Science.gov

Sample records for rf power determination

  1. Rf power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  2. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing. PMID:22559603

  3. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing.

  4. Automatic calorimetry system monitors RF power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harness, B. W.; Heiberger, E. C.

    1969-01-01

    Calorimetry system monitors the average power dissipated in a high power RF transmitter. Sensors measure the change in temperature and the flow rate of the coolant, while a multiplier computes the power dissipated in the RF load.

  5. High-Power Rf Load

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Vlieks, Arnold E.

    1998-09-01

    A compact high-power RF load comprises a series of very low Q resonators, or chokes [16], in a circular waveguide [10]. The sequence of chokes absorb the RF power gradually in a short distance while keeping the bandwidth relatively wide. A polarizer [12] at the input end of the load is provided to convert incoming TE.sub.10 mode signals to circularly polarized TE.sub.11 mode signals. Because the load operates in the circularly polarized mode, the energy is uniformly and efficiently absorbed and the load is more compact than a rectangular load. Using these techniques, a load having a bandwidth of 500 MHz can be produced with an average power dissipation level of 1.5 kW at X-band, and a peak power dissipation of 100 MW. The load can be made from common lossy materials, such as stainless steel, and is less than 15 cm in length. These techniques can also produce loads for use as an alternative to ordinary waveguide loads in small and medium RF accelerators, in radar systems, and in other microwave applications. The design is easily scalable to other RF frequencies and adaptable to the use of other lossy materials.

  6. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies.

  7. Rf power sources for 1990 and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper will discuss the types of devices and system architectures that show promise in providing rf power sources for future space requirements. It will extrapolate these solutions to accelerators that are now being planned for construction and commissioning in the 1990s and will suggest technological advantages of using SDI-developed rf systems. Finally, the present state of the various SDI-sponsored high-powered rf-development programs will be reviewed.

  8. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper.

  9. Single frequency RF powered ECG telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. H.; Hynecek, J.; Homa, J.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a radio frequency magnetic field can be used to power implanted electronic circuitry for short range telemetry to replace batteries. A substantial reduction in implanted volume can be achieved by using only one RF tank circuit for receiving the RF power and transmitting the telemetered information. A single channel telemetry system of this type, using time sharing techniques, was developed and employed to transmit the ECG signal from Rhesus monkeys in primate chairs. The signal from the implant is received during the period when the RF powering radiation is interrupted. The ECG signal is carried by 20-microsec pulse position modulated pulses, referred to the trailing edge of the RF powering pulse. Satisfactory results have been obtained with this single frequency system. The concept and the design presented may be useful for short-range long-term implant telemetry systems.

  10. Low reflectance high power RF load

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.

    2016-02-02

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  11. RF power recovery feedback circulator

    DOEpatents

    Sharamentov, Sergey I.

    2011-03-29

    A device and method for improving the efficiency of RF systems having a Reflective Load. In the preferred embodiment, Reflected Energy from a superconducting resonator of a particle accelerator is reintroduced to the resonator after the phase of the Reflected Energy is aligned with the phase of the Supply Energy from a RF Energy Source. In one embodiment, a Circulator is used to transfer Reflected Energy from the Reflective Load into a Phase Adjuster which aligns the phase of the Reflected Energy with that of the Supply Energy. The phase-aligned energy is then combined with the Supply Energy, and reintroduced into the Reflective Load. In systems having a constant phase shift, the Phase Adjuster may be designed to shift the phase of the Reflected Energy by a constant amount using a Phase Shifter. In systems having a variety (variable) phase shifts, a Phase Shifter controlled by a phase feedback loop comprising a Phase Detector and a Feedback Controller to account for the various phase shifts is preferable.

  12. POWER DENSITY, FIELD INTENSITY, AND CARRIER FREQUENCY DETERMINANTS OF RF-ENERGY-INDUCED CALCIUM-ION EFFLUX FROM BRAIN TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To explain a carrier frequency dependence reported for radiofrequency (RF)-induced calcium-ion efflux from brain tissue, a chick-brain hemisphere bathed in buffer solution is modeled as a sphere within the uniform field of the incident electromagnetic wave. Calculations on a sphe...

  13. Advanced RF power sources for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-10-01

    In order to maintain a reasonable over-all length at high center-of-mass energy, the main linac of an electron-positron linear collider must operate at a high accelerating gradient. For copper (non-superconducting) accelerator structures, this implies a high peak power per unit length and a high peak power per RF source, assuming a limited number of discrete sources are used. To provide this power, a number of devices are currently under active development or conceptual consideration: conventional klystrons with multi-cavity output structures, gyroklystrons, magnicons, sheet-beam klystrons, multiple-beam klystrons and amplifiers based on the FEL principle. To enhance the peak power produced by an rf source, the SLED rf pulse compression scheme is currently in use on existing linacs, and new compression methods that produce a flatter output pulse are being considered for future linear colliders. This paper covers the present status and future outlook for the more important rf power sources and pulse compression systems. It should be noted that high gradient electron linacs have applications in addition to high-energy linear colliders; they can, for example, serve as compact injectors for FEL`s and storage rings.

  14. Simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency (RF) power dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents due to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis. PMID:23606428

  15. RF System High Power Amplifier Software Conversion at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    G. Lahti; H. Dong; T. Seegerger

    2006-10-31

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of converting the RF system from analog RF modules and non-smart high power amplifiers (HPAs) to digital RF modules and smart HPAs. The present analog RF module controls both the RF signal and the non-smart HPA hardware. The new digital RF module will only control the RF signal, so the new HPA must include embedded software. This paper will describe the conversion from a software perspective, including the initial testing, the intermediate mixed system of old and new units, and finally the totally new RF system.

  16. Overview of High Power Vacuum Dry RF Load Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2015-08-27

    A specific feature of RF linacs based on the pulsed traveling wave (TW) mode of operation is that only a portion of the RF energy is used for the beam acceleration. The residual RF energy has to be terminated into an RF load. Higher accelerating gradients require higher RF sources and RF loads, which can stably terminate the residual RF power. RF feeders (from the RF source though the accelerating section to the load) are vacuumed to transmit multi-megawatt high power RF. This overview will outline vacuumed RF loads only. A common method to terminate multi-MW RF power is to use circulated water (or other liquid) as an absorbing medium. A solid dielectric interface (a high quality ceramic) is required to separate vacuum and liquid RF absorber mediums. Using such RF load approaches in TW linacs is troubling because there is a fragile ceramic window barrier and a failure could become catastrophic for linac vacuum and RF systems. Traditional loads comprising of a ceramic disk have limited peak and average power handling capability and are therefore not suitable for high gradient TW linacs. This overview will focus on ''vacuum dry'' or ''all-metal'' loads that do not employ any dielectric interface between vacuum and absorber. The first prototype is an original design of RF loads for the Stanford Two-Mile Accelerator.

  17. 47 CFR 2.1046 - Measurements required: RF power output.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Measurements required: RF power output. 2.1046... Measurements required: RF power output. (a) For transmitters other than single sideband, independent sideband and controlled carrier radiotelephone, power output shall be measured at the RF output terminals...

  18. Rf power sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.M.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Nelson, E.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. ); Boyd, J.K.; Houk, T.; Ryne, R.D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S. (Lawrence Live

    1990-06-01

    The next generation of linear colliders requires peak power sources of over 200 MW per meter at frequencies above 10 GHz at pulse widths of less than 100 nsec. Several power sources are under active development, including a conventional klystron with rf pulse compression, a relativistic klystron (RK) and a crossed-field amplifier. Power from one of these has energized a 0.5 meter two- section High Gradient Accelerator (HGA) and accelerated a beam at over 80 MeV meter. Results of tests with these experimental devices are presented here.

  19. CLIC RF High Power Production Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Syratchev, I.; Riddone, G.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and generate RF power for the main linac accelerating structure. The demands on the high power production ({approx} 150 MW) and the needs to transport the 100 A drive beam for about 1 km without losses, makes the PETS design rather unique and the operation very challenging. In the coming year, an intense PETS testing program will be implemented. The target is to demonstrate the full performance of the PETS operation. The testing program overview and test results available to date are presented.

  20. High power rf klystrons for linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, G.T.

    1984-04-01

    Recent klystron developments at SLAC are described. The standard 40 MW klyston, which typically operates at 35 MW on the SLAC linac, is the starting point for the push to higher peak and average power. The standard tube is capable of a 2.5 ..mu..s rf pulse width at 360 pps. For the SLC a 50 MW klystron capable of 5 ..mu..s pulse width at 180 pps is under development. Another tube currently being worked on is a 150 MW klystron capable of 1 ..mu..s rf and 180 pps. Design criteria and actual operating experience for both developmental tubes are described. 10 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Cryostat for testing RF power couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Champion, M.S.; Koepke, K.P.; Misek, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    Similar to the power leads of accelerator superconducting magnets, the power couplers of accelerator superconducting cavities are components that link room temperature to superfluid helium temperature for the purpose of energy transfer. Instead of conducting kiloamperes of current they guide megawatts of RF power between those two temperatures. In this paper we describe a cryostat designed for testing the performance of these components and measuring their heat loads. A special feature of this cryostat is its minimum liquid inventory that considerably simplifies safety related requirements. This cryostat is part of a Fermilab facility contributing to the international collaboration working on TESLA (TeV Electron Superconducting Linear Accelerator). This facility is now operational and we will be presenting specifications as well as performance data on the cryostat as well as the first pair of power couplers tested with it.

  2. High power solid state rf amplifier for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Akhilesh; Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2008-01-15

    A 1.5 kW solid state rf amplifier at 352 MHz has been developed and tested at RRCAT. This rf source for cw operation will be used as a part of rf system of 100 MeV proton linear accelerator. A rf power of 1.5 kW has been achieved by combining output power from eight 220 W rf amplifier modules. Amplifier modules, eight-way power combiner and divider, and directional coupler were designed indigenously for this development. High efficiency, ease of fabrication, and low cost are the main features of this design.

  3. Recent advances in RF power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is a review of the progress and methods used in RF generation for particle accelerators. The frequencies of interest are from a few megahertz to 100 GHz, and the powers are for super linear collider applications, but in this case the pulses are short, generally below 1 {mu}s. The very high-power, short-pulse generators are only lightly reviewed here, and for more details the reader should follow the specialized references. Different RF generators excel over various parts of the frequency spectrum. Below 100 MHz solid-state devices and gridded tubes prevail, while the region between 400 MHz and 3 GHz, the cyclotron-resonant devices predominate, and above 250 GHz, Free-Electron Lasers and ubitrons are the most powerful generators. The emphasis for this review is on microwave generation at frequencies below 20 GHz, so the cyclotron-resonant devices are only partially reviewed, while the progress on free-electron laser and ubitrons is not reviewed in this paper. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF HIGH POWER RF VECTOR MODULATORS*

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Wilson, Joshua L; Champion, Mark; Hardek, Thomas W; Kim, Sang-Ho; McCarthy, Mike; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V

    2007-01-01

    A fan-out RF power distribution system can allow many accelerating cavities to be powered by a single high-power klystron amplifier. High-power vector modulators can perform independent control of amplitudes and phases of RF voltages at the cavities without changing the klystron signal. A prototype highpower RF vector modulator employing a quadrature hybrid and two ferrite phase shifters in coaxial TEM transmission lines has been built and tested for 402.5 MHz. RF properties of the design and results of high power testing are presented.

  5. High pulse power rf sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1983-09-01

    RF sources with high peak power output and relatively short pulse lengths will be required for future high gradient e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders. The required peak power and pulse length depend on the operating frequency, energy gradient and geometry of the collider linac structure. The frequency and gradient are in turn constrained by various parameters which depend on the beam-beam collision dynamics, and on the total ac wall-plug power that has been committed to the linac rf system. Various rf sources which might meet these requirements are reviewed. Existing source types (e.g., klystrons, gyrotrons) and sources which show future promise based on experimental prototypes are first considered. Finally, several proposals for high peak power rf sources based on unconventional concepts are discussed. These are an FEL source (two beam accelerator), rf energy storage cavities with switching, and a photocathode device which produces an rf current by direct emission modulation of the cathode.

  6. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  7. Multimegawatt rf power sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1991-04-01

    Conceptual designs for a future linear collider operating at 11.4 GHz call for peak rf power as high as 240 MW per meter, with an accelerator length of 14 km. This is an extremely high total power, which results in requirements for microwave sources that cannot be met with existing microwave tubes. While some new tube concepts are being considered, work is proceeding at several laboratories in the US and abroad on conventional 100 MW klystrons for this application. The electron beam necessary for this power to be generated, unless carefully controlled, can easily cause intrapulse melting at the klystron output circuit. This, coupled to the need for good efficiency, high production yield, and long life, poses some difficult problems to the klystron designer. Experimental klystrons at SLAC and other laboratories are approaching the goal of 100 MW in 800 nsec pulses, but much work remains to be done before a design is available which is suitable for manufacturing thousands of these tubes. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Lifetime characterization of capacitive power RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Afshin; Dean, Thierry; Mancuso, Yves

    2006-03-01

    RF MEMS switches provide a low-cost, high performance solution for many RF/microwave applications these switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, switched filters reflector array antennas for military and commercial markets. In this paper, progress in characterizing of THALES capacitive MEMS devices under high RF power is presented. The design, fabrication and testing of capacitive RF MEMS switches for microwave/mm- wave applications on high-resistivity silicon substrate is presented. The switches tested demonstrated power handling capabilities of 2W (33 dBm) for continuous RF power. The reliability of these switches was tested at various power levels indicating that under continuous RF power. In addition a description of the power failures and their associated operating conditions is presented The PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads have been developed. Best-case lifetimes of 5x10 10 cycles have been achieved in several switches from different lots under 33 dbm RF power.

  9. Feed-through connector couples RF power into vacuum chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandy, G. L.

    1967-01-01

    Feed-through device connects RF power to an RF coil in a vacuum chamber. The coil and leads are water cooled and vacuum tight seals are provided at the junctions. The device incorporates silver soldered copper tubes, polytetrafluoroethylene electrical insulators, and O-ring vacuum seals.

  10. High Power RF Transmitters for ICRF Applications on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yuzhou; Yuan, Shuai; Zhao, Yanping; Zhang, Xinjun; Chen, Gen; Kumazawa, R.; Cheng, Yan; Wang, Lei; Ju, Songqing; Deng, Xu; Qin, Chengming; Yang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    An Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) system with a radio frequency (RF) power of 4 × 1.5 MW was developed for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). High RF power transmitters were designed as a part of the research and development (R&D) for an ICRF system with long pulse operation at megawatt levels in a frequency range of 25 MHz to 70 MHz. Studies presented in this paper cover the following parts of the high power transmitter: the three staged high power amplifier, which is composed of a 5 kW wideband solid state amplifier, a 100 kW tetrode drive stage amplifier and a 1.5 MW tetrode final stage amplifier, and the DC high voltage power supply (HVPS). Based on engineering design and static examinations, the RF transmitters were tested using a matched dummy load where an RF output power of 1.5 MW was achieved. The transmitters provide 6 MW RF power in primary phase and will reach a level up to 12 MW after a later upgrade. The transmitters performed successfully in stable operations in EAST and HT-7 devices. Up to 1.8 MW of RF power was injected into plasmas in EAST ICRF heating experiments during the 2010 autumn campaign and plasma performance was greatly improved.

  11. Influence of RF power on magnetron sputtered AZO films

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Mohit; Modi, Pankaj; Dusane, R. O.

    2013-02-05

    Al-doped Zinc Oxide (AZO) transparent conducting films are prepared on glass substrate by RF magnetron sputtering under different RF power with a 3 inch diameter target of 2 wt%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in zinc oxide. The effect of RF power on the structural, optical and electrical properties of AZO films was investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Hall measurement and UV-Visible spectrophotometry. The XRD data indicates a preferential c-axis orientation for all the films. All films exhibit high transmittance (<90%) in visible region. Films deposited at 60 W power exhibit lowest resistivity of 5.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}{omega}cm. Such low-resistivity and high-transmittance AZO films when prepared using low RF power at room temperature could find important applications in flexible electronics.

  12. High power RF systems for the BNL ERL project

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2011-03-28

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  13. R&D ERL: High power RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltsman, A.

    2010-01-15

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2.5 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  14. Scanning beam switch experiment for intense rf power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Stanley, Jr.; Babcock, Steven R.; Wilson, J. M.; Adler, Richard J.

    1991-04-01

    1407_57The SBS_1 experiment at Sandia National Laboratories is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the Scanning Beam Switch for high-power rf generation. The primary application is to pulsed rf linacs and high-frequency induction accelerators. It is expected that the apparatus will generate rf output power exceeding 100 MW at 50 MHz over a 5 microsecond(s) pulse. The device can operate as an oscillator or high gain amplifier. To achieve the capability for long-macropulse and high-duty-cycle operation, SBS_1 uses a large dispenser cathode and vacuum triode input driver.

  15. Electrodeless lighting RF power source development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-30

    An efficient, solid state RF power source has been developed on this NICE project for exciting low power electrodeless lamp bulbs. This project takes full advantage of concurrent advances in electrodeless lamp technology. Electrodeless lamp lighting systems utilizing the sulfur based bulb type developed by Fusion Lighting, Inc., is an emerging technology which is based on generating light in a confined plasma created and sustained by RF excitation. The bulb for such a lamp is filled with a particular element and inert gas at low pressure when cold. RF power from the RF source creates a plasma within the bulb which reaches temperatures approaching those of high pressure discharge lamp plasmas. At these temperatures the plasma radiates substantial visible light with a spectrum similar to sunlight.

  16. A HIGH POWER RF COUPLER DESIGN FOR MUON COOLING RF CAVITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT,J.; LI,DERUN; RIMMER,R.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.

    1999-03-29

    We present a high power RF coupler design for an interleaved {pi}/2 805 MHz standing wave accelerating structure proposed for an muon cooling experiment at FNAL. The coupler, in its simplest form, is a rectangular waveguide directly connected to an accelerating Cell through an open slot on the cavity side-wall or end-plates. Two of such couplers are needed to feed the interleaved cavities. Current high power RF test requires the coupler to be at critical coupling. Numerical simulations on the coupler designs using MAFIA will be presented.

  17. Possible high power limitations from RF pulsed heating

    SciTech Connect

    Pritzkau, D.P.; Bowden, G.B.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.

    1999-05-01

    One of the possible limitations to achieving high power in RF structures is damage to metal surfaces due to RF pulsed heating. Such damage may lead to degradation of RF performance. An experiment to study RF pulsed heating on copper has been developed at SLAC. The experiment consists of operating two pillbox cavities in the TE{sub 011} mode using a 50 MW X-Band klystron. The estimated temperature rise of the surface of copper is 350&hthinsp;{degree}C for a power input of 20 MW to each cavity with a pulse length of 1.5 {mu}s. Preliminary results from an experiment performed earlier are presented. A revised design for continued experiments is also presented along with relevant theory and calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.W. Kang; D.E. Anderson; I.E. Campisi; M. Champion; M.T. Crofford; R.E. Fuja; P.A. Gurd; S. Hasan; K.-U. Kasemir; M.P. McCarthy; D. Stout; J.Y. Tang; A.V. Vassioutchenko; M. Wezensky; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; T. Powers; M. Stirbet

    2005-05-16

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavities have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducting and superconducting accelerating cavities and components.

  19. Experiments with very-high-power RF pulses at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, H.A.; Loew, G.A.; Price, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    Experiments in which the powers of two SLAC klystrons were combined and fed into a resonant cavity pulse-compression system (SLED) are described. Pulse powers up to 65 MW into SLED were reached. The corresponding instantaneous peak power out of SLED was 390 MW. After normal initial aging, no persistent RF breakdown problems were encountered. X-radiation at the SLED cavities was generally less than 400 mR/h after aging. The theoretical relationship between x-radiation intensity and RF electric field strength is discussed.

  20. New rf power system for SuperHILAC

    SciTech Connect

    Fugitt, J.; Lancaster, H.; Sorensen, R.

    1985-05-01

    The upgraded rf system for the SuperHILAC is now operational using 9 new tetrode amplifiers. Each amplifier can produce in excess of 1MW of 70 Mhz pulsed rf power. Ferrite is used to decouple the screen grid circuit and to absorb parasitic oscillations. This results in a very stable amplifier with reasonable gain. This system uses a common 8 MW anode power supply and crowbar system. Overall system efficiency has been increased significantly. We project a 3 year payback on the equipment cost, realized from the power savings alone. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  1. A 12 GHz RF Power Source for the CLIC Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schirm, Karl; Curt, Stephane; Dobert, Steffen; McMonagle, Gerard; Rossat, Ghislain; Syratchev, Igor; Timeo, Luca; Haase, Andrew Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Nantista, Christopher; Sprehn, Daryl; Vlieks, Arnold; Hamdi, Abdallah; Peauger, Franck; Kuzikov, Sergey; Vikharev, Alexandr; /Nizhnii Novgorod, IAP

    2012-07-03

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  2. The RF power system for the SNS linac

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-12-31

    The initial goal of the SNS project is to produce a 1 MW average beam of protons with short pulse lengths onto a neutron-producing target. The objective of the SNS RF system is to generate 117 MW peak of pulsed 805 MHz microwave power with an accelerated beam pulse length of 1.04 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The power system must be upgradeable in peak power to deliver 2 MW average power to the neutron target. The RF system also requires about 3 MW peak of RF power at 402.5 MHz, but that system is not discussed here. The design challenge is to produce an RF system at minimum cost, that is very reliable and economical to operate. The combination of long pulses and high repetition rates make conventional solutions, such as the pulse transformer and transmission line method, very expensive. The klystron, with a modulating anode, and 1.5 MW of peak output power is the baseline RF amplifier, an 56 are required in the baseline design. The authors discuss four power system configurations that are the candidates for the design. The baseline design is a floating-deck modulating anode system. A second power system being investigated is the fast-pulsed power supply, that can be turned on and off with a rise time of under 0.1 ms. This could eliminate the need for a modulator, and drastically reduce the energy storage requirements. A third idea is to use a pulse transformer with a series IGBT switch and a bouncer circuit on the primary side, as was done for the TESLA modulator. A fourth method is to use a series IGBT switch at high voltage, and not use a pulse transformer. The authors discuss the advantages and problems of these four types of power systems, but they emphasize the first two.

  3. In vivo RF powering for advanced biological research.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark D; Chaimanonart, Nattapon; Young, Darrin J

    2006-01-01

    An optimized remote powering architecture with a miniature and implantable RF power converter for an untethered small laboratory animal inside a cage is proposed. The proposed implantable device exhibits dimensions less than 6 mmx6 mmx1 mm, and a mass of 100 mg including a medical-grade silicon coating. The external system consists of a Class-E power amplifier driving a tuned 15 cmx25 cm external coil placed underneath the cage. The implant device is located in the animal's abdomen in a plane parallel to the external coil and utilizes inductive coupling to receive power from the external system. A half-wave rectifier rectifies the received AC voltage and passes the resulting DC current to a 2.5 kOmega resistor, which represents the loading of an implantable microsystem. An optimal operating point with respect to operating frequency and number of turns in each coil inductor was determined by analyzing the system efficiency. The determined optimal operating condition is based on a 4-turn external coil and a 20-turn internal coil operating at 4 MHz. With the Class-E amplifier consuming a constant power of 25 W, this operating condition is sufficient to supply a desired 3.2 V with 1.3 mA to the load over a cage size of 10 cmx20 cm with an animal tilting angle of up to 60 degrees, which is the worst case considered for the prototype design. A voltage regulator can be designed to regulate the received DC power to a stable supply for the bio-implant microsystem. PMID:17945719

  4. A compact RF power coupler for the NLC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G.B.

    2000-03-01

    A high power RF coupler connecting WR90 rectangular waveguide to the disc loaded waveguide accelerating structure of NLC is described. The coupler design is symmetric and free of beam deflecting field components. It makes an efficient electrical match between the rectangular waveguide power feed and the accelerator structure while keeping electrical surface field enhancement low. Electrical and mechanical design of the coupler are presented as well as quantitative comparisons between numerical simulation and low power cold test models.

  5. Broadband photonic RF quadrifilar with reconfigurable power splitting ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C.; Chan, E. H. W.; Wang, X.; Feng, X.; Guan, B.

    2016-07-01

    An all-optical 4-way photonic RF power splitter with quadrature-phase outputs is presented. It is based on using the new power splitting and independent optical phase control function in a Fourier-domain optical processor to split a single-wavelength phase modulated optical signal into four with the desired optical phases at different frequencies and route them to four different output ports. It solves the large phase error problem in the electrical quadrature-phase power dividers, and has the advantages of infinite isolation and a reconfigurable RF power splitting ratio. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate a 4-way photonic RF hybrid splitter with a 3-dB operating frequency range from 10.5 GHz to 26.5 GHz, an amplitude imbalance of less than 1 dB and a phase error of less than ±0.35°. The reconfigurable RF power splitting ratio of the hybrid splitter is also demonstrated experimentally.

  6. RF Power Upgrade for CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Kimber,Richard Nelson

    2011-03-01

    Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is currently upgrading the 6GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12GeV. As part of the upgrade, RF systems will be added, bringing the total from 340 to 420. Existing RF systems can provide up to 6.5 kW of CW RF at 1497 MHZ. The 80 new systems will provide increased RF power of up to 13 kW CW each. Built around a newly designed and higher efficiency 13 kW klystron developed for JLab by L-3 Communications, each new RF chain is a completely revamped system using hardware different than our present installations. This paper will discuss the main components of the new systems including the 13 kW klystron, waveguide isolator, and HV power supply using switch-mode technology. Methodology for selection of the various components and results of initial testing will also be addressed. Notice: Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

  7. Publications of Proceedings for the RF 2005 7th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, Jr, N C

    2006-01-01

    The University of California, Davis hosted the High Energy Density and High Power RF 7th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF in Kalamata, Greece, 13-17 June, 2005. The Proceedings cost was supported by these funds from the U.S. Department of Energy. The Proceedings was published through the American Institute of Physics.

  8. Klystron based high power rf system for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Patel, Niranjan; Handu, Verander E-mail: manjiri08@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    As a part of ADS program a proton accelerator (20 MeV, 30 mA) and its high power RF systems (HPRF) are being developed in BARC. This paper explains design details of this klystron based HPRF system. (author)

  9. High power testing of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Gonichon, J.

    1995-12-31

    The physics and technological issues involved in high gradient particle acceleration at high microwave (RF) frequencies are under study at MIT. The 17 GHz photocathode RF gun has a 1 1/2 cell ({pi} mode) room temperature cooper cavity. High power tests have been conducted at 5-10 MW levels with 100 ns pulses. A maximum surface electric field of 250 MV/m was achieved. This corresponds to an average on-axis gradient of 150 MeV/m. The gradient was also verified by a preliminary electron beam energy measurement. Even high gradients are expected in our next cavity design.

  10. Coating power RF components with TiN

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Hahn, E.

    1995-03-01

    A facility for coating RF power components with thin films of Ti and/or TiN has been in operation for some time at Fermilab supporting the Accelerator Division RF development work and the TESLA program. It has been experimentally verified that such coatings improve the performance of these components as far as withstanding higher electric fields. This is attributed to a reduction in the secondary electron emission coefficient of the surfaces when coated with a thin film containing titanium. The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to describe the facility and the procedure used.

  11. Thermal evaluation method for Klystron RF power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B. L.; Schleier, H.; Tesarek, T.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of adding instrumentation to the cooling system of a microwave transmitter for use as a calorimetric power measurement calibration is examined. It considers the accuracy of the basic measurements as well as heat sources and losses not measured. Experimental results are presented in support of the theory.

  12. RF peak power reduction in CAIPIRINHA excitation by interslice phase optimization.

    PubMed

    Sbrizzi, Alessandro; Poser, Benedikt A; Tse, Desmond H Y; Hoogduin, Hans; Luijten, Peter R; van den Berg, Cornelis A T

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to show that the overall peak power of RF pulses for CAIPIRINHA excitation can be substantially reduced by applying interslice phase relaxation. The optimal phases are scan dependent and can be quickly calculated by the proposed method. The multi-band RF pulse design is implemented as the minimization of a linear objective function with quadratic constraints. The interslice phase is considered to be a variable for optimization. In the case of a phase cycling scheme (CAIPIRINHA), the peak power is considered over all pulses. The computation time (about 1 s) is compatible with online RF pulse design. It is shown that the optimal interslice phases depend on the CAIPIRINHA scheme used and that RF peak power is reduced when the CAIPIRINHA phase cycling is taken into account in the optimization. The proposed method is extremely fast and results in RF pulses with low peak power for CAIPIRINHA excitation. The MATLAB implementation is given in the appendix; it allows for online determination of scan-dependent phase parameters. Furthermore, the method can be easily extended to pTx shimming systems in the context of multi-slice excitations, and this possibility is included in the software. PMID:26387856

  13. RF Input Power Couplers for High Current SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, V. F.; Anders, W.; Burrill, Andrew; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Neumann, Axel; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-12-01

    High current SRF technology is being explored in present day accelerator science. The bERLinPro project is presently being built at HZB to address the challenges involved in high current SRF machines with the goal of generating and accelerating a 100 mA electron beam to 50 MeV in continuous wave (cw) mode at 1.3 GHz. One of the main challenges in this project is that of handling the high input RF power required for the photo-injector as well as booster cavities where there is no energy recovery process. A high power co-axial input power coupler is being developed to be used for the photo-injector and booster cavities at the nominal beam current. The coupler is based on the KEK–cERL design and has been modified to minimise the penetration of the coupler tip in the beam pipe without compromising on beam-power coupling (Qext ~105). Herein we report on the RF design of the high power (115 kW per coupler, dual couplers per cavity) bERLinPro (BP) coupler along with initial results on thermal calculations. We summarise the RF conditioning of the TTF-III couplers (modified for cw operation) performed in the past at BESSY/HZB. A similar conditioning is envisaged in the near future for the low current SRF photo-injector and the bERLinPro main linac cryomodule.

  14. High-power RF testing of a 352-MHZ fast-ferrite RF cavity tuner at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Cherbak, E.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2006-01-01

    A 352-MHz fast-ferrite rf cavity tuner, manufactured by Advanced Ferrite Technology, was high-power tested on a single-cell copper rf cavity at the Advanced Photon Source. These tests measured the fast-ferrite tuner performance in terms of power handling capability, tuning bandwidth, tuning speed, stability, and rf losses. The test system comprises a single-cell copper rf cavity fitted with two identical coupling loops, one for input rf power and the other for coupling the fast-ferrite tuner to the cavity fields. The fast-ferrite tuner rf circuit consists of a cavity coupling loop, a 6-1/8-inch EIA coaxial line system with directional couplers, and an adjustable 360{sup o} mechanical phase shifter in series with the fast-ferrite tuner. A bipolar DC bias supply, controlled by a low-level rf cavity tuning loop consisting of an rf phase detector and a PID amplifier, is used to provide a variable bias current to the tuner ferrite material to maintain the test cavity at resonance. Losses in the fast-ferrite tuner are calculated from cooling water calorimetry. Test data will be presented.

  15. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  16. Improved Thermal Stability of RF Power BJT with Ballast Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Benqing; Zhang, Qingzhong

    2013-12-01

    To improve thermal stability and relieve current convergence in rf power bjts, an embedded active CMOS ballast circuit is proposed. By detecting the inhomogeneous temperature through distributed temperature sensors, the adjacent ballast circuit is triggered to shunt the base convergence current of the power BJT cell, performing the ballast protection for the device. Simulations and measurements validate the effectiveness of the proposed ballast circuit. Compared to conventional ballast resistor methods, the improved device integrated with ballast circuits exhibits superior electrical performance. The single ballast circuit only consumes 6.5 mW with additional occupied area of 2530 um2.

  17. Micro-Fabricated DC Comparison Calorimeter for RF Power Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Neji, Bilel; Xu, Jing; Titus, Albert H.; Meltzer, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Diode detection and bolometric detection have been widely used to measure radio frequency (RF) power. However, flow calorimeters, in particular micro-fabricated flow calorimeters, have been mostly unexplored as power meters. This paper presents the design, micro-fabrication and characterization of a flow calorimeter. This novel device is capable of measuring power from 100 μW to 200 mW. It has a 50-Ohm load that is heated by the RF source, and the heat is transferred to fluid in a microchannel. The temperature change in the fluid is measured by a thermistor that is connected in one leg of a Wheatstone bridge. The output voltage change of the bridge corresponds to the RF power applied to the load. The microfabricated device measures 25.4 mm × 50.8 mm, excluding the power supplies, microcontroller and fluid pump. Experiments demonstrate that the micro-fabricated sensor has a sensitivity up to 22 × 10−3 V/W. The typical resolution of this micro-calorimeter is on the order of 50 μW, and the best resolution is around 10 μW. The effective efficiency is 99.9% from 0–1 GHz and more than 97.5% at frequencies up to 4 GHz. The measured reflection coefficient of the 50-Ohm load and coplanar wave guide is less than −25 dB from 0–2 GHz and less than −16 dB at 2–4 GHz. PMID:25350509

  18. Coaxial extraction of RF power from a traveling wave amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.; Kerslick, G.S.; Nation, J.A.; Schaecter, L.

    1996-12-31

    The authors present new results from a high-power relativistic traveling wave tube amplifier experiment in which the RF power is extracted in a coaxial output section. The amplifier consists of two slow-wave structures separated by a resistive sever. The first stage imparts a small modulation to the beam. The second stage consists of an iris-loaded circular waveguide which is tapered from both ends by an adiabatic increase in the iris aperture with each successive period. The periodic length and the external cavity radius are kept constant. This provides a low-reflection transition from the slow-wave structure to the empty circular waveguide. A coaxial inner conductor is inserted into the output tapered section of the slow-wave structure and its` position and radius chosen to minimize reflections and maximize extracted RF power. It is shown both experimentally and through MAGIC simulations that a fairly low reflection circular TM{sub 01} to coaxial TEM mode transition can be made this way. Any small reflections form the output end travel backwards and are absorbed in the sever. In contrast to the traditional transverse extraction of power into a rectangular waveguide, the coaxial extraction is fairly broadband and exhibits much lower sensitivity to dimensions. The beam is dumped through an aperture in the inner conductor. Presently, the power is extracted into the coaxial waveguide and absorbed into a tapered resistive load. This will be later converted to the TE{sub 10} mode of a rectangular waveguide.

  19. Measuring the attenuation characteristics of biological tissues enabling for low power in vivo RF transmission.

    PubMed

    Laqua, Daniel; Just, Thomas; Husar, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In clinical routine there is a need of periodical recording of vital parameters in high risk groups, for example the intraocular pressure. A solution for this could be an intracorporeal sensor using a wireless radio frequency (RF) transmitter. Thereby the risk of an infection is reduced, because a percutaneous connection is not necessary. A limiting factor for some organs is the size of implants. For designing an energy efficient low power RF transmitter, the dielectric parameters of representative biological tissues have to be determined. In this article two methods of measurement are presented, the coaxial probe and transmission line method. With this information about the dielectric parameters a miniaturized RF transmitter was built for proofing tests on phantoms with equal properties like biological tissue. PMID:21096351

  20. RF power amplifier: pushing the boundaries of performance versus cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Souza, M. M.; Chevaux, N.; Rasheduzzaman, M.

    2012-10-01

    The Radio Frequency Power Amplifier lies at the heart of all modern day communication systems ranging from the cellular infrastructure market to broadcast, radar, medical, automotive and military to name a few. Transmission systems not only require substantial power at high frequencies, but they are also one of the most demanding of semiconductor applications on account of their requirements for efficiency and linearity, which inherently introduces a tradeoff during design. Three types of device technologies have been in typical use for RF power amplification: the VDMOS (at frequencies upto 1 GHz), the LDMOS (at frequencies upto 3.5 GHz), and more recently the Gallium Nitride HEMT, which extends the frequency range upto 5-7 GHz. As an emerging technology, GaN has huge potential, but its widespread use is still currently limited by the level of experience, absence of reliable device models and prices which are roughly (6-10 times that of silicon). This overview highlights the distinct features of the RF Power devices and touches upon the performance metrics of the above technologies (in silicon and GaN).

  1. LCLS-II high power RF system overview and progress

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, Anahid Dian

    2015-10-07

    A second X-ray free electron laser facility, LCLS-II, will be constructed at SLAC. LCLS-II is based on a 1.3 GHz, 4 GeV, continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator, to be installed in the first kilometer of the SLAC tunnel. Multiple types of high power RF (HPRF) sources will be used to power different systems on LCLS-II. The main 1.3 GHz linac will be powered by 280 1.3 GHz, 3.8 kW solid state amplifier (SSA) sources. The normal conducting buncher in the injector will use four more SSAs identical to the linac SSAs but run at 2 kW. Two 185.7 MHz, 60 kW sources will power the photocathode dual-feed RF gun. A third harmonic linac section, included for linearizing the bunch energy spread before the first bunch compressor, will require sixteen 3.9 GHz sources at about 1 kW CW. A description and an update on all the HPRF sources of LCLS-II and their implementation is the subject of this paper.

  2. rf power system for thrust measurements of a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Kieckhafer, Alexander W.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2010-07-15

    A rf power system has been developed, which allows the use of rf plasma devices in an electric propulsion test facility without excessive noise pollution in thruster diagnostics. Of particular importance are thrust stand measurements, which were previously impossible due to noise. Three major changes were made to the rf power system: first, the cable connection was changed from a balanced transmission line to an unbalanced coaxial line. Second, the rf power cabinet was placed remotely in order to reduce vibration-induced noise in the thrust stand. Finally, a relationship between transmission line length and rf was developed, which allows good transmission of rf power from the matching network to the helicon antenna. The modified system was tested on a thrust measurement stand and showed that rf power has no statistically significant contribution to the thrust stand measurement.

  3. rf power system for thrust measurements of a helicon plasma source.

    PubMed

    Kieckhafer, Alexander W; Walker, Mitchell L R

    2010-07-01

    A rf power system has been developed, which allows the use of rf plasma devices in an electric propulsion test facility without excessive noise pollution in thruster diagnostics. Of particular importance are thrust stand measurements, which were previously impossible due to noise. Three major changes were made to the rf power system: first, the cable connection was changed from a balanced transmission line to an unbalanced coaxial line. Second, the rf power cabinet was placed remotely in order to reduce vibration-induced noise in the thrust stand. Finally, a relationship between transmission line length and rf was developed, which allows good transmission of rf power from the matching network to the helicon antenna. The modified system was tested on a thrust measurement stand and showed that rf power has no statistically significant contribution to the thrust stand measurement. PMID:20687758

  4. rf power system for thrust measurements of a helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieckhafer, Alexander W.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2010-07-01

    A rf power system has been developed, which allows the use of rf plasma devices in an electric propulsion test facility without excessive noise pollution in thruster diagnostics. Of particular importance are thrust stand measurements, which were previously impossible due to noise. Three major changes were made to the rf power system: first, the cable connection was changed from a balanced transmission line to an unbalanced coaxial line. Second, the rf power cabinet was placed remotely in order to reduce vibration-induced noise in the thrust stand. Finally, a relationship between transmission line length and rf was developed, which allows good transmission of rf power from the matching network to the helicon antenna. The modified system was tested on a thrust measurement stand and showed that rf power has no statistically significant contribution to the thrust stand measurement.

  5. 15.6 GHz Ceramic RF Power Extractor Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.V.; Luo, Y.; Yu, D.

    2004-12-07

    A 15.6GHz, slow-wave dielectric structure with matched RF power outcoupler is described. The extractor is to be driven at the 12th harmonic of a bunched electron beam at the upgraded AWA facility at ANL. The design includes a single-port output with two stubs, an upstream absorber, and a ceramic tube matched for the fundamental mode at the downstream end and for the dipole mode at the upstream end. Two codes (Microwave Studio registered and Gd1) were used to optimize and analyze the design in frequency and time domains including wakefields.

  6. Results of a preliminary, high power RF thruster test

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, L.; Karras, T.; Frind, G.; Holmes, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate a high power electrodeless, RF electric propulsion concept. This was successfully accomplished. No attempt was made to optimize the design of the thruster with regard to physical dimensions, mass flow, nozzle shape, operational frequency, or power level. Measurements made were chamber pressure, total and static pressures at the nozzle exit plane and exhaust tank pressure. Mass flows range from about 0.4 to 1 gm/sec and, assuming perfect gas relationships, specific impulses up to 580 sec were obtained. Typical chamber pressure was 300 torr exhausting to a tank pressure of about 10 torr. Working fluids used were argon, helium and mixtures of the two. No degration of the device was detected after 12 start/stop cycles, about three hours of total run time, and a maximum input power of 70 kW. 10 refs.

  7. Neutral particle dynamics in a high-power RF source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, D.; Paunska, Ts.; Tarnev, Kh.; Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies on the spatial discharge structure in the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions carried out at low applied power are extended towards description of the discharge maintenance under the conditions of the actual rf power deposition of 100 kW planned for a single driver of the source. In addition to the expected higher electron density, the results show strong increase of the electron temperature and of the temperatures of the neutral species (hydrogen atoms and molecules). In the discussions, not only the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters but also that of the fluxes in the discharge (particle and energy fluxes) is involved. The obtained results come in confirmation of basic concepts for low-pressure discharge maintenance: (i) mutually related electron density and temperature as a display of the generalized Schottky condition, (ii) discharge behavior governed by the fluxes, i.e. strong nonlocality in the discharge, and (iii) a non-ambipolarity in the discharge regime, which originates from shifted maxima of the electron density and temperature and shows evidence in a vortex electron flux and in a dc current in a rf discharge, the latter resulting from a shift in the positions of the maxima of the electron density and plasma potential.

  8. Neutral particle dynamics in a high-power RF source

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, D. Paunska, Ts.; Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-04-08

    Previous studies on the spatial discharge structure in the SPIDER source of negative hydrogen/deuterium ions carried out at low applied power are extended towards description of the discharge maintenance under the conditions of the actual rf power deposition of 100 kW planned for a single driver of the source. In addition to the expected higher electron density, the results show strong increase of the electron temperature and of the temperatures of the neutral species (hydrogen atoms and molecules). In the discussions, not only the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters but also that of the fluxes in the discharge (particle and energy fluxes) is involved. The obtained results come in confirmation of basic concepts for low-pressure discharge maintenance: (i) mutually related electron density and temperature as a display of the generalized Schottky condition, (ii) discharge behavior governed by the fluxes, i.e. strong nonlocality in the discharge, and (iii) a non-ambipolarity in the discharge regime, which originates from shifted maxima of the electron density and temperature and shows evidence in a vortex electron flux and in a dc current in a rf discharge, the latter resulting from a shift in the positions of the maxima of the electron density and plasma potential.

  9. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  10. Wirelessly powered microfluidic dielectrophoresis devices using printable RF circuits.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wen; Cho, Gyoujin; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2011-03-21

    We report the first microfluidic device integrated with a printed RF circuit so the device can be wirelessly powered by a commercially available RFID reader. For conventional dielectrophoresis devices, electrical wires are needed to connect the electric components on the microchip to external equipment such as power supplies, amplifiers, function generators, etc. Such a procedure is unfamiliar to most clinicians and pathologists who are used to working with a microscope for examination of samples on microscope slides. The wirelessly powered device reported here eliminates the entire need for wire attachments and external instruments so the operators can use the device in essentially the same manner as they do with microscope slides. The integrated circuit can be fabricated on a flexible plastic substrate at very low cost using a roll-to-roll printing method. Electrical power at 13.56 MHz transmitted by a radio-frequency identification (RFID) reader is inductively coupled to the printed RFIC and converted into 10 V DC (direct current) output, which provides sufficient power to drive a microfluidic device to manipulate biological particles such as beads and proteins via the DC dielectrophoresis (DC-DEP) effect. To our best knowledge, this is the first wirelessly powered microfluidic dielectrophoresis device. Although the work is preliminary, the device concept, the architecture, and the core technology are expected to stimulate many efforts in the future and transform the technology to a wide range of clinical and point-of-care applications. PMID:21293829

  11. Low power smartdust receiver with novel applications and improvements of an RF power harvesting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Thomas Steven, Jr.

    Smartdust is the evolution of wireless sensor networks to cubic centimeter dimensions or less. Smartdust systems have advantages in cost, flexibility, and rapid deployment that make them ideal for many military, medical, and industrial applications. This work addresses the limitations of prior works of research to provide sufficient lifetime and performance for Smartdust sensor networks through the design, fabrication and testing of a novel low power receiver for use in a Smartdust transceiver. Through the novel optimization of a multi-stage LNA design and novel application of a power matched Villard voltage doubler circuit, a 1.0 V, 1.6 mW low power On-Off Key (OOK) receiver operating at 2.2 GHz is fabricated using 0.13 um CMOS technology. To facilitate data transfer in adverse RF propagation environments (1/r3 loss), the chip receives a 1 Mbps data signal with a sensitivity of -90 dBm while consuming just 1.6 nJ/bit. The receiver operates without the addition of any external passives facilitating its application in Smartdust scale (cm 3) wireless sensor networks. This represents an order of magnitude decrease in power consumption over receiver designs of comparable sensitivity. In an effort to further extend the lifetime of the Smartdust transceiver, RF power harvesting is explored as a power source. The small scale of Smartdust sensor networks poses unique challenges in the design of RF power scavenging systems. To meet these challenges, novel design improvements to an RF power scavenging circuit integrated directly onto CMOS are presented. These improvements include a reduction in the threshold voltage of diode connected MOSFET and sources of circuit parasitics that are unique to integrated circuits. Utilizing these improvements, the voltage necessary to drive Smartdust circuitry (1 V) with a greater than 20% RF to DC conversion efficiency was generated from RF energy levels measured in the environment (66 uW). This represents better than double the RF to DC

  12. 47 CFR 97.315 - Certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Certification of external RF power amplifiers... power amplifiers. (a) Any external RF power amplifier (see § 2.815 of the FCC Rules) manufactured or... accordance with subpart J of part 2 of the FCC Rules. No amplifier capable of operation below 144 MHz may...

  13. 47 CFR 97.315 - Certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Certification of external RF power amplifiers... power amplifiers. (a) Any external RF power amplifier (see § 2.815 of the FCC Rules) manufactured or... accordance with subpart J of part 2 of the FCC Rules. No amplifier capable of operation below 144 MHz may...

  14. 47 CFR 97.315 - Certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification of external RF power amplifiers... power amplifiers. (a) Any external RF power amplifier (see § 2.815 of the FCC Rules) manufactured or... accordance with subpart J of part 2 of the FCC Rules. No amplifier capable of operation below 144 MHz may...

  15. 47 CFR 97.315 - Certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Certification of external RF power amplifiers... power amplifiers. (a) Any external RF power amplifier (see § 2.815 of the FCC Rules) manufactured or... accordance with subpart J of part 2 of the FCC Rules. No amplifier capable of operation below 144 MHz may...

  16. 47 CFR 97.315 - Certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Certification of external RF power amplifiers... power amplifiers. (a) Any external RF power amplifier (see § 2.815 of the FCC Rules) manufactured or... accordance with subpart J of part 2 of the FCC Rules. No amplifier capable of operation below 144 MHz may...

  17. Sintering of ceramics using low frequency rf power

    SciTech Connect

    Caughman, J.B.O.; Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Akerman, M.A.; Forrester, S.C.; Kass, M.D.

    1995-07-01

    Sintering with low frequency rf power ({approximately}50 MHz) is a new technique with unique capabilities that has been used to sinter a variety of ceramic materials, including zirconia-toughened alumina, alumina, silicon carbide, and boron carbide. Processing with low frequencies offers many advantages compared to processing with conventional microwave frequencies (915 MHz and 2.45 GHz). Because of the longer wavelength, the rf electric field penetrates materials more than microwaves. This effect allows the processing of a wider variety of materials and allows for an increase in the physical size of the material being processed. In addition, the material is heated in a single mode cavity with a uniform electric field, which reduces the occurrence of hot-spot generation and thermal runaway effects. This technique has been used to sinter large crack-free alumina samples (3 inch square) to > 97% density. The sintering and/or annealing of a number of carbide materials has been demonstrated as well, including silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, and titanium carbide.

  18. CD-insensitive PMD monitoring based on RF power measurement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Yu, Changyuan; Cheng, Linghao; Li, Zhaohui; Lu, Chao; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Tam, Hwa-yaw; Wai, P K A

    2011-01-17

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a chromatic dispersion (CD)-insensitive first-order polarization mode dispersion (PMD) monitoring method based on radio-frequency (RF) power measurement. In high-speed (>10-GSym/s) transmission systems, a narrowband fiber Bragg grating (FBG) notch filter filters out the optical components at 10GHz away from the carrier. After square-law detection, the 10-GHz RF tone changes with PMD and is insensitive to CD, which can be used as a PMD monitoring signal. Compared with the monitoring techniques utilizing clock tone, the PMD measurement range is increased from 26.3-ps to 50-ps while the requirement of the bandwidth of photodetector is reduced from 19GHz to 10GHz in 19-Gsym/s systems. It is experimentally shown that this technique is efficient on CD-insensitive first-order PMD monitoring for 38-Gbit/s DQPSK and 57-Gbit/s D8PSK systems. PMID:21263676

  19. Apparatus for nonresonant rf power absorption studies in high Tc superconductors and CMR materials using rf oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, S.; Bhat, S. V.

    2005-02-01

    The design, fabication, and performance of an apparatus for measurement of nonresonant rf power absorption (NRRA) in superconducting and CMR samples are described. The system consists of an effective self-resonant LC tank circuit driven by a NOT gate (Logic gate). The samples under investigation are placed in the core of an inductive coil and nonresonant power absorption is determined from the measured shift in total current supplies to the whole oscillator circuit. A customized low temperature insert is used to integrate the experiment with a commercial oxford cryostat and temperature controller. The system makes use of a sensitive digital multimeter (Keithley 2002 model) and is capable of measuring NRRA in superconducting and colossal magnetoresistance samples of volume as small as 1×10-3cm3 with a signal to noise ratio of 10. Further increase in the sensitivity of the experimental setup can be obtained by summing the results of repeated measurements obtained in the same temperature interval. The system has been tested for an IC 74LS04 oscillator at frequencies between 1MHz and 25MHz in the temperature range from 4.2Kto400K and in magnetic field from 0to1.4T. The system performance is evaluated by measuring the NRRA in YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) superconducting sample and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganite samples at different rf frequencies. During a measurement all operation are controlled automatically by computer from a menu-driven software system, with user input required only on initiation of measurement sequence.

  20. Klystron Cluster Scheme for ILC High Power RF Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present a concept for powering the main linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) by delivering high power RF from the surface via overmoded, low-loss waveguides at widely spaced intervals. The baseline design employs a two-tunnel layout, with klystrons and modulators evenly distributed along a service tunnel running parallel to the accelerator tunnel. This new idea eliminates the need for the service tunnel. It also brings most of the warm heat load to the surface, dramatically reducing the tunnel water cooling and HVAC requirements. In the envisioned configuration, groups of 70 klystrons and modulators are clustered in surface buildings every 2.5 km. Their outputs are combined into two half-meter diameter circular TE{sub 01} mode evacuated waveguides. These are directed via special bends through a deep shaft and along the tunnel, one upstream and one downstream. Each feeds approximately 1.25 km of linac with power tapped off in 10 MW portions at 38 m intervals. The power is extracted through a novel coaxial tap-off (CTO), after which the local distribution is as it would be from a klystron. The tap-off design is also employed in reverse for the initial combining.

  1. Power excitation by the use of a rf wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    It is well-known that there are difficulties to obtain rf power sources of significant amount for frequencies larger than 3 GHz. Yet, rf sources in the centimeter/millimeter wavelength range would be very useful to drive, for example, high-gradient accelerating linacs for electron-positron linear colliders. We would like to propose an alternative method to produce such radiation. It makes use of a short electron bunch traveling along the axis of a waveguide which is at the same time excited by a TM propagating electromagnetic wave. It is well known that radiation can be obtained by wiggling the motion of the electrons in a direction perpendicular to the main one. The wiggling action can be included by electromagnetic fields in a fashion similar to the one caused by wiggler magnets. We found that an interesting mode of operation is to drive the waveguide with an excitation frequency very close to the cut off. For such excitation, the corresponding e.m. wave travels with a very large phase velocity which in turn has the effect to increase the wiggling action on the electron bunch. Our method, to be effective, relies also on the coherence of the radiation; that is the bunch length is taken to be considerably shorter than the radiated wavelength. In this case, the total power radiated should be proportional to the square of the total number of electrons in the bunch. The paper concludes with possible modes of operation, a list of performance parameters and a proposed experimental set-up.

  2. Power excitation by the use of a rf wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-07-01

    It is well-known that there are difficulties to obtain rf power sources of significant amount for frequencies larger than 3 GHz. Yet, rf sources in the centimeter/millimeter wavelength range would be very useful to drive, for example, high-gradient accelerating linacs for electron-positron linear colliders. We would like to propose an alternative method to produce such radiation. It makes use of a short electron bunch traveling along the axis of a waveguide which is at the same time excited by a TM propagating electromagnetic wave. It is well known that radiation can be obtained by wiggling the motion of the electrons in a direction perpendicular to the main one. The wiggling action can be included by electromagnetic fields in a fashion similar to the one caused by wiggler magnets. We found that an interesting mode of operation is to drive the waveguide with an excitation frequency very close to the cut off. For such excitation, the corresponding e.m. wave travels with a very large phase velocity which in turn has the effect to increase the wiggling action on the electron bunch. Our method, to be effective, relies also on the coherence of the radiation; that is the bunch length is taken to be considerably shorter than the radiated wavelength. In this case, the total power radiated should be proportional to the square of the total number of electrons in the bunch. The paper concludes with possible modes of operation, a list of performance parameters and a proposed experimental set-up.

  3. Publication of Proceedings for the 6th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF (RF 2003)

    SciTech Connect

    Victor L. Granatstein

    2004-08-08

    The 6th Workshop on High Energy Density and High Power RF (RF 2003) was held from June 22 to June 26 at the Coolfont Resort and Conference Center in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. The Workshop was hosted by the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics (IREAP) of the University of Maryland, College Park and by the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC. As its name implies this was the sixth in a series of biennial workshops devoted to exchanging information and ideas on high power microwave sources and components. The applications addressed included particle accelerators, radar, HPM, space exploration, neutron sources and plasma heating and current driven in controlled thermonuclear fusion research. This Final Report includes a brief description of the RF 2003 Workshop and the distribution of the published proceedings.

  4. Development of 3 kW at 325 MHz solid-state RF power amplifier using four power amplifier modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramarao, B. V.; Sonal, S.; Mishra, J. K.; Pande, M.; Singh, P.; Kumar, G.; Mukherjee, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high power solid-state RF power amplifier of 3 kW at 325 MHz has been developed using only four RF power amplifier modules of 850 W power output each. The design and characterization of RF power modules have been presented. A four way Wilkinson power combiner adds the output of four power amplifier modules with a total transmission loss of less than 6%. The combined power amplifier has a power gain of 20.2 dB at 1-dB compression point, and the corresponding output power is 2.8 kW at 325 MHz. The drain efficiency of the power amplifier is 65.3% at 3 kW. All the harmonics of this amplifier are below -40 dBc. The amplifier has better characteristics like fewer numbers of active devices per kilo watt, high efficiency, high gain, and ruggedness etc for RF accelerator applications.

  5. Tore Supra LH transmitter upgrade, a new RF driver for the power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Berger-By, G.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Bouquey, F.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Lombard, G.; Magne, R.; Mollard, P.; Pagano, M.; Prou, M.; Samaille, F.; Volpe, D.; Volpe, R.

    2011-12-23

    New real time tools have been developed for testing new 700kW/3.7GHz/CW klystrons and for the operations on very long plasma shots. After the commissioning of the 18 series tubes on the high power test bed facility, the installation of the first 8 klystrons in the Tore Supra transmitter and the adjustment tests on load, this upgrade work has been materialized during the last 2010 campaign by a successful operation on the Full Active Multijunction (FAM) C3 antenna, with new performances: 3.5MW/40s on plasma. The RF output power control in amplitude and phase has been improved for a better control of the wave spectrum launched into the plasma. The new klystrons have no modulating anode and the high cathode voltage must be adjusted with the RF input power in order to optimize the RF output power with a minimization of the thermal power losses in the collector. A new phase correction, depending on the 3 RF output power ranges used, has been introduced. The improvements made in 2009 and 2010 on the generic phase loop and the procedures used during the real time tests of the RF transfer functions in amplitude and phase are detailed below. All RF measurements systems, RF safety systems and the RF calibration procedures have been revised in order to have the best consistency, reproducibility and with a measurement error against the calorimetry measurement lower than 10%.

  6. Effect of RF power on the optical, electrical, mechanical and structural properties of sputtering Ga-doped ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Chuen-Lin; Yu, Kuo-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Yo; Liu, Ming-Chung

    2015-11-01

    We present the influences of radio-frequency (RF) power on the optical, electrical, mechanical, and structural properties of Ga-doped zinc oxide (GZO) thin films by RF magnetron sputtering at room temperature. GZO thin films were grown on unheated glass and silicon substrates using radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method with different RF powers (from 60 W to 160 W). The optical properties of the GZO thin film were determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The residual stress in GZO films were measured by a home-made Twyman-Green interferometer with the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method. The surface roughness of GZO films were measured by a microscopic interferometry. The microstructure, composition and crystal orientation of the GZO films were determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). This paper revealed that the optical, electrical, mechanical, and structural properties of GZO thin film are subject to the RF power. For the optical spectrum measurement, an average optical transmittance in the visible region of the spectra of 85% was obtained. For the characteristic measurements, all the GZO thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering have compressive stress at different RF powers. A minimum residual stress of 0.24 GPa is found at the RF power of 140 W. A four-point probe method was used to measure the resistivity of the GZO thin films with different powers, the results indicate that the resistivity increases with increasing of RF power. In addition, the root-mean-square (RMS) surface roughness of GZO thin films slightly increases as the RF power is increasing. We have also compared the results with the relevant literatures.

  7. Beamline considerations for a compact, high current, high power linear RF electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Marder, B.

    1987-06-01

    A design for a compact, high current, high power linear electron accelerator using an rf power source is investigated. It consists of adjacent cavities into which rf power is injected and through which electron pulses pass. The source is assumed to be capable of delivering sufficient rf power to the desired location at the proper phase. Beamline issues such as cavity loading, energy extraction, longitudinal and transverse pulse focusing, and beam breakup are considered. A device which, given the required source, can deliver beam parameters comparable to existing induction accelerators but which is more than an order of magnitude smaller appears feasible.

  8. Self-heating study of bulk acoustic wave resonators under high RF power.

    PubMed

    Ivira, Brice; Fillit, René-Yves; Ndagijimana, Fabien; Benech, Philippe; Parat, Guy; Ancey, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    The present work first provides an experimental technique to study self-heating of bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators under high RF power in the gigahertz range. This study is specially focused on film bulk acoustic wave resonators and solidly mounted resonators processed onto silicon wafers and designed for wireless systems. Precisely, the reflection coefficient of a one-port device is measured while up to several watts are applied and power leads to electrical drifts of impedances. In the following, we describe how absorbed power can be determined from the incident one in real time. Therefore, an infrared camera held over the radio frequency micro electromechanical system (RF-MEMS) surface with an exceptional spatial resolution reaching up to 2 microm/pixels gives accurate temperature mapping of resonators after emissivity correction. From theoretical point of view, accurate three-dimensional (3-D) structures for finite-element modeling analyses are carried out to know the best materials and architectures to use for enhancing power handling. In both experimental and theoretical investigations, comparison is made between film bulk acoustic wave resonators and solidly mounted resonators. Thus, the trend in term of material, architecture, and size of device for power application such as in transmission path of a transceiver is clearly identified. PMID:18334320

  9. Exploring the limits of broadband excitation and inversion: II. Rf-power optimized pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobzar, Kyryl; Skinner, Thomas E.; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.; Luy, Burkhard

    2008-09-01

    In [K. Kobzar, T.E. Skinner, N. Khaneja, S.J. Glaser, B. Luy, Exploring the limits of broadband excitation and inversion, J. Magn. Reson. 170 (2004) 236-243], optimal control theory was employed in a systematic study to establish physical limits for the minimum rf-amplitudes required in broadband excitation and inversion pulses. In a number of cases, however, experimental schemes are not limited by rf-amplitudes, but by the overall rf-power applied to a sample. We therefore conducted a second systematic study of excitation and inversion pulses of varying pulse durations with respect to bandwidth and rf-tolerances, but this time using a modified algorithm involving restricted rf-power. The resulting pulses display a variety of pulse shapes with highly modulated rf-amplitudes and generally show better performance than corresponding pulses with identical pulse length and rf-power, but limited rf-amplitude. A detailed description of pulse shapes and their performance is given for the so-called power-BEBOP and power-BIBOP pulses.

  10. Battery-Powered RF Pre-Ionization System for the Caltech Magnetohydrodynamically-Driven Jet Experiment: RF Discharge Properties and MHD-Driven Jet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.

    This thesis describes investigations of two classes of laboratory plasmas with rather different properties: partially ionized low pressure radiofrequency (RF) discharges, and fully ionized high density magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven jets. An RF pre-ionization system was developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and create hotter, faster jets in the Caltech MHD-Driven Jet Experiment. The RF plasma source used a custom pulsed 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF power amplifier that was powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 4-6 kV with the cathode of the jet experiment. The argon RF discharge equilibrium and transport properties were analyzed, and novel jet dynamics were observed. Although the RF plasma source was conceived as a wave-heated helicon source, scaling measurements and numerical modeling showed that inductive coupling was the dominant energy input mechanism. A one-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed to quantitatively explain the expansion of the pre-ionized plasma into the jet experiment chamber. The plasma transitioned from an ionizing phase with depressed neutral emission to a recombining phase with enhanced emission during the course of the experiment, causing fast camera images to be a poor indicator of the density distribution. Under certain conditions, the total visible and infrared brightness and the downstream ion density both increased after the RF power was turned off. The time-dependent emission patterns were used for an indirect measurement of the neutral gas pressure. The low-mass jets formed with the aid of the pre-ionization system were extremely narrow and collimated near the electrodes, with peak density exceeding that of jets created without pre-ionization. The initial neutral gas distribution prior to plasma breakdown was found to be critical in determining the ultimate jet structure. The visible radius of the dense central jet column was several times narrower than the axial current channel

  11. Simulation of plasma effects on rf power transport in vacuum waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, Peter; Smithe, David

    2007-11-01

    Researchers use rf power to heat tokamak plasmas and excite cavities for particle accelerators among other applications. Unwanted plasma can limit the power one can transmit from a source (such as a klystron) to the target (such as the tokamak plasma or the accelerating cavity). Researchers believe some possible sources for this plasma are ionization of residual gas or sputtering of material from the waveguide surface. We use computer simulation to model the effects of this plasma on the rf power transmission in a typical rf waveguide. In particular, we estimate using a coronal model the power radiated by ions in the plasma (these could be plasma ions or impurity ions). We calculate the ion density required to radiate all the incident rf power for various power levels up to 100 MW. We also use this density to estimate spot sizes on the waveguide surface, comparing these estimates with observations at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  12. Dependence of nuclear spin singlet lifetimes on RF spin-locking power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVience, Stephen J.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2012-05-01

    We measure the lifetime of long-lived nuclear spin singlet states as a function of the strength of the RF spin-locking field and present a simple theoretical model that agrees well with our measurements, including the low-RF-power regime. We also measure the lifetime of a long-lived coherence between singlet and triplet states that does not require a spin-locking field for preservation. Our results indicate that for many molecules, singlet states can be created using weak RF spin-locking fields: more than two orders of magnitude lower RF power than in previous studies. Our findings suggest that for many endogenous biomolecules, singlets and related states with enhanced lifetimes might be achievable in vivo with safe levels of RF power.

  13. Simplified RF power system for Wideroe-type linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Fugitt, J.; Howard, D.; Crosby, F.; Johnson, R.; Nolan, M.; Yuen, G.

    1981-03-01

    The RF system for the SuperHILAC injector linac was designed and constructed for minimum system complexity, wide dynamic range, and ease of maintenance. The final amplifier is close coupled to the linac and operates in an efficient semilinear mode, eliminating troublesome transmission lines, modulators, and high level regulators. The system has been operated at over 250 kW, 23 MHz with good regulation. The low level RF electronics are contained in a single chassis adjacent to the RF control computer, which monitors all important operating parameters. A unique 360/sup 0/ phase and amplitude modular is used for precise control and regulation of the accelerating voltage.

  14. Feedback analysis and design of RF power links for low-power bionic systems.

    PubMed

    Baker, M W; Sarpeshkar, R

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a feedback-loop technique for analyzing and designing RF power links for transcutaneous bionic systems, i.e., between an external RF coil and an internal RF coil implanted inside the body. The feedback techniques shed geometric insight into link design and minimize algebraic manipulations. We demonstrate that when the loop transmission of the link's feedback loop is -1, the link is critically coupled, i.e., the magnitude of the voltage transfer function across the link is maximal. We also derive an optimal loading condition that maximizes the energy efficiency of the link and use it as a basis for our link design. We present an example of a bionic implant system designed for load power consumptions in the 1-10-mW range, a low-power regime not significantly explored in prior designs. Such low power levels add to the challenge of link efficiency, because the overhead associated with switching losses in power amplifiers at the link input and with rectifiers at the link output significantly degrade link efficiency. We describe a novel integrated Class-E power amplifier design that uses a simple control strategy to minimize such losses. At 10-mW load power consumption, we measure overall link efficiencies of 74% and 54% at 1- and 10-mm coil separations, respectively, in good agreement with our theoretical predictions of the link's efficiency. At 1-mW load power consumption, we measure link efficiencies of 67% and 51% at 1- and 10-mm coil separations, respectively, also in good accord with our theoretical predictions. In both cases, the link's rectified output dc voltage varied by less than 16% over link distances that ranged from 2 to 10 mm. PMID:23851518

  15. Long pulse H- beam extraction with a rf driven ion source on a high power level.

    PubMed

    Kraus, W; Fantz, U; Franzen, P

    2010-02-01

    IPP Garching is investigating the applicability of rf driven negative ion sources for the neutral beam injection of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The setup of the tested source was improved to enable long pulses up to 100 kW rf power. The efficiency of negative ion production decreases at high power. The extracted H(-) currents as well as the symmetry of the plasma density close to the plasma grid and of the beam divergence depend on the magnetic filter field. The pulse duration is limited by the increase in coextracted electrons, which depends on the rf power and the caesium conditions on the plasma grid. PMID:20192417

  16. Solid state RF power: The route to 1W per euro cent

    SciTech Connect

    Heid, Oliver

    2013-04-19

    In most particle accelerators RF power is a decisive design constraint due to high costs and relative inflexibility of current electron beam based RF sources, i.e. Klystrons, Magnetrons, Tetrodes etc. At VHF/UHF frequencies the transition to solid state devices promises to fundamentally change the situation. Recent progress brings 1 Watt per Euro cent installed cost within reach. We present a Silicon Carbide semiconductor solution utilising the Solid State Direct Drive technology at unprecedented efficiency, power levels and power densities. The proposed solution allows retrofitting of existing RF accelerators and opens the route to novel particle accelerator concepts.

  17. Development toward high-power sub-1-ohm DC-67 GHz RF switches using phase change materials for reconfigurable RF front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jeong-sun; Seo, Hwa-chang; Le, Duc

    2014-06-01

    We report GeTe-based phase change material RF switches with on-state resistance of 0.07 ohm*mm and off-state capacitance of 20 fF/mm. The RF switch figure-of-merit, Ron*Coff is comparable to RF MEMS ohmic switches. The PCM RF shunt and series switches were fabricated for the first time in a lateral FET configuration to reduce parasitics, different from the vertical via switches. In a shunt switch configuration, isolation of 30 dB was achieved up to 67 GHz with return loss of 15 dB. RF power handling was tested with ~10 W for series and 3 W for shunt configurations. Harmonic powers were suppressed more than 100 dBc at fundamental power of 1 W, for future tunable and reconfigurable RF technology.

  18. Power resource management and low-power remote wireless RF electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Forrester, Thomas; Degrood, Kevin; Lee, Kang; Gans, Eric; Walter, Kevin

    2009-05-01

    Battery power resource management becomes a critical issue in the case of self-powered remote wireless RF electronics, where the basic parameter is time of system operation before battery recharging or battery replacement. In such cases, very often related to physical protection against antitampering (AT), proper theoretical modeling of a battery driven power supply in the context of a given digital electronic system is of utmost importance. Such modeling should include various types of batteries (primary and secondary), various self-discharge processes in different temperatures, and even energy harvesting, the latter to supply power for long-term content, low-power electronic subsystems. In this paper we analyze simple modeling of resource power management, including variations of all of these parameters and energy harvesting.

  19. Effect of RF power and annealing on chemical bonding and morphology of a-CNx thin films as humidity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, N. F. H.; Ritikos, R.; Kamal, S. A. A.; Hussain, N. S. Mohamed; Awang, R.

    2013-11-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were deposited using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) technique. A set of a-CNx thin films were prepared using pure methane (CH4) gas diluted with nitrogen (N2) gas. The rf power was varied at 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 W. These films were then annealed at 400 °C in a quartz tube furnace in argon (Ar) gas. The effects of rf power and thermal annealing on the chemical bonding and morphology of these samples were studied. Surface profilometer was used to measure film thickness. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) measurements were used to determine their chemical bonding and morphology respectively. The deposition rate of the films increased constantly with increasing rf power up to 80W, before decreasing with further increase in rf power. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) studies showed a systematic change in the spectra and revealed three main peaks included C-N, C=N, C=C and C≡N triple bond. C=N and C≡N bonds decreased with increased C-N bonds after thermal annealing process. The FESEM images showed that the structure is porous for as-deposited and covered by granule-like grain structure after thermal annealing process was done. The resistance of the a-CNx thin film changed from 23.765 kΩ to 5.845 kΩ in the relative humidity range of 5 to 92 % and the film shows a good response and repeatability as a humidity sensing materials. This work showed that rf power and thermal annealing has significant effects on the chemical bonding and surface morphology of the a-CNx films and but yield films which are potential candidate as humidity sensor device.

  20. Systematic Observation of Time-Dependent Phenomena in the RF Output Spectrum of High Power Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaich, Andreas; Gantenbein, Gerd; Kern, Stefan; Thumm, Manfred

    2012-09-01

    At IHM/KIT, high power gyrotrons with conventional cavity (e.g. 1 MW CW at 140 GHz for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X) and coaxial cavity (2 MW shortpulse at 170 GHz for ITER) for fusion applications are being developed and verified experimentally. Especially with respect to the problem of parasitic RF oscillations in the beam tunnel of some W7-X tubes, investigations of the gyrotron RF output spectrum have proved to be a valuable source of diagnostic information. Signs of transient effects in millisecond pulses, like frequency switching or intermittent low-frequency modulation, have indicated that truly time-dependent measurements with high frequency resolution and dynamic range could give deeper insight into these phenomena. In this paper, an improved measurement system is presented, which employs a fast oscilloscope as receiver. Shorttime Fourier transform (STFT) is applied to the time-domain signal, yielding time-variant spectra with frequency resolutions only limited by acquisition length and STFT segmentation choice. Typical reasonable resolutions are in the range of 100 kHz to 10 MHz with a currently memory-limited maximum acquisition length of 4 ms. A key feature of the system consists in the unambiguity of frequency measurement: The system receives through two parallel channels, each using a harmonic mixer (h = 9 - 12) to convert the signal from RF millimeter wave frequencies (full D-Band, 110 - 170 GHz) to IF (0 - 3 GHz). For each IF output signal of each individual mixer, injection side and receiving harmonic are initially not known. Using accordingly determined LO frequencies, this information is retrieved from the redundancy of the channels, yielding unambiguously reconstructed RF spectra with a total span of twice the usable receiver IF bandwidth, up to ≈ 6 GHz in our case. Using the system, which is still being improved continuously, various transient effects like cavity mode switching, parasitic oscillation frequency variation, and lowfrequency

  1. Rf power system for the chopper/buncher system on the NBS-Los Alamos RTM

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf power system and its closed-loop feedback control for the racetrack microtron (RTM) chopper/buncher system are described. Measurements made on the response of the feedback system to external perturbations will also be reported.

  2. RF system calibration for global Q matrix determination.

    PubMed

    Padormo, Francesco; Beqiri, Arian; Malik, Shaihan J; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2016-06-01

    The use of multiple transmission channels (known as Parallel Transmission, or PTx) provides increased control of the MRI signal formation process. This extra flexibility comes at a cost of uncertainty of the power deposited in the patient under examination: the electric fields produced by each transmitter can interfere in such a way to lead to excessively high heating. Although it is not possible to determine local heating, the global Q matrix (which allows the whole-body Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) to be known for any PTx pulse) can be measured in-situ by monitoring the power incident upon and reflected by each transmit element during transmission. Recent observations have shown that measured global Q matrices can be corrupted by losses between the coil array and location of power measurement. In this work we demonstrate that these losses can be accounted for, allowing accurate global Q matrix measurement independent of the location of the power measurement devices. PMID:26747407

  3. RF system calibration for global Q matrix determination

    PubMed Central

    Padormo, Francesco; Beqiri, Arian; Malik, Shaihan J.; Hajnal, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    The use of multiple transmission channels (known as Parallel Transmission, or PTx) provides increased control of the MRI signal formation process. This extra flexibility comes at a cost of uncertainty of the power deposited in the patient under examination: the electric fields produced by each transmitter can interfere in such a way to lead to excessively high heating. Although it is not possible to determine local heating, the global Q matrix (which allows the whole-body Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) to be known for any PTx pulse) can be measured in-situ by monitoring the power incident upon and reflected by each transmit element during transmission. Recent observations have shown that measured global Q matrices can be corrupted by losses between the coil array and location of power measurement. In this work we demonstrate that these losses can be accounted for, allowing accurate global Q matrix measurement independent of the location of the power measurement devices. PMID:26747407

  4. Design and Implementation of a RF Powering Circuit for RFID Tags or Other Batteryless Embedded Devices

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongsheng; Wang, Rencai; Yao, Ke; Zou, Xuecheng; Guo, Liang

    2014-01-01

    A RF powering circuit used in radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and other batteryless embedded devices is presented in this paper. The RF powering circuit harvests energy from electromagnetic waves and converts the RF energy to a stable voltage source. Analysis of a NMOS gate-cross connected bridge rectifier is conducted to demonstrate relationship between device sizes and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the rectifier. A rectifier with 38.54% PCE under normal working conditions is designed. Moreover, a stable voltage regulator with a temperature and voltage optimizing strategy including adoption of a combination resistor is developed, which is able to accommodate a large input range of 4 V to 12 V and be immune to temperature variations. Latch-up prevention and noise isolation methods in layout design are also presented. Designed with the HJTC 0.25 μm process, this regulator achieves 0.04 mV/°C temperature rejection ratio (TRR) and 2.5 mV/V voltage rejection ratio (VRR). The RF powering circuit is also fabricated in the HJTC 0.25 μm process. The area of the RF powering circuit is 0.23 × 0.24 mm2. The RF powering circuit is successfully integrated with ISO/IEC 15693-compatible and ISO/IEC 14443-compatible RFID tag chips. PMID:25123466

  5. Design and implementation of a RF powering circuit for RFID tags or other batteryless embedded devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongsheng; Wang, Rencai; Yao, Ke; Zou, Xuecheng; Guo, Liang

    2014-01-01

    A RF powering circuit used in radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags and other batteryless embedded devices is presented in this paper. The RF powering circuit harvests energy from electromagnetic waves and converts the RF energy to a stable voltage source. Analysis of a NMOS gate-cross connected bridge rectifier is conducted to demonstrate relationship between device sizes and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the rectifier. A rectifier with 38.54% PCE under normal working conditions is designed. Moreover, a stable voltage regulator with a temperature and voltage optimizing strategy including adoption of a combination resistor is developed, which is able to accommodate a large input range of 4 V to 12 V and be immune to temperature variations. Latch-up prevention and noise isolation methods in layout design are also presented. Designed with the HJTC 0.25 μm process, this regulator achieves 0.04 mV/°C temperature rejection ratio (TRR) and 2.5 mV/V voltage rejection ratio (VRR). The RF powering circuit is also fabricated in the HJTC 0.25 μm process. The area of the RF powering circuit is 0.23 × 0.24 mm². The RF powering circuit is successfully integrated with ISO/IEC 15693-compatible and ISO/IEC 14443-compatible RFID tag chips. PMID:25123466

  6. Effects of rf power on chemical composition and surface roughness of glow discharge polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; He, Xiaoshan; Chen, Guo; Wang, Tao; Tang, Yongjian; He, Zhibing

    2016-03-01

    The glow discharge polymer (GDP) films for laser fusion targets were successfully fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at different radio frequency (rf) powers. The films were deposited using trans-2-butene (T2B) mixed with hydrogen as gas sources. The composition and state of plasma were diagnosed by quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and Langmuir probe during the deposition process. The composition, surface morphology and roughness were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and white-light interferometer (WLI), respectively. Based on these observation and analyses, the growth mechanism of defects in GDP films were studied. The results show that, at low rf power, there is a larger probability for secondary polymerization and formation of multi-carbon C-H species in the plasma. In this case, the surface of GDP film turns to be cauliflower-like. With the increase of rf power, the degree of ionization is high, the relative concentration of smaller-mass hydrocarbon species increases, while the relative concentration of larger-mass hydrocarbon species decreases. At higher rf power, the energy of smaller-mass species are high and the etching effects are strong correspondingly. The GDP film's surface roughness shows a trend of decrease firstly and then increase with the increasing rf power. At rf power of 30 W, the surface root-mean-square roughness (Rq) drops to the lowest value of 12.8 nm, and no "void" defect was observed.

  7. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  8. 47 CFR 97.317 - Standards for certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... power amplifiers. 97.317 Section 97.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... certification of external RF power amplifiers. (a) To receive a grant of certification, the amplifier must: (1... amplifier is operated at the lesser of 1.5 kW PEP or its full output power and when the amplifier is...

  9. 47 CFR 97.317 - Standards for certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... power amplifiers. 97.317 Section 97.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... certification of external RF power amplifiers. (a) To receive a grant of certification, the amplifier must: (1... amplifier is operated at the lesser of 1.5 kW PEP or its full output power and when the amplifier is...

  10. 47 CFR 97.317 - Standards for certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... power amplifiers. 97.317 Section 97.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... certification of external RF power amplifiers. (a) To receive a grant of certification, the amplifier must: (1... amplifier is operated at the lesser of 1.5 kW PEP or its full output power and when the amplifier is...

  11. 47 CFR 97.317 - Standards for certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... power amplifiers. 97.317 Section 97.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... certification of external RF power amplifiers. (a) To receive a grant of certification, the amplifier must: (1... amplifier is operated at the lesser of 1.5 kW PEP or its full output power and when the amplifier is...

  12. 47 CFR 97.317 - Standards for certification of external RF power amplifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... power amplifiers. 97.317 Section 97.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... certification of external RF power amplifiers. (a) To receive a grant of certification, the amplifier must: (1... amplifier is operated at the lesser of 1.5 kW PEP or its full output power and when the amplifier is...

  13. An RF energy harvesting power management circuit for appropriate duty-cycled operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirane, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Noboru; Masu, Kazuya

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we present an RF energy harvesting power management unit (PMU) for battery-less wireless sensor devices (WSDs). The proposed PMU realizes a duty-cycled operation that is divided into the energy charging time and discharging time. The proposed PMU detects two types of timing, thus, the appropriate timing for the activation can be recognized. The activation of WSDs at the proper timing leads to energy efficient operation and stable wireless communication. The proposed PMU includes a hysteresis comparator (H-CMP) and an RF signal detector (RF-SD) to detect the timings. The proposed RF-SD can operate without the degradation of charge efficiency by reusing the RF energy harvester (RF-EH) and H-CMP. The PMU fabricated in a 180 nm Si CMOS demonstrated the charge operation using the RF signal at 915 MHz and the two types of timing detection with less than 124 nW in the charge phase. Furthermore, in the active phase, the PMU generates a 0.5 V regulated power supply from the charged energy.

  14. RF power sources for 5--15 TeV linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-09-01

    After outlining the design of the NLC rf system at 1 TeV, the possibility of a leap in linear collider energy into the 5--15 TeV energy range is considered. To keep the active accelerator length and ac wall-plug power within reasonable bounds, higher accelerating gradients at higher rf frequencies will be necessary. Scaling relations are developed for basic rf system parameters as a function of frequency, and some specific parameter examples are given for colliders at 34 Ghz and 91 Ghz. Concepts for rf pulse compression system design and for high power microwave sources at 34 Ghz (for example sheet-beam and multiple-beam klystrons) are briefly discussed.

  15. Traveling wave linear accelerator with RF power flow outside of accelerating cavities

    DOEpatents

    Dolgashev, Valery A.

    2016-06-28

    A high power RF traveling wave accelerator structure includes a symmetric RF feed, an input matching cell coupled to the symmetric RF feed, a sequence of regular accelerating cavities coupled to the input matching cell at an input beam pipe end of the sequence, one or more waveguides parallel to and coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities, an output matching cell coupled to the sequence of regular accelerating cavities at an output beam pipe end of the sequence, and output waveguide circuit or RF loads coupled to the output matching cell. Each of the regular accelerating cavities has a nose cone that cuts off field propagating into the beam pipe and therefore all power flows in a traveling wave along the structure in the waveguide.

  16. New high power 200 MHz RF system for the LANSCE drift tube linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Friedrichs, C.; Lynch, M.

    1998-12-31

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linac provides an 800 MeV direct H{sup +} proton beam, and injects H{sup {minus}} to the upgraded proton storage ring for charge accumulation for the Short Pulse Spallation Source. Accelerating these interlaced beams requires high average power from the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac (DTL) RF system. Three power amplifiers have operated at up to three Megawatts with 12% duty factor. The total number of electron power tubes in the RF amplifiers and their modulators has been reduced from fifty-two to twenty-four. The plant continues to utilize the original design of a tetrode driving a super power triode. Further increases in the linac duty factor are limited, in part, by the maximum dissipation ratings of the triodes. A description of the system modifications proposed to overcome these limitations includes new power amplifiers using low-level RF modulation for tank field control. The first high power Diacrode{reg_sign} is being delivered and a new amplifier cavity is being designed. With only eight power tubes, the new system will deliver both peak power and high duty factor, with lower mains power and cooling requirements. The remaining components needed for the new RF system will be discussed.

  17. Commissioning the new high power rf system for the AGS with high intensity beam

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.; Ciardullo, D.J.; Deng, D.P; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Otis, A.; Sanders, R.T.; Zaltsman, A.

    1994-08-01

    A new high power rf system has been installed in the AGS in order to raise the beam loading limit to beyond 6 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. The old system was limited to 2.2 {times} 10{sup l3} ppp by: available real power, multi-loop instability, and transient beam loading during batch filling from the Booster. The key components of the new system are: new power amplifiers in the tunnel using the Thomson-CSF TH573 300kW tetrode, rf feedback around the power stage, and reduction of the 10 cavities` R/Q by 1.8 by additional gap capacitors. Commissioning of the new rf system with high intensity beam is described. The intensity goal for the 1994 running period is 4 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp. To date, 3.7 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp has been achieved.

  18. A design study on high power RF system for the TARLA facility of TAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karslı, Özlem; Yavaş, Ömer

    2012-11-01

    The Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory in Ankara (TARLA) is a superconducting electron linac based IR FEL and Bremsstrahlung facility and it is under construction in Ankara as the first facility of the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project. TARLA will compose of two optical cavity systems to produce oscillator FEL in infrared region (2-250 μm) and also Bremsstrahlung radiation to be used in basic and applied sciences. In this study, main parameters of TARLA's high power RF and power transmission line systems are defined and a 20 kW RF solid state power amplifier is optimized.

  19. A brief history of high power RF proton linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The first mention of linear acceleration was in a paper by G. Ising in 1924 in which he postulated the acceleration of positive ions induced by spark discharges which produced electric fields in gaps between a series of {open_quotes}drift tubes{close_quotes}. Ising apparently was not able to demonstrate his concept, most likely due to the limited state of electronic devices. Ising`s work was followed by a seminal paper by R. Wideroe in 1928 in which he demonstrated the first linear accelerator. Wideroe was able to accelerate sodium or potassium ions to 50 keV of energy using drift tubes connected alternately to high frequency waves and to ground. Nuclear physics during this period was interested in accelerating protons, deuterons, electrons and alpha particles and not heavy ions like sodium or potassium. To accelerate the light ions required much higher frequencies than available at that time. So linear accelerators were not pursued heavily at that time. Research continued during the 1930s but the development of high frequency RF tubes for radar applications in World War 2 opened the potential for RF linear accelerators after the war. The Berkeley laboratory of E. 0. Lawrence under the leadership of Luis Alvarez developed a new linear proton accelerator concept that utilized drift tubes that required a full RF period to pass through as compared to the earlier concepts. This development resulted in the historic Berkeley 32 MeV proton linear accelerator which incorporated the {open_quotes}Alvarez drift tube{close_quotes} as the basic acceleration scheme using surplus 200 MHz radar components.

  20. High-Power RF Sources for Advanced Accelerator R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J. L.; Kozyrev, E. V.; LaPointe, M. A.; Nezhevenko, O. A.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2006-11-27

    Improved understanding of the processes that limit RF electric and magnetic fields at material surfaces is needed to enable development of new accelerator structures that can sustain accelerating fields in the range of 150 MeV/m, and in turn to allow design of a future multi-TeV electron-positron collider. For this purpose, stand-alone RF sources are needed to carry out RF breakdown and pulsed heating studies on test structures of novel design, structures fabricated from a variety of alternate materials, and structures processed using alternate techniques. These new RF sources should operate at frequencies above 11.4 GHz (where high-power klystrons built for NLC are already available), and should incorporate a high-power phase-stable amplifier or harmonic multiplier delivering several 10's of MW's of peak power in near-microsecond-long pulses at a repetition rate in the range of 100 Hz. These sources would be operated together with pulse compression systems that can multiply the peak power to 100's of MW. This paper briefly reviews current performance of the Yale/Omega-P 34-GHz magnicon as a point of departure, and discusses alternative candidates for RF sources at other frequencies. These include a 30-GHz, 50 MW magnicon; and 20.0, 22.8, 34.3, and 45.6 GHz harmonic multipliers.

  1. Variable power combiner for RF mode shimming in 7-T MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Pedram; Solbach, Klaus; Bitz, Andreas K

    2012-09-01

    This contribution discusses the utilization of RF power in an MRI system with RF mode shimming which enables the superposition of circularly polarized modes of a transmit RF coil array driven by a Butler matrix. Since the required power for the individual modes can vary widely, mode-shimming can result in a significant underutilization of the total available RF power. A variable power combiner (VPC) is proposed to improve the power utilization: it can be realized as a reconfiguration of the MRI transmit system by the inclusion of one additional matrix network which receives the power from all transmit amplifiers at its input ports and provides any desired (combined) power distribution at its output ports by controlling the phase and amplitude of the amplifiers' input signals. The power distribution at the output ports of the VPC is then fed into the "mode" ports of the coil array Butler matrix in order to superimpose the spatial modes at the highest achievable power utilization. The VPC configuration is compared to the standard configuration of the transmit chain of our MRI system with 8 transmit channels and 16 coils. In realistic scenarios, improved power utilization was achieved from 17% to 60% and from 14% to 55% for an elliptical phantom and a region of interest in the abdomen, respectively, and an increase of the power utilization of 1 dB for a region of interest in the upper leg. In general, it is found that the VPC allows significant improvement in power utilization when the shimming solution demands only a few modes to be energized, while the technique can yield loss in power utilization in cases with many modes required at high power level. PMID:22752102

  2. RF Design and Operating Results for a New 201.25 MHz RF Power Amplifier for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, John T.; Baca, David M.; Bratton, Ray E.; Brennan, Nicholas W.; Bultman, Nathan K.; Chen, Zukun; Davis, Jerry L.; Naranjo, Angela C.; Rees, Daniel E.; Sandoval, Gilbert M. Jr.; Summers, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    A prototype VHF RF Final Power Amplifier (FPA) for Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The cavity amplifier has met the goals of generating 2.5 MW peak and 260 kW of average power, at an elevation of 2.1 km. It was designed to use a Thales TH628 Diacrode{sup R}, a state-of-art tetrode power tube that is double-ended, providing roughly twice the power of a conventional tetrode. The amplifier is designed with tunable input and output transmission line cavity circuits, a grid decoupling circuit, an adjustable output coupler, TE mode suppressors, blocking, bypassing and decoupling capacitors, and a cooling system. The tube is connected in a full wavelength output circuit, with the lower main tuner situated 3/4{lambda} from the central electron beam region in the tube and the upper slave tuner 1/4{lambda} from the same point. We summarize the design processes and features of the FPA along with significant test results. A pair of production amplifiers are planned to be power-combined and installed at the LANSCE DTL to return operation to full beam duty factor.

  3. Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.; Glanz, J.

    1985-04-16

    A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  4. Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma

    DOEpatents

    Motley, Robert W.; Glanz, James

    1985-01-01

    A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  5. High power tests of dressed supconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hocker, A.; Harms, E.R.; Lunin, A.; Sukhanov, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    A single-cavity test cryostat is used to conduct pulsed high power RF tests of superconducting 1.3 GHz RF cavities at 2 K. The cavities under test are welded inside individual helium vessels and are outfitted ('dressed') with a fundamental power coupler, higher-order mode couplers, magnetic shielding, a blade tuner, and piezoelectric tuners. The cavity performance is evaluated in terms of accelerating gradient, unloaded quality factor, and field emission, and the functionality of the auxiliary components is verified. Test results from the first set of dressed cavities are presented here.

  6. High-power testing of the first PEP-II RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.; Allen, M.; Fant, K.; Hill, A.; Hoyt, M.; Judkins, J.; Saba, J.; Schwarz, H.; Franks, R.M.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes the high-power testing of the first RF cavity for the PEP-II B-factory. The cavity is designed for continuous operation at 476 MHz with up to 150 kW wall dissipation and heavy beam loading. Three rectangular waveguides and broad-band loads are used to damp the cavity higher-order modes. The test configuration, RF conditioning history and high-power performance are described and plans for processing of the production run of cavities are discussed.

  7. Design and Implementation of RF Energy Harvesting System for Low-Power Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, Yunus

    2016-08-01

    Radio frequency (RF) energy harvester systems are a good alternative for energizing of low-power electronics devices. In this work, an RF energy harvester is presented to obtain energy from Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) 900 MHz signals. The energy harvester, consisting of a two-stage Dickson voltage multiplier circuit and L-type impedance matching circuits, was designed, simulated, fabricated and tested experimentally in terms of its performance. Simulation and experimental works were carried out for various input power levels, load resistances and input frequencies. Both simulation and experimental works have been carried out for this frequency band. An efficiency of 45% is obtained from the system at 0 dBm input power level using the impedance matching circuit. This corresponds to the power of 450 μW and this value is sufficient for many low-power devices. The most important parameters affecting the efficiency of the RF energy harvester are the input power level, frequency band, impedance matching and voltage multiplier circuits, load resistance and the selection of diodes. RF energy harvester designs should be optimized in terms of these parameters.

  8. RF Conditioning and Testing of Fundamental Power Couplers for SNS Superconducting Cavity Production

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stirbet; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; C. Grenoble; J. Henry; G. Myneni; T. Powers; K. Wilson; M. Wiseman; I.E. Campisi; Y.W. Kang; D. Stout

    2005-05-16

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) makes use of 33 medium beta (0.61) and 48 high beta (0.81) superconducting cavities. Each cavity is equipped with a fundamental power coupler, which should withstand the full klystron power of 550 kW in full reflection for the duration of an RF pulse of 1.3 msec at 60 Hz repetition rate. Before assembly to a superconducting cavity, the vacuum components of the coupler are submitted to acceptance procedures consisting of preliminary quality assessments, cleaning and clean room assembly, vacuum leak checks and baking under vacuum, followed by conditioning and RF high power testing. Similar acceptance procedures (except clean room assembly and baking) were applied for the airside components of the coupler. All 81 fundamental power couplers for SNS superconducting cavity production have been RF power tested at JLAB Newport News and, beginning in April 2004 at SNS Oak Ridge. This paper gives details of coupler processing and RF high power-assessed performances.

  9. Design and Implementation of RF Energy Harvesting System for Low-Power Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, Yunus

    2016-03-01

    Radio frequency (RF) energy harvester systems are a good alternative for energizing of low-power electronics devices. In this work, an RF energy harvester is presented to obtain energy from Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) 900 MHz signals. The energy harvester, consisting of a two-stage Dickson voltage multiplier circuit and L-type impedance matching circuits, was designed, simulated, fabricated and tested experimentally in terms of its performance. Simulation and experimental works were carried out for various input power levels, load resistances and input frequencies. Both simulation and experimental works have been carried out for this frequency band. An efficiency of 45% is obtained from the system at 0 dBm input power level using the impedance matching circuit. This corresponds to the power of 450 μW and this value is sufficient for many low-power devices. The most important parameters affecting the efficiency of the RF energy harvester are the input power level, frequency band, impedance matching and voltage multiplier circuits, load resistance and the selection of diodes. RF energy harvester designs should be optimized in terms of these parameters.

  10. RF Distribution System for High Power Test of the SNS Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W; Broyles, Michael R; Crofford, Mark T; Geng, Xiaosong; Kim, Sang-Ho; Phibbs, Curtis L; Strong, William Herb; Peglow, Robert C; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V

    2012-01-01

    A four-way waveguide RF power distribution system for testing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) multi-cavity cryomodule to investigate the collective behavior has been developed. A single klystron operating at 805MHz for 1.3 msec at 60Hz powers the 4-way waveguide splitter to deliver up to 400 kW to individual cavities. Each cavity is fed through a combination of waveguide splitters and vector modulators (VM) to provide independent magnitude and phase controls. The waveguide vector modulator consists of two quadrature hybrids and two motorized waveguide phase shifters. The phase shifters and the assembled waveguide vector modulators were individually tested and characterized for low power and high RF power in the SNS RF test facility. Precise calibrations of magnitude and phase were performed to generate the look up tables (LUTs) to provide operational references during the cryomodule test. An I-Q demodulator module was developed and utilized to measure relative phases in pulsed high RF power operation. PLC units were developed for mechanical control of the phase shifters. Initial low/high power measurements were made using LabVIEW. An operation algorithm has been implemented into EPICS control for the cryomodule test stand.

  11. Integration of LHCD system with SST1 machine and its high power rf performance in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Ambulkar, K. K.; Dalakoti, S.; Parmar, P. R.; Virani, C. G.; Thakur, A. L.

    2014-02-01

    A 2.0 MW CW lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system based on 3.7 GHz klystron sources, is in advanced stage of commissioning, which would drive and sustain plasma current, non-inductively, in superconducting steadystate tokamak (SST1) for long pulse operation. Four klystrons, each rated for 0.5 MW CW rf power, delivers 2.0 MW of rf power to four layer of the LHCD system, which finally feeds the rf power to grill antenna. The antenna system along with vacuum window and vacuum transmission line is successfully integrated on the machine. Its vacuum and pressurization compatibility has been successfully established. To validate the high power performance of LHCD system for SST1 machine, stage-wise commissioning of LHCD system in staggered manner is planned. It has been envisaged that LHCD power may be gradually increased initially, since full power may not be required during the initial phases of SST1 plasma operation. Also if the system is integrated in steps or in phases, then integration issues, as well as high power operational issues, if any, can be addressed, attended and handled in a simpler way before integrating all the layers to the grill antenna. To begin with, one klystron is connected to one layer, out of four layers, which energizes a quarter of the grill antenna. Gradually, the rf power and its pulse length is increased to validate high power performance of the system. Arcing and reflections are observed as rf power is gradually increased. The problems are analysed and after taking appropriate remedial action the system performance is improved for operation up to 160kW. Several trains of short pulses are launched in SST1 vacuum vessel for rf conditioning of the LHCD system. Normally, reflections are high when power is launched in vacuum; therefore the pulse length is restricted up to 100 milliseconds. The high power performance of this layer, connected with grill antenna is validated by launching high power microwaves in vacuum vessel of SST1 machine

  12. RF and DC Power Handling Characterization of Thin Film Resistors Embedded on LCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Horst, Stephen; Papapolymerou, John

    2007-01-01

    For the first time, the DC and RF power handling capability of NiCrAlSi thin film resistors on Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP) is presented. It is shown that there is a maximum power that the resistors can handle without causing degradation of the resistors, and this value is significantly less than the power required for burn out of the resistors. EDAX shows that the resistors fail due to electromigration of Ni and Cr, and migration of C from the LCP.

  13. RF Power and Magnetic Field Modulation Experiments with Simple Mirror Geometry in the Central Cell of Hanbit Device

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.G.; Bak, J.G.; Jhang, H.G.; Kim, S.S.

    2005-01-15

    The radio frequency (RF) stabilization effects to investigate the characteristics of the interchange instability by RF power and magnetic field modulation experiments were performed near {omega}/{omega}{sub i} {approx} = 1 and with low beta ({approx} 0.1%) plasmas in the central cell of the Hanbit mirror device. Temporal behaviors of the interchange mode were measured and analyzed when the interchange mode was triggered by sudden changes of the RF power and magnetic field intensity.

  14. Influence of RF power on microstructural and electrochemical properties of rf-sputtered LiMn2O4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanth-Babu, K.; Jeevan-Kumar, P.; Hussain, O. M.

    2013-06-01

    Thin films of Lithium transition metal oxides (LTMOs) have wide applications as a cathode material in the fabrication of all solid state thin film microbatteries. Among various LTMOs, LiMn2O4 with spinel structure is one of the most promising cathode material as it offers high energy density, high cell voltage, low cost and low toxicity. Hence in the present investigation thin films of LiMn2O4 were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering on gold coated silicon substrates maintained at a constant substrate temperature of 573 K with different RF powers ranging from 40 to 150 watts. The influence of RF power on micro structural and electrochemical properties of LiMn2O4 films was studied. The lattice parameter, Mn-Mn-O interatomic distance and grain size was found to be increased with the increase of RF power as evidenced from XRD and SEM studies. The films deposited at a moderate substrate temperature of 573 K with RF power 100 W exhibited predominant (111) orientation with cubic spinel structure. The calculated lattice parameter, Mn-Mn, Mn-O inter atomic distances for the films deposited at RF power 100 W was 8.215Å, 2.905 and 1.922 Å. From the electrochemical (EC) studies an initial discharge capacity of 38.5 μAhcm-2μm-1 was observed for the films deposited at RF power 100 W in the potential window of 0.0 - 1.2 V.

  15. Sublimation TiN Coating of RF Power Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorkiewicz, J.; Kula, J.; Pszona, S.; Sobczak, J.; Bilinski, A.

    2008-03-01

    Titanium evaporation in a reactive atmosphere of ammonia has been chosen to deposit thin (up to 10 nm) protective surface layers containing titanium nitride and titanium oxinitrides which suppress secondary electron emission. The coating procedure, applied by the author in DESY (Hamburg) for TESLA couplers anti-multipactor protection, has been recently implemented in The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ) where a new coating device is used, equipped with a special titanium sublimation setup in a 100 1 vacuum chamber. Several arrays of cylindrical and coaxial RF coupler windows have been coated so far after optimizing the processing parameters. A check of the obtained surface layers ability to attenuate secondary electron emission has been performed; measurements of the secondary electron yield from TiN layers deposited on alumina samples were done in IPJ on as-delivered coated samples, then after vacuum bake-out and finally after additional electron bombardment of their surfaces. Also chemical composition of the surface layers has been studied using XPS in the Institute of Physical Chemistry (IChF).

  16. Choke Flange for High Power RF Components Excited by TE01 Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.Dian; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    A multifaceted program to study high gradient structures and properties of RF breakdown is under way at SLAC. This program includes testing of simplified versions of traveling wave and standing wave structures at 11.4 GHz. [Dolgashev] RF power is fed into these structures using a TE01 mode-launcher. An RF flange is used to connect the mode-launcher to the test-structure. The rf currents flow through either the stainless steel lip on the flange or, in an alternate assembly, through a copper gasket pressed between the same stainless steel lips. In a recent experiment with a single cell traveling wave structure, a flange with stainless steel lips was irreversibly damaged at RF power about 90 MW and {approx}100 ns pulse length. We suggest an alternative flange that does not rely on metal-to-metal contact in the rf power transfer region. The idea is to use an asymmetric choke flange, where the choke grove is cut into a conflate flange on the mode-launcher. The structures themselves will have a simpler, flat conflate flange with rounded corners on the vacuum side. The Vacuum seal is achieved with a Cu gasket between these two flanges above the RF region. We have designed a flange with a choke which is almost field free in the vacuum gasket region, whose technical specifications and RF properties are presented below. Design simulations were conducted using HFSS, a 3D finite element code that solves electromagnetic fields in complex structures. Figure 1 demonstrates the projected physical look of the choke flange, while the table next to it lists the critical parameters. The maximum electric field for in this geometry is on axis at 33.6MV/m for 100 MW input. The electric field near the gasket, meaning at the top of the choke gap is at 125kV/m or 1.25kV/cm. Figure 2 demonstrates the electric field strength profile in the geometry for 100 MW input power. The maximum magnetic field for in this geometry is near the pipe at 59kA/m for 100 MW input. The magnetic field at the

  17. Using a Balun Transformer Combiner for High Power RF Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, M. C.; Pesavento, P. V.

    2011-10-01

    A novel coaxial power combiner design has been duplicated that has distinct advantages over other combiner geometries that can handle high power. This design is being applied to combine four 3 kW power supplies to obtain a 12 kW, 5 MHz system for an ICRF antenna on HSX. In the past, Wilkinson type combiners have had limited application to high power systems because of the lack of non-inductive, high power, 100 Ω balance loads. With this new design, standard 50 Ω dummy loads can be used instead for the balance load. The cost is considerably lower than lumped element combiner designs which are dominated by capacitor costs. At such a relatively low frequency, a 3-dB quarter-wave coupled-line coupler becomes impractically long, and a conventional branch-line hybrid requires 35 Ω-line, which is commercially unavailable. The balun combiner uses less transmission line than a ring hybrid and has good bandwidth characteristics even away from its best line impedance. Theoretical calculations and modeling were performed for line impedances from 65 Ω to 75 Ω. Measurements from a low-power test device show excellent agreement with theory, and construction of the high power system is underway. Work supported by US DOE under Contract No DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  18. Design of a new VHF RF power amplifier system for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, John T M

    2010-01-01

    A major upgrade is replacing much of the 40 year-old proton drift tube linac RF system with new components at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). When installed, the new system will reduce the total number of electron power tubes from twenty-four to eight in the RF powerplant. A new 200 MHz high power cavity amplifier has being developed at LANSCE. This 3.2 MW final power amplifier (FPA) uses a Thales TH628 Diacrode{reg_sign}, a state-of-the-art tetrode that eliminates the large anode modulator of the triode-based FPA that has been in use for four decades. Drive power for the FPA is provided by a new tetrode intermediate power amplifier (and a solid-state driver stage). The new system has sufficient duty-factor capability to allow LANSCE to return to 1 MW beam operation. Prototype RF power amplifiers have been designed, fabricated, and assembled, and are being tested. High voltage DC power became available through innovative re-engineering of an installed system. Details of the electrical and mechanical design of the FPA and ancillary systems are discussed.

  19. High-power RF window design for the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Hodgson, J.; Ng, C.; Schwarz, H.; Skarpaas, K.; Kroll, N. |; Rimmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the design of RF windows to transmit up to 500 kW CW to the PEP-II 476 MHz cavities. RF analysis of the windows using high-frequency simulation codes are described. These provide information about the power loss distribution in the ceramic and tim matching properties of the structure. Finite-element analyses of the resulting temperature distribution and thermal stresses are presented. Fabrication methods including a proposed scheme to compensate for thermal expansion s are discussed and hardware tests to validate this approach are described. The effects of surface coatings (intentional and otherwise) and the application of air cooling are considered.

  20. Design of RF energy harvesting platforms for power management unit with start-up circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, Alessandra; Masotti, Diego

    2013-12-01

    In this contribution we discuss an unconventional rectifier design dedicated to RF energy harvesting from ultra-low sources, such as ambient RF sources which are typically of the order of few to few tens of μW. In such conditions unsuccessful results may occur if the rectenna is directly connected to its actual load since either the minimum power or the minimum activation voltage may not be simultaneously available. For this reason a double-branch rectifier topology is considered for the power management unit (PMU), instead of traditional single-branch one. The new PMU, interposed between the rectenna and application circuits, allows the system to operate with significantly lower input power with respect to the traditional solution, while preserving efficiency during steady-state power conversion.

  1. State of the Art Power Couplers for Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Isidoro Campisi

    2002-08-01

    Simulations are now routinely performed that allow the prediction of electromagnetic, multipacting, thermal, and mechanical properties of couplers. From these studies, better designs have been conceived which can minimize potential problems ahead of construction. Judicious use of materials and the implementation of clean practices and of careful conditioning have gradually increased the power levels at which couplers can safely operate. Machine operation at hundreds of kilowatts has been achieved in CW at KEK and Cornell, and in a pulsed mode at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF). Test stand operations in CW at the megawatt level (Accelerator for the Production of Tritium) and in pulse mode at a peak power of 2 MW (Spallation Neutron Source, TTF version II) have been achieved. The recent progress indicates that the understanding of the behavior of fundamental power couplers is rapidly increasing and that optimal designs are being developed which will allow in the future to attain routine attainment of the megawatt power levels necessary for high-beam-power machines under construction and under study.

  2. Time-reversal duality of high-efficiency RF power amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Reveyrand, T; Ramos, I; Popovic, Z

    2012-12-06

    The similarity between RF power amplifiers and rectifiers is discussed. It is shown that the same high-efficiency harmonically-terminated power amplifier can be operated in a dual rectifier mode. Nonlinear simulations with a GaN HEMT transistor model show the time-reversal intrinsic voltage and current waveform relationship between a class-F amplifier and rectifier. Measurements on a class-F-1 amplifier and rectifier at 2.14 GHz demonstrate over 80% efficiency in both cases.

  3. High-power RF window and coupler development for the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Fant, K.; Hodgson, J.; Judkins, J.; Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and testing of the RF windows designed to transmit power to the PEP-II 476 MHz cavities. Design choices to maximize the reliability of the window are discussed. Fabrication technologies for the window are described and finite-element analysis of the assembly process is presented. Conditioning and high-power testing of the window are discussed. Design of the coupler assembly including the integration of the window and other components is reported.

  4. An ISM 2.4 GHz low power low-IF RF receiver front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heping, Ma; Hua, Xu; Bei, Chen; Yin, Shi

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an RF receiver front-end for the 2.4 GHz industrial scientific medical band under TSMC 0.13 μm CMOS technology; it comprises a low noise amplifier (LNA) which uses an added gate-source capacitor for low power performance and a dual-converter composed of a single-balanced active RF mixer and double-balanced passive IF mixer. Dual-down-conversion technique is used for reducing power. A 2.4 GHz low power low-IF RF receiver front-end is proposed. An LNA for rejecting image signal, an inductor-capacitor (LC) tank is used in series with source of input-stage transistor of the RF mixer, and combined with the LC load of the LNA, 30-dB image rejection is realized. Fabricated in a 0.13 μm CMOS process, the proposed chip occupies 0.42 mm2 area, achieves 4 dB noise figure, -22 dBm IIP3 and 37 dB voltage gain dissipating only 4.2-mW under 1.2-V supply.

  5. Development of fundamental power coupler for high-current superconducting RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain P.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Xu, W.

    2012-05-20

    Brookhaven National Laboratory took a project of developing a 704 MHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity for high-current linacs, including Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for planned electron-hadron collider eRHIC. The cavity will be fed by a high-power RF amplifier using a coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC), which delivers 20 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. The design of FPC is one of the important aspects as one has to take into account the heat losses dissipated on the surface of the conductor by RF fields along with that of the static heat load. Using a simple simulation model we show the temperature profile and the heat load dissipated along the coupler length. To minimize the heat load on FPC near the cavity end, a thermal intercept is required at an appropriate location on FPC. A 10 K intercept was chosen and its location optimized with our simulation code. The requirement on the helium gas flow rate for the effective heat removal from the thermal intercept is also discussed.

  6. High Power RF Tests on WR650 Pre-Stressed Planar Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbet, Mircea; Davis, G. Kirk; Elliott, Thomas S.; King, Larry; Powers, Thomas J.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Walker, Richard L.

    2009-11-01

    A new planar, ceramic window intended to be used with WR650 waveguide fundamental power couplers at 1300 MHz or 1500 MHz has been developed. It is based on the pre-stressed planar window concept tested in PEP II and LEDA. A test stand that made use of the 100kW CW 1500 MHz RF system in the JLAB FEL was commissioned and used to apply up to 80 kW traveling wave (TW)to the windows. Two different types of RF windows (brazed and diffusion bonded ceramics) with design specification of 50 kW CW in TW mode were successfully tested both as a gas barrier (intended to operate up to 2 psi) and as a vacuum barrier. The vacuum windows were able to maintain UHV quality vacuum and were successfully operated in the 10{sup -9} mbar range. An overview of the pre-stressed power windows, RF test stand, procedures and RF power testing results will be presented.

  7. High-power, solid-state rf source for accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.R.; Mols, G.E.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years the Defense and Electronics Center of Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed a solid-state, 250-kW peak, rf amplifier for use with the SPS-40 radar system. This system has a pulse length of 60 ..mu..s and operates across the frequency band from 400 to 450 MHz. Because of the potential use of such a system as an rf source for accelerator applications, a collaborative experiment was initiated between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Westinghouse to simulate the resonant load conditions of an accelerator cavity. This paper describes the positive results of that experiment as well as the solid-state amplifier architecture. It also explores the future of high-power, solid-state amplifiers as rf sources for accelerator structures.

  8. Composition of RF-sputtered refractory compounds determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Brainard, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    RF-sputtered coatings of CrB2, MoSi2, Mo2C, TiC, and MoS2 were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Data on stoichiometry, impurity content, and chemical bonding were obtained. The influences of sputtering target history, deposition time, RF power level, and substrate bias were studied. Significant deviations from stoichiometry and high oxide levels were related to target outgassing. The effect of substrate bias depended on the particular coating material studied.

  9. Monolithic microprocessor and rf transceiver for low-power mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McShane, Erik A.; Shenai, Krishna; Alkalai, Leon; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Holmberg, Eric A.

    1998-08-01

    In recent years the demand has surged for low-power and small form-factor wireless communications devices. Coupled with the migration of desktop computing to mobile computing, a new market is merging for portable products that combine wireless communications and high-performance computing. The evolution of semiconductor device technology toward the deep submicron regime is enabling the development of CMOS RF communications circuits which are amenable to monolithic integration with existing mixed-signal processes. A 1.2- micron bulk CMOS process has been used to develop a monolithic architecture consisting of an 8-bit RISC microprocessor, a 256-byte SRAM memory, power management, and a 400-MHz RF transceiver. The logic portion of the IC operates at 50 MHz, and the RF transceiver achieves a data transmission rate of 16 kb/sec with a 10 kHz bandwidth. On- chip power regulation minimizes supply glitches due to logic switching, and power management is provided to minimize the standby power dissipation of idle components. This IC demonstrates the potential of CMOS to deliver a low-power architecture for computing and wireless communication.

  10. Studies in RF Power Communication, SAR, and Temperature Elevation in Wireless Implantable Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Tang, Lin; Rennaker, Robert; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable neural interfaces are designed to provide a high spatial and temporal precision control signal implementing high degree of freedom real-time prosthetic systems. The development of a Radio Frequency (RF) wireless neural interface has the potential to expand the number of applications as well as extend the robustness and longevity compared to wired neural interfaces. However, it is well known that RF signal is absorbed by the body and can result in tissue heating. In this work, numerical studies with analytical validations are performed to provide an assessment of power, heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the wireless RF transmitting within the human head. The receiving antenna on the neural interface is designed with different geometries and modeled at a range of implanted depths within the brain in order to estimate the maximum receiving power without violating SAR and tissue temperature elevation safety regulations. Based on the size of the designed antenna, sets of frequencies between 1 GHz to 4 GHz have been investigated. As expected the simulations demonstrate that longer receiving antennas (dipole) and lower working frequencies result in greater power availability prior to violating SAR regulations. For a 15 mm dipole antenna operating at 1.24 GHz on the surface of the brain, 730 uW of power could be harvested at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) SAR violation limit. At approximately 5 cm inside the head, this same antenna would receive 190 uW of power prior to violating SAR regulations. Finally, the 3-D bio-heat simulation results show that for all evaluated antennas and frequency combinations we reach FCC SAR limits well before 1 °C. It is clear that powering neural interfaces via RF is possible, but ultra-low power circuit designs combined with advanced simulation will be required to develop a functional antenna that meets all system requirements. PMID:24223123

  11. A high power microwave triggered RF opening switch.

    PubMed

    Beeson, S; Dickens, J; Neuber, A

    2015-03-01

    A 4-port S-band waveguide structure was designed and fabricated such that a signal of any amplitude (less than 1 MW) can be switched from a normally closed state, <0.5 dB insertion loss (IL), to an open state >30 dB IL by initiating plasma in a gas cell situated at the junction of this waveguide and one propagating a megawatt level magnetron pulse. The 90/10 switching time is as low as 20 ns with a delay of ∼30 ns between the onset of the high power microwave pulse and the initial drop of the signal. Two ports of this device are for the high power triggering pulse while the other two ports are for the triggered signal in a Moreno-like coupler configuration. In order to maintain high isolation, these two sets of waveguides are rotated 90° from each other with a TE111 resonator/plasma cell located at the intersection. This manuscript describes the design and optimization of this structure using COMSOL 4.4 at the design frequency of 2.85 GHz, comparison of simulated scattering parameters with measured "cold tests" (testing without plasma), and finally the temporal waveforms of this device being used to successfully switch a low power CW signal from 2 W to <5 mW on a sub-microsecond timescale. PMID:25832255

  12. High-power-handling linear-integrated coherent photoreceivers for RF photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Abhay; Datta, Shubhashish; Rue, Jim; Rajagopalan, Sruti; Lemke, Shaun

    2013-05-01

    We report integrated coherent optical receivers designed specifically for RF Photonics applications. These receivers may be implemented in either single- or dual-polarization (DP) systems which utilize I/Q (in-phase, quadrature) phase modulation. The integrated receivers incorporate a monolithic 90 degree optical hybrid followed by eight high power-handling InGaAs photodiodes. Linear operation to +27 dBm of total optical input power, 20 mA photocurrent per diode, output third-order intercept (OIP3) > 40 dBm, third-order harmonic distortion < -100 dBc, and RF bandwidths > 4 GHz is presented. Such photoreceiver power-handling and linearity is required to optimize the photonic system spurious free dynamic range (SFDR), noise figure (NF) and link gain.

  13. High power testing of the 402.5 MHZ and 805 MHZ RF windows for the spallation neutron source accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, K. A.; De Baca, J. M.; Harrison, J. S.; Rodriguez, M. B.; Torrez, P. A.; Warner, D. K.

    2003-01-01

    Hisorically, Radio Frequency (RF) windows have been a common point of failure in input power couplers; therefore, reliable RF windows are critical to the success of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. The normal conducting part of the SNS accelerator requires six RF windows at 402.5 MHz and eight RF windows at 805 MHz[l]. Each RF window will transmit up to 180 kW of average power and 2.5 MW peak power at 60 Hz with 1.2 millisecond pulses. The RF windows, designed and manufactured by Thales, were tested at the full average power for 4 hours to ensure no problems with the high average power and then tested to an effective forward power level of 10 MW by testing at 2.5 MW forward power into a short and varying the phase of the standing wave. The sliding short was moved from 0 to 180 degrees to ensure no arcing or breakdown problems occur in any part of the window. This paper discusses the results of the high power testing of both the 402.5 MHz and the 805 MHz RF windows. Problems encountered during testing and the solutions for these problems are discussed.

  14. Normal conducting RF cavity of high current photoinjector for high power CW FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.; Schrage, D. L.; Wood R. L.; Schultheiss, T.; Rathke, J.; Christina, V.; Young, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    An RF photoinjector capable of producing high continuous average current with low emittance and energy spread is a key enabling technology for high power CW FEL. The design of a 2.5-cell {pi}-mode 700-MHz normal-conducting RF photoinjector cavity with magnetic emittance compensation is completed. With the electric field gradients of 7, 7, and 5 MV/m in the three cells, the photoinjector will produce a 2.5-MeV electron beam with 3-nC charge per bunch and 7 mm-mrad transverse rms emittance. Electromagnetic modeling was used extensively to optimize ridge-loaded tapered waveguides and RF couplers, which led to a new improved coupler-iris design. The results, combined with a thermal/stress analysis, show that the challenging problem of cavity cooling can be successfully solved. A demo 100-mA (at 35-MHz bunch-repetition rate) photoinjector is being manufactured. The design is scalable to higher power levels by increasing the bunch repetition rate, and provides a path to a MW-class amplifier FEL. The cavity design and details of RF coupler modeling are presented.

  15. Normal-conducting RF cavity of high current photoinjector for high power CW FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.; Schrage, D. L.; Wood R. L.; Schultheiss, T.; Rathke, J.; Young, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    An RF photoinjector capable of producing high continuous average current with low emittance and energy spread is a key enabling technology for high power CW FEL. The design of a 2.5-cell, {pi}-mode, 700-MHz normal-conducting RF photoinjector cavity with magnetic emittance compensation is completed. With the electric field gradients of 7.7, and 5 MV/m in the three cells, the photoinjector will produce a 2.5-MeV electron beam with 3-nC charge per bunch and the transverse rms emittance 7 mm-mrad. Electromagnetic modeling was used extensively to optimize ridge-loaded tapered waveguides and RF couplers, which led to a new, improved coupler iris design. The results, combined with a thermal and stress analysis, show that the challenging problem of cavity cooling can be successfully solved. The manufacturing of a demo 100-mA (at 35 MHz bunch repetition rate) photoinjector is underway. The design is scalable to higher power levels by increasing the electron bunch repetition rate, and provides a path to a MW-class amplifier FEL. This paper presents the cavity design and details of RF coupler modeling.

  16. Excitation of Global Alfvén Waves by Low RF Power on TCABR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglia, P. G. P.; Elfimov, A. G.; Ruchko, L.; Galvão, R. M. O.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Ronchi, G.; Fonseca, A. M. M.; Kuznetsov, Yu K.; Nascimento, I. C.; Reis, A. P.; de Sá, W. P.; Sanada, E. K.; Severo, J. H. F.; Theodoro, V. C.; Elizondo, J. I.

    2015-03-01

    Recent results of Global Alfvén wave (GAW) excited by external antenna and fed by low radio-frequency (RF) power (≤1kW) in tokamak TCABR are presented. The goal of this work is to develop a diagnostic tool based on the excitation of GAW using low power RF generators when the waves can be excited without perturbing the basic plasma parameters in TCABR. This method named MHD diagnostics has already been developed on other tokamaks for toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmodes as well for GAW. Two magnetic probes are used for measurements of the magnetic field perturbations in two regimes of excitation. In the first one, the fixed RF frequency is combined with gas-puffing induced density rise and relaxation (1-2)×1013/cm3 in order to meet the GAW resonance, while in the second excitation method RF frequency sweeps 2-4 MHz are applied to the relatively stable plasma density. The plasma discharges are accompanied by saw-tooth (ST) oscillations registered by Soft-X Ray diagnostics that helps in an identification of the GAW resonances due to ST density oscillations. It is found that the fixed frequency GAW resonance appears during density rise, as well during slow density reducing after stop of gas puffing. The effective mass number Aeff=1.36 is found.

  17. A new slip stacking RF system for a twofold power upgrade of Fermilab's Accelerator Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Madrak, Robyn

    2014-09-11

    Fermilab@?s Accelerator Complex has been recently upgraded, in order to increase the 120GeV proton beam power on target from about 400kW to over 700kW for NO@nA and other future intensity frontier experiments. One of the key ingredients of the upgrade is the offloading of some Main Injector synchrotron operations - beam injection and RF manipulation called ''slip stacking'' - to the 8GeV Recycler Ring, which had until recently been used only for low-intensity antiproton storage and cooling. This required construction of two new 53MHz RF systems for the slip-stacking manipulations. The cavities operate simultaneously at V_p_e_a_k@?150kV, but at slightly different frequencies (@Df=1260Hz). Their installation was completed in September 2013. This paper describes the novel solutions used in the design of the new cavities, their tuning system, and the associated high power RF system. First results showing effective operation of the RF system, beam capture and successful slip-stacking in the Recycler Ring are presented.

  18. High Power Testing of an X-Band RF Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, G. P.; Hartemann, F. V.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Ho, C. H.; Lau, W. K.; Yang, T. T.; Hwang, J. Y.; Liu, Y. C.

    1997-05-01

    A high brightness X-band photoinjector, capable of multibunch operation has been developed as a collaborative effort between the UC Davis Department of Applied Science and the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Hsinchu, Taiwan. The high power, UHV structure is in the initial stages of high gradient testing. Simulations using SUPERFISH and PARMELA show that approximately 10 MW of drive power at 8.548 GHz will produce 4.1 MeV electron bunches. A cold test cavity model has demonstrated a ohmic Q value of 4,718 with cavity components pressed together. The closed cavity ohmic Q value simulated using SUPERFISH is 7,168. Phase stabilization measurements of a 1 kW signal from a TWTA filtered by the high Q cold test cavity are also presented.(Work supported by DoD/AFOSR MURI F49620-95-1-0253, AFOSR (ATRI) F30602-94-2-001, ARO DAAHO4-95-1-0336, LLNL/LDRD DoE W-7405-ENG-48 IUT B335885)

  19. Advanced concepts for high power RF generation using solid state materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Erickson, G.A.

    1999-05-01

    Traditionally, high power radio frequency and microwave energy have been generated using electron beam driven hard-vacuum tubes such as klystrons and magnetrons. High-power solid-state sources of RF have not been available. It is well known that a non-linear, dispersive system can convert a pulse into an array of solitons. Although this effect has been exploited in the optical field, using non-linear optical materials, little work has been done in the field of high voltage electronics. It is the goal of this work, which is just beginning, to develop sources of RF in the few hundreds of megahertz to gigahertz range with power levels in the hundreds of megawatts to the gigawatt level. To generate solitons a high voltage pulse is fed onto a transmission line that is periodically loaded with a non-linear ceramic dielectric in the paraelectric phase. The combination of the non-linearity and dispersion causes the pulse to break up into an array of solitons. A soliton-based system has several components: the solid state, high voltage, high current switch to provide the initial high voltage pulse; a shock line to decrease the rise time of the initial pulse to less than a few nanoseconds; and the soliton generating transmission line where the high power RF is generated when driven by the fast rising pulse from the shock line. The approach and progress to date will be described. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Engineering development of superconducting RF linac for high-power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic Chan, K.C.; Rusnak, B.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Campbell, B.M.; Kelley, J.P.; Safa, H.

    1998-12-31

    High-power proton linacs are a promising source of neutrons for material processing and research applications. Superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) Rf linac technology is preferred for such applications because of power efficiency. A multi-year engineering development program is underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the required SCRF technology. The program consists of development of SC cavities, power couplers, and cryomodule integration. Prototypes will be built and operated to obtain performance and integration information, and for design improvement. This paper describes the scope and present status of the development program.

  1. A High-Power RF-Focusing CW Electron LINAC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobenin, N. P.; Kostin, D. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Trower, W. P.

    1997-05-01

    Using a biperiodic accelerating structure with rectangular cavities in a high-power Continuous Wave electron LINear ACcelerator simplifies accelerator construction and reduces beam losses. By optimizing the beam aperture and coupling slots, we have obtained high focusing gradients, shunt impedances (N.P. Sobenin, V.N. Kandurin, A.I. Karev, V.N. Melekhin, V.I. Shvedunov, and W.P. Trower, in Proc. 1995 Particle Accelerator Conf., L. Gennari ed. (IEEE, Piscataway,1996) v. 3, p. 1827.), and couplings (around 20 percent). By successively rotating six rectangular accelerating cavity sections through 90^o about the beam axis and separating the sections by axially symmetric cavities which serve as drift spaces, we obtain focusing similar to that of a quadrupole magnets system. We find that a 500 mA beam accelerated from 2 to 10 MeV in a 4 m structure suffers negligible beam losses. A similar axially symmetric structure without external focusing begins losing substantial beam at around 100 mA.

  2. Suppression of beam induced pulse shortening modes in high power RF generator TW output structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Several different style 11.4 GHz relativistic klystrons, operating with beam pulse widths of 50 ns and using large aperture, tapered phase-velocity TW structures,` have recently demonstrated output RF power levels in the range of 100 to 300 MW without breakdown or pulse shortening. To extend this performance into the long pulse regime (1 {mu}s) or to demonstrate a threefold increase in output power by using higher currents, the existing TW circuit designs must be modified (a) to reduce the cavity maximum surface E-fields by a factor of 2 to 3, and (b) to elevate the current threshold values of the beam induced higher order modes (HOM) to ensure avoidance of RF pulse shortening and associated instabilities. A technique for substantially elevating this threshold current is described, and microwave data and photographs are presented showing the degree of HOM damping achieved in a recently constructed 11.4 GHz TW structure.

  3. Thermal management of space-based, high-power solid-state RF amplifiers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, M.F.; Chow, L.C.; Johnson, J.H.

    1990-08-01

    The advanced weapons concepts envisioned by the SDIO employed a wide array of highly energetic devices, which due to inefficiencies, generate large quantities of waste heat. Power and thermal management are integrally related. In the vacuum of space, disposing of waste energy is a major problem which can contribute as much as 50% to the overall spacecraft mass and volume. The problem becomes more acute as the temperature at which the energy must be rejected is lowered. In an earlier study, thermal management issues associated with megawatt class RF microwave tubes were explored to determine if there were simple, approximately mass neutral schemes which might be adapted to dispose of the waste energy generated within a tube collector operating in space. The assumptions for that study were: (1) Tubes were in the megawatt class-70% efficient for single simple collector and 90% efficient for depressed collectors, (2) On-board, super critical hydrogen was available at a pressure of 35 bars and a temperature of 35 K. (3) The largest single event run time was 500 seconds. (4) The device would be dormant for long periods of time, be required to become active in tens of seconds followed by long periods of dormancy. (5) The only allowable effluent is hydrogen. (6) System impact must be minimal.

  4. High total dose proton irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathi, M. N.; Praveen, K. C.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Pushpa, N.

    2014-04-24

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the I-V characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied in the dose range of 100 Krad to 100 Mrad. The different electrical characteristics like Gummel, current gain and output characteristics were systematically studied before and after irradiation. The recovery in the I-V characteristics of irradiated NPN BJTs were studied by isochronal and isothermal annealing methods.

  5. Results of the SLAC LCLS Gun High-Power RF Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; Wang, J.; Lewandowski, J.; Vlieks, A.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The beam quality and operational requirements for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) currently being constructed at SLAC are exceptional, requiring the design of a new RF photocathode gun for the electron source. Based on operational experience at SLAC's GTF and SDL and ATF at BNL as well as other laboratories, the 1.6cell s-band (2856MHz) gun was chosen to be the best electron source for the LCLS, however a significant redesign was necessary to achieve the challenging parameters. Detailed 3-D analysis and design was used to produce near-perfect rotationally symmetric rf fields to achieve the emittance requirement. In addition, the thermo-mechanical design allows the gun to operate at 120Hz and a 140MV/m cathode field, or to an average power dissipation of 4kW. Both average and pulsed heating issues are addressed in the LCLS gun design. The first LCLS gun is now fabricated and has been operated with high-power RF. The results of these high-power tests are presented and discussed.

  6. Design and fabrication of the high-power RF transmission line into the PEFP linac tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Kim, Han-Sung; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2012-07-01

    The 100-MeV proton linear accelerator (linac) for the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) has been developed and will be installed at the Gyeong-ju site. For the linac, a total of 11 sets of RF systems are required, and the waveguide layout was fixed to install high-power RF (HPRF) systems. One of the important interfaces with the building construction is the high-power radio-frequency (HPRF) transmission line embedded in the tunnel, which is used to transmit 1-MW RF power to each cavity in the tunnel. The waveguide section penetrating into the linac tunnel was designed with a bending structure for radiation shielding, and the dependence of its voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR) on the chamfer length of the bending was calculated. The HPRF transmission line was fabricated into a piece of waveguide to prevent moisture and any foreign debris inside the 2.5-m thick concrete block. Air leakage was checked with a pressure of 0.25 psig of nitrogen gas, and a maximum VSWR of 1.196 was obtained by measuring the vector reflection coefficients with the quarter-wave transmission section. In this paper, the design and the fabrication of the HPRF transmission line into the PEFP linac tunnel are presented.

  7. HIGH POWER TEST OF RF SEPARATOR FOR 12 GEV UPGRADE OF CEBAF AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, M. Wissmann, J. Mammosser, C. Hovater, M. Spata, G. Krafft, J. Delayen

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF at JLab is in the process of an energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. The existing setup of the RF separator cavities in the 5th pass will not be adequate to extract the highest energy (11 GeV) beam to any two existing halls (A, B or C) while simultaneously delivering to the new hall D in the case of the proposed 12 GeV upgrade of the machine. To restore this capability, we are exploring the possibility of extension of existing normal conducting 499 MHz TEM-type rf separator cavities. Detailed numerical studies suggest that six 2-cell normal conducting structures meet the requirements; each 2-cell structure will require up to 4 kW RF input power in contrast with the current nominal operating power of 1.0 to 2.0 kW. A high power test of 4 kW confirms that the cavity meet the requirement.

  8. Effect of RF power and annealing on chemical bonding and morphology of a-CN{sub x} thin films as humidity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, N. F. H; Hussain, N. S. Mohamed; Awang, R.; Ritikos, R.; Kamal, S. A. A.

    2013-11-27

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) thin films were deposited using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) technique. A set of a-CN{sub x} thin films were prepared using pure methane (CH{sub 4}) gas diluted with nitrogen (N{sub 2}) gas. The rf power was varied at 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 W. These films were then annealed at 400 °C in a quartz tube furnace in argon (Ar) gas. The effects of rf power and thermal annealing on the chemical bonding and morphology of these samples were studied. Surface profilometer was used to measure film thickness. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) measurements were used to determine their chemical bonding and morphology respectively. The deposition rate of the films increased constantly with increasing rf power up to 80W, before decreasing with further increase in rf power. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) studies showed a systematic change in the spectra and revealed three main peaks included C-N, C=N, C=C and C≡N triple bond. C=N and C≡N bonds decreased with increased C-N bonds after thermal annealing process. The FESEM images showed that the structure is porous for as-deposited and covered by granule-like grain structure after thermal annealing process was done. The resistance of the a-CN{sub x} thin film changed from 23.765 kΩ to 5.845 kΩ in the relative humidity range of 5 to 92 % and the film shows a good response and repeatability as a humidity sensing materials. This work showed that rf power and thermal annealing has significant effects on the chemical bonding and surface morphology of the a-CN{sub x} films and but yield films which are potential candidate as humidity sensor device.

  9. Traveling Wave Tube (TVT) RF Power Combining Demonstration for use in the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, Joseph A.

    2004-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) is set to launch between the years 2012 and 2015. It will possibly utilize a nuclear reactor power source and ion engines as it travels to the moons of Jupiter. The nuclear reactor will produce hundreds of kilowatts of power for propulsion, communication and various scientific instruments. Hence, the RF amplification devices aboard will be able to operate at a higher power level and data rate. The initial plan for the communications system is for an output of 1000 watts of RF power, a data rate of at least 10 megabits a second, and a frequency of 32 GHz. A higher data rate would be ideal to fully utilize the instruments aboard JIMO. At NASA Glenn, one of our roles in the JIMO project is to demonstrate RF power combining using multiple traveling wave tubes (TWT). In order for the power of separate TWT s to be combined, the RF output waves from each must be in-phase and have the same amplitude. Since different tubes act differently, we had to characterize each tube using a Network Analyzer. We took frequency sweeps and power sweeps to characterize each tube to ensure that they will behave similarly under the same conditions. The 200 watt Dornier tubes had been optimized to run at a lower power level (120 watts) for their extensive use in the ACTS program, so we also had to experiment with adjusting the voltage settings on several internal components (helix, anode, collector) of the tubes to reach the full 200 watt potential. from the ACTS program. Phase shifters and power attenuators were placed in the waveguide circuit at the inputs to the tubes so that adjustments could be made individually to match them exactly. A magic tee was used to route and combine the amplified electromagnetic RF waves on the tube output side. The demonstration of 200 watts of combined power was successful with efficiencies greater than 90% over a 500 MHz bandwidth. The next step will be to demonstrate the use of three amplifiers using two magic tees by

  10. A digitally calibrated CMOS RMS power detector for RF automatic gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taotao, Yan; Hui, Wang; Jinbo, Li; Jianjun, Zhou

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a digitally calibrated CMOS wideband radio frequency (RF) root-mean-square (RMS) power detector for high accuracy RF automatic gain control (AGC). The proposed RMS power detector demonstrates accurate power detection in the presence of process, supply voltage, and temperature (PVT) variations by employing a digital calibration scheme. It also consumes low power and occupies a small chip area. The measurement results show that the scheme improves the accuracy of the detector to better than 0.3 dB over the PVT variations and wide operating frequency range from 0.2 to 0.8 GHz. Implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS process and occupying a small die area of 263 × 214 μm2, the proposed digitally calibrated CMOS RMS power detector only consumes 1.6 mA in power detection mode and 2.1 mA in digital calibration mode from a 1.8 V supply voltage.

  11. High-power rf pulse compression with SLED-II at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, C.; Kroll, N.M.; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1993-04-01

    Increasing the peak rf power available from X-band microwave tubes by means of rf pulse compression is envisioned as a way of achieving the few-hundred-megawatt power levels needed to drive a next-generation linear collider with 50--100 MW klystrons. SLED-II is a method of pulse compression similar in principal to the SLED method currently in use on the SLC and the LEP injector linac. It utilizes low-los resonant delay lines in place of the storage cavities of the latter. This produces the added benefit of a flat-topped output pulse. At SLAC, we have designed and constructed a prototype SLED-II pulse-compression system which operates in the circular TE{sub 01} mode. It includes a circular-guide 3-dB coupler and other novel components. Low-power and initial high-power tests have been made, yielding a peak power multiplication of 4.8 at an efficiency of 40%. The system will be used in providing power for structure tests in the ASTA (Accelerator Structures Test Area) bunker. An upgraded second prototype will have improved efficiency and will serve as a model for the pulse compression system of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator).

  12. RF Conditioning and testing of fundamental power couplers for the RIA project

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stirbet; J. Popielarski; T. L. Grimm; M. Johnson

    2003-09-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is the highest priority of the nuclear physics community in the United States for a major new accelerator facility. A principal element of RIA will be a superconducting 1.4 GeV superconducting ion linac accelerating ions of isotopes from hydrogen to uranium onto production targets or for further acceleration by a second superconducting linac. The superconducting linac technology is closely related to that used at existing accelerators and the Spallation Neutron Source. Taking advantage of JLAB's SRF Institute facilities and expertise for the SNS project, preparation of couplers, RF conditioning and high power tests have been performed on fundamental power couplers for RIA project.

  13. Development of a Movable Plunger Tuner for the High Power RF Cavity for the PEP II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, H.D.; Fant, K.; Neubauer, Mark Stephen; Rimmer, R.A.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-08-26

    A 10 cm diameter by 5 cm travel plunger tuner was developed for the PEP-II RF copper cavity system. The single cell cavity including the tuner is designed to operate up to 150 kW of dissipated RF power. Spring finger contacts to protect the bellows from RF power are specially placed 8.5 cm away from the inside wall of the cavity to avoid fundamental and higher order mode resonances. The spring fingers are made of dispersion-strengthened copper to accommodate relatively high heating. The design, alignment, testing and performance of the tuner is described.

  14. An RF-Powered Micro-Reactor for Efficient Extraction and Hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, V.

    2014-12-01

    An RF sample-processing micro-reactor that was developed as part of potential in situ Exploration Missions to inner- and outer-planetary bodies was designed to utilize aqueous solutions subjected to 60 GHz radiation at 730 mW of input power to extract target organic compounds and molecular and inorganic ions as well as to hydrolyze complex polymeric materials. Successful identification and characterization of these molecules relies on the sample-processing techniques utilized alongside state-of-the-art detection and analysis. For mass and power restrictions put on space exploration missions, smaller and more efficient instruments are highly desirable. The RF micro-reactor potentially offers a simplified alternative to the typical gold-standard extractions that often use solvents, chemicals, and conditions that can vary wildly and depend on the targeted molecules. Instead, this instrument uses a single solvent ­— water — that can be "tuned" under the different experimental conditions, leveraging the operating principles of the Sub-Critical Water Extractor. Proof-of-concept experiments examining the hydrolysis of glycosidic and peptide bonds were successful in demonstrating the RF micro-reactor's capabilities. Progress toward coupling the reactor with a micro-scale sample-handling system enabling slurry delivery has been made and preliminary results on heterogeneous reactions and extractions will be presented.

  15. Flexible low-power RF nanoelectronics in the GHz regime using CVD MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogeesh, Maruthi

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted substantial interest for flexible nanoelectronics due to the overall device mechanical flexibility and thickness scalability for high mechanical performance and low operating power. In this work, we demonstrate the first MoS2 RF transistors on flexible substrates based on CVD-grown monolayers, featuring record GHz cutoff frequency (5.6 GHz) and saturation velocity (~1.8×106 cm/s), which is significantly superior to contemporary organic and metal oxide thin-film transistors. Furthermore, multicycle three-point bending results demonstrated the electrical robustness of our flexible MoS2 transistors after 10,000 cycles of mechanical bending. Additionally, basic RF communication circuit blocks such as amplifier, mixer and wireless AM receiver have been demonstrated. These collective results indicate that MoS2 is an ideal advanced semiconducting material for low-power, RF devices for large-area flexible nanoelectronics and smart nanosystems owing to its unique combination of large bandgap, high saturation velocity and high mechanical strength.

  16. Investigations of DC power supplies with optoelectronic transducers and RF energy converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzowski, B.; Gozdur, R.; Bernacki, L.; Lakomski, M.

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Distribution Cabinets (FDC) monitoring systems are increasingly popular. However it is difficult to realize such system in passive FDC, due to lack of source of power supply. In this paper investigation of four different DC power supplies with optoelectronic transducers is described. Two converters: photovoltaic power converter and PIN photodiode can convert the light transmitted through the optical fiber to electric energy. Solar cell and antenna RF-PCB are also tested. Results presented in this paper clearly demonstrate that it is possible to build monitoring system in passive FDC. During the tests maximum obtained output power was 11 mW. However all converters provided enough power to excite 32-bit microcontroller with ARM-cores and digital thermometer.

  17. Developments and directions in 200 MHz very high power RF at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Cliff, R.; Bush, E.D.; DeHaven, R.A.; Harris, H.W.; Parsons, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), is a linear particle accelerator a half-mile long. It produces an 800 million electron- volt hydrogen-ion beam at an average current of more than one milliamp. The first RF section of the accelerator consists of four Alvarez drift-tube structures. Each of these structures is excited by an amplifier module at a frequency of 201.25 MHz. These amplifiers operate at a duty of 13 percent or more and at peak pulsed power levels of about 2.5 million watts. The second RF accelerator section consists of forty-four side-coupled-cavity structures. Each of these is excited by an amplifier module at a frequency of 805 MHz. These amplifiers operate at a duty of up to 12 percent and at peak pulsed power levels of about 1.2 million watts. The relatively high average beam current in the accelerator places a heavy demand upon components in the RF systems. The 201-MHz modules have always required a large share of maintenance efforts. In recent years, the four 201.25 MHz modules have been responsible for more than twice as much accelerator down-time as have the forty-four 805 MHz modules. This paper reviews recent, ongoing, and planned improvements in the 201-MHz systems. The Burle Industries 7835 super power triode is used in the final power amplifiers of each of the 201-MHz modules. This tube has been modified for operation at LAMPF by the addition of Penning ion vacuum pumps.'' This has enabled more effective tube conditioning and restarting. A calorimetry system of high accuracy is in development to monitor tube plate-power dissipation.

  18. Design and Construction of a 500 kW CW, 400 MHz Klystron to be used as RF Power Source for LHC/RF Component Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischholz, H.; Fowkes, W. R.; Pearson, C.

    1997-05-01

    A 500 kW CW klystron operating at 400 MHz was jointly developed and constructed by CERN and SLAC for use as a high power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could be incorporated in the LHC test klystron. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing frame, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned by using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented. Finally the set-up of the LHC/RF test stand and the features of its auxiliary high-power RF equipment, such as circulator and absorber, are described.

  19. Unique mechanization to fault isolate failures of an electron tube Radio Frequency (RF) amplifier and its high voltage power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. G.

    1986-03-01

    An electronics circuit for improving the fault isolation of failures between an electron tube radio frequency (RF) amplifier and its high voltage power supply is disclosed. High voltage power supplies control their output voltage by comparing a feedback voltage against a reference. This comparison is used to develop an error voltage which, in turn, drives a pulsewidth modulator that corrects the feedback voltage to the reference. The output of a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) is used as the reference voltage. The DAC is driven by a counter which would count to the correct reference voltage represented by a specific count. The final count is determined by a comparator which compares the counter output to the desired final counter and stops the counter when it is reached.

  20. Effects of applied radio frequency power on low-temperature catalytic-free nanostructured carbon nitride films by rf PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritikos, Richard; Othman, Maisara; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature catalytic-free carbon nitride, CN x nanostructured thin films were produced by using radio frequency (rf) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition employing a parallel-plate electrode configuration. The effects of varying applied rf power, P rf (30-100 W), on the formation of these structures were studied. Aligned nanostructured CN x films were produced at P rf as low as 40 W, but uniform highly vertical-aligned CN x nanorods were produced at P rf of 60 and 80 W. This was induced by the presence of high ion bombardment on the growing films and the preferential bonding of isonitrile to aromatic bonds in the nanostructures. It was also observed that nitrogen incorporation is highest in this range and the structure and bonding in the nanostructure reflects those of typical polymeric/amorphous carbon nitride films.

  1. A Self-Powered Hybrid Energy Scavenging System Utilizing RF and Vibration Based Electromagnetic Harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uluşan, H.; Gharehbaghi, K.; Zorlu, Ö.; Muhtaroğlu, A.; Külah, H.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a novel hybrid system that combines the power generated simultaneously by a vibration-based Electromagnetic (EM) harvester and a UHF band RF harvester. The novel hybrid scavenger interface uses a power management circuit in 180 nm CMOS technology to step-up and to regulate the combined output. At the first stage of the system, the RF harvester generates positive DC output with a 7-stage threshold compensated rectifier, while the EM harvester generates negative DC output with a self-powered AC/DC negative doubler circuit. At the second stage, the generated voltages are serially added, stepped-up with an on-chip charge pump circuit, and regulated to a typical battery voltage of 3 V. Test results indicate that the hybrid operation enables generation of 9 μW at 3 V output for a wide range of input stimulations, which could not be attained with either harvesting mode by itself. Moreover the hybrid system behaves as a typical battery, and keeps the output voltage stable at 3 V up to 18 μW of output power. The presented system is the first battery-like harvester to our knowledge that generates energy from two independent sources and regulates the output to a stable DC voltage.

  2. Mechanical Design and Fabrication of a New RF Power Amplifier for LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zukun

    2011-01-01

    A Full-scale prototype of a new 201.25 MHz RF Final Power Amplifier (FPA) for Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed, fabricated, assembled and installed in the test facility. This prototype was successfully tested and met the physics and electronics design criteria. The team faced design and manufacturing challenges, having a goal to produce 2 MW peak power at 13% duty factor, at the elevation of over 2 km in Los Alamos. The mechanical design of the final power amplifier was built around a Thales TH628 Diacrode{sup R}, a state-of-art tetrode power tube. The main structure includes Input circuit, Output circuit, Grid decoupling circuit, Output coupler, Tuning pistons, and a cooling system. Many types of material were utilized to make this new RF amplifier. The fabrication processes of the key components were completed in the Prototype Fabrication Division shop at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The critical plating procedures were achieved by private industry. The FPA mass is nearly 600 kg and installed in a beam structural support stand. In this paper, we summarize the FPA design basis and fabrication, plating, and assembly process steps with necessary lifting and handling fixtures. In addition, to ensure the quality of the FPA support structure a finite element analysis with seismic design forces has also been carried out.

  3. Power Dependence of the RF Surface Resistance of MgB2 Superconductor.

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Findikoglu, A. T.; Jason, A. J.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Mueller, F. M.; Shapiro, A. H.; Geng, R. L.; Padamsee, Hasan,; Romanenko, A.; Moeckly, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) is a superconducting material that has a transition temperature (T{sub c}) of {approx}40 K, which is {approx}30 K higher than niobium (Nb) that has been used for most superconducting RF cavities in the past decades. Last year, it was demonstrated that the RF surface resistance of MgB{sub 2} can be lower than Nb at 4 K. One of the problems with other high-T{sub c} materials such as YBCO was its rapid increase in RF surface resistance with higher surface magnetic fields. Recently, we have shown that MgB2 shows little increase in the surface resistance up to {approx}120 Oe, equivalent of an accelerating field of {approx}3 MV/m. The highest field tested was limited by available power. This result is encouraging and has made us consider fabrication of a cavity coated with MgB{sub 2} and test it. Also, there is a potential that this material has a higher critical magnetic field that enables the cavity to run at a higher gradient than Nb cavities in addition to the possibility of operation at higher temperatures.

  4. Magnet-free uniform sputtering of dielectric film by RF and microwave power superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Kensuke; Hagihara, Toshiya; Noda, Tomonori; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-08-01

    A novel sputtering device that is free of magnets (magnet-free surface wave sputtering plasma: MF-SSP) is developed by combining a surface wave plasma and RF bias power. Low-pressure (<0.5 Pa) plasma sustainment is demonstrated by MF-SSP with a uniform sputter deposition rate with a deviation of less than 5% within an area of 10 × 10 cm2. Highly oriented MgO films are deposited at a substrate temperature of 200 °C.

  5. RF power fading mitigation for an IMDD multicarrier LR-PON.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Wei; Lai, Tsan-Ning; Chang, Mu-Fan; Feng, Kai-Ming

    2016-08-22

    In an intensity-modulation direct-detection (IMDD) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal format, radio frequency (RF) power fading produces non-uniform receiving performance among the subcarriers due to chromatic dispersion. Hence each subscriber experiences distinct quality of service (QoS) in conventional frequency division multiple access (FDMA). In this paper, a multicarrier code division multiple access (MC-CDMA) signal along with multicode interference (MCI) cancellation process is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to enhance the receiving performance in an IMDD long reach passive optical network (LR-PON). With the proposed scheme, the receiving performance of each subcarrier can be equalized so that a universal transmitter design at central office (CO) can support all the subscribers with their locations ranging from back-to-back to 100 km. Our experimental results also reveal that, even under 20 dB RF power fading, the proposed scheme can still provide over 21.7 dB power budget and only approximately 2 dB sensitivity deviation is observed in an IMDD LR-PON system. PMID:27557210

  6. Design and implementation of a high power rf oscillator on a printed circuit board for multipole ion guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Raman; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2006-11-01

    Radio frequency (rf) oscillators are commonly used to drive electrodes of ion guides. In this article a rf oscillator circuit design and its implementation is presented. The printed circuit board for the rf oscillator is designed and fabricated. The performance of the circuit was tested to transfer ions through a hexapole in a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometer. A comprehensive discussion of several aspects of printed circuit board design for high power and high frequency circuits is presented.

  7. HIGH POWER RF DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL FOR MULTI-CAVITY CRYOMODULE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Broyles, Michael R; Crofford, Mark T; Geng, Xiaosong; Kim, Sang-Ho; Lee, Sung-Woo; Phibbs, Curtis L; Shin, Ki; Strong, William Herb

    2011-01-01

    Qualification of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in the cryomodules for the accelerating performance needs to be done through high power processing. A four-way waveguide power distribution system with independent control of power outputs has been being developed for testing the multi-cavity cryomodules for the SNS linac. SNS is employing two types of cryomodules: one type with three medium beta six-cell cavities and the other with four high beta six-cell cavities. The cryomodule that is being manufactured as a spare and the new crymodules for the future power upgrade project (PUP) of SNS will be high beta types. The four-way power distribution with independently controlled power outputs was considered useful for powering all cavities at the same time with a klystron amplifier since the SNS test facility was configured for a single klystron operation. Since certain interaction between the cavities under severe field emission was suspected in existing cryomodules, this type of high power test can be valuable for characterization of SRF cavities. By implementing a vector modulator at each arm of the splitting system, the amplitudes and the phases of RF outputs can be controlled independently. This paper discusses the present status of the development.

  8. RF power upgrade at the superconducting 1.3 GHz CW LINAC "ELBE" with solid state amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttig, Hartmut; Arnold, A.; Büchner, A.; Justus, M.; Kuntsch, M.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Schurig, R.; Staats, G.; Teichert, J.

    2013-03-01

    The RF power for the superconducting 1.3 GHz CW LINAC "ELBE" has been doubled from less than 10 kW to 20 kW per cavity. In January 2012 the four 10 kW klystrons used to drive the four superconducting cavities of the LINAC have been replaced by pairs of 10 kW solid state power amplifiers (SSPA). ELBE is now worldwide the first 1.3 GHz CW LINAC equipped with solid state RF power amplifiers. This technical note details on this project.

  9. Can we estimate the cellular phone RF peak output power with a simple experiment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioreze, Maycon; dos Santos Junior, Sauli; Goncalves Hönnicke, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    Cellular phones are becoming increasingly useful tools for students. Since cell phones operate in the microwave bandwidth, they can be used to motivate students to demonstrate and better understand the properties of electromagnetic waves. However, since these waves operate at higher frequencies (L-band, from 800 MHz to 2 GHz) it is not simple to detect them. Usually, expensive real-time high frequency oscilloscopes are required. Indirect measurements are also possible through heat-based and diode-detector-based radio-frequency (RF) power sensors. Another didactic and intuitive way is to explore a simple and inexpensive detection system, based on the interference effect caused in the electronic circuit of TV and PC soundspeakers, and to try to investigate different properties of the cell phones’ RF electromagnetic waves, such as its power and modulated frequency. This manuscript proposes a trial to quantify these measurements, based on a simple Friis equation model and the time constant of the circuit used in the detection system, in order to show it didactically to the students and even allow them also to explore such a simple detection system at home.

  10. Ultra-low output impedance RF power amplifier for parallel excitation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xu; Yang, Xing; Liu, Yunfeng; Sabate, Juan; Zhu, Yudong

    2009-04-01

    Inductive coupling between coil elements of a transmit array is one of the key challenges faced by parallel RF transmission. An ultra-low output impedance RF power amplifier (PA) concept was introduced to address this challenge. In an example implementation, an output-matching network was designed to transform the drain-source impedance of the metallic oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) into a very low value for suppressing interelement coupling effect, and meanwhile, to match the input impedance of the coil to the optimum load of the MOSFET for maximizing the available output power. Two prototype amplifiers with 500-W output rating were developed accordingly, and were further evaluated with a transmit array in phantom experiments. Compared to the conventional 50-Omega sources, the new approach exhibited considerable effectiveness suppressing the effects of interelement coupling. The experiments further indicated that the isolation performance was comparable to that achieved by optimized overlap decoupling. The new approach, benefiting from a distinctive current-source characteristic, also exhibited a superior robustness against load variation. Feasibility of the new approach in high-field MR was demonstrated on a 3T clinical scanner. PMID:19189287

  11. Quantitative description of RF power-based ratiometric chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) pH imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Renhua; Longo, Dario Livio; Aