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1

Quality assurance of qualitative research: a review of the discourse  

PubMed Central

Background Increasing demand for qualitative research within global health has emerged alongside increasing demand for demonstration of quality of research, in line with the evidence-based model of medicine. In quantitative health sciences research, in particular clinical trials, there exist clear and widely-recognised guidelines for conducting quality assurance of research. However, no comparable guidelines exist for qualitative research and although there are long-standing debates on what constitutes 'quality' in qualitative research, the concept of 'quality assurance' has not been explored widely. In acknowledgement of this gap, we sought to review discourses around quality assurance of qualitative research, as a first step towards developing guidance. Methods A range of databases, journals and grey literature sources were searched, and papers were included if they explicitly addressed quality assurance within a qualitative paradigm. A meta-narrative approach was used to review and synthesise the literature. Results Among the 37 papers included in the review, two dominant narratives were interpreted from the literature, reflecting contrasting approaches to quality assurance. The first focuses on demonstrating quality within research outputs; the second focuses on principles for quality practice throughout the research process. The second narrative appears to offer an approach to quality assurance that befits the values of qualitative research, emphasising the need to consider quality throughout the research process. Conclusions The paper identifies the strengths of the approaches represented in each narrative and recommend these are brought together in the development of a flexible framework to help qualitative researchers to define, apply and demonstrate principles of quality in their research. PMID:22182674

2011-01-01

2

College student stressors: a review of the qualitative research.  

PubMed

A total of 40 qualitative studies were reviewed and coded according to the college student stressors they represented. These studies utilized a variety of qualitative methods to examine stressors representing the following themes: relationships, lack of resources, academics, the environment, expectations, diversity, transitions and other stressors. Relationship stressors were the most commonly reported theme and covered areas including stress associated with family, romantic, peer and faculty relationships. Three of the themes (relationships, diversity and other) are novel categories of stressors compared with quantitative reviews on the topic, highlighting the importance of gathering both quantitative and qualitative pieces of information. This review contributes to the stress literature by synthesizing and identifying trends in the qualitative student stress research. PMID:23023893

Hurst, Carrie S; Baranik, Lisa E; Daniel, Francis

2013-10-01

3

WOMEN'S EXPERIENCES OF ABUSE: A REVIEW OF QUALITATIVE RESEARCH  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews qualitative research published within the past 15 years based on women's first person accounts of their abuse experiences. Battered women's accounts of their experiences in abusive relationships aid in understanding why they stay, how they cope, and how others can help. Women's views of the emotional consequences of battering, the process of leaving, and the impact of

Martha R. Sleutel

1998-01-01

4

Qualitative research.  

PubMed

Qualitative research has an important role in helping nurses and other healthcare professionals understand patient experiences of health and illness. Qualitative researchers have a large number of methodological options and therefore should take care in planning and conducting their research. This article offers a brief overview of some of the key issues qualitative researchers should consider. PMID:25804178

Gelling, Leslie

2015-03-25

5

Methodological Challenges in Cross-Language Qualitative Research: A Research Review  

PubMed Central

Objectives Cross-language qualitative research occurs when a language barrier is present between researchers and participants. The language barrier is frequently mediated through the use of a translator or interpreter. The purpose of this critical review of cross-language qualitative research was three fold: 1) review the methods literature addressing cross language research; 2) synthesize the methodological recommendations from the literature into a list of criteria that could evaluate how researchers methodologically managed translators and interpreters in their qualitative studies; and 3) test these criteria on published cross-language qualitative studies. Data sources A group of 40 purposively selected cross-language qualitative studies found in nursing and health sciences journals. Review methods The synthesis of the cross-language methods literature produced 14 criteria to evaluate how qualitative researchers managed the language barrier between themselves and their study participants. To test the criteria, the researcher conducted a summative content analysis framed by discourse analysis techniques of the 40 cross-language studies. Results The evaluation showed that only 6 out of 40 studies met all the criteria recommended by the cross-language methods literature for the production of trustworthy results in cross-language qualitative studies. Multiple inconsistencies, reflecting disadvantageous methodological choices by cross-language researchers, appeared in the remaining 33 studies. To name a few, these included rendering the translator or interpreter as an invisible part of the research process, failure to pilot test interview questions in the participant’s language, no description of translator or interpreter credentials, failure to acknowledge translation as a limitation of the study, and inappropriate methodological frameworks for cross-language research. Conclusions The finding about researchers making the role of the translator or interpreter invisible during the research process supports studies completed by other authors examining this issue. The analysis demonstrated that the criteria produced by this study may provide useful guidelines for evaluating cross-language research and for novice cross-language researchers designing their first studies. Finally, the study also indicates that researchers attempting cross-language studies need to address the methodological issues surrounding language barriers between researchers and participants more systematically. PMID:18789799

Squires, Allison

2009-01-01

6

Epistemology in Qualitative Social Work Research: A Review of Published Articles, 2008-2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the epistemological foundations of qualitative social work research. A template-based review was completed on 100 articles from social work journals. Reviewers examined five things: (1) the purpose or aims of the research, (2) the rationale or justification for the work, (3) the populations studied, (4) the presence of four…

Gringeri, Christina; Barusch, Amanda; Cambron, Christopher

2013-01-01

7

A guide to reading and using systematic reviews of qualitative research.  

PubMed

There is an increasingly widespread policy momentum to increase patient-centred care and to improve quality of life outcomes within health services. Qualitative research methods are used to elicit in-depth and detailed insights into people's attitudes, beliefs, emotions and experiences-much of which may remain unspoken during clinical encounters. Questions about patients' beliefs and preferences for treatment can be addressed by qualitative research and inform evidence-based strategies for delivering patient-centred care. Systematic reviews of multiple primary qualitative studies bring together findings from different studies to offer new and more comprehensive understandings of social phenomena across various healthcare contexts and populations and are an emerging methodology in the literature including for care in chronic kidney disease. This article will provide a framework for the systematic review of qualitative research so readers can make sense of these study types and use them in clinical care and policy. PMID:25414375

Tong, Allison; Palmer, Suetonia; Craig, Jonathan C; Strippoli, Giovanni F M

2014-11-20

8

Combining qualitative and quantitative research within mixed method research designs: A methodological review  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesIt has been argued that mixed methods research can be useful in nursing and health science because of the complexity of the phenomena studied. However, the integration of qualitative and quantitative approaches continues to be one of much debate and there is a need for a rigorous framework for designing and interpreting mixed methods research. This paper explores the analytical

Ulrika Östlund; Lisa Kidd; Yvonne Wengström; Neneh Rowa-Dewar

2011-01-01

9

Use of qualitative methods in published health services and management research: a 10-year review.  

PubMed

Over the past 10 years, the field of health services and management research has seen renewed interest in the use of qualitative research methods. This article examines the volume and characteristics of qualitative research articles published in nine major health services and management journals between 1998 and 2008. Qualitative research articles comprise 9% of research articles published in these journals. Although the publication rate of qualitative research articles has not kept pace with that of quantitative research articles, citation analysis suggests that qualitative research articles contribute comparably to the field's knowledge base. A wide range of policy and management topics has been examined using qualitative methods. Case study designs, interviews, and documentary sources were the most frequently used methods. Half of qualitative research articles provided little or no detail about key aspects the study's methods. Implications are discussed and recommendations are offered for promoting the publication of qualitative research. PMID:20675353

Weiner, Bryan J; Amick, Halle R; Lund, Jennifer L; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Hoff, Timothy J

2011-02-01

10

Use of Qualitative Methods in Published Health Services and Management Research: A 10-Year Review  

PubMed Central

Over the past 10 years, the field of health services and management research has seen renewed interest in the use of qualitative research methods. This article examines the volume and characteristics of qualitative research articles published in nine major health services and management journals between 1998 and 2008. Qualitative research articles comprise 9% of research articles published in these journals. Although the publication rate of qualitative research articles has not kept pace with that of quantitative research articles, citation analysis suggests that qualitative research articles contribute comparably to the field’s knowledge base. A wide range of policy and management topics has been examined using qualitative methods. Case study designs, interviews, and documentary sources were the most frequently used methods. Half of qualitative research articles provided little or no detail about key aspects the study’s methods. Implications are discussed and recommendations are offered for promoting the publication of qualitative research. PMID:20675353

Weiner, Bryan J.; Amick, Halle R.; Lund, Jennifer L.; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Hoff, Timothy J.

2011-01-01

11

Critiquing qualitative research.  

PubMed

The ability to critique research is a valuable skill that is fundamental to a perioperative nurse's ability to base his or her clinical practice on evidence derived from research. Criteria differ for critiquing a quantitative versus a qualitative study (ie, statistics are evaluated in a quantitative study, but not in a qualitative study). This article provides on guidelines for assessing qualitative research. Excerpts from a published qualitative research report are summarized and then critiqued. Questions are provided that help evaluate different sections of a research study (eg, sample, data collection methods, data analysis). PMID:19801006

Beck, Cheryl Tatano

2009-10-01

12

Sampling in Qualitative Research  

PubMed Central

In gerontology the most recognized and elaborate discourse about sampling is generally thought to be in quantitative research associated with survey research and medical research. But sampling has long been a central concern in the social and humanistic inquiry, albeit in a different guise suited to the different goals. There is a need for more explicit discussion of qualitative sampling issues. This article will outline the guiding principles and rationales, features, and practices of sampling in qualitative research. It then describes common questions about sampling in qualitative research. In conclusion it proposes the concept of qualitative clarity as a set of principles (analogous to statistical power) to guide assessments of qualitative sampling in a particular study or proposal. PMID:22058580

LUBORSKY, MARK R.; RUBINSTEIN, ROBERT L.

2011-01-01

13

Grant writing for qualitative research.  

PubMed

In order to broaden understanding of the quality of qualitative grant proposals, analysis of 19 summary statements from qualitative grant proposals was conducted. This analysis showed that reviewers determined quality of proposals in terms of four themes: scientific contribution of the research; conceptual framework guiding the work; methods; and knowledge, skills, and resources available to the proposal writers. Writers' responses to the evaluations were reflected in the theme: surviving the review. This analysis suggested that reviewers of qualitative proposals recognized salient issues and were able to respond in ways that writers perceived as helpful. Qualitative research proposals that are clearly written, internally consistent, meaningful and have potential impact for the discipline of nursing are well-received. PMID:8340125

Cohen, M Z; Knafl, K; Dzurec, L C

1993-01-01

14

A qualitative systematic review of studies using the normalization process theory to research implementation processes  

PubMed Central

Background There is a well-recognized need for greater use of theory to address research translational gaps. Normalization Process Theory (NPT) provides a set of sociological tools to understand and explain the social processes through which new or modified practices of thinking, enacting, and organizing work are implemented, embedded, and integrated in healthcare and other organizational settings. This review of NPT offers readers the opportunity to observe how, and in what areas, a particular theoretical approach to implementation is being used. In this article we review the literature on NPT in order to understand what interventions NPT is being used to analyze, how NPT is being operationalized, and the reported benefits, if any, of using NPT. Methods Using a framework analysis approach, we conducted a qualitative systematic review of peer-reviewed literature using NPT. We searched 12 electronic databases and all citations linked to six key NPT development papers. Grey literature/unpublished studies were not sought. Limitations of English language, healthcare setting and year of publication 2006 to June 2012 were set. Results Twenty-nine articles met the inclusion criteria; in the main, NPT is being applied to qualitatively analyze a diverse range of complex interventions, many beyond its original field of e-health and telehealth. The NPT constructs have high stability across settings and, notwithstanding challenges in applying NPT in terms of managing overlaps between constructs, there is evidence that it is a beneficial heuristic device to explain and guide implementation processes. Conclusions NPT offers a generalizable framework that can be applied across contexts with opportunities for incremental knowledge gain over time and an explicit framework for analysis, which can explain and potentially shape implementation processes. This is the first review of NPT in use and it generates an impetus for further and extended use of NPT. We recommend that in future NPT research, authors should explicate their rationale for choosing NPT as their theoretical framework and, where possible, involve multiple stakeholders including service users to enable analysis of implementation from a range of perspectives. PMID:24383661

2014-01-01

15

Current Practice of Public Involvement Activities in Biomedical Research and Innovation: A Systematic Qualitative Review  

PubMed Central

Background A recent report from the British Nuffield Council on Bioethics associated ‘emerging biotechnologies’ with a threefold challenge: 1) uncertainty about outcomes, 2) diverse public views on the values and implications attached to biotechnologies and 3) the possibility of creating radical changes regarding societal relations and practices. To address these challenges, leading international institutions stress the need for public involvement activities (PIAs). The objective of this study was to assess the state of PIA reports in the field of biomedical research. Methods PIA reports were identified via a systematic literature search. Thematic text analysis was employed for data extraction. Results After filtering, 35 public consultation and 11 public participation studies were included in this review. Analysis and synthesis of all 46 PIA studies resulted in 6 distinguishable PIA objectives and 37 corresponding PIA methods. Reports of outcome translation and PIA evaluation were found in 9 and 10 studies respectively (20% and 22%). The paper presents qualitative details. Discussion The state of PIAs on biomedical research and innovation is characterized by a broad range of methods and awkward variation in the wording of objectives. Better comparability of PIAs might improve the translation of PIA findings into further policy development. PIA-specific reporting guidelines would help in this regard. The modest level of translation efforts is another pointer to the “deliberation to policy gap”. The results of this review could inform the design of new PIAs and future efforts to improve PIA comparability and outcome translation. PMID:25469705

Lander, Jonas; Hainz, Tobias; Hirschberg, Irene; Strech, Daniel

2014-01-01

16

Writing a qualitative research report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A research project in nursing or nursing education is probably only complete once the findings have been published. This paper offers a format for writing a qualitative research report for publication. It suggests, at least, the following sections: introduction, aims of the study, review of the literature, sample, data collection methods, data analysis methods, findings, discussion, conclusion, abstract. Each of

Philip Burnard

2004-01-01

17

Qualitative research in marketing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Purpose,– To discuss and,analyse,three themes,in qualitative research in marketing,which,are objects of both frustration and confusion: analysis and interpretation; theory generation; and a quest for scientific pluralism and individual researcher lifestyles. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Underpinning the discussion is that complexity, ambiguity, fuzziness, chaos, change, uncertainty and unpredictability are characteristics of a market economy; that qualitative and subjective interpretation is necessary,to add

E. Gummesson

2005-01-01

18

Socio-Cultural Aspects of Chagas Disease: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Research  

PubMed Central

Background Globally, more than 10 million people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes about 20 000 annual deaths. Although Chagas disease is endemic to certain regions of Latin America, migratory flows have enabled its expansion into areas where it was previously unknown. Economic, social and cultural factors play a significant role in its presence and perpetuation. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of qualitative research on Chagas disease, both in endemic and non-endemic countries. Methodology/Principal Findings Searches were carried out in ten databases, and the bibliographies of retrieved studies were examined. Data from thirty-three identified studies were extracted, and findings were analyzed and synthesized along key themes. Themes identified for endemic countries included: socio-structural determinants of Chagas disease; health practices; biomedical conceptions of Chagas disease; patient's experience; and institutional strategies adopted. Concerning non-endemic countries, identified issues related to access to health services and health seeking. Conclusions The emergence and perpetuation of Chagas disease depends largely on socio-cultural aspects influencing health. As most interventions do not address the clinical, environmental, social and cultural aspects jointly, an explicitly multidimensional approach, incorporating the experiences of those affected is a potential tool for the development of long-term successful programs. Further research is needed to evaluate this approach. PMID:24069473

Ventura-Garcia, Laia; Roura, Maria; Pell, Christopher; Posada, Elisabeth; Gascón, Joaquim; Aldasoro, Edelweis; Muñoz, Jose; Pool, Robert

2013-01-01

19

Wellbeing Research in Developing Countries: Reviewing the Role of Qualitative Methods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors review the contribution of qualitative methods to exploring concepts and experiences of wellbeing among children and adults living in developing countries. They provide examples illustrating the potential of these methods for gaining a holistic and contextual understanding of people's perceptions and experiences. Some of these come…

Camfield, Laura; Crivello, Gina; Woodhead, Martin

2009-01-01

20

What Influences the Uptake of Information to Prevent Skin Cancer? A Systematic Review and Synthesis of Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Skin cancer is an increasing problem in Europe, America and Australasia, although largely preventable by avoiding excessive ultraviolet (UV) exposure. This paper presents the findings of a systematic review of qualitative research about the prevention of skin cancer attributable to UV exposure. The aim is to understand elements that may contribute…

Garside, Ruth; Pearson, Mark; Moxham, Tiffany

2010-01-01

21

Consensual Qualitative Research: An Update  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors reviewed the application of consensual qualitative research (CQR) in 27 studies published since the method's introduction to the field in 1997 by C. E. Hill, B. J. Thompson, and E. N. Williams (1997). After first describing the core components and the philosophical underpinnings of CQR, the authors examined how it has been applied in…

Hill, Clara E.; Knox, Sarah; Thompson, Barbara J.; Williams, Elizabeth Nutt; Hess, Shirley A.; Ladany, Nicholas

2005-01-01

22

"She's Weird!"--The Social Construction of Bullying in School: A Review of Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative research provides opportunities to study bullying and peer harassment as social processes, interactions and meaning-making in the everyday context of particular settings. It offers the possibility of developing a deep understanding of the culture and group processes of bullying and the participants' perspectives on peer harassment as…

Thornberg, Robert

2011-01-01

23

Disciplining Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative research exists in a time of global uncertainty. Around the world, governments are attempting to regulate scientific inquiry by defining what counts as "good" science. These regulatory activities raise fundamental, philosophical epistemological, political and pedagogical issues for scholarship and freedom of speech in the academy. This…

Denzin, Norman K.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.; Giardina, Michael D.

2006-01-01

24

Ten criteria for evaluating qualitative research proposals.  

PubMed

With the proliferation of interest in qualitative research in nursing comes the attendant problem of how to evaluate it appropriately. Qualitative research has its own unique history, philosophical foundations, and methodologies that separate it from the quantitative approach. Although the literature is crowded with guidelines for evaluating the latter, little is offered for the qualitative reviewer. The Research Proposal Evaluation Form: Qualitative Methodology is a partial solution to this dilemma. It provides a framework for critiquing the proposal phase of a qualitative study and can be an important guide both for the educator and for the novice researcher. PMID:3035126

Cobb, A K; Hagemaster, J N

1987-04-01

25

Uncovering Treatment Burden as a Key Concept for Stroke Care: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Research  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with chronic disease may experience complicated management plans requiring significant personal investment. This has been termed ‘treatment burden’ and has been associated with unfavourable outcomes. The aim of this systematic review is to examine the qualitative literature on treatment burden in stroke from the patient perspective. Methods and Findings The search strategy centred on: stroke, treatment burden, patient experience, and qualitative methods. We searched: Scopus, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsycINFO. We tracked references, footnotes, and citations. Restrictions included: English language, date of publication January 2000 until February 2013. Two reviewers independently carried out the following: paper screening, data extraction, and data analysis. Data were analysed using framework synthesis, as informed by Normalization Process Theory. Sixty-nine papers were included. Treatment burden includes: (1) making sense of stroke management and planning care, (2) interacting with others, (3) enacting management strategies, and (4) reflecting on management. Health care is fragmented, with poor communication between patient and health care providers. Patients report inadequate information provision. Inpatient care is unsatisfactory, with a perceived lack of empathy from professionals and a shortage of stimulating activities on the ward. Discharge services are poorly coordinated, and accessing health and social care in the community is difficult. The study has potential limitations because it was restricted to studies published in English only and data from low-income countries were scarce. Conclusions Stroke management is extremely demanding for patients, and treatment burden is influenced by micro and macro organisation of health services. Knowledge deficits mean patients are ill equipped to organise their care and develop coping strategies, making adherence less likely. There is a need to transform the approach to care provision so that services are configured to prioritise patient needs rather than those of health care systems. Systematic Review Registration International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews CRD42011001123 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23824703

Gallacher, Katie; Morrison, Deborah; Jani, Bhautesh; Macdonald, Sara; May, Carl R.; Montori, Victor M.; Erwin, Patricia J.; Batty, G. David; Eton, David T.; Langhorne, Peter; Mair, Frances S.

2013-01-01

26

The Limits of Collaboration: A Qualitative Study of Community Ethical Review of Environmental Health Research  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We assessed the effectiveness of various systems of community participation in ethical review of environmental health research. Methods. We used situation analysis methods and a global workspace theoretical framework to conduct comparative case studies of 3 research organizations at 1 medical center. Results. We found a general institutional commitment to community review as well as personal commitment from some participants in the process. However, difficulty in communicating across divides of knowledge and privilege created serious gaps in implementation, leaving research vulnerable to validity threats (such as misinterpretation of findings) and communities vulnerable to harm. The methods used in each collaboration solved some, but not all, of the problems that hindered communication. Conclusions. Researchers, community spokespersons, and institutional review boards constitute organizational groups with strong internal ties and highly developed cultures. Few cross-linkages and little knowledge of each other cause significant distortion of information and other forms of miscommunication between groups. Our data suggest that organizations designed to protect human volunteers are in the best position to take the lead in implementing community review. PMID:19542033

Fullilove, Robert E.; Kaufman, Molly Rose; Wallace, Rodrick; Fullilove, Mindy Thompson

2009-01-01

27

What influences contraceptive behaviour in women who experience unintended pregnancy? A systematic review of qualitative research.  

PubMed

One in five pregnancies in the UK ends in abortion. The great majority of those pregnancies are unintended, resulting from incorrect, inconsistent or non-use of contraception, rather than contraception failure. We undertook a synthesis of qualitative research with women who have unintended pregnancies as a new approach to understanding contraceptive behaviour. A literature search was carried out using four databases. Identified studies were screened against pre-set inclusion criteria. Included studies were quality assessed. Analysis followed a meta-ethnographic approach. A total of 236 studies were identified, of which nine were included. Six categories involved in contraceptive behaviour were identified - access, method factors, knowledge, societal influence, personal beliefs and motivations and relationship factors. A model of contraceptive behaviour was developed. Contraceptive behaviour is a complex, multifactorial process. Interventions targeting one aspect are unlikely to make a difference; however identifying and affecting the important factors within a population may improve contraception adherence. PMID:24911041

Pratt, R; Stephenson, J; Mann, S

2014-11-01

28

The aetiology and trajectory of anabolic-androgenic steroid use initiation: a systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research  

PubMed Central

Background To our knowledge, there has never been a systematic review and synthesis of the qualitative literature on the trajectory and aetiology of nonmedical anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use. Methods We systematically reviewed and synthesized qualitative literature gathered from searches in PsycINFO, PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar, and reference lists of relevant literature to investigate AAS users’ ages of first use and source(s), history prior to use, and motives/drives for initiating use. We adhered to the recommendations of the UK Economic and Social Research Council’s qualitative research synthesis manual and the PRISMA guidelines. Results A total of 44 studies published between 1980 and 2014 were included in the synthesis. Studies originated from 11 countries: the United States (n =?18), England (n =?8), Australia (n =?4), Sweden (n =?4), both England and Wales (n =?2), and Scotland (n =?2). One study each originated from Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, France, Great Britain, and Norway. The majority of AAS users initiated use before age 30. Sports participation (particularly power sports), negative body image, and psychological disorders such as depression preceded initiation of AAS use for most users. Sources of first AAS were mainly users’ immediate social networks and the illicit market. Enhanced sports performance, appearance, and muscle/strength were the paramount motives for AAS use initiation. Conclusions Our findings elucidate the significance of psychosocial factors in AAS use initiation. The proliferation of AAS on the illicit market and social networks demands better ways of dealing with the global public health problem of AAS use. PMID:24984881

2014-01-01

29

Collaborative Principal Preparation Programs: A Systematic Review and Synthesis of Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this systematic review was to (1) conduct the systematic search of the literature to identify the studies on partnerships in school leader preparation; and to (2) systematically review the findings of these studies and synthesize them into major themes reflecting the state of the art in collaborative leadership preparation in the…

Parylo, Oksana

2013-01-01

30

Qualitative research: a brief description.  

PubMed

Qualitative research refers to, a range of methodological approaches which aim to generate an in-depth and interpreted understanding of the social world, by learning about people's social and material circumstances, their experiences, perspectives, and histories. Requires researchers to become intensely involved, often remaining in field for lengthy periods of time. The greatest value of qualitative research is its ability to address questions of relevance to public health knowledge and practice which are difficult to answer satisfactorily using quantitative methods. PMID:24231397

Kemparaj, Umesh; Chavan, Sangeeta

2013-01-01

31

Positivism and qualitative nursing research.  

PubMed

Despite the hostility to positivism shown by qualitative methodologists in nursing, as in other disciplines, the epistemological and ontological instincts of qualitative researchers seem to coincide with those of the positivists, especially Bayesian positivists. This article suggests that positivists and qualitative researchers alike are pro-observation, proinduction, pro-plausibility and pro-subjectivity. They are also anti-cause, anti-realist, anti-explanation, anti-correspondence, anti-truth. In only one respect is there a significant difference between positivist and qualitative methodologists: most positivists have believed that, methodologically, the natural sciences and the social sciences are the same; most qualitative researchers are adamant that they are not. However, if positivism fails as a philosophy of the natural sciences (which it probably does), it might well succeed as a philosophy of the social sciences, just because there is a methodological watershed between the two. Reflex antagonism to positivism might therefore be a major obstacle to understanding the real reasons why qualitative research and the natural sciences are methodologically divergent; and less hostility on the part of qualitative nurse researchers might bring certain advantages in its wake. PMID:11885869

Paley, J

2001-01-01

32

Learning Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article I explore through a narrative how I came to do a research project in East New York. I show how first contact was established, how local contacts were made, and how trust between my research participants and me was created. I then explore how the research topic evolved through informal conversations, open-ended interviews, and…

Gerhart, Lael

2009-01-01

33

Interactions between injured workers and insurers in workers' compensation systems: a systematic review of qualitative research literature.  

PubMed

Introduction Work-related injury is a major public health problem and a worker's recovery can be shaped by their interactions with employers, healthcare providers and the workers' compensation system. Most research on the effects of compensation has concentrated on examining outcomes rather than considering the compensation process itself. There has been little attention paid to the interactions between stakeholders and only recently has the client's view been considered as worthy of investigation. This systematic review aimed to identify and synthesize findings from peer reviewed qualitative studies that investigated injured workers interactions with insurers in workers' compensation systems. Method A search of six electronic library databases revealed 1,006 articles. After screening for relevance, 18 articles were read in full and a search of those bibliographies revealed a further nine relevant articles. Quality assessment of the 27 studies resulted in a final 13 articles of medium and high quality being retained for data extraction. Results Included studies focused mainly on experiences of injured workers, many of whom had long term claims. Findings were synthesized using a meta-ethnographic approach. Six themes were identified which characterised the interactions between insurers and injured workers. The majority of interactions were negative and resulted in considerable psychosocial consequences for injured workers. Positive interactions were less frequently reported and included respectful, understanding and supportive communication and efficient service from insurers. Conclusion Findings from this synthesis support the growing consensus that involvement in compensation systems contributes to poorer outcomes for claimants. Interactions between insurers and injured workers were interwoven in cyclical and pathogenic relationships, which influence the development of secondary injury in the form of psychosocial consequences instead of fostering recovery of injured workers. This review suggests that further research is required to investigate positive interactions and identify mechanisms to better support and prevent secondary psychosocial harm to injured workers. PMID:24832892

Kilgour, Elizabeth; Kosny, Agnieszka; McKenzie, Donna; Collie, Alex

2015-03-01

34

Qualitative research as methodical hermeneutics.  

PubMed

The proportion of publications of qualitative research in mainstream psychology journals is small. Thus, in terms of this important criterion, despite its recent rapid growth, qualitative research is marginalized in psychology. The author suggests that contributing to this situation is the lack of a coherent and unifying methodology of qualitative research methods that elucidates their credibility. He groups the many qualitative research methods into 3 main kinds, then applies to them 4 propositions offered as such a methodology: (1) Qualitative research is hermeneutical, entailing application of the method of the hermeneutic circle to text about experience and/or action. (2) Implicit in the use of the hermeneutic circle method is the activity of educing and articulating the meaning of text, an activity that modifies and interacts with C. S. Peirce's (1965, 1966) logical operations of abduction, theorematic deduction, and induction. (3) The cycling of these 4 moments enables demonstration, achieved rhetorically, of the validity of the understandings resulting from the exegesis of the text under study. (4) This demonstrative rhetoric is enhanced when researchers disclose reflexively those aspects of their perspectives they judge to have most relevant bearing on their understandings. The author compares abduction as formulated here with other recent uptakes of it. As an installment on the generality of the methodology, he explores its fit with the descriptive phenomenological psychological method, conversation analysis, and thematic analysis. PMID:22823104

Rennie, David L

2012-09-01

35

Qualitative research in evidence-based practice: a valuable partnership  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss the nature of the qualitative research paradigm, with a particular emphasis on the marginalization of qualitative approaches within the current discourse of evidence-based librarianship. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper presents examples of qualitative research in the field of library and information studies, reviews the discourse of EBL as it relates to

Lisa Given

2006-01-01

36

Computer-Assisted Analysis of Qualitative Gerontological Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asserts that qualitative research has great potential for use in gerontological research. Describes QUALOG, a computer-assisted, qualitative data analysis scheme using logic programming developed at Syracuse University. Reviews development of QUALOG and discusses how QUALOG was used to analyze data from a qualitative study of older adult learners.…

Hiemstra, Roger; And Others

1987-01-01

37

Consensual Qualitative Research: Some Cautions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers methodological and epistemological suggestions regarding consensual qualitative research (CQR). Discusses the scope of CQR, the illusion of representativeness, dialogical understanding, the problem of commonality as a goal, and difficulties with the CQR consensus procedure. Epistemological concerns include the nature of truth, objective…

Stiles, William B.

1997-01-01

38

Reading and assessing qualitative research.  

PubMed

What makes doctors burn out? What is it like to have epilepsy? Why do smokers not give up? Qualitative research makes it possible to look behind the statistics and to study health and health care from the inside: to find out what it is really like for the health professionals who provide the care and for the patients on the receiving end. PMID:11436445

Powell, A E; Davies, H T

2001-06-01

39

Qualitative research in clinical epidemiology.  

PubMed

This chapter has been written to specifically address the usefulness of qualitative research for the practice of clinical epidemiology. The methods of grounded theory to facilitate understanding of human behavior and construction of monitoring scales for use in quantitative studies are discussed. In end-stage renal disease patients receiving long-term hemodialysis, a qualitative study used grounded theory to generate a multilayered classification system, which culminated in a substantive theory on living with end-stage renal disease and hemodialysis. The qualitative data base was re-visited for the purpose of scale development and led to the Patient Perception of Hemodialysis Scale (PPHS). The quantitative study confirmed that the PPHS was psychometrically valid and reliable and supported the major premises of the substantive theory. PMID:25694318

Gregory, Deborah M; Way, Christine Y

2015-01-01

40

Part 2: Home-based family caregiving at the end of life: a comprehensive review of published qualitative research (1998-2008).  

PubMed

Family caregivers are crucial for supporting home death. We reviewed published qualitative research on home-based family caregiving at end of life (1998-2008), synthesizing key findings and identifying gaps where additional research is needed. Multiple databases were searched and abstracts reviewed for a focus on family caregiving and palliative care; full articles were reviewed to extract data for this review. In total, 105 articles were included. Findings are presented in the following areas: the caregiving experience and contextual features; supporting family caregivers at end of life; caregiving roles and decision-making; and rewards, meaning and coping. We noted a lack of definitional clarity; a reliance on interview methods and descriptive, thematic analyses, and a relative lack of diversity of patient conditions. Research needs are identified in several areas, including the bereavement experience, caregiver ambivalence, access to services, caregiver meaning-making, and relational and contextual influences on family caregiving at end of life. PMID:20576673

Funk, L; Stajduhar, Ki; Toye, C; Aoun, S; Grande, Ge; Todd, Cj

2010-09-01

41

Qualitative Research: An Essential Part of Statistical Cognition Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our research in statistical cognition uses both qualitative and quantitative methods. A mixed method approach makes our research more comprehensive, and provides us with new directions, unexpected insights, and alternative explanations for previously established concepts. In this paper, we review four statistical cognition studies that used mixed…

Kalinowski, Pav; Lai, Jerry; Fidler, Fiona; Cumming, Geoff

2010-01-01

42

Qualitative Studies: Developing Good Research Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative research is a type of research process that is widely used to give people a voice while researching a particular subject matter. In using this research process, one must understand how important it is to develop research questions within the qualitative research process. The purpose of this article is to aid researchers in the…

Bufkin, Melissa A.

2006-01-01

43

Language barriers and qualitative nursing research: methodological considerations  

PubMed Central

Aim This review of the literature synthesizes methodological recommendations for the use of translators and interpreters in cross-language qualitative research. Background Cross-language qualitative research involves the use of interpreters and translators to mediate a language barrier between researchers and participants. Qualitative nurse researchers successfully address language barriers between themselves and their participants when they systematically plan for how they will use interpreters and translators throughout the research process. Experienced qualitative researchers recognize that translators can generate qualitative data through translation processes and by participating in data analysis. Failure to address language barriers and the methodological challenges they present threatens the credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability of cross-language qualitative nursing research. Through a synthesis of the cross-language qualitative methods literature, this article reviews the basics of language competence, translator and interpreter qualifications, and roles for each kind of qualitative research approach. Methodological and ethical considerations are also provided. Conclusion By systematically addressing the methodological challenges cross-language research presents, nurse researchers can produce better evidence for nursing practice and policy making when working across different language groups. Findings from qualitative studies will also accurately represent the experiences of the participants without concern that the meaning was lost in translation. PMID:19522941

Squires, A.

2009-01-01

44

Conducting qualitative research within Clinical Trials Units: avoiding potential pitfalls.  

PubMed

The value of using qualitative research within or alongside randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is becoming more widely accepted. Qualitative research may be conducted concurrently with pilot or full RCTs to understand the feasibility and acceptability of the interventions being tested, or to improve trial conduct. Clinical Trials Units (CTUs) in the United Kingdom (UK) manage large numbers of RCTs and, increasingly, manage the qualitative research or collaborate with qualitative researchers external to the CTU. CTUs are beginning to explicitly manage the process, for example, through the use of standard operating procedures for designing and implementing qualitative research with trials. We reviewed the experiences of two UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) registered CTUs of conducting qualitative research concurrently with RCTs. Drawing on experiences gained from 15 studies, we identify the potential for the qualitative research to undermine the successful completion or scientific integrity of RCTs. We show that potential problems can arise from feedback of interim or final qualitative findings to members of the trial team or beyond, in particular reporting qualitative findings whilst the trial is on-going. The problems include: We make recommendations for improving the management of qualitative research within CTUs. PMID:24937019

Cooper, Cindy; O'Cathain, Alicia; Hind, Danny; Adamson, Joy; Lawton, Julia; Baird, Wendy

2014-07-01

45

Data management and security in qualitative research.  

PubMed

Qualitative research provides rich data on phenomena important to nursing and may offer in-depth information for critical care nurses in providing care to their patients. Data management, which encompasses topics such as human subjects' protection, confidentiality, data storage and record keeping, data ownership, and data sharing, is a critical process in qualitative research that deserves researchers' attention. Thus, the purpose of this article is to synthesize existing research studies on qualitative data management. PMID:19387279

Lin, Li-Chen

2009-01-01

46

Qualitative Research Practice in Adult Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of 20 papers is aimed at researchers, research students, and research supervisors interested in qualitative research into facilitated adult learning in the workplace, formal education programs, professional development, and community settings. "Introduction" (Willis) provides a summary of the papers. "Qualitative Inquiry: Meaning…

Willis, Peter, Ed.; Neville, Bernie, Ed.

47

Qualitative Research in Intercultural Communication: An Overview and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting the recent growing concern for the theoretical development of intercultural communication, this paper reviews various interpretive schools of thought that have used qualitative research methods in either intracultural or intercultural communication contexts. Following a brief discussion of the differences between qualitative and…

Ting-Toomey, Stella

48

Longitudinal Qualitative Research: Analyzing Change through Time.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book outlines the basic elements of longitudinal qualitative data, focusing on micro-levels of change observed within individual cases and groups of participants, and presents 16 questions through which researchers can approach the analysis of longitudinal qualitative data. The chapters are: (1) "Longitudinal Qualitative Studies, Time, and…

Saldana, Johnny

49

The Question of Quality in Qualitative Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative research is a model for systematic, data-based inquiry. It has been used widely in the social sciences, and it has a growing acceptance in educational research. Its purpose is to describe and understand a particular, bounded social setting. The differences between quantitative and qualitative research involve the methods employed at…

Locke, Lawrence F.

50

Understanding Qualitative Research: A School Nurse Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More school nurses are engaging in the generation of research, and their studies increasingly are using qualitative methods to describe various areas of practice. This article provides an overview of 4 major qualitative methods: ethnography, phenomenology, grounded theory, and historical research. Examples of school nursing research studies that…

Broussard, Lisa

2006-01-01

51

Qualitative methods in environmental health research.  

PubMed Central

Public health researchers increasingly turn to qualitative methods either on their own or in combination with quantitative methods. Qualitative methods are especially important to community environmental health research, as they provide a way to produce community narratives that give voice to individuals and characterize the community in a full and complex fashion. This article first traces the legacy of qualitative research in environmental health, then uses a case study of the author's experiences studying the Woburn, Massachusetts, childhood leukemia cluster to provide personal and scholarly insights on qualitative approaches. That material then informs a discussion of important components of qualitative methods in environmental health research, including flexible study design, access, trust, empathy, and personal shifts in the researcher's worldview, bias, and the nature of the researcher's roles. A concluding discussion addresses issues in funding policy and research practices. PMID:14594634

Brown, Phil

2003-01-01

52

A Guide to Conducting Consensual Qualitative Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the components of a new methodology--consensual qualitative research (CQR)--which uses words to describe phenomena and which recognizes the importance of context. Locates CQR within the qualitative research tradition and details ways to develop a focused topic area, choose a team, attend to group dynamics, and other important issues.…

Hill, Clara E.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Williams, Elizabeth Nutt

1997-01-01

53

Qualitative Case Study Research in Business Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to using qualitative case study research in business education explains methodological steps and decisions, illustrated with examples from business research. It addresses data analysis and interpretation, including discussion of software tools. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

O'Connor, Bridget N.

2002-01-01

54

Qualitative Research in Educational Gerontology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Quantitative methods such as logical positivism often view nondominant groups as deviant and purport to be objective. Qualitative methods such as ethnography help educational gerontologists understand diverse elderly populations and allow elders to participate in the process of defining reality and producing knowledge. (SK)

Applewhite, Steven Lozano

1997-01-01

55

RESEARCH REVIEW  

EPA Science Inventory

The report reviews aquatic research programs conducted or managed by the Environmental Research Laboratory, Gulf Breeze, Florida, for the office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1978 and 1979. The research program examines the impact of pestici...

56

Qualitative Clinical Research with Children and Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides an overview of how qualitative research methods (QRMs) can augment the literature in child and adolescent clinical psychology by contributing to theory and hypothesis building. We discuss the utility of qualitative methods in examining the nature of clinical processes and obtaining deeper understandings about quantitative…

Nelson, Mary Lee; Quintana, Stephen M.

2005-01-01

57

Research Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the author's review of research about material culture and its relevance to teaching artists. In this review, three themes emerged that may provide a conceptual framework. This framework may offer a base of understanding from which teaching artists may, in turn, be able to situate some of their practices or create new…

Serig, Dan

2011-01-01

58

Research Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research review is dedicated to the memory of William Safire (1929-2009). A visionary leader, Safire brought other visionaries, researchers, educators, artists, and policymakers together to explore the confluence of arts education and neuroscience. He fostered the new field of neuroeducation in his work as chair of The Dana Foundation in…

Serig, Dan, Ed.

2010-01-01

59

Step-by-step guide to critiquing research. Part 2: Qualitative research.  

PubMed

As with a quantitative study, critical analysis of a qualitative study involves an in-depth review of how each step of the research was undertaken. Qualitative and quantitative studies are, however, fundamentally different approaches to research and therefore need to be considered differently with regard to critiquing. The different philosophical underpinnings of the various qualitative research methods generate discrete ways of reasoning and distinct terminology; however, there are also many similarities within these methods. Because of this and its subjective nature, qualitative research it is often regarded as more difficult to critique. Nevertheless, an evidenced-based profession such as nursing cannot accept research at face value, and nurses need to be able to determine the strengths and limitations of qualitative as well as quantitative research studies when reviewing the available literature on a topic. PMID:17851363

Ryan, Frances; Coughlan, Michael; Cronin, Patricia

60

Getting through ethics: the fit between research ethics board assessments and qualitative research.  

