secular variation (SV) across the Gauss/Matuyama (G/M) normal-to-reverse polarity transition. The behavior of the field preceding and following the reversal is considered here, while in a companion paper [Glen et al., this issue] the details of the transition are discussed. The record encompasses an interval of roughly 183,000 years beginning 50 kyr (9 m) before and extending more than 128 kyr (23 m) beyond the transition, while the main phase of the transition lasts for nearly 5 kyr (1 m). Because the core was rotary drilled, and declinations lost, SV was characterized by the inclination and its angular dispersion. Inclination-only statistics reveal that (1) the record displays overall higher than expected values of angular dispersion (normal S˜20°; reverse S˜19°; expected S˜15.5°), suggesting that the field proximal to transitions may be more noisy than the distal field. In addition, normal data from immediately before the transition display higher S than reverse data immediately following it, implying that the postransitional field is more stable than the pretransitional field. One of the most prominent features of this record is an excursion of the field occurring roughly 4 kyr prior to the onset of the reversal. A record of the G/M transition from Chinese loess (R. Zhu et al., submitted manuscript, 1999) displays a similar event (also occurring roughly 4 kyr before the transition). This and the fact that the event is associated with anomalously low intensities suggest that the disturbance may be global in nature. The fact that comparable features are associated with other transitions [Hartl and Tauxe, 1996; Clement, 1992] intimates that the field may commonly show signs of early instability. This precursory event is actually one of a sequence of oscillations (in inclination and intensity) preceding the transition. That these fluctuations occur at

  14. Causality and Tsirelson's bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, H.; Massar, S.

    2005-11-15

    We study the properties of no-signaling correlations that cannot be reproduced by local measurements on entangled quantum states. We say that such correlations violate Tsirelson bounds. We show that if these correlations are obtained by some reversible unitary quantum evolution U, then U cannot be written in the product form U{sub A}xU{sub B}. This implies that U can be used for signaling and for entanglement generation. This result is completely general and in fact can be viewed as a characterization of Tsirelson bounds. We then show how this result can be used as a tool to study Tsirelson bounds and we illustrate this by rederiving the Tsirelson bound of 2{radical}(2) for the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality, and by deriving a new Tsirelson bound for qutrits.

  15. An Electropolymerized Crystalline Film Incorporating Axially-Bound Metalloporphycenes: Remarkable Reversibility, Reproducibility, and Coloration Efficiency of Ruthenium(II/III)-Based Electrochromism.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masaaki; Futagawa, Hiroki; Ono, Toshikazu; Yamada, Teppei; Kimizuka, Nobuo; Hisaeda, Yoshio

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative electropolymeization of an axially bound, bithiophene-pyridine complex of ruthenium(III)-porphycene [Ru(TPrPc) (btp)2]PF6 (1) gives a submicrometer-thick, polymeric film on an ITO electrode with a crystalline morphology. The polymeric film, the first example of axially linked multimetalloporphycene coordination arrays, exhibits highly stable and reproducible electrochromic response with high electrochromic efficiency upon electrochemical control over the metal-centered electron transfer process (Ru(II)/Ru(III)). PMID:26569481

  16. Phosphonate analogues of carboxypeptidase A substrates are potent transition-state analogue inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hanson, J E; Kaplan, A P; Bartlett, P A

    1989-07-25

    Analogues of tri- and tetrapeptide substrates of carboxypeptidase A in which the scissile peptide linkage is replaced with a phosphonate moiety (-PO2--O-) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of the enzyme. The inhibitors terminated with either L-lactate or L-phenyllactate [designated (O) Ala and (O) Phe, respectively] in the P1' position. Transition-state analogy was shown for a series of 14 tri- and tetrapeptide derivatives containing the structure RCO-AlaP-(O)Ala [RCO-AP(O)A, AP indicates the phosphonic acid analogue of alanine] by the correlation of the Ki values for the inhibitors and the Km/kcat values for the corresponding amide substrates. This correlation supports a transition state for the enzymatic reaction that resembles the tetrahedral intermediate formed upon addition of water to the scissile carbonyl group. The inhibitors containing (O) Phe at the P1' position proved to be the most potent reversible inhibitors of carboxypeptidase A reported to date: the dissociation constants of ZAFP(O)F, ZAAP(O)F, and ZFAP(O)F are 4, 3, and 1 pM, respectively. Because of the high affinity of these inhibitors, their dissociation constants could not be determined by steady-state methods. Instead, the course of the association and dissociation processes was monitored for each inhibitor as its equilibrium with the enzyme was established in both the forward and reverse directions. A phosphonamidate analogue, ZAAPF, in which the peptide linkage is replaced with a -PO2-NH- moiety, was prepared and shown to hydrolyze rapidly at neutral pH (t1/2 = 20 min at pH 7.5). This inhibitor is bound an order of magnitude less tightly than the corresponding phosphonate, ZAAP(O)F, a result that contrasts with the 840-fold higher affinity of phosphonamidates for thermolysin [Bartlett, P. A., & Marlowe, C. K. (1987) Science 235, 569-571], a zinc peptidase with a similar arrangement of active-site catalytic residues. PMID:2790000

  17. Dihydrogen catalysis of the reversible formation and cleavage of C-H and N-H bonds of aminopyridinate ligands bound to (η(5) -C5 Me5 )Ir(III.).

    PubMed

    Zamorano, Ana; Rendón, Nuria; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Valpuesta, José E V; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Carmona, Ernesto

    2015-02-01

    This study focuses on a series of cationic complexes of iridium that contain aminopyridinate (Ap) ligands bound to an (η(5) -C5 Me5 )Ir(III) fragment. The new complexes have the chemical composition [Ir(Ap)(η(5) -C5 Me5 )](+) , exist in the form of two isomers (1(+) and 2(+) ) and were isolated as salts of the BArF (-) anion (BArF =B[3,5-(CF3 )2 C6 H3 ]4 ). Four Ap ligands that differ in the nature of their bulky aryl substituents at the amido nitrogen atom and pyridinic ring were employed. In the presence of H2 , the electrophilicity of the Ir(III) centre of these complexes allows for a reversible prototropic rearrangement that changes the nature and coordination mode of the aminopyridinate ligand between the well-known κ(2) -N,N'-bidentate binding in 1(+) and the unprecedented κ-N,η(3) -pseudo-allyl-coordination mode in isomers 2(+) through activation of a benzylic C-H bond and formal proton transfer to the amido nitrogen atom. Experimental and computational studies evidence that the overall rearrangement, which entails reversible formation and cleavage of H-H, C-H and N-H bonds, is catalysed by dihydrogen under homogeneous conditions. PMID:25504864

  18. Phosphonate analogue substrates for enolase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, V E; Cleland, W W

    1990-11-20

    Phosphonate analogues in which the bridge between C-2 and phosphorus is a CH2 group are slow substrates for yeast enolase. The pH variation of the kinetic parameters for the methylene analogue of 2-phosphoglycerate suggests that the substrate binds as a dianion and that Mg2+ can bind subsequently only if a metal ligand and the catalytic base are unprotonated. Primary deuterium isotope effects of 4-8 on V/KMg, but ones of only 1.15-1.32 on V for dehydration, show that proton removal to give the carbanion intermediate largely limits V/KMg and that a slow step follows which largely limits V (presumably carbanion breakdown). Since there is a D2O solvent isotope effect on V for the reverse reaction of 5, but not an appreciable one on the forward reaction, it appears that the slow rates with phosphonate analogues result from the fact that the carbanion intermediate is more stable than that formed from the normal substrates, and its reaction in both directions limits V. Increased stability as a result of replacement of oxygen by carbon at C-2 of the carbanion is the expected chemical behavior. PMID:2271661

  19. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cubitt, Toby; Kastoryano, Michael; Montanaro, Ashley; Temme, Kristan

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  20. Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outward Bound, Inc., Andover, MA.

    The Outward Bound concept was developed in Germany and Great Britain with the saving of human life as the ultimate goal. Courses are designed to help students discover their true physical and mental limits through development of skills including emergency medical aid, firefighting, search and rescue, mountaineering, and sailing. Five Outward Bound…

  1. 2',5'-Bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-3'-spiro-5''-(4''-amino-1'',2''- oxathiole-2'',2'-dioxide)pyrimidine (TSAO) nucleoside analogues: highlyselective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 that are targeted at the viral reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; Pérez-Pérez, M J; San-Félix, A; Schols, D; Perno, C F; Vandamme, A M; Camarasa, M J; De Clercq, E

    1992-01-01

    A series of pyrimidine nucleoside analogues containing [2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-3'-spiro-5''-(4''-amino- 1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2''-dioxide)]-beta-D-ribofuranose as the pentose were found to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 [HIV-1(IIIB)] replication at a concentration of 0.06-0.8 microM but were not cytotoxic at a 1000- to 10,000-fold higher concentration. These nucleoside derivatives were also effective against various other HIV-1 strains, including those resistant to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, but not against HIV-2, simian immunodeficiency virus, Moloney murine sarcoma virus, or other RNA or DNA viruses. They proved to be highly specific inhibitors of the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase function of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, showing no marked inhibition of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-associated DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity, HIV-2 reverse transcriptase, DNA polymerase alpha, herpes simplex virus 1 DNA polymerase, or Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase. Images PMID:1374900

  2. Carbocyclic nucleoside analogues: classification, target enzymes, mechanisms of action and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyugina, E. S.; Khandazhinskaya, A. P.; Kochetkov, Sergei N.

    2012-08-01

    Key biological targets (S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, telomerase, human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase, herpes virus DNA polymerase and hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase) and the mechanisms of action of carbocyclic nucleoside analogues are considered. Structural types of analogues are discussed. Methods of synthesis for the most promising compounds and the spectrum of their biological activities are described. The bibliography includes 126 references.

  3. Synthesis, Modeling, and Biological Evaluation of Analogues of the Semisynthetic Brevetoxin Antagonist β-Naphthoyl-Brevetoxin

    PubMed Central

    Michelliza, Sophie; Abraham, William M.; Jacocks, Henry M.; Schuster, Thomas; Baden, Daniel G.

    2008-01-01

    Brevetoxins are neurotoxic compounds produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. Extensive blooms induce neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) and asthma-like symptoms in humans. β-naphthoyl-brevetoxin, the first semisynthetic brevetoxin antagonist, has been defined as the lead compound in the investigation of the mechanisms of bronchoconstriction induced by inhaled brevetoxins and relaxation or reversal of those effects by selected derivatives. In pursuit of more potent and effective brevetoxin antagonists, a series of β-naphthoyl-brevetoxin analogues have been synthesized. Activities were determined by competitive displacement of tritiated brevetoxin-3 from rat brain synaptosomes and by lung resistance measurements in sheep. Additionally, preliminary computational structural studies have been performed. All analogues bound to rat brain synaptosomes with affinities similar to β-naphthoyl-brevetoxin but exhibited very different responses in sheep. The biological evaluations along with computational studies suggest that the brevetoxin binding site in rat brain synaptosome might be different from the ones in lung tissue and both steric and electrostatic factors contribute to the efficacy of brevetoxin antagonism. PMID:18000915

  4. Synthesis, modeling, and biological evaluation of analogues of the semisynthetic brevetoxin antagonist beta-naphthoyl-brevetoxin.

    PubMed

    Michelliza, Sophie; Abraham, William M; Jacocks, Henry M; Schuster, Thomas; Baden, Daniel G

    2007-12-17

    Brevetoxins are neurotoxic compounds produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. Extensive blooms induce neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) and asthma-like symptoms in humans. beta-naphthoyl-brevetoxin, the first semisynthetic brevetoxin antagonist, has been defined as the lead compound in the investigation of the mechanisms of bronchoconstriction induced by inhaled brevetoxins and relaxation or reversal of those effects by selected derivatives. In pursuit of more potent and effective brevetoxin antagonists, a series of beta-naphthoyl-brevetoxin analogues have been synthesized. Activities were determined by competitive displacement of tritiated brevetoxin-3 from rat brain synaptosomes and by lung resistance measurements in sheep. Additionally, preliminary computational structural studies have been performed. All analogues bound to rat brain synaptosomes with affinities similar to beta-naphthoyl-brevetoxin but exhibited very different responses in sheep. The biological evaluations along with computational studies suggest that the brevetoxin binding site in rat brain synaptosome might be different from the ones in lung tissue and both steric and electrostatic factors contribute to the efficacy of brevetoxin antagonism. PMID:18000915

  5. Fluoride-Mediated Capture of a Noncovalent Bound State of a Reversible Covalent Enzyme Inhibitor: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Exceptionally Potent α-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-01-01

    Two cocrystal X-ray structures of the exceptionally potent α-ketoheterocycle inhibitor 1 (Ki = 290 pM) bound to a humanized variant of rat fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed, representing noncovalently and covalently bound states of the same inhibitor with the enzyme. Key to securing the structure of the noncovalently bound state of the inhibitor was the inclusion of fluoride ion in the crystallization conditions that is proposed to bind the oxyanion hole precluding inhibitor covalent adduct formation with stabilization of the tetrahedral hemiketal. This permitted the opportunity to detect important noncovalent interactions stabilizing the binding of the inhibitor within the FAAH active site independent of the covalent reaction. Remarkably, noncovalently bound 1 in the presence of fluoride appears to capture the active site in the same “in action” state with the three catalytic residues Ser241–Ser217–Lys142 occupying essentially identical positions observed in the covalently bound structure of 1, suggesting that this technique of introducing fluoride may have important applications in structural studies beyond inhibiting substrate or inhibitor oxyanion hole binding. Key insights to emerge from the studies include the observations that noncovalently bound 1 binds in its ketone (not gem diol) form, that the terminal phenyl group in the acyl side chain of the inhibitor serves as the key anchoring interaction overriding the intricate polar interactions in the cytosolic port, and that the role of the central activating heterocycle is dominated by its intrinsic electron-withdrawing properties. These two structures are also briefly compared with five X-ray structures of α-ketoheterocycle-based inhibitors bound to FAAH recently disclosed. PMID:21355555

  6. Fluoride-Mediated Capture of a Noncovalent Bound State of a Reversible Covalent Enzyme Inhibitor: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Exceptionally Potent [alpha]-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitor of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L.

    2011-11-02

    Two cocrystal X-ray structures of the exceptionally potent {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitor 1 (K{sub i} = 290 pM) bound to a humanized variant of rat fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed, representing noncovalently and covalently bound states of the same inhibitor with the enzyme. Key to securing the structure of the noncovalently bound state of the inhibitor was the inclusion of fluoride ion in the crystallization conditions that is proposed to bind the oxyanion hole precluding inhibitor covalent adduct formation with stabilization of the tetrahedral hemiketal. This permitted the opportunity to detect important noncovalent interactions stabilizing the binding of the inhibitor within the FAAH active site independent of the covalent reaction. Remarkably, noncovalently bound 1 in the presence of fluoride appears to capture the active site in the same 'in action' state with the three catalytic residues Ser241-Ser217-Lys142 occupying essentially identical positions observed in the covalently bound structure of 1, suggesting that this technique of introducing fluoride may have important applications in structural studies beyond inhibiting substrate or inhibitor oxyanion hole binding. Key insights to emerge from the studies include the observations that noncovalently bound 1 binds in its ketone (not gem diol) form, that the terminal phenyl group in the acyl side chain of the inhibitor serves as the key anchoring interaction overriding the intricate polar interactions in the cytosolic port, and that the role of the central activating heterocycle is dominated by its intrinsic electron-withdrawing properties. These two structures are also briefly compared with five X-ray structures of {alpha}-ketoheterocycle-based inhibitors bound to FAAH recently disclosed.

  7. Steroidogenic activity of a peptide specified by the reversed sequence of corticotropin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, B L; Blalock, J E

    1990-01-01

    The molecular recognition theory predicts that a reversed (3'----5') reading of an mRNA should yield a peptide that is structurally and functionally similar to that specified in the 5'----3' direction. We tested this idea by synthesizing a corticotropin (ACTH) analogue using a reverse reading of bovine mRNA for ACTH-(1-24). This peptide, designated ACTH-3'----5', had a similar hydropathic profile to native ACTH-5'----3' but had only 30% sequence homology and eight different charge substitutions. ACTH-3'----5' specifically bound to the surface of mouse Y-1 adrenal cells and to polyclonal anti-ACTH antibody. Additionally, ACTH-3'----5' stimulated cAMP synthesis and steroidogenesis in adrenal cells. These findings show that ACTH-3'----5' mimics the corticotropic properties of native ACTH, thereby further validating the molecular recognition theory. PMID:2175911

  8. Aspartame and Its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. A.; Komarova, T. V.; Davidovich, Yurii A.; Rogozhin, S. V.

    1981-04-01

    The results of studies on the biochemistry of the sweet taste are briefly reviewed. The methods of synthesis of "aspartame" — a sweet dipeptide — are considered, its structural analogues are described, and quantitative estimates are made of the degree of sweetness relative to sucrose. Attention is concentrated mainly on problems of the relation between the structure of the substance and its taste in the series of aspartyl derivatives. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  9. Structural Analogues of Selfotel.

    PubMed

    Dziuganowska, Zofia A; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Volle, Jean-Noël; Virieux, David; Pirat, Jean-Luc; Kafarski, Paweł

    2016-06-17

    A small library of phosphonopiperidylcarboxylic acids, analogues of NMDA antagonist selfotel (CGS 19755), was synthesized. First, the series of aromatic esters was obtained via a palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction (Hirao coupling) of dialkyl phosphites with bromopyridinecarboxylates, followed by their hydrolysis. Then, hydrogenation of the resulting phosphonopyridylcarboxylic acids over PtO2 yielded the desired phosphonopiperidylcarboxylic acids. NMR studies indicated that the hydrogenation reaction proceeds predominantly by cis addition. Several compounds were obtained as monocrystal structures. Preliminary biological studies performed on cultures of neurons suggest that the obtained compounds possess promising activity toward NMDA receptors. PMID:27187758

  10. Effects of inorganic phosphate analogues on stiffness and unloaded shortening of skinned muscle fibres from rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, P B; Martyn, D A; Kushmerick, M J; Gordon, A M

    1993-01-01

    1. We examined the effects of aluminofluoride (AlFx) and orthovanadate (Vi), tightly binding analogues of orthophosphate (Pi), on the mechanical properties of glycerinated fibres from rabbit psoas muscle. Maximum Ca(2+)-activated force, stiffness, and unloaded shortening velocity (Vus) were measured under conditions of steady-state inhibition (up to 1 mM of inhibitor) and during the recovery from inhibition. 2. Stiffness was measured using either step or sinusoidal (1 kHz) changes in fibre length. Sarcomere length was monitored continuously by helium-neon laser diffraction during maximum Ca2+ activation. Stiffness was determined from the changes in sarcomere length and the corresponding changes in force. Vus was measured using the slack test method. 3. AlF chi and Vi each reversibly inhibited force, stiffness and Vus. Actively cycling cross-bridges were required for reversal of these inhibitory effects. Recovery from inhibition by AlF chi was 3- to 4-fold slower than that following removal of V1. 4. At various degrees of inhibition, AlF chi and Vi both inhibited steady-state isometric force more than either Vus or stiffness. For both AlF chi and Vi, the relatively greater inhibition of force over stiffness persisted during recovery from steady-state inhibition. We interpret these results to indicate that the cross-bridges with AlF chi or Vi bound are analogous to those which occur early in the cross-bridge cycle. PMID:8487194

  11. Analogue-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analogue Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Discusses circuits for three-bit and four-bit analogue digital converters and digital analogue converters. These circuits feature slow operating speeds that enable the circuitry to be used to demonstrate the mode of operation using oscilloscopes and signal generators. (DDR)

  12. Analogue modelling of syntectonic leucosomes in migmatitic schists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druguet, Elena; Carreras, Jordi

    2006-10-01

    Migmatites from the Cap de Creus tectonometamorphic belt display a wide variety of structures, from those formed when the leucosomes were melt-bearing, to those developed during solid-state deformation. The observed field structures have been modelled by means of analogue experiments. The materials used in the models are layered plasticine as a schist analogue, and chocolate as analogue of the crystallizing leucosome. A model for the development of syntectonic migmatites is proposed in which initial melt-bearing patches, preferentially formed within fertile pelitic layers, progressively evolve towards lens-shaped veins. Furthermore, heterogeneous deformation of anisotropic metasediments facilitates formation of extensional sites for further melt accumulation and transport. Melt crystallization implies a rapid increase in effective viscosity of leucosomes producing a reversal in competence contrast with respect to the enclosing schists. During the whole process, deformation localizes around crystallizing veins, giving rise to different and contrasting structures for melt-bearing and for solid-state stages.

  13. NASA/ESMD Analogue Mission Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation exploring Earth and its analogues is shown. The topics include: 1) ESMD Goals for the Use of Earth Analogues; 2) Stakeholders Summary; 3) Issues with Current Analogue Situation; 4) Current state of Analogues; 5) External Implementation Plan (Second Step); 6) Recent Progress in Utilizing Analogues; 7) Website Layout Example-Home Page; 8) Website Layout Example-Analogue Site; 9) Website Layout Example-Analogue Mission; 10) Objectives of ARDIG Analog Initiatives; 11) Future Plans; 12) Example: Cold-Trap Sample Return; 13) Example: Site Characterization Matrix; 14) Integrated Analogue Studies-Prerequisites for Human Exploration; and 15) Rating Scale Definitions.

  14. Incorporation of tryptophan analogues into the lantibiotic nisin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Shao, Jinfeng; Li, Qian; van Heel, Auke J; de Vries, Marcel P; Broos, Jaap; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-05-01

    Lantibiotics are posttranslationally modified peptides with efficient inhibitory activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the original modifications, incorporation of non-canonical amino acids can render new properties and functions to lantibiotics. Nisin is the most studied lantibiotic and contains no tryptophan residues. In this study, a system was constructed to incorporate tryptophan analogues into nisin, which included the modification machinery (NisBTC) and the overexpression of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS). Tryptophan and three different tryptophan analogues (5-fluoroTrp (5FW), 5-hydroxyTrp (5HW) and 5-methylTrp (5MeW)) were successfully incorporated at four different positions of nisin (I1W, I4W, M17W and V32W). The incorporation efficiency of tryptophan analogues into mutants I1W, M17W and V32W was over 97 %, while the mutant I4W showed relatively low incorporation efficiency (69-93 %). The variants with 5FW showed relatively higher production yield, while 5MeW-containing variants showed the lowest yield. The dehydration efficiency of serines or threonines was affected by the tryptophan mutants of I4W and V32W. The affinity of the peptides for the cation-ion exchange and reverse phase chromatography columns was significantly reduced when 5HW was incorporated. The antimicrobial activity of IIW and its 5FW analogue both decreased two times compared to that of nisin, while that of its 5HW analogue decreased four times. The 5FW analogue of I4W also showed two times decreased activity than nisin. However, the mutant M17W and its 5HW analogue both showed 32 times reduced activity relative to that of nisin. PMID:26872656

  15. Phenolic analogues of diastereoisomeric 2-methyl reversed esters of pethidine.

    PubMed

    Casy, A F; Dewar, G H; Pascoe, R A

    1989-03-01

    The preparation and stereochemical characterization of alpha- and beta-isomers of 1,2-dimethyl-4-m-hydroxyphenyl-4-propionyloxypiperidine are described. Both the alpha (axial 4-aryl/chair) and beta (equatorial 4-aryl/chair) isomers were of low potency or inactive in mice antinociceptive tests. Shortcomings of the alpha-isomer as a model for the 4-arylpiperidine moiety of morphine are discussed. PMID:2568454

  16. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  17. Glucagonlike Peptide 2 Analogue Teduglutide

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Lakshmi S.; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Short bowel syndrome occurs when a shortened intestine cannot absorb sufficient nutrients or fluids. Teduglutide is a recombinant analogue of human glucagonlike peptide 2 that reduces dependence on parenteral nutrition in patients with short bowel syndrome by promoting enterocytic proliferation, increasing the absorptive surface area. However, enterocyte function depends not only on the number of cells that are present but also on differentiated features that facilitate nutrient absorption and digestion. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that teduglutide impairs human intestinal epithelial differentiation. DESIGN AND SETTING We investigated the effects of teduglutide in the modulation of proliferation and differentiation in human Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells at a basic science laboratory. This was an in vitro study using Caco-2 cells, a human-derived intestinal epithelial cell line commonly used to model enterocytic biology. EXPOSURE Cells were exposed to teduglutide or vehicle control. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES We analyzed the cell cycle by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation or propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry and measured cell proliferation by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. We used quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to assay the expression of the enterocytic differentiation markers villin, sucrase-isomaltase, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), as well as that of the putative differentiation signals schlafen 12 (SLFN12) and caudal-related homeobox intestine-specific transcription factor (Cdx2). Villin promoter activity was measured by a luciferase-based assay. RESULTS The MTS assay demonstrated that teduglutide increased cell numbers by a mean (SD) of 10% (2%) over untreated controls at a maximal 500nM (n = 6, P < .05). Teduglutide increased bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells vs untreated controls by a mean (SD

  18. A matrix lower bound

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2002-02-04

    A matrix lower bound is defined that generalizes ideas apparently due to S. Banach and J. von Neumann. The matrix lower bound has a natural interpretation in functional analysis, and it satisfies many of the properties that von Neumann stated for it in a restricted case. Applications for the matrix lower bound are demonstrated in several areas. In linear algebra, the matrix lower bound of a full rank matrix equals the distance to the set of rank-deficient matrices. In numerical analysis, the ratio of the matrix norm to the matrix lower bound is a condition number for all consistent systems of linear equations. In optimization theory, the matrix lower bound suggests an identity for a class of min-max problems. In real analysis, a recursive construction that depends on the matrix lower bound shows that the level sets of continuously differential functions lie asymptotically near those of their tangents.

  19. Probing the Active Center of Benzaldehyde Lyase with Substitutions and the Pseudosubstrate Analogue Benzoylphosphonic Acid Methyl Ester

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Nemeria, Natalia; Chakraborty, Sumit; McLeish, Michael J.; Yep, Alejandra; Kenyon, George L.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2008-07-28

    Benzaldehyde lyase (BAL) catalyzes the reversible cleavage of (R)-benzoin to benzaldehyde utilizing thiamin diphosphate and Mg{sup 2+} as cofactors. The enzyme is important for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of a wide range of compounds via its carboligation reaction mechanism. In addition to its principal functions, BAL can slowly decarboxylate aromatic amino acids such as benzoylformic acid. It is also intriguing mechanistically due to the paucity of acid-base residues at the active center that can participate in proton transfer steps thought to be necessary for these types of reactions. Here methyl benzoylphosphonate, an excellent electrostatic analogue of benzoylformic acid, is used to probe the mechanism of benzaldehyde lyase. The structure of benzaldehyde lyase in its covalent complex with methyl benzoylphosphonate was determined to 2.49 {angstrom} (Protein Data Bank entry 3D7K) and represents the first structure of this enzyme with a compound bound in the active site. No large structural reorganization was detected compared to the complex of the enzyme with thiamin diphosphate. The configuration of the predecarboxylation thiamin-bound intermediate was clarified by the structure. Both spectroscopic and X-ray structural studies are consistent with inhibition resulting from the binding of MBP to the thiamin diphosphate in the active centers. We also delineated the role of His29 (the sole potential acid-base catalyst in the active site other than the highly conserved Glu50) and Trp163 in cofactor activation and catalysis by benzaldehyde lyase.

  20. Trehalose Analogues: Latest Insights in Properties and Biocatalytic Production

    PubMed Central

    Walmagh, Maarten; Zhao, Renfei; Desmet, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-glucopyranoside) is a non-reducing sugar with unique stabilizing properties due to its symmetrical, low energy structure consisting of two 1,1-anomerically bound glucose moieties. Many applications of this beneficial sugar have been reported in the novel food (nutricals), medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Trehalose analogues, like lactotrehalose (α-d-glucopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside) or galactotrehalose (α-d-galactopyranosyl α-d-galactopyranoside), offer similar benefits as trehalose, but show additional features such as prebiotic or low-calorie sweetener due to their resistance against hydrolysis during digestion. Unfortunately, large-scale chemical production processes for trehalose analogues are not readily available at the moment due to the lack of efficient synthesis methods. Most of the procedures reported in literature suffer from low yields, elevated costs and are far from environmentally friendly. “Greener” alternatives found in the biocatalysis field, including galactosidases, trehalose phosphorylases and TreT-type trehalose synthases are suggested as primary candidates for trehalose analogue production instead. Significant progress has been made in the last decade to turn these into highly efficient biocatalysts and to broaden the variety of useful donor and acceptor sugars. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the latest insights and future perspectives in trehalose analogue chemistry, applications and production pathways with emphasis on biocatalysis. PMID:26084050

  1. Trehalose Analogues: Latest Insights in Properties and Biocatalytic Production.

    PubMed

    Walmagh, Maarten; Zhao, Renfei; Desmet, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose (α-D-glucopyranosyl α-D-glucopyranoside) is a non-reducing sugar with unique stabilizing properties due to its symmetrical, low energy structure consisting of two 1,1-anomerically bound glucose moieties. Many applications of this beneficial sugar have been reported in the novel food (nutricals), medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Trehalose analogues, like lactotrehalose (α-D-glucopyranosyl α-D-galactopyranoside) or galactotrehalose (α-D-galactopyranosyl α-D-galactopyranoside), offer similar benefits as trehalose, but show additional features such as prebiotic or low-calorie sweetener due to their resistance against hydrolysis during digestion. Unfortunately, large-scale chemical production processes for trehalose analogues are not readily available at the moment due to the lack of efficient synthesis methods. Most of the procedures reported in literature suffer from low yields, elevated costs and are far from environmentally friendly. "Greener" alternatives found in the biocatalysis field, including galactosidases, trehalose phosphorylases and TreT-type trehalose synthases are suggested as primary candidates for trehalose analogue production instead. Significant progress has been made in the last decade to turn these into highly efficient biocatalysts and to broaden the variety of useful donor and acceptor sugars. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the latest insights and future perspectives in trehalose analogue chemistry, applications and production pathways with emphasis on biocatalysis. PMID:26084050

  2. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth; Preston, Dean L.

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  3. Asymptotic entropy bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    We show that known entropy bounds constrain the information carried off by radiation to null infinity. We consider distant, planar null hypersurfaces in asymptotically flat spacetime. Their focusing and area loss can be computed perturbatively on a Minkowski background, yielding entropy bounds in terms of the energy flux of the outgoing radiation. In the asymptotic limit, we obtain boundary versions of the quantum null energy condition, of the generalized Second Law, and of the quantum Bousso bound.

  4. Phosphonomethyl analogues of hexose phosphates.

    PubMed

    Webster, D; Jondorf, W R; Dixon, H B

    1976-05-01

    The analogue of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in which the phosphate group, -O-PO3H2, on C-6 is replaced by the phosphonomethyl group, -CH2-PO3H2, was made enzymically from the corresponding analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate. It was a substrate for aldolase, which was used to form it, but not for fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase. It was hydrolysed chemically to yield the corresponding analogue of fructose 6-phosphate [i.e. 6-deoxy-6-(phosphonomethyl)-D-fructose, or, more strictly, 6,7-dideoxy-7-phosphono-D-arabino-2-heptulose]. This proved to be a substrate for the sequential actions of glucose 6-phosphate isomerase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Thus seven out of the nine enzymes of the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways so far tested catalyse the reactions of the phosphonomethyl isosteres of their substrates. PMID:7247

  5. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  6. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  7. Synthesis, Receptor Binding, and CNS Pharmacological Studies of New Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone (TRH) Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Monga, Vikramdeep; Meena, Chhuttan L.; Rajput, Satyendra; Pawar, Chandrashekhar; Sharma, Shyam S.; Lu, Xinping; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2012-01-01

    As part of our search for selective and CNS-active thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analogues, we synthesized a set of 44 new analogues in which His and pGlu residues were modified or replaced. The analogues were evaluated as agonists at TRH-R1 and TRH-R2 in cells in vitro, and in vivo in mice for analeptic and anticonvulsant activities. Several analogues bound to TRH-R1 and TRH-R2 with good to moderate affinities, and are full agonists at both receptor subtypes. Specifically, analogue 21 a (R = CH3) exhibited binding affinities (Ki values) of 0.17 μM for TRH-R1 and 0.016 μM for TRH-R2; it is 10-fold less potent than TRH in binding to TRH-R1 and equipotent with TRH in binding to TRH-R2. Compound 21 a, the most selective agonist, activated TRH-R2 with a potency (EC50 value) of 0.0021 μM, but activated TRH-R1 at EC50 = 0.05 μM, and exhibited 24-fold selectivity for TRH-R2 over TRH-R1. The newly synthesized TRH analogues were also evaluated in vivo to assess their potencies in antagonism of barbiturate-induced sleeping time, and several analogues displayed potent analeptic activity. Specifically, analogues 21 a,b and 22 a,b decreased sleeping time by nearly 50 % more than TRH. These analogues also displayed potent anticonvulsant activity and provided significant protection against PTZ-induced seizures, but failed to provide any protection in MES-induced seizures at 10 μmol kg−1. The results of this study provide evidence that TRH analogues that show selectivity for TRH-R2 over TRH-R1 possess potent CNS activity. PMID:21302359

  8. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  9. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  10. Bound infragravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihiro, Michele; Guza, R. T.; Seymour, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    Model predictions of bound (i.e., nonlinearly forced by and coupled to wave groups) infragravity wave energy are compared with about 2 years of observations in 8- to 13-m depths at Imperial Beach, California, and Barbers Point, Hawaii. Frequency-directional spectra of free waves at sea and swell frequencies, estimated with a small array of four pressure sensors, are used to predict the bound wave spectra below 0.04 Hz. The predicted total bound wave energy is always less than the observed infragravity energy, and the underprediction increases with increasing water depth and especially with decreasing swell energy. At most half, and usually much less, of the observed infragravity energy is bound. Bound wave spectra are also predicted with data from a single wave gage in 183-m depth at Point Conception, California, and the assumption of unidirectional sea and swell. Even with energetic swell, less than 10% of the total observed infragravity energy in 183-m depth is bound. Free waves, either leaky or edge waves, are more energetic than bound waves at both the shallow and deep sites. The low level of infragravity energy observed in 183-m depth compared with 8- to 13-m depths, with similarly moderate sea and swell energy, suggests that leaky (and very high-mode edge) waves contribute less than 10% of the infragravity energy in 8-13 m. Most of the free infragravity energy in shallow water is refractively trapped and does not reach deep water.

  11. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD) analogues chemosensitize multidrug-resistant cancer cells to clinical anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junhua; Wang, Xu; Liu, Peng; Deng, Rongxin; Lei, Min; Chen, Wantao; Hu, Lihong

    2013-07-15

    Novel 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD) analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for the chemosensitizing activity against a multidrug resistant (MDR) cell line (KBvcr) overexpressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that aromatic substituted aliphatic amine at the 24-positions (groups V) effectively and significantly sensitized P-gp overexpressing multidrug resistant (MDR) cells to anticancer drugs, such as docetaxel (DOC), vincristine (VCR), and adriamycin (ADM). PPD derivatives 12 and 18 showed 1.3-2.6 times more effective reversal ability than verapamil (VER) for DOC and VCR. Importantly, no cytotoxicity was observed by the active PPD analogues (5μM) against both non-MDR and MDR cells, suggesting that PPD analogues serve as novel lead compounds toward a potent and safe resistance modulator. Moreover, a preliminary mechanism study demonstrated that the chemosensitizing activity of PPD analogues results from inhibition of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpressed in MDR cancer cells. PMID:23683834

  12. A Bosonic Analogue of a Topological Dirac Semi-Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapa, Matthew; Cho, Gil Young; Hughes, Taylor

    We construct a bosonic analogue of a two-dimensional topological Dirac Semi-Metal (DSM). The low-energy description of the most basic 2D DSM model consists of two Dirac cones at positions +/-k0 in momentum space. The local stability of the Dirac cones is guaranteed by a composite symmetry Z2, where  is time-reversal and  is inversion. This model also exhibits interesting time-reversal and inversion symmetry breaking electromagnetic responses. In this work we construct a bosonic analogue of a DSM by replacing each Dirac cone with a copy of the O (4) Nonlinear Sigma Model (NLSM) with topological theta term and theta angle θ = +/- π . One copy of this NLSM also describes the gapless surface termination of the 3D Bosonic Topological Insulator (BTI). We compute the time-reversal and inversion symmetry breaking electromagnetic responses for our model and show that they are twice the value one gets in the DSM case. We also investigate the local stability of the individual O (4) NLSM's in the BSM model. Along the way we clarify many aspects of the surface theory of the BTI including the electromagnetic response, the charges of vortex excitations, and the stability to symmetry-allowed perturbations. Nsf CAREER DMR-1351895.

  13. Muscarinic interactions of bisindolylmaleimide analogues.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J

    1998-11-01

    We have used radioligand binding studies to determine the affinities of seven bisindolylmaleimide analogues, six of which are selective inhibitors of protein kinase C, at human muscarinic M1-M4 receptors. The compounds were most potent at M1 receptors, and Ro-31-8220 was the most potent analogue, with a Kd of 0.6 microM at M1 receptors. The weakest compounds, bisindolylmaleimide IV and bisindolylmaleimide V, had Kd values of 100 microM. If it is necessary to use protein kinase C inhibitors at concentrations of 10 microM or more in studies involving muscarinic receptors then bisindolylmaleimide IV may be the most appropriate inhibitor to use. PMID:9851596

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a beauveriolide analogue library.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kenichiro; Doi, Takayuki; Sekiguchi, Takafumi; Namatame, Ichiji; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Omura, Satoshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Synthesis of beauveriolide III (1b), which is an inhibitor of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages, was achieved by solid-phase assembly of linear depsipeptide using a 2-chlorotrityl linker followed by solution-phase cyclization. On the basis of this strategy, a combinatorial library of beauveriolide analogues was carried out by radio frequency-encoded combinatorial chemistry. After automated purification using preparative reversed-phase HPLC, the library was tested for inhibitory activity of CE synthesis in macrophages to determine structure-activity relationships of beauveriolides. Among them, we found that diphenyl derivative 7{9,1} is 10 times more potent than 1b. PMID:16398560

  15. NMR studies of multiple conformations in complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with analogues of pyrimethamine

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, B.; Tendler, S.J.B.; Feeney, J.; Carr, M.D. ); Arnold, J.R.P.; Thomas, J.A.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Griffin, R.J.; Stevens, M.F.G. )

    1990-10-01

    {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR signals from bound ligands have been assigned in one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra of complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with various pyrimethamine analogues. The signals were identified mainly by correlating signals from bound and free ligands by using 2D exchange experiments. Analogues with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to {sup 1}H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to {sup 1}H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues containing asymmetrically substituted aromatic rings exist as mixtures of two rotational isomers (an enantiomeric pair) because of this hindered rotation and the NMR spectra revealed that both isomers (forms A and B) bind to the enzyme with comparable, though unequal, binding energies. In this case two complete sets of bound proton signals were observed. The relative orientations of the two forms have been determined from NOE through-space connections between protons on the ligand and protein. Ternary complexes with NADP{sup {plus}} were also examined.

  16. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  17. Policy issues in space analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, Robin N.; Facktor, Debra D.

    Space mission planning is increasingly focusing on destinations beyond Earth orbit. Advancements in technology will inevitably be required to enable long-duration human spaceflight missions, and breakthroughs in the policy arena will also be needed to achieve success in such missions. By exploring how policy issues have been addressed in analogous extreme environments, policymakers can develop a framework for addressing these issues as they apply to long-term human spaceflight. Policy issues that need to be addressed include: crew selection, training, organization, and activities, medical testing, illness, injury, and death; communication; legal accountability and liability; mission safety and risk management; and environmental contamination. This paper outlines the approach of a study underway by The George Washington University and ANSER to examine how these policy issues have been addressed in several analogues and how the experiences of these analogues can help formulate policies for long-duration human spaceflight missions. Analogues being studied include Antarctic bases, submarine voyages, undersea stations, Biosphere 2, and the U.S. Skylab and Russian Mir space stations.

  18. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures. PMID:3811050

  19. Bounding the Bogoliubov coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2008-11-15

    While over the last century or more considerable effort has been put into the problem of finding approximate solutions for wave equations in general, and quantum mechanical problems in particular, it appears that as yet relatively little work seems to have been put into the complementary problem of establishing rigourous bounds on the exact solutions. We have in mind either bounds on parametric amplification and the related quantum phenomenon of particle production (as encoded in the Bogoliubov coefficients), or bounds on transmission and reflection coefficients. Modifying and streamlining an approach developed by one of the present authors [M. Visser, Phys. Rev. A 59 (1999) 427-438, (arXiv:quant-ph/9901030)], we investigate this question by developing a formal but exact solution for the appropriate second-order linear ODE in terms of a time-ordered exponential of 2x2 matrices, then relating the Bogoliubov coefficients to certain invariants of this matrix. By bounding the matrix in an appropriate manner, we can thereby bound the Bogoliubov coefficients.

  20. Lability of copper bound to humic acid.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lingchen; Young, Scott D; Bailey, Elizabeth H

    2015-07-01

    Geochemical speciation models generally include the assumption that all metal bound to humic acid and fulvic acid (HA, FA) is labile. However, in the current study, we determined the presence of a soluble 'non-labile' Cu fraction bound to HA extracted from grassland and peat soils. This was quantified by determining isotopically-exchangeable Cu (E-value) and EDTA-extraction of HA-bound Cu, separated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and assayed by coupled ICP-MS. Evidence of time-dependent Cu fixation by HA was found during the course of an incubation study (160 d); up to 50% of dissolved HA-bound Cu was not isotopically exchangeable. This result was supported by extraction with EDTA where approximately 40% of Cu remained bound to HA despite dissolution in 0.05 M Na2-EDTA. The presence of a substantial non-labile metal fraction held by HA challenges the assumption of wholly reversible equilibrium which is central to current geochemical models of metal binding to humic substances. PMID:25863164

  1. Himbacine-derived thrombin receptor antagonists: c7-spirocyclic analogues of vorapaxar.

    PubMed

    Chelliah, Mariappan V; Eagen, Keith; Guo, Zhuyan; Chackalamannil, Samuel; Xia, Yan; Tsai, Hsingan; Greenlee, William J; Ahn, Ho-Sam; Kurowski, Stan; Boykow, George; Hsieh, Yunsheng; Chintala, Madhu

    2014-05-01

    We have synthesized several C7-spirocyclic analogues of vorapaxar and evaluated their in vitro activities against PAR-1 receptor. Some of these analogues showed activities and rat plasma levels comparable to vorapaxar. Compound 5c from this series showed excellent PAR-1 activity (K i = 5.1 nM). We also present a model of these spirocyclic compounds docked to the PAR-1 receptor based on the X-ray crystal structure of vorapaxar bound to PAR-1 receptor. This model explains some of the structure-activity relationships in this series. PMID:24900880

  2. A novel NADPH:(bound) NADP+ reductase and NADH:(bound) NADP+ transhydrogenase function in bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, Gian F; Ferraris, Anna M; Sanna, Paola; Kirkman, Henry N

    2005-02-01

    Many catalases have the shared property of containing bound NADPH and being susceptible to inactivation by their own substrate, H2O2. The presence of additional (unbound) NADPH effectively prevents bovine liver and human erythrocytic catalase from becoming compound II, the reversibly inactivated state of catalase, and NADP+ is known to be generated in the process. The function of the bound NADPH, which is tightly bound in bovine liver catalase, has been unknown. The present study with bovine liver catalase and [14C]NADPH and [14C]NADH revealed that unbound NADPH or NADH are substrates for an internal reductase and transhydrogenase reaction respectively; the unbound NADPH or NADH cause tightly bound NADP+ to become NADPH without becoming tightly bound themselves. This and other results provide insight into the function of tightly bound NADPH. PMID:15456401

  3. Validation of EMP bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G.; Derr, W.

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  4. Computing Graphical Confidence Bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation for graphical confidence bounds is simple enough to run on programmable calculator. Approximation is used in lieu of numerical tables not always available, and exact calculations, which often require rather sizable computer resources. Approximation verified for collection of up to 50 data points. Method used to analyze tile-strength data on Space Shuttle thermal-protection system.

  5. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  6. FUNCTION GENERATOR FOR ANALOGUE COMPUTERS

    DOEpatents

    Skramstad, H.K.; Wright, J.H.; Taback, L.

    1961-12-12

    An improved analogue computer is designed which can be used to determine the final ground position of radioactive fallout particles in an atomic cloud. The computer determines the fallout pattern on the basis of known wind velocity and direction at various altitudes, and intensity of radioactivity in the mushroom cloud as a function of particle size and initial height in the cloud. The output is then displayed on a cathode-ray tube so that the average or total luminance of the tube screen at any point represents the intensity of radioactive fallout at the geographical location represented by that point. (AEC)

  7. Ecstasy analogues found in cacti.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jan G; El-Seedi, Hesham R; Stephanson, Nikolai; Beck, Olof; Shulgin, Alexander T

    2008-06-01

    Human interest in psychoactive phenethylamines is known from the use of mescaline-containing cacti and designer drugs such as Ecstasy. From the alkaloid composition of cacti we hypothesized that substances resembling Ecstasy might occur naturally. In this article we show that lophophine, homopiperonylamine and lobivine are new minor constituents of two cactus species, Lophophora williamsii (peyote) and Trichocereus pachanoi (San Pedro). This is the first report of putatively psychoactive phenethylamines besides mescaline in these cacti. A search for further biosynthetic analogues may provide new insights into the structure-activity relationships of mescaline. An intriguing question is whether the new natural compounds can be called "designer drugs." PMID:18720674

  8. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 mutagenic nucleoside analogues.

    PubMed

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of "lethal mutagenesis" that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively. PMID:25398876

  9. Inhibition of experimental ascending urinary tract infection by an epithelial cell-surface receptor analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edén, C. Svanborg; Freter, R.; Hagberg, L.; Hull, R.; Hull, S.; Leffler, H.; Schoolnik, G.

    1982-08-01

    It has been shown that the establishment of urinary tract infection by Escherichia coli is dependent on attachment of the bacteria to epithelial cells1-4. The attachment involves specific epithelial cell receptors, which have been characterized as glycolipids5-10. Reversible binding to cell-surface mannosides may also be important4,11-13. This suggests an approach to the treatment of infections-that of blocking bacterial attachment with cell membrane receptor analogues. Using E. coli mutants lacking one or other of the two binding specificities (glycolipid and mannose), we show here that glycolipid analogues can block in vitro adhesion and in vivo urinary tract infection.

  10. Copper inhibits activated protein C: protective effect of human albumin and an analogue of its high-affinity copper-binding site, d-DAHK.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, David; Rael, Leonard T; Winkler, James V; Yukl, Richard L; Thomas, Gregory W; Shimonkevitz, Richard P

    2002-02-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is useful in the treatment of sepsis. Ischemia and acidosis, which often accompany sepsis, cause the release of copper from loosely bound sites. We investigated (i) whether physiological concentrations of copper inhibit APC anticoagulant activity and (ii) if any copper-induced APC inhibition is reversible by human serum albumin (HSA) or a high-affinity copper-binding analogue of the human albumin N-terminus, d-Asp-d-Ala-d-His-d-Lys (d-DAHK). APC activity after 30 min of incubation with CuCl2 (10 microM) was decreased 26% below baseline. HSA, both alone and when combined with various ratios of CuCl2, increased APC activity significantly above baseline. d-DAHK alone and 2:1 and 4:1 ratios of d-DAHK:CuCl2 also increased APC activity. APC contained 1.4 microM copper, which helps explain the increased APC activity with HSA and d-DAHK alone. These in vitro results indicate that copper inhibits APC activity and that albumin and d-DAHK reverse the copper-induced APC deactivation. PMID:11820775

  11. The Valles natural analogue project

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C.; McConnell, V.

    1994-12-01

    The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.

  12. Reversible formation of Ag44 from selenolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indranath; Pradeep, T.

    2014-11-01

    The cluster Ag44SePh30, originally prepared from silver selenolate, upon oxidative decomposition by H2O2 gives the same cluster back, in an apparently reversible synthesis. Such an unusual phenomenon was not seen for the corresponding thiolate analogues. From several characterization studies such as mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, etc., it has been confirmed that the degraded and as-synthesized selenolates are the same in nature, which leads to the reversible process. The possibility of making clusters from the degraded material makes cluster synthesis economical. This observation makes one to consider cluster synthesis to be a reversible chemical process, at least for selenolates.The cluster Ag44SePh30, originally prepared from silver selenolate, upon oxidative decomposition by H2O2 gives the same cluster back, in an apparently reversible synthesis. Such an unusual phenomenon was not seen for the corresponding thiolate analogues. From several characterization studies such as mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, etc., it has been confirmed that the degraded and as-synthesized selenolates are the same in nature, which leads to the reversible process. The possibility of making clusters from the degraded material makes cluster synthesis economical. This observation makes one to consider cluster synthesis to be a reversible chemical process, at least for selenolates. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental procedures; instrumentation; reversible cycles, UV/Vis spectra of thiophenol, 4-FTP, 3-FTP protected Ag44, and Ag152 cluster; UV/Vis, SEM images and Raman spectra of as-synthesized and degraded thiolates & selenolates; SEM/EDAX of degraded selenolates, UV/Vis of the Ag44(SePh)30 cluster under different selenol concentrations and temperatures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03267e

  13. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  14. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  15. Four Generations of Transition State Analogues for Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Shi, W; Rinaldo-Mathis, A; Tyler, P; Evans, G; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) stops growth of activated T-cells and the formation of 6-oxypurine bases, making it a target for leukemia, autoimmune disorders, and gout. Four generations of ribocation transition-state mimics bound to PNP are structurally characterized. Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 58 pM, first-generation) contains an iminoribitol cation with four asymmetric carbons. DADMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, second-generation), uses a methylene-bridged dihydroxypyrrolidine cation with two asymmetric centers. DATMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, third-generation) contains an open-chain amino alcohol cation with two asymmetric carbons. SerMe-ImmH (K*{sub i} = 5 pM, fourth-generation) uses achiral dihydroxyaminoalcohol seramide as the ribocation mimic. Crystal structures of PNPs establish features of tight binding to be; (1) ion-pair formation between bound phosphate (or its mimic) and inhibitor cation, (2) leaving-group interactions to N1, O6, and N7 of 9-deazahypoxanthine, (3) interaction between phosphate and inhibitor hydroxyl groups, and (4) His257 interacting with the 5{prime}-hydroxyl group. The first generation analogue is an imperfect fit to the catalytic site with a long ion pair distance between the iminoribitol and bound phosphate and weaker interactions to the leaving group. Increasing the ribocation to leaving-group distance in the second- to fourth-generation analogues provides powerful binding interactions and a facile synthetic route to powerful inhibitors. Despite chemical diversity in the four generations of transition-state analogues, the catalytic site geometry is almost the same for all analogues. Multiple solutions in transition-state analogue design are available to convert the energy of catalytic rate enhancement to binding energy in human PNP.

  16. Reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren A; Holliger, Philipp; Flors, Cristina

    2012-08-30

    We describe the engineering of reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA with high-density substitution, and its applications in advanced fluorescence microscopy methods. High-density labeling of DNA with cyanine dyes can be achieved by polymerase chain reaction using a modified DNA polymerase that has been evolved to efficiently incorporate Cy3- and Cy5-labeled cytosine base analogues into double-stranded DNA. The resulting biopolymer, "CyDNA", displays hundreds of fluorophores per DNA strand and is strongly colored and highly fluorescent, although previous observations suggest that fluorescence quenching at such high density might be a concern, especially for Cy5. Herein, we first investigate the mechanisms of fluorescence quenching in CyDNA and we suggest that two different mechanisms, aggregate formation and resonance energy transfer, are responsible for fluorescence quenching at high labeling densities. Moreover, we have been able to re-engineer CyDNA into a reversible fluorescence photoswitchable biopolymer by using the properties of the Cy3-Cy5 pair. This novel biopolymer constitutes a new class of photoactive DNA-based nanomaterial and is of great interest for advanced microscopy applications. We show that reversible fluorescence photoswitching in CyDNA can be exploited in optical lock-in detection imaging. It also lays the foundations for improved and sequence-specific super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of DNA. PMID:22861666

  17. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  18. Bound entanglement in quantum phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Baghbanzadeh, S.; Alipour, S.; Rezakhani, A. T.

    2010-04-15

    We investigate quantum phase transitions in which a change in the type of entanglement from bound entanglement to either free entanglement or separability may occur. In particular, we present a theoretical method to construct a class of quantum spin-chain Hamiltonians that exhibit this type of quantum criticality. Given parameter-dependent two-site reduced density matrices (with prescribed entanglement properties), we lay out a reverse construction for a compatible pure state for the whole system, as well as a class of Hamiltonians for which this pure state is a ground state. This construction is illustrated through several examples.

  19. Discrete analogue of generalized Hardy spaces and multiplication operators on homogenous trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, Perumal; Ponnusamy, Saminathan

    2016-08-01

    In this article, we define discrete analogue of generalized Hardy spaces and its separable subspace on a homogenous rooted tree and study some of its properties such as completeness, inclusion relations with other spaces, separability, growth estimate for functions in these spaces and their consequences. Equivalent conditions for multiplication operators to be bounded and compact are also obtained. Furthermore, we discuss about point spectrum, approximate point spectrum and spectrum of multiplication operators and discuss when a multiplication operator is an isometry.

  20. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  1. An analogue study of intrusions.

    PubMed

    Laposa, Judith M; Alden, Lynn E

    2006-07-01

    According to cognitive theorists, intrusive trauma memories have their origin in how information during the event is processed. Two studies investigated functional cognitive strategies during medical crises that might protect against intrusions. In Study 1, interviews with health-care professionals were used to identify cognitive strategies judged to be effective in controlling emotions and dealing with medical crises. Study 2 systematically manipulated the use of those strategies in a trauma analogue film paradigm. Experimental participants reported fewer intrusions, and less fear and avoidance of film-related stimuli during the subsequent week than controls. The manipulation did not affect anxiety during the film or memory disorganization. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusion development are discussed. PMID:16125135

  2. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer

    PubMed Central

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  3. Universal bounds on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  4. Laboratory study of cometary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colangeli, L.; Brucato, J.; Mennella, V.; Palumbo, P.

    In situ exploration (e.g., GIOTTO mission) and astronomical observations (e.g., ISO) of comets have provided fundamental information about the structure, chemistry and physical properties of materials present in such primordial bodies of the Solar System. Moreover, it is known that cosmic materials evolve, depending on the efficiency of active processes (e.g., thermal annealing, UV irradiation, ion bombardment, gassolid interactions) in different space environments. Thus, the properties of cometary constituents must be considered in a wider perspective, including cosmic dust formation around cold stars and evolution in the interstellar medium until the formation of proto-planetary nebulae. In this scenario, laboratory experiments provide important hints to clarify the status of cometary compounds. The laboratory work is aimed at both reproducing material properties and at simulating their evolution based on the most effective mechanisms active in space. Several techniques are used to synthesise "analogues" of cometary compounds with controlled chemical and physical characteristics. The study of optical properties, complemented by other analytical techniques, is applied to investigate the products of synthesis in the experiments. The monitoring of the effects produced by processing methods, similar to those active in space, provides information both on the reactivity of materials and on the efficiency of treatments. Such an approach is able to provide quantitative information on chemical and structural modifications produced on organic and refractory materials. The comparison of laboratory results with data coming from space observations and in situ measurements provides a powerful tool to understand the real nature of comets and to place constraints on formation and evolution pathways. The laboratory experiments on analogues gain even more relevance as a sort of training in the future perspective of analysing cometary samples returned to Earth by space missions (e

  5. Bound charges and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczyński, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    Bound charges and currents are among the conceptually challenging topics in advanced courses on electricity and magnetism. It may be tempting for students to believe that they are merely computational tools for calculating electric and magnetic fields in matter, particularly because they are usually introduced through abstract manipulation of integral identities, with the physical interpretation provided a posteriori. Yet these charges and currents are no less real than free charges and currents and can be measured experimentally. A simpler and more direct approach to introducing this topic, suggested by the ideas in the classic book by Purcell and emphasizing the physical origin of these phenomena, is proposed.

  6. Plant volatile analogues strengthen attractiveness to insect.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  7. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  8. Reversibility conditions for quantum channels and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shirokov, M E

    2013-08-31

    Conditions for a quantum channel (noncommutative Markov operator) to be reversible with respect to complete families of quantum states with bounded rank are obtained. A description of all quantum channels reversible with respect to a given (orthogonal or nonorthogonal) complete family of pure states is given. Some applications in quantum information theory are considered. Bibliography: 20 titles.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of resveratrol analogues.

    PubMed

    Chalal, Malik; Klinguer, Agnès; Echairi, Abdelwahad; Meunier, Philippe; Vervandier-Fasseur, Dominique; Adrian, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Stilbenes, especially resveratrol and its derivatives, have become famous for their positive effects on a wide range of medical disorders, as indicated by a huge number of published studies. A less investigated area of research is their antimicrobial properties. A series of 13 trans-resveratrol analogues was synthesized via Wittig or Heck reactions, and their antimicrobial activity assessed on two different grapevine pathogens responsible for severe diseases in the vineyard. The entire series, together with resveratrol, was first evaluated on the zoospore mobility and sporulation level of Plasmopara viticola (the oomycete responsible for downy mildew). Stilbenes displayed a spectrum of activity ranging from low to high. Six of them, including the most active ones, were subsequently tested on the development of Botrytis cinerea (fungus responsible for grey mold). The results obtained allowed us to identify the most active stilbenes against both grapevine pathogens, to compare the antimicrobial activity of the evaluated series of stilbenes, and to discuss the relationship between their chemical structure (number and position of methoxy and hydroxy groups) and antimicrobial activity. PMID:24918540

  10. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  11. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-09-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mltogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  12. Space analogue studies in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugg, D.; Shepanek, M.

    1999-01-01

    Medical research has been carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) for 50 years. As an extension of this program collaborative Australian/United States research on immunology, microbiology, psychology and remote medicine has produced important data and insight on how humans adapt to the stress of extreme isolation, confinement and the harsh environment of Antarctica. An outstanding analogue for the isolation and confinement of space missions (especially planetary outposts), ANARE has been used as an international research platform by Australia and the United States since 1993. Collaborative research has demonstrated a lowered responsiveness of the immune system under the isolation and confinement of Antarctic winter-over; a reduction of almost 50% in T cell proliferation to mitogen phytohaemogglutinin, as well as changes in latent herpesvirus states and the expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus infected B cell populations. Although no clinically significant disease has been found to result from these immune changes, research is currently assessing the effects of psychological factors on the immune system. This and associated research performed to date and its relevance to both organisations is discussed, and comment made on possible extensions to the program in both medical and other fields.

  13. Andreev-Majorana bound states in superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Silaev, M. A. Volovik, G. E.

    2014-12-15

    We consider Andreev-Majorana (AM) bound states with zero energy on surfaces, interfaces, and vortices in different phases of the p-wave superfluids. We discuss the chiral superfluid {sup 3}He-A and time reversal invariant phases: superfluid {sup 3}He-B, planar and polar phases. The AM zero modes are determined by topology in the bulk and disappear at the quantum phase transition from the topological to nontopological state of the superfluid. The topology demonstrates the interplay of dimensions. In particular, the zero-dimensional Weyl points in chiral superfluids (the Berry phase monopoles in momentum space) give rise to the one-dimensional Fermi arc of AM bound states on the surface and to the one-dimensional flat band of AM modes in the vortex core. The one-dimensional nodal line in the polar phase produces a two-dimensional flat band of AM modes on the surface. The interplay of dimensions also connects the AM states in superfluids with different dimensions. For example, the topological properties of the spectrum of bound states in three-dimensional {sup 3}He-B are connected to the properties of the spectrum in the two-dimensional planar phase (thin film)

  14. Bound entangled states with a private key and their classical counterpart.

    PubMed

    Ozols, Maris; Smith, Graeme; Smolin, John A

    2014-03-21

    Entanglement is a fundamental resource for quantum information processing. In its pure form, it allows quantum teleportation and sharing classical secrets. Realistic quantum states are noisy and their usefulness is only partially understood. Bound-entangled states are central to this question--they have no distillable entanglement, yet sometimes still have a private classical key. We present a construction of bound-entangled states with a private key based on classical probability distributions. From this emerge states possessing a new classical analogue of bound entanglement, distinct from the long-sought bound information. We also find states of smaller dimensions and higher key rates than previously known. Our construction has implications for classical cryptography: we show that existing protocols are insufficient for extracting private key from our distributions due to their "bound-entangled" nature. We propose a simple extension of existing protocols that can extract a key from them. PMID:24702340

  15. Heterocyclic chalcone analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Vipin; Kumar, Pradeep

    2013-03-01

    Chalcones, aromatic ketones and enones acting as the precursor for flavonoids such as Quercetin, are known for their anticancer effects. Although, parent chalcones consist of two aromatic rings joined by a three-carbon α,β-unsaturated carbonyl system, various synthetic compounds possessing heterocyclic rings like pyrazole, indole etc. are well known and proved to be effective anticancer agents. In addition to their use as anticancer agents in cancer cell lines, heterocyclic analogues are reported to be effective even against resistant cell lines. In this connection, we hereby highlight the potential of various heterocyclic chalcone analogues as anticancer agents with a brief summary about therapeutic potential of chalcones, mechanism of anticancer action of various chalcone analogues, and current and future prospects related to the chalcones-derived anticancer research. Furthermore, some key points regarding chalcone analogues have been reviewed by analyzing their medicinal properties. PMID:22721390

  16. Synthesis and SAR of vinca alkaloid analogues.

    PubMed

    Voss, Matthew E; Ralph, Jeffery M; Xie, Dejian; Manning, David D; Chen, Xinchao; Frank, Anthony J; Leyhane, Andrew J; Liu, Lei; Stevens, Jason M; Budde, Cheryl; Surman, Matthew D; Friedrich, Thomas; Peace, Denise; Scott, Ian L; Wolf, Mark; Johnson, Randall

    2009-02-15

    Versatile intermediates 12'-iodovinblastine, 12'-iodovincristine and 11'-iodovinorelbine were utilized as substrates for transition metal based chemistry which led to the preparation of novel analogues of the vinca alkaloids. The synthesis of key iodo intermediates, their transformation into final products, and the SAR based upon HeLa and MCF-7 cell toxicity assays is presented. Selected analogues 27 and 36 show promising anticancer activity in the P388 murine leukemia model. PMID:19147348

  17. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Wilks, Scott; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen; Baring, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top relativistic particle accelerators, ultrafast charged particle imaging systems and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. In this presentation, using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show how to derive the theoretical maximum and minimum of f. These boundaries constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. Close agreement is shown with several dozens of published experimental data points and simulation results, helping to confirm the theory. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  18. Planetary habitability: lessons learned from terrestrial analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Louisa J.; Dartnell, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial analogue studies underpin almost all planetary missions and their use is essential in the exploration of our Solar system and in assessing the habitability of other worlds. Their value relies on the similarity of the analogue to its target, either in terms of their mineralogical or geochemical context, or current physical or chemical environmental conditions. Such analogue sites offer critical ground-truthing for astrobiological studies on the habitability of different environmental parameter sets, the biological mechanisms for survival in extreme environments and the preservation potential and detectability of biosignatures. The 33 analogue sites discussed in this review have been selected on the basis of their congruence to particular extraterrestrial locations. Terrestrial field sites that have been used most often in the literature, as well as some lesser known ones which require greater study, are incorporated to inform on the astrobiological potential of Venus, Mars, Europa, Enceladus and Titan. For example, the possibility of an aerial habitable zone on Venus has been hypothesized based on studies of life at high-altitudes in the terrestrial atmosphere. We also demonstrate why many different terrestrial analogue sites are required to satisfactorily assess the habitability of the changing environmental conditions throughout Martian history, and recommend particular sites for different epochs or potential niches. Finally, habitable zones within the aqueous environments of the icy moons of Europa and Enceladus and potentially in the hydrocarbon lakes of Titan are discussed and suitable analogue sites proposed. It is clear from this review that a number of terrestrial analogue sites can be applied to multiple planetary bodies, thereby increasing their value for astrobiological exploration. For each analogue site considered here, we summarize the pertinent physiochemical environmental features they offer and critically assess the fidelity with which

  19. Fundamental Bounds in Measurements for Estimating Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyang-Tag; Ra, Young-Sik; Hong, Kang-Hee; Lee, Seung-Woo; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2014-07-01

    Quantum measurement unavoidably disturbs the state of a quantum system if any information about the system is extracted. Recently, the concept of reversing quantum measurement has been introduced and has attracted much attention. Numerous efforts have thus been devoted to understanding the fundamental relation of the amount of information obtained by measurement to either state disturbance or reversibility. Here, we experimentally prove the trade-off relations in quantum measurement with respect to both state disturbance and reversibility. By demonstrating the quantitative bound of the trade-off relations, we realize an optimal measurement for estimating quantum systems with minimum disturbance and maximum reversibility. Our results offer fundamental insights on quantum measurement and practical guidelines for implementing various quantum information protocols.

  20. Inhibition of monoterpene cyclases by inert analogues of geranyl diphosphate and linalyl diphosphate☆

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Frank; Zhao, Yuxin; Santhamma, Bindu; Assink, Bryce; Coates, Robert M.; Croteau, Rodney B.

    2007-01-01

    The tightly coupled nature of the reaction sequence catalyzed by monoterpene synthases has prevented direct observation of the topologically required isomerization step leading from geranyl diphosphate to the enzyme-bound, tertiary allylic intermediate linalyl diphosphate, which then cyclizes to the various monoterpene skeletons. X-ray crystal structures of these enzymes complexed with suitable analogues of the substrate and intermediate could provide a clearer view of this universal, but cryptic, step of monoterpenoid cyclase catalysis. Toward this end, the functionally inert analogues 2-fluorogeranyl diphosphate, (±)-2-fluorolinalyl diphosphate, and (3R)- and (3S)-homolinalyl diphosphates (2,6-dimethyl-2-vinyl-5-heptenyl diphosphates) were prepared, and compared to the previously described substrate analogue 3-azageranyl diphosphate (3-aza-2,3-dihydrogeranyl diphosphate) as inhibitors and potential crystallization aids with two representative monoterpenoid cyclases, (−)-limonene synthase and (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase. Although these enantioselective synthases readily distinguished between (3R)- and (3S)-homolinalyl diphosphates, both of which were more effective inhibitors than was 3-azageranyl diphosphate, the fluorinated analogues proved to be the most potent competitive inhibitors and have recently yielded informative liganded structures with limonene synthase. PMID:17949678

  1. Loratadine analogues as MAGL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayendra Z; Ahenkorah, Stephen; Vaara, Miia; Staszewski, Marek; Adams, Yahaya; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Parkkari, Teija; Savinainen, Juha R; Walczyński, Krzysztof; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Nevalainen, Tapio J

    2015-04-01

    Compound 12a (JZP-361) acted as a potent and reversible inhibitor of human recombinant MAGL (hMAGL, IC50=46 nM), and was found to have almost 150-fold higher selectivity over human recombinant fatty acid amide hydrolase (hFAAH, IC50=7.24 μM) and 35-fold higher selectivity over human α/β-hydrolase-6 (hABHD6, IC50=1.79 μM). Additionally, compound 12a retained H1 antagonistic affinity (pA2=6.81) but did not show cannabinoid receptor activity, when tested at concentrations ⩽ 10 μM. Hence, compound 12a represents a novel dual-acting pharmacological tool possessing both MAGL-inhibitory and antihistaminergic activities. PMID:25752982

  2. Bounds for Asian basket options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  3. Northwest Outward Bound Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Outward Bound School, Portland, OR.

    Instructor responsibilities, procedures for completing activities safely, and instructional methods and techniques are outlined to assist instructors in the Northwest Outward Bound School (Portland, Oregon) as they strive for teaching excellence. Information is organized into six chapters addressing: history and philosophy of Outward Bound; course…

  4. Convergent syntheses of LeX analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An; Hendel, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of three Lex derivatives from one common protected trisaccharide is reported. These analogues will be used respectively for competitive binding experiments, conjugation to carrier proteins and immobilization on gold. An N-acetylglucosamine monosaccharide acceptor was first glycosylated at O-4 with a galactosyl imidate. This coupling was performed at 40 °C under excess of BF3·OEt2 activation and proceeded best if the acceptor carried a 6-chlorohexyl rather than a 6-azidohexyl aglycon. The 6-chlorohexyl disaccharide was then converted to an acceptor and submitted to fucosylation yielding the corresponding protected 6-chlorohexyl Lex trisaccharide. This protected trisaccharide was used as a precursor to the 6-azidohexyl, 6-acetylthiohexyl and 6-benzylthiohexyl trisaccharide analogues which were obtained in excellent yields (70–95%). In turn, we describe the deprotection of these intermediates in one single step using dissolving metal conditions. Under these conditions, the 6-chlorohexyl and 6-azidohexyl intermediates led respectively to the n-hexyl and 6-aminohexyl trisaccharide targets. Unexpectedly, the 6-acetylthiohexyl analogue underwent desulfurization and gave the n-hexyl glycoside product, whereas the 6-benzylthiohexyl analogue gave the desired disulfide trisaccharide dimer. This study constitutes a particularly efficient and convergent preparation of these three Lex analogues. PMID:20485599

  5. Biological Evaluation of Double Point Modified Analogues of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D₂ as Potential Anti-Leukemic Agents.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Aoife; Nadkarni, Sharmin; Yasuda, Kaori; Sakaki, Toshiyuki; Brown, Geoffrey; Kutner, Andrzej; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Structurally similar double-point modified analogues of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₂ (1,25D₂) were screened in vitro for their pro-differentiating activity against the promyeloid cell line HL60. Their affinities towards human full length vitamin D receptor (VDR) and metabolic stability against human vitamin D 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) were also tested. The analogues (PRI-1730, PRI-1731, PRI-1732, PRI-1733 and PRI-1734) contained 5,6-trans modification of the A-ring and of the triene system, additional hydroxyl or unsaturation at C-22 in the side chain and reversed absolute configuration (24-epi) at C-24 of 1,25D₂. As presented in this paper, introduction of selected structural modifications simultaneously in two distinct parts of the vitamin D molecule resulted in a divergent group of analogues. Analogues showed lower VDR affinity in comparison to that of the parent hormones, 1,25D₂ and 1,25D₃, and they caused effective HL60 cell differentiation only at high concentrations of 100 nM and above. Unexpectedly, introducing of a 5,6-trans modification combined with C-22 hydroxyl and 24-epi configuration switched off entirely the cell differentiation activity of the analogue (PRI-1734). However, this analogue remained a moderate substrate for CYP24A1, as it was metabolized at 22%, compared to 35% for 1,25D₂. Other analogues from this series were either less (12% for PRI-1731 and PRI-1733) or more (52% for PRI-1732) resistant to the enzymatic deactivation. Although the inactive analogue PRI-1734 failed to show VDR antagonism, when tested in HL60 cells, its structure might be a good starting point for our design of a vitamin D antagonist. PMID:26840307

  6. Biological Evaluation of Double Point Modified Analogues of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D2 as Potential Anti-Leukemic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Aoife; Nadkarni, Sharmin; Yasuda, Kaori; Sakaki, Toshiyuki; Brown, Geoffrey; Kutner, Andrzej; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Structurally similar double-point modified analogues of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (1,25D2) were screened in vitro for their pro-differentiating activity against the promyeloid cell line HL60. Their affinities towards human full length vitamin D receptor (VDR) and metabolic stability against human vitamin D 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) were also tested. The analogues (PRI-1730, PRI-1731, PRI-1732, PRI-1733 and PRI-1734) contained 5,6-trans modification of the A-ring and of the triene system, additional hydroxyl or unsaturation at C-22 in the side chain and reversed absolute configuration (24-epi) at C-24 of 1,25D2. As presented in this paper, introduction of selected structural modifications simultaneously in two distinct parts of the vitamin D molecule resulted in a divergent group of analogues. Analogues showed lower VDR affinity in comparison to that of the parent hormones, 1,25D2 and 1,25D3, and they caused effective HL60 cell differentiation only at high concentrations of 100 nM and above. Unexpectedly, introducing of a 5,6-trans modification combined with C-22 hydroxyl and 24-epi configuration switched off entirely the cell differentiation activity of the analogue (PRI-1734). However, this analogue remained a moderate substrate for CYP24A1, as it was metabolized at 22%, compared to 35% for 1,25D2. Other analogues from this series were either less (12% for PRI-1731 and PRI-1733) or more (52% for PRI-1732) resistant to the enzymatic deactivation. Although the inactive analogue PRI-1734 failed to show VDR antagonism, when tested in HL60 cells, its structure might be a good starting point for our design of a vitamin D antagonist. PMID:26840307

  7. Reversible Silencing of CFTR Chloride Channels by Glutathionylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Oliva, Claudia; Li, Ge; Holmgren, Arne; Lillig, Christopher Horst; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2005-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a phosphorylation- and ATP-dependent chloride channel that modulates salt and water transport across lung and gut epithelia. The relationship between CFTR and oxidized forms of glutathione is of potential interest because reactive glutathione species are produced in inflamed epithelia where they may be modulators or substrates of CFTR. Here we show that CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches is markedly inhibited by several oxidized forms of glutathione (i.e., GSSG, GSNO, and glutathione treated with diamide, a strong thiol oxidizer). Three lines of evidence indicate that the likely mechanism for this inhibitory effect is glutathionylation of a CFTR cysteine (i.e., formation of a mixed disulfide with glutathione): (a) channels could be protected from inhibition by pretreating the patch with NEM (a thiol alkylating agent) or by lowering the bath pH; (b) inhibited channels could be rescued by reducing agents (e.g., DTT) or by purified glutaredoxins (Grxs; thiol disulfide oxidoreductases) including a mutant Grx that specifically reduces mixed disulfides between glutathione and cysteines within proteins; and (c) reversible glutathionylation of CFTR polypeptides in microsomes could be detected biochemically under the same conditions. At the single channel level, the primary effect of reactive glutathione species was to markedly inhibit the opening rates of individual CFTR channels. CFTR channel inhibition was not obviously dependent on phosphorylation state but was markedly slowed when channels were first “locked open” by a poorly hydrolyzable ATP analogue (AMP-PNP). Consistent with the latter finding, we show that the major site of inhibition is cys-1344, a poorly conserved cysteine that lies proximal to the signature sequence in the second nucleotide binding domain (NBD2) of human CFTR. This region is predicted to participate in ATP-dependent channel opening and to be occluded in the

  8. Nonlocal spectroscopy of Andreev bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindele, J.; Baumgartner, A.; Maurand, R.; Weiss, M.; Schönenberger, C.

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Andreev bound states (ABSs) in a carbon nanotube quantum dot (QD) connected to a superconducting Nb lead (S). A weakly coupled normal metal contact acts as a tunnel probe that measures the energy dispersion of the ABSs. Moreover, we study the response of the ABS to nonlocal transport processes, namely, Cooper pair splitting and elastic co-tunnelling, which are enabled by a second QD fabricated on the same nanotube on the opposite side of S. We find an appreciable nonlocal conductance with a rich structure, including a sign reversal at the ground-state transition from the ABS singlet to a degenerate magnetic doublet. We describe our device by a simple rate equation model that captures the key features of our observations and demonstrates that the sign of the nonlocal conductance is a measure for the charge distribution of the ABS, given by the respective Bogoliubov-de Gennes amplitudes u and v.

  9. Dolastatin 11 conformations, analogues and pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ahad; Bates, Robert B; Crane, Zackary D; Dicus, Christopher W; Gramme, Michelle R; Hamel, Ernest; Marcischak, Jacob; Martinez, David S; McClure, Kelly J; Nakkiew, Pichaya; Pettit, George R; Stessman, Chad C; Sufi, Bilal A; Yarick, Gayle V

    2005-07-01

    Twenty analogues of the natural antitumor agent dolastatin 11, including majusculamide C, were synthesized and tested for cytotoxicity against human cancer cells and stimulation of actin polymerization. Only analogues containing the 30-membered ring were active. Molecular modeling and NMR evidence showed the low-energy conformations. The amide bonds are all trans except for the one between the Tyr and Val units, which is cis. Since an analogue restricted to negative 2-3-4-5 angles stimulated actin polymerization but was inactive in cells, the binding conformation (most likely the lowest-energy conformation in water) has a negative 2-3-4-5 angle, whereas a conformation with a positive 2-3-4-5 angle (most likely the lowest energy conformation in chloroform) goes through cell walls. The highly active R alcohol from borohydride reduction of dolastatin 11 is a candidate for conversion to prodrugs. PMID:15878670

  10. A new approach to the synthesis of the 5'-deoxy-5'-methylphosphonate linked thymidine oligonucleotide analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, T; Kers, A; Stawinski, J

    1995-01-01

    A new synthetic method for the preparation of the 5'-deoxy-5'-methylphosphonate linked thymidine oligonucleotides (5'-methylenephosphonate analogues) was developed. The method is based on the use of a phosphonate protecting group, 4-methoxy-1-oxido-2-picolyl, enabling intramolecular nucleophilic catalysis which together with the condensing agent, 2,4,6-triisopropylbenzenesulfonyl chloride, secures fast and efficient formation of the 5'-methylenephosphonate internucleosidic bonds. The produced protected oligomers were treated with thiophenol and triethylamine to remove the phosphonate protecting groups, cleaved from the solid support using concentrated aqueous ammonia, and purified by HPLC. Several thymidine oligonucleotide analogues with the chain length of up to 20 nucleotidic units, in which all internal 5'-oxygen atoms have been replaced by methylene groups directly bound to phosphorus, were synthesised using this methodology. PMID:7731801

  11. Characterisation of ATP analogues to cross-link and label P2X receptors

    PubMed Central

    Agboh, Kelvin C.; Powell, Andrew J.; Evans, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    P2X receptors are a distinct family of ATP-gated ion channels with a number of physiological roles ranging from smooth muscle contractility to the regulation of blood clotting. In this study we determined whether the UV light-reactive ATP analogues 2-azido ATP, ATP azidoanilide (ATP-AA) and 2′,3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) can be used to label the ATP binding site of P2X1 receptors. These analogues were agonists, and in patch clamp studies evoked inward currents from HEK293 cells stably expressing the P2X1 receptor. Following irradiation in the presence of these compounds subsequent responses to an EC50 concentration of ATP were reduced by >65%. These effects were partially reversed by co-application of ATP or suramin with the photo-reactive ATP analogue at the time of irradiation. In autoradiographic studies radiolabelled 2-azido [γ32P] ATP and ATP-AA-[γ32P] cross-linked to P2X1 receptors and this binding was reduced by co-incubation with ATP. These studies demonstrate that photo-reactive ATP analogues can be used to label P2X receptor and may prove useful in elucidating the ATP binding site at this novel class of ATP binding proteins. PMID:18599093

  12. Saturating the holographic entropy bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2010-10-15

    The covariant entropy bound states that the entropy, S, of matter on a light sheet cannot exceed a quarter of its initial area, A, in Planck units. The gravitational entropy of black holes saturates this inequality. The entropy of matter systems, however, falls short of saturating the bound in known examples. This puzzling gap has led to speculation that a much stronger bound, S < or approx. A{sup 3/4}, may hold true. In this note, we exhibit light sheets whose entropy exceeds A{sup 3/4} by arbitrarily large factors. In open Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes, such light sheets contain the entropy visible in the sky; in the limit of early curvature domination, the covariant bound can be saturated but not violated. As a corollary, we find that the maximum observable matter and radiation entropy in universes with positive (negative) cosmological constant is of order {Lambda}{sup -1} ({Lambda}{sup -2}), and not |{Lambda}|{sup -3/4} as had hitherto been believed. Our results strengthen the evidence for the covariant entropy bound, while showing that the stronger bound S < or approx. A{sup 3/4} is not universally valid. We conjecture that the stronger bound does hold for static, weakly gravitating systems.

  13. Complementarity reveals bound entanglement of two twisted photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.; Löffler, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate the detection of bipartite bound entanglement as predicted by the Horodecki's in 1998. Bound entangled states, being heavily mixed entangled quantum states, can be produced by incoherent addition of pure entangled states. Until 1998 it was thought that such mixing could always be reversed by entanglement distillation; however, this turned out to be impossible for bound entangled states. The purest form of bound entanglement is that of only two particles, which requires higher-dimensional (d > 2) quantum systems. We realize this using photon qutrit (d = 3) pairs produced by spontaneous parametric downconversion, that are entangled in the orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, which is scalable to high dimensions. Entanglement of the photons is confirmed via a ‘maximum complementarity protocol’. This conceptually simple protocol requires only maximized complementary of measurement bases; we show that it can also detect bound entanglement. We explore the bipartite qutrit space and find that, also experimentally, a significant portion of the entangled states are actually bound entangled.

  14. Bounds on the information rate of quantum-secret-sharing schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep

    2011-04-15

    An important metric of the performance of a quantum-secret-sharing scheme is its information rate. Beyond the fact that the information rate is upper-bounded by one, very little is known in terms of bounds on the information rate of quantum-secret-sharing schemes. Furthermore, not every scheme can be realized with rate one. In this paper we derive upper bounds for the information rates of quantum-secret-sharing schemes. We show that there exist quantum access structures on n players for which the information rate cannot be better than O((log{sub 2}n)/n). These results are the quantum analogues of the bounds for classical-secret-sharing schemes proved by Csirmaz.

  15. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  16. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  17. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  18. Mechanistic Insights from the Binding of Substrate and Carbocation Intermediate Analogues to Aristolochene Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mengbin; Al-lami, Naeemah; Janvier, Marine; D'Antonio, Edward L.; Faraldos, Juan A.; Cane, David E.; Allemann, Rudolf K.; Christianson, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Aristolochene synthase, a metal-dependent sesquiterpene cyclase from Aspergillus terreus, catalyzes the ionization-dependent cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) to form the bicyclic eremophilane (+)-aristolochene with perfect structural and stereochemical precision. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of aristolochene synthase complexed with three Mg2+ ions and the unreactive substrate analogue farnesyl-S-thiolodiphosphate (FSPP), showing that the substrate diphosphate group is anchored by metal coordination and hydrogen bond interactions identical to those previously observed in the complex with three Mg2+ ions and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). Moreover, the binding conformation of FSPP directly mimics that expected for productively bound FPP, with the exception of the precise alignment of the C-S bond with regard to the C10-C11 π system that would be required for C1-C10 bond formation in the first step of catalysis. We also report crystal structures of aristolochene synthase complexed with Mg2+3-PPi and ammonium or iminium analogues of bicyclic carbocation intermediates proposed for the natural cyclization cascade. Various binding orientations are observed for these bicyclic analogues, and these orientations appear to be driven by favorable electrostatic interactions between the positively charged ammonium group of the analogue and the negatively charged PPi anion. Surprisingly, the active site is sufficiently flexible to accommodate analogues with partially or completely incorrect stereochemistry. Although this permissiveness in binding is unanticipated, based on the stereochemical precision of catalysis that leads exclusively to the (+)-aristolochene stereoisomer, it suggests the ability of the active site to enable controlled reorientation of intermediates during the cyclization cascade. Taken together, these structures illuminate important aspects of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:23905850

  19. Bounding the elliptic Mahler measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinner, Christopher

    1998-11-01

    We give a simple inequality relating the elliptic Mahler measure of a polynomial to the traditional Mahler measure (via the length of the polynomial). These bounds are essentially sharp. We also give the corresponding result for polynomials in several variables.

  20. D-luciferin analogues: a multicolor toolbox for bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Qiang; Liu, Jing; Wang, Pi; Zhang, Jingyu; Guo, Wei

    2012-08-20

    Colorful mixture: Three types of luciferin analogues, that is, alkylaminoluciferins, aminoselenoluciferin, and luciferins with a benzimidazole scaffold, have been reported. These analogues show excellent bioluminescent properties and great potential in bioluminescence imaging. PMID:22807027

  1. Solanapyrone analogues from a Hawaiian fungicolous fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four new solanayrone analogues (solanapyrones J-M; 1-4) have been isolated from an unidentified fungicolous fungus collected in Hawaii. The structures and relative configurations of these compounds were determined by analysis of ID NMR, 2D NMR, and MS data. Solanapyrone J(1) showed antifungal acti...

  2. New cytotoxic analogues of annonaceous acetogenins.

    PubMed

    Rodier, S; Le Huerou, Y; Renoux, B; Doyon, J; Renard, P; Pierré, A; Gesson, J P; Grée, R

    2001-01-01

    A series of new acetogenin analogues incorporating a central catechol moiety instead of the tetrahydrofuran ring(s) have been prepared and tested against L1210 leukemia cells. Although less potent than bullatacinone, which has the same terminal lactone, these compounds display interesting cell cycle effects. PMID:11962508

  3. Synthesis and Cytoxicity of Sempervirine and Analogues.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaohong; Yang, Chunying; Cleveland, John L; Bannister, Thomas D

    2016-03-01

    Sempervirine and analogues were synthesized using a route featuring Sonogashira and Larock Pd-catalyzed reactions. Structure-activity relationships were investigated using three human cancer cell lines. 10-Fluorosempervirine is the most potently cytotoxic member of the family yet described. PMID:26828413

  4. The arsonomethyl analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, S R; Sparkes, M J; Dixon, H B

    1983-01-01

    4-Arsono-2-hydroxybutanoic acid, the analogue of 3-phosphoglycerate in which -CH2-AsO3H2 replaces -O-PO3H2, was synthesized. It proved to be a substrate for phosphoglycerate kinase. Its Michaelis constant was only slightly higher than that of the natural substrate, but its catalytic constant was about 1300 times smaller. PMID:6615422

  5. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-03-01

    Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  6. Synthesis of lipid II phosphonate analogues.

    PubMed

    Borbás, Anikó; Herczegh, Pál

    2011-09-01

    Simple analogues of lipid II were synthesized from 3,4,6-tri-O-acetyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-1-thio-β-D-glucopyranose using conjugate addition onto ethylidene bisphosphonate and subsequent Wadsworth-Horner-Emmons reaction with long chain aliphatic aldehydes. PMID:21600568

  7. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Choi, B S; Kwon, K C; Lee, S O; Kwak, H J; Lee, C H

    2000-08-01

    Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of squalamine analogue 2 are reported. The synthesis of 2 was accomplished from bisnoralcohol 3. The spermidine moiety was introduced via reductive amination of an appropriately functionalized 3beta-aminosterol with spermidinyl aldehyde 17 utilizing sodium triacetoxyborohydride as the reducing agent. Compound 2 shows weaker antimicrobial activity than squalamine. PMID:11003150

  8. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  9. Synthesis and Characterization in Vitro and in Vivo of (l)-(Trimethylsilyl)alanine Containing Neurotensin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Roberto; Besserer-Offroy, Élie; René, Adeline; Côté, Jérôme; Tétreault, Pascal; Collerette-Tremblay, Jasmin; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Leduc, Richard; Martinez, Jean; Sarret, Philippe; Cavelier, Florine

    2015-10-01

    The silylated amino acid (l)-(trimethylsilyl)alanine (TMSAla) was incorporated at the C-terminal end of the minimal biologically active neurotensin (NT) fragment, leading to the synthesis of new hexapeptide NT[8-13] analogues. Here, we assessed the ability of these new silylated NT compounds to bind to NTS1 and NTS2 receptors, promote regulation of multiple signaling pathways, induce inhibition of the ileal smooth muscle contractions, and affect distinct physiological variables, including blood pressure and pain sensation. Among the C-terminal modified analogues, compound 6 (JMV2007) carrying a TMSAla residue in position 13 exhibits a higher affinity toward NT receptors than the NT native peptide. We also found that compound 6 is effective in reversing carbachol-induced contraction in the isolated strip preparation assay and at inducing a drop in blood pressure. Finally, compound 6 produces potent analgesia in experimental models of acute and persistent pain. PMID:26348111

  10. [Dmt(1)]DALDA analogues modified with tyrosine analogues at position 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunxin; Lu, Dandan; Chen, Zhen; Ding, Yi; Chung, Nga N; Li, Tingyou; Schiller, Peter W

    2016-08-01

    Analogues of [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2; Dmt=2',6'-dimethyltyrosine), a potent μ opioid agonist peptide with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant activity were prepared by replacing Dmt with various 2',6'-dialkylated Tyr analogues, including 2',4',6'-trimethyltyrosine (Tmt), 2'-ethyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Emt), 2'-isopropyl-6'-methyltyrosine (Imt) and 2',6'-diethyltyrosine (Det). All compounds were selective μ opioid agonists and the Tmt(1)-, Emt(1) and Det(1)-analogues showed subnanomolar μ opioid receptor binding affinities. The Tmt(1)- and Emt(1)-analogues showed improved antioxidant activity compared to the Dmt(1)-parent peptide in the DPPH radical-scavenging capacity assay, and thus are of interest as drug candidates for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:27301366

  11. Matrix algorithms for solving (in)homogeneous bound state equations

    PubMed Central

    Blank, M.; Krassnigg, A.

    2011-01-01

    In the functional approach to quantum chromodynamics, the properties of hadronic bound states are accessible via covariant integral equations, e.g. the Bethe–Salpeter equation for mesons. In particular, one has to deal with linear, homogeneous integral equations which, in sophisticated model setups, use numerical representations of the solutions of other integral equations as part of their input. Analogously, inhomogeneous equations can be constructed to obtain off-shell information in addition to bound-state masses and other properties obtained from the covariant analogue to a wave function of the bound state. These can be solved very efficiently using well-known matrix algorithms for eigenvalues (in the homogeneous case) and the solution of linear systems (in the inhomogeneous case). We demonstrate this by solving the homogeneous and inhomogeneous Bethe–Salpeter equations and find, e.g. that for the calculation of the mass spectrum it is as efficient or even advantageous to use the inhomogeneous equation as compared to the homogeneous. This is valuable insight, in particular for the study of baryons in a three-quark setup and more involved systems. PMID:21760640

  12. Recent advances in topoisomerase I-targeting agents, camptothecin analogues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Kee; Lee, Namkyu

    2002-12-01

    The present review concentrates on camptothecin (CPT) analogues, the most extensively studied topoisomerase I (topo I) inhibitors, and provides concise information on the structural features of human topo I enzyme, mechanisms of interaction of CPT with topo I, structure-activity relationship study of CPT analogues including the influence of lactone stability on antitumor activity, and recent updates of valuable CPT analogues. PMID:12370044

  13. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  14. Entropic uncertainty and measurement reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Mario; Wehner, Stephanie; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-07-01

    The entropic uncertainty relation with quantum side information (EUR-QSI) from (Berta et al 2010 Nat. Phys. 6 659) is a unifying principle relating two distinctive features of quantum mechanics: quantum uncertainty due to measurement incompatibility, and entanglement. In these relations, quantum uncertainty takes the form of preparation uncertainty where one of two incompatible measurements is applied. In particular, the ‘uncertainty witness’ lower bound in the EUR-QSI is not a function of a post-measurement state. An insightful proof of the EUR-QSI from (Coles et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 210405) makes use of a fundamental mathematical consequence of the postulates of quantum mechanics known as the non-increase of quantum relative entropy under quantum channels. Here, we exploit this perspective to establish a tightening of the EUR-QSI which adds a new state-dependent term in the lower bound, related to how well one can reverse the action of a quantum measurement. As such, this new term is a direct function of the post-measurement state and can be thought of as quantifying how much disturbance a given measurement causes. Our result thus quantitatively unifies this feature of quantum mechanics with the others mentioned above. We have experimentally tested our theoretical predictions on the IBM quantum experience and find reasonable agreement between our predictions and experimental outcomes.

  15. [Insulin analogues: modifications in the structure, molecular and metabolic consequences].

    PubMed

    de Luis, D A; Romero, E

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technology has provided insulin analogues for the treatment of diabetes mellitus, with an efficacy and safety that has improved the treatment of this disease. We briefly review the principal characteristics of the insulin analogues currently available. Both rapid-acting (lispro, aspart and glulisine) and long acting (glargine and determir) insulin analogues are included in this review. We describe the pharmacology of each insulin analogue, their differences with the human insulin, the administration, indication, efficacy and safety. In addition we discussed the main controversies of the use of these insulin analogues. In particular, those related with the risk of cancer and retinopathy, and their use in pregnant women. PMID:23517895

  16. Bound polarons in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woggon, U.; Miller, D.; Kalina, F.; Gerlach, B.; Kayser, D.; Leonardi, K.; Hommel, D.

    2003-01-01

    Bound polarons are discrete, confined electronic states, spatially localized due to a local potential V(r) but sharing a common phonon state of the surrounding crystal. We study the energy states of polarons bound in a potential and determine the local optical absorption spectrum up to first-order time-dependent perturbation theory with respect to the electron-photon interaction. The model is applied to describe the optical properties of submonolayer CdSe insertions epitaxially grown between ZnSe layers. As a typical signature of bound polarons we found excited-state energies equidistantly separated by the LO phonon energy and with optical transition probabilities determined by the anisotropies in V(r).

  17. Unitarity bound for gluon shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Levin, E.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2009-06-15

    Although at small Bjorken x gluons originated from different nucleons in a nucleus overlap in the longitudinal direction, most of them are still well separated in the transverse plane and therefore cannot fuse. For this reason the gluon density in nuclei cannot drop at small x below a certain bottom bound, which we evaluated in a model independent manner assuming the maximal strength of gluon fusion. We also calculated gluon shadowing in the saturated regime using the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation and found the nuclear ratio to be well above the unitarity bound. The recently updated analysis of parton distributions in nuclei, including BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) data on high-p{sub T} hadron production at forward rapidities, led to strong gluon shadowing. Such strong shadowing and therefore the interpretation of the nuclear modification of the p{sub T} spectra in dA collisions at RHIC seem to be inconsistent with this unitarity bound.

  18. Dynamics of a membrane-bound tryptophan analog in environments of varying hydration: a fluorescence approach.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Arora, Ajuna; Kelkar, Devaki A

    2005-12-01

    Tryptophan octyl ester (TOE) represents an important model for membrane-bound tryptophan residues. In this article, we have employed a combination of wavelength-selective fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies to monitor the effect of varying degrees of hydration on the dynamics of TOE in reverse micellar environments formed by sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in isooctane. Our results show that TOE exhibits red edge excitation shift (REES) and other wavelength-selective fluorescence effects when bound to reverse micelles of AOT. Fluorescence parameters such as intensity, emission maximum, anisotropy, and lifetime of TOE in reverse micelles of AOT depend on [water]/[surfactant] molar ratio (w (o)). These results are relevant and potentially useful for analyzing dynamics of proteins or peptides bound to membranes or membrane-mimetic media under conditions of changing hydration. PMID:16184387

  19. Bounds for nonlocality distillation protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, Manuel

    2011-06-15

    Nonlocality can be quantified by the violation of a Bell inequality. Since this violation may be amplified by local operations, an alternative measure has been proposed--distillable nonlocality. The alternative measure is difficult to calculate exactly due to the double exponential growth of the parameter space. In this paper, we give a way to bound the distillable nonlocality of a resource by the solutions to a related optimization problem. Our upper bounds are exponentially easier to compute than the exact value and are shown to be meaningful in general and tight in some cases.

  20. Design and synthesis of new fluconazole analogues.

    PubMed

    Pore, Vandana S; Agalave, Sandip G; Singh, Pratiksha; Shukla, Praveen K; Kumar, Vikash; Siddiqi, Mohammad I

    2015-06-21

    We have synthesized new fluconazole analogues containing two different 1,2,3-triazole units in the side chain. The synthesis of new amide analogues using a variety of acids is also described. All the compounds showed very good antifungal activity. A hemolysis study of the most active compounds 6e and 13j showed that both compounds did not cause any hemolysis at the dilutions tested. These compounds did not exhibit any toxicity to L929 cells at MIC and lower concentrations. In the docking study, the overall binding mode of 6e and 13j appeared to be reasonable and provided a good insight into the structural basis of inhibition of Candida albicans Cyp51 by these compounds. PMID:25975803

  1. Synthesis of constrained analogues of tryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Negrato, Marco; Abbiati, Giorgio; Dell’Acqua, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Summary A Lewis acid-catalysed diastereoselective [4 + 2] cycloaddition of vinylindoles and methyl 2-acetamidoacrylate, leading to methyl 3-acetamido-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocarbazole-3-carboxylate derivatives, is described. Treatment of the obtained cycloadducts under hydrolytic conditions results in the preparation of a small library of compounds bearing the free amino acid function at C-3 and pertaining to the class of constrained tryptophan analogues. PMID:26664620

  2. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of acetogenin analogues.

    PubMed

    Rodier, S; Le Huérou, Y; Renoux, B; Doyon, J; Renard, P; Pierré, A; Gesson, J P; Grée, R

    2000-06-19

    A set of 16 new simplified analogues of acetogenins has been designed based on: (i) the replacement of the bis THF moiety of these natural products by an ethylene glycol bis ether unit; (ii) the introduction of different lipophilic side chains (alkyl, aryl, dialkylamino, O-cholesteryl); (iii) the presence of the same terminal isolactone. In vitro cytotoxic activity against L1210 leukemia is reported. PMID:10890167

  3. Efficient synthesis of esermethole and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongyun; Zhao, Yuanhong; Dai, Xiaoyong; Liu, Jianping; Li, Liang; Zhang, Hongbin

    2011-06-01

    In this work, a general and flexible synthetic route towards the synthesis of pyrroloindoline alkaloids was developed. This new strategy features with a palladium mediated sequential arylation-allylation of o-bromoanilides and leads to the construction of oxindoles bearing a full carbon quaternary center. The cheap triphenylphosphine was proved to be a highly effective ligand for this one pot transformation. On the basis of this new method, esermethole and its analogues were synthesized. PMID:21472186

  4. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  5. Liver S9 Fraction-Derived Metabolites of Curcumin Analogue UBS109

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To address the shortcomings of the natural product curcumin, many groups have created analogues that share similar structural features while displaying superior properties, particularly in anticancer drug discovery. Relatively unexplored have been the mechanisms by which such compounds are metabolized. A comprehensive in vitro study of a curcumin analogue (UBS109) in liver S9 fractions from five different species is presented. Further, we examine the cell-based bioactivity of the major metabolites. In spite of the fact that UBS109 reduces tumor growth in mice, it is quickly metabolized in vitro and 94% protein bound in mouse plasma. The primary monounsaturated metabolite is only modestly bioactive against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. These observations suggest that while the α,β-unsaturated ketone common to curcumin analogues is important for bioactivity, protein binding and tissue distribution may serve to protect UBS109 from full metabolism in vivo while allowing it to exert a pharmacological effect by means of slow drug release. PMID:24900828

  6. Incorporation of Methionine Analogues Into Bombyx mori Silk Fibroin for Click Modifications.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Hidetoshi; Kojima, Katsura

    2015-05-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibroin incorporating three methionine (Met) analogues-homopropargylglycine (Hpg), azidohomoalanine (Aha), and homoallylglycine (Hag)-can be produced simply by adding them to the diet of B. mori larvae. The Met analogues are recognized by methionyl-tRNA synthetase, bound to tRNA(Met), and used for the translation of adenine-uracil-guanine (AUG) codons competitively with Met. In the presence of the standard amount of Met in the diet, incorporation of these analogues remains low. Lowering the amount of Met in the diet drastically improves incorporation efficiencies. Alkyne and azide groups in Hpg and Aha incorporated into silk fibroin can be selectively modified with Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions (click chemistry). Since Met residues exist only at the N-terminal domain of the fibroin heavy chain and in the fibroin light chain, good access to the reactive sites is expected and domain-selective modifications are possible without perturbing other major domains, including repetitive domains. PMID:25644632

  7. Blood Loss Estimation Using Gauze Visual Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Ali Algadiem, Emran; Aleisa, Abdulmohsen Ali; Alsubaie, Huda Ibrahim; Buhlaiqah, Noora Radhi; Algadeeb, Jihad Bagir; Alsneini, Hussain Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimating intraoperative blood loss can be a difficult task, especially when blood is mostly absorbed by gauze. In this study, we have provided an improved method for estimating blood absorbed by gauze. Objectives To develop a guide to estimate blood absorbed by surgical gauze. Materials and Methods A clinical experiment was conducted using aspirated blood and common surgical gauze to create a realistic amount of absorbed blood in the gauze. Different percentages of staining were photographed to create an analogue for the amount of blood absorbed by the gauze. Results A visual analogue scale was created to aid the estimation of blood absorbed by the gauze. The absorptive capacity of different gauze sizes was determined when the gauze was dripping with blood. The amount of reduction in absorption was also determined when the gauze was wetted with normal saline before use. Conclusions The use of a visual analogue may increase the accuracy of blood loss estimation and decrease the consequences related to over or underestimation of blood loss. PMID:27626017

  8. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  9. Teacher Education in Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Richard A.

    A series of Outward Bound programs and experiences was planned for El Paso County, Colorado, school teachers to increase their awareness of their personal characteristics, especially those that might enhance learning on the part of their students. Part of the planning for the program involved a survey of county high school teachers, counselors,…

  10. Wronskian Method for Bound States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple and straightforward method based on Wronskians for the calculation of bound-state energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems. We explicitly discuss the asymptotic behaviour of the wavefunction and show that the allowed energies make the divergent part vanish. As illustrative examples we consider…

  11. Hydrogen adsorption in thin films of Prussian blue analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Ding, Vivian; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Steve; Zhao, Yusheng

    2008-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurement was used to investigate the kinetics of the molecular hydrogen adsorption into thin films of prussian blue analogues - Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} at ambient conditions. Although the equilibrium adsorption seems to be independent of the thickness, the adsorption rate substantially decreases with the thickness of the films. In addition, the reversibility of H{sub 2} adsorption into the Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} films was investigated. The results indicate that the Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} maily interacts with H{sub 2} molecules physically. The highest H{sub 2} uptake by the Cu{sub 3}[Co(CN){sub 6}]{sub 2} films is obtained when the gas phase is stagnant inside the testing cell. However, the unusual high H{sub 2} uptake obtained from the QCM-D measurement makes us question how reliable this analytic methodology is.

  12. Titania bound sodium titanate ion exchanger

    DOEpatents

    DeFilippi, Irene C. G.; Yates, Stephen Frederic; Shen, Jian-Kun; Gaita, Romulus; Sedath, Robert Henry; Seminara, Gary Joseph; Straszewski, Michael Peter; Anderson, David Joseph

    1999-03-23

    This invention is method for preparing a titania bound ion exchange composition comprising admixing crystalline sodium titanate and a hydrolyzable titanium compound and, thereafter drying the titania bound crystalline sodium titanate and subjecting the dried titania bound ion exchange composition to optional compaction and calcination steps to improve the physical strength of the titania bound composition.

  13. Climatic Forecasting of Net Infiltration at Yucca Montain Using Analogue Meteororological Data

    SciTech Connect

    B. Faybishenko

    2006-09-11

    At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, future changes in climatic conditions will most likely alter net infiltration, or the drainage below the bottom of the evapotranspiration zone within the soil profile or flow across the interface between soil and the densely welded part of the Tiva Canyon Tuff. The objectives of this paper are to: (a) develop a semi-empirical model and forecast average net infiltration rates, using the limited meteorological data from analogue meteorological stations, for interglacial (present day), and future monsoon, glacial transition, and glacial climates over the Yucca Mountain region, and (b) corroborate the computed net-infiltration rates by comparing them with the empirically and numerically determined groundwater recharge and percolation rates through the unsaturated zone from published data. In this paper, the author presents an approach for calculations of net infiltration, aridity, and precipitation-effectiveness indices, using a modified Budyko's water-balance model, with reference-surface potential evapotranspiration determined from the radiation-based Penman (1948) formula. Results of calculations show that net infiltration rates are expected to generally increase from the present-day climate to monsoon climate, to glacial transition climate, and then to the glacial climate. The forecasting results indicate the overlap between the ranges of net infiltration for different climates. For example, the mean glacial net-infiltration rate corresponds to the upper-bound glacial transition net infiltration, and the lower-bound glacial net infiltration corresponds to the glacial transition mean net infiltration. Forecasting of net infiltration for different climate states is subject to numerous uncertainties-associated with selecting climate analogue sites, using relatively short analogue meteorological records, neglecting the effects of vegetation and surface runoff and runon on a local scale, as well as possible anthropogenic climate changes.

  14. Transversely bounded DFB lasers. [bounded distributed-feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G.; Yeh, C.

    1975-01-01

    Bounded distributed-feedback (DFB) lasers are studied in detail. Threshold gain and field distribution for a number of configurations are derived and analyzed. More specifically, the thin-film guide, fiber, diffusion guide, and hollow channel with inhomogeneous-cladding DFB lasers are considered. Optimum points exist and must be used in DFB laser design. Different-modes feedback and the effects of the transverse boundaries are included. A number of applications are also discussed.

  15. Characterizing analogue caldera collapse with computerized X-ray micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Sam; Holohan, Eoghan; Boone, Matthieu; Pauwels, Elin; Cnudde, Veerle; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    Analogue models in the past mainly explored caldera collapse structures by documenting 2D model cross-sections. Kinematic aspects and 3D structures of caldera collapse are less well understood, although they are essential to interpret recent field and monitoring data. We applied high resolution radiography and computerized X-ray micro-tomography (µCT) to image the deformation during analogue fluid withdrawal in small-scale caldera collapse models. The models test and highlight the possibilities and limitations of µCT-scanning to qualitatively image and quantitatively analyse deformation of analogue volcano-tectonic experiments. High resolution interval radiography sequences document '2.5D' surface and internal model geometry, and subsidence kinematics of a collapsing caldera block into an emptying fluid body in an unprecedented way. During the whole drainage process, all subsidence was bound by caldera ring faults. Subsidence was associated with dilatation of the analogue granular material within the collapsing column. The temporal subsidence rate pattern within the subsiding volume comprised three phases: 1) Upward ring fault propagation, 2) Rapid subsidence with the highest subsidence rates within the uppermost subsiding volume, 3) Relatively slower subsidence rates over the whole column with intermittent subsidence rate acceleration. Such acceleration did almost never affect the whole column. By using radiography sequences it is possible in a non-destructive manner to obtain a continuous observation of fault propagation, down sag mechanisms and the subsequent development of collapse structures. Multi-angle µCT scans of the collapse result allow for a full virtual 3D reconstruction of the model. This leads to an unprecedented 3D view on fault geometries. The developed method is a step towards the quantitative documentation of volcano-tectonic models that would render data interpretations immediately comparable to monitoring data available from recent

  16. 6MAP, a fluorescent adenine analogue, is a probe of base flipping by DNA photolyase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kongsheng; Matsika, Spiridoula; Stanley, Robert J

    2007-09-01

    Cyclobutylpyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are formed between adjacent pyrimidines in DNA when it absorbs ultraviolet light. CPDs can be directly repaired by DNA photolyase (PL) in the presence of visible light. How PL recognizes and binds its substrate is still not well understood. Fluorescent nucleic acid base analogues are powerful probes of DNA structure. We have used the fluorescent adenine analogue 6MAP, a pteridone, to probe the local double helical structure of the CPD substrate when bound by photolyase. Duplex melting temperatures were obtained by both UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies to ascertain the effect of the probe and the CPD on DNA stability. Steady-state fluorescence measurements of 6MAP-containing single-stranded and doubled-stranded oligos with and without protein show that the local region around the CPD is significantly disrupted. 6MAP shows a different quenching pattern compared to 2-aminopurine, another important adenine analogue, although both probes show that the structure of the complementary strand opposing the 5'-side of the CPD lesion is more destacked than that opposing the 3'-side in substrate/protein complexes. We also show that 6MAP/CPD duplexes are substrates for PL. Vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moment directions for 6MAP were calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. Using these results, the Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency between the individual adenine analogues and the oxidized flavin cofactor was calculated to account for the observed intensity pattern. These calculations suggest that energy transfer is highly efficient for the 6MAP probe and less so for the 2Ap probe. However, no experimental evidence for this process was observed in the steady-state emission spectra. PMID:17696385

  17. Ultrasonic Time Reversal Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Mathias; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael

    2004-11-01

    For more than ten years, time reversal techniques have been developed in many different fields of applications including detection of defects in solids, underwater acoustics, room acoustics and also ultrasound medical imaging and therapy. The essential property that makes time reversed acoustics possible is that the underlying physical process of wave propagation would be unchanged if time were reversed. In a non dissipative medium, the equations governing the waves guarantee that for every burst of sound that diverges from a source there exists in theory a set of waves that would precisely retrace the path of the sound back to the source. If the source is pointlike, this allows focusing back on the source whatever the medium complexity. For this reason, time reversal represents a very powerful adaptive focusing technique for complex media. The generation of this reconverging wave can be achieved by using Time Reversal Mirrors (TRM). It is made of arrays of ultrasonic reversible piezoelectric transducers that can record the wavefield coming from the sources and send back its time-reversed version in the medium. It relies on the use of fully programmable multi-channel electronics. In this paper we present some applications of iterative time reversal mirrors to target detection in medical applications.

  18. Reverse Transfer in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    This article considers national Australian data on reverse transfer--the transfer of students from bachelor programs or higher to sub baccalaureate programs, institutions and sectors. It finds that previous studies have overstated the prevalence and perhaps also the significance of reverse transfer. The data are not good, but the best conclusion…

  19. Justice and Reverse Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alan H.

    Defining reverse discrimination as hiring or admissions decisions based on normally irrelevant criteria, this book develops principles of rights, compensation, and equal opportunity applicable to the reverse discrimination issue. The introduction defines the issue and discusses deductive and inductive methodology as applied to reverse…

  20. Reverse Discrimination: Recent Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhilber, August W.

    This paper discusses reverse discrimination cases with particular emphasis on Bakke v. Regents of University of California and those cases which preceded it. A brief history is given of court cases used by opponents and proponents in the discussion of reverse discrimination. Legal theory and a discussion of court cases that preceded Bakke follow.…

  1. Quantum secret sharing schemes and reversibility of quantum operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Akira; Iwamoto, Mitsugu; Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    2005-09-15

    Quantum secret sharing schemes encrypting a quantum state into a multipartite entangled state are treated. The lower bound on the dimension of each share given by Gottesman [Phys. Rev. A 61, 042311 (2000)] is revisited based on a relation between the reversibility of quantum operations and the Holevo information. We also propose a threshold ramp quantum secret sharing scheme and evaluate its coding efficiency.

  2. Reversible Shape Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Qiaoxi; Turner, Sara; Brosnan, Sarah; Tippets, Cary; Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Nykypnachuk, Dmytro; Gang, Oleg; Dobrynin, Andrey; Lopez, Rene; Ashby, Valerie; Sheiko, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Reversible shape memory has been achieved on various shapes, e.g. hairpin, origami, coil, robotic gripper and flow rate control device, allowing for multiple switching between encoded shapes without applying any external force. Also, the reversible photonic structure molded in dielectric elastomers has been designed. Maximum reversibility can be achieved by tuning the crosslinking density and the degree of crystallinity of semi-crystalline elastomers. Different crystallization protocols including isothermal and cooling crystallization have been applied to develop a universal picture integrating different shape memory (SM) behaviors: conventional one-way SM, two-way reversible SM, and one-way reversible SM. Acknowledge financial support from the NSF DMR-1122483, DMR- 1004576, and DMR-1206957.

  3. Design of potent linear alpha-melanotropin 4-10 analogues modified in positions 5 and 10.

    PubMed

    Al-Obeidi, F; Hruby, V J; Castrucci, A M; Hadley, M E

    1989-01-01

    alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is a linear tridecapeptide (Ac-Ser-Tyr-Ser-Met-Glu-His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-Lys-Pro-Val-NH2) that has diverse physiological functions in addition to its reversible darkening of amphibian skins by stimulating melanosome dispersion within melanophores. On the basis of theoretical and experimental results from our laboratory and others, we have designed a group of 1-13, 4-13, and especially 4-10 analogues related to the superpotent analogue [Nle4,D-Phe7]alpha-MSH in which the Glu5 has been replaced with Asp5, and the Gly10 has been replaced with Lys10 and other basic amino acid residues in the 4-10 analogues, and in which Gly10 and Lys11 were interchanged in the longer peptide analogues. In the 1-13 and 4-13 series the Lys10, Gly11 analogues generally retained superpotency for the D-Phe7-containing analogues. Most interestingly, synthesis of Ac-[Nle4,Xxx5,Yyy7,Zzz10]alpha-MSH4-10-NH2 analogues where Xxx = Asp or Glu, Yyy = Phe or D-Phe, and Zzz = basic amino acids (Lys, Orn, alpha,gamma-diaminobutyric acid (Dab), and alpha,beta-diaminopropionic acid (Dpr] provided melanotropins with potencies up to 10 times that of the native hormone in stimulating frog (Rana pipiens) skin darkening and 8-50 times more potent than alpha-MSH in stimulating lizard (Anolis carolinensis) skin melanophores in vitro. To our knowledge, Ac-[Nle4,Asp5,D-Phe7,Dab10]alpha-MSH4-10-NH2, the most potent analogue, is the most potent melanotropin obtained thus far for the Anolis assay system. These results provide new insights into the structural and conformational requirements for biological potency of alpha-MSH and the differential structural and conformational requirements of alpha-MSH and its analogues at two different types of pigment cell receptors. PMID:2535874

  4. Modifications of the Griesmer bound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Solomon, G.

    1991-01-01

    The Griesmer bound is a classical technique (developed in 1960) for estimating the minimum length n required for a binary linear code with a given dimension k and minimum distance d. In this article, a unified derivation of the Griesmer bound and two new variations on it are presented. The first variation deals with linear codes which contain the all-ones vector; such codes are quite common and are useful in practice because of their 'transparent' properties. The second variation deals with codes that are constrained to contain a word of weight greater than or equal to M. In both cases these constraints (the all-ones word or a word of high weight) can increase the minimum length of a code with given k and d.

  5. Three Efficient Methods for Preparation of Coelenterazine Analogues.

    PubMed

    Shakhmin, Anton; Hall, Mary P; Walker, Joel R; Machleidt, Thomas; Binkowski, Brock F; Wood, Keith V; Kirkland, Thomas A

    2016-07-18

    The growing popularity of bioluminescent assays has highlighted the need for coelenterazine analogues possessing properties tuned for specific applications. However, the structural diversity of known coelenterazine analogues has been limited by current syntheses. Known routes for the preparation of coelenterazine analogues employ harsh reaction conditions that limit access to many substituents and functional groups. Novel synthetic routes reported here establish simple and robust methods for synthesis and investigation of structurally diverse marine luciferase substrates. Specifically, these new routes allow synthesis of coelenterazine analogues containing various heterocyclic motifs and substituted aromatic groups with diverse electronic substituents at the R(2) position. Interesting analogues described herein were characterized by their physicochemical properties, bioluminescent half-life, light output, polarity and cytotoxicity. Some of the analogues represent leads that can be utilized in the development of improved bioluminescent systems. PMID:27305599

  6. Bounds for Hecke eigenforms and their allied L-functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing

    We consider Hecke eigenforms and their allied L-functions from three aspects in this thesis. First we generalize the Iwaniec's spectral large sieve estimates of Maass cusp form to the local version for all congruence groups of level q. Our approach is based on an inequality for a general bilinear form involving Kloosterman sums and Bessel functions. The exceptional eigenvalues emerge in the course of the proof. In the second part, we extend Luo's result to prove a general optimal bound for L4-norms of the dihedral Maass forms associated to Hecke's grossencharacters of a fixed real quadratic field. Given a fixed quadratic field with discriminant D, we remove the condition that the narrow class number of K is 1. The key ingredients are Watson and Ichino's formula and the local spectral large sieve inequality established in the first part. Finally we obtain a long equation intended to establish an upper bound for the second moment of symmetric square L-functions. Petersson trace formula plays an important role and we study thoroughly an analogue of Estermann series using Hurwitz zeta function and establish its meromorphic extension and functional equation. This work provides a useful approach to the further study for the central value of the symmetric square L-functions.

  7. Semiclassical bounds in magnetic bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel; Kovařík, Hynek; Weidl, Timo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to derive spectral estimates into several classes of magnetic systems. They include three-dimensional regions with Dirichlet boundary as well as a particle in ℝ3 confined by a local change of the magnetic field. We establish two-dimensional Berezin-Li-Yau and Lieb-Thirring-type bounds in the presence of magnetic fields and, using them, get three-dimensional estimates for the eigenvalue moments of the corresponding magnetic Laplacians.

  8. 78 FR 18326 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math Science... Upward Bound Math Science Annual Performance Report. OMB Control Number: 1840-NEW. Type of Review: New... under the regular Upward Bound (UB) and Upward Bound Math and Science (UBMS) Programs. The Department...

  9. Structural insights into the interactions of xpt riboswitch with novel guanine analogues: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swapan S; Sonavane, Uddhavesh B; Uppuladinne, Mallikarjunachari V N; McLaughlin, Emily C; Wang, Weiqing; Black, Sheneil; Joshi, Rajendra R

    2015-01-01

    Ligand recognition in purine riboswitches is a complex process requiring different levels of conformational changes. Recent efforts in the area of purine riboswitch research have focused on ligand analogue binding studies. In the case of the guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (xpt) riboswitch, synthetic analogues that resemble guanine have the potential to tightly bind and subsequently influence the genetic expression of xpt mRNA in prokaryotes. We have carried out 25 ns Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation studies of the aptamer domain of the xpt G-riboswitch in four different states: guanine riboswitch in free form, riboswitch bound with its cognate ligand guanine, and with two guanine analogues SJ1 and SJ2. Our work reveals novel interactions of SJ1 and SJ2 ligands with the binding core residues of the riboswitch. The ligands proposed in this work bind to the riboswitch with greater overall stability and lower root mean square deviations and fluctuations compared to guanine ligand. Reporter gene assay data demonstrate that the ligand analogues, upon binding to the RNA, lower the genetic expression of the guanine riboswitch. Our work has important implications for future ligand design and binding studies in the exciting field of riboswitches. PMID:24404773

  10. Reversible Thermal-Stiffening in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Erkan; Akcora, Pinar

    2015-03-01

    Silica nanoparticles adsorbed with a high glass-transition temperature polymer, PMMA (Tg: 130 °C) are shown to uniformly disperse in a low-Tg polymer matrix, PEO (Tg: -60 °C). These nanocomposites exhibit an unusual reversible liquid-to-solid transition at temperatures above Tg's of both polymers. Mechanical adaptivity of PEO nanocomposites to temperatures underlies the existence of dynamically asymmetric bound layers on particles, and more importantly their impact on mechanical behavior, which sets these materials apart from conventional polymer composites that soften upon heating. Moreover, the growth rate of elastic moduli at temperatures above Tg of PMMA presents an Arrhenius-type relaxation with activation energy well-matching with the α- β merging region of PMMA. These results suggest that the mobility of the surface-bound polymer is essential for reinforcement contrary to commonly accepted glassy-layer hypothesis.

  11. Hunting η-bound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machner, H.

    2010-09-01

    The η meson can be bound to atomic nuclei. Experimental search is discussed in the form of final state interaction for the reactions dp → 3Heη and dd → 4Heη. For the latter case tensor polarized deuterons were used in order to extract the s-wave strength. For both reactions complex scattering lengths are deduced: a3Heη = [± (10.7 ± 0.8+0.1-0.5) + i. (1.5 ± 2.6 +1.0-0.9)] fm and a4Heη = [±(3.1 ±0.5) + i. (0 ±0.5)] fm. In a two-nucleon transfer reaction under quasi-free conditions, p27 Al → 3HeX, was investigated. The system X can be the bound 25Mgotimesη at rest. When a possible decay of an intermediate N* (1535) is required, a highly significant bump shows up in the missing mass spectrum. The data give for a bound state a binding energy of 13.3 ±1.6 MeV and a width of σ = 4.4±1.3 MeV.

  12. CO2 Removal using a Synthetic Analogue of Carbonic Anhydrase

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-09-14

    Project attempts to develop a synthetic analogue for carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it in a membrane for separation of CO2 from coal power plant flue gas. Conference poster presents result of first 9 months of project progress including concept, basic system architecture and membrane properties target, results of molecular modeling for analogue - CO2 interaction, and next steps of testing analogue resistance to flue gas contaminants.

  13. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission natural analogue research program

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, L.A.; Ott, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes the natural analogue research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). It contains information on the regulatory context and organizational structure of the high-level radioactive waste research program plan. It also includes information on the conditions and processes constraining selection of natural analogues, describes initiatives of the US NRC, and describes the role of analogues in the licensing process.

  14. Conformationally restrained aromatic analogues of fosmidomycin and FR900098.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Thomas; Schlüter, Katrin; Pein, Miriam; Behrendt, Christoph; Bergmann, Bärbel; Walter, Rolf D

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis and in-vitro antimalarial activity of conformationally restrained bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) ester analogues of the natural product fosmidomycin is presented. In contrast to alpha-aryl-substituted analogues, conformationally restrained aromatic analogues exhibit only moderate in-vitro antimalarial activity against the chloroquine-sensitive strain 3D7 of Plasmodium falciparum. The most active derivative displays an IC(50) value of 47 microM. PMID:17611943

  15. Analogue factoring algorithm based on polychromatic interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamma, Vincenzo; Garuccio, Augusto; Shih, Yanhua

    2010-08-01

    We present a novel factorization algorithm which can be computed using an analogue computer based on a polychromatic source with a given wavelength bandwidth, a multi-path interferometer and a spectrometer. The core of this algorithm stands on the measurement of the periodicity of a "factoring" function given by an exponential sum at continuous argument by recording a sequence of interferograms associated with suitable units of displacement in the inteferometer. A remarking rescaling property of such interferograms allows, in principle, the prime number decomposition of several large integers. The information about factors is encoded in the location of the inteferogram maxima.

  16. Spectroscopic study of solar twins and analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datson, Juliet; Flynn, Chris; Portinari, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Context. Many large stellar surveys have been and are still being carried out, providing huge amounts of data, for which stellar physical parameters will be derived. Solar twins and analogues provide a means to test the calibration of these stellar catalogues because the Sun is the best-studied star and provides precise fundamental parameters. Solar twins should be centred on the solar values. Aims: This spectroscopic study of solar analogues selected from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) at a resolution of 48 000 provides effective temperatures and metallicities for these stars. We test whether our spectroscopic parameters, as well as the previous photometric calibrations, are properly centred on the Sun. In addition, we search for more solar twins in our sample. Methods: The methods used in this work are based on literature methods for solar twin searches and on methods we developed in previous work to distinguish the metallicity-temperature degeneracies in the differential comparison of spectra of solar analogues versus a reference solar reflection spectrum. Results: We derive spectroscopic parameters for 148 solar analogues (about 70 are new entries to the literature) and verify with a-posteriori differential tests that our values are well-centred on the solar values. We use our dataset to assess the two alternative calibrations of the GCS parameters; our methods favour the latest revision. We show that the choice of spectral line list or the choice of asteroid or time of observation does not affect the results. We also identify seven solar twins in our sample, three of which are published here for the first time. Conclusions: Our methods provide an independent means to differentially test the calibration of stellar catalogues around the values of a well-known benchmark star, which makes our work interesting for calibration tests of upcoming Galactic surveys. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Observatory under programme ID 077.D

  17. Phonon analogue of topological nodal semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po, Hoi Chun; Bahri, Yasaman; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2015-03-01

    Recently, Kane and Lubensky proposed a mapping between bosonic phonon problems on isostatic lattices to chiral fermion systems based on factorization of the dynamical matrix [Nat. Phys. 10, 39 (2014)]. The existence of topologically protected zero modes in such mechanical problems is related to their presence in the fermionic system and is dictated by a local index theorem. Here we adopt the proposed mapping to construct a two-dimensional mechanical analogue of a fermionic topological nodal semimetal that hosts a robust bulk node in its linearized phonon spectrum. Such topologically protected soft modes with tunable wavevector may be useful in designing mechanical structures with fault-tolerant properties.

  18. Digitoxin Analogues with Improved Anticytomegalovirus Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides are potent inhibitors of cancer cell growth and possess antiviral activities at nanomolar concentrations. In this study we evaluated the anticytomegalovirus (CMV) activity of digitoxin and several of its analogues. We show that sugar type and sugar length attached to the steroid core structure affects its anticytomegalovirus activity. Structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies identified the l-sugar containing cardiac glycosides as having improved anti-CMV activity and may lead to better understanding of how these compounds inhibit CMV replication. PMID:24900847

  19. Materials analogue of zero-stiffness structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Subramaniam, Anandh

    2011-04-01

    Anglepoise lamps and certain tensegrities are examples of zero-stiffness structures. These structures are in a state of neutral equilibrium with respect to changes in configuration of the system. Using Eshelby's example of an edge dislocation in a thin plate that can bend, we report the discovery of a non-trivial new class of material structures as an analogue to zero-stiffness structures. For extended positions of the edge dislocation in these structures, the dislocation experiences a zero image force. Salient features of these material structures along with the key differences from conventional zero-stiffness structures are pointed out.

  20. Aminotroponiminates as tunable, redox-active ligands: reversible single electron transfer and reductive dimerisation.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, C; Krummenacher, I

    2016-08-21

    Aminotroponiminates (atis) are shown to be redox-active ligands. Under strongly reducing conditions, the result of electron transfer can be controlled by the choice of the metal bound to the ati ligand. Either reversible electron transfer or a reductively induced dimerisation is observed. The latter reaction is (regio- and diastereo-) selective and chemically reversible. PMID:27452905

  1. Time-reversal violation in beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, P.

    2003-01-01

    At present there is no unambigous direct evidence for time-reversal (T) violation in the fundamental interactions. But T-violation is intimately connected with CP-violation by the CPT theorem. A stringent bound on possible violation of CPT invariance comes from the properties of K{sup 0} - {bar K}{sup 0} mixing [I]. In the following we shall assume that CPT violating interactions, if present, can be neglected, and use the terms 'T-violation' and 'CP-violation' interchangably.

  2. Fate of Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and Formation of Ester- and Ether-Linked Bound Residues in an Oxic Sandy Soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangjie; Wang, Jiajia; Jiang, Bingqi; Yang, Xue; Nastold, Peter; Kolvenbach, Boris; Wang, Lianhong; Ma, Yini; Corvini, Philippe François-Xavier; Ji, Rong

    2015-11-01

    Bound-residue formation is a major dissipation process of most organic xenobiotics in soil. However, both the formation and nature of bound residues of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in soil are unclear. Using a 14C-tracer, we studied the fate of TBBPA in an oxic soil during 143 days of incubation. TBBPA dissipated with a half-life of 14.7 days; at the end of incubation, 19.6% mineralized and 66.5% formed bound residues. Eight extractable metabolites were detected, including TBBPA methyl ethers, single-ring bromophenols, and their methyl ethers. Bound residues (mostly bound to humin) rapidly formed during the first 35 days. The amount of those humin-bound residues then quickly decreased, whereas total bound residues decreased slowly. By contrast, residues bound to humic acids and fulvic acids increased continuously until a plateau was reached. Ester- and ether-linked residues accounted for 9.6-27.0% of total bound residues during the incubation, with ester linkages being predominant. Residues bound via ester linkages consisted of TBBPA, TBBPA monomethyl ether, and an unknown polar compound. Our results indicated that bound-residue formation is the major pathway of TBBPA dissipation in oxic soil and provide first insights into the chemical structure of the reversibly ester-linked bound residues of TBBPA and its metabolites. PMID:26444952

  3. Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines as conformationally restricted analogues of the antibacterial agent trimethoprim.

    PubMed

    Kuyper, L F; Garvey, J M; Baccanari, D P; Champness, J N; Stammers, D K; Beddell, C R

    1996-04-01

    Conformationally restricted analogues of the antibacterial agent trimethoprim (TMP) were designed to mimic the conformation of drug observed in its complex with bacterial dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This conformation of TMP was achieved by linking the 4-amino function to the methylene group by one- and two-carbon bridges. A pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine, a dihydro analogue, and a tetrahydropyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine were synthesized and tested as inhibitors of DHFR. One analogue showed activity equivalent to that of TMP against DHFR from three species of bacteria. An X-ray crystal structure of this inhibitor bound to Escherichia coli DHFR was determined to evaluate the structural consequences of the conformational restriction. PMID:8735847

  4. Dissipation Bound for Thermodynamic Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-12-01

    Biological and engineered systems operate by coupling function to the transfer of heat and/or particles down a thermal or chemical gradient. In idealized deterministically driven systems, thermodynamic control can be exerted reversibly, with no entropy production, as long as the rate of the protocol is made slow compared to the equilibration time of the system. Here we consider fully realizable, entropically driven systems where the control parameters themselves obey rules that are reversible and that acquire directionality in time solely through dissipation. We show that when such a system moves in a directed way through thermodynamic space, it must produce entropy that is on average larger than its generalized displacement as measured by the Fisher information metric. This distance measure is subextensive but cannot be made small by slowing the rate of the protocol.

  5. Dissipation Bound for Thermodynamic Control.

    PubMed

    Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-12-31

    Biological and engineered systems operate by coupling function to the transfer of heat and/or particles down a thermal or chemical gradient. In idealized deterministically driven systems, thermodynamic control can be exerted reversibly, with no entropy production, as long as the rate of the protocol is made slow compared to the equilibration time of the system. Here we consider fully realizable, entropically driven systems where the control parameters themselves obey rules that are reversible and that acquire directionality in time solely through dissipation. We show that when such a system moves in a directed way through thermodynamic space, it must produce entropy that is on average larger than its generalized displacement as measured by the Fisher information metric. This distance measure is subextensive but cannot be made small by slowing the rate of the protocol. PMID:26764981

  6. The electrical properties of Mars analogue dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, J.; Jensen, J.; Kinch, K.; Mugford, R.; Nørnberg, P.

    2004-03-01

    Dust is a major environmental factor on the surface and in the atmosphere of Mars. Knowing the electrical charge state of this dust would be of both scientific interest and important for the safety of instruments on the Martian surface. In this study the first measurements have been performed of dust electrification using suspended Mars analogue material. This has been achieved by attracting suspended dust onto electrodes placed inside a Mars simulation wind tunnel. The Mars analogue used was from Salten Skov in Denmark, this contained a high concentration of ferric oxide precipitate. Once suspended, this dust was found to consist of almost equal quantities of negatively (46±6%) and positively (44±15%) charged grains. These grains were estimated to typically carry a net charge of around 10 5e, this is sufficient to dominate the processes of adhesion and cohesion of this suspended dust. Evidence is presented for electrostatic aggregation of the dust while in suspension. Development of a simple instrument for measuring electrical charging of the suspended dust on Mars will be discussed.

  7. Long-term predictions using natural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    One of the unique and scientifically most challenging aspects of nuclear waste isolation is the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data (hours to years) to the long time periods (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} years) required by regulatory agencies for performance assessment. The direct validation of these extrapolations is not possible, but methods must be developed to demonstrate compliance with government regulations and to satisfy the lay public that there is a demonstrable and reasonable basis for accepting the long-term extrapolations. Natural systems (e.g., {open_quotes}natural analogues{close_quotes}) provide perhaps the only means of partial {open_quotes}validation,{close_quotes} as well as data that may be used directly in the models that are used in the extrapolation. Natural systems provide data on very large spatial (nm to km) and temporal (10{sup 3}-10{sup 8} years) scales and in highly complex terranes in which unknown synergisms may affect radionuclide migration. This paper reviews the application (and most importantly, the limitations) of data from natural analogue systems to the {open_quotes}validation{close_quotes} of performance assessments.

  8. Self-Powered Analogue Smart Skin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mayue; Zhang, Jinxin; Chen, Haotian; Han, Mengdi; Shankaregowda, Smitha A; Su, Zongming; Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-04-26

    The progress of smart skin technology presents unprecedented opportunities for artificial intelligence. Resolution enhancement and energy conservation are critical to improve the perception and standby time of robots. Here, we present a self-powered analogue smart skin for detecting contact location and velocity of the object, based on a single-electrode contact electrification effect and planar electrostatic induction. Using an analogue localizing method, the resolution of this two-dimensional smart skin can be achieved at 1.9 mm with only four terminals, which notably decreases the terminal number of smart skins. The sensitivity of this smart skin is remarkable, which can even perceive the perturbation of a honey bee. Meanwhile, benefiting from the triboelectric mechanism, extra power supply is unnecessary for this smart skin. Therefore, it solves the problems of batteries and connecting wires for smart skins. With microstructured poly(dimethylsiloxane) films and silver nanowire electrodes, it can be covered on the skin with transparency, flexibility, and high sensitivity. PMID:27010713

  9. Tubal ligation reversal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fernandez H, Gervaise A. Tubal anastomosis after tubal sterilization: a review. Arch Gynecol Obstet . 2011 May;283( ... Berger GS, Zerden ML. Pregnancy success after hysteroscopic sterilization reversal. Obstet Gynecol . 2014 Dec;124(6):1183- ...

  10. Reversible shape memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; Zhou, Jing; White, Sarah; Ashby, Valerie

    2012-02-01

    An ``Achilles' heel'' of shape memory materials is that shape transformations triggered by an external stimulus are usually irreversible. Here we present a new concept of reversible transitions between two well-defined shapes by controlling hierarchic crystallization of a dual-network elastomer. The reversibility was demonstrated for different types of shape transformations including rod bending, winding of a helical coil, and widening an aperture. The distinct feature of the reversible shape alterations is that both counter-shapes are infinitely stable at a temperature of exploitation. Shape reversibility is highly desirable property in many practical applications such as non-surgical removal of a previously inserted catheter and handfree wrapping up of an earlier unraveled solar sail on a space shuttle.

  11. Lower bounds for randomized Exclusive Write PRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, P.D.

    1995-05-02

    In this paper we study the question: How useful is randomization in speeding up Exclusive Write PRAM computations? Our results give further evidence that randomization is of limited use in these types of computations. First we examine a compaction problem on both the CREW and EREW PRAM models, and we present randomized lower bounds which match the best deterministic lower bounds known. (For the CREW PRAM model, the lower bound is asymptotically optimal.) These are the first non-trivial randomized lower bounds known for the compaction problem on these models. We show that our lower bounds also apply to the problem of approximate compaction. Next we examine the problem of computing boolean functions on the CREW PRAM model, and we present a randomized lower bound, which improves on the previous best randomized lower bound for many boolean functions, including the OR function. (The previous lower bounds for these functions were asymptotically optimal, but we improve the constant multiplicative factor.) We also give an alternate proof for the randomized lower bound on PARITY, which was already optimal to within a constant additive factor. Lastly, we give a randomized lower bound for integer merging on an EREW PRAM which matches the best deterministic lower bound known. In all our proofs, we use the Random Adversary method, which has previously only been used for proving lower bounds on models with Concurrent Write capabilities. Thus this paper also serves to illustrate the power and generality of this method for proving parallel randomized lower bounds.

  12. Giant rodlike reversed micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.J.; Neuman, R.D. )

    1994-05-04

    Herein we report that sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate, which is similar in structure to the classical surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), forms very large rodlike reversed micelles and that their size can be even much larger if water is removed from the apolar solution. We further suggest that long-range electrostatic interactions are the primary driving force for the formation of giant reversed micelles. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Indenter growth in analogue models of Alpine-type deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Talbot, Christopher J.; Boccaletti, Mario; Milnes, Alan G.

    1999-02-01

    A series of analogue experiments were carried out to simulate continental convergence, as seen in a profile through the Central Alps. A rigid indenter, representing the Adriatic plate, was driven laterally into a sand pack representing the brittle upper crust of Europe, detached and thickening above its subducting ductile lower crust. The rigid indenter advanced at the same steady rate in each experiment, but the dip of its front face was steepened in 15° increments from 15° to 90°. Where the rigid indenter face dipped at 45° or less, a sand wedge rose and was bound by a series of forekinks that nucleated at the toe of the indenter. Where the face of the rigid indenter dipped 60° or more, the wedge was defined by a single forekink and one or more backkinks that nucleated from a point advancing in front of the indenter toe. We interpret these results as indicating that slices of the sand pack and rising wedge are transferred across kink bands to build an "effective" indenter with a frontal dip closer to that dictated by the changing shear strength of the sand pile, which thickens vertically as it shortens laterally. One of our models (with a rigid indenter dipping 75°) simulates most of the major structures shown in recent syntheses of surface geology and deep seismic data in the Central Alps, without the isostatic lithospheric depression. This model accounts for the late collisional stage (Oligocene to Present) complex strain and metamorphic histories in the core of the orogenic wedge, the rapid rise and extrusion of small pips of Alpine eclogites, and the current passivity of the Insubric Line. It also emphasizes that lateral extension along gently dipping "thrusts" (orogen-normal horizontal escape) is confined to the extruded portion of the rising wedge.

  14. MDMA (3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine) Analogues as Tools to Characterize MDMA-Like Effects: An Approach to Understand Entactogen Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Briones, P.; Hernández, A.

    2013-01-01

    Besides stimulants and hallucinogens, whose psychotropic effects are shared by many structurally related molecules exhibiting different efficacies and potencies in humans, the phenylisopropylamine MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, XTC, “Ecstasy”) is the prototypical representative of a separate class of psychotropic substance, able to elicit the so-called entactogenic syndrome in healthy humans. This reversible altered state of consciousness, usually described as an “open mind state”, may have relevant therapeutic applications, both in psychotherapy and as a pharmacological support in many neuropsychiatric disorders with a high rate of treatment failure. Nevertheless, a comprehensive and systematic exploration of the structure-activity relationships associated with entactogenic activity has remained incomplete and controversial, highlighting the possibility that MDMA might represent a pharmacological rarity in the field of psychotropics. As the latter is still an open question, the pharmacological characterization of MDMA analogues remains the logical strategy to attempt the elucidation of the structural requirements needed to elicit typical MDMA-like effects. Intriguingly, almost no experimental evidence supports the existence of actual MDMA analogues that truly resemble the whole pharmacological profile of MDMA, probably due to its complex (and partially not fully understood) mechanism of action that includes a disruption of monoaminergic neurotransmission. The present review presents a brief summary of the pharmacology of MDMA, followed by the evidence accumulated over the years regarding the characterization of classical structurally related MDMA analogues in different models and how this state of the art highlights the need to develop new and better MDMA analogues. PMID:24403876

  15. MDMA (3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine) Analogues as Tools to Characterize MDMA-Like Effects: An Approach to Understand Entactogen Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Briones, P; Hernández, A

    2013-09-01

    Besides stimulants and hallucinogens, whose psychotropic effects are shared by many structurally related molecules exhibiting different efficacies and potencies in humans, the phenylisopropylamine MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, XTC, "Ecstasy") is the prototypical representative of a separate class of psychotropic substance, able to elicit the so-called entactogenic syndrome in healthy humans. This reversible altered state of consciousness, usually described as an "open mind state", may have relevant therapeutic applications, both in psychotherapy and as a pharmacological support in many neuropsychiatric disorders with a high rate of treatment failure. Nevertheless, a comprehensive and systematic exploration of the structure-activity relationships associated with entactogenic activity has remained incomplete and controversial, highlighting the possibility that MDMA might represent a pharmacological rarity in the field of psychotropics. As the latter is still an open question, the pharmacological characterization of MDMA analogues remains the logical strategy to attempt the elucidation of the structural requirements needed to elicit typical MDMA-like effects. Intriguingly, almost no experimental evidence supports the existence of actual MDMA analogues that truly resemble the whole pharmacological profile of MDMA, probably due to its complex (and partially not fully understood) mechanism of action that includes a disruption of monoaminergic neurotransmission. The present review presents a brief summary of the pharmacology of MDMA, followed by the evidence accumulated over the years regarding the characterization of classical structurally related MDMA analogues in different models and how this state of the art highlights the need to develop new and better MDMA analogues. PMID:24403876

  16. Coefficient of performance and its bounds with the figure of merit for a general refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Rui; Liu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    A general refrigerator model with non-isothermal processes is studied. The coefficient of performance (COP) and its bounds at maximum χ figure of merit are obtained and analyzed. This model accounts for different heat capacities during the heat transfer processes. So, different kinds of refrigerator cycles can be considered. Under the constant heat capacity condition, the upper bound of the COP is the Curzon-Ahlborn (CA) coefficient of performance and is independent of the time durations of the heat exchanging processes. With the maximum χ criterion, in the refrigerator cycles, such as the reversed Brayton refrigerator cycle, the reversed Otto refrigerator cycle and the reversed Atkinson refrigerator cycle, where the heat capacity in the heat absorbing process is not less than that in the heat releasing process, their COPs are bounded by the CA coefficient of performance; otherwise, such as for the reversed Diesel refrigerator cycle, its COP can exceed the CA coefficient of performance. Furthermore, the general refined upper and lower bounds have been proposed.

  17. Bound adenosine 5'-triphosphate formation, bound adenosine 5'-diphosphate and inorganic phosphate retention, and inorganic phosphate oxygen exchange by chloroplast adenosinetriphosphatase in the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+.

    PubMed

    Wu, D; Boyer, P D

    1986-06-01

    When the heat-activated chloroplast F1 ATPase hydrolyzes [3H, gamma-32P]ATP, followed by the removal of medium ATP, ADP, and Pi, the enzyme has labeled ATP, ADP, and Pi bound to it in about equal amounts. The total of the bound [3H]ADP and [3H]ATP approaches 1 mol/mol of enzyme. Over a 30-min period, most of the bound [32P]Pi falls off, and the bound [3H]ATP is converted to bound [3H]ADP. Enzyme with such remaining tightly bound ADP will form bound ATP from relatively high concentrations of medium Pi with either Mg2+ or Ca2+ present. The tightly bound ADP is thus at a site that retains a catalytic capacity for slow single-site ATP hydrolysis (or synthesis) and is likely the site that participates in cooperative rapid net ATP hydrolysis. During hydrolysis of 50 microM [3H]ATP in the presence of either Mg2+ or Ca2+, the enzyme has a steady-state level of about one bound [3H]ADP per mole of enzyme. Because bound [3H]ATP is also present, the [3H]ADP is regarded as being present on two cooperating catalytic sites. The formation and levels of bound ATP, ADP, and Pi show that reversal of bound ATP hydrolysis can occur with either Ca2+ or Mg2+ present. They do not reveal why no phosphate oxygen exchange accompanies cleavage of low ATP concentrations with Ca2+ in contrast to Mg2+ with the heat-activated enzyme. Phosphate oxygen exchange does occur with either Mg2+ or Ca2+ present when low ATP concentrations are hydrolyzed with the octyl glucoside activated ATPase. Ligand binding properties of Ca2+ at the catalytic site rather than lack of reversible cleavage of bound ATP may underlie lack of oxygen exchange under some conditions. PMID:2873834

  18. Entropy bounds and dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2004-07-01

    Entropy bounds render quantum corrections to the cosmological constant Λ finite. Under certain assumptions, the natural value of Λ is of order the observed dark energy density ~10-10 eV4, thereby resolving the cosmological constant problem. We note that the dark energy equation of state in these scenarios is w≡p/ρ=0 over cosmological distances, and is strongly disfavored by observational data. Alternatively, Λ in these scenarios might account for the diffuse dark matter component of the cosmological energy density. Permanent address: Institute of Theoretical Science and Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403.

  19. Bound potassium in muscle II.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Z

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to decide between the alternatives a) the ionized K+ is in a dissolved state in the muscle water, or b) a part of the muscle potassium is in a "bound' state. Sartorius muscles of Rana esculenta were put into glicerol for about one hour at 0-2 degrees C. Most of muscle water came out, but most of muscle potassium remained in the muscles. In contrast to this: from muscle in heat rigor more potassium was released due to glicerol treating than from the intact ones. 1. Supposition a) is experimentally refuted. 2. Supposition b) corresponds to the experimental results. PMID:6969511

  20. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  1. Consistent Tolerance Bounds for Statistical Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Assumption that sample comes from population with particular distribution is made with confidence C if data lie between certain bounds. These "confidence bounds" depend on C and assumption about distribution of sampling errors around regression line. Graphical test criteria using tolerance bounds are applied in industry where statistical analysis influences product development and use. Applied to evaluate equipment life.

  2. Lower bound of concurrence for qubit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xue-Na; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2013-11-01

    We study the concurrence of four-qubit quantum states and provide analytical lower bounds of concurrence in terms of the monogamy inequality of concurrence for qubit systems. It is shown that these lower bounds are able to improve the existing bounds and detect entanglement better. The approach is generalized to arbitrary qubit systems.

  3. Endurance bounds of aerial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Aaron M.; Kroninger, Christopher M.

    2014-06-01

    Within the past few years micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) have received much more attention and are starting to proliferate into military as well as civilian roles. However, one of the major drawbacks for this technology currently, has been their poor endurance, usually below 10 minutes. This is a direct result of the inefficiencies inherent in their design. Often times, designers do not consider the various components in the vehicle design and match their performance to the desired mission for the vehicle. These vehicles lack a prescribed set of design guidelines or empirically derived design equations which often limits their design to selection of commercial off-the-shelf components without proper consideration of their affect on vehicle performance. In the current study, the design space for different vehicle configurations has been examined including insect flapping, avian flapping, rotary wing, and fixed wing, and their performance bounds are established. The propulsion system typical of a rotary wing vehicle is analyzed to establish current baselines for efficiency of vehicles at this scale. The power draw from communications is analyzed to determine its impact on vehicle performance. Finally, a representative fixed wing MAV is examined and the effects of adaptive structures as a means for increasing vehicle endurance and range are examined. This paper seeks to establish the performance bounds for micro air vehicles and establish a path forward for future designs so that efficiency may be maximized.

  4. Quantum correlations beyond Tsirelson's bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Dominic; Ringbauer, Martin; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; White, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Violations of Bell inequalities show that there are correlations that cannot explained by any classical theory. Further violation, beyond Tsirelson's bound, shows that there are correlations that are not explained by quantum mechanics. Such super-quantum correlations would enable violation of information causality, where communication of one bit provides more than one bit of information [Nature 461, 1101 (2009)]. An unavoidable feature of all realistic Bell inequality experiments is loss. If one postselects on successful measurements, unentangled states can violate Bell inequalities. On the other hand, loss can be used to enhance the violation of Bell inequalities for entangled states. This can improve the ability to distinguish between entangled and unentangled states, despite loss. Here we report an optical experiment providing maximal violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality with entangled states. Due to loss and postselection, Tsirelson's bound is also violated. This enables us to more easily distinguish between entangled and unentangled states. In addition, it provides violation of information causality for the postselected data.

  5. Functional Analysis: The Use of Analogues in Applied Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stichter, Janine Peck

    2001-01-01

    This article suggests possible applications of experimental analyses using analogues to empirically verify results of functional assessments in classrooms for students with autism and related disabilities. Analogue assessments involve creating conditions in which antecedents and consequences are held constant and specific variables suspected to…

  6. Space Analogue Environments: Are the Populations Comparable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandal, G. M.

    Background: Much of our present understanding about psychology in space is based on studies of groups operating in so-called analogue environments where personnel are exposed to many of the same stressors as those experienced by astronauts in space. One possible problem with extrapolating results is that personnel operating in various hazardous and confined environments might differ in characteristics influencing coping, interaction, and performance. The object of this study was to compare the psychological similarity of these populations in order to get a better understanding of whether this extrapolation is justifiable. The samples investigated include polar crossings (N= 22), personnel on Antarctic research stations (N= 183), several military occupations (N= 187), and participants in space simulation studies (N=20). Methods: Personnel in each of these environments were assessed using the Personality Characteristic Inventory (PCI) and Utrecht Coping List (UCL). The PCI is a multidimensional trait assessment battery that measures various aspects of achievement orientation and social competence. The UCL is a questionnaire designed to assess habitual coping strategies when encountering stressful or demanding situations. Results: Only minor differences in use of habitual coping strategies were evident across the different samples. In relation to personality scores, the military subjects and participants in space simulation studies indicated higher competitiveness and negative instrumentality compared to both the personnel on Antarctic research stations and participants in polar expedition. Among the personnel on Antarctic research stations, significant gender differences were found with women scoring lower on competitiveness, negative instrumentality and impatience/irritability. Compared to the other samples, the participants in polar expeditions were found to be more homogeneous in personality and no significant gender differences were evident on the traits that

  7. Stacking of the mutagenic base analogue 5-bromouracil: energy landscapes of pyrimidine dimers in gas phase and water.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Leo F; van Mourik, Tanja

    2015-11-11

    The potential energy surfaces of stacked base pairs consisting of cytosine (C), thymine (T), uracil (U) and the mutagenic thymine analogue 5-bromouracil (BrU) have been searched to obtain all possible minima. Minima and transition states were optimised at the counterpoise-corrected M06-2X/6-31+G(d) level, both in the gas phase and in water, modelled by the polarizable continuum model. The stacked dimers studied are BrU/BrU, C/BrU, C/C, C/T, C/U, T/BrU and T/U. Both face-to-back and face-to-face structures were considered. Free energies were calculated at 298.15 K. Together with U/U, T/T and BrU/U results from previous work, these results complete the family consisting of every stacked dimer combination consisting of C, T, U and BrU. The results were used to assess the hypothesis suggested in the literature that BrU stacks stronger than T, which could stabilise the mispair formed by BrU and guanine. In the gas phase, structures of C/BrU, T/BrU and U/BrU with greater zero-point-corrected binding energies than C/T, T/T and U/T, respectively, were found, with differences in favour of BrU of 3.1 kcal mol(-1), 1.7 kcal mol(-1) and 0.5 kcal mol(-1), respectively. However, the structure of these dimers differed considerably from anything encountered in DNA. When only the dimers with the most "DNA-like" twist (±36°) were considered, C/BrU and T/BrU were still more strongly bound than C/T and T/T, by 0.5 kcal mol(-1) and 1.7 kcal mol(-1), respectively. However, when enthalpic and/or solvent contributions were taken into account, the stacking advantage of BrU was reversed in the gas phase and mostly nullified in water. Enhanced stacking therefore does not seem a plausible mechanism for the considerably greater ability of BrU-G mispairs over T-G mispairs to escape enzymatic repair. PMID:26507806

  8. Cardinality bounds for triangulations with bounded minimum angle

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.A.

    1994-05-01

    We consider bounding the cardinality of an arbitrary triangulation with smallest angle {alpha}. We show that if the local feature size (i.e. distance between disjoint vertices or edges) of the triangulation is within a constant factor of the local feature size of the input, then N < O(1/{alpha})M, where N is the cardinality of the triangulation and M is the cardinality of any other triangulation with smallest angle at least {alpha}. Previous results had an O(1/{alpha}{sup 1/{alpha}}) dependence. Our O(1/{alpha}) dependence is tight for input with a large length to height ratio, in which triangles may be oriented along the long dimension.

  9. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Analogues Sequester Cholesterol and Reduce Prion Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Tayebi, Mourad; Williams, Alun

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of prion diseases is the conversion of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPC where C is cellular) into an alternatively folded, disease-related isoform (PrPSc, where Sc is scrapie), the accumulation of which is associated with synapse degeneration and ultimately neuronal death. The formation of PrPSc is dependent upon the presence of PrPC in specific, cholesterol-sensitive membrane microdomains, commonly called lipid rafts. PrPC is targeted to these lipid rafts because it is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Here, we show that treatment of prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScN2a, ScGT1, or SMB cells) with synthetic glycosylphosphatidylinositol analogues, glucosamine-phosphatidylinositol (glucosamine-PI) or glucosamine 2-O-methyl inositol octadecyl phosphate, reduced the PrPSc content of these cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ScGT1 cells treated with glucosamine-PI did not transmit infection following intracerebral injection to mice. Treatment with glucosamine-PI increased the cholesterol content of ScGT1 cell membranes and reduced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (PLA2), consistent with the hypothesis that the composition of cell membranes affects key PLA2-dependent signaling pathways involved in PrPSc formation. The effect of glucosamine-PI on PrPSc formation was also reversed by the addition of platelet-activating factor. Glucosamine-PI caused the displacement of PrPC from lipid rafts and reduced expression of PrPC at the cell surface, putative sites for PrPSc formation. We propose that treatment with glucosamine-PI modifies local micro-environments that control PrPC expression and activation of PLA2 and subsequently inhibits PrPSc formation. PMID:20427265

  10. O2 reduction reaction by biologically relevant anionic ligand bound iron porphyrin complexes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Subhra; Das, Pradip Kumar; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Sengupta, Kushal; Mondal, Biswajit; Dey, Abhishek

    2013-11-18

    Iron porphyrin complex with a covalently attached thiolate ligand and another with a covalently attached phenolate ligand has been synthesized. The thiolate bound complex shows spectroscopic features characteristic of P450, including the hallmark absorption spectrum of the CO adduct. Electrocatalytic O2 reduction by this complex, which bears a terminal alkyne group, is investigated by both physiabsorbing on graphite surfaces (fast electron transfer rates) and covalent attachment to azide terminated self-assembled monolayer (physiologically relevant electron transfer rates) using the terminal alkyne group. Analysis of the steady state electrochemical kinetics reveals that this catalyst can selectively reduce O2 to H2O with a second-order k(cat.) ~10(7) M(-1 )s(-1) at pH 7. The analogous phenolate bound iron porphyrin complex reduces O2 with a second-order rate constant of 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) under the same conditions. The anionic ligand bound iron porphyrin complexes catalyze oxygen reduction reactions faster than any known synthetic heme porphyrin analogues. The kinetic parameters of O2 reduction of the synthetic thiolate bound complex, which is devoid of any second sphere effects present in protein active sites, provide fundamental insight into the role of the protein environment in tuning the reactivity of thiolate bound iron porphyrin containing metalloenzymes. PMID:24171513