PubMed

In this paper, we draw on the authors' collective experiences as qualitative researchers undergoing research ethics reviews. We highlight specific areas within our standard national guidelines that support qualitative research. Using case examples, we illustrate how diverse interpretations of these guidelines can be inconsistent and problematic for qualitative researchers. We outline recommendations for transparency, reciprocity, and streamlining of the review process. It is our hope that adoption of these recommendations will lead to a more collegial evaluative process, thereby contributing to the advancement of knowledge. PMID:23324201

McCormack, Dianne; Carr, Tracy; McCloskey, Rose; Keeping-Burke, Lisa; Furlong, Karen E; Doucet, Shelley

2012-12-01

61

The Job Satisfaction–Job Performance Relationship: A Qualitative and Quantitative Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

A qualitative and quantitative review of the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance is provided. The qualitative review is organized around 7 models that characterize past research on the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance. Although some models have received more support than have others, research has not provided conclusive confirmation or disconfirmation of any model, partly because

Timothy A. Judge; Carl J. Thoresen; Joyce E. Bono; Gregory K. Patton

2001-01-01

62

Secondhand Smoke Exposure Levels in Outdoor Hospitality Venues: A Qualitative and Quantitative Review of the Research Literature  

PubMed Central

Objective This paper considers the evidence on whether outdoor secondhand smoke (SHS) is present in high enough levels of hospitality venues to potentially pose health risks, particularly among employees of such establishments. Data Sources Search strings in PubMed and Web of Science included combinations of environmental tobacco smoke, secondhand smoke, or passive smoke AND outdoor, yielding 217 and 5,199 results, respectively through June, 2012. Study Selection Sixteen studies were selected based on abstract review that either entirely or partly measured outdoor SHS exposures (particulate matter (PM) or other SHS indicators). Data Extraction The methods used to measure SHS indicators, particularly PM, were assessed for inclusion of extraneous variables that may affect such measurements or the corroboration of ambient levels with known standards. Data Synthesis The magnitude of SHS exposure (PM2.5) is dependent on the number of smokers present, proximity to the measuring device, outdoor enclosures, and wind. Under specific conditions, peak outdoor PM2.5 levels can be comparable to those recorded in indoor smoky environments. Using data from both observational and experimental studies, annual excess PM2.5 exposure of full-time waitstaff at outdoor smoking environments could average 4.0 to 12.2 ?g/m3 under variable smoking conditions. Conclusions Although highly transitory, outdoor SHS exposures could occasionally exceed annual ambient air quality exposure guidelines. However, such exposures are likely to be higher for occupationally exposed individuals compared to patrons due to repeated and cumulative outdoor SHS exposures. Personal monitoring studies of waitstaff are warranted to corroborate these modeled estimates. PMID:23220937

LICHT, ANDREA S; HYLAND, ANDREW; TRAVERS, MARK J; CHAPMAN, SIMON

2013-01-01

63

Interrogating Racism in Qualitative Research Methodology. Counterpoints.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book explores the link between critical race theory and qualitative research methodology, interrogating how race connects and conflicts with other areas of difference and is never entirely absent from the research process. After an introduction, "Critical Race Theory in Education: Theory, Praxis, and Recommendations" (Sylvia R. Lazos Vargas),…

Lopez, Gerardo R., Ed.; Parker, Laurence, Ed.

64

Research Review  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has made its 2002 Research Review available at this site. The document can be downloaded as a whole or in segments by its nine subject areas. An interesting look at "low-wind-speed turbines" discusses the importance of several turbine components in designing an efficient, low-cost source of power. Vehicle emissions and hydrogen fuel cell applications are among several other areas covered. The Research Review is written in a very non-technical manner, so it is ideal for anyone wanting to learn about renewable energy and clean technologies.

65

Qualitative description – the poor cousin of health research?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The knowledge and use of qualitative description as a qualitative research approach in health services research is limited. The aim of this article is to discuss the potential benefits of a qualitative descriptive approach, to identify its strengths and weaknesses and to provide examples of use. DISCUSSION: Qualitative description is a useful qualitative method in much medical research if

Mette Asbjoern Neergaard; Frede Olesen; Rikke Sand Andersen; Jens Sondergaard

2009-01-01

66

Personality and leadership: A qualitative and quantitative review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a qualitative review of the trait perspective in leadership research, followed by a meta-analysis. The authors used the five-factor model as an organizing framework and meta-analyzed 222 correlations from 73 samples. Overall, the correlations with leadership were Neuroticism .24, Extraversion .31, Openness to Experience .24, Agreeableness .08, and Conscientiousness .28. Results indicated that the relations of Neuroticism,

Timothy A. Judge; Joyce E. Bono; Remus Ilies; Megan W. Gerhardt

2002-01-01

67

A systematic review of qualitative research on the contributory factors leading to medicine-related problems from the perspectives of adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Objectives To synthesise contributing factors leading to medicine-related problems (MRPs) in adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or diabetes mellitus from their perspectives. Design A systematic literature review of qualitative studies regarding the contributory factors leading to MRPs, medication errors and non-adherence, followed by a thematic synthesis of the studies. Data sources We screened Pubmed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, PsycInfo, International Pharmaceutical Abstract and PsycExtra for qualitative studies (interviews, focus groups and questionnaires of a qualitative nature). Review methods Thematic synthesis was achieved by coding and developing themes from the findings of qualitative studies. Results The synthesis yielded 21 studies that satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Three themes emerged that involved contributing factors to MRPs: patient-related factors including socioeconomic factors (beliefs, feeling victimised, history of the condition, lack of finance, lack of motivation and low self-esteem) and lifestyle factors (diet, lack of exercise/time to see the doctor, obesity, smoking and stress), medicine-related factors (belief in natural remedies, fear of medicine, lack of belief in medicines, lack of knowledge, non-adherence and polypharmacy) and condition-related factors (lack of knowledge/understanding, fear of condition and its complications, and lack of control). Conclusions MRPs represent a major health threat, especially among adult patients with cardiovascular diseases and/or diabetes mellitus. The patients’ perspectives uncovered hidden factors that could cause and/or contribute to MRPs in these groups of patients. PMID:25239295

Al Hamid, A; Ghaleb, M; Aljadhey, H; Aslanpour, Z

2014-01-01

68

The Role Of Qualitative Research In Productivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Productivity is the relationship between efforts and assigned tasks (inputs) and results (outputs). The paper explores the role of qualitative research to understand the resources of efforts, strategic approaches, modern methods, BPR systems in order to increase productivity. Modern organizations need to identify some intelligent steps. The steps from market analysis, evaluating competitors and suggesting strategies are based on the

Zar Wajidi

2007-01-01

69

Dialog on a country path: the qualitative research journey.  

PubMed

There is little information in the literature describing how students learn qualitative research. This article describes an approach to learning that is based on the pedagogical approach of Dinkins' Socratic-Hermeneutic Shared Inquiry. This approach integrates shared dialog as an essential aspect of learning. The qualitative pedagogy described in this article focused on three questions: What is knowing in qualitative research? How do we come to know qualitative research? What can we do with qualitative research? Students learned the basics of qualitative research within a context that fostered interpretive inquiry. In this way, the course framework mirrored the combination of interviewing, storytelling, and journeying toward understanding that constitute qualitative research. PMID:24262443

Sorrell, Jeanne M; Cangelosi, Pamela R; Dinkins, Christine S

2014-03-01

70

[The relationship between qualitative research and positivism].  

PubMed

Historically, positivism has been the dominant approach in the philosophy of science. In nursing, most quantitative researchers tend to employ positivism as their epistemological underpinning, which could be why positivism has long been identified as the epistemology of quantitative research. It can be argued, however, that some of the procedures of qualitative research reflect the perspectives on which positivists insist. This article takes grounded theory and phenomenology as examples, in order to observe how positivism influences their methodologies, evidence obtained is then used to support the aruthors' arguments. The article, furthermore encourages beginning researchers to familiarize themselves with background knowledge of philosophy of social sciences, especially epistemologies and methodologies, in order to make clear the philosophical context in which their research is conducted. PMID:18836976

Yang, Cheng-I; Lee, Li-Hung; Tzeng, Wen-Chii

2008-10-01

71

Study design in qualitative research--1: Developing questions and assessing resource needs.  

PubMed

This is the second in a series of four papers on understanding and doing qualitative research [Frankel & Devers (2000) Qualitative research: a consumer's guide, Education for Health, 13, 113-123; Devers & Frankel (2000) Study design in qualitative research--2: sampling and data collection strategies, Education for Health, 13, 263-271]. Here, we focus on problems of study design, including question development, literature review, identifying a target audience and resource needs assessment. We provide a step-by-step description of major issues and choice points in the process. There are three key differences between qualitative and quantitative research designs. First, the logic of qualitative research is often inductive, rather than deductive, and consists of describing people's and groups' particular situations, meanings and experiences. Second, qualitative research designs are often emergent and flexible, and the research itself is quite dynamic. Third, the qualitative research process is non-linear and non-sequential. There is agreement that good qualitative studies answer clearly stated, important research questions. How qualitative research questions are formulated has implications for conducting a literature review. Some scholars believe that literature should be reviewed prior to beginning a study; others argue that this may impede the researcher from truly listening, observing and remaining open to new concepts and ideas. We offer suggestions about formulating research questions and how and when to conduct a literature review. Another important issue in conducting qualitative research is determining the resources that will be needed to conduct a study. These include internal resources, such as research skills, and external resources, such as personnel (expertise and time), equipment, supplies and travel. A description of typical resource and management issues in conducting a qualitative research study is included. PMID:14742087

Frankel, R M; Devers, K J

2000-01-01

72

Getting added value from using qualitative research with randomized controlled trials: a qualitative interview study  

PubMed Central

Background Qualitative research is undertaken with randomized controlled trials of health interventions. Our aim was to explore the perceptions of researchers with experience of this endeavour to understand the added value of qualitative research to the trial in practice. Methods A telephone semi-structured interview study with 18 researchers with experience of undertaking the trial and/or the qualitative research. Results Interviewees described the added value of qualitative research for the trial, explaining how it solved problems at the pretrial stage, explained findings, and helped to increase the utility of the evidence generated by the trial. From the interviews, we identified three models of relationship of the qualitative research to the trial. In ‘the peripheral’ model, the trial was an opportunity to undertake qualitative research, with no intention that it would add value to the trial. In ‘the add-on’ model, the qualitative researcher understood the potential value of the qualitative research but it was viewed as a separate and complementary endeavour by the trial lead investigator and wider team. Interviewees described how this could limit the value of the qualitative research to the trial. Finally ‘the integral’ model played out in two ways. In ‘integral-in-theory’ studies, the lead investigator viewed the qualitative research as essential to the trial. However, in practice the qualitative research was under-resourced relative to the trial, potentially limiting its ability to add value to the trial. In ‘integral-in-practice’ studies, interviewees described how the qualitative research was planned from the beginning of the study, senior qualitative expertise was on the team from beginning to end, and staff and time were dedicated to the qualitative research. In these studies interviewees described the qualitative research adding value to the trial although this value was not necessarily visible beyond the original research team due to the challenges of publishing this research. Conclusions Health researchers combining qualitative research and trials viewed this practice as strengthening evaluative research. Teams viewing the qualitative research as essential to the trial, and resourcing it in practice, may have a better chance of delivering its added value to the trial. PMID:24913438

2014-01-01

73

Qualitative Research Projects in Computing Education Research: An Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Qualitative research approaches have much to offer computing education research (CER). Conducting studies which are theoretically anchored in pedagogy, as well as in computing, can help us to draw more solid and significant conclusions about how students learn computing. When studying teaching and learning situations it is important to take into explicit account what is meant by learning. We claim

Anders Berglund; Mats Daniels; Arnold Pears

2006-01-01

74

Qualitative health psychology research: Diversity, power, and impact.  

PubMed

This special issue showcases a range of qualitative research projects conducted by health psychologists with a view to promoting greater uptake and development of qualitative research methods in the field. It is timely because qualitative methods have become prominent across psychology and health research and because major health research funders are now inviting qualitative research to help give voice to patient experiences. As a whole, the papers demonstrate the diversity, power, and impact of qualitative research conducted in health-related settings and show how traditional health psychology methods and concepts can be enriched in the process. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25822048

Gough, Brendan; Deatrick, Janet A

2015-04-01

75

The Cultural Politics of Qualitative Research in Education: Confirming and Contesting the Canon.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a critical review of the 1992 "Handbook of Qualitative Research in Education." The article examines diverse approaches to qualitative field research, discusses ambiguous relationships between education and parent disciplines, notes how the collection represents current dialogue, and examines chapters on critical ethnology. (SM)

Anderson, Gary L.

1994-01-01

76

Making meaning: the creative component in qualitative research.  

PubMed

Findings in qualitative research are often wondrous and exciting, expounding new knowledge and perceptions previously unknown. Qualitative research requires the researcher to ponder and reflect on the data collected so as to find the meaning within. Helping researchers learn how to perform this step is not well discussed in the qualitative literature, yet this is one of the more crucial components of this type of research. In this article, the incubation, the meaning-making phase of qualitative research, is discussed in relation to the experiences of five researchers who have used traditional processes, models, metaphors, plays, pastiche, poetry, and quilt making and design to help them make meaning. PMID:11918103

Hunter, Anita; Lusardi, Paula; Zucker, Donna; Jacelon, Cynthia; Chandler, Genevieve

2002-03-01

77

Incorporating Qualitative Evidence in Systematic Reviews: Strategies and Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The quality of mixed methods systematic reviews relies on the quality of primary-level studies. The synthesis of qualitative evidence and the recent development of synthesizing mixed methods studies hold promise, but also pose challenges to evidence synthesis.

Caracelli, Valerie J.; Cooksy, Leslie J.

2013-01-01

78

Research Review Psychology 2011  

E-print Network

Research Review Psychology 2011 QANU July 2012 #12;QANU / Psychology research assessment 20122;QANU / Psychology Research assessment 2012 3 CONTENTS 1. The Review Committee and review procedures...............................................166 Appendix D: Additional information regarding the Leiden Institute of Psychology ..............169

van Rooij, Robert

79

Revisiting the Quantitative-Qualitative Debate: Implications for Mixed-Methods Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care research includes many studies that combine quantitative and qualitative methods. In this paper, we revisit the quantitative-qualitative debate and review the arguments for and against using mixed-methods. In addition, we discuss the implications stemming from our view, that the paradigms upon which the methods are based have a different view of reality and therefore a different view of

Joanna E. M. Sale; Lynne H. Lohfeld; Kevin Brazil

2002-01-01

80

Qualitative Research and its Uses in Health Care  

PubMed Central

Although relatively uncommon in health care research, qualitative research is now receiving recognition and is increasingly used in health care research with social and cultural dimensions. Unlike quantitative research, which is deductive and tends to analyze phenomena in terms of trends and frequencies, qualitative research seeks to determine the meaning of a phenomenon through description. It aims to develop concepts that aid in the understanding of natural phenomena with emphasis on the meaning, experiences and views of the participants. Differences among qualitative researchers exist on matters of ontology, epistemology, data collection methods and methods of evaluation. The aim of this article is not to act as a practical guide on how to conduct qualitative research, but is an attempt to give an introduction to qualitative research methods and their use in health-related research. PMID:21654952

Al-Busaidi, Zakiya Q

2008-01-01

81

Staff experiences within the implementation of computer-based nursing records in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research  

PubMed Central

Background Since the introduction of electronic nursing documentation systems, its implementation in recent years has increased rapidly in Germany. The objectives of such systems are to save time, to improve information handling and to improve quality. To integrate IT in the daily working processes, the employee is the pivotal element. Therefore it is important to understand nurses’ experience with IT implementation. At present the literature shows a lack of understanding exploring staff experiences within the implementation process. Methods A systematic review and meta-ethnographic synthesis of primary studies using qualitative methods was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, and Cochrane. It adheres to the principles of the PRISMA statement. The studies were original, peer-reviewed articles from 2000 to 2013, focusing on computer-based nursing documentation in Residential Aged Care Facilities. Results The use of IT requires a different form of information processing. Some experience this new form of information processing as a benefit while others do not. The latter find it more difficult to enter data and this result in poor clinical documentation. Improvement in the quality of residents’ records leads to an overall improvement in the quality of care. However, if the quality of those records is poor, some residents do not receive the necessary care. Furthermore, the length of time necessary to complete the documentation is a prominent theme within that process. Those who are more efficient with the electronic documentation demonstrate improved time management. For those who are less efficient with electronic documentation the information processing is perceived as time consuming. Normally, it is possible to experience benefits when using IT, but this depends on either promoting or hindering factors, e.g. ease of use and ability to use it, equipment availability and technical functionality, as well as attitude. Conclusions In summary, the findings showed that members of staff experience IT as a benefit when it simplifies their daily working routines and as a burden when it complicates their working processes. Whether IT complicates or simplifies their routines depends on influencing factors. The line between benefit and burden is semipermeable. The experiences differ according to duties and responsibilities. PMID:24947420

2014-01-01

82

Validity in Qualitative Research: Application of Safeguards  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The construct of validity has received considerable attention in qualitative methods literature (Denzin, 1989; Erickson, 1986; Geertz, 1973; Goetz & LeCompte, 1984; Howe & Eisenhart, 1990; Maxwell, 1992; Smith & Glass, 1987). Much of the attention has been focused upon the issue of whether qualitative results and interpretations accurately reflect…

Daytner, Katrina M.

2006-01-01

83

Developing a Research Program Using Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A research program on postpartum depression is used to illustrate the use of both qualitative and quantitative approaches. The direction of a research program is thus not limited by the type of methods in which a researcher has expertise. (SK)

Beck, Cheryl Tatano

1997-01-01

84

A Guide to Qualitative Research in Plastic Surgery  

PubMed Central

Qualitative research can explore parts of the subjective patient experience that cannot be detailed with quantitative methods such as surveys. Unfortunately this powerful methodology is underutilized in Plastic Surgery, a specialty where subjective outcomes are more important than traditional outcomes indicators. Qualitative research can be used to add depth to patient satisfaction questionnaires or other quantitative measures. Qualitative methodology can also be used to explore complex issues such as why patients choose to undergo cosmetic surgery or to detail patient experiences following reconstructive surgery. We explain the basics of qualitative research including asking the appropriate research question, applying steps to collect data, data analysis and practical applications of the results. PMID:20463619

Shauver, Melissa S.; Chung, Kevin C.

2015-01-01

85

Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

Jolliffe, Lee

1994-01-01

86

Peer Review of Grant Applications: Criteria Used and Qualitative Study of Reviewer Practices  

PubMed Central

Background Peer review of grant applications has been criticized as lacking reliability. Studies showing poor agreement among reviewers supported this possibility but usually focused on reviewers’ scores and failed to investigate reasons for disagreement. Here, our goal was to determine how reviewers rate applications, by investigating reviewer practices and grant assessment criteria. Methods and Findings We first collected and analyzed a convenience sample of French and international calls for proposals and assessment guidelines, from which we created an overall typology of assessment criteria comprising nine domains relevance to the call for proposals, usefulness, originality, innovativeness, methodology, feasibility, funding, ethical aspects, and writing of the grant application. We then performed a qualitative study of reviewer practices, particularly regarding the use of assessment criteria, among reviewers of the French Academic Hospital Research Grant Agencies (Programmes Hospitaliers de Recherche Clinique, PHRCs). Semi-structured interviews and observation sessions were conducted. Both the time spent assessing each grant application and the assessment methods varied across reviewers. The assessment criteria recommended by the PHRCs were listed by all reviewers as frequently evaluated and useful. However, use of the PHRC criteria was subjective and varied across reviewers. Some reviewers gave the same weight to each assessment criterion, whereas others considered originality to be the most important criterion (12/34), followed by methodology (10/34) and feasibility (4/34). Conceivably, this variability might adversely affect the reliability of the review process, and studies evaluating this hypothesis would be of interest. Conclusions Variability across reviewers may result in mistrust among grant applicants about the review process. Consequently, ensuring transparency is of the utmost importance. Consistency in the review process could also be improved by providing common definitions for each assessment criterion and uniform requirements for grant application submissions. Further research is needed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of these measures. PMID:23029386

Abdoul, Hendy; Perrey, Christophe; Amiel, Philippe; Tubach, Florence; Gottot, Serge; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Alberti, Corinne

2012-01-01

87

Outplacement and Re-Employment Measures during Organizational Restructuring in Belgium: Overview of the Literature and Results of Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Aims to review the research literature and legislation on outplacement and re-employment interventions in Belgium and present results of qualitative research and case studies of companies, regarding interventions during organizational restructuring. Design/methodology/approach: Comprises a literature review, qualitative (semi-structured…

De Witte, Hans; Vandoorne, Jan; Verlinden, Roel; De Cuyper, Nele

2005-01-01

88

Turning Points in Qualitative Research: Tying Knots in a Handkerchief. Crossroads in Qualitative Inquiry Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The chapters of this volume traces the changes in the discipline of qualitative inquiry over the last five decades. The collection serves as a textbook for training scholars in the history and trajectory of qualitative research. The chapters of part 1, The Revolution of Representation: Feminist and Race/Ethnic Studies Discourses, are: (1) Situated…

Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.; Denzin, Norman K., Ed.

89

Conducting qualitative research in the British Armed Forces: theoretical, analytical and ethical implications.  

PubMed

The aim of qualitative research is to produce empirical evidence with data collected through means such as interviews and observation. Qualitative research encourages diversity in the way of thinking and the methods used. Good studies produce a richness of data to provide new knowledge or address extant problems. However, qualitative research resulting in peer review publications within the Defence Medical Services (DMS) is a rarity. This article aims to help redress this balance by offering direction regarding qualitative research in the DMS with a focus on choosing a theoretical framework, analysing the data and ethical approval. Qualitative researchers need an understanding of the paradigms and theories that underpin methodological frameworks, and this article includes an overview of common theories in phenomenology, ethnography and grounded theory, and their application within the military. It explains qualitative coding: the process used to analyse data and shape the analytical framework. A popular four phase approach with examples from an operational nursing research study is presented. Finally, it tackles the issue of ethical approval for qualitative studies and offers direction regarding the research proposal and participant consent. The few qualitative research studies undertaken in the DMS have offered innovative insights into defence healthcare providing information to inform and change educational programmes and clinical practice. This article provides an extra resource for clinicians to encourage studies that will improve the operational capability of the British Armed Forces. It is anticipated that these guidelines are transferable to research in other Armed Forces and the military Veterans population. PMID:24464464

Finnegan, Alan

2014-06-01

90

Ethical challenges of researchers in qualitative studies: the necessity to develop a specific guideline  

PubMed Central

Considering the nature of qualitative studies, the interaction between researchers and participants can be ethically challenging for the former, as they are personally involved in different stages of the study. Therefore, formulation of specific ethical guidelines in this respect seems to be essential. The present paper aimed to discuss the necessity to develop explicit guidelines for conducting qualitative studies with regard to the researchers’ role. For this purpose, a literature review was carried out in domestic and international databases by related keywords. Health care providers who carry out qualitative research have an immense responsibility. As there is no statistical analysis in qualitative studies, the researcher has to both evaluate what he or she observes and to interpret it. Providing researchers with the necessary skills and applying stringent supervision can lead to better extraction of reliable information from qualitative studies. This article presents a debate in order to illustrate how researchers could cover the ethical challenges of qualitative studies and provide applicable and trustworthy outcomes. Researchers face ethical challenges in all stages of the study, from designing to reporting. These include anonymity, confidentiality, informed consent, researchers’ potential impact on the participants and vice versa. It seems of paramount importance that health care providers, educators and clinicians be well informed of all the different aspects of their roles when acting as qualitative researchers. Hence, these adroit roles need to be well defined, and the use of practical guidelines and protocols in all stages of qualitative studies should be encouraged. PMID:25512833

Sanjari, Mahnaz; Bahramnezhad, Fatemeh; Fomani, Fatemeh Khoshnava; Shoghi, Mahnaz; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali

2014-01-01

91

How will we know "good" qualitative research when we see it? Beginning the dialogue in health services research.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To lay the foundation for an explicit review and dialogue concerning the criteria that should be used to evaluate qualitative health services research. Clear criteria are critical for the discipline because they provide a benchmark against which research can be assessed. DATA SOURCES: Existing literature in the social sciences and health services research, particularly in primary care and medicine. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Traditional criteria for evaluating qualitative research are rooted in the philosophical perspective (positivism) most closely associated with quantitative research and methods. As a result, qualitative research and methods may not be used as frequently as they can be and research results generated from qualitative studies may not be disseminated as widely as possible. However, alternative criteria for evaluating qualitative research have been proposed that reflect a different philosophical perspective (post-positivism). Moreover, these criteria are tailored to the unique purposes for which qualitative research is used and the research designs traditionally employed. While criteria based on these two different philosophical perspectives have much in common, some important differences exist. CONCLUSION: The field of health services research must engage in a collective, "qualitative" process to determine which criteria to adopt (positivist or post-positivist), or whether some combination of the two is most appropriate. Greater clarity about the criteria used to evaluate qualitative research will strengthen the discipline by fostering a more appropriate and improved use of qualitative methods, a greater willingness to fund and publish "good" qualitative research, and the development of more informed consumers of qualitative research results. Images Figure 1 PMID:10591278

Devers, K J

1999-01-01

92

001 op: ucl qualitative health research symposium 2015: enriching qualitative inquiry in health.  

PubMed

The field of health research appears increasingly open to qualitative approaches. We celebrate the rise in qualitative and mixed methods publications and the marked presence of qualitative researchers in academic centres of health research. However, we note enduring tensions between the conceptual and methodological approaches of qualitative research and those of a quantitative paradigm, generally more familiar to health practitioners, policymakers and often other researchers. In some instances, qualitatively-oriented investigations continue to conflict with the expectations within health research to provide concrete and timely findings and recommendations. These concerns foreground questions to be explored around the applicability, value, contribution, legitimacy and limitations of qualitative inquiry within the prevailing research culture. In recognition of these questions, we curated a day long symposium around abstracts submitted in response to an open, internationally disseminated call, framed to create a productive space for the critical examination of the current state of qualitative health research, and the exploration of ways to enable its enrichment. We organised the papers, posters, keynote address and panel discussion into three themes. The first, Problematising the research landscape, reflects on particular issues arising when we 'do' qualitative research. The second, Re-approaching familiar frameworks, explores the application of epistemological traditions of the social sciences to understand health, and to consider what underpins how we frame and treat such topics. The third, Imagination at work-enriching the potential, attends to the prospects of bringing new approaches into research, sometimes borrowed from other fields. The symposium facilitated engagement with current research and reflections on connecting methodological advances with theoretical traditions amidst challenges of carrying out applied health research. A perceived need exists for qualitative researchers to concertedly promote and enrich our contributions without homogenising or obscuring what our approach has to offer. This could be achieved through the continued development of a common platform for qualitative research that facilitates collaborations and fosters interdisciplinary education and training. This symposium represents critical steps towards these aims, to be further developed through the convening of future events. PMID:25869693

Baim-Lance, A; Black, G; Llewellyn, H; McGregor, L M; Vindrola-Padros, C; V?uková, M; Vrinten, C

2015-01-01

93

Feminist Issues in Qualitative Research With Formerly Homeless Mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the author's attempts to incorporate feminist principles into a qualitative study of the process of successful restabilization among formerly homeless mother-headed families. It discusses methods for dealing with such issues as the research agenda, epistemology, and ethics, so the credibility and agenda of feminist qualitative research is not compromised, and presents case examples from the author's field

Elizabeth W. Lindsey

1997-01-01

94

Estranged Familiars: A Deweyan Approach to Philosophy and Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay argues that philosophy can be combined with qualitative research without sacrificing the aims of either approach. Philosophers and qualitative researchers have articulated and supported the idea that human meaning-constructions are appropriately grasped through close attention to "consequences incurred in action," in…

Shuffelton, Amy

2015-01-01

95

Can Qualitative Researchers Answer Policymakers' What-Works Question?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article asks whether constructivist qualitative researchers have anything to offer policymakers who expect researchers to tell them what works. The first part of the article addresses philosophical objections to characterizing the social world in cause/effect terms. Specifically, it considers whether it is legitimate for qualitative

Donmoyer, Robert

2012-01-01

96

Ethical Perspectives on Qualitative Research in Applied Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present article explores ethical issues that emerge in qualitative research conducted by applied psychologists. The utility and relevance of the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (American Psychological Association, 2002) for qualitative research are examined. The importance of psychology's fiduciary relationship with…

Haverkamp, Beth E.

2005-01-01

97

Validating Indicators of Disaster Recovery with Qualitative Research  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Recovery from disasters is a critical function of federal, state, and local governments, yet measurable, validated indicators of community recovery remain unidentified. A list of potential recovery indicators was developed by the authors through a literature review, recovery plan review, and case study of two disaster impacted communities. Methods: To validate the indicators, qualitative data was collected from experts on disaster recovery. Twenty-one key informant interviews and two focus groups were conducted between January and April of 2014 to solicit feedback from disaster recovery practitioners and academics. Results: Five major themes emerged from the qualitative data. These included: the flexibility of the indicators to serve multiple purposes for communities and individuals both pre- and post- disaster; the focus areas are comprehensive, but content and organization can be improved; the importance of seeing the indicators as a self-assessment, rather than a tool for comparing communities; the potential challenges of collecting data for some indicators; and the identification of potential measurement issues with the indicators. Discussion: The proposed recovery indicators can be utilized by both practitioners and researchers to effectively track post-disaster recovery. They capture many of the complexities of community disaster recovery and provide potential opportunities for linkages to the development of disaster recovery plans and other activities that could increase community resilience in the future. PMID:25685626

Dwyer, Caroline; Horney, Jennifer

2014-01-01

98

Innovative Data Collection Strategies in Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides an innovative meta-framework comprising strategies designed to guide qualitative data collection in the 21st century. We present a meta-framework comprising strategies for collecting data from interviews, focus groups, observations, and documents/material culture. We present a template for collecting nonverbal data during…

Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Leech, Nancy L.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.

2010-01-01

99

Appraising Qualitative Research Reports: A Developmental Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, the author discusses the development of an appraisal instrument designed for evaluating submissions to "The Qualitative Report"--the TQR Rubric. Following a description of the context of TQR, she explains what led to the development of the TQR Rubric and describes its components. She concludes by presenting the plan of…

Cooper, Robin

2011-01-01

100

Experiences of abortion: A narrative review of qualitative studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although abortion or termination of pregnancy (TOP) has become an increasingly normalized component of women's health care over the past forty years, insufficient attention has been paid to women's experiences of surgical or medical methods of TOP. OBJECTIVE: To undertake a narrative review of qualitative studies of women's experiences of TOP and their perspectives on surgical or medical methods.

Mabel LS Lie; Stephen C Robson; Carl R May

2008-01-01

101

Narratives: use in qualitative health-related research.  

PubMed

The present bibliographic review followed a path through several chains of thought concerned with studying narratives. Some classical studies on narrative structure with origins within literature, history, communications theory and psychoanalysis were analyzed with the aim of exploring whether their categories and concepts would be methodologically applicable to qualitative health-related research. In the conclusions, the potential for using narratives to study situations in which there is interest in mediations between experience and language, between structure and events, between subjects and collective groups or between memory and political action are highlighted. These are questions that traditionally are of interest within Brazilian public health with regard to the field of "Policy, Planning and Management". PMID:18820761

Onocko Campos, Rosana Teresa; Furtado, Juarez Pereira

2008-12-01

102

Conducting Qualitative Research on Desertification in Western Lesvos, Greece  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main aim of this article is to present some critical methodological strategies employed in a qualitative research study on local socioeconomic development and desertification in western Lesvos, Greece. Through in-depth qualitative interviews with local producers in western Lesvos, Greece, an effort was made to identify and analyze the links…

Iosifides, Theodoros; Politidis, Theodoros

2005-01-01

103

Aesthetic Forms of Data Representation in Qualitative Family Therapy Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we provide a rationale for using alternative, aesthetic methods of qualitative representation (e.g., creative writing, art, music, performance, poetry) in qualitative family therapy research. We also provide illustrative examples of methods that bring findings to life, and involve the audience in reflecting on their meaning. One…

Piercy, Fred P.; Benson, Kristen

2005-01-01

104

The myth of induction in qualitative nursing research.  

PubMed

In nursing today, it remains unclear what constitutes a good foundation for qualitative scientific inquiry. There is a tendency to define qualitative research as a form of inductive inquiry; deductive practice is seldom discussed, and when it is, this usually occurs in the context of data analysis. We will look at how the terms 'induction' and 'deduction' are used in qualitative nursing science and by qualitative research theorists, and relate these uses to the traditional definitions of these terms by Popper and other philosophers of science. We will also question the assertion that qualitative research is or should be inductive. The position we defend here is that qualitative research should use deductive methods. We also see a need to understand the difference between the creative process needed to create theory and the justification of a theory. Our position is that misunderstandings regarding the philosophy of science and the role of inductive and deductive logic and science are still harming the development of nursing theory and science. The purpose of this article is to discuss and reflect upon inductive and deductive views of science as well as inductive and deductive analyses in qualitative research. We start by describing inductive and deductive methods and logic from a philosophy of science perspective, and we examine how the concepts of induction and deduction are often described and used in qualitative methods and nursing research. Finally, we attempt to provide a theoretical perspective that reconciles the misunderstandings regarding induction and deduction. Our conclusion is that openness towards deductive thinking and testing hypotheses is needed in qualitative nursing research. We must also realize that strict induction will not create theory; to generate theory, a creative leap is needed. PMID:25413613

Bergdahl, Elisabeth; Berterö, Carina M

2015-04-01

105

Qualitative Research Methods in Special Education: Ethnography, Microethnography, and Ethology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three qualitative research methodologies (ethnography, microethnography, and ethology) are contrasted according to their disciplinary origins, methods for data collection and analysis, and use of audiovisual technology. Studies that exemplify the special education applications of these methodologies are summarized. (Author)

Murray, Carola; And Others

1986-01-01

106

A review of electrophysiology in attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder: I. Qualitative and quantitative electroencephalography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This article reviews the electroencephalography (EEG) literature in relation to attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (AD\\/HD).Methods: The review briefly outlines the history of the disorder, focusing on the changing diagnostic systems which both reflect and constrain research into AD\\/HD. Both qualitative and quantitative EEG studies are examined, and their results are discussed in relation to various models of AD\\/HD. Implications of these

Robert J Barry; Adam R Clarke; Stuart J Johnstone

2003-01-01

107

Qualitative research on point-of-care testing strategies and programs for HIV.  

PubMed

Point-of-care (POC) testing in communities, home settings and primary healthcare centers plays an important role in cutting delays in HIV diagnosis and in the uptake of voluntary testing and counseling. Qualitative research methods have important potential to overcome the current challenges in expanding HIV POC testing programs and strategies, by examining the diagnostic processes, complex inter-relationships and patterns involved in making POC diagnostics work in real-world settings. This article reviews existing qualitative studies on POC testing strategies and programs for HIV. Qualitative research on POC diagnostics around the uptake of POC tests, the actual diagnostic and testing processes involved, the influence of POC tests on clinical decision-making, communication of decisions and decisions exercised by patients are limited. Equally limited are studies that explore adaptation of POC programs to various socio-cultural contexts. More qualitative research is needed to inform test developers, funders and policymakers. PMID:25267607

Engel, Nora; Pant Pai, Nitika

2015-01-01

108

Opening up the black box: an introduction to qualitative research methods in anaesthesia.  

PubMed

Qualitative research methods are a group of techniques designed to allow the researcher to understand phenomena in their natural setting. A wide range is used, including focus groups, interviews, observation, and discourse analysis techniques, which may be used within research approaches such as grounded theory or ethnography. Qualitative studies in the anaesthetic setting have been used to define excellence in anaesthesia, explore the reasons behind drug errors, investigate the acquisition of expertise and examine incentives for hand-hygiene in the operating theatre. Understanding how and why people act the way they do is essential for the advancement of anaesthetic practice, and rigorous, well-designed qualitative research can generate useful data and important insights. Meticulous social scientific methods, transparency, reproducibility and reflexivity are markers of quality in qualitative research. Tools such as the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research checklist and the critical appraisal skills programme are available to help authors, reviewers and readers unfamiliar with qualitative research assess its merits. PMID:24548356

Shelton, C L; Smith, A F; Mort, M

2014-03-01

109

The need for adequate ethical guidelines for qualitative health research.  

PubMed

This paper discusses adequacy as to the application of Brazilian guidelines, Resolution 196/96(1) and complementaries to qualitative health researches, considering that these are based on non-positivistic paradigms. Frequently, decisions about the research are made together with the studied community. There is a concern with justice and social change. And, since subjectivity can be considered their privileged instrument, such researchers seek a balance between objectivity and subjectivity, discussing how to overcome the researcher's view. We have studied the application and the concept of research found in international and in the Brazilian guidelines. We have noticed that they adopt a positivist conception of research, which establishes 1) the hypothesis test, 2) that all procedures are previously defined by the researcher; 3) neutrality of the researcher and of the knowledge produced. We will present some characteristics of qualitative research; the ethical implications in the way as qualitative research is conceived in non-positivist paradigms and a brief history of these guidelines. Our conclusion: it is inadequate to analyze qualitative researches using these documents, and we suggest the design of specific guidelines for them. PMID:18813543

Guerriero, Iara Coelho Zito; Dallari, Sueli Gandolfi

2008-01-01

110

Giving Bad News: A Qualitative Research Exploration  

PubMed Central

Background: The manner in which healthcare professionals deliver bad news affects the way it is received, interpreted, understood, and dealt with. Despite the fact that clinicians are responsible for breaking bad news, it has been shown that they lack skills necessary to perform this task. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian mothers’ experiences to receive bad news about their children cancer and to summarize suggestions for improving delivering bad news by healthcare providers. Materials and Methods: A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 mothers from two pediatric hospitals in Iran. Results: Five major categories emerged from the data analysis, including dumping information, shock and upset, emotional work, burden of delivering bad news to the family members, and a room for multidisciplinary approach. Conclusions: Effective communication of healthcare team with mothers is required during breaking bad news. Using multidisciplinary approaches to prevent harmful reactions and providing appropriate support are recommended. PMID:25068066

Aein, Fereshteh; Delaram, Masoumeh

2014-01-01

111

Qualitative research and the profound grasp of the obvious.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To discuss the value of promoting coexistent and complementary relationships between qualitative and quantitative research methods as illustrated by presentations made by four respected health services researchers who described their experiences in multi-method projects. DATA SOURCES: Presentations and publications related to the four research projects, which described key substantive and methodological areas that had been addressed with qualitative techniques. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sponsor interest in timely, insightful, and reality-anchored evidence has provided a strong base of support for the incorporation of qualitative methods into major contemporary policy research studies. In addition, many issues may be suitable for study only with qualitative methods because of their complexity, their emergent nature, or because of the need to revisit and reexamine previously untested assumptions. CONCLUSION: Experiences from the four projects, as well as from other recent health services studies with major qualitative components, support the assertion that the interests of sponsors in the policy realm and pressure from them suppress some of the traditional tensions and antagonisms between qualitative and quantitative methods. PMID:10591276

Hurley, R E

1999-01-01

112

Bracketing in qualitative research: conceptual and practical matters.  

PubMed

Bracketing is presented as two forms of researcher engagement: with data and with evolving findings. The first form is the well-known identification and temporary setting aside of the researcher's assumptions. The second engagement is the hermeneutic revisiting of data and of one's evolving comprehension of it in light of a revised understanding of any aspect of the topic. Both of these processes are ongoing, and they include the careful development of language with which to represent findings. Extensive everyday examples of bracketing and of interviewing are presented. As a form of disclosure in qualitative research, the background from which this article was written is shared. At that point, Husserl's and Heidegger's historical introductions of bracketing are presented briefly, followed by a discussion of reflexivity and hermeneutics. The article closes with warnings of how residual positivism can work against qualitative rigor and with a suggested qualitative research study on bracketing. PMID:20183407

Fischer, Constance T

2009-07-01

113

Phases of the qualitative research interview with institutionalized elderly individuals.  

PubMed

The in-depth, open-ended formal interview is a mainstay of qualitative nursing research. However, difficulties with this method of data collection are common with institutionalized elderly individuals. During a qualitative study of urinary incontinence among nursing home residents, six distinct phases of the formal interview were identified: introducing, personalizing, reminiscing, contextualizing, closing, and reciprocating. These phases were discovered in the course of analyzing field notes and verbatim transcripts from open-ended formal interviews with 10 respondents. Allowing qualitative research interviews with institutionalized elderly individuals to unfold in this fashion may help researchers studying this group overcome problems with recruitment, retention, and "thin" data. In turn, more institutionalized elderly individuals would reap benefits associated with participation in research interviews and staff would ultimately have the opportunity to understand and appreciate life in an institution from the resident's perspective. PMID:11883617

Robinson, J P

2000-11-01

114

Why We Need Qualitative Research in Suicidology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using the differentiation between "explanations" and "understanding" from philosophy of science as the point of departure, a critical look at the current mainstream suicidological research was launched. An almost exclusive use of quantitative methodology focusing on "explanations" is demonstrated. This bias in scope and methodology has to a large…

Hjelmeland, Heidi; Knizek, Birthe Loa

2010-01-01

115

Qualitative Research and the Post-Positivist Mind.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Defines the post-positivist approach to qualitative research as one that characterizes knowledge as neither conclusive, verifiable, or external to the human psyche. Instead it assumes knowledge to be socially and individually constructed. Argues for a more tolerant and creative understanding of the various research methodologies by their…

Reimer, Bennett

1996-01-01

116

The Mentor's Perspective: A Qualitative Inquiry and Future Research Agenda  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study employed a qualitative research strategy for examining mentoring from the perspective of the mentor. A total of 27 mentors participated in in-depth interviews regarding their experiences as a mentor. The research focused on investigating issues related to the decision to mentor others. To meet this objective, four major areas of inquiry were examined: individual reasons for mentoring

Tammy D. Allen; Mark L. Poteet; Susan M. Burroughs

1997-01-01

117

Understanding Quantitative and Qualitative Research in Early Childhood Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book describes the research process in order to facilitate understanding of the process and its products, especially as they pertain to early childhood education. It examines both quantitative and qualitative research methods, emphasizing ways in which they can be used together to fully study a given phenomenon or topic. Chapter 1 examines…

Goodwin, William L.; Goodwin, Laura D.

118

An internationally focused synthesised marketing strategy underpinned by qualitative research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The aim of the paper is to make explicit how qualitative research can enable senior marketers to formulate an internationally focused synthesised marketing strategy. A number of marketing research issues are highlighted including the need to track customer expectations; identify what customer value represents; and explain how scenario analysis and planning can be embraced in order to produce

Peter R. J. Trim; Yang-Im Lee

2006-01-01

119

Qualitative Teacher Research and the Complexity of Classroom Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses how the underlying assumptions and practices of teacher research position it as a distinct form of educational inquiry, and identifies qualitative methodology as a central influence on the work. A discussion of some of the common conceptualizations and processes of PK-12 teacher research, the complex yet continually changing…

Klehr, Mary

2012-01-01

120

In Search of a Culture: Navigating the Dimensions of Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ralph LaRossa's (2012) article on the multidimensional world of qualitative research provides family scientists with a set of innovative tools to guide writing and reviewing. He proffered an engaging challenge: to view the "Journal of Marriage and Family" ("JMF") as a meeting place of scholars, a thought community (Zerubavel, 1997), even a culture…

Roy, Kevin M.

2012-01-01

121

Never the twain shall meet? Quantitative psychological researchers’ perspectives on qualitative research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this article was to provide a quantitative researchers’ perspective on qualitative research applied to sport and exercise psychology. Specifically, we aimed to identify some of the ‘problems’ that researchers adopting a predominantly quantitative, ‘natural science’ approach to psychological phenomena in psychology have with qualitative approaches. In addition, we also identified, as researchers from a predominantly background, the

Martin S. Hagger; Nikos L. D. Chatzisarantis

2011-01-01

122

Ethical use of social media to facilitate qualitative research.  

PubMed

Increasingly, qualitative health researchers might consider using social media to facilitate communication with participants. Ambiguity surrounding the potential risks intrinsic to social media could hinder ethical conduct and discourage use of this innovative method. We used some core principles of traditional human research ethics, that is, respect, integrity, and beneficence, to design our photo elicitation research that explored the social influences of drinking alcohol among 34 underage women in metropolitan South Australia. Facebook aided our communication with participants, including correspondence ranging from recruitment to feeding back results and sharing research data. This article outlines the ethical issues we encountered when using Facebook to interact with participants and provides guidance to researchers planning to incorporate social media as a tool in their qualitative studies. In particular, we raise the issues of privacy and confidentiality as contemporary risks associated with research using social media. PMID:25212856

Lunnay, Belinda; Borlagdan, Joseph; McNaughton, Darlene; Ward, Paul

2015-01-01

123

Observations on positivism and pseudoscience in qualitative nursing research.  

PubMed

In this paper I will examine the boundaries between positivism, interpretivism and pseudoscience, arguing that some qualitative researchers may risk the credibility of nursing research by utilizing concepts from the margins of science. There are two major threats to the perceived rigour and credibility of qualitative research in its many forms. First is a trend in some work towards a mystical view of both the methods and the content of the qualitative enterprise. This can be detected, I will argue, in the work of Rosemary Parse in particular. The second potentially damaging trend is almost its epistemological opposite, towards excessive reliance on precise procedures, strict definitions and verification exemplified by Juliet Corbin and others. I will suggest that this is nothing to fear, but something to be clear about. This is not social constructionism or interpretivism but a 'qualitative' version of positivism. The paper concludes that students and researchers should be cautious in the uncritical acceptance of theories and 'research' which approach the boundaries of pseudoscience on the one hand, and 'hard' science on the other. PMID:10403982

Johnson, M

1999-07-01

124

Celebrating methodological challenges and changes: reflecting on the emergence and importance of the role of qualitative evidence in Cochrane reviews  

PubMed Central

Cochrane systematic reviews have proven to be beneficial for decision making processes, both on a practitioner and a policy level, and there are current initiatives to extend the types of evidence used by them, including qualitative research. In this article we outline the major achievements of the Cochrane Qualitative and Implementation Methods Group. Although the Group has encountered numerous challenges in dealing with the evolution of qualitative evidence synthesis, both outside and within the Cochrane Collaboration, it has successfully responded to the challenges posed in terms of incorporating qualitative evidence in systematic reviews. The Methods Group will continue to advocate for more flexible and inclusive approaches to evidence synthesis in order to meet the exciting challenges and opportunities presented by mixed methods systematic reviews and reviews of complex interventions. PMID:24135194

2013-01-01

125

Evocative Cues and Presence: Relational Consciousness within Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper introduces an example of how pictures were used to facilitate exploration of spiritual aspects of self, as a basis for qualitative research, with young people aged 15-18 years. The author considers how spiritually moving and stirring experiences may be related to the notion of a direct, participatory embodied attunement to the world.…

Pearmain, Rosalind

2007-01-01

126

The Value of Qualitative Methods in Social Validity Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One quality indicator of intervention research is the extent to which the intervention has a high degree of social validity, or practicality. In this study, I drew on Wolf's framework for social validity and used qualitative methods to ascertain five middle schoolteachers' perceptions of the social validity of System 44®--a phonics-based…

Leko, Melinda M.

2014-01-01

127

How to Conduct Clinical Qualitative Research on the Patient's Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From a perspective of patient-centered healthcare, exploring patients' (a) preconceptions, (b) treatment experiences, (c) quality of life, (d) satisfaction, (e) illness understandings, and (f) design are all critical components in improving primary health care and research. Utilizing qualitative approaches to discover patients' experiences can…

Chenail, Ronald J.

2011-01-01

128

Under Construction: How Narrative Elements Shape Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article considers how narrative constructs could be used to strengthen the writing process. The authors outline the narratological devices of plot, point of view, authorial distance, and character, and examine how these concepts can be used when writing with qualitative data. Narratological tools equip the researcher to selectively manage the…

Holley, Karri; Colyar, Julia

2012-01-01

129

Methodology or method? A critical review of qualitative case study reports  

PubMed Central

Despite on-going debate about credibility, and reported limitations in comparison to other approaches, case study is an increasingly popular approach among qualitative researchers. We critically analysed the methodological descriptions of published case studies. Three high-impact qualitative methods journals were searched to locate case studies published in the past 5 years; 34 were selected for analysis. Articles were categorized as health and health services (n=12), social sciences and anthropology (n=7), or methods (n=15) case studies. The articles were reviewed using an adapted version of established criteria to determine whether adequate methodological justification was present, and if study aims, methods, and reported findings were consistent with a qualitative case study approach. Findings were grouped into five themes outlining key methodological issues: case study methodology or method, case of something particular and case selection, contextually bound case study, researcher and case interactions and triangulation, and study design inconsistent with methodology reported. Improved reporting of case studies by qualitative researchers will advance the methodology for the benefit of researchers and practitioners. PMID:24809980

Hyett, Nerida; Kenny, Amanda; Dickson-Swift, Virginia

2014-01-01

130

Anglo-North American qualitative counseling and psychotherapy research.  

PubMed

Qualitative counseling and psychotherapy research produced in the United Kingdom and in Canada and the United States is examined. It is shown that the methods and methodologies in the British research have been influenced by postmodern epistemology more than in North American work, which reflects a greater effect of positivism. Correspondingly, it is shown that a higher value has been placed on methods in the latter region compared with the former. The differences are discussed in terms of the way the field of counseling has developed in the United Kingdom compared with the United States and Canada. Also discussed are the tensions between realism and relativism and, correspondingly, between positive valuing of method and skepticism. The article concludes with thoughts about the implications of qualitative research for the field of counseling and psychotherapy as a whole. PMID:22011116

Rennie, David L

2004-03-01

131

Qualitative Research Methods in Education and Educational Technology. Research Methods for Educational Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Qualitative Research Methods in Education and Educational Technology" was written for students and scholars interested in exploring the many qualitative methods developed over the last 50 years in the social sciences. The book does not stop, however, at the boundaries of the social sciences. Social scientists now consume and use research methods…

Willis, Jerry W.

2008-01-01

132

Qualitative methodologies in health-care priority setting research.  

PubMed

Priority setting research in health economics has traditionally employed quantitative methodologies and been informed by post-positivist philosophical assumptions about the world and the nature of knowledge. These approaches have been rewarded with well-developed and validated tools. However, it is now commonly noted that there has been limited uptake of economic analysis into actual priority setting and resource allocation decisions made by health-care systems. There seem to be substantial organizational and political barriers. The authors argue in this paper that understanding and addressing these barriers will depend upon the application of qualitative research methodologies. Some efforts in this direction have been attempted; however these are theoretically under-developed and seldom rooted in any of the established qualitative research traditions. Two such approaches - narrative inquiry and discourse analysis - are highlighted here. These are illustrated with examples drawn from a real-world priority setting study. The examples demonstrate how such conceptually powerful qualitative traditions produce distinctive findings that offer unique insight into organizational contexts and decision-maker behavior. We argue that such investigations offer untapped benefits for the study of organizational priority setting and thus should be pursued more frequently by the health economics research community. PMID:18972324

Smith, Neale; Mitton, Craig; Peacock, Stuart

2009-10-01

133

E-mail interviewing in qualitative research: A methodological discussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes findings from studies that employed electronic mail (e-mail) for conducting in- depth interviewing. It discusses the benefits of, and the challenges associated with, using e-mail interviewing in qualitative research. The article concludes that while a mixed mode interviewing strategy should be considered when possible, e-mail interviewing can be in many cases a viable alternative to face-to-face and

Lokman I. Meho

2006-01-01

134

Patients’ experiences of chronic non-malignant musculoskeletal pain: a qualitative systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain is one of the most predominant types of pain and accounts for a large portion of the primary care workload. Aim To systematically review and integrate the findings of qualitative research to increase understanding of patients’ experiences of chronic non-malignant MSK pain. Design and setting Synthesis of qualitative research using meta-ethnography using six electronic databases up until February 2012 (Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Psychinfo, Amed and HMIC). Method Databases were searched from their inception until February 2012, supplemented by hand-searching contents lists of specific journals for 2001–2011 and citation tracking. Full published reports of qualitative studies exploring adults’ own experience of chronic non-malignant MSK pain were eligible for inclusion. Results Out of 24 992 titles, 676 abstracts, and 321 full texts were screened, 77 papers reporting 60 individual studies were included. A new concept of pain as an adversarial struggle emerged. This adversarial struggle was to: 1) affirm self; 2) reconstruct self in time; 3) construct an explanation for suffering; 4) negotiate the healthcare system; and 5) prove legitimacy. However, despite this struggle there is also a sense for some patients of 6) moving forward alongside pain. Conclusions This review provides a theoretical underpinning for improving patient experience and facilitating a therapeutic collaborative partnership. A conceptual model is presented, which offers opportunities for improvement by involving patients, showing them their pain is understood, and forming the basis to help patients move forward alongside their pain. PMID:24351499

Toye, Francine; Seers, Kate; Allcock, Nick; Briggs, Michelle; Carr, Eloise; Andrews, JoyAnn; Barker, Karen

2013-01-01

135

Qualitative research methods: key features and insights gained from use in infection prevention research.  

PubMed

Infection control professionals and hospital epidemiologists are accustomed to using quantitative research. Although quantitative studies are extremely important in the field of infection control and prevention, often they cannot help us explain why certain factors affect the use of infection control practices and identify the underlying mechanisms through which they do so. Qualitative research methods, which use open-ended techniques, such as interviews, to collect data and nonstatistical techniques to analyze it, provide detailed, diverse insights of individuals, useful quotes that bring a realism to applied research, and information about how different health care settings operate. Qualitative research can illuminate the processes underlying statistical correlations, inform the development of interventions, and show how interventions work to produce observed outcomes. This article describes the key features of qualitative research and the advantages that such features add to existing quantitative research approaches in the study of infection control. We address the goal of qualitative research, the nature of the research process, sampling, data collection and analysis, validity, generalizability of findings, and presentation of findings. Health services researchers are increasingly using qualitative methods to address practical problems by uncovering interacting influences in complex health care environments. Qualitative research methods, applied with expertise and rigor, can contribute important insights to infection prevention efforts. PMID:18834752

Forman, Jane; Creswell, John W; Damschroder, Laura; Kowalski, Christine P; Krein, Sarah L

2008-12-01

136

Do we need methodological theory to do qualitative research?  

PubMed

Positivism is frequently used to stand for the epistemological assumption that empirical science based on principles of verificationism, objectivity, and reproducibility is the foundation of all genuine knowledge. Qualitative researchers sometimes feel obliged to provide methodological alternatives to positivism that recognize their different ethical, ontological, and epistemological commitments and have provided three theories: phenomenology, grounded theory, and ethnography. The author argues that positivism was a doomed attempt to define empirical foundations for knowledge through a rigorous separation of theory and evidence; offers a pragmatic, coherent view of knowledge; and suggests that rigorous, rational empirical investigation does not need methodological theory. Therefore, qualitative methodological theory is unnecessary and counterproductive because it hinders critical reflection on the relation between methodological theory and empirical evidence. PMID:14502964

Avis, Mark

2003-09-01

137

The Researcher as Instrument: Learning to Conduct Qualitative Research through Analyzing and Interpreting a Choral Rehearsal  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative researchers often describe the ambiguities and complexities of extracting meaning from ambiguous and complex data. Although methodological literature provides useful frameworks and heuristics to guide the process of transforming field data into credible findings, learning to analyze and interpret qualitative data also involves a…

Barrett, Janet R.

2007-01-01

138

Proposing an Argument for Research Questions that Could Create Permeable Boundaries within Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this conceptual paper, we discuss how carefully developed research questions may support qualitative researchers by providing boundaries for their study designs. These boundaries could indicate a researcher's epistemological and theoretical connections and support his or her research choices. Although these boundaries are permeable and in flux,…

Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka; Hayes, Sharon

2010-01-01

139

Qualitative Research as Cultural and Religious Mirror: What Do Researchers Really Learn?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the interaction between the work and lives of five religious qualitative researchers whose research studies investigate both culture and religion. The ways their personal backgrounds, experiences, and values affect their choice of research topics and their relationships with research participants and with data, are revealed…

Court, Deborah

2008-01-01

140

A philosophical analysis of the general methodology of qualitative research: a critical rationalist perspective.  

PubMed

Philosophical discussion of the general methodology of qualitative research, such as that used in some health research, has been inductivist or relativist to date, ignoring critical rationalism as a philosophical approach with which to discuss the general methodology of qualitative research. This paper presents a discussion of the general methodology of qualitative research from a critical rationalist perspective (inspired by Popper), using as an example mental health research. The widespread endorsement of induction in qualitative research is positivist and is suspect, if not false, particularly in relation to the context of justification (or rather theory testing) as compared to the context of discovery (or rather theory generation). Relativism is riddled with philosophical weaknesses and hence it is suspect if not false too. Theory testing is compatible with qualitative research, contrary to much writing about and in qualitative research, as theory testing involves learning from trial and error, which is part of qualitative research, and which may be the form of learning most conducive to generalization. Generalization involves comparison, which is a fundamental methodological requirement of any type of research (qualitative or other); hence the traditional grounding of quantitative and experimental research in generalization. Comparison--rather than generalization--is necessary for, and hence compatible with, qualitative research; hence, the common opposition to generalization in qualitative research is misdirected, disregarding whether this opposition's claims are true or false. In conclusion, qualitative research, similar to quantitative and experimental research, assumes comparison as a general methodological requirement, which is necessary for health research. PMID:22592885

Rudnick, Abraham

2014-09-01

141

Quality of work life, burnout, and stress in emergency department physicians: a qualitative review.  

PubMed

A 2006 literature review reported that emergency department (ED) physicians showed elevated burnout levels and highlighted several environment and personal issues contributing toward burnout. Research on burnout in EDs is limited. We propose an updated qualitative review on the relationships between work stress, burnout, and quality of work life in ED physicians. We searched MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and Science Direct for studies published since 2005. Of 491 papers, 10 papers were retained, using validated measures and having a minimum of 75 participants. Data extraction was performed manually by the first author and was reviewed by the second author. The majority of the studies used large samples, cross-sectional designs, random, and/or stratified assignment. ED physicians showed moderate to high levels of burnout with difficult work conditions including significant psychological demands, lack of resources, and poor support. Nonetheless, physicians reported high job satisfaction. Further studies should focus on the implementation of measures designed to prevent burnout. PMID:25093897

Bragard, Isabelle; Dupuis, Gilles; Fleet, Richard

2014-08-01

142

Qualitative Research in Counseling: A Reflection for Novice Counselor Researchers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Counselors practice in a wide range of disciplines, but also represent a distinct discipline separate from medicine, psychology, and social work. Particularly in countries like Australia, Canada, and the Asia Pacific nations, as a relatively new field, counseling is taking up the challenges of encouraging a research culture that can both critique…

Bowers, Randolph; Minichiello, Victor; Plummer, David

2007-01-01

143

Research Review NOVA and Astronomy  

E-print Network

Research Review NOVA and Astronomy 2010 October 2011 #12;2 QANU / Research Review NOVA NOVA and Astronomy 3 Contents: Update 5 1. The Review Committee and Review Procedures 7 2. Remarks concerning the overall NOVA research school 9 3. General Remarks on the level of the Institutes 15 4

van Rooij, Robert

144

Mental and social health in disasters: relating qualitative social science research and the Sphere standard.  

PubMed

Increasingly, social scientists interested in mental and social health conduct qualitative research to chronicle the experiences of and humanitarian responses to disaster We reviewed the qualitative social science research literature in relation to a significant policy document, the Sphere Handbook, which includes a minimum standard in disaster response addressing "mental and social aspects of health", involving 12 interventions indicators. The reviewed literature in general supports the relevance of the Sphere social health intervention indicators. However, social scientists' chronicles of the diversity and complexity of communities and responses to disaster illustrate that these social interventions cannot be assumed helpful in all settings and times. With respect to Sphere mental health intervention indicators, the research largely ignores the existence and well-being of persons with pre-existing, severe mental disorders in disasters, whose well-being is addressed by the relevant Sphere standard. Instead, many social scientists focus on and question the relevance of posttraumatic stress disorder-focused interventions, which are common after some disasters and which are not specifically covered by the Sphere standard. Overall, social scientists appear to call for a social response that more actively engages the political, social, and economic causes of suffering, and that recognizes the social complexities and flux that accompany disaster. By relating social science research to the Sphere standard for mental and social health, this review informs and illustrates the standard and identifies areas of needed research. PMID:16202495

Batniji, Rajaie; Van Ommeren, Mark; Saraceno, Benedetto

2006-04-01

145

Are We (T)here Yet? Qualitative Research in Education's Profuse and Contested Present  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay addresses the topic of the state of qualitative research in education by asserting that qualitative research in education is in quite a state. Drawing heavily on Denzin and Lincoln's periodization of qualitative research as a guide, it outlines the various competing developments from within and outside that are vying to characterize the…

Wright, Handel Kashope

2006-01-01

146

A Critical Review of Qualitative Interviews in Applied Linguistics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article asks what applied linguistics can learn from related disciplines with regard to the collection, analysis and representation of qualitative interviews. It assesses the contributions of qualitative sociology, anthropology, discursive psychology and outlines four "discourse dilemmas" which might provide the basis for a more critical and…

Mann, Steve

2011-01-01

147

Engaging High School Students as Co-Researchers in Qualitative Research: Logistical, Methodological and Ethical Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores six phases of a research project designed specifically to engage high school students as co-researchers in a multisite qualitative study exploring perceptions of tobacco use among high school students in four schools. It describes how university researchers collaborated with the high school students and summarizes seven major…

Miller, Dana L.; McVea, Kristine L. S. P.; Creswell, John W.; Harter, Lynn; Mickelson, William; McEntarffer, Rob

148

Error and objectivity: cognitive illusions and qualitative research.  

PubMed

Psychological research has shown that cognitive illusions, of which visual illusions are just a special case, are systematic and pervasive, raising epistemological questions about how error in all forms of research can be identified and eliminated. The quantitative sciences make use of statistical techniques for this purpose, but it is not clear what the qualitative equivalent is, particularly in view of widespread scepticism about validity and objectivity. I argue that, in the light of cognitive psychology, the 'error question' cannot be dismissed as a positivist obsession, and that the concepts of truth and objectivity are unavoidable. However, they constitute only a 'minimal realism', which does not necessarily bring a commitment to 'absolute' truth, certainty, correspondence, causation, reductionism, or universal laws in its wake. The assumption that it does reflects a misreading of positivism and, ironically, precipitates a 'crisis of legitimation and representation', as described by constructivist authors. PMID:15935085

Paley, John

2005-07-01

149

We are library faculty at CUNY engaged in a qualitative research project about the student experience; here are our research questions. Qualitative methods can offer insights that  

E-print Network

1 #12;We are library faculty at CUNY engaged in a qualitative research project about the student experience; here are our research questions. Qualitative methods can offer insights that challenge our assumptions about students. We are especially interested in what students are doing when we can't see them

Rosen, Jay

150

Journal Writing as a Qualitative Research Technique: History, Issues, and Reflections.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes and explains how journal writing may be used as a qualitative research technique in long-term qualitative studies. Journal writing has a long and reliable history in the arts and humanities, and it provides qualitative researchers with a powerful heuristic tool. The notion of a comprehensive reflective journal to address the…

Janesick, Valerie J.

151

Theory Building through Qualitative Research: Marshalling Opportunities to Advance Cancer Screening Efforts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many researchers lack the resources, time, and/or expertise to include qualitative strategies in their research. In recent years, substantive progress has been made among qualitative methodologists themselves to codify and systematize concept construction and typologies in qualitatively derived theory. These authors discuss the work of Rena Pasick…

Hay, Jennifer L.; Craddock Lee, Simon J.

2009-01-01

152

Intelligent building research: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the last two decades, substantial amount of literature on intelligent building has been generated. However, there is a lack of systematic review of existing research efforts and achievements. A comprehensive review on existing research provides great benefits to identify where more efforts are needed and therefore the future research directions. For this purpose, this paper reviews the literature related

J. K. W. Wong; H. Li; S. W. Wang

2005-01-01

153

Qualitative methods in health services and management research: pockets of excellence and progress, but still a long way to go.  

PubMed

The 10-year systematic review of published health services and management research by Weiner et al. (2011) chronicles the contributions of qualitative methods, highlights areas of substantial progress, and identifies areas in need of more progress. This article (Devers, 2011) discusses possible reasons for lack of progress in some areas--related to the under-supply of well-trained qualitative researchers and more tangible demand for their research--and mechanisms for future improvement. To ensure a robust health services research toolbox, the field must take additional steps to provide stronger education and training in qualitative methods and more funding and publication opportunities. Given the rapidly changing health care system post the passage of national health reform and the chalresearch issues associated with it, the health services research and management field will not meet its future challenges with quantitative methods alone or with a half-empty toolbox. PMID:21252376

Devers, Kelly J

2011-02-01

154

Men's reflections on participating in cancer rehabilitation: a systematic review of qualitative studies 2000-2013.  

PubMed

This paper aims to report on a systematic review of qualitative studies on men's reflections on participating in cancer rehabilitation. Nine databases were systematically searched to identify qualitative papers published between 2000 and 2013. Papers were selected by pre-defined inclusion criteria and subsequently critically appraised. Key themes were extracted and synthesised. Fifteen papers were selected and represented. Four central themes were identified in the analytical process: 'changed life perspective', 'the masculinity factor', 'a desire to get back to normal' and 'the meaning of work'. Six peripheral themes were identified: 'the meaning of context', 'music', 'physical training', 'religion', 'humour' and 'the unmentionable'. The themes were synthesised into an integrative model representing men's reflections on participating in cancer rehabilitation. We conclude that existing qualitative literature offers insight into men's reflections on cancer rehabilitation and highlights the interrelationship between men's reflections on their changed life perspective, masculinity, orientation towards a normal life and getting back to work. Further research-based knowledge is needed to explore (1) the underlying causes and patterns of the men's needs, preferences and choices in rehabilitation; and (2) the health professional perspective on male cancer rehabilitation. PMID:24118299

Handberg, C; Nielsen, C V; Lomborg, K

2014-03-01

155

Interviewing the Investigator: Strategies for Addressing Instrumentation and Researcher Bias Concerns in Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Instrumentation rigor and bias management are major challenges for qualitative researchers employing interviewing as a data generation method in their studies. A usual procedure for testing the quality of an interview protocol and for identifying potential researcher biases is the pilot study in which investigators try out their proposed methods…

Chenail, Ronald J.

2011-01-01

156

PICO, PICOS and SPIDER: a comparison study of specificity and sensitivity in three search tools for qualitative systematic reviews.  

PubMed

BackgroundQualitative systematic reviews are increasing in popularity in evidence based health care. Difficulties have been reported in conducting literature searches of qualitative research using the PICO search tool. An alternative search tool, entitled SPIDER, was recently developed for more effective searching of qualitative research, but remained untested beyond its development team.MethodsIn this article we tested the `SPIDER¿ search tool in a systematic narrative review of qualitative literature investigating the health care experiences of people with Multiple Sclerosis. Identical search terms were combined into the PICO or SPIDER search tool and compared across Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL Plus databases. In addition, we added to this method by comparing initial SPIDER and PICO tools to a modified version of PICO with added qualitative search terms (PICOS).ResultsResults showed a greater number of hits from the PICO searches, in comparison to the SPIDER searches, with greater sensitivity. SPIDER searches showed greatest specificity for every database. The modified PICO demonstrated equal or higher sensitivity than SPIDER searches, and equal or lower specificity than SPIDER searches. The modified PICO demonstrated lower sensitivity and greater specificity than PICO searches.ConclusionsThe recommendations for practice are therefore to use the PICO tool for a fully comprehensive search but the PICOS tool where time and resources are limited. Based on these limited findings the SPIDER tool would not be recommended due to the risk of not identifying relevant papers, but has potential due to its greater specificity. PMID:25413154

Methley, Abigail M; Campbell, Stephen; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; McNally, Rosalind; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh

2014-11-21

157

A Scoping Review of Qualitative Studies about Children Experiencing Parental Separation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores a scoping review of qualitative studies about children's experiences and feelings during times of parental separation. The purpose of the review was to explore children's feelings and attitudes about their parents' separation and how their voices are heard during times of parental separation. The scoping review examined 44…

Birnbaum, Rachel; Saini, Michael

2013-01-01

158

Revisiting the Benefits Debate: Does Qualitative Social Work Research Produce Salubrious Effects?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work discussion about the intersection of therapy and research has been heated. There is ongoing theoretical debate about the fit of qualitative research and social work practice, as well as the proper goals and potential impact of clinical research. In this article, two qualitative researchers report empirical findings and discuss the…

McCoyd, Judith L. M.; Shdaimah, Corey S.

2007-01-01

159

Self-Care and the Qualitative Researcher: When Collecting Data Can Break Your Heart  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conducting qualitative research on topics that are emotionally laden can have a powerful impact on the researcher. Recent literature addresses the essential nature of the emotional connection that must be part of the qualitative research process. However, for the most part, it neglects the issue of self-care strategies for the researcher that are…

Rager, Kathleen B.

2005-01-01

160

Implications for Application of Qualitative Methods to Library and Information Science Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents conceptual framework for library and information science research and analyzes research methodology that has application for information science, using as example results of study conducted by authors. Rationale for use of qualitative research methods in theory building is discussed and qualitative and quantitative research methods are…

Grover, Robert; Glazier, Jack

1985-01-01

161

End of life care in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of the qualitative literature  

PubMed Central

Background End of life (EoL) care in sub-Saharan Africa still lacks the sound evidence-base needed for the development of effective, appropriate service provision. It is essential to make evidence from all types of research available alongside clinical and health service data, to ensure that EoL care is ethical and culturally appropriate. This article aims to synthesize qualitative research on EoL care in sub-Saharan Africa to inform policy, practice and further research. It seeks to identify areas of existing research; describe findings specifically relevant to the African context; and, identify areas lacking evidence. Methods Relevant literature was identified through eight electronic databases: AMED, British Nursing Index & Archive, CINAHL, EMBASE, IBSS, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and the Social Sciences Citation Index; and hand searches. Inclusion criteria were: published qualitative or mixed-method studies in sub-Saharan Africa, about EoL care. Study quality was assessed using a standard grading scale. Relevant data including findings and practice recommendations were extracted and compared in tabular format. Results Of the 407 articles initially identified, 51 were included in the qualitative synthesis. Nineteen came from South Africa and the majority (38) focused on HIV/AIDS. Nine dealt with multiple or unspecified conditions and four were about cancer. Study respondents included health professionals, informal carers, patients, community members and bereaved relatives. Informal carers were typically women, the elderly and children, providing total care in the home, and lacking support from professionals or the extended family. Twenty studies focused on home-based care, describing how programmes function in practice and what is needed to make them effective. Patients and carers were reported to prefer institutional care but this needs to be understood in context. Studies focusing on culture discussed good and bad death, culture-specific approaches to symptoms and illness, and the bereavement process. Conclusions The data support or complement the findings from quantitative research. The review prompts a reconsideration of the assumption that in Africa the extended family care for the sick, and that people prefer home-based care. The review identifies areas relevant for a research agenda on socio-cultural issues at the EoL in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:21388538

2011-01-01

162

Heath Beliefs of UK South Asians Related to Lifestyle Diseases: A Review of Qualitative Literature  

PubMed Central

Objective. To review available qualitative evidence in the literature for health beliefs and perceptions specific to UK South Asian adults. Exploring available insight into the social and cultural constructs underlying perceptions related to health behaviours and lifestyle-related disease. Methods. A search of central databases and ethnic minority research groups was augmented by hand-searching of reference lists. For included studies, quality was assessed using a predetermined checklist followed by metaethnography to synthesise the findings, using both reciprocal translation and line-of-argument synthesis to look at factors impacting uptake of health behaviours. Results. A total of 10 papers varying in design and of good quality were included in the review. Cultural and social norms strongly influenced physical activity incidence and motivation as well as the ability to engage in healthy eating practices. Conclusions. These qualitative studies provide insight into approaches to health among UK South Asians in view of their social and cultural norms. Acknowledgement of their approach to lifestyle behaviours may assist acceptability of interventions and delivery of lifestyle advice by health professionals. PMID:23476751

Lucas, Anna; Murray, Esther

2013-01-01

163

Health-seeking behaviour for schistosomiasis: a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative literature  

PubMed Central

Schistosomiasis is a chronic and debilitating parasitic disease acquired through contact with infested freshwater. An essential component of its control is passive case finding, which, in order to be effective, requires a detailed understanding of health-seeking behaviour. This study aimed to systematically review evidence on health-seeking behaviour for schistosomiasis, in order to determine factors influencing use or non-use of modern health services for the infection. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed method studies reporting on factors related to seeking treatment from modern health services for schistosomiasis were obtained, combining electronic and hand searching. Data extraction and quality assessment of the included articles were performed, with all studies qualitatively analysed using thematic synthesis. A total of 19 studies were included in the review. Six themes were identified from the analysis: biomedical knowledge on schistosomiasis, perceptions of modern treatment and health services, financial considerations of treatment, perceptions on the symptoms, stigma of the infection, and physical location and community. These findings were consistent across studies of different design, setting and quality. Many of the themes identified echo existing literature on health-seeking behaviour. The synthesis also highlighted the role of stigma, and aspects of the physical location and community that may affect treatment-seeking for schistosomiasis. Health education programmes that intend to improve the utilisation of modern health services for the infection need to acknowledge the multiple determinants influencing their use. Future research should move beyond describing health-seeking behaviour to identifying the factors that underlay such behaviour. PMID:24839538

Cronin, Thomas; Sheppard, James; de Wildt, Gilles

2013-01-01

164

Study design in qualitative research--2: Sampling and data collection strategies.  

PubMed

In two prior papers in our series on qualitative research [Frankel & Devers (2000a, 2000b) Qualitative research: a consumer's guide, Education for Health, 13, 113-123; Frankel & Devers (2000) Study design in qualitative research-1: developing research questions and assessing research needs, Education for Health, 13, 251-261], we examine two critical issues in qualitative research design: sampling, including identifying and negotiating access to research sites and subjects, and data collection and management. We describe these two key steps in the qualitative research design process, discuss challenges that often emerge when pursuing these steps, and provide guidelines for addressing them. Qualitative research most often uses "purposive," rather than random, sampling strategies. A good understanding of these sampling strategies and why they are used is central to designing a credible qualitative study. In addition, given the real-world context in which most qualitative research is carried out, identifying and negotiating access to research sites and subjects are critical parts of the process. We also provide suggestions for developing and maintaining productive and mutually satisfying research relationships with sites and subjects. Finally, data collection and management are often neglected subjects in qualitative research. We offer practical advice on how to collect and manage qualitative data, including factors to consider when deciding how structured the data collection process should be, the pros and cons of audio- and/or videotaping compared with note-taking, and tips for writing up field notes and document management. A forthcoming, final paper in the series will focus on qualitative data analysis and the publication of qualitative research results. PMID:14742088

Devers, K J; Frankel, R M

2000-01-01

165

Review of Qualitative Approaches for the Construction Industry: Designing a Risk Management Toolbox  

PubMed Central

Objectives This paper presents the framework and protocol design for a construction industry risk management toolbox. The construction industry needs a comprehensive, systematic approach to assess and control occupational risks. These risks span several professional health and safety disciplines, emphasized by multiple international occupational research agenda projects including: falls, electrocution, noise, silica, welding fumes, and musculoskeletal disorders. Yet, the International Social Security Association says, "whereas progress has been made in safety and health, the construction industry is still a high risk sector." Methods Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) employ about 80% of the world's construction workers. In recent years a strategy for qualitative occupational risk management, known as Control Banding (CB) has gained international attention as a simplified approach for reducing work-related risks. CB groups hazards into stratified risk 'bands', identifying commensurate controls to reduce the level of risk and promote worker health and safety. We review these qualitative solutions-based approaches and identify strengths and weaknesses toward designing a simplified CB 'toolbox' approach for use by SMEs in construction trades. Results This toolbox design proposal includes international input on multidisciplinary approaches for performing a qualitative risk assessment determining a risk 'band' for a given project. Risk bands are used to identify the appropriate level of training to oversee construction work, leading to commensurate and appropriate control methods to perform the work safely. Conclusion The Construction Toolbox presents a review-generated format to harness multiple solutions-based national programs and publications for controlling construction-related risks with simplified approaches across the occupational safety, health and hygiene professions. PMID:22953194

Spee, Ton; Gillen, Matt; Lentz, Thomas J.; Garrod, Andrew; Evans, Paul; Swuste, Paul

2011-01-01

166

Teaching Qualitative Research: Using Theory to Inform Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article considers how theories of instructional scaffolding--which call for a skilled expert to teach a novice a new task by breaking it into smaller pieces--might be employed in graduate-level qualitative methods courses. The author discusses how she used instructional scaffolding in the design and delivery of a qualitative methods course…

Sallee, Margaret W.

2010-01-01

167

Qualitative Research: An Introduction. Purposes, Methodology, Criteria for Judgment, and a Rationale for Mixed Methodology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative research is research that attempts not only to understand the world, but also to understand it through the eyes of the participants whose world it is. Consequently, qualitative research must occur in a natural setting. The study begins, not with hypotheses to be proved or disproved, but with a flexible plan to explore a phenomenon.…

Wilson, Vicki A.

168

Journeying the Quagmire: Exploring the Discourses That Shape the Qualitative Research Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the struggles to have its legitimacy recognized, qualitative research has been framed as a singular entity understood in relation to quantitative research. This interpretation is now being challenged, resulting in the emergence of increasingly complex, frequently contradictory, and often unarticulated understandings of the goals and practices associated with qualitative research. This article chronicles the pragmatic and ethical struggles the

Deborah OConnor

2001-01-01

169

Troubling 'lived experience': a post-structural critique of mental health nursing qualitative research assumptions.  

PubMed

Qualitative studies in mental health nursing research deploying the 'lived experience' construct are often written on the basis of conventional qualitative inquiry assumptions. These include the presentation of the 'authentic voice' of research participants, related to their 'lived experience' and underpinned by a meta-assumption of the 'metaphysics of presence'. This set of assumptions is critiqued on the basis of contemporary post-structural qualitative scholarship. Implications for mental health nursing qualitative research emerging from this critique are described in relation to illustrative published work, and some benefits and challenges for researchers embracing post-structural sensibilities are outlined. PMID:24118139

Grant, A

2014-08-01

170

Understanding the relationships between the physical environment and physical activity in older adults: a systematic review of qualitative studies  

PubMed Central

Background While physical activity (PA) provides many physical, social, and mental health benefits for older adults, they are the least physically active age group. Ecological models highlight the importance of the physical environment in promoting PA. However, results of previous quantitative research revealed inconsistencies in environmental correlates of older adults’ PA that may be explained by methodological issues. Qualitative studies can inform and complement quantitative research on environment-PA relationships by providing insight into how and why the environment influences participants’ PA behaviors. The current study aimed to provide a systematic review of qualitative studies exploring the potential impact of the physical environment on older adults’ PA behaviors. Methods A systematic search was conducted in databases of various disciplines, including: health, architecture and urban planning, transportation, and interdisciplinary databases. From 3,047 articles identified in the physical activity, initial search, 31 articles published from 1996 to 2012 met all inclusion criteria. An inductive content analysis was performed on the extracted findings to identify emerging environmental elements related to older adults’ PA. The identified environmental elements were then grouped by study methodologies [indoor interviews (individual or focus groups) vs spatial methods (photo-voice, observations, walk-along interviews)]. Results This review provides detailed information about environmental factors that potentially influence older adults’ PA behaviors. These factors were categorized into five themes: pedestrian infrastructure, safety, access to amenities, aesthetics, and environmental conditions. Environmental factors especially relevant to older adults (i.e., access to facilities, green open spaces and rest areas) tended to emerge more frequently in studies that combined interviews with spatial qualitative methods. Conclusions Findings showed that qualitative research can provide in-depth information on environmental elements that influence older adults’ PA. Future qualitative studies on the physical environment and older adults’ PA would benefit from combining interviews with more spatially-oriented methods. Multidisciplinary mixed-methods studies are recommended to establish quantitative relationships complemented with in-depth qualitative information. PMID:25034246

2014-01-01

171

The Impact of Social Media on Medical Professionalism: A Systematic Qualitative Review of Challenges and Opportunities  

PubMed Central

Background The rising impact of social media on the private and working lives of health care professionals has made researchers and health care institutions study and rethink the concept and content of medical professionalism in the digital age. In the last decade, several specific policies, original research studies, and comments have been published on the responsible use of social media by health care professionals. However, there is no systematic literature review that analyzes the full spectrum of (1) social media–related challenges imposed on medical professionalism and (2) social media–related opportunities to both undermine and improve medical professionalism. Objective The aim of this systematic qualitative review is to present this full spectrum of social media–related challenges and opportunities. Methods We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed (restricted to English and German literature published between 2002 and 2011) for papers that address social media–related challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism. To operationalize “medical professionalism”, we refer to the 10 commitments presented in the physicians’ charter “Medical professionalism in the new millennium” published by the ABIM Foundation. We applied qualitative text analysis to categorize the spectrum of social media–related challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism. Results The literature review retrieved 108 references, consisting of 46 original research studies and 62 commentaries, editorials, or opinion papers. All references together mentioned a spectrum of 23 broad and 12 further-specified, narrow categories for social media–related opportunities (n=10) and challenges (n=13) for medical professionalism, grouped under the 10 commitments of the physicians’ charter. Conclusions The accommodation of the traditional core values of medicine to the characteristics of social media presents opportunities as well as challenges for medical professionalism. As a profession that is entitled to self-regulation, health care professionals should proactively approach these challenges and seize the opportunities. There should be room to foster interprofessional and intergenerational dialogue (and eventually guidelines and policies) on both challenges and opportunities of social media in modern health care. This review builds a unique source of information that can inform further research and policy development in this regard. PMID:23985172

Gholami-Kordkheili, Fatemeh; Wild, Verina

2013-01-01

172

Researching Up: Triangulating Qualitative Research to Influence the Public Debate of "On-Time" College Graduation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The field of higher education abounds with qualitative research aimed at highlighting the needs, struggles, strengths, and motivations of academically struggling students. However, because of the small-scale nature of these studies, they rarely enter the public debate or impact institutional policy concerning access, remediation,…

McCormack, Tim; Schnee, Emily; VanOra, Jason

2014-01-01

173

Quantitative Analysis of Qualitative Information from Interviews: A Systematic Literature Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: A systematic literature review was conducted on mixed methods area. Objectives: The overall aim was to explore how qualitative information from interviews has been analyzed using quantitative methods. Methods: A contemporary review was undertaken and based on a predefined protocol. The references were identified using inclusion and…

Fakis, Apostolos; Hilliam, Rachel; Stoneley, Helen; Townend, Michael

2014-01-01

174

Using Qualitative Research to Generate Questions and Contextualize Writing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the strengths of a qualitative study of the effectiveness of environmental impact statements. Notes that the study explores an ill-defined area and relates writing to the situation in which it occurs. (RS)

Winsor, Dorothy A.

1993-01-01

175

The Critical Incident Technique: A Tool for Qualitative Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares qualitative and quantitative methods. Proposes critical incident technique as an appropriate tool for workplace and classroom settings. Describes its components, including interview techniques, coding of interview themes, data analysis, and drawing conclusions. (Contains 28 references.) (SK)

Redmann, Donna H.; Stitt-Gohdes, Wanda L.; Lambrecht, Judith J.

2000-01-01

176

Pharmacological treatments in gambling disorder: a qualitative review.  

PubMed

Gambling disorder (GD) is a psychiatric condition associated with both social and family costs; DSM-5 currently includes GD among addictive disorders. Despite the high burden of this condition, to date there are no treatment guidelines approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Purpose of this paper is to offer a qualitative overview about the different pharmacologic agents used for the treatment of GD. Our analysis, conducted on a final selection of 75 scientific papers, demonstrates that a variety of pharmaceutical classes have been utilised, with different results. Published data, although limited by brief duration of the studies and small number of enrolled subjects, shows mixed evidence for serotonergic antidepressants, opioid antagonists, and mood stabilizers. Other compounds, such as glutamatergic agents and psychostimulants, deserve further studies. PMID:24955359

Lupi, Matteo; Martinotti, Giovanni; Acciavatti, Tiziano; Pettorruso, Mauro; Brunetti, Marcella; Santacroce, Rita; Cinosi, Eduardo; Di Iorio, Giuseppe; Di Nicola, Marco; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

2014-01-01

177

Pharmacological Treatments in Gambling Disorder: A Qualitative Review  

PubMed Central

Gambling disorder (GD) is a psychiatric condition associated with both social and family costs; DSM-5 currently includes GD among addictive disorders. Despite the high burden of this condition, to date there are no treatment guidelines approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Purpose of this paper is to offer a qualitative overview about the different pharmacologic agents used for the treatment of GD. Our analysis, conducted on a final selection of 75 scientific papers, demonstrates that a variety of pharmaceutical classes have been utilised, with different results. Published data, although limited by brief duration of the studies and small number of enrolled subjects, shows mixed evidence for serotonergic antidepressants, opioid antagonists, and mood stabilizers. Other compounds, such as glutamatergic agents and psychostimulants, deserve further studies. PMID:24955359

Lupi, Matteo; Martinotti, Giovanni; Acciavatti, Tiziano; Brunetti, Marcella; Cinosi, Eduardo; Di Iorio, Giuseppe; Di Nicola, Marco; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

2014-01-01

178

Exploring the Nature of the Researcher-Practitioner Relationship in Qualitative Educational Research Publications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This literature review looks at the way in which the researcher-practitioner relationship is described in research publications. The main finding of this review points to: a limited description and discussion of the relationship; a similarly limited, sometimes confusing, understanding of the notion of collaboration; as well as limited…

Yu, Ke

2011-01-01

179

Fathers Matter: A Research Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review outlines key areas of research in relation to the following: the nature of father involvement; factors influencing involvement; the influence of fathers on children; and social policy developments. It reviews the practice oriented research which has emerged in the UK as engaging fathers has become part of the agenda for many child…

Featherstone, Brid

2004-01-01

180

Location Science Research: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document presents a broad review of facility location and location science research. The goal of this report is not to provide an exhaustive list of location science topics (an undertaking far beyond the scope of a single journal article), but rather to provide the reader with a more general review of the location science research landscape. This document starts

Trevor S. Hale; Christopher R. Moberg

2003-01-01

181

The Use of Qualitative Research Methods in Student Affairs: A Practical Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes what qualitative research is in theory and how mid-level student affairs administrators can best use it to enrich their understanding of the deep complexities of the student clientele. Aids administrators in initiating a qualitative research process appropriate to their own departmental needs. (EV)

Walters, Evon

2002-01-01

182

Experiences of breathlessness: A systematic review of the qualitative literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Breathlessness is one of the core symptoms in many advanced conditions. The sub- jective nature of the symptom has been acknowledged in many definitions, emphasizing that it can only be fully perceived and interpreted by the patients themselves. Aim: To review and assess the evidence on the psychosocial nature or experience of breathlessness. Methods: Relevant literature was identified through

Marjolein Gysels; Claudia Bausewein; Irene J. Higginson

2007-01-01

183

Characteristics of qualitative studies in influential journals of general medicine: a critical review.  

PubMed

Although qualitative studies have increased since the 1990s, some reports note that relatively few influential journals published them up until 2000. This study critically reviewed the characteristics of qualitative studies published in top tier medical journals since 2000. We assessed full texts of qualitative studies published between 2000 and 2004 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine. We found 80 qualitative studies, of which 73 (91%) were published in BMJ. Only 10 studies (13%) combined qualitative and quantitative methods. Sixty-two studies (78%) used only one method of data collection. Interviews dominated the choice of data collection. The median sample size was 36 (range: 9-383). Thirty-three studies (41%) did not specify the type of analysis used but rather described the analytic process in detail. The rest indicated the mode of data analysis, in which the most prevalent methods were the constant comparative method (23%) and the grounded theory approach (22%). Qualitative data analysis software was used by 33 studies (41%). Among influential journals of general medicine, only BMJ consistently published an average of 15 qualitative study reports between 2000 and 2004. These findings lend insight into what qualities and characteristics make a qualitative study worthy of consideration to be published in an influential journal, primarily BMJ. PMID:20103848

Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Slingsby, Brian Taylor; Takahashi, Miyako; Hayashi, Yoko; Sugimori, Hiroki; Nakayama, Takeo

2009-12-01

184

Challenges of Interdisciplinary Research: Reconciling Qualitative and Quantitative Methods for Understanding Human-Landscape Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While interdisciplinary research is increasingly practiced as a way to transcend the limitations of individual disciplines, our concepts, and methods are primarily rooted in the disciplines that shape the way we think about the world and how we conduct research. While natural and social scientists may share a general understanding of how science is conducted, disciplinary differences in methodologies quickly emerge during interdisciplinary research efforts. This paper briefly introduces and reviews different philosophical underpinnings of quantitative and qualitative methodological approaches and introduces the idea that a pragmatic, realistic approach may allow natural and social scientists to work together productively. While realism assumes that there is a reality that exists independently of our perceptions, the work of scientists is to explore the mechanisms by which actions cause meaningful outcomes and the conditions under which the mechanisms can act. Our task as interdisciplinary researchers is to use the insights of our disciplines in the context of the problem to co-produce an explanation for the variables of interest. Research on qualities necessary for successful interdisciplinary researchers is also discussed along with recent efforts by funding agencies and academia to increase capacities for interdisciplinary research.

Lach, Denise

2014-01-01

185

Safer@home—Simulation and training: the study protocol of a qualitative action research design  

PubMed Central

Introduction While it is predicted that telecare and other information and communication technology (ICT)-assisted services will have an increasingly important role in future healthcare services, their implementation in practice is complex. For implementation of telecare to be successful and ensure quality of care, sufficient training for staff (healthcare professionals) and service users (patients) is fundamental. Telecare training has been found to have positive effects on attitudes to, sustained use of, and outcomes associated with telecare. However, the potential contribution of training in the adoption, quality and safety of telecare services is an under-investigated research field. The overall aim of this study is to develop and evaluate simulation-based telecare training programmes to aid the use of videophone technology in elderly home care. Research-based training programmes will be designed for healthcare professionals, service users and next of kin, and the study will explore the impact of training on adoption, quality and safety of new telecare services. Methods and analysis The study has a qualitative action research design. The research will be undertaken in close collaboration with a multidisciplinary team consisting of researchers and managers and clinical representatives from healthcare services in two Norwegian municipalities, alongside experts in clinical education and simulation, as well as service user (patient) representatives. The qualitative methods used involve focus group interviews, semistructured interviews, observation and document analysis. To ensure trustworthiness in the data analysis, we will apply member checks and analyst triangulation; in addition to providing contextual and sample description to allow for evaluation of transferability of our results to other contexts and groups. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. The study is based on voluntary participation and informed written consent. Informants can withdraw at any point in time. The results will be disseminated at research conferences, peer review journals, one PhD thesis and through public presentations to people outside the scientific community. PMID:25079924

Wiig, Siri; Guise, Veslemøy; Anderson, Janet; Storm, Marianne; Lunde Husebø, Anne Marie; Testad, Ingelin; Søyland, Elsa; Moltu, Kirsti L

2014-01-01

186

Visual Juxtaposition as Qualitative Inquiry in Educational Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Visual juxtaposition is inquiry through contrast, facilitated by side-by-side positioning of two images, or images and text. When combined with a theoretical foundation that explores interactions between the material and discursive elements of visual data, juxtaposition creates opportunities for qualitative analysis that are not as readily…

Metcalfe, Amy Scott

2015-01-01

187

Procedure versus process: ethical paradigms and the conduct of qualitative research  

PubMed Central

Background Research is fundamental to improving the quality of health care. The need for regulation of research is clear. However, the bureaucratic complexity of research governance has raised concerns that the regulatory mechanisms intended to protect participants now threaten to undermine or stifle the research enterprise, especially as this relates to sensitive topics and hard to reach groups. Discussion Much criticism of research governance has focused on long delays in obtaining ethical approvals, restrictions imposed on study conduct, and the inappropriateness of evaluating qualitative studies within the methodological and risk assessment frameworks applied to biomedical and clinical research. Less attention has been given to the different epistemologies underlying biomedical and qualitative investigation. The bioethical framework underpinning current regulatory structures is fundamentally at odds with the practice of emergent, negotiated micro-ethics required in qualitative research. The complex and shifting nature of real world settings delivers unanticipated ethical issues and (occasionally) genuine dilemmas which go beyond easy or formulaic ‘procedural’ resolution. This is not to say that qualitative studies are ‘unethical’ but that their ethical nature can only be safeguarded through the practice of ‘micro-ethics’ based on the judgement and integrity of researchers in the field. Summary This paper considers the implications of contrasting ethical paradigms for the conduct of qualitative research and the value of ‘empirical ethics’ as a means of liberating qualitative (and other) research from an outmoded and unduly restrictive research governance framework based on abstract prinicipalism, divorced from real world contexts and values. PMID:23016663

2012-01-01

188

Protocol for a qualitative study of knowledge translation in a participatory research project  

PubMed Central

Introduction In this article, we present a methodological design for qualitative investigation of knowledge translation (KT) between participants in a participatory research project. In spite of a vast expansion of conceptual models and frameworks for conducting KT between research and practice, few models emphasise how KTs come about. Better understanding of the actions and activities involved in a KT process is important for promoting diffusion of knowledge and improving patient care. The purpose of this article is to describe a methodological design for investigating how KTs come about in participatory research. Methods and analysis The article presents an ethnographic study which investigates meetings between participants in a participatory research project. The participants are researchers and primary healthcare clinicians. Data are collected through observation, interviews and document studies. The material is analysed using the analytical concepts of knowledge objects, knowledge forms and knowledge positions. These concepts represent an analytical framework enabling us to observe knowledge and how it is translated between participants. The main expected outcome of our study is to develop a typology of KT practices relevant to participatory research. Ethics and dissemination The project has been evaluated and approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. Informed consent was obtained for all participants. The findings from this study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and national and international conference presentations. PMID:23959758

Lillehagen, Ida; Vøllestad, Nina; Heggen, Kristin; Engebretsen, Eivind

2013-01-01

189

The Science of Context: Modes of Response for Qualitative Researchers in Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

How might qualitative researchers meaningfully operate in a contemporary research climate that holds to such limited conceptions of what constitutes "scientific" research in education? This article discusses implications of scientifically based research (SBR) and identifies several pathways along which researchers may productively work in such a…

Demerath, Peter

2006-01-01

190

Troubling objectivity: the promises and pitfalls of training haitian clinicians in qualitative research methods.  

PubMed

Building research capacity is a central component of many contemporary global health programs and partnerships. While medical anthropologists have been conducting qualitative research in resource-poor settings for decades, they are increasingly called on to train "local" clinicians, researchers, and students in qualitative research methods. In this article, I describe the process of teaching introductory courses in qualitative research methods to Haitian clinicians, hospital staff, and medical students, who rarely encounter qualitative research in their training or practice. These trainings allow participants to identify and begin to address challenges related to health services delivery, quality of care, and provider-patient relations. However, they also run the risk of perpetuating colonial legacies of objectification and reinforcing hierarchies of knowledge and knowledge production. As these trainings increase in number and scope, they offer the opportunity to reflect critically on new forms of transnational interventions that aim to reduce health disparities. PMID:25203930

Minn, Pierre

2015-01-01

191

ETV Programmes: Review of Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research on educational television (ETV), focusing on teacher and student attitudes; impact on children and teachers and in-service education in media; and utilization. Also reviews a few studies on the impact and utilization of educational radio broadcasts. Draws broad conclusions about the use, design, and learning process of ETV. (PEN)

Chaudhary, Sohanvir; Panda, Santosh

1997-01-01

192

Qualitative Research in Career Development: Exploring the Center and Margins of Discourse About Careers and Working  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the contributions of qualitative research to the study of career development and the psychology of working. Epistemological perspectives (logical positivism, postpositivism, and social constructionism) are discussed as they relate to historical context, career theories, and the various methods used within qualitative

Blustein, David L.; Kenna, Alexandra C.; Murphy, Kerri A.; DeVoy, Julia E.; DeWine, David B.

2005-01-01

193

Qualitative Methods Can Enrich Quantitative Research on Occupational Stress: An Example from One Occupational Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The chapter examines the ways in which qualitative and quantitative methods support each other in research on occupational stress. Qualitative methods include eliciting from workers unconstrained descriptions of work experiences, careful first-hand observations of the workplace, and participant-observers describing "from the inside" a particular…

Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Farrell, Edwin

2010-01-01

194

Blackbirds Singing in the Dead of Night?: Advancing the Craft of Teaching Qualitative Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asserts that the craft knowledge of skilled teachers must be shared to help nursing students become competent, committed qualitative researchers. Strategies to develop a qualitative eye, deal with challenges such as ethical conduct, inform approaches to fieldwork, and extend capacity and confidence to interpret data, play with ideas, analyze…

McAllister, Margaret; Rowe, Jennifer

2003-01-01

195

A Qualitative Experiment: Research on Mediated Meaning Construction Using a Hybrid Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a hybrid methodological technique that fuses elements of experimental design with qualitative strategies to explore mediated communication. Called the "qualitative experiment," this strategy uses focus groups and in-depth interviews "within" randomized stimulus conditions typically associated with experimental research. This…

Robinson, Sue; Mendelson, Andrew L.

2012-01-01

196

Qualitative Research in Career Development: Content Analysis from 1990 to 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A content analysis of 11 journals that published career, vocational, and work-related articles from 1990 to 2009 was conducted. Of 3,279 articles analyzed, 55.9% used quantitative methods and 35.5% were theoretical/conceptual articles. Only 6.3% used qualitative research methods. Among the qualitative empirical studies, standards of academic rigor…

Stead, Graham B.; Perry, Justin C.; Munka, Linda M.; Bonnett, Heather R.; Shiban, Abbey P.; Care, Esther

2012-01-01

197

Doing Phenomenology in Science Education: A Research Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a review of applications of phenomenology, as a philosophy of knowledge and qualitative research approach, to the field of science education (SE). The purpose is to give an overview of work that has been done as well as to assess it and discuss its possibilities of future development. We ask: what attempts for connecting…

OStergaard, Edvin; Dahlin, Bo; Hugo, Aksel

2008-01-01

198

Application of Haddon’s matrix in qualitative research methodology: an experience in burns epidemiology  

PubMed Central

Background Little has been done to investigate the application of injury specific qualitative research methods in the field of burn injuries. The aim of this study was to use an analytical tool (Haddon’s matrix) through qualitative research methods to better understand people’s perceptions about burn injuries. Methods This study applied Haddon’s matrix as a framework and an analytical tool for a qualitative research methodology in burn research. Both child and adult burn injury victims were enrolled into a qualitative study conducted using focus group discussion. Haddon’s matrix was used to develop an interview guide and also through the analysis phase. Results The main analysis clusters were pre-event level/human (including risky behaviors, belief and cultural factors, and knowledge and education), pre-event level/object, pre-event phase/environment and event and post-event phase (including fire control, emergency scald and burn wound management, traditional remedies, medical consultation, and severity indicators). This research gave rise to results that are possibly useful both for future injury research and for designing burn injury prevention plans. Conclusion Haddon’s matrix is applicable in a qualitative research methodology both at data collection and data analysis phases. The study using Haddon’s matrix through a qualitative research methodology yielded substantially rich information regarding burn injuries that may possibly be useful for prevention or future quantitative research. PMID:22866013

Deljavan, Reza; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Fouladi, Nasrin; Arshi, Shahnam; Mohammadi, Reza

2012-01-01

199

Medical students’ perceptions and attitudes about family practice: a qualitative research synthesis  

PubMed Central

Background During the last decade medical students from most Western countries have shown little interest in family practice. Understanding the factors that influence medical students to choose family medicine is crucial. Objective To systematically review and synthesize published evidence about medical students’ attitudes and perceptions towards family practice. Methods A qualitative systematic review. The literature search was undertaken in July 2010 in PubMed, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Social Science Citation Index (SSCI), and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses. Two authors independently selected the studies for their inclusion and assessed their quality. The selected studies were thoroughly read. Key themes and categories were identified. A matrix was created for allowing the comparison of each theme across studies. Results Ten studies were finally included. Seven broad themes were identified across them: 1) Scope and context of practice was a broad theme comprising linked sub-themes: perception of a varied specialty, broad practice, holistic perspective and flexibility that allows having a family; 2) Lower interest or intellectually less challenging: treating common disease, repetitive, quasi administrative job; 3) Influence of role models, either positive and negative, and society: negative comments from other professionals, peers and family; 4) Lower prestige; 5) Poor remuneration; 6) Medical school influences, being important both the length and quality of the exposure; 7) Post graduate training, where the shorter duration and the lower intensity were perceived as positive aspects. After identifying these seven key themes, were also looked into patterns in the distribution of these themes among studies. Conclusions Our qualitative review provides a comprehensive picture of medical students’ attitudes towards family practice in the available literature. In general, although some students find family medicine appealing, it is regarded as a career of low interest and prestige. More research is needed on the influence of role models, medical school and post graduate training. PMID:22909189

2012-01-01

200

Teenage pregnancy and social disadvantage: systematic review integrating controlled trials and qualitative studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To determine the impact on teenage pregnancy of interventions that address the social disadvantage associated with early parenthood and to assess the appropriateness of such interventions for young people in the United Kingdom.Design Systematic review, including a statistical meta-analysis of controlled trials on interventions for early parenthood and a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies that investigated the views on

Angela Harden; Ginny Brunton; Adam Fletcher; Ann Oakley

2009-01-01

201

Mutual research capacity strengthening: a qualitative study of two-way partnerships in public health research  

PubMed Central

Introduction Capacity building has been employed in international health and development sectors to describe the process of ‘experts’ from more resourced countries training people in less resourced countries. Hence the concept has an implicit power imbalance based on ‘expert’ knowledge. In 2011, a health research strengthening workshop was undertaken at Atoifi Adventist Hospital, Solomon Islands to further strengthen research skills of the Hospital and College of Nursing staff and East Kwaio community leaders through partnering in practical research projects. The workshop was based on participatory research frameworks underpinned by decolonising methodologies, which sought to challenge historical power imbalances and inequities. Our research question was, “Is research capacity strengthening a two-way process?” Methods In this qualitative study, five Solomon Islanders and five Australians each responded to four open-ended questions about their experience of the research capacity strengthening workshop and activities: five chose face to face interview, five chose to provide written responses. Written responses and interview transcripts were inductively analysed in NVivo 9. Results Six major themes emerged. These were: Respectful relationships; Increased knowledge and experience with research process; Participation at all stages in the research process; Contribution to public health action; Support and sustain research opportunities; and Managing challenges of capacity strengthening. All researchers identified benefits for themselves, their institution and/or community, regardless of their role or country of origin, indicating that the capacity strengthening had been a two-way process. Conclusions The flexible and responsive process we used to strengthen research capacity was identified as mutually beneficial. Using community-based participatory frameworks underpinned by decolonising methodologies is assisting to redress historical power imbalances and inequities and is helping to sustain the initial steps taken to establish a local research agenda at Atoifi Hospital. It is our experience that embedding mutuality throughout the research capacity strengthening process has had great benefit and may also benefit researchers from more resourced and less resourced countries wanting to partner in research capacity strengthening activities. PMID:23249439

2012-01-01

202

Caught in the Paradigm Gap: Qualitative Researchers' Lived Experience and the Politics of Epistemology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The narratives of more than 300 qualitative researchers about problems and solutions attempted during research were collected and analyzed to develop three successive descriptive-interpretive frameworks for understanding researchers' lived experiences during the shift from single to multiple research paradigms. The need for more reflective…

Miller, Suzanne M.; Nelson, Marie Wilson; Moore, Michael T.

1998-01-01

203

A qualitative review for wireless health monitoring system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A proliferating interest has been being observed over the past years in accurate wireless system development in order to monitor incessant human activities in health care centres. Furthermore because of the swelling number of elderly population and the inadequate number of competent staffs for nursing homes there is a big market petition for health care monitoring system. In order to detect human researchers developed different methods namely which include Field Identification technique, Visual Sensor Network, radar detection, e-mobile techniques and so on. An all-encompassing overview of the non-wired human detection application advancement is presented in this paper. Inductive links are used for human detection application while wiring an electronic system has become impractical in recent times. Keeping in mind the shortcomings, an Inductive Intelligent Sensor (IIS) has been proposed as a novel human monitoring system for future implementation. The proposed sensor works towards exploring the signature signals of human body movement and size. This proposed sensor is fundamentally based on inductive loop that senses the presence and a passing human resulting an inductive change.

Arshad, Atika; Fadzil Ismail, Ahmad; Khan, Sheroz; Zahirul Alam, A. H. M.; Tasnim, Rumana; Samnan Haider, Syed; Shobaki, Mohammed M.; Shahid, Zeeshan

2013-12-01

204

Governing through community allegiance: a qualitative examination of peer research in community-based participatory research  

PubMed Central

The disappointing results of many public health interventions have been attributed in part to the lack of meaningful community engagement in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of these initiatives. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has emerged as an alternative research paradigm that directly involves community members in all aspects of the research process. Their involvement is often said to be an empowering experience that builds capacity. In this paper, we interrogate these assumptions, drawing on interview data from a qualitative study investigating the experiences of 18 peer researchers (PRs) recruited from nine CBPR studies in Toronto, Canada. These individuals brought to their respective projects experience of homelessness, living with HIV, being an immigrant or refugee, identifying as transgender, and of having a mental illness. The reflections of PRs are compared to those of other research team members collected in separate focus groups. Findings from these interviews are discussed with an attention to Foucault's concept of ‘governmentality’, and compared against popular community-based research principles developed by Israel and colleagues. While PRs spoke about participating in CBPR initiatives to share their experience and improve conditions for their communities, these emancipatory goals were often subsumed within corporatist research environments that limited participation. Overall, this study offers a much-needed theoretical engagement with this popular research approach and raises critical questions about the limits of community engagement in collaborative public health research. PMID:24273389

Guta, Adrian; Flicker, Sarah; Roche, Brenda

2013-01-01

205

Students' Conceptions of Research. I: A Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relatively little is known about students' conceptions of research and, in particular, whether there are conceptually discrete patterns of variation that can be used to model this phenomenon in terms of research-as-learning outcomes. The present study explores the dimensionality of students' conceptions of research from two complementary research

Meyer, Jan H. F.; Shanahan, Martin P.; Laugksch, Rudiger C.

2005-01-01

206

Investigación cualitativa y psicología del consumidor: alternativas de aplicación Qualitative research and consumer psychology: alternatives for application  

Microsoft Academic Search

Qualitative research is a research strategy used to analyze the reality. When applied to consumer psychology, it allows a deeper knowledge about consumer's behavior and associated emotions and motivations. Qualitative research goes beyond the description of buyers' behavior and shows informa- tion about how and why that behavior is produced. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how qualitative

ANDREA VELANDIA MORALES

207

Research Review, 1983  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Global Modeling and Simulation Branch (GMSB) of the Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS) is engaged in general circulation modeling studies related to global atmospheric and oceanographic research. The research activities discussed are organized into two disciplines: Global Weather/Observing Systems and Climate/Ocean-Air Interactions. The Global Weather activities are grouped in four areas: (1) Analysis and Forecast Studies, (2) Satellite Observing Systems, (3) Analysis and Model Development, (4) Atmospheric Dynamics and Diagnostic Studies. The GLAS Analysis/Forecast/Retrieval System was applied to both FGGE and post FGGE periods. The resulting analyses have already been used in a large number of theoretical studies of atmospheric dynamics, forecast impact studies and development of new or improved algorithms for the utilization of satellite data. Ocean studies have focused on the analysis of long-term global sea surface temperature data, for use in the study of the response of the atmosphere to sea surface temperature anomalies. Climate research has concentrated on the simulation of global cloudiness, and on the sensitivities of the climate to sea surface temperature and ground wetness anomalies.

1984-01-01

208

Teachers as Researchers: Pursuing Qualitative Enquiry in Drama Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores and advocates the role of teachers as researchers, specifically within the field of drama. Outlines approaches useful for drama educators. Lists issues involving drama education that might form useful content for teacher research inquiries. (HB)

Errington, Edward Peter

1993-01-01

209

What do people do with porn? Qualitative research into the comsumption, use, and experience of pornography and other sexually explicit media  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews qualitative research into the consumption of pornography and other sexually explicit media emerging from\\u000a a range of subject areas. Taking a critique of quantitative methods and a focus on measuring sexual effects and attitudes\\u000a as a starting point, it considers the proposition that qualitative work is more suited to an examination of the complex social,\\u000a cultural, and

Feona Attwood

2005-01-01

210

Recruitment to Intellectual Disability Research: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Difficulties in the recruitment of adults with intellectual disability (ID) to research studies are well described but little studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the difficulties in recruiting to a specific research project, in order to inform future recruitment to ID research. Methods: Individual semi-structured…

Nicholson, L.; Colyer, M.; Cooper, S. -A.

2013-01-01

211

Parental experiences of providing skin-to-skin care to their newborn infant—Part 1: A qualitative systematic review  

PubMed Central

Aim To describe parental experiences of providing skin-to-skin care (SSC) to their newborn infants. Background SSC care for newborn infants has been reported to have positive physiological and psychological benefits to the infants and their parents. No systematic review regarding parental experiences has been identified. Design In this first part of a meta-study, the findings of a systematic literature review on parental experience of SSC care are presented. Data sources Four databases were searched, without year or language limitations, up until December 2013. Manual searches were performed in reference lists and in a bibliography of the topic. Review methods After a quality-appraisal process, data from the original articles were extracted and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results The systematic and manual searches led to the inclusion of 29 original qualitative papers from nine countries, reporting experiences from 401 mothers and 94 fathers. Two themes that characterized the provision of SSC emerged: a restoring experience and an energy-draining experience. Conclusion This review has added scientific and systematic knowledge about parental experiences of providing SSC. Further research about fathers’ experiences is recommended. PMID:25319746

Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta; Lamy, Zeni Carvalho; Eriksson, Mats

2014-01-01

212

Surviving depressive ill-health: a qualitative systematic review of older persons' narratives.  

PubMed

The aim of this qualitative systematic review was to report a comprehensive literature synthesis of older persons' narratives about what they need in order to survive when suffering from depression. Their survival strategies seem to be a state rarely outlined in the literature. A systematic search of EBSCOhost/Academic Search Premier, ProQuest and PubMed was conducted for the period January 2000 to April 2012. Data were analyzed by means of thematic analysis. Thirteen studies were selected and three themes emerged from synthesis: the need for courage, strength, and self-reliance; the meaning of responsibility; and wearing a mask of normalcy to hide the shame. The first comprised two subthemes: the value of faith and distraction and activity; the second had no subtheme; and the third had one subtheme: reaching out of loneliness towards aloneness and connectivity. Further research should be focused on how community projects can improve health services such as enhancing the safety of health care and disseminating health information. PMID:23692267

Holm, Anne Lise; Severinsson, Elisabeth

2014-03-01

213

Synergistic Analysis of Structured Essays: A Large Sample, Discovery-Oriented, Qualitative Research Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reacts to a new methodology: consensual qualitative research (CQR). Provides an outline of the historical debate on psychological research methods, explains the distinction between discovery-oriented and verification-oriented research, and labels the CQR approach as a discovery-oriented design. Questions the CQR's emphasis on consensus and…

Tinsley, Howard E. A.

1997-01-01

214

Working in the Interpretive Zone: Conceptualizing Collaboration in Qualitative Research Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Formulates the idea of the "interpretive zone" as a way to describe the space in which collaborative interpretation of research unfolds. Because of the importance of teamwork to qualitative research, the interpretive zone becomes a critical location for future methodological inquiry and examination of the dynamics of group research. (SLD)

Wasser, Judith Davidson; Bresler, Liora

1996-01-01

215

A Qualitative Investigation of Practicing Psychologists' Attitudes Toward Research-Informed Practice: Implications for Dissemination Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the results of a qualitative analysis of interviews with 25 psychologists in independent practice, investigating everyday treatment decisions and attitudes about treatment outcome research and empirically supported treatments (ESTs). Clinicians noted positive aspects about treatment outcome research, such as being interested in what works. However, they had misgivings about the application of controlled research findings to their

Rebecca E. Stewart; Shannon Wiltsey Stirman; Dianne L. Chambless

2012-01-01

216

Using Hermeneutics as a Qualitative Research Approach in Professional Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is targeted primarily at doctoral students and others considering hermeneutics as a research strategy. Research using hermeneutics was carried out with occupational therapy educators and clinicians in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the UK. A total of 53 participants engaged in focus groups and individual interviews over a one-year.…

Paterson, Margo; Higgs, Joy

2005-01-01

217

Using Technology to Enhance Qualitative Research with Hidden Populations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advances in technology provide researchers with increased opportunities to locate and conduct research with populations that have historically been inaccessible. This manuscript describes the development of private, voluntary web-based groups, and the process for using web cameras to conduct individual web-based interviews as a method of data…

Matthews, John; Cramer, Elizabeth P.

2008-01-01

218

Recruiting Ethnically Diverse Participants into Qualitative Health Research: Lessons Learned  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The inclusion of ethnically diverse populations in health research is crucial for addressing ethnic disparities in health status and care. Despite this need, non-dominant ethnic groups continue to be under-represented in health studies. The reasons may be at least partly due to the difficulties inherent in recruiting such groups for research. In…

Renert, Hagar; Russell-Mayhew, Shelly; Arthur, Nancy

2013-01-01

219

Insecurities of Women Regarding Breast Cancer Research: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Only 1.2%–11% of all potential study participants participate in cancer studies. Low participation rates can result in bias or in a failure to obtain data saturation. Subject-scientific psychology assumes that reasons for acting are based on individual premises. The objective of this study was to render reproducible individual reasons of female breast cancer patients to participate or not participate in breast cancer studies using a qualitative approach. Methods Problem-based interviews were conducted with female breast cancer patients. The selection of interview partners continued until theoretical data saturation was achieved. Results As main arguments against participation emotional overload and too many medication side-effects were stated. Improvement of health-related values, long-term protection and comprehensive follow-up exams were stated as arguments for participation. Trust in the attending physician was mentioned as influencing both participation and non-participation. Conclusions A significant influential factor determining willingness to participate in studies was one's contentment with patient-physician communication. In order to guarantee an adequate patient decision-making process, keeping existing standards for patient briefings is absolutely mandatory. PMID:24312584

Habersack, Marion; Luschin, Gero

2013-01-01

220

Qualitative Directions in Human–Animal Companion Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Researcher inquiries into topics such as animal welfare, animal affect, and human experiences of the human–animal bond have\\u000a historically been rooted in positivist epistemologies and reliant on quantitative measures and experiments, rather than naturalistic\\u000a observations and individual experiences (Fraser, 2009). In this chapter, I target several topic areas within human–animal\\u000a and animal research to explore the existence and benefits of

David Shen-Miller

221

Recommendations for internet-based qualitative health research with hard-to-reach populations.  

PubMed

Researchers new to online qualitative health research frequently have questions about how to transfer knowledge of offline data collection to an online environment. In this article, we present best-practice guidelines derived from the literature and our experience to help researchers determine if an online qualitative study design is appropriate for their research project and, if so, when to begin data collection with a hard-to-reach population. Researchers should reflect on administrative, population, and data collection considerations when deciding between online and offline data collection. Decisions must be made regarding whether to conduct interviews or focus groups, to collect data using asynchronous or synchronous methods, and to use only text or to incorporate visual media. Researchers should also reflect on human subjects, recruitment, research instrumentation, additional data collection, and public relations considerations when writing protocols to guide the research team's response to various situations. Our recommendations direct researchers' reflection on these considerations. PMID:24623662

Wilkerson, J Michael; Iantaffi, Alex; Grey, Jeremy A; Bockting, Walter O; Rosser, B R Simon

2014-04-01

222

Recommendations for Internet-Based Qualitative Health Research With Hard-to-Reach Populations  

PubMed Central

Researchers new to online qualitative health research frequently have questions about how to transfer knowledge of offline data collection to an online environment. In this article, we present best-practice guidelines derived from the literature and our experience to help researchers determine if an online qualitative study design is appropriate for their research project and, if so, when to begin data collection with a hard-to-reach population. Researchers should reflect on administrative, population, and data collection considerations when deciding between online and offline data collection. Decisions must be made regarding whether to conduct interviews or focus groups, to collect data using asynchronous or synchronous methods, and to use only text or incorporate visual media. Researchers should also reflect on human subjects, recruitment, research instrumentation, additional data collection, and public relations considerations when writing protocols to guide the research team’s response to various situations. Our recommendations direct researchers’ reflection on these considerations. PMID:24623662

Wilkerson, J. Michael; Iantaffi, Alex; Grey, Jeremy A.; Bockting, Walter O.; Simon Rosser, B. R.

2014-01-01

223

From Qualitative Work to Intervention Development in Pediatric Oncology Palliative Care Research  

PubMed Central

Qualitative methods can be particularly useful approaches to use with individuals who are experiencing a rare disease and thus who comprise a small sample (such as children with cancer) and are at points in care that few experience (such as end of life). This data-based methods article describes how findings from a qualitative study were used to guide and shape a pediatric oncology palliative care intervention. Qualitative data can lay a strong foundation for subsequent pilot intervention work by facilitating the development of an underlying study conceptualization, providing recruitment feasibility estimates, helping establish clinically meaningful inclusion criteria, establishing staff acceptability of a research intervention, and providing support for face validity of newly developed interventions. These benefits of preliminary qualitative research are described in the context of this study on legacy-making, which involves reports of children (7-12 years of age) living with advanced cancer and of their parent caregivers. PMID:23632900

Gilmer, Mary Jo; Friedman, Debra L.; Given, Barbara; Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna L.; Hinds, Pamela S.

2013-01-01

224

CCN Assignment 3 Research Review  

E-print Network

The migraine disease is a chronic complex disorder that is characterized by convulsive throbbing head painCCN Assignment 3 Research Review Computational Study of the Migraine Aura and the Cortical Edinburgh, April 8, 2008 #12;#12;A Computational Study of the Migraine Aura and the Cortical Spreading

Seriès, Peggy

225

Personal health information-seeking: a qualitative review of the literature.  

PubMed

This qualitative review establishes Personal Health Information-Seeking (PHIS) as a more accurate description of the patient and health education information-seeking activity commonly known as Consumer Health Information Seeking. This review introduces multiple knowledge or domain facets which need to be considered in order to understand the complexities of this behavior by providing a brief overview of key empirical and theoretical work framed around Metoyer-Duran's ethnolinguistic community information theoretical model originally published in 1991, which should guide PHIS system development. PMID:11604973

Stavri, P Z

2001-01-01

226

Guidelines for conducting rigorous health care psychosocial cross-cultural/language qualitative research.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to synthesize and chronicle the authors' experiences as four bilingual and bicultural researchers, each experienced in conducting cross-cultural/cross-language qualitative research. Through narrative descriptions of experiences with Latinos, Iranians, and Hmong refugees, the authors discuss their rewards, challenges, and methods of enhancing rigor, trustworthiness, and transparency when conducting cross-cultural/cross-language research. The authors discuss and explore how to effectively manage cross-cultural qualitative data, how to effectively use interpreters and translators, how to identify best methods of transcribing data, and the role of creating strong community relationships. The authors provide guidelines for health care professionals to consider when engaging in cross-cultural qualitative research. PMID:25375998

Arriaza, Pablo; Nedjat-Haiem, Frances; Lee, Hee Yun; Martin, Shadi S

2015-01-01

227

Doing Qualitative Research Using Your Computer: A Practical Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is a practical, hands-on guide to using commonly available everyday technology, including Microsoft software, to manage and streamline research projects. It uses straight-forward, everyday language to walk readers through this process, drawing on a wide range of examples to demonstrate how easy it is to use such software. This guide is…

Hahn, Chris

2008-01-01

228

Improving Transcription of Qualitative Research Interviews with Speech Recognition Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The recent development of high-quality voice recognition software greatly facilitates the production of transcriptions for research and allows for objective and full transcription as well as annotated interpretation. Commercial speech recognition programs that are appropriate for generating transcriptions are available from a number of vendors,…

Fogg, Terry; Wightman, Colin W.

229

What does qualitative research have to offer evidence based health  

E-print Network

& definitions · Coding of all transcripts · Check for inter-rater reliability · Conclusion · N= 30-40 · Data interviews · Focus groups · Discourse analysis · Documentary analysis #12;Subject Matter - How People, p.297. #12;"The goal of all research in health technology assessment should be to establish

Glasgow, University of

230

Barriers to adherence with glaucoma medications: a qualitative research study  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeGlaucoma is initially asymptomatic, but untreated can result in progressive visual field loss and eventual blindness. With adequate therapy progression can be halted, but poor adherence with medical therapy is a significant issue requiring further research. The aim of the present study was to gain a better understanding of the obstacles to, and the motivations for, adherence with glaucoma medication

J Lacey; H Cate; D C Broadway

2009-01-01

231

Factors influencing the implementation of fall-prevention programmes: a systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies  

PubMed Central

Background More than a third of people over the age of 65?years fall each year. Falling can lead to a reduction in quality of life, mortality, and a risk of prolonged hospitalisation. Reducing and preventing falls has become an international health priority. To help understand why research evidence has often not been translated into changes in clinical practice, we undertook a systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research in order to identify what factors serve as barriers and facilitators to the successful implementation of fall-prevention programmes. Methods We conducted a review of literature published between 1980 and January 2012 for qualitative research studies that examined barriers and facilitators to the effective implementation of fall-prevention interventions among community-dwelling older people and healthcare professionals. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed methodological quality according to predefined criteria. Findings were synthesised using meta-ethnography. Results Of the 5010 articles identified through database searching, 19 were included in the review. Analysis of the 19 studies revealed limited information about the mechanisms by which barriers to implementation of fall-prevention interventions had been overcome. Data synthesis produced three overarching concepts: (1) practical considerations, (2) adapting for community, and (3) psychosocial. A line of argument synthesis describes the barriers and facilitators to the successful implementation of fall-prevention programmes. These concepts show that the implementation of fall-prevention programmes is complex and multifactorial. This is the first systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies to examine factors influencing the implementation of fall-prevention programmes from the perspectives of both the healthcare professional and the community-dwelling older person. Conclusions The current literature on barriers and facilitators to the implementation of fall-prevention programmes examines a variety of interventions. However, the ways in which the interventions are reported suggests there are substantial methodological challenges that often inhibit implementation into practice. We recommend that successful implementation requires individuals, professionals, and organisations to modify established behaviours, thoughts, and practice. The issues identified through this synthesis need to be fully considered and addressed if fall-prevention programmes are to be successfully implemented into clinical practice. PMID:22978693

2012-01-01

232

Structural issues affecting mixed methods studies in health research: a qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Health researchers undertake studies which combine qualitative and quantitative methods. Little attention has been paid to the structural issues affecting this mixed methods approach. We explored the facilitators and barriers to undertaking mixed methods studies in health research. METHODS: Face-to-face semi-structured interviews with 20 researchers experienced in mixed methods research in health in the United Kingdom. RESULTS: Structural facilitators

Alicia O'Cathain; Jon Nicholl; Elizabeth Murphy

2009-01-01

233

Public participation in tackling health inequalities: implications from recent qualitative research  

Microsoft Academic Search

ecent qualitative research highlights important issues for successful public participation in action to reduce health inequalities. In the UK, the New Labour government has made a sustained commitment to tackling health inequalities and advocates the active engagement of local communities in this agenda.1 This offers a historically unprecedented opportunity, but there remains a paucity of research documenting effective interventions.2 Critically,

Bruce L. Bolam

2005-01-01

234

Leadership in University-Based Cooperative Research Centres: A Qualitative Investigation of Performance Dimensions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In spite of the importance often attached to the role played by leadership in university-based cooperative research centres, we know very little about what "leadership" means in this specific context. The research reported here used a qualitative approach to identify fifteen dimensions of leadership performance for directors of university-based…

Craig, S. Bartholomew; Hess, Clara E.; McGinnis, Jennifer Lindberg; Gray, Denis O.

2009-01-01

235

"Ouch!" Recruitment of Overweight and Obese Adolescent Boys for Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to examine the complexities of recruiting overweight and obese adolescent boys for qualitative research, discuss specific recruitment considerations for this population, and offer guidance to researchers interested in recruiting overweight adolescent boys. Three overweight adolescent boys and six community…

Morrison, Zachary; Gregory, David; Thibodeau, Steven; Copeland, Jennifer

2012-01-01

236

Expressing Certainty in Discussion Sections of Qualitative and Quantitative Research Articles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper investigates how boosters are used by qualitative and quantitative research article writers to express certainty. Boosters are words such as "definitely," "sure," "demonstrate" which signal writers' assurance in what they say. Drawing on a corpus of 200 research articles in Applied Linguistics, this…

Dobakhti, Leila

2013-01-01

237

Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods: Old Wine in New Bottles? On Understanding and Interpreting Educational Phenomena  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Generally educational research is grounded in the empirical traditions of the social sciences (commonly called quantitative and qualitative methods) and is as such distinguished from other forms of scholarship such as theoretical, conceptual or methodological essays, critiques of research traditions and practices and those studies grounded in the…

Smeyers, Paul

2008-01-01

238

(E)pistemological Awareness, Instantiation of Methods, and Uninformed Methodological Ambiguity in Qualitative Research Projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores epistemological awareness and instantiation of methods, as well as uninformed ambiguity, in qualitative methodological decision making and research reporting. The authors argue that efforts should be made to make the research process, epistemologies, values, methodological decision points, and argumentative logic open, accessible, and visible for audiences. To these ends, they discuss two ways of conceptualizing the role

Mirka Koro-Ljungberg; Diane Yendol-Hoppey; Jason Jude Smith; Sharon B. Hayes

2009-01-01

239

(E)pistemological Awareness, Instantiation of Methods, and Uninformed Methodological Ambiguity in Qualitative Research Projects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores epistemological awareness and instantiation of methods, as well as uninformed ambiguity, in qualitative methodological decision making and research reporting. The authors argue that efforts should be made to make the research process, epistemologies, values, methodological decision points, and argumentative logic open,…

Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka; Yendol-Hoppey, Diane; Smith, Jason Jude; Hayes, Sharon B.

2009-01-01

240

A Rejoinder to Stiles', Hoshmand's, and Tinsley's Comments about "A Guide to Conducting Consensual Qualitative Research."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers reactions to critiques of a proposed research model: consensual qualitative research (CQR). Clarifies the meaning of consensus, explicates the representativeness of samples, analyzes the limitations and advantages of self-report data, and explores the nature of truth. Explores theory and verification in CQR and compares CQR to other…

Hill, Clara E.; Williams, Elizabeth Nutt; Thompson, Barbara J.

1997-01-01

241

The Use of Email Interviewing as a Qualitative Method of Inquiry in Educational Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article argues for the potential that email interviewing has as a qualitative method in educational research. The article draws on research that uses email as a way of generating online narratives in order to understand how academics construct their identities. In doing so, the article considers the challenges that email interviewing poses…

James, Nalita

2007-01-01

242

Expanding Perspectives: Qualitative Research in Higher Education. Second Edition. ASHE Reader Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chapters in this volume provide an introduction to qualitative research in higher education, organizing the discussion around four central themes. Part 1, Situating Ourselves and Our Inquiry, contains: (1) Objectivity in Educational Research (Elliot Eisner); (2) Truth in Trouble (Kenneth Gergen); (3) Beyond Translation: Truth and Rigoberta Menchu…

Conrad, Clifton F., Ed.; Haworth, Jennifer Grant, Ed.; Lattuca, Lisa R., Ed.

243

Qualitative Research, Semiotics, North Beach, South of Markey, Jack London, and the Grateful Dead.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Looks at educational research from a macro perspective, advocating semiotics as the foundation for qualitative research in education. Presents myths and disputations and an open-ended conclusion via the kaleidoscopic interpretations of Jack London, Phil Dick, Jack Kerouac, the Grateful Dead, and an assortment of street characters. (Author/VWL)

Shank, Gary

1999-01-01

244

Doing Qualitative Research on Suicide in a Developing Country: Practical and Ethical Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This article describes and discusses the challenges faced by researchers who conducted a qualitative interview study on attitudes toward suicide among the Baganda, Uganda. Many of the challenges addressed in this article have not been described earlier in suicide research conducted in the developing world. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore attitudes and cultural responses toward

James Mugisha; Birthe Loa Knizek; Eugene Kinyanda; Heidi Hjelmeland

2011-01-01

245

Plethora or paucity: a systematic search and bibliometric study of the application and design of qualitative methods in nursing research 2008-2010.  

PubMed

Qualitative methodology has increased in application and acceptability in all research disciplines. In nursing, it is appropriate that a plethora of qualitative methods can be found as nurses pose real-world questions to clinical, cultural and ethical issues of patient care (Johnson, 2007; Long and Johnson, 2007), yet the methods nurses readily use in pursuit of answers remains under intense scrutiny. One of the problems with qualitative methodology for nursing research is its place in the hierarchy of evidence (HOE); another is its comparison to the positivist constructs of what constitutes good research and the measurement of qualitative research against this. In order to position and strengthen its evidence base, nursing may well seek to distance itself from a qualitative perspective and utilise methods at the top of the HOE; yet given the relation of qualitative methods to nursing this would constrain rather than broaden the profession in search of answers and an evidence base. The comparison between qualitative and quantitative can be both mutually exclusive and rhetorical, by shifting the comparison this study takes a more reflexive position and critically appraises qualitative methods against the standards set by qualitative researchers. By comparing the design and application of qualitative methods in nursing over a two year period, the study examined how qualitative stands up to independent rather than comparative scrutiny. For the methods, a four-step mixed methods approach newly constructed by the first author was used to define the scope of the research question and develop inclusion criteria. 2. Synthesis tables were constructed to organise data, 3. Bibliometrics configured data. 4. Studies selected for inclusion in the review were critically appraised using a critical interpretive synthesis (Dixon-Woods et al., 2006). The paper outlines the research process as well as findings. Results showed of the 240 papers analysed, 27% used ad hoc or no references to qualitative; methodological terms such as thematic analysis or constant comparative methods were used inconsistently; qualitative was a catch-all panacea rather than a methodology with well-argued terms or contextual definition. PMID:21295895

Ball, Elaine; McLoughlin, Moira; Darvill, Angela

2011-04-01

246

Ethics Review for Qualitative Inquiry: Adopting a Values-Based, Facilitative Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In many institutions, the institutional review board/research ethics board (IRB/REB) uses the traditional audit approach that emerged from the biomedical community (e.g., Nuremburg Code, Belmont Report) to review the ethical acceptability of research using humans as participants. This approach is guided by participant protection and risk…

Connolly, Kate; Reid, Adela

2007-01-01

247

A qualitative study into the difficulties experienced by healthcare decision makers when reading a Cochrane diagnostic test accuracy review  

PubMed Central

Background Cochrane reviews are one of the best known and most trusted sources of evidence-based information in health care. While steps have been taken to make Cochrane intervention reviews accessible to a diverse readership, little is known about the accessibility of the newcomer to the Cochrane library: diagnostic test accuracy reviews (DTARs). The current qualitative study explored how healthcare decision makers, who varied in their knowledge and experience with test accuracy research and systematic reviews, read and made sense of DTARs. Methods A purposive sample of clinicians, researchers and policy makers (n = 21) took part in a series of think-aloud interviews, using as interview material the first three DTARs published in the Cochrane library. Thematic qualitative analysis of the transcripts was carried out to identify patterns in participants’ ‘reading’ and interpretation of the reviews and the difficulties they encountered. Results Participants unfamiliar with the design and methodology of DTARs found the reviews largely inaccessible and experienced a range of difficulties stemming mainly from the mismatch between background knowledge and level of explanation provided in the text. Experience with systematic reviews of interventions did not guarantee better understanding and, in some cases, led to confusion and misinterpretation. These difficulties were further exacerbated by poor layout and presentation, which affected even those with relatively good knowledge of DTARs and had a negative impact not only on their understanding of the reviews but also on their motivation to engage with the text. Comparison between the readings of the three reviews showed that more accessible presentation, such as presenting the results as natural frequencies, significantly increased participants’ understanding. Conclusions The study demonstrates that authors and editors should pay more attention to the presentation as well as the content of Cochrane DTARs, especially if the reports are aimed at readers with various levels of background knowledge and experience. It also raises the question as to the anticipated target audience of the reports and suggests that different groups of healthcare decision-makers may require different modes of presentation. PMID:23680077

2013-01-01

248

Developing longitudinal qualitative designs: lessons learned and recommendations for health services research  

PubMed Central

Background Longitudinal qualitative methods are becoming increasingly used in the health service research, but the method and challenges particular to health care settings are not well described in the literature.We reflect on the strategies used in a longitudinal qualitative study to explore the experience of symptoms in cancer patients and their carers, following participants from diagnosis for twelve months; we highlight ethical, practical, theoretical and methodological issues that need to be considered and addressed from the outset of a longitudinal qualitative study. Results Key considerations in undertaking longitudinal qualitative projects in health research, include the use of theory, utilizing multiple methods of analysis and giving consideration to the practical and ethical issues at an early stage. These can include issues of time and timing; data collection processes; changing the topic guide over time; recruitment considerations; retention of staff; issues around confidentiality; effects of project on staff and patients, and analyzing data within and across time. Conclusions As longitudinal qualitative methods are becoming increasingly used in health services research, the methodological and practical challenges particular to health care settings need more robust approaches and conceptual improvement. We provide recommendations for the use of such designs. We have a particular focus on cancer patients, so this paper will have particular relevance for researchers interested in chronic and life limiting conditions. PMID:23388075

2013-01-01

249

Developing and piloting an online graduate nursing course focused on experiential learning of qualitative research methods.  

PubMed

Despite the turmoil of a worldwide economic crisis, the health sector remains largely understaffed, and the nursing shortage represents a major issue that jeopardizes graduate nursing education. Access to education remains a challenge, particularly in rural and remote areas. This article reports the process of developing an asynchronous online qualitative research course. This online course was piloted among 16 interdisciplinary students. Participants agreed that experiential learning was useful to understand the intricacies of qualitative research. Within this constructivist approach, students were immersed in real-life experiences, which focused on the development of skills applicable to qualitative research. Based on the findings, we suggest that constructivism and the Four-Component Instructional Design (4C/ID) model (a four-part approach for fostering the development of complex skills) represent valuable ontological and pedagogical approaches that can be used in online courses. Triangulating these two approaches is also congruent with the student-centered philosophy that underpins nursing graduate programs. PMID:22533499

Holtslander, Lorraine F; Racine, Louise; Furniss, Shari; Burles, Meridith; Turner, Hollie

2012-06-01

250

Life Review: Implementation, Theory, Research, and Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A selective literature review of publications on life review generated ideas on implementation, theory, research, and therapy. The review begins by differentiating life review from reminiscence, and summarizing ways to conduct a life review. A dozen theories that have been influenced by the life review technique are presented, with a focus placed…

Haber, David

2006-01-01

251

ForPeerReview Mixed Methods in Land Change Research: Towards  

E-print Network

ForPeerReview Mixed Methods in Land Change Research: Towards Integration Journal: Transactions of British Geographers #12;ForPeerReview Mixed Methods in Land Change Research: Towards Integration integration of quantitative and qualitative information for developing process-based knowledge for land use

Lopez-Carr, David

252

A Review and Meta-Synthesis of Qualitative Studies on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Objective To review and synthesize findings across qualitative studies on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Methods Articles were systematically reviewed and analyzed within a meta-analytic framework. Analyses included a multi-perspective (e.g., individual, physician, familial) examination of ME/CFS, as well as a comparative analysis of ME/CFS versus other chronic conditions. Results Thirty-four (34) qualitative studies on ME/CFS were identified and included. Findings include three substantive thematic areas that focus on studies concerning: (1) experiences of people with ME/CFS, (2) experiences of physicians, and (3) themes that intersect both of these groups. For patients, illness development influenced identity, reductions in functioning, and coping. Physician-specific themes described lack of awareness about the illness and recommended improvement in medical education. Themes that intersected expressed issues with diagnosis which creates tensions and fuels the stigmatization of ME/CFS. Conclusions Findings indicate multilayered, context-specific experiences and ways in which both people with ME/CFS, as well as the people involved in their lives, such as family or the medical community, understand their illness. Future qualitative studies should coalesce the various facets of the ME/CFS experience, the network members of people with ME/CFS, and the sociocultural environment through which the illness is understood. Practice implications Health care professionals can gain unique insight from patient experiences, allowing for more accurate diagnoses and treatment recommendations. PMID:21571484

Anderson, Valerie R.; Jason, Leonard A.; Hlavaty, Laura; Porter, Nicole; Cudia, Jacqueline

2011-01-01

253

[The ethics of qualitative research in health: the said and the unsaid in the scientific production].  

PubMed

This study investigated the ethics of qualitative research by using bibliographic research. Data were collected in scientific articles from a Brazilian journal of collective health and the access to the sources was electronic. It were analyzed 117 articles of qualitative research which corresponded to 23.49% of the total production of the journal from 01/1998 to 03/2007. The information collected was organized considering the identification, themes/object, theoretical referential, methodology and ethical aspects involved. The analysis proposed a discussion based on what the researchers express about ethics on their qualitative studies when it comes to two different kinds of relation: between the researchers and their research-subject and with their co-workers. The conclusions brought up many issues to be discussed on the daily routine of the research activity and that demands exposition and openness to criticism. There is also an urge to think what the "said" and the "unsaid" can reveal underneath the obedience to the rules, launching to the process of maturing and to the theoretical consistence of the researchers, especially in the ethical dimension of the researching activity. A huge part of those challenges are of direct responsibility of the institutions which are in charge of the researcher's formation. PMID:20640329

Ramos, Flávia Regina Souza; Finkler, Mirelle; Gonçalves, Evelise Ribeiro; Caetano, João Carlos

2010-06-01

254

015 pp: a lone voice: reflections on presenting qualitative research at a surgeon's conference.  

PubMed

In this paper I describe how I used my dual position of service user and sociologist to present my research findings at an international conference for surgeons. As a former breast cancer patient I was invited to participate in a study of women's experiences of having breast reconstruction using their own body tissue. Questions included rating my happiness and confidence on a scale of 1-10 which challenged me as a qualitative researcher. The study also revealed parallels with my own research with 24 women who had been treated for early stage breast cancer, where similar issues had emerged organically through their narratives. When I discussed this with the breast care team I was encouraged to submit an abstract to the conference where the results of the quantitative study were going to be presented. The subsequent paper, entitled 'Autologous Breast Reconstruction from the Patient's Perspective: A Qualitative Study,' was presented at the 5(th) International Meeting of Oncoplastic and Reconstructive Breast Surgery in Nottingham in September 2013. My reflections on my experience of presenting to an audience, who were unaccustomed to qualitative research, include the challenges of facing my own intimidation by health professionals as a patient. I will discuss the positive feedback that I received which will hopefully encourage other qualitative health researchers to reach beyond the usual audiences in order to disseminate their research findings. PMID:25869711

Trusson, D

2015-01-01

255

Quality of life of people with mental health problems: a synthesis of qualitative research  

PubMed Central

Purpose To identify the domains of quality of life important to people with mental health problems. Method A systematic review of qualitative research undertaken with people with mental health problems using a framework synthesis. Results We identified six domains: well-being and ill-being; control, autonomy and choice; self-perception; belonging; activity; and hope and hopelessness. Firstly, symptoms or ‘ill-being’ were an intrinsic aspect of quality of life for people with severe mental health problems. Additionally, a good quality of life was characterised by the feeling of being in control (particularly of distressing symptoms), autonomy and choice; a positive self-image; a sense of belonging; engagement in meaningful and enjoyable activities; and feelings of hope and optimism. Conversely, a poor quality life, often experienced by those with severe mental health difficulties, was characterized by feelings of distress; lack of control, choice and autonomy; low self-esteem and confidence; a sense of not being part of society; diminished activity; and a sense of hopelessness and demoralization. Conclusions Generic measures fail to address the complexity of quality of life measurement and the broad range of domains important to people with mental health problems. PMID:23173689

2012-01-01

256

Qualitative Data Analysis: A Compendium of Techniques and a Framework for Selection for School Psychology Research and Beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

Qualitative researchers in school psychology have a multitude of analyses available for data. The purpose of this article is to present several of the most common methods for analyzing qualitative data. Specifically, the authors describe the following 18 qualitative analysis techniques: method of constant comparison analysis, keywords-in-context, word count, classical content analysis, domain analysis, taxonomic analysis, componential analysis, conversation analysis,

Nancy L. Leech; Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie

2008-01-01

257

Qualitative Data Analysis: A Compendium of Techniques and a Framework for Selection for School Psychology Research and Beyond  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative researchers in school psychology have a multitude of analyses available for data. The purpose of this article is to present several of the most common methods for analyzing qualitative data. Specifically, the authors describe the following 18 qualitative analysis techniques: method of constant comparison analysis, keywords-in-context,…

Leech, Nancy L.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

2008-01-01

258

How does reviewing the evidence change veterinary surgeons' beliefs regarding the treatment of ovine footrot? A quantitative and qualitative study.  

PubMed

Footrot is a widespread, infectious cause of lameness in sheep, with major economic and welfare costs. The aims of this research were: (i) to quantify how veterinary surgeons' beliefs regarding the efficacy of two treatments for footrot changed following a review of the evidence (ii) to obtain a consensus opinion following group discussions (iii) to capture complementary qualitative data to place their beliefs within a broader clinical context. Grounded in a Bayesian statistical framework, probabilistic elicitation (roulette method) was used to quantify the beliefs of eleven veterinary surgeons during two one-day workshops. There was considerable heterogeneity in veterinary surgeons' beliefs before they listened to a review of the evidence. After hearing the evidence, seven participants quantifiably changed their beliefs. In particular, two participants who initially believed that foot trimming with topical oxytetracycline was the better treatment, changed to entirely favour systemic and topical oxytetracycline instead. The results suggest that a substantial amount of the variation in beliefs related to differences in veterinary surgeons' knowledge of the evidence. Although considerable differences in opinion still remained after the evidence review, with several participants having non-overlapping 95% credible intervals, both groups did achieve a consensus opinion. Two key findings from the qualitative data were: (i) veterinary surgeons believed that farmers are unlikely to actively seek advice on lameness, suggesting a proactive veterinary approach is required (ii) more attention could be given to improving the way in which veterinary advice is delivered to farmers. In summary this study has: (i) demonstrated a practical method for probabilistically quantifying how veterinary surgeons' beliefs change (ii) revealed that the evidence that currently exists is capable of changing veterinary opinion (iii) suggested that improved transfer of research knowledge into veterinary practice is needed (iv) identified some potential obstacles to the implementation of veterinary advice by farmers. PMID:23696869

Higgins, Helen M; Green, Laura E; Green, Martin J; Kaler, Jasmeet

2013-01-01

259

How Does Reviewing the Evidence Change Veterinary Surgeons’ Beliefs Regarding the Treatment of Ovine Footrot? A Quantitative and Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Footrot is a widespread, infectious cause of lameness in sheep, with major economic and welfare costs. The aims of this research were: (i) to quantify how veterinary surgeons’ beliefs regarding the efficacy of two treatments for footrot changed following a review of the evidence (ii) to obtain a consensus opinion following group discussions (iii) to capture complementary qualitative data to place their beliefs within a broader clinical context. Grounded in a Bayesian statistical framework, probabilistic elicitation (roulette method) was used to quantify the beliefs of eleven veterinary surgeons during two one-day workshops. There was considerable heterogeneity in veterinary surgeons’ beliefs before they listened to a review of the evidence. After hearing the evidence, seven participants quantifiably changed their beliefs. In particular, two participants who initially believed that foot trimming with topical oxytetracycline was the better treatment, changed to entirely favour systemic and topical oxytetracycline instead. The results suggest that a substantial amount of the variation in beliefs related to differences in veterinary surgeons’ knowledge of the evidence. Although considerable differences in opinion still remained after the evidence review, with several participants having non-overlapping 95% credible intervals, both groups did achieve a consensus opinion. Two key findings from the qualitative data were: (i) veterinary surgeons believed that farmers are unlikely to actively seek advice on lameness, suggesting a proactive veterinary approach is required (ii) more attention could be given to improving the way in which veterinary advice is delivered to farmers. In summary this study has: (i) demonstrated a practical method for probabilistically quantifying how veterinary surgeons’ beliefs change (ii) revealed that the evidence that currently exists is capable of changing veterinary opinion (iii) suggested that improved transfer of research knowledge into veterinary practice is needed (iv) identified some potential obstacles to the implementation of veterinary advice by farmers. PMID:23696869

Higgins, Helen M.; Green, Laura E.; Green, Martin J.; Kaler, Jasmeet

2013-01-01

260

Methodological Reporting in Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Health Services Research Articles  

PubMed Central

Objectives Methodologically sound mixed methods research can improve our understanding of health services by providing a more comprehensive picture of health services than either method can alone. This study describes the frequency of mixed methods in published health services research and compares the presence of methodological components indicative of rigorous approaches across mixed methods, qualitative, and quantitative articles. Data Sources All empirical articles (n = 1,651) published between 2003 and 2007 from four top-ranked health services journals. Study Design All mixed methods articles (n = 47) and random samples of qualitative and quantitative articles were evaluated to identify reporting of key components indicating rigor for each method, based on accepted standards for evaluating the quality of research reports (e.g., use of p-values in quantitative reports, description of context in qualitative reports, and integration in mixed method reports). We used chi-square tests to evaluate differences between article types for each component. Principal Findings Mixed methods articles comprised 2.85 percent (n = 47) of empirical articles, quantitative articles 90.98 percent (n = 1,502), and qualitative articles 6.18 percent (n = 102). There was a statistically significant difference (?2(1) = 12.20, p = .0005, Cramer's V = 0.09, odds ratio = 1.49 [95% confidence interval = 1,27, 1.74]) in the proportion of quantitative methodological components present in mixed methods compared to quantitative papers (21.94 versus 47.07 percent, respectively) but no statistically significant difference (?2(1) = 0.02, p = .89, Cramer's V = 0.01) in the proportion of qualitative methodological components in mixed methods compared to qualitative papers (21.34 versus 25.47 percent, respectively). Conclusion Few published health services research articles use mixed methods. The frequency of key methodological components is variable. Suggestions are provided to increase the transparency of mixed methods studies and the presence of key methodological components in published reports. PMID:22092040

Wisdom, Jennifer P; Cavaleri, Mary A; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J; Green, Carla A

2012-01-01

261

Typology of Analytical Errors in Qualitative Educational Research: An Analysis of the 2003-2007 Education Science Dissertations in Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this research, the level of quality of the qualitative research design used and the analytic mistakes made in the doctorate dissertations carried out in the field of education science in Turkey have been tried to be identified. Case study design has been applied in the study in which qualitative research techniques have been used. The universe…

Karadag, Engin

2010-01-01

262

Qualitative Research and Confluent Education: A Method for the Study of Differences and the Expression of Diversity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the philosophical and methodological perspectives of qualitative research and the guiding principles of confluent education. The paper presents issues, concerns, and criticisms of both paradigms and discusses areas for their mutual support and improvement. Qualitative research has established itself as a research methodology…

Martin, Kathleen Jeanette

263

End of life care in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of the qualitative literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  End of life (EoL) care in sub-Saharan Africa still lacks the sound evidence-base needed for the development of effective,\\u000a appropriate service provision. It is essential to make evidence from all types of research available alongside clinical and\\u000a health service data, to ensure that EoL care is ethical and culturally appropriate. This article aims to synthesize qualitative\\u000a research on EoL care

Marjolein Gysels; Christopher Pell; Lianne Straus; Robert Pool

2011-01-01

264

Methods and Management of the Healthy Brain Study: A Large Multisite Qualitative Research Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose of the study: To describe processes used in the Healthy Brain project to manage data collection, coding, and data distribution in a large qualitative project, conducted by researchers at 9 universities in 9 states. Design and Methods: Project management protocols included: (a) managing audiotapes and surveys to ensure data confidentiality,…

Laditka, Sarah B.; Corwin, Sara J.; Laditka, James N.; Liu, Rui; Friedman, Daniela B.; Mathews, Anna E.; Wilcox, Sara

2009-01-01

265

Theory and Concepts in Qualitative Research: A Theory of Methodology in a Study of Directed Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of theory in qualitative work is discussed through an examination of the search for theory that arose in relation to a case study of educational change in an American school district. Theory is defined as an analytical, interpretive framework to help the researcher make sense of what is going on in the social setting. Certain…

Mills, Geoffrey E.

266

Breaking Out from the Shadow: The Question of Criteria in Qualitative Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Goodness" is offered here as new language for judging qualitative research. Goodness requires that elements of the meaning making process are illustrated; epistemological and theoretical foundations are linked to the selected methodology; and that the method of data collection and its analysis are clear, offering new understanding that leads to…

Arminio, Jan L.; Hultgren, Francine H.

2002-01-01

267

Mixing Qualitative and Quantitative Research in Developmental Science: Uses and Methodological Choices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multiple methods are vital to understanding development as a dynamic, transactional process. This article focuses on the ways in which quantitative and qualitative methodologies can be combined to enrich developmental science and the study of human development, focusing on the practical questions of "when" and "how." Research situations that may…

Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Weisner, Thomas S.; Kalil, Ariel; Way, Niobe

2008-01-01

268

Co-Operative Education: Challenges of Qualitative Research on Learning in the Workplace.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is concerned with the challenges of qualitative research on workplace learning that occurs within co-operative (co-op) education. Co-op education is extensive in Canada, with an estimated 10% of the student population enrolled in co-op secondary education each year. The context for this study was a veterinary clinic in which four co-op…

Chin, Peter; Munby, Hugh; Hutchinson, Nancy L.

269

Mixing Methods: The Entry of Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches into the Research Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Qualitative and quantitative research are often presented as two fundamentally different paradigms through which we study the social world. These paradigms act as lightning conductors to which sets of epistemological assumptions, theoretical approaches and methods are attracted. Each is seen to be incompatible with the other. These paradigmatic claims have a tendency to resurface from time to time, manifesting themselves

Julia Brannen

2005-01-01

270

Linking Quantitative and Qualitative Distance Education Research through Complementarity. ZIFF Papiere 56.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on the linkage between the quantitative and qualitative distance education research methods. The concept that serves as the conceptual link is termed "complementarity." The definition of complementarity emerges through a simulated study of FernUniversitat's mentors. The study shows that in the case of the mentors, educational…

Rothe, J. Peter

271

Qualitative and Quantitative Management Tools Used by Financial Officers in Public Research Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation set out to identify effective qualitative and quantitative management tools used by financial officers (CFOs) in carrying out their management functions of planning, decision making, organizing, staffing, communicating, motivating, leading and controlling at a public research university. In addition, impediments to the use of…

Trexler, Grant Lewis

2012-01-01

272

On Conceptual Analysis as the Primary Qualitative Approach to Statistics Education Research in Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Statistics education in psychology often falls disappointingly short of its goals. The increasing use of qualitative approaches in statistics education research has extended and enriched our understanding of statistical cognition processes, and thus facilitated improvements in statistical education and practices. Yet conceptual analysis, a…

Petocz, Agnes; Newbery, Glenn

2010-01-01

273

Studying across Race: A Conversation about the Place of Difference in Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is a dialog between colleagues from different races who struggle with the complexities of doing qualitative research with participants who come from backgrounds that do not match their own. Based on transcriptions of extensive audiotaped conversations, the article explores issues related to studying across difference. The discussion…

Barclay-McLaughlin, Gina; Hatch, J. Amos

2005-01-01

274

The Legend of the Qualitative/Quantitative Dualism: Implications for Research in Technology and Teacher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The discipline of teacher education and technology is poised to leave poor research behind and to remove the false wall between qualitative and quantitative methods of describing, predicting, and controlling education. The arguments used by Dewey early in the century against the dualisms of his day are still powerful and have a bearing on the…

Tellez, Kip

275

Disaggregating Qualitative Data from Asian American College Students in Campus Racial Climate Research and Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article highlights the utility of disaggregating qualitative research and assessment data on Asian American college students. Given the complexity of and diversity within the Asian American population, scholars have begun to underscore the importance of disaggregating data in the empirical examination of Asian Americans, but most of those…

Museus, Samuel D.; Truong, Kimberly A.

2009-01-01

276

Productivity and Academic Assessment in Brazil: Challenges for Qualitative Health Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the challenges to the qualitative health research approach, under the regime of productivity that rules current academic evaluation in many countries. The analysis considers aspects common to several contexts, illustrating the discussion with the Brazilian context and, more specifically, within the dynamics of the collective…

Bosi, Maria Lucia Magalhaes

2012-01-01

277

Reflecting on the Strategic Use of CAQDAS to Manage and Report on the Qualitative Research Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As an increasing number of researchers have been trained to use programs such as Atlas/ti, NUD*IST, Nvivo, and ETHNOGRAPH their value in analyzing qualitative data has gained greater recognition. Drawing on the experience of two PhD candidates at the University of Tasmania, this paper reflects upon some potential uses of a suite of computer…

Wickham, Mark; Woods, Megan

2005-01-01

278

Complementary, Not Contradictory: The Spurious Conflict between Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methodologies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

R. Zubir and M. Pope (1984) and K. Howe (1985, 1988) have argued against the "tyranny of methodological dogma" and that the division between quantitative psychometric and qualitative phenomenological and anthropological traditions is unnecessary. The postmodern self-consciousness of educational research has resulted in the realization that there…

Mashhadi, Azam

279

Bouncing between the Dark and Bright Sides: Can Technology Help Qualitative Research?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors carried out a 4-year qualitative analysis of a case study in higher education. An undergraduate course based on the principles of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) was designed, implemented, and evaluated. The process was developed by a community of practice, formed by quite a number of researchers coming from the…

Jorrin-Abellan, Ivan M.; Rubia-Avi, Bartolome; Anguita-Martinez, Rocio; Gomez-Sanchez, Eduardo; Martinez-Mones, Alejandra

2008-01-01

280

Educational Researchers' Personal Explicit Theories on Creativity and Its Development: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this paper is to investigate implicit theories of educational researchers on creativity and the potential to support creativity in schools. We used qualitative thematic analysis of material produced by 27 educational experts from Serbia. Personal explicit theories about manifestations of creativity are mainly based on qualities and…

Maksic, Slavica; Pavlovic, Jelena

2011-01-01

281

Qualitative Methodology in Counseling Research: Recent Contributions and Challenges for a New Century  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For the past 10 years, qualitative research methodology has become more visible in counseling studies. Results from a content analysis of articles published between 1997 and 2002 in 4 professional journals in the field (Counseling and Values, Journal of Counseling & Development, Professional School Counseling, and The Counseling Psychologist)…

Berrios, Reinaldo; Lucca, Nydia

2006-01-01

282

A Qualitative Action Research Project Documenting Student Perceptions of the Effects of Visual Culture on Identity  

Microsoft Academic Search

I have conducted a qualitative action research project focusing on student perceptions of the impact of visual culture on teens including popular media. Students especially in high schools are bombarded with visual imagery through various technology sources. While working with high school juniors and seniors I noticed a rise in teen pregnancy and sexual confusion among this population. I wondered

Jessica M. Miccichi

2011-01-01

283

Fear of crime and the environment: systematic review of UK qualitative evidence  

PubMed Central

Background The fear of crime may have negative consequences for health and wellbeing. It is influenced by factors in the physical and social environment. This study aimed to review and synthesize qualitative evidence from the UK on fear of crime and the environment. Methods Eighteen databases were searched, including crime, health and social science databases. Qualitative studies conducted in the UK which presented data on fear of crime and the environment were included. Quality was assessed using Hawker et al.’s framework. Data were synthesized thematically. Results A total of 40 studies were included in the review. Several factors in the physical environment are perceived to impact on fear of crime, including visibility and signs of neglect. However, factors in the local social environment appear to be more important as drivers of fear of crime, including social networks and familiarity. Broader social factors appear to be of limited relevance. There is considerable evidence for limitations on physical activity as a result of fear of crime, but less for mental health impacts. Conclusions Fear of crime represents a complex set of responses to the environment. It may play a role in mediating environmental impacts on health and wellbeing. PMID:23705936

2013-01-01

284

Exploring health researchers’ perceptions of policymaking in Argentina: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Much of the published research on evidence-informed health policymaking in low- and middle-income countries has focused on policymakers, overlooking the role of health researchers in the research-to-policy process. Through 20 semi-structured, in-depth qualitative interviews conducted with researchers in Argentina’s rural northwest and the capital of Buenos Aires, we explore the perspectives, experiences and attitudes of Argentine health researchers regarding the use and impact of health research in policymaking in Argentina. We find that the researcher, and the researcher’s function of generating evidence, is nested within a broader complex system that influences the researcher’s interaction with policymaking. This system comprises communities of practice, government departments/civil society organizations, bureaucratic processes and political governance and executive leadership. At the individual level, researcher capacity and determinants of research availability also play a role in contributing to evidence-informed policymaking. In addition, we find a recurrent theme around ‘lack of trust’ and explore the role of trust within a research system, finding that researchers’ distrust towards policymakers and even other researchers are linked inextricably to the sociopolitical history of Argentina, which contributes to shaping researchers’ identities in opposition to policymakers. For policymakers, national research councils and funders of national health research systems, this article provides a deeper understanding of researchers’ perceptions which can help inform and improve programme design when developing interventions to enhance research utilization and develop equitable and rational health policies. For donors and development agencies interested in health research capacity building and achieving development goals, this research demonstrates a need for investment in building research capacity and training health researchers to interact with the public policy ‘world’ and enhancing research communications and transferability to decision makers. It also highlights an opportunity to invest in implementation research platforms, such as health policy research and analysis institutions. PMID:25274639

Corluka, Adrijana; Hyder, Adnan A; Winch, Peter J; Segura, Elsa

2014-01-01

285

ADVANCING THE STUDY OF VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN USING MIXED METHODS: INTEGRATING QUALITATIVE METHODS INTO A QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM  

PubMed Central

A mixed methods approach, combining quantitative with qualitative data methods and analysis, offers a promising means of advancing the study of violence. Integrating semi-structured interviews and qualitative analysis into a quantitative program of research on women’s sexual victimization has resulted in valuable scientific insight and generation of novel hypotheses for testing. This mixed methods approach is described and recommendations for integrating qualitative data into quantitative research are provided. PMID:21307032

Testa, Maria; Livingston, Jennifer A.; VanZile-Tamsen, Carol

2011-01-01

286

Review article: high stakes and high risk: a focused qualitative review of hazards during cardiac surgery.  

PubMed

Cardiac surgery is a high-risk procedure performed by a multidisciplinary team using complex tools and technologies. Efforts to improve cardiac surgery safety have been ongoing for more than a decade, yet the literature provides little guidance regarding best practices for identifying errors and improving patient safety. This focused review of the literature was undertaken as part of the FOCUS initiative (Flawless Operative Cardiovascular Unified Systems), a multifaceted effort supported by the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists Foundation to identify hazards and develop evidence-based protocols to improve cardiac surgery safety. Hazards were defined as anything that posed a potential or real risk to the patient, including errors, near misses, and adverse events. Of the 1438 articles identified for title review, 390 underwent full abstract screening, and 69 underwent full article review, which in turn yielded 55 meeting the inclusion criteria for this review. Two key themes emerged. First, studies were predominantly reactive (responding to an event or report) instead of proactive (using prospective designs such as self-assessments and external reviewers, etc.) and very few tested interventions. Second, minor events were predictive of major problems: multiple, often minor, deviations from normal procedures caused a cascade effect, resulting in major distractions that ultimately led to major events. This review fills an important gap in the literature on cardiac surgery safety, that of systematically identifying and categorizing known hazards according to their primary systemic contributor (or contributors). We conclude with recommendations for improving patient outcomes by building a culture of safety, promoting transparency, standardizing training, increasing teamwork, and monitoring performance. Finally, there is an urgent need for studies that evaluate interventions to mitigate the inherent risks of cardiac surgery. PMID:21372272

Martinez, Elizabeth A; Thompson, David A; Errett, Nicole A; Kim, George R; Bauer, Laura; Lubomski, Lisa H; Gurses, Ayse P; Marsteller, Jill A; Mohit, Babak; Goeschel, Christine A; Pronovost, Peter J

2011-05-01

287

UK Health-Care Professionals' Experience of On-Line Learning Techniques: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Continuing professional development and education is vital to the provision of better health services and outcomes. The aim of this study is to contribute to the evidence base by performing a systematic review of qualitative data from studies reporting health professionals' experience of e-learning. No such previous review has been…

Carroll, Christopher; Booth, Andrew; Papaioannou, Diana; Sutton, Anthea; Wong, Ruth

2009-01-01

288

Using Multiple Interviewers in Qualitative Research Studies: The Influence of Ethic of Care Behaviors in Research Interview Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study considered the methodological implications of a qualitative study that involved two research practitioners as interviewers, one male and one female, who conducted semistructured cognitive interviews with middle school students. During the reading and analysis of interview transcriptions, differences were noted between the interviewers'…

Matteson, Shirley M.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.

2009-01-01

289

Research Review: Issues in Magazine Journalism Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that, hobbled by an impoverished underlying model and a lack of resources, very little empirical research has explored magazine journalism education. Investigates the underlying model, reviews existing research, and offers an optimistic assessment about future research possibilities. (SR)

King, Elliot

1994-01-01

290

Formality and Friendship: Research Ethics Review and Participatory Action Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

While Participatory Action Research (PAR) is gaining a foothold in geographical research practice, universities and major funding bodies are imposing ethics review procedures that are inherently contradictory to doing PAR. This paper examines these paradoxes paying particular attention to the way that research participants and researchers are constructed differently in PAR and ethics review. The implications of these differences are

Megan K. Blake

2007-01-01

291

Research Ethics: Institutional Review Board Oversight of Art Therapy Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

By having their research proposals reviewed and approved by Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), art therapists meet important ethical principles regarding responsibility to research participants. This article provides an overview of the history of human subjects protections in the United States; underlying ethical principles and their application in research practice; and a discussion of concerns nonmedical, post-positivist art therapy researchers need

Sarah P. Deaver

2011-01-01

292

Review of Statistical Research Methods Training and Research  

E-print Network

Review of Statistical Research Methods Training and Research Support (including the Statistical Consulting Unit) Report August 2014 #12;Review of Statistical Research Methods Training and Research Support, provide courses in statistical methods as compulsory or elective subjects. It has become apparent, however

Chen, Ying

293

Qualitative personal interviews in international business research: Some lessons from a study of Hong Kong Transnational Corporations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is concerned with the role of qualitative personal interviews in international business research. Based on an ongoing research into more than 120 transnational corporations from Hong Kong and more than 60 of their subsidiaries and\\/or affiliates in Southeast Asia, I argue that the qualitative personal interview method is a much better technique than other common techniques in international

Henry Wai-chung Yeung

1995-01-01

294

Is It Science? A Study of the Attitudes of Medical Trainees and Physicians toward Qualitative and Quantitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the degree of acceptance of qualitative research by medical trainees and physicians, and explored the causes for any differences in their support of qualitative versus quantitative research. Thirty-two individuals at four levels of medical training were studied. Eight philosophers of science served for construct validation.…

Goguen, Jeannette; Knight, Melanie; Tiberius, Richard

2008-01-01

295

Cell Phones and Driving: Review of Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The research literature on drivers' use of cell phones was reviewed to identify trends in drivers' phone use and to determine the state of knowledge about the safety consequences of such use.Methods. Approximately 125 studies were reviewed with regard to the research questions, type and rigor of the methods, and findings. Reviewed studies included surveys of drivers, experiments, naturalistic

Anne T. Mccartt; Laurie A. Hellinga; Keli A. Bratiman

2006-01-01

296

005 pp: the benefits of using qualitative research methods to understand care home medicine management systems.  

PubMed

In United Kingdom care homes (CHs), multi-compartment compliance aid (MCA) medicine management systems are more commonly used than original medicine packaging (OP), to organise and administer the large volume of medicines used by residents. This study aimed to understand how these two systems (MCAs and OP) impact on CH medicine administration. This was a mixed methods study. The quantitative component involved direct observation to identify discrepancies in medicine administration. The qualitative component involved an ethnographic approach and interviews to understand the medicine administration process and identify associated barriers/facilitators. In September and October 2014, a pharmacist researcher spent 1-3 days observing 17 nurses administer medicines and interviewing 15 nurses, at 4 purposively sampled CHs around Greater London that used either MCAs or OP. Ethical approval was obtained from the University College London Research Ethics Committee. The ethnographic approach allowed the researcher to immerse themselves into the work environment of the nurses. This facilitated a comprehensive understanding of the MCA and OP medicine management systems under research, at all times of the day and under all possible work conditions that could arise. The observations allowed the researcher to identify practices that may contribute to medicine administration discrepancies. These practices may not have been discussed at all, or in any great detail, during nurse interviews. Potential challenges of this qualitative research include participant apprehensiveness concerning the observations in general, or observations interfering with daily work practices. These were managed by ensuring observations were minimally intrusive and all participating CHs and nurses remained anonymous. The qualitative research methods used in this study helped explain the quantitative data and provided a rich and comprehensive understanding of the systems under research, which is unlikely to have occurred using quantitative research methods alone. PMID:25869700

Gilmartin, Jfm; Jani, Y; Smith, F J

2015-01-01

297

After the doctorate: a qualitative study investigating nursing research career development in Jordan.  

PubMed

There is a dearth of research exploring the development of postdoctoral nursing research careers in non-Western contexts. This paper reports on a qualitative study of Jordanian graduates of UK PhD programs. Interviews were held with 16 graduates who worked in the nursing faculty of seven different universities in Jordan. Participants reported that their doctoral degree had equipped them with confidence and enthusiasm for developing a research career. Mentorship, leadership, and peer support were identified as essential to supporting ongoing research activity. Access to these sources of support was variable and participants also described a range of institutional and organizational structures that directly or indirectly discouraged them from developing research productivity. This research suggests that support for postdoctoral novice researchers is an important area for further attention - for Jordanian universities, for UK PhD supervisors (and their associated academic departments), and for the wider nursing community. PMID:23347142

Al-Nawafleh, Ahmed; Zeilani, Ruqayya S; Evans, Catrin

2013-12-01

298

GARS ESH Management Review GARS Research Operations  

E-print Network

on the presentation content Senior Managers shall comment on the need for change or improvement. #12;GARS FY13 ESHGARS ESH Management Review GARS Research Operations December 11, 2013 #12;GARS FY13 ESH Management Review ­ Slide 2 Management Review Scope Senior Management shall review the EMS and OSH Management

Ohta, Shigemi

299

The scope for qualitative methods in research and clinical trials in dementia.  

PubMed

In the evaluation of drugs, the randomised double-blind placebo controlled trial is the 'gold standard'. This method, based on a positivist paradigm, answers questions about efficacy and side-effects of treatments that are accepted as valid, reliable and generalisable, provided the study is well designed and properly conducted. In contrast, qualitative research methodologies, originating from the social sciences, embrace a variety of approaches, including phenomenological and other paradigms. Within clinical and health services research, qualitative approaches view the world more subjectively, acknowledging that the researcher is part of what is researched, focusing on meanings and understanding of experience, rather than on what can be reduced to quantitative measures. They can develop new ideas through induction from data, rather than confirming or refuting hypotheses. Qualitative methods have improved our understanding of the experiences of people with dementia and, if used alongside clinical trials, could be used to improve the relevance of outcomes to patients, compliance and user involvement. They could also possibly generate new measures of efficacy and effectiveness in severe dementia. PMID:15226116

Gibson, Grant; Timlin, Alison; Curran, Stephen; Wattis, John

2004-07-01

300

Patient perspectives about depressive symptoms in heart failure: A review of the qualitative literature  

PubMed Central

Background Scientists have systematically established the prevalence and consequences of depressive symptoms in patients with heart failure (HF). However, a comprehensive understanding of patient perspectives about depressive symptoms, in combination with HF, has not been published. A patient-centered approach may support the design of interventions that are effective and acceptable to patients with HF and depressive symptoms. Objective To review qualitative findings about patient perspectives of the contributing factors, associated symptoms, consequences, and self-care strategies used for depressive symptoms in HF. Methods Qualitative studies were included when they were published between 2000 to 2012, in English, and described emotional components about living with HF. Three electronic databases were searched using key words “heart failure,” “qualitative,” and “depression or psychosocial or stress or emotional.” Results Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. Patients with HF reported that financial stressors, overall poor health, past traumatic life experiences, and negative thinking contributed to depressive symptoms. Patients described cognitive-affective symptoms of depression and anxiety, but not somatic symptoms of depression. Perceived consequences of depressive symptoms included hopelessness, despair, impaired social relationships, and a decreased ability to engage in HF self-care. Recommended management strategies consisted of enhanced social support and cognitive strategies. Conclusions Depressive symptoms in patients with HF were associated with a number of contributing factors, including those not specifically related to their disease, and serious consequences that reduced their self-care ability. Non-pharmacological management approaches to depressive symptoms that include improved social support or cognitive interventions may be effective and acceptable strategies. PMID:23151836

Dekker, Rebecca L.

2012-01-01

301

Land mines in the field: a modest proposal for improving the craft of qualitative health research.  

PubMed

In this commentary, the authors encourage a renewed enthusiasm for attention to quality criteria in qualitative health research by poking fun at what they understand to be patterns and themes emerging from data collected in their respective extensive "fieldwork" experiences within the genre. Conceptualizing some of the particularly problematic interpretive turns as land mines in the field (or, alternatively, missteps in the dance, cracks in the pottery, wrong turns in the journey, weeds in the garden, or dropped stitches in the quilt), they challenge researchers' collective relationship to both factual and metaphoric empirical claims. With a warning to those unaccustomed to self-deprecating humor, the authors challenge all to pay serious heed to what does and does not constitute rigorous, high-quality, empirical science within the qualitative tradition. PMID:16221882

Thorne, Sally; Darbyshire, Philip

2005-10-01

302

Using Qualitative Research to Inform the Development of a Comprehensive Outcomes Assessment for Asthma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Qualitative research can inform the development of asthma patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures and user-friendly technologies through defining measurement constructs, identifying potential limitations in measurement and sources of response error, and evaluating usability. Abstract: Objective: To inform the development of a comprehensive asthma PRO assessment with input from patients and clinical experts. Abstract: Methods: Self-reported adult asthma patients recruited from

Diane M. Turner-Bowker; Renee N. Saris-Baglama; Michael A. DeRosa; Christine A. Paulsen; Christopher P. Bransfield

2009-01-01

303

Issues of Conducting Qualitative Research in an Inner-City Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes and critiques the use of a combined qualitative and quantitative research methodology to investigate the impact of the verdict and subsequent civil disturbances in the Rodney King police brutality case upon Black youth, ages 15-3Q, in South Central Los Angeles. The study conducted in 1993-1994, focused on the attitudes and experiences of these youth in four institutional

Jewelle Taylor Gibbs; Teiahsha Bankhead-Greene

1997-01-01

304

Participatory action research: considerations for ethical review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the distinctive nature of participatory action research (PAR) in relation to ethical review requirements. As a framework for conducting research and reducing health disparities, PAR is gaining increased attention in community and public health research. As a result, PAR researchers and members of Research Ethics Boards could benefit from an increased understanding of the array of ethical

N. Khanlou; E. Peter

2005-01-01

305

Evaluation of Evaluation Studies Using Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Work Literature (1990-2003): Evidence that Constitutes a Wake-Up Call  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study examines the quality of evaluation studies using qualitative research methods in the social work literature in terms of a number of criteria commonly adopted in the field of qualitative research. Method: Using qualitative and evaluation as search terms, relevant qualitative evaluation studies from 1990 to 2003 indexed by…

Shek, Daniel T. L.; Tang, Vera M. Y.; Han, X. Y.

2005-01-01

306

Patient narratives representing patient voices to inform research: a pilot qualitative study.  

PubMed

We are investigating the feasibility and effectiveness of establishing a library of patient narratives to inform patient-centered research in the U.S. Veterans Affairs organization. Using qualitative methods, we conducted a needs assessment of 15 researchers and then interviewed and videotaped 11 veterans with traumatic brain injury or diabetes. We developed a method for displaying the narratives to researchers modeled after a UK initiative called DIPEx and then performed preliminary usability testing. We found that it is not only feasible to provide researchers with patient narratives that could help guide their research, but that similar narratives might be useful to practitioners, health system decision makers, and other patients as well. PMID:25676947

Ash, Joan S; Cottrell, Erika; Saxton, Lauren; Newman, Lucas; Gebhardt, Eric; Helfand, Mark

2015-01-01

307

Researcher Perspectives on Conflicts of Interest: A Qualitative Analysis of Views from Academia.  

PubMed

The increasing interconnectedness of academic research and external industry has left research vulnerable to conflicts of interest. These conflicts have the potential to undermine the integrity of scientific research as well as to threaten public trust in scientific findings. The present effort sought to identify themes in the perspectives of faculty researchers regarding conflicts of interest. Think-aloud interview responses were qualitatively analyzed in an effort to provide insights with regard to appropriate ways to address the threat of conflicts of interest in research. Themes in participant responses included disclosure of conflicts of interest, self-removal from situations where conflict exists, accommodation of conflict, denial of the existence of conflict, and recognition of complexity of situations involving conflicts of interest. Moral disengagement operations are suggested to explain the appearance of each identified theme. In addition, suggestions for best practices regarding addressing conflicts of interest given these themes in faculty perspectives are provided. PMID:25115563

Mecca, Jensen T; Gibson, Carter; Giorgini, Vincent; Medeiros, Kelsey E; Mumford, Michael D; Connelly, Shane

2014-08-13

308

Game-Based Learning in Science Education: A Review of Relevant Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to review empirical research articles regarding game-based science learning (GBSL) published from 2000 to 2011. Thirty-one articles were identified through the Web of Science and SCOPUS databases. A qualitative content analysis technique was adopted to analyze the research purposes and designs, game design and…

Li, Ming-Chaun; Tsai, Chin-Chung

2013-01-01

309

[The positioning of nursing research in the academic studies: the origin and development of qualitative and quantitative studies].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to discuss the historical context of qualitative and quantitative research so as to explain the principle of qualitative study and examine the positioning of nursing research within academic study as a whole. This paper guides the readers towards the historical context from empirical science, discusses the influences of qualitative and quantitative research on nursing research, then investigates the nature of research paradigms, examines the positioning of nursing research, which includes the characteristics of fields such as natural science, humanity and social studies, and science, and lastly, presents the research standard proposed by Yardley in 2000. The research paradigms include Positivism, Postpositivism, Criticism, and Constructivism, which can be compared with Ontology, Epistemology, and Methodology. The nature of the paradigm is to determine the assumption of the paradigm on the basis of Ontology, Epistemology, and Methodology. The paradigm determines how the researcher views the world and decides on what to answer, how to research, and how to answer. The difference in academic environment is reflected in the long-term dialogue between qualitative and quantitative studies, as well as the standard for criticism. This paper introduces the method of evaluation of the quality of qualitative study proposed by Yardley in 2002, namely the sensitivity of the context, the promise and conscientiousness, transparency and consistency, influence and significance. The paper is intended to provide a guideline for readers in evaluating the quality of qualitative study. PMID:16432800

Lu, Pei-Pei; Ting, Shing-Shiang; Chen, Mei-Ling; Tang, Woung-Ru

2005-12-01

310

004 op: enacting ppi in qualitative mental health research: peer researcher involvement in data analysis in the 'core' study.  

PubMed

Patient and public involvement (PPI) is now an expected component of UK publicly-funded health research. Compatibilities with PPI aims and values mean that qualitative research is often a vehicle for enacting PPI. This presentation focuses on the involvement of "peer researchers" (service users and carers) in qualitative data analysis, and offers critical reflections of the practicalities of this process in the context of mental health research and an academic-led project. "CORE" (Crisis resolution team Optimisation and RElapse prevention) is a large NIHR-funded research project that aims to optimise the functioning of crisis resolution teams (CRTs). CRTs provide intensive home-based treatment for people experiencing an acute mental health crisis, as an alternative to hospital admission. They exist in all NHS Mental Health Trusts in England, but their performance and effectiveness is variable. The CORE project adopts a collaborative model of service user and carer involvement within an academic-led project. A large service user and carer working group contributes to a range of project activities including a qualitative study of stakeholders' views on current and best CRT practice, in which peer researchers have conducted interviews and been involved in data analysis. Faced with a large data set of more than 100 pieces of data, and little existing guidance on peer researcher involvement in qualitative data analysis, we attempted to develop an approach that enabled genuine involvement and maximised the methodological benefits of collaboration. Additional aims were to build research skills and capacity, and to obtain feedback from participants about their experiences of this. Peer researcher involvement began in the early stages of thematic analysis, in order to maximise contributions to the development of thematic codes at the point when these were most fluid and open. This was part of a staged process that meshed the work and perspectives of peer researchers with those of the academic researcher team. The presentation will describe this process and the rationale behind it, and discuss critical issues such as whether academic-led collaborations perpetuate or have the capacity to challenge existing power inequalities that are greater in mental health than other healthcare contexts. PMID:25869713

Morant, N; Lloyd-Evans, B

2015-01-01

311

Qualitative research in applied situations: strategies to ensure rigor and validity.  

PubMed

Traditionally, qualitative studies are founded on interpretative and constructive epistemology. The process of data collection in these studies is longer and intensive. This helps to build a strong rapport with the community, hence enabling to capture the field as naturally as possible. These characteristics provide an ample scope to take care of quality and validity of data. However, in applied situations, data collection is often a truncated activity. This robs away a number of taken-for-granted strengths of traditional qualitative research methods: No time is spent on rapport building; holism is left behind, instead we engage in selection; we focus narrowly on specific phenomenon of concern, divorced from its context; analysis does not evolve out of an iterative process. In this paper, we aim to discuss some of the issues related to rigor and quality of such studies and strategies available to address them. PMID:22684166

Nakkeeran, N; Zodpey, Sanjay P

2012-01-01

312

Challenges facing translational research organizations in China: a qualitative multiple case study  

PubMed Central

Background Translational medicine is attracting much attention worldwide and many translational research organizations (TROs) have been established. In China, translational medicine has developed rapidly, but faces many challenges. This study was aimed at exploring these challenges faced by emerging TROs in China. Method A qualitative, multiple case study approach was used to assess the challenges faced by TROs in China. Data were collected between May and August 2012. Results Eight cases were identified. Overall, four themes that characterized TROs in China emerged from analyses: 1. objectives, organizer, and funding resources, 2. participating partners and research teams, 3. management, and 4. achievements. All TROs had objectives related to translating basic discovery to clinic treatment and cultivating translational researchers. In terms of organizer and funding resources, 7 out of 8 TROs were launched only by universities and/or hospitals, and funded mostly through research grants. As for participating partners and multidisciplinary research teams, all but one of the TROs only involved biomedical research institutions who were interested in translational research, and characterized as clinical research centers; 7 out of 8 TROs involved only researchers from biomedicine and clinical disciplines and none involved disciplines related to education, ethnicity, and sociology, or engaged the community. Current management of the TROs were generally nested within the traditional research management paradigms, and failed to adapt to the tenets of translational research. Half of the TROs were at developmental stages defined as infrastructure construction and recruitment of translational researchers. Conclusions TROs in China face the challenge of attracting sustainable funding sources, widening multidisciplinary cooperation, cultivating multi-disciplinary translational researchers and adapting current research management to translational research. Greater emphasis should be placed on increasing multidisciplinary cooperation, and innovating in education programs to cultivate of translational researchers. Efforts should be made to reform research management in TROs, and establish sustainable funding resources. PMID:24119837

2013-01-01

313

A qualitative study on clinical research in Finland: fragmented governance and volume in the 2000s  

PubMed Central

Objectives Although concerns over clinical research have been expressed, the governance of clinical research has been little studied. The aim was to describe research policy, volume, funding and concerns over clinical research in Finland. Design A qualitative study and the data were collected from various sources, including documents, statistics and semistructured expert interviews. Setting Finland. Results We found no national policy for clinical research. Many actors were responsible for facilitating, directing, regulating and funding clinical research, but no actor had the main responsibility. Health professionals were the main drivers for clinical research. The role of the health ministry was small. The ministry distributed state money for clinical research in health services (EVO-money), but did not use it to direct research. Municipalities responsible for health services or national health insurance had little interest in clinical research. The Academy of Finland had had initiatives to promote clinical research, but they had not materialised in funding. Clinical research was common and internationally competitive, but its volume had declined relatively in the 2000s. Industry was an important private funder, mainly supporting drug trials made for licensing purposes. Drug trials without an outside sponsor (academic projects) declined between 2002 and 2010. The funding and its targeting and amount were no one's responsibility. Concerns over clinical research were similar as in other countries, but it had appeared late. Conclusions Our results suggest fragmented governance and funding in clinical research. The unsystematic research environment has not prevented clinical research from flourishing, but the public health relevance of the research carried out and its sustainability are unclear. PMID:23408074

Hemminki, Elina; Veerus, Piret; Virtanen, Jorma; Lehto, Juhani

2013-01-01

314

The ALICE Data Quality Monitoring: qualitative and quantitative review of three years of operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter produced in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Due to the complexity of ALICE in terms of number of detectors and performance requirements, Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) plays an essential role in providing online feedback on the data being recorded. It intends to provide shifters with precise and complete information to quickly identify problems, and as a consequence to ensure acquisition of high quality data. This paper presents a review of the ALICE DQM system during the first three years of LHC operations from a quantitative and qualitative point of view. We start by presenting the DQM software and tools before moving on to the various analyses carried out. An overview of the produced monitoring quantities is given, presenting the diversity of usage and flexibility of the DQM. Well-prepared shifters and experts, in addition to a precise organisation, were required to ensure smooth and successful operations. The description of the measures taken to ensure both aspects and an account of the DQM shifters' job are followed by a summary of the evolution of the system. We then give a quantitative review of the final setup of the system used during the whole year 2012. We conclude the paper with use cases where the DQM proved to be very valuable, scalable and efficient and with the plans for the coming years.

von Haller, Barthélémy; Bellini, Francesca; Telesca, Adriana; Foka, Yiota; Alice Dqm Collaboration

2014-06-01

315

Using quantitative and qualitative data in health services research – what happens when mixed method findings conflict? [ISRCTN61522618  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In this methodological paper we document the interpretation of a mixed methods study and outline an approach to dealing with apparent discrepancies between qualitative and quantitative research data in a pilot study evaluating whether welfare rights advice has an impact on health and social outcomes among a population aged 60 and over. METHODS: Quantitative and qualitative data were collected

Suzanne Moffatt; Martin White; Joan Mackintosh; Denise Howel

2006-01-01

316

I Yam What I Am: Examining Qualitative Research through the Ethnographic Self, the Literary "Other" and the Academy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The conduct and use of qualitative research and the role of fiction as a way of examining the experiences of an African American woman are explored. The paper uses an alternative qualitative model to examine issues of power, equity, and race in the particular context of the African American woman. It discusses the writings of Zora Neale Hurston as…

Jeffries, Rhonda Baynes

317

The challenges of including sex/gender analysis in systematic reviews: a qualitative survey  

PubMed Central

Background Systematic review methodology includes the rigorous collection, selection, and evaluation of data in order to synthesize the best available evidence for health practice, health technology assessments, and health policy. Despite evidence that sex and gender matter to health outcomes, data and analysis related to sex and gender are frequently absent in systematic reviews, raising concerns about the quality and applicability of reviews. Few studies have focused on challenges to implementing sex/gender analysis within systematic reviews. Methods A multidisciplinary group of systematic reviewers, methodologists, biomedical and social science researchers, health practitioners, and other health sector professionals completed an open-ended survey prior to a two-day workshop focused on sex/gender, equity, and bias in systematic reviews. Respondents were asked to identify challenging or ‘thorny’ issues associated with integrating sex and gender in systematic reviews and indicate how they address these in their work. Data were analysed using interpretive description. A summary of the findings was presented and discussed with workshop participants. Results Respondents identified conceptual challenges, such as defining sex and gender, methodological challenges in measuring and analysing sex and gender, challenges related to availability of data and data quality, and practical and policy challenges. No respondents discussed how they addressed these challenges, but all proposed ways to address sex/gender analysis in the future. Conclusions Respondents identified a wide range of interrelated challenges to implementing sex/gender considerations within systematic reviews. To our knowledge, this paper is the first to identify these challenges from the perspectives of those conducting and using systematic reviews. A framework and methods to integrate sex/gender analysis in systematic reviews are in the early stages of development. A number of priority items and collaborative initiatives to guide systematic reviewers in sex/gender analysis are provided, based on the survey results and subsequent workshop discussions. An emerging ‘community of practice’ is committed to enhancing the quality and applicability of systematic reviews by integrating considerations of sex/gender into the review process, with the goals of improving health outcomes and ensuring health equity for all persons. PMID:24720875

2014-01-01

318

Understanding the role of the volunteer in specialist palliative care: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies  

PubMed Central

Background Volunteers make a major contribution to palliative patient care, and qualitative studies have been undertaken to explore their involvement. With the aim of making connections between existing studies to derive enhanced meanings, we undertook a systematic review of these qualitative studies including synthesising the findings. We sought to uncover how the role of volunteers with direct contact with patients in specialist palliative care is understood by volunteers, patients, their families, and staff. Methods We searched for relevant literature that explored the role of the volunteer including electronic citation databases and reference lists of included studies, and also undertook handsearches of selected journals to find studies which met inclusion criteria. We quality appraised included studies, and synthesised study findings using a novel synthesis method, thematic synthesis. Results We found 12 relevant studies undertaken in both inpatient and home-care settings, with volunteers, volunteer coordinators, patients and families. Studies explored the role of general volunteers as opposed to those offering any professional skills. Three theme clusters were found: the distinctness of the volunteer role, the characteristics of the role, and the volunteer experience of the role. The first answers the question, is there a separate volunteer role? We found that to some extent the role was distinctive. The volunteer may act as a mediator between the patient and the staff. However, we also found some contradictions. Volunteers may take on temporary surrogate family-type relationship roles. They may also take on some of the characteristics of a paid professional. The second cluster helps to describe the essence of the role. Here, we found that the dominant feature was that the role is social in nature. The third helps to explain aspects of the role from the point of view of volunteers themselves. It highlighted that the role is seen by volunteers as flexible, informal and sometimes peripheral. These characteristics some volunteers find stressful. Conclusions This paper demonstrates how qualitative research can be sythnesised systematically, extending methodological techniques to help answer difficult research questions. It provides information that may help managers and service planners to support volunteers appropriately. PMID:24506971

2014-01-01

319

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN PERCEPTIONS OF SEXUAL INTENT: A QUALITATIVE REVIEW AND INTEGRATION  

PubMed Central

Men appear to interpret people’s behaviors more sexually than do women. This finding, which has been replicated in scores of studies using a variety of methodological approaches, has been linked to important social concerns, including sexual assault and sexual harassment. This article provides a critical review of the published literature on gender differences in sexual intent perception, using selective examples to illustrate and summarize the field’s major constructs, methodologies, and empirical findings. Theoretical explanations for gender differences in sexual intent perceptions are reviewed. Finally, we highlight the field’s remaining issues and make several recommendations for future research directions. PMID:19763282

Lindgren, Kristen P.; Parkhill, Michele R.; George, William H.; Hendershot, Christian S.

2009-01-01

320

Flexible Delivery of Training. Review of Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on flexible delivery of training in Australia since 1990 was reviewed to identify main trends in the delivery of training, the adequacy of research on the topic, and topics that should be addressed in future studies. Selected conclusions of the review are as follows: (1) flexible delivery strategies are valuable in facilitating access to…

Kearns, Peter

321

Second Language Research Using Magnetoencephalography: A Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this review we show how magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a constructive tool for language research and review MEG findings in second language (L2) research. MEG is the magnetic analog of electroencephalography (EEG), and its primary advantage over other cross-sectional (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography) functional…

Schmidt, Gwen L.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

2009-01-01

322

Research Review: Magazine Management and Economics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research on magazine management and economics. Finds that most citations are from business and trade publications; research is being presented at conferences but not published; most management research covers industry trends rather than specific industry topics; and no solid base of conceptual and theoretical magazine management research

Worthington, Robert

1994-01-01

323

Using qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) in systematic reviews of complex interventions: a worked example  

PubMed Central

Background Systematic reviews that address policy and practice questions in relation to complex interventions frequently need not only to assess the efficacy of a given intervention but to identify which intervention - and which intervention components - might be most effective in particular situations. Here, intervention replication is rare, and commonly used synthesis methods are less useful when the focus of analysis is the identification of those components of an intervention that are critical to its success. Methods Having identified initial theories of change in a previous analysis, we explore the potential of qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to assist with complex syntheses through a worked example. Developed originally in the area of political science and historical sociology, a QCA aims to identify those configurations of participant, intervention and contextual characteristics that may be associated with a given outcome. Analysing studies in these terms facilitates the identification of necessary and sufficient conditions for the outcome to be obtained. Since QCA is predicated on the assumption that multiple pathways might lead to the same outcome and does not assume a linear additive model in terms of changes to a particular condition (that is, it can cope with ‘tipping points’ in complex interventions), it appears not to suffer from some of the limitations of the statistical methods often used in meta-analysis. Results The worked example shows how the QCA reveals that our initial theories of change were unable to distinguish between ‘effective’ and ‘highly effective’ interventions. Through the iterative QCA process, other intervention characteristics are identified that better explain the observed results. Conclusions QCA is a promising alternative (or adjunct), particularly to the standard fall-back of a ‘narrative synthesis’ when a quantitative synthesis is impossible, and should be considered when reviews are broad and heterogeneity is significant. There are very few examples of its use with systematic review data at present, and further methodological work is needed to establish optimal conditions for its use and to document process, practice, and reporting standards. PMID:24950727

2014-01-01

324

A systematic review and synthesis of the quantitative and qualitative evidence behind patient-centred goal setting in stroke rehabilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To map out from the literature the nature, extent and effects of application of patient-centred goal setting in stroke rehabilitation practice.Design: Systematic review.Data sources: A search was conducted in the Cochrane (Wiley), AMED, Medline (EBSCO), Embase, Sports discuss, Medline (Ovid) and CINAHL databases. Secondary search based on references from the preliminary search was undertaken.Review methods: Quantitative and qualitative studies

Sheeba Rosewilliam; Carolyn Anne Roskell; AD Pandyan

2011-01-01

325

Improving Hawaiian and Filipino Involvement in Clinical Research Opportunities: Qualitative Findings from Hawai'i  

PubMed Central

Objective Investigate the barriers to participation in medical research that involves Asian and Pacific Islander (API) populations in Hawai'i. Participants Fifty people (27 Filipinos, 23 Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders) in five different communities on Oahu. Design Nine focus groups with an ethnically matched moderator were held to explore people's feelings, problems, and recommendations regarding medical research. Sessions were audiotaped, transcribed, and qualitatively analyzed with the constant comparison method. Results Only 12% of study participants said that they absolutely would not participate in a clinical study. Most agreed that research is vital. Filipino participants were more optimistic about the safety and value of joining in medical research. Hawaiian groups were more hesitant and fearful. Reasons for nonparticipation included negative feelings about the purpose and intent of clinical trials and language and cultural barriers. Suggestions on how to encourage API populations to participate in research investigations included improving peoples' understanding of the benefits to family and community. Hawaiian and Filipino groups differed only slightly in their assessments of the type of research needed in their communities. Conclusions Recruitment campaigns must improve people's awareness of the process of informed consent, research safeguards, and benefits to family and community. Attention should focus on K-12 health education to use members of the younger generations to access and educate elders, involving persons with medical research experience as a recruitment resource, returning results to study participants, and increasing the number of healthcare professionals and researchers that are culturally and linguistically matched to the community. PMID:16312944

Gollin, Lisa X.; Harrigan, Rosanne C.; Perez, John; Easa, David; Calderón, José L.

2006-01-01

326

Barriers to the effective treatment and prevention of malaria in Africa: A systematic review of qualitative studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In Africa, an estimated 300-500 million cases of malaria occur each year resulting in approximately 1 million deaths. More than 90% of these are in children under 5 years of age. To identify commonly held beliefs about malaria that might present barriers to its successful treatment and prevention, we conducted a systematic review of qualitative studies examining beliefs and

David M Maslove; Anisa Mnyusiwalla; Edward J Mills; Jessie McGowan; Amir Attaran; Kumanan Wilson

2009-01-01

327

Translating research into maternal health care policy: a qualitative case study of the use of evidence in policies for the treatment of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia in South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Few empirical studies of research utilisation have been conducted in low and middle income countries. This paper explores how research information, in particular findings from randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews, informed policy making and clinical guideline development for the use of magnesium sulphate in the treatment of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia in South Africa. METHODS: A qualitative case-study approach

Karen Daniels; Simon Lewin

2008-01-01

328

An Examination of Qualitative Empirical Studies at the AHRD from 1999-2003: Research Purpose, Research Questions, and Inquiry Literature Cited  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper examines the nature of qualitative empirical studies published in the AHRD proceedings from 1999-2003 and discusses findings on research purpose, research question(s), and inquiry literature cited. (Contains 4 tables.)

Plakhotnik, Maria S.; Rocco, Tonette S.; McCarley, Howard; Ianinska, Silvana; Bernier, Judith D.

2006-01-01

329

Research Ethics: Institutional Review Board Oversight of Art Therapy Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By having their research proposals reviewed and approved by Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), art therapists meet important ethical principles regarding responsibility to research participants. This article provides an overview of the history of human subjects protections in the United States; underlying ethical principles and their application…

Deaver, Sarah P.

2011-01-01

330

Qualitative Research in Counseling Psychology: A Primer on Research Paradigms and Philosophy of Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents an overview of philosophy of science and research paradigms. The philosophy of science parameters of ontology, epistemology, axiology, rhetorical structure, and methodology are discussed across the research paradigms of positivism, postpositivism, constructivism-interpretivism, and the critical-ideological perspective. Counseling researchers are urged to locate their inquiry approaches within identifiable research paradigms, and examples of \\

Joseph G. Ponterotto

2005-01-01

331

A qualitative analysis of the determinants in the choice of a French journal reviewing procedures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Between 1993 and 2010, two French journals (Aster and Didaskalia) coming from different backgrounds but belonging to the same institution used to publish papers on research in science and technology education. The merging of these journals made it necessary for them to compare the different reviewing procedures used by each. This merging occurred at a time when research is becoming increasingly international which partly determines some of the reviewing procedure choices. In order for a francophone international journal to survive, it needs to take this internationalization into account in a reasoned manner. The author of this article, as a chief editor of RDST (Recherches en Didactique des Sciences et des Technologies)—the journal resulting from the merging- taking part in this merger, analyses the social, cultural and pragmatic determinants which impacted the choices made in reviewing procedures. This paper describes how these diversity of factors leads us to drop the idea of a standard reviewing procedure which would be valid for all journals.

Morge, Ludovic

2014-05-01

332

What supports physiotherapists’ use of research in clinical practice? A qualitative study in Sweden  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence-based practice has increasingly been recognized as a priority by professional physiotherapy organizations and influential researchers and clinicians in the field. Numerous studies in the past decade have documented that physiotherapists hold generally favorable attitudes to evidence-based practice and recognize the importance of using research to guide their clinical practice. Research has predominantly investigated barriers to research use. Less is known about the circumstances that actually support use of research by physiotherapists. This study explores the conditions at different system levels that physiotherapists in Sweden perceive to be supportive of their use of research in clinical practice. Methods Patients in Sweden do not need a referral from a physician to consult a physiotherapist and physiotherapists are entitled to choose and perform any assessment and treatment technique they find suitable for each patient. Eleven focus group interviews were conducted with 45 physiotherapists, each lasting between 90 and 110 minutes. An inductive approach was applied, using topics rather than questions to allow the participants to generate their own questions and pursue their own priorities within the framework of the aim. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Analysis of the data yielded nine favorable conditions at three system levels supporting the participant’s use of research in clinical practice: two at the individual level (attitudes and motivation concerning research use; research-related knowledge and skills), four at the workplace level (leadership support; organizational culture; research-related resources; knowledge exchange) and three at the extra-organizational level (evidence-based practice guidelines; external meetings, networks, and conferences; academic research and education). Conclusions Supportive conditions for physiotherapists’ use of research exist at multiple interdependent levels, including the individual, workplace, and extra-organizational levels. Research use in physiotherapy appears to be an interactive and interpretative social process that involves a great deal of interaction with various people, including colleagues and patients. PMID:23497502

2013-01-01

333

Using Qualitative Research to Inform the Development of a Comprehensive Outcomes Assessment for Asthma  

PubMed Central

Background Qualitative research can inform the development of asthma patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures and user-friendly technologies through defining measurement constructs, identifying potential limitations in measurement and sources of response error, and evaluating usability. Objective The goal of the current study was to inform the development of a comprehensive asthma PRO assessment with input from patients and clinical experts. Method Self-reported adult asthma sufferers recruited from a 3,000 member New England-area research panel participated in either one of three focus groups (N=21) or individual cognitive item debriefing interviews (N=20) to discuss how asthma impacts their health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and provide feedback on a preliminary set of asthma impact survey items and prototype patient report. Focus groups and cognitive interviews were conducted using traditional research principles (e.g., semi-structured interview guide, probing, and think aloud techniques). An Expert Advisory Panel (N=12) including asthma clinical specialists and measurement professionals was convened to review results from the focus group and cognitive interview studies and make recommendations for final survey and report development. Results Domains of health impacted by asthma included physical (recreation, play, competitive sports, and exercise), social (activities, family relationships), emotional (anger, upset, frustration, anxiety, worry), sleep, role (recreational/leisure activities; work), and sexual functioning. Most items in the impact survey were easily understood, covered important content, and included relevant response options. Items with contradictory examples and multiple concepts were difficult to comprehend. Suggestions were made to expand survey content by including additional items on physical and sexual functioning, sleep, self-consciousness, stigma, and finances. Reports were considered useful and participants saw value in sharing the results with their doctor. Graphic presentation of scores was not always understood; participants preferred tabular presentation of score levels with associated interpretative text. Display of inverse scores for different measures (higher scores equaling better health on one scale and worse health on another) shown on a single page was confusing. The score history section of the report was seen as helpful for monitoring progress over time, particularly for those recently diagnosed with asthma. Expert panelists agreed that displaying inverse scores in a single summary report may be confusing to patients and providers. They also stressed the importance of comprehensive interpretation guidelines for patients, with an emphasis on what they should do next based on scores. Panelists made recommendations for provider and aggregate-level reports (e.g., “red flags” to indicate significant score changes or cut-points of significance; identification of subgroups that have scored poorly or recently gotten worse). Conclusion Incorporating input from patients, clinicians, and measurement experts in the early stages of product development should improve the construct validity of this PRO measure and enhance its practical application in healthcare. PMID:20508735

Turner-Bowker, Diane M.; Saris-Baglama, Renee N.; DeRosa, Michael A.; Paulsen, Christine A.; Bransfield, Christopher P.

2009-01-01

334

Organizational Determinants of Interprofessional Collaboration in Integrative Health Care: Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies  

PubMed Central

Context Inteprofessional collaboration (IPC) between biomedically trained doctors (BMD) and traditional, complementary and alternative medicine practitioners (TCAMP) is an essential element in the development of successful integrative healthcare (IHC) services. This systematic review aims to identify organizational strategies that would facilitate this process. Methods We searched 4 international databases for qualitative studies on the theme of BMD-TCAMP IPC, supplemented with a purposive search of 31 health services and TCAM journals. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using published checklist. Results of each included study were synthesized using a framework approach, with reference to the Structuration Model of Collaboration. Findings Thirty-seven studies of acceptable quality were included. The main driver for developing integrative healthcare was the demand for holistic care from patients. Integration can best be led by those trained in both paradigms. Bridge-building activities, positive promotion of partnership and co-location of practices are also beneficial for creating bonding between team members. In order to empower the participation of TCAMP, the perceived power differentials need to be reduced. Also, resources should be committed to supporting team building, collaborative initiatives and greater patient access. Leadership and funding from central authorities are needed to promote the use of condition-specific referral protocols and shared electronic health records. More mature IHC programs usually formalize their evaluation process around outcomes that are recognized both by BMD and TCAMP. Conclusions The major themes emerging from our review suggest that successful collaborative relationships between BMD and TCAMP are similar to those between other health professionals, and interventions which improve the effectiveness of joint working in other healthcare teams with may well be transferable to promote better partnership between the paradigms. However, striking a balance between the different practices and preserving the epistemological stance of TCAM will remain the greatest challenge in successful integration. PMID:23209634

Chung, Vincent C. H.; Ma, Polly H. X.; Hong, Lau Chun; Griffiths, Sian M.

2012-01-01

335

Tuberculosis in Migrant Populations. A Systematic Review of the Qualitative Literature  

PubMed Central

Background The re-emergence of tuberculosis (TB) in low-incidence countries and its disproportionate burden on immigrants is a public health concern posing specific social and ethical challenges. This review explores perceptions, knowledge, attitudes and treatment adherence behaviour relating to TB and their social implications as reported in the qualitative literature. Methods Systematic review in four electronic databases. Findings from thirty selected studies extracted, tabulated, compared and synthesized. Findings TB was attributed to many non-exclusive causes including air-born transmission of bacteria, genetics, malnutrition, excessive work, irresponsible lifestyles, casual contact with infected persons or objects; and exposure to low temperatures, dirt, stress and witchcraft. Perceived as curable but potentially lethal and highly contagious, there was confusion around a condition surrounded by fears. A range of economic, legislative, cultural, social and health system barriers could delay treatment seeking. Fears of deportation and having contacts traced could prevent individuals from seeking medical assistance. Once on treatment, family support and “the personal touch” of health providers emerged as key factors facilitating adherence. The concept of latent infection was difficult to comprehend and while TB screening was often seen as a socially responsible act, it could be perceived as discriminatory. Immigration and the infectiousness of TB mutually reinforced each another exacerbating stigma. This was further aggravated by indirect costs such as losing a job, being evicted by a landlord or not being able to attend school. Conclusions Understanding immigrants’ views of TB and the obstacles that they face when accessing the health system and adhering to a treatment programme-taking into consideration their previous experiences at countries of origin as well as the social, economic and legislative context in which they live at host countries- has an important role and should be considered in the design, evaluation and adaptation of programmes. PMID:24349284

Abarca Tomás, Bruno; Pell, Christopher; Bueno Cavanillas, Aurora; Guillén Solvas, José; Pool, Robert; Roura, María

2013-01-01

336

Cognitive Neurorehabilitation of HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders: A Qualitative Review and Call to Action  

PubMed Central

Despite significant advances in the virologic management of HIV infection over the last two decades, effective treatments for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain elusive. While pharmacological interventions have yielded some success in improving neurocognitive outcomes in HIV, there is a dearth of rigorous studies examining the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation for remediating HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment. This qualitative review summarizes and critiques the emerging literature on cognitive and behavioral treatments for HAND, which provides many reasons for optimism, but also has major limitations that underscore the scope of the work that lies ahead. Considering the notable real-world consequences of HAND, the development, validation, and clinical deployment of cognitive neurorehabilitation interventions tailored to the needs of persons living with HIV infection is a priority for clinical neuroAIDS investigators. In describing potential future directions for this endeavor, particular attention was paid to the application of cognitive neuropsychological principles in developing theory-driven approaches to managing HAND, improving everyday functioning, and enhancing HIV health outcomes. PMID:23417497

Weber, Erica; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Woods, Steven Paul

2013-01-01

337

Effect of Preventive Hormonal Therapy on Breast Density: A Systematic Qualitative Review  

PubMed Central

Breast density (BD) is recognized as one of the strongest independent risk factors of breast cancer (BC). Unlike most other risk factors, BD can be modified, suggesting that it may be a biomarker for preventive interventions. We conducted a qualitative systematic review to address the effect of preventive hormonal therapy on BD. Among the 26 relevant studies, 10 assessed the effect of tamoxifen on BD (TAM: n = 2?877), 9 that of raloxifene (RLX: n = 1?544), and 7 that of aromatase inhibitors (AI: n = 416). The studies were characterized by a large heterogeneity in designs and in methods of BD measurement. BD could be reduced by TAM (10 studies/10). However, the effect of RLX and AI on BD remains unclear due to conflicting results between studies. Consequently, it is crucial to develop practical, accurate, and reproducible methods of measurement in order to be able to compare the effect of preventive hormonal agents on BD and to determine whether change in BD can be used as a predictor of response to therapy. PMID:24895676

Lienart, Virginie; Carly, Birgit; Liebens, Fabienne

2014-01-01

338

Researchers’ Needs for Resource Discovery and Collaboration Tools: A Qualitative Investigation of Translational Scientists  

PubMed Central

Background A critical aspect of clinical and translational science (CTS) is interdisciplinary and collaborative research, which increasingly requires a wide range of computational and human resources. However, few studies have systematically analyzed such resource needs of CTS researchers. Objective To improve our understanding of CTS researchers’ needs for computational and human resources in order to build useful and useable supporting informatics tools. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews of 30 CTS researchers from the University of Michigan, followed by qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts. Results The analysis identified three recurring themes: the need for the federation of information, the need to address information overload, and the need to humanize computing, including strong and well-informed views about the use of social networking tools for research collaboration. These findings helped us to narrow down the available design choices for assisting CTS researchers, and helped to identify potential deficiencies of well-known theoretical frameworks used to guide our study, with suggestions for future remedies. Conclusions The user needs identified through the study, along with concrete design suggestions, provided key design, methodological, and theoretical insights, which are being used to guide the design and development of a CTS resource portal. The results and interview instrument should be useful to other institutions with Clinical and Translational Science Awards that face similar challenges related to helping CTS researchers make more effective use of computational and human resources. PMID:22668750

Warden, Michael; Zheng, Kai; Hill, Mary; Athey, Brian D

2012-01-01

339

Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review  

SciTech Connect

This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

NONE

1995-07-01

340

A Review of Research on Mobile Learning in Teacher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mobile devices have become attractive learning devices for education. While the majority of the existing research has focused primarily on the value of mobile learning for students, researchers have recently started exploring its potentials within teacher development. The present qualitative synthesis of quantitative and qualitative research aimed…

Baran, Evrim

2014-01-01

341

Patient and professional attitudes towards research in general practice: the RepR qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Since the 1990s, professional institutions worldwide have emphasised the need to develop research in general practice to improve the health of the population. The recent creation of professorships in general practice in French Universities should foster research in this field. Our aim was to explore the views of patients and relevant professionals on research in general practice. Methods Qualitative study, using the grounded theory approach according to Strauss and Corbin, conducted in 2010 in three French regions. Nine focus groups were run to data saturation, and included 57 participants in four different categories: patients, non-academic GPs, academic GPs, academics in other disciplines. Results Most of the participants in the four categories described research in general practice as specific to the population managed and relevant for health care. They considered that its grounding in day-to-day practice enabled pragmatic approaches. The influence of the pharmaceutical industry, rivalries between university disciplines and a possible gap between research and practice were considered as pitfalls. The barriers identified were representations of the medical researcher as a “laboratory worker”, the lack of awareness of any research in the discipline, and lack of time and training. While the views of patients and non-academic GPs are mostly focused on professional issues and the views of academics other than GPs on technical issues, academic GPs are in a position to play a role of interface between the universities and general practices. Conclusions Although the role of GPs in research is perceived differently by the various protagonists, research in general practice has an undisputed legitimacy in France. Solutions for overcoming the identified barriers include research networks with appropriate resources and training and scientifically sound collaborative research projects, as already implemented in leading countries. PMID:25047280

2014-01-01

342

A Review of Mobile HCI Research Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines and reviews research methods applied within the field of mobile human-computer interaction. The purpose is to provide a snapshot of current practice for studying mobile HCI to identify shortcomings in the way research is conducted and to propose opportunities for future ap- proaches. 102 publications on mobile human-computer interaction research were categorized in a matrix relating their

Jesper Kjeldskov; Connor Graham

2003-01-01

343

Stanford University Reviewing Veterans Affairs (VA) Research  

E-print Network

Stanford University HRPP Reviewing Veterans Affairs (VA) Research [for IRB staff and members] AID applicable to research supported by, or otherwise subject to, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Questions-VA Research: Participation of non-veterans Justification should be discussed in IRB meeting

Puglisi, Joseph

344

Participatory action research: considerations for ethical review.  

PubMed

This paper addresses the distinctive nature of participatory action research (PAR) in relation to ethical review requirements. As a framework for conducting research and reducing health disparities, PAR is gaining increased attention in community and public health research. As a result, PAR researchers and members of Research Ethics Boards could benefit from an increased understanding of the array of ethical concerns that can arise. We discuss these concerns in light of commonly held ethical requirements for clinical research (social or scientific value, scientific validity, fair subject/participant selection, favourable risk-benefit ratio, independent review, informed consent, and respect for potential and enrolled participants) and refer to guidelines specifically developed for participatory research in health promotion. We draw from our community-based experiences in mental health promotion research with immigrant and culturally diverse youth to illustrate the ethical advantages and challenges of applying a PAR approach. We conclude with process suggestions for Research Ethics Boards. PMID:15748680

Khanlou, N; Peter, E

2005-05-01

345

A qualitative approach to Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training development: identification of metacognitive strategies.  

PubMed

Although Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training is common in the sciences, the effectiveness of RCR training is open to question. Three key factors appear to be particularly important in ensuring the effectiveness of ethics education programs: (1) educational efforts should be tied to day-to-day practices in the field, (2) educational efforts should provide strategies for working through the ethical problems people are likely to encounter in day-to-day practice, and (3) educational efforts should be embedded in a broader program of on-going career development efforts. This article discusses a complex qualitative approach to RCR training development, based on a sensemaking model, which strives to address the afore-mentioned training concerns. Ethnographic observations and prior RCR training served the purpose of collecting information specific to a multi-disciplinary and multi-university research center with the goal of identifying metacognitive reasoning strategies that would facilitate ethical decision-making. The extensive qualitative analyses resulted in the identification of nine metacognitive reasoning strategies on which future RCR training will be developed. The implications of the findings for RCR training in the sciences are discussed. PMID:17899449

Kligyte, Vykinta; Marcy, Richard T; Sevier, Sydney T; Godfrey, Elaine S; Mumford, Michael D

2008-03-01

346

Quantitative and qualitative research across cultures and languages: cultural metrics and their application.  

PubMed

Growing globalisation of the world draws attention to cultural differences between people from different countries or from different cultures within the countries. Notwithstanding the diversity of people's worldviews, current cross-cultural research still faces the challenge of how to avoid ethnocentrism; comparing Western-driven phenomena with like variables across countries without checking their conceptual equivalence clearly is highly problematic. In the present article we argue that simple comparison of measurements (in the quantitative domain) or of semantic interpretations (in the qualitative domain) across cultures easily leads to inadequate results. Questionnaire items or text produced in interviews or via open-ended questions have culturally laden meanings and cannot be mapped onto the same semantic metric. We call the culture-specific space and relationship between variables or meanings a 'cultural metric', that is a set of notions that are inter-related and that mutually specify each other's meaning. We illustrate the problems and their possible solutions with examples from quantitative and qualitative research. The suggested methods allow to respect the semantic space of notions in cultures and language groups and the resulting similarities or differences between cultures can be better understood and interpreted. PMID:24809790

Wagner, Wolfgang; Hansen, Karolina; Kronberger, Nicole

2014-12-01

347

A systematic review of qualitative findings on factors enabling and deterring uptake of HIV testing in Sub-Saharan Africa  

PubMed Central

Background Despite Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) being the epicenter of the HIV epidemic, uptake of HIV testing is not optimal. While qualitative studies have been undertaken to investigate factors influencing uptake of HIV testing, systematic reviews to provide a more comprehensive understanding are lacking. Methods Using Noblit and Hare’s meta-ethnography method, we synthesised published qualitative research to understand factors enabling and deterring uptake of HIV testing in SSA. We identified 5,686 citations out of which 56 were selected for full text review and synthesised 42 papers from 13 countries using Malpass’ notion of first-, second-, and third-order constructs. Results The predominant factors enabling uptake of HIV testing are deterioration of physical health and/or death of sexual partner or child. The roll-out of various HIV testing initiatives such as ‘opt-out’ provider-initiated HIV testing and mobile HIV testing has improved uptake of HIV testing by being conveniently available and attenuating fear of HIV-related stigma and financial costs. Other enabling factors are availability of treatment and social network influence and support. Major barriers to uptake of HIV testing comprise perceived low risk of HIV infection, perceived health workers’ inability to maintain confidentiality and fear of HIV-related stigma. While the increasingly wider availability of life-saving treatment in SSA is an incentive to test, the perceived psychological burden of living with HIV inhibits uptake of HIV testing. Other barriers are direct and indirect financial costs of accessing HIV testing, and gender inequality which undermines women’s decision making autonomy about HIV testing. Despite differences across SSA, the findings suggest comparable factors influencing HIV testing. Conclusions Improving uptake of HIV testing requires addressing perception of low risk of HIV infection and perceived inability to live with HIV. There is also a need to continue addressing HIV-related stigma, which is intricately linked to individual economic support. Building confidence in the health system through improving delivery of health care and scaling up HIV testing strategies that attenuate social and economic costs of seeking HIV testing could also contribute towards increasing uptake of HIV testing in SSA. PMID:23497196

2013-01-01

348

An Ethno-medical Perspective on Research Participation: A Qualitative Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Background Recruitment of racial/ethnic minorities for clinical research continues to be problematic, yet critical to ensuring that research data will be applicable to diverse populations. There is a paucity of information about culturally appropriate methods for recruiting and retaining racial/ethnic minorities in research. Objective To cross-culturally assess perceptions of research participation by African American and immigrant Latinos living in the inner-city community of Watts, Los Angeles, California, using qualitative methods. Design Focus groups using ethnically matched moderators were convened with African American and immigrant Latino participants. Discussion was facilitated using a script that focused on perceived “feelings” and “perceptions” about research. Discussions were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using manual and computerized statistically based software (mixed) methods. Results African Americans and immigrant Latinos shared several barriers and motivators to research. However, they also reported barriers and motivators to research that were distinct to each group. Latinos were more interested in healthcare and health information, and African Americans were more concerned with issues of trust and quality of care. Most participants said they would participate in research if they were better informed, or if they or a family member had an illness. Improving communication was reported as being important for motivating participation in clinical research. Overall, socioecologically and socioeconomically based domains were shared, whereas historically and/or socioculturally based domains were distinct. Conclusions Using an ethno-medical science model, we demonstrated that it is possible to identify shared barriers and motivators to research participation between 2 distinct cultural groups. This approach can be useful in developing targeted community-based strategies to increase minority participation in clinical trials. PMID:16926762

Calderón, José L.; Baker, Richard S.; Fabrega, Horacio; Conde, José G.; Hays, Ron D.; Fleming, Erik; Norris, Keith

2006-01-01

349

Equatorial oceanography. [review of research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

United States progress in equatorial oceanography is reviewed, focusing on the low frequency response of upper equatorial oceans to forcing by the wind. Variations of thermocline depth, midocean currents, and boundary currents are discussed. The factors which determine sea surface temperature (SST) variability in equatorial oceans are reviewed, and the status of understanding of the most spectacular manifestation of SST variability, the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomenon, is discussed. The problem of observing surface winds, regarded as a fundamental factor limiting understanding of the equatorial oceans, is addressed. Finally, an attempt is made to identify those current trends which are expected to bear fruit in the near and distant future.

Cane, M. A.; Sarachik, E. S.

1983-01-01

350

A Review of Astronomy Education Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The field of astronomy education is rapidly growing beyond merely sharing effective activities or curriculum ideas. This paper categorizes and summarizes the literature in astronomy education research and contains more than 100 references to articles, books, and Web-based materials. Research into student understanding on a variety of topics now occupies a large part of the literature. Topics include the shape of Earth and gravity, lunar phases, seasons, astrobiology, and cosmology. The effectiveness of instructional methods is now being tested systematically, taking data beyond the anecdotal with powerful research designs and statistical analyses. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-methods approaches have found their places in the researcher's toolbox. In all cases, the connection between the research performed and its effect on classroom instruction is largely lacking.

Bailey, Janelle M.; Slater, Timothy F.

351

Qualitative Research in Counseling Psychology: A Primer on Research Paradigms and Philosophy of Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an overview of philosophy of science and research paradigms. The philosophy of science parameters of ontology, epistemology, axiology, rhetorical structure, and methodology are discussed across the research paradigms of positivism, postpositivism, constructivism-interpretivism, and the critical-ideological perspective.…

Ponterotto, Joseph G.

2005-01-01

352

Grievances: A Review of Research and Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviewed behavioral and industrial relations literature on grievances, and raised serious methodological, theoretical, and ethical questions. Given existing threats to traditional grievance systems, basic research, especially program evaluation, on proposed structural and behavior variants of grievance procedures is necessary. (JAC)

Gordon, Michael E.; Miller, Sandra J.

1984-01-01

353

Children and Nuclear War. Reviews of Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research on children's and adolescents' knowledge, feelings, and fears about nuclear war. Offers suggestions for teachers who wish to address children's and adolescents' concerns about nuclear war. (Author/BB)

Wallinga, Charlotte; And Others

1991-01-01

354

KTH-Sustainable Research Review  

E-print Network

to developing the SD research agenda at KTH. Create lighthouse projects and roadmaps · A key integrating is multi-disciplinary `lighthouse projects'. These bring research- ers together to deliver new knowledge that offers the potential to unlock new levels of system per- formance. · When creating lighthouse projects

Lagergren, Jens

355

Factors influencing recruitment to research: qualitative study of the experiences and perceptions of research teams  

PubMed Central

Background Recruiting the required number of participants is vital to the success of clinical research and yet many studies fail to achieve their expected recruitment rate. Increasing research participation is a key agenda within the NHS and elsewhere, but the optimal methods of improving recruitment to clinical research remain elusive. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that researchers perceive as influential in the recruitment of participants to clinically focused research. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 individuals from three clinical research teams based in London. Sampling was a combination of convenience and purposive. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using the framework method to identify key themes. Results Four themes were identified as influential to recruitment: infrastructure, nature of the research, recruiter characteristics and participant characteristics. The main reason individuals participate in clinical research was believed to be altruism, while logistical issues were considered important for those who declined. Suggestions to improve recruitment included reducing participant burden, providing support for individuals who do not speak English, and forming collaborations with primary care to improve the identification of, and access to, potentially eligible participants. Conclusions Recruiting the target number of research participants was perceived as difficult, especially for clinical trials. New and diverse strategies to ensure that all potentially eligible patients are invited to participate may be beneficial and require further exploration in different settings. Establishing integrated clinical and academic teams with shared responsibilities for recruitment may also facilitate this process. Language barriers and long journey times were considered negative influences to recruitment; although more prominent, these issues are not unique to London and are likely to be important influences in other locations. PMID:24456229

2014-01-01

356

Pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents: a qualitative review.  

PubMed

We present the results of a systematic review on the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sixty-four studies fulfilled the selection criteria, being the most of them focused in SSRI and Clomipramine. The trials on augmentation strategies and third line monotherapies are scarce, being the majority open-trials and case series. Similarly, studies on combined treatment (psychological and pharmacological) are few; furthermore this is a relevant future research line. It is also remarkable the lack of quasi-experimental and experimental comparison studies and the long-term follow-up measures. PMID:23803803

Rosa-Alcázar, Ana I; Iniesta-Sepúlveda, Marina; Rosa-Alcázar, Angel

2013-01-01

357

Understanding Authority in Classrooms: A Review of Theory, Ideology, and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Authority is a fundamental, problematic, and poorly understood component of classroom life. A better understanding of classroom authority can be achieved by reviewing writings on social theory, educational ideology, and qualitative research in schools. Social theories provide important analytical tools for examining the constitutive elements of…

Pace, Judith L.; Hemmings, Annette

2007-01-01

358

Pursuing Quality Evidence: Applying Single-Subject Quality Indicators to Non-Experimental Qualitative Educational Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need for quality evidence in support of strategies used while working with persons with autism and intellectual disability (ID) has been long been recognized by researchers and practitioners. The authors reviewed and applied a number of evidence-based indicators, developed through the "What Works Clearinghouse" (WWC), to the conduct…

Stodden, Robert A.; Yamamoto, Kathryn K.; Folk, Eric; Kong, Eran; Otsuji, Derek N.

2013-01-01

359

Research review for information management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of RICIS research in information management is to apply currently available technology to existing problems in information management. Research projects include the following: the Space Business Research Center (SBRC), the Management Information and Decision Support Environment (MIDSE), and the investigation of visual interface technology. Several additional projects issued reports. New projects include the following: (1) the AdaNET project to develop a technology transfer network for software engineering and the Ada programming language; and (2) work on designing a communication system for the Space Station Project Office at JSC. The central aim of all projects is to use information technology to help people work more productively.

Bishop, Peter C.

1988-01-01

360

Research using qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods and choice based on the research.  

PubMed

Research is fundamental to the advancement of medicine and critical to identifying the most optimal therapies unique to particular societies. This is easily observed through the dynamics associated with pharmacology, surgical technique and the medical equipment used today versus short years ago. Advancements in knowledge synthesis and reporting guidelines enhance the quality, scope and applicability of results; thus, improving health science and clinical practice and advancing health policy. While advancements are critical to the progression of optimal health care, the high cost associated with these endeavors cannot be ignored. Research fundamentally needs to be evaluated to identify the most efficient methods of evaluation. The primary objective of this paper is to look at a specific research methodology when applied to the area of clinical research, especially extracorporeal circulation and its prognosis for the future. PMID:25378417

McCusker, K; Gunaydin, S

2014-11-01

361

Bracketing as a skill in conducting unstructured qualitative interviews.  

PubMed

Aim To provide an overview of bracketing as a skill in unstructured qualitative research interviews. Background Researchers affect the qualitative research process. Bracketing in descriptive phenomenology entails researchers setting aside their pre-understanding and acting non-judgementally. In interpretative phenomenology, previous knowledge is used intentionally to create new understanding. Data sources A literature search of bracketing in phenomenology and qualitative research. Review methods This is a methodology paper examining the researchers' impact in creating data in creating data in qualitative research. Discussion Self-knowledge, sensitivity and reflexivity of the researcher enable bracketing. Conclusion Skilled and experienced researchers are needed to use bracketing in unstructured qualitative research interviews. Implications for research/practice Bracketing adds scientific rigour and validity to any qualitative study. PMID:25783146

Sorsa, Minna Anneli; Kiikkala, Irma; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

2015-03-01

362

Review of Research: Neuroscience and Reading--A Review for Reading Education Researchers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this review, we lay the groundwork for an interdisciplinary conversation between literacy education research and relevant neuroscience research. We review recent neuroscience research on correlates of proposed cognitive subprocesses in text decoding and reading comprehension and analyze some of the methodological and conceptual challenges of…

Hruby, George G.; Goswami, Usha

2011-01-01

363

34 CFR 97.109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-07-01 false IRB review of research. 97.109 Section 97.109 Education...Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review and...

2014-07-01

364

34 CFR 97.109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false IRB review of research. 97.109 Section 97.109 Education...Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review and...

2013-07-01

365

34 CFR 97.109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 false IRB review of research. 97.109 Section 97.109 Education...Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review and...

2012-07-01

366

34 CFR 97.109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 false IRB review of research. 97.109 Section 97.109 Education...Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review and...

2011-07-01

367

34 CFR 97.109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false IRB review of research. 97.109 Section 97.109 Education...Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review and...

2010-07-01

368

Blogging as a Viable Research Methodology for Young People With Arthritis: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background The development of services that are responsive to the needs of users is a health policy priority. Finding ways of engaging young people in research to gain insights into their particular experiences, perspectives, and needs is vital but challenging. These data are critical to improving services in ways that meet the needs of young people. Objective Our aim was to evaluate Web-based blogging as a viable method for understanding the daily experiences and condition management strategies of young people with juvenile arthritis. Methods To meet the objectives of the study, a qualitative approach was required to gather information on the experiences and perspectives of young people regarding the management of their condition and its daily impact. In collaboration with a group of young people with arthritis, a custom website was developed. This website provided the opportunity for young people (aged 11-19) with arthritis from a United Kingdom pediatric hospital to contribute blogs. It was designed so that young people were free to write about whatever was important to them, but the site also included some structure and prompts to facilitate the writing of blogs. Qualitative analytical procedures were employed, supported by NVivo software. Results Engagement in the study by young people was variable in terms of their participation rates, frequency of website visits, and the length of their blogs. Young people used the site in different ways, some responding to the website categories and prompts that the team created, while others used it as a diary to record their experiences and thoughts. In line with principles of qualitative inquiry, the data collection was participant-led. Young people were in control of what, how much, and how often they wrote. However, some young people expressed difficulty regarding knowing what they should blog about. For a number of reasons, discussed here, the blogs may also not be fully reflective of experiences and perspectives of the participants. However, the data obtained provided insights into young people’s experiences of living with arthritis and their use of medicines in the context of their daily lives. Conclusions Web-based research with young people presents opportunities and challenges for researchers. Web-based blogging methodology has the potential to give young people and parents the space and empowerment to express their own ideas and concerns. However, this project suggests that it might not be the best way to engage a large diverse group of young people and might most effectively be combined with other approaches. Despite these limitations, the study provided valuable data about the experience and impact of living with a long-term condition from the perspectives of young people with arthritis. PMID:25749691

Gray, Nicola J; Smith, Felicity J; McDonagh, Janet E

2015-01-01

369

Video Elicitation Interviews: A Qualitative Research Method for Investigating Physician-Patient Interactions  

PubMed Central

We describe the concept and method of video elicitation interviews and provide practical guidance for primary care researchers who want to use this qualitative method to investigate physician-patient interactions. During video elicitation interviews, researchers interview patients or physicians about a recent clinical interaction using a video recording of that interaction as an elicitation tool. Video elicitation is useful because it allows researchers to integrate data about the content of physician-patient interactions gained from video recordings with data about participants’ associated thoughts, beliefs, and emotions gained from elicitation interviews. This method also facilitates investigation of specific events or moments during interactions. Video elicitation interviews are logistically demanding and time consuming, and they should be reserved for research questions that cannot be fully addressed using either standard interviews or video recordings in isolation. As many components of primary care fall into this category, high-quality video elicitation interviews can be an important method for understanding and improving physician-patient interactions in primary care. PMID:22412003

Henry, Stephen G.; Fetters, Michael D.

2012-01-01

370

Stakeholders understanding of the concept of benefit sharing in health research in Kenya: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background The concept of benefit sharing to enhance the social value of global health research in resource poor settings is now a key strategy for addressing moral issues of relevance to individuals, communities and host countries in resource poor settings when they participate in international collaborative health research. The influence of benefit sharing framework on the conduct of collaborative health research is for instance evidenced by the number of publications and research ethics guidelines that require prior engagement between stakeholders to determine the social value of research to the host communities. While such efforts as the production of international guidance on how to promote the social value of research through such strategies as benefit sharing have been made, the extent to which these ideas and guidelines have been absorbed by those engaged in global health research especially in resource poor settings remains unclear. We examine this awareness among stakeholders involved in health related research in Kenya. Methods We conducted in-depth interviews with key informants drawn from within the broader health research system in Kenya including researchers from the mainstream health research institutions, networks and universities, teaching hospitals, policy makers, institutional review boards, civil society organisations and community representative groups. Results Our study suggests that although people have a sense of justice and the moral aspects of research, this was not articulated in terms used in the literature and the guidelines on the ethics of global health research. Conclusion This study demonstrates that while in theory several efforts can be made to address the moral issues of concern to research participants and their communities in resource poor settings, quick fixes such as benefit sharing are not going to be straightforward. We suggest a need to pay closer attention to the processes through which ethical principles are enacted in practice and distil lessons on how best to involve individuals and communities in promoting ethical conduct of global health research in resource poor settings. PMID:21961798

2011-01-01

371

Interdisciplinary Doctoral Research Supervision: A Scoping Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This scoping literature review examines the topic of interdisciplinary doctoral research supervision. Interdisciplinary doctoral research programs are expanding in response to encouragement from funding agencies and enthusiasm from faculty and students. In an acknowledgement that the search for creative and innovative solutions to complex problems…

Vanstone, Meredith; Hibbert, Kathy; Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; McKenzie, Pam; Pitman, Allan; Lingard, Lorelei

2013-01-01

372

Research Review: The Specialized Business Press.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews scholarly research (from journalism, communication, business, and the humanities) on the specialized business press. Notes the lack of theory building and ties across disciplines, and anticipates that new advances in CD-ROM technology may increase research into the field as well as strengthen ties across disciplines. (SR)

Endres, Kathleen L.

1994-01-01

373

Research Review: City and Regional Magazines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that city magazines have vast unexplored potential as agenda setters, investigative reporters, and advocates of improved cities. Traces the historical development of city magazines, reviews the limited research in the field, and suggests research approaches that the magazines could use to expand their services to readers, advertisers,…

Hynds, Ernest C.

1994-01-01

374

A Research Review of E-Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of e-assessment in higher education is a relatively new educational practice that has been more frequently studied in recent years. This review aims to summarise some research on e-assessment, providing an overview based on articles from three well-established scientific journals. Focusing on research topics, settings for e-assessment and…

Stodberg, Ulf

2012-01-01

375

Trajectory to a first episode of psychosis: a qualitative research study with families  

PubMed Central

Aim The trajectory in psychotic disorders which leads from a relatively normal premorbid state in young people to a first episode of psychosis is only partly understood. Qualitative research methods can be used to begin to elucidate the temporal unfolding of symptoms leading to a first episode of psychosis, and its impact on families. Methods We conducted open-ended interviews with family members of 13 patients with recent onset non-affective psychotic disorders, which focused on changes observed, effects on the family, explanatory models, help-seeking patterns and future expectations. Standard data analytic methods employed for qualitative research were used. Results Narratives by family members were remarkably similar. First, social withdrawal and mood symptoms developed in previously normal children; these changes were typically ascribed to drugs or stress, or to the ‘storminess’ of adolescence. Coping strategies by family members included prayer and reasoning/persuasion with the young person, and family initially sought help from friends and religious leaders. Entry into the mental health system was then catalysed by the emergence of overt symptoms, such as ‘hearing voices’, or violent or bizarre behaviour. Family members perceived inpatient hospitalization as traumatic or difficult, and had diminished expectations for the future. Conclusions Understanding families’ explanatory models for symptoms and behavioural changes, and their related patterns of help-seeking, may be useful for understanding evolution of psychosis and for the design of early intervention programmes. Dissatisfaction with hospitalization supports the mandate to improve systems of care for recent-onset psychosis patients, including destigmatization and a focus on recovery. PMID:19129931

Corcoran, Cheryl; Gerson, Ruth; Sills-Shahar, Rachel; Nickou, Connie; McGlashan, Thomas; Malaspina, Dolores; Davidson, Larry

2008-01-01

376

Perceptions of Drinking among Hispanic College Students: How Qualitative Research Can Inform the Development of Collegiate Alcohol Abuse Prevention Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alcohol abuse on college campuses continues to be a significant public health issue and health promotion strategies are being directed at changing the culture of collegiate drinking. From a qualitative research perspective such efforts remain uniformed since this area of research is currently dominated by large-scale surveys that illuminate little…

Quintero, Gilbert A.; Young, Kathleen J.; Mier, Nelda; Jenks, Shepard, Jr.

2005-01-01

377

"What a Long, Strange Trip It's Been...": Twenty-Five Years of Qualitative and New Paradigm Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tracking the history of qualitative research is to some extent a personal journey, reflective of the individual's own experience in the field. Many scholars participated in the ongoing dialogue around the shift from a solely positivist model of research to a multiple-models context. There still remain some philosophical and practical problems,…

Lincoln, Yvonna S.

2010-01-01

378

Using Culture-Centered Qualitative Formative Research to Design Broadcast Messages for HIV Prevention for African American Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need for formative research in designing mass media health-education messages is widely accepted; however, distinct methodologies for developing such messages are less well documented. This article describes a culture-centered approach for developing messages to promote sexual risk reduction in urban African American adolescents. The method uses qualitative formative research to identify “competing narratives” that support healthy behavior despite the

Jennifer R. Horner; Daniel Romer; Peter A. Vanable; Laura F. Salazar; Michael P. Carey; Ivan Juzang; Thierry Fortune; Ralph DiClemente; Naomi Farber; Bonita Stanton; Robert F. Valois

2008-01-01

379

Determinants of fruit and vegetable consumption among children and adolescents: a review of the literature. Part II: qualitative studies  

PubMed Central

Background Large proportions of children do not fulfil the World Health Organization recommendation of eating at least 400 grams of fruit and vegetables (FV) per day. To promote an increased FV intake among children it is important to identify factors which influence their consumption. Both qualitative and quantitative studies are needed. Earlier reviews have analysed evidence from quantitative studies. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic review of qualitative studies of determinants of children's FV intake. Methods Relevant studies were identified by searching Anthropology Plus, Cinahl, CSA illumine, Embase, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Medline, PsycINFO, and Web of Science using combinations of synonyms for FV intake, children/adolescents and qualitative methods as search terms. The literature search was completed by December 1st 2010. Papers were included if they applied qualitative methods to investigate 6-18-year-olds' perceptions of factors influencing their FV consumption. Quantitative studies, review studies, studies reported in other languages than English, and non-peer reviewed or unpublished manuscripts were excluded. The papers were reviewed systematically using standardised templates for summary of papers, quality assessment, and synthesis of findings across papers. Results The review included 31 studies, mostly based on US populations and focus group discussions. The synthesis identified the following potential determinants for FV intake which supplement the quantitative knowledge base: Time costs; lack of taste guarantee; satiety value; appropriate time/occasions/settings for eating FV; sensory and physical aspects; variety, visibility, methods of preparation; access to unhealthy food; the symbolic value of food for image, gender identity and social interaction with peers; short term outcome expectancies. Conclusions The review highlights numerous potential determinants which have not been investigated thoroughly in quantitative studies. Future large scale quantitative studies should attempt to quantify the importance of these factors. Further, mechanisms behind gender, age and socioeconomic differences in FV consumption are proposed which should be tested quantitatively in order to better tailor interventions to vulnerable groups. Finally, the review provides input to the conceptualisation and measurements of concepts (i.e. peer influence, availability in schools) which may refine survey instruments and theoretical frameworks concerning eating behaviours. PMID:21999291

2011-01-01

380

Understanding of Factors that Enable Health Promoters in Implementing Health-Promoting Schools: A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of Qualitative Evidence  

PubMed Central

Health-promoting schools have been regarded as an important initiative in promoting child and adolescent health in school settings using the whole-school approach. Quantitative research has proved its effectiveness in various school-based programmes. However, few qualitative studies have been conducted to investigate the strategies used by health promoters to implement such initiatives. In this study, the researchers conducted a systematic review and narrative synthesis of the qualitative literature to identify important enablers assisting the implementation of health-promoting schools from the perspectives of health promoters. Five enablers have been identified from the review: (a) Following a framework/guideline to implement health-promoting schools; (b) Obtaining committed support and contributions from the school staff, school board management, government authorities, health agencies and other stakeholders; (c) Adopting a multidisciplinary, collaborative approach to implementing HPS; (d) Establishing professional networks and relationships; and (e) Continuing training and education in school health promotion. This highlights the importance of developing school health policies that meet local health needs, and socio-cultural characteristics that can foster mutual understanding between the health and education sectors so as to foster health promotion in children and adolescents. PMID:25264789

Hung, Tommy Tsz Man; Chiang, Vico Chung Lim; Dawson, Angela; Lee, Regina Lai Tong

2014-01-01

381

IACUC Review of Nonhuman Primate Research  

PubMed Central

This article will detail some of the issues that must be considered as institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) review the use of nonhuman primates (NHPs) in research. As large, intelligent, social, long-lived, and non-domesticated animals, monkeys are amongst the most challenging species used in biomedical research and the duties of the IACUC in relation to reviewing research use of these species can also be challenging. Issues of specific concern for review of NHP research protocols that are discussed in this article include scientific justification, reuse, social housing requirements, amelioration of distress, surgical procedures, and humane endpoints. Clear institutional policies and procedures as regards NHP in these areas are critical, and the discussion of these issues presented here can serve as a basis for the informed establishment of such policies and procedures. PMID:24174445

Tardif, Suzette D.; Coleman, Kristine; Hobbs, Theodore R.; Lutz, Corrine

2013-01-01

382

Qualitative Analysis of the Interdisciplinary Interaction between Data Analysis Specialists and Novice Clinical Researchers  

PubMed Central

Background The inherent complexity of statistical methods and clinical phenomena compel researchers with diverse domains of expertise to work in interdisciplinary teams, where none of them have a complete knowledge in their counterpart's field. As a result, knowledge exchange may often be characterized by miscommunication leading to misinterpretation, ultimately resulting in errors in research and even clinical practice. Though communication has a central role in interdisciplinary collaboration and since miscommunication can have a negative impact on research processes, to the best of our knowledge, no study has yet explored how data analysis specialists and clinical researchers communicate over time. Methods/Principal Findings We conducted qualitative analysis of encounters between clinical researchers and data analysis specialists (epidemiologist, clinical epidemiologist, and data mining specialist). These encounters were recorded and systematically analyzed using a grounded theory methodology for extraction of emerging themes, followed by data triangulation and analysis of negative cases for validation. A policy analysis was then performed using a system dynamics methodology looking for potential interventions to improve this process. Four major emerging themes were found. Definitions using lay language were frequently employed as a way to bridge the language gap between the specialties. Thought experiments presented a series of “what if” situations that helped clarify how the method or information from the other field would behave, if exposed to alternative situations, ultimately aiding in explaining their main objective. Metaphors and analogies were used to translate concepts across fields, from the unfamiliar to the familiar. Prolepsis was used to anticipate study outcomes, thus helping specialists understand the current context based on an understanding of their final goal. Conclusion/Significance The communication between clinical researchers and data analysis specialists presents multiple challenges that can lead to errors. PMID:20195374

Zammar, Guilherme Roberto; Shah, Jatin; Bonilauri Ferreira, Ana Paula; Cofiel, Luciana; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Pietrobon, Ricardo

2010-01-01

383

Global health research in narrative: a qualitative look at the FICRS-F experience.  

PubMed

For American professional and graduate health sciences trainees, a mentored fellowship in a low- or middle-income country (LMIC) can be a transformative experience of personal growth and scientific discovery. We invited 86 American trainees in the Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholars and Fellows Program and Fulbright-Fogarty Fellowship 2011-2012 cohorts to contribute personal essays about formative experiences from their fellowships. Nine trainees contributed essays that were analyzed using an inductive approach. The most frequently addressed themes were the strong continuity of research and infrastructure at Fogarty fellowship sites, the time-limited nature of this international fellowship experience, and the ways in which this fellowship period was important for shaping future career planning. Trainees also addressed interaction with host communities vis-à-vis engagement in project implementation. These qualitative essays have contributed insights on how a 1-year mentored LMIC-based research training experience can influence professional development, complementing conventional evaluations. Full text of the essays is available at http://fogartyscholars.org/. PMID:25246694

Bearnot, Benjamin; Coria, Alexandra; Barnett, Brian Scott; Clark, Eva H; Gartland, Matthew G; Jaganath, Devan; Mendenhall, Emily; Seu, Lillian; Worjoloh, Ayaba G; Carothers, Catherine Lem; Vermund, Sten H; Heimburger, Douglas C

2014-11-01

384

Being a Parent with a Learning Disability: A Qualitative Study   

E-print Network

This research portfolio aims to further explore the issues faced by parents with a learning disability. Firstly, a systematic review of qualitative research into the social support of parents with a learning disability ...

Shewan, Laura

2011-01-01

385

Gabapentin and postoperative pain: a qualitative and quantitative systematic review, with focus on procedure  

PubMed Central

Background Gabapentin is an antiepileptic drug used in a variety of chronic pain conditions. Increasing numbers of randomized trials indicate that gabapentin is effective as a postoperative analgesic. This procedure-specific systematic review aims to analyse the 24-hour postoperative effect of gabapentin on acute pain in adults. Methods Medline, The Cochrane Library and Google Scholar were searched for double-blind randomized placebo controlled trials of gabapentin for postoperative pain relief compared with placebo, in adults undergoing a surgical procedure. Qualitative analysis of postoperative effectiveness was evaluated by assessment of significant difference (P < 0.05) in pain relief using consumption of supplemental analgesic and pain scores between study groups. Quantitative analyses of combined data from similar procedures, were performed by calculating the weighted mean difference (WMD) of 24-hour cumulated opioid requirements, and the WMD for visual analogue scale (VAS) pain, (early (6 h) and late (24 h) postoperatively), between study groups. Side-effects (nausea, vomiting, dizziness and sedation) were extracted for calculation of their relative risk (RR). Results Twenty-three trials with 1529 patients were included. In 12 of 16 studies with data on postoperative opioid requirement, the reported 24-hour opioid consumption was significantly reduced with gabapentin. Quantitative analysis of five trials in abdominal hysterectomy showed a significant reduction in morphine consumption (WMD – 13 mg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -19 to -8 mg), and in early pain scores at rest (WMD – 11 mm on the VAS, 95% CI -12 to -2 mm) and during activity (WMD -8 mm on the VAS; 95% CI -13 to -3 mm), favouring gabapentin. In spinal surgery, (4 trials), analyses demonstrated a significant reduction in morphine consumption (WMD of – 31 mg (95%CI – 53 to -10 mg) and pain scores, early (WMD – 17 mm on the VAS; 95 % CI -31 to -3 mm) and late (WMD -12 mm on the VAS; 95% CI -23 to -1 mm) also favouring gabapentin treatment. Nausea was improved with gabapentin in abdominal hysterectomy (RR 0.7; 95 % CI 0.5 to 0.9). Other side-effects were unaffected. Conclusion Perioperative use of gabapentin has a significant 24-hour opioid sparing effect and improves pain score for both abdominal hysterectomy and spinal surgery. Nausea may be reduced in abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:17617920

Mathiesen, Ole; Møiniche, Steen; Dahl, Jørgen B

2007-01-01

386

Pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based treatment in PTSD: a qualitative review  

PubMed Central

There is a good amount of evidence that exposure therapy is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Notwithstanding its efficacy, there is room for improvement, since a large proportion of patients does not benefit from treatment. Recently, an interesting new direction in the improvement of exposure therapy efficacy for PTSD emerged. Basic research found evidence of the pharmacological enhancement of the underlying learning and memory processes of exposure therapy. The current review aims to give an overview of clinical studies on pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based treatment for PTSD. The working mechanisms, efficacy studies in PTSD patients, and clinical utility of four different pharmacological enhancers will be discussed: d-cycloserine, MDMA, hydrocortisone, and propranolol. PMID:24147208

de Kleine, Rianne A.; Rothbaum, Barbara O.; van Minnen, Agnes

2013-01-01

387

Managing lifestyle change to reduce coronary risk: a synthesis of qualitative research on peoples’ experiences  

PubMed Central

Background Coronary heart disease is an incurable condition. The only approach known to slow its progression is healthy lifestyle change and concordance with cardio-protective medicines. Few people fully succeed in these daily activities so potential health improvements are not fully realised. Little is known about peoples’ experiences of managing lifestyle change. The aim of this study was to synthesise qualitative research to explain how participants make lifestyle change after a cardiac event and explore this within the wider illness experience. Methods A qualitative synthesis was conducted drawing upon the principles of meta-ethnography. Qualitative studies were identified through a systematic search of 7 databases using explicit criteria. Key concepts were identified and translated across studies. Findings were discussed and diagrammed during a series of audiotaped meetings. Results The final synthesis is grounded in findings from 27 studies, with over 500 participants (56% male) across 8 countries. All participants experienced a change in their self-identity from what was ‘familiar’ to ‘unfamiliar’. The transition process involved ‘finding new limits and a life worth living’?, ‘finding support for self’ and ‘finding a new normal’. Analyses of these concepts led to the generation of a third order construct, namely an ongoing process of ‘reassessing past, present and future lives’ as participants considered their changed identity. Participants experienced a strong urge to get back to ‘normal’. Support from family and friends could enable or constrain life change and lifestyle changes. Lifestyle change was but one small part of a wider ‘life’ change that occurred. Conclusions The final synthesis presents an interpretation, not evident in the primary studies, of a person-centred model to explain how lifestyle change is situated within ‘wider’ life changes. The magnitude of individual responses to a changed health status varied. Participants experienced distress as their notion of self identity shifted and emotions that reflected the various stages of the grief process were evident in participants’ accounts. The process of self-managing lifestyle took place through experiential learning; the level of engagement with lifestyle change reflected an individual’s unique view of the balance needed to manage ‘realistic change’ whilst leading to a life that was perceived as ‘worth living’. Findings highlight the importance of providing person centred care that aligns with both psychological and physical dimensions of recovery which are inextricably linked. PMID:25097066

2014-01-01

388

Review of research on structureborne noise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Publications on the topic of structureborne noise are reviewed. Recent accomplishments, including representative results, are presented for aircraft, rotorcraft, space structures, automotive vehicles, ship and building technology. Special attention is given to propeller-driven aircraft. This review demonstrates that substantial progress has been made in understanding the characteristics of structureborne noise. Possible future research efforts and development of technology for control of structureborne noise are discussed.

Vaicaitis, R.; Mixson, J. S.

1985-01-01

389

Factors Influencing Household Uptake of Improved Solid Fuel Stoves in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Qualitative Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Household burning of solid fuels in traditional stoves is detrimental to health, the environment and development. A range of improved solid fuel stoves (IS) are available but little is known about successful approaches to dissemination. This qualitative systematic review aimed to identify factors that influence household uptake of IS in low- and middle-income countries. Extensive searches were carried out and studies were screened and extracted using established systematic review methods. Fourteen qualitative studies from Asia, Africa and Latin-America met the inclusion criteria. Thematic synthesis was used to synthesise data and findings are presented under seven framework domains. Findings relate to user and stakeholder perceptions and highlight the importance of cost, good stove design, fuel and time savings, health benefits, being able to cook traditional dishes and cleanliness in relation to uptake. Creating demand, appropriate approaches to business, and community involvement, are also discussed. Achieving and sustaining uptake is complex and requires consideration of a broad range of factors, which operate at household, community, regional and national levels. Initiatives aimed at IS scale up should include quantitative evaluations of effectiveness, supplemented with qualitative studies to assess factors affecting uptake, with an equity focus. PMID:25123070

Debbi, Stanistreet; Elisa, Puzzolo; Nigel, Bruce; Dan, Pope; Eva, Rehfuess

2014-01-01

390

The experiences of commercial kidney donors: thematic synthesis of qualitative research.  

PubMed

Commercial transplantation has expanded because of the shortage of kidneys for transplantation. This study aims to synthesize qualitative studies on the experiences and perspectives of living commercial kidney donors. We conducted a comprehensive literature search in electronic databases to April 2011 and consulted experts to identify unpublished studies. Thematic synthesis was used to analyze the findings. Seven studies involving over 676 commercial kidney donors were included. Three major themes were identified: desperation (the participants' decision to sell their kidney was forced by poverty, debt, or to fulfill a family obligation); despair (destroyed body integrity, shame and secrecy, dehumanized and dispirited, loss of livelihood, heightened sense of vulnerability, disappointment, and regret); and debasement (deception by brokers and recipients, victimized by the hospital, stigmatized by community, and rejected by family). Commercial kidney transplantation is reported to result in ramifications for the donors' mental, physical, and social well-being. Not only do they remain in poverty, they lose dignity, sense of purpose, respect, relationships, and livelihood. Review of this published literature supports the need for effective implementation of the WHO guiding principles and legislated regulation to deter potential recipients and healthcare providers from pursuing commercial transplantation. PMID:22830975

Tong, Allison; Chapman, Jeremy R; Wong, Germaine; Cross, Nicholas B; Batabyal, Pikli; Craig, Jonathan C

2012-11-01

391

Suffering, silence, and status: the importance and challenges of qualitative research on AIDS orphanhood.  

PubMed

Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork with Ugandan children affected by AIDS conducted from 2007 to 2014, this report summarizes findings of a study conducted to better understand the ways children experience orphanhood at the hands of HIV/AIDS. Three crucial, interrelated concepts emerged: suffering, silence, and status. This study explored the social context of AIDS orphanhood as both a cause of social suffering and a context for the suffering of individual children. Though problematic, silence about suffering is often due to continuing HIV/AIDS stigma in Uganda that makes one's status unspeakable, in spite of the adverse effect this has on the social order and efforts to eradicate the disease. Approaching silence as a distinct form of communication rather than an absence of it, the report considers silence's intergenerational functions, its detriments, and its consolations, in the context of HIV/AIDS-affected children's lives. In doing so, it also highlights the need for more child-centered, qualitative research on AIDS' psychosocial effects on children, despite the challenges of doing such research. PMID:25297723

Cheney, Kristen E

2015-01-01

392

Urban metabolism: a review of research methodologies.  

PubMed

Urban metabolism analysis has become an important tool for the study of urban ecosystems. The problems of large metabolic throughput, low metabolic efficiency, and disordered metabolic processes are a major cause of unhealthy urban systems. In this paper, I summarize the international research on urban metabolism, and describe the progress that has been made in terms of research methodologies. I also review the methods used in accounting for and evaluating material and energy flows in urban metabolic processes, simulation of these flows using a network model, and practical applications of these methods. Based on this review of the literature, I propose directions for future research, and particularly the need to study the urban carbon metabolism because of the modern context of global climate change. Moreover, I recommend more research on the optimal regulation of urban metabolic systems. PMID:23619057

Zhang, Yan

2013-07-01

393

Understanding the 'four directions of travel': qualitative research into the factors affecting recruitment and retention of doctors in rural Vietnam  

PubMed Central

Background Motivation and retention of health workers, particularly in rural areas, is a question of considerable interest to policy-makers internationally. Many countries, including Vietnam, are debating the right mix of interventions to motivate doctors in particular to work in remote areas. The objective of this study was to understand the dynamics of the health labour market in Vietnam, and what might encourage doctors to accept posts and remain in-post in rural areas. Methods This study forms part of a labour market survey which was conducted in Vietnam in November 2009 to February 2010. The study had three stages. This article describes the findings of the first stage - the qualitative research and literature review, which fed into the design of a structured survey (second stage) and contingent valuation (third stage). For the qualitative research, three tools were used - key informant interviews at national and provincial level (6 respondents); in-depth interviews of doctors at district and commune levels (11 respondents); and focus group discussions with medical students (15 participants). Results The study reports on the perception of the problem by national level stakeholders; the motivation for joining the profession by doctors; their views on the different factors affecting their willingness to work in rural areas (including different income streams, working conditions, workload, equipment, support and supervision, relationships with colleagues, career development, training, and living conditions). It presents findings on their overall satisfaction, their ranking of different attributes, and willingness to accept different kinds of work. Finally, it discusses recent and possible policy interventions to address the distribution problem. Conclusions Four typical 'directions of travel' are identified for Vietnamese doctors - from lower to higher levels of the system, from rural to urban areas, from preventive to curative health and from public to private practice. Substantial differences in income from formal and informal sources all reinforce these preferences. While non-financial attributes are also important for Vietnamese doctors, the scale of the difference of opportunities presents a considerable policy challenge. Significant salary increases for doctors in hard-to-staff areas are likely to have some impact. However, addressing the differentials is likely to require broader market reforms and regulatory measures. PMID:21849045

2011-01-01

394

Qualitative content analysis in nursing research: concepts, procedures and measures to achieve trustworthiness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Qualitative content analysis as described in published literature shows conflicting opinions and unsolved issues regarding meaning and use of concepts, procedures and interpretation. This paper provides an overview of important concepts (manifest and latent content, unit of analysis, meaning unit, condensation, abstraction, content area, code, category and theme) related to qualitative content analysis; illustrates the use of concepts related to

U. H. Graneheim; B. Lundman

2004-01-01

395

Confusing Claims for Data: A Critique of Common Practices for Presenting Qualitative Research on Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We question widely accepted practices of publishing articles that present quantified analyses of qualitative data. First, articles are often published that provide only very brief excerpts of the qualitative data themselves to illustrate the coding scheme, tacitly or explicitly treating the coding results as data. Second, articles are often…

Hammer, David; Berland, Leema K.

2014-01-01

396

Rural Collaboratives: A Review of the Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alternative models of rural school improvement consortia were identified through a review of research literature in order to determine what existing models were applicable to rural school consortia in the northwest United States. Organization structure of rural school collaboratives and characteristics associated with successful functioning were…

Crohn, Leslie; Nelson, Steven R.

397

ISSN exercise & sport nutrition review: research & recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sports nutrition is a constantly evolving field with hundreds of research papers published annually. For this reason, keeping up to date with the literature is often difficult. This paper is a five year update of the sports nutrition review article published as the lead paper to launch the JISSN in 2004 and presents a well-referenced overview of the current state

Richard B Kreider; Colin D Wilborn; Lem Taylor; Bill Campbell; Anthony L Almada; Rick Collins; Mathew Cooke; Conrad P Earnest; Mike Greenwood; Douglas S Kalman; Chad M Kerksick; Susan M Kleiner; Brian Leutholtz; Hector Lopez; Lonnie M Lowery; Ron Mendel; Abbie Smith; Marie Spano; Robert Wildman; Darryn S Willoughby; Tim N Ziegenfuss; Jose Antonio

2010-01-01

398

Teacher Performance Pay: A Review. Research Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comprehensive report from the National Center on Performance Incentives reviews the history of teacher pay policy in the United States and earlier cycles of interest in merit or performance-based pay, the various critiques of its use in K-12 education, and empirical research studies that are useful in considering its likely impact. The report…

National Center on Performance Incentives, 2006

2006-01-01

399

A review of research in rotor loads  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The research accomplished in the area of rotor loads over the last 13 to 14 years is reviewed. The start of the period examined is defined by the 1973 AGARD Milan conference and the 1974 hypothetical rotor comparison. The major emphasis of the review is research performed by the U.S. Army and NASA at their laboratories and/or by the industry under government contract. For the purpose of this review, two main topics are addressed: rotor loads prediction and means of rotor loads reduction. A limited discussion of research in gust loads and maneuver loads is included. In the area of rotor loads predictions, the major problem areas are reviewed including dynamic stall, wake induced flows, blade tip effects, fuselage induced effects, blade structural modeling, hub impedance, and solution methods. It is concluded that the capability to predict rotor loads has not significantly improved in this time frame. Future progress will require more extensive correlation of measurements and predictions to better understand the causes of the problems, and a recognition that differences between theory and measurement have multiple sources, yet must be treated as a whole. There is a need for high-quality data to support future research in rotor loads, but the resulting data base must not be seen as an end in itself. It will be useful only if it is integrated into firm long-range plans for the use of the data.

Bousman, William G.; Mantay, Wayne R.

1988-01-01

400

HEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH STRATEGIC REVIEW  

E-print Network

with the Health System, Including Allied Health And Primary Health Care 17 Theme Three: Scale, Scope engagement with the health system including Allied Health and Primary Health Care 28 Scale, scopeHEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH STRATEGIC REVIEW ISSUES PAPER 29 OCTOBER 2012 #12;#12;CONTENTS The Vice

Viglas, Anastasios

401

Review of the Fusion Materials Research Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report presents the results and recommendations of the deliberations of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Panel on the Review of the Fusion Materials Research Program carried out during 1998. Metrics evaluated included evidence of recognition, publications per worker, new people attracted to the work and significance of recent accomplishments.

Harkness, Samuel D.; Baker, Charles C.; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Davis, John W.; Hogan, William; Kulcinski, Gerald L.; Mauel, Michael; McHargue, Carl; Odette, Robert; Petti, David A.; Shewmon, Paul; Zweben, Stewart J.

2000-03-01

402

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Research Review and Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on fetal alcohol syndrome is reviewed, with particular emphasis on the implications of the syndrome for the development of mental retardation and other handicapping conditions. Attention is given to historical aspects; epidemiology; physiological and behavioral characteristics; and concerns related to diagnosis, prevention, and…

Griesbach, Linda Sue; Polloway, Edward A.

403

Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Using Mind Maps to Facilitate Participant Recall in Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mind maps may provide a new means to gather unsolicited data through qualitative research designs. In this paper, I explore the utility of mind maps through a project designed to uncover the experiences of Latvians involved in a legal technical assistance project. Based on a sample of 19 respondents, the depth and detail of the responses between…

Wheeldon, Johannes

2011-01-01

404

Gender equitable boys in a gender inequitable world: Reflections from qualitative research and programme development in Rio de Janeiro  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article offers insights from a qualitative study with a group of more 'gender equitable' heterosexual young men in a low-income setting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and considers the implications for working with boys to promote gender equity, including increased attention to sexual health. Research consisted of interviews and interactions with 25 young men aged 15-21 who are more

Gary Barker

2000-01-01

405

Writing Educational Biography: Explorations in Qualitative Research. Critical Education Practice; Volume 13. Garland Reference Library of Social Science, Volume 1098.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection examines many influences of biographical inquiry in education and discusses methodological issues from the perspectives of veteran and novice biographers. The section on qualitative research and educational biography contains the following chapters: "Musings on Life Writing: Biography and Case Studies in Teacher Education" (Robert…

Kridel, Craig, Ed.

406

Qualitative Insights from a Canadian Multi-Institutional Research Study: In Search of Meaningful E-Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports the qualitative findings of a mixed methods research study conducted at three Canadian post-secondary institutions. Called the Meaningful E-learning or MEL project, the study was an exploration of the teaching and learning experiences of faculty and students as well as their perceptions of the benefits and challenges of…

Carter, Lorraine M.; Salyers, Vince; Myers, Sue; Hipfner, Carol; Hoffart, Caroline; MacLean, Christa; White, Kathy; Matus, Theresa; Forssman, Vivian; Barrett, Penelope

2014-01-01

407

Qualitative Research: A Tool To Help Future Special Educators See beyond the Labels of Their Future Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two projects in the teacher education program at Seton Hall University gave assignments involving basic qualitative research methods as applied to a focused goal of interaction between future teachers and their students. The first project focused on life in community residential programs for adults with developmental disabilities, and the second…

Szepkouski, Grace Mest; Dunn, Manina Urgolo

408

A Qualitative Study of Juvenile Offenders, Student Engagement, and Interpersonal Relationships: Implications for Research Directions and Preventionist Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background factors that correlate with juvenile delinquency are consistent across the interdisciplinary literature base. Yet, information about the process of how risks relate to outcomes, especially within school settings, is limited. Researchers used qualitative methods to examine school and interpersonal experiences from the perspective of…

Sander, Janay B.; Sharkey, Jill D.; Olivarri, Roger; Tanigawa, Diane A.; Mauseth, Tory

2010-01-01

409

Challenges of children with cancer and their mothers: A qualitative research  

PubMed Central

Background: Cancer is one of the major causes of death in children and adolescents. About 4% of deaths in children of age less than 5 years and 13% of deaths in children of age 5-15 years are due to cancer in Iranian population. The disease can cause many problems, which are usually detected by a psychologist, for the children and their mothers. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the psychological challenges of the children with cancer and their mothers’ experience. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative research conducted through thematic analysis approach. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect the data. Purposive sampling was conducted. The numbers of the children and their mothers participating in this study were 34 and 32, respectively. Results: Data analysis showed that the problems faced by children with cancer and their mothers fell into five main categories. These categories included spiritual, psychological (such as aggression, anxiety, depression), communicational problems, inadequate knowledge (about the disease, its treatment, and treatment complications), and care-related problems. Conclusions: The results showed that lack of awareness and spiritual problems were the most important problems of the patients and their mothers. If necessary knowledge about the disease and its treatment and complications is given to the children and their mothers at the time of diagnosis, and also, spiritual care interventions are administered during treatment, their psychological problems can be notably reduced. PMID:25183971

Reisi-Dehkordi, Negar; Baratian, Hajar; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

2014-01-01

410

University Research Consortium annual review meeting program  

SciTech Connect

This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

NONE

1996-07-01

411

From Qualitative Dissertation to Quality Articles: Seven Lessons Learned  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New scholars frequently face an immense challenge in writing papers for publication. Qualitative research novices, in particular, experience frustration in getting peer-reviewed papers published in top-tier journals. This article is a primer on converting a dissertation based on qualitative research into a journal article. It summarizes seven…

Bowen, Glenn A.

2010-01-01

412

Qualitative research study of high-achieving females' life experiences impacting success  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This qualitative study investigated the life experiences of five academically gifted female students in math and science in reflection of their elementary learning prior to enrollment at a prestigious science and mathematics high school. The elite high school limits admission to the state of Illinois' top students. The purpose of this study is to unfold the story of five academically gifted females in attendance at the elite high school reflecting on their life experiences in elementary school that contributed to their current academic success. Twelve female students, who at the time of this study were currently in their senior year (12th grade) of high school, were solicited from the top academic groups who are regarded by their teachers as highly successful in class. Students were selected as part of the study based on academic status, survey completion and interest in study, Caucasian and Asian ethnicity, locale of elementary school with preference given to the variety of school demographics---urban, suburban, and rural---further defined the group to the core group of five. All female participants were personally interviewed and communicated via Internet with the researcher. Parents and teachers completing surveys as well met the methodological requirements of triangulation. An emergent theme of paternal influence came from the research. Implications supported in the research drawn from this study to increase achievement of academically gifted females include: (a) proper early identification of learner strengths plays a role; (b) learning with appropriate intellectual peers is more important than learning with their age group; (c) teachers are the greatest force for excellent instruction; (d) effective teaching strategies include cooperative learning, multi-sensory learning, problem-based learning, and hands-on science; (e) rigor in math is important; (f) gender and stereotypes need not be barriers; (g) outside interests and activities are important for self-concept; (h) high parental expectations and the parental role, especially the father's role, are imperative; and (i) reading avidly was preferred over watching television. Further research is needed to verify all components and interactions of the same with a greater sample of gifted students, by extending the study to include the male counterpart and by providing additional validity to elementary instruction and the success of academically gifted students.

Butcher, Ann Patrice

2003-07-01

413

Review of Computer Mediated Communication Research for Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research review examines recent developments in computer-mediated communication (CMC) research for educational applications. The review draws on 170 recent research articles selected from 78 journals representing a wide range of disciplines. The review focuses on peer-reviewed empirical studies, but is open to a variety of methodologies. The…

Luppicini, Rocci

2007-01-01

414

Facilitating the Recruitment of Minority Ethnic People into Research: Qualitative Case Study of South Asians and Asthma  

PubMed Central

Background There is international interest in enhancing recruitment of minority ethnic people into research, particularly in disease areas with substantial ethnic inequalities. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis found that UK South Asians are at three times increased risk of hospitalisation for asthma when compared to white Europeans. US asthma trials are far more likely to report enrolling minority ethnic people into studies than those conducted in Europe. We investigated approaches to bolster recruitment of South Asians into UK asthma studies through qualitative research with US and UK researchers, and UK community leaders. Methods and Findings Interviews were conducted with 36 researchers (19 UK and 17 US) from diverse disciplinary backgrounds and ten community leaders from a range of ethnic, religious, and linguistic backgrounds, followed by self-completion questionnaires. Interviews were digitally recorded, translated where necessary, and transcribed. The Framework approach was used for analysis. Barriers to ethnic minority participation revolved around five key themes: (i) researchers' own attitudes, which ranged from empathy to antipathy to (in a minority of cases) misgivings about the scientific importance of the question under study; (ii) stereotypes and prejudices about the difficulties in engaging with minority ethnic populations; (iii) the logistical challenges posed by language, cultural differences, and research costs set against the need to demonstrate value for money; (iv) the unique contexts of the two countries; and (v) poorly developed understanding amongst some minority ethnic leaders of what research entails and aims to achieve. US researchers were considerably more positive than their UK counterparts about the importance and logistics of including ethnic minorities, which appeared to a large extent to reflect the longer-term impact of the National Institutes of Health's requirement to include minority ethnic people. Conclusions Most researchers and community leaders view the broadening of participation in research as important and are reasonably optimistic about the feasibility of recruiting South Asians into asthma studies provided that the barriers can be overcome. Suggested strategies for improving recruitment in the UK included a considerably improved support structure to provide academics with essential contextual information (e.g., languages of particular importance and contact with local gatekeepers), and the need to ensure that care is taken to engage with the minority ethnic communities in ways that are both culturally appropriate and sustainable; ensuring reciprocal benefits was seen as one key way of avoiding gatekeeper fatigue. Although voluntary measures to encourage researchers may have some impact, greater impact might be achieved if UK funding bodies followed the lead of the US National Institutes of Health requiring recruitment of ethnic minorities. Such a move is, however, likely in the short- to medium-term, to prove unpopular with many UK academics because of the added “hassle” factor in engaging with more diverse populations than many have hitherto been accustomed to. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:19823568

Sheikh, Aziz; Halani, Laila; Bhopal, Raj; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Partridge, Martyn R.; Car, Josip; Griffiths, Chris; Levy, Mark

2009-01-01

415

Veterinary World Vol.3(8): 367-368 RESEARCH Qualitative phytochemical screening of  

E-print Network

The present study was undertaken to find out the phytochemicals present in Hygrophila spinosa plant extract. Fresh leaves and aerial parts of botanically identified plant was collected and were processed for preparation of plant extract using specified technique. The plant extract was then subjected for different qualitative chemical tests to investigate the chemical profile of H. spinosa extracts. Analysis showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds and tannins in the extact as confirmed by implying different qualitative tests specified for these phytochemicals.

G. K. Dutta; S. Nath

416

A qualitative review of study behaviour before and during the first year of engineering studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of the study behaviour of first-year Engineering students was undertaken in order to investigate two sets of influencing factors. The first part of the study reviewed these students' selfreported retrospective study behaviour in the context of secondary school Science, while the second part focused on their approaches to the study of Applied Mechanics as a core undergraduate degree

Alan Cliff

1995-01-01

417

Learning effects of thematic peer-review: A qualitative analysis of reflective journals on spiritual care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the learning effects of thematic peer-review discussion groups (Hendriksen, 2000. Begeleid intervisie model, Collegiale advisering en probleemoplossing, Nelissen, Baarn.) on developing nursing students’ competence in providing spiritual care. It also discusses the factors that might influence the learning process. The method of peer-review is a form of reflective learning based on the theory of experiential learning (Kolb,

René van Leeuwen; Lucas J. Tiesinga; Henk Jochemsen; Doeke Post

2009-01-01

418

A qualitative systematic review of older persons' perceptions of health, ill health, and their community health care needs.  

PubMed

The aim of this qualitative systematic review was to report a synthesis of older persons' perceptions of health, ill health, and their community health care needs. The review questions were what characterizes older persons' perceptions of health and ill health? and what are their community health care needs? Ten studies were identified in a systematic search for relevant qualitative papers published between January 2000 and January 2013 in the following electronic databases: PubMed, EBSCOhost/Academic Search Premier, and CINAHL. Publications were evaluated for quality, and a thematic analysis was performed. Two main themes were interpreted on a higher level: reconciliation with how life has become: and desire to regain their identity and sense of self-worth despite disability. Two themes emerged: creating meaning led to the experience of being valued in health care and society and a mental struggle to regain independence with the help of caregivers. Of special interest is the finding of perceptions related to the fear of becoming dependent on caregivers as well as the sorrow and pain caused by encountering caregivers who did not understand their desire to create meaning in their lives or their struggle for autonomy and independency. PMID:23738062

Holm, Anne Lise; Severinsson, Elisabeth

2013-01-01

419

Public perceptions of non-pharmaceutical interventions for reducing transmission of respiratory infection: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies  

PubMed Central

Background Non-pharmaceutical public health interventions may provide simple, low-cost, effective ways of minimising the transmission and impact of acute respiratory infections in pandemic and non-pandemic contexts. Understanding what influences the uptake of non-pharmaceutical interventions such as hand and respiratory hygiene, mask wearing and social distancing could help to inform the development of effective public health advice messages. The aim of this synthesis was to explore public perceptions of non-pharmaceutical interventions that aim to reduce the transmission of acute respiratory infections. Methods Five online databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE and Web of Science) were systematically searched. Reference lists of articles were also examined. We selected papers that used a qualitative research design to explore perceptions and beliefs about non-pharmaceutical interventions to reduce transmission of acute respiratory infections. We excluded papers that only explored how health professionals or children viewed non-pharmaceutical respiratory infection control. Three authors performed data extraction and assessment of study quality. Thematic analysis and components of meta-ethnography were adopted to synthesise findings. Results Seventeen articles from 16 studies in 9 countries were identified and reviewed. Seven key themes were identified: perceived benefits of non-pharmaceutical interventions, perceived disadvantages of non-pharmaceutical interventions, personal and cultural beliefs about infection transmission, diagnostic uncertainty in emerging respiratory infections, perceived vulnerability to infection, anxiety about emerging respiratory infections and communications about emerging respiratory infections. The synthesis showed that some aspects of non-pharmaceutical respiratory infection control (particularly hand and respiratory hygiene) were viewed as familiar and socially responsible actions to take. There was ambivalence about adopting isolation and personal distancing behaviours in some contexts due to their perceived adverse impact and potential to attract social stigma. Common perceived barriers included beliefs about infection transmission, personal vulnerability to respiratory infection and concerns about self-diagnosis in emerging respiratory infections. Conclusions People actively evaluate non-pharmaceutical interventions in terms of their perceived necessity, efficacy, acceptability, and feasibility. To enhance uptake, it will be necessary to address key barriers, such as beliefs about infection transmission, rejection of personal risk of infection and concern about the potential costs and stigma associated with some interventions. PMID:24920395

2014-01-01

420

Procedures of recruiting, obtaining informed consent, and compensating research participants in Qatar: findings from a qualitative investigation  

PubMed Central

Background Very few researchers have reported on procedures of recruiting, obtaining informed consent, and compensating participants in health research in the Arabian Gulf Region. Empirical research can inform the debate about whether to adjust these procedures for culturally diverse settings. Our objective was to delineate procedures related to recruiting, obtaining informed consent, and compensating health research participants in the extremely high-density multicultural setting of Qatar. Methods During a multistage mixed methods project, field observations and qualitative interviews were conducted in a general medicine clinic of a major medical center in Qatar. Participants were chosen based on gender, age, literacy, and preferred language, i.e., Arabic, English, Hindi and Urdu. Qualitative analysis identified themes about recruitment, informed consent, compensation, and other research procedures. Results A total of 153 individuals were approached and 84 enrolled; the latter showed a diverse age range (18 to 75 years); varied language representation: Arabic (n?=?24), English (n?=?20), Hindi (n?=?20), and Urdu (n?=?20); and balanced gender distribution: women (n?=?43) and men (n?=?41). Primary reasons for 30 declinations included concern about interview length and recording. The study achieved a 74% participation rate. Qualitative analytics revealed key themes about hesitation to participate, decisions about participation with family members as well as discussions with them as “incidental research participants”, the informed consent process, privacy and gender rules of the interview environment, reactions to member checking and compensation, and motivation for participating. Vulnerability emerged as a recurring issue throughout the process among a minority of participants. Conclusions This study from Qatar is the first to provide empirical data on recruitment, informed consent, compensation and other research procedures in a general adult population in the Middle East and Arabian Gulf. This investigation illustrates how potential research participants perceive research participation. Fundamentally, Western ethical research principles were applicable, but required flexibility and culturally informed adaptations. PMID:24495499

2014-01-01

421

National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2005 Research Review  

SciTech Connect

Science and technology are at the heart of everything we do at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, as we pursue innovative, robust, and sustainable ways to produce energy--and as we seek to understand and illuminate the physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering behind alternative energy technologies. This year's Research Review highlights the Lab's work in the areas of alternatives fuels and vehicles, high-performing commercial buildings, and high-efficiency inverted, semi-mismatched solar cells.

Brown, H.; Gwinner, D.; Miller, M.; Pitchford, P.

2006-06-01

422

A review of tuberculosis research in malaysia.  

PubMed

One hundred seventy four articles related to tuberculosis were found in a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to medicine published in Malaysia between the years 2000-2013. One hundred fifty three articles were selected and reviewed on the basis of clinical relevance and future research implications. Topics related to epidemiology, clinical presentation, detection methods and treatment were well researched. However, limited information was available on screening and behavioural interventions. The younger population were more vulnerable to tuberculosis infection and had higher prevalence of risk factors that reactivate tuberculosis infection. Screening of tuberculosis was conducted primarily on healthcare workers, tuberculosis contacts, prisoners and foreign workers. Data on the clinical presentation of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis was comprehensive. There was a general focus on related risk factors such as HIV and diabetes mellitus. A great degree of information was available on the treatment and various detection methods to identify tuberculosis. The efficacy and the practicality of investigative methods was analysed in this review. In conclusion, the direction of research should be aimed at novel preventive and control measures of tuberculosis. There should be emphasis on the screening of high risk groups (other than HIV) within the population namely diabetic patients, smokers and immunosuppressed individuals. The design of health policies should be guided by information gathered from research evaluation of communitybased behavioural interventions. PMID:25417956

Swarna Nantha, Y

2014-08-01

423

Qualitative Risk Assessment for an LNG Refueling Station and Review of Relevant Safety Issues  

SciTech Connect

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tank truck deliveries, and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of ``best practice`` information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, J.S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1998-02-01

424

Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues  

SciTech Connect

This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.

Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W.; Byers, J.

1997-07-01

425

Methodological quality of systematic reviews of animal studies: a survey of reviews of basic research  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Systematic reviews can serve as a tool in translation of basic life sciences research from laboratory to human research and healthcare. The extent to which reviews of animal research are systematic and unbiased is not known. METHODS: We searched, without language restrictions, Medline, Embase, bibliographies of known reviews (1996–2004) and contacted experts to identify citations of reviews of basic

Luciano E Mignini; Khalid S Khan

2006-01-01

426

The Introduction of a Qualitative Perspective in Advanced Psychological Research Training: Narrative of a Mixed Methods Doctoral Dissertation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first mixed methods dissertation in the Department of Psychology in the Gradu- ate School of Arts and Sciences of Fordham University is described. In research on pre-kindergarten through 3rd-grade school programs, the interplay of quantitative hypothesis testing and qualitative discovery was used to gain knowledge of how dif- ferent educational outcomes are achieved. A narrative addresses such contemporary disciplinary

Kimber Bogard; Frederick J. Wertz

2006-01-01

427

Review of research methodologies for tigers: telemetry.  

PubMed

Over the past half century, wildlife research has relied on technological advances to gain additional insight into the secretive lives of animals. This revolution started in the 1960s with the development of radio telemetry and continues today with the use of Global Positioning System (GPS)-based research techniques. In the present paper we review the history of radio telemetry from its origins with grizzly bears in Yellowstone to its early applications in tiger research and conservation in Asia. We address the different types of data that are available using radio telemetry as opposed to using other research techniques, such as behavioral observations, camera trapping, DNA analysis and scat analysis. In the late 1990s, the rapid development of GPS collar technology revolutionized wildlife research. This new technology has enabled researchers to dramatically improve their ability to gather data on animal movements and ecology. Despite the ecological and conservation benefits of radio telemetry, there have been few telemetry studies of tigers in the wild, and most have been on the Bengal or Amur subspecies. We close with an assessment of the current tiger conservation efforts using GPS technology and discuss how this new information can help to preserve tigers for future generations. PMID:21392355

Miller, Clayton S; Hebblewhite, Mark; Goodrich, John M; Miquelle, Dale G

2010-12-01

428

Patient engagement in research: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background A compelling ethical rationale supports patient engagement in healthcare research. It is also assumed that patient engagement will lead to research findings that are more pertinent to patients’ concerns and dilemmas. However; it is unclear how to best conduct this process. In this systematic review we aimed to answer 4 key questions: what are the best ways to identify patient representatives? How to engage them in designing and conducting research? What are the observed benefits of patient engagement? What are the harms and barriers of patient engagement? Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, Cochrane, EBSCO, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Business Search Premier, Academic Search Premier and Google Scholar. Included studies were published in English, of any size or design that described engaging patients or their surrogates in research design. We conducted an environmental scan of the grey literature and consulted with experts and patients. Data were analyzed using a non-quantitative, meta-narrative approach. Results We included 142 studies that described a spectrum of engagement. In general, engagement was feasible in most settings and most commonly done in the beginning of research (agenda setting and protocol development) and less commonly during the execution and translation of research. We found no comparative analytic studies to recommend a particular method. Patient engagement increased study enrollment rates and aided researchers in securing funding, designing study protocols and choosing relevant outcomes. The most commonly cited challenges were related to logistics (extra time and funding needed for engagement) and to an overarching worry of a tokenistic engagement. Conclusions Patient engagement in healthcare research is likely feasible in many settings. However, this engagement comes at a cost and can become tokenistic. Research dedicated to identifying the best methods to achieve engagement is lacking and clearly needed. PMID:24568690

2014-01-01

429

QANU Research Review11 NOVA and Astronomy 201012  

E-print Network

1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 QANU Research Review11 NOVA and Astronomy 201012 13 1. The Review Committee 4 The Committee was asked to perform an assessment of the research school NOVA and of the research NOVA research school47 48 Through the NOVA research school, the Netherlands makes contributions

van Suijlekom, Walter

430

Travelers and Trolls: Practitioner Research and Institutional Review Boards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Practitioner research is a growing form of educational research that presents distinctive ethical issues concerning the protection of research subjects. These issues are also evident in similar forms of action-oriented research carried out in natural settings. Some Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) have been criticized for drawing inappropriate conclusions in their reviews of proposed practitioner research projects. This article seeks to

Ivor A. Pritchard

2002-01-01

431

Ethical issues and ethics reviews in social science research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the ethics of social science research has not enjoyed as much scholarly attention as the ethics of biomedical research, social scientists continue to debate the relevance of research ethics and ethics review to social science research. Like social scien- tists, biomedical scientists have also objected to ethical review of biomedical research, and much has been gained from the ensuing

Douglas R Wassenaar; Nicole Mamotte

2008-01-01

432

Time, Monetary and Other Costs of Participation in Family-Based Child Weight Management Interventions: Qualitative and Systematic Review Evidence  

PubMed Central

Background Childhood overweight and obesity have health and economic impacts on individuals and the wider society. Families participating in weight management programmes may foresee or experience monetary and other costs which deter them from signing up to or completing programmes. This is recognised in the health economics literature, though within this sparse body of work, costs to families are often narrowly defined and not fully accounted for. A societal perspective incorporating a broader array of costs may provide a more accurate picture. This paper brings together a review of the health economics literature on the costs to families attending child weight management programmes with qualitative data from families participating in a programme to manage child overweight and obesity. Methods A search identified economic evaluation studies of lifestyle interventions in childhood obesity. The qualitative work drew on interviews with families who attended a weight management intervention in three UK regions. Results We identified four cost-effectiveness analyses that include information on costs to families. These were categorised as direct (e.g. monetary) and indirect (e.g. time) costs. Our analysis of qualitative data demonstrated that, for families who attended the programme, costs were associated both with participation on the scheme and with maintaining a healthy lifestyle afterwards. Respondents reported three kinds of cost: time-related, social/emotional and monetary. Conclusion Societal approaches to measuring cost-effectiveness provide a framework for assessing the monetary and non-monetary costs borne by participants attending treatment programmes. From this perspective, all costs should be considered in any analysis of cost-effectiveness. Our data suggest that family costs are important, and may act as a barrier to the uptake, completion and maintenance of behaviours to reduce child obesity. These findings have implications for the development and implementation of child weight initiatives in particular, in relation to reducing inequalities in health. PMID:25853729

Arai, Lisa; Panca, Monica; Morris, Steve; Curtis-Tyler, Katherine; Lucas, Patricia J.; Roberts, Helen M.

2015-01-01

433

A qualitative systematic review of coasting, a procedure to avoid ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in IVF patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

'Coasting', a method which consists of stopping exogenous gonadotrophins and postponing HCG administration until the patient's serum estradiol (E2) level decreases, is often used to prevent ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). We conducted a systematic review to analyse whether there is sufficient evidence to justify the general acceptance of coasting. The studies, which involved 493 patients in 12 studies, are very

Annick Delvigne; Serge Rozenberg

434

Effectiveness of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: A Systematic Qualitative Review of Controlled Outcome Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: We review all available controlled outcome studies of solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) to evaluate evidence of its effectiveness. Method: Forty-three studies were located and key data abstracted on problem, setting, SFBT intervention, design characteristics, and outcomes. Results: Thirty-two (74%) of the studies reported…

Gingerich, Wallace J.; Peterson, Lance T.

2013-01-01

435

Occlusal treatments in temporomandibular disorders: a qualitative systematic review of randomized controlled trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occlusal treatments (occlusal splints and occlusal adjustment) are controversial but widely used treatment methods for temporomandibular disorders (TMD). To investigate whether studies are in agreement with current clinical practices, a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of occlusal treatment studies from the period 1966 to March 1999 was undertaken. Eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria, 14 on splint therapy,

Heli Forssell; Eija Kalso; Pirkko Koskela; Raili Vehmanen; Pauli Puukka; Pentti Alanen

1999-01-01

436

40 CFR 26.109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false IRB review of research. 26.109 Section 26.109 Protection...Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review...

2013-07-01

437

40 CFR 26.1109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false IRB review of research. 26.1109 Section 26.1109 ...Ethical Requirements for Third-Party Human Research for Pesticides Involving Intentional...Adults § 26.1109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review and...

2013-07-01

438

40 CFR 26.109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false IRB review of research. 26.109 Section 26.109 Protection...Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review...

2012-07-01

439

40 CFR 26.109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false IRB review of research. 26.109 Section 26.109 Protection...Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review...

2014-07-01

440

40 CFR 26.1109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false IRB review of research. 26.1109 Section 26.1109 ...Ethical Requirements for Third-Party Human Research for Pesticides Involving Intentional...Adults § 26.1109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review and...

2014-07-01

441

40 CFR 26.1109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false IRB review of research. 26.1109 Section 26.1109 ...Ethical Requirements for Third-Party Human Research for Pesticides Involving Intentional...Adults § 26.1109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review and...

2012-07-01

442

40 CFR 26.109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false IRB review of research. 26.109 Section 26.109 Protection...Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review...

2010-07-01

443

40 CFR 26.1109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false IRB review of research. 26.1109 Section 26.1109 ...Ethical Requirements for Third-Party Human Research for Pesticides Involving Intentional...Adults § 26.1109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review and...

2010-07-01

444

40 CFR 26.109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false IRB review of research. 26.109 Section 26.109 Protection...Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review...

2011-07-01

445

40 CFR 26.1109 - IRB review of research.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false IRB review of research. 26.1109 Section 26.1109 ...Ethical Requirements for Third-Party Human Research for Pesticides Involving Intentional...Adults § 26.1109 IRB review of research. (a) An IRB shall review and...

2011-07-01

446

78 FR 58575 - Review of Experiments for Research Reactors  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NRC-2013-0219] Review of Experiments for Research Reactors AGENCY...RG) 2.4, ``Review of Experiments for Research Reactors...this action by the following methods: NRC's Agencywide Documents...withdrawing RG 2.4, ``Review of Experiments for Research...

2013-09-24

447

Research Review Psychology 1998-2004 November 2006  

E-print Network

.1. Cognitive neuroscience 17 3.2. Clinical psychology 17 3.3. Developmental psychology 18 3.4. SocialResearch Review Psychology 1998-2004 November 2006 #12;2 QANU / Research Review Psychology 1998 Review Psychology 1998-2004 Table of Contents Foreword 5 Preface 7 1. Research Evaluation Psychology 9 1

van Rooij, Robert

448

Facilitators and Barriers to Engagement in Parenting Programs: A Qualitative Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parenting programs have the potential to improve the health and well-being of parents and children. A challenge for providers is to recruit and retain parents in programs. Studies researching engagement with programs have largely focused on providers', policy makers', or researchers' reflections of their experience of parents'…

Mytton, Julie; Ingram, Jenny; Manns, Sarah; Thomas, James

2014-01-01

449

Interventions to reduce tourniquet-related ischaemic damage in orthopaedic surgery: a qualitative systematic review of randomised trials.  

PubMed

Ischaemia of the extremity from the use of a tourniquet and the subsequent reperfusion contribute to the release of reactive oxygen species. This release may result in injury to remote organs. We performed a qualitative systematic review exploring the interventions used to prevent tourniquet-related oxidative damage in adults undergoing orthopaedic surgery, and the possible relationship between biochemical oxidative stress markers and postoperative clinical outcomes. Seventeen randomised controlled studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. Most trials were of low methodological quality and only two studies reported postoperative clinical outcomes. Nine studies tested anaesthetics (propofol, dexmedetomidine, ketamine, and spinal anaesthesia); four studies tested antioxidants (N-acetyl-cysteine, vitamin C, and mannitol); and four studies tested ischaemic pre-conditioning. Fifteen studies showed a significant reduction in biochemical oxidative stress markers. We conclude that propofol and ischaemic pre-conditioning, in particular, appear to show some benefit at reducing oxidative stress following operations under tourniquet; the correlation between a reduction in oxidative stress and postoperative clinical outcomes should be further investigated in the future. PMID:24800642

Halladin, N L; Zahle, F V; Rosenberg, J; Gögenur, I

2014-09-01

450

Gender-Related Barriers and Delays in Accessing Tuberculosis Diagnostic and Treatment Services: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies  

PubMed Central

Background. Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant global public health problem with known gender-related (male versus female) disparities. We reviewed the qualitative evidence (written/spoken narrative) for gender-related differences limiting TB service access from symptom onset to treatment initiation. Methods. Following a systematic process, we searched 12 electronic databases, included qualitative studies that assessed gender differences in accessing TB diagnostic and treatment services, abstracted data, and assessed study validity. Using a modified “inductive coding” system, we synthesized emergent themes within defined barriers and delays limiting access at the individual and provider/system levels and examined gender-related differences. Results. Among 13,448 studies, 28 studies were included. All were conducted in developing countries and assessed individual-level barriers; 11 (39%) assessed provider/system-level barriers, 18 (64%) surveyed persons with suspected or diagnosed TB, and 7 (25%) exclusively surveyed randomly sampled community members or health care workers. Each barrier affected both genders but had gender-variable nature and impact reflecting sociodemographic themes. Women experienced financial and physical dependence, lower general literacy, and household stigma, whereas men faced work-related financial and physical barriers and community-based stigma. Conclusions. In developing countries, barriers limiting access to TB care have context-specific gender-related differences that can inform integrated interventions to optimize TB services. PMID:24900921

Akande, Tokunbo; Shankar, Anita V.; McIntire, Katherine N.; Gounder, Celine R.; Gupta, Amita; Yang, Wei-Teng

2014-01-01

451

Dear Diary: Early Career Geographers Collectively Reflect on Their Qualitative Field Research Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After completing a qualitative methods course in geography, we moved classroom discussions into practice. While undertaking graduate fieldwork in sites across the globe, we participated in critical, reflexive journaling. Whereas journal writing is often private, we shared our entries, aiming to facilitate rigour while concurrently exploring…

Heller, Elizabeth; Christensen, Julia; Long, Lindsay; Mackenzie, Catrina A.; Osano, Philip M.; Ricker, Britta; Kagan, Emily; Turner, Sarah

2011-01-01

452

Strategies Employed by Iranian EFL Freshman University Students in Extensive Listening: A Qualitative Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the findings of a qualitative study on the strategies employed by Iranian freshmen in extensive listening. A group of 12 freshman university students were purposefully selected based on their scores in the Oxford Placement Test administered. Four learners were identified as advanced, four as intermediate, and four as lower…

Bidabadi, Farinaz Shirani; Yamat, Hamidah

2014-01-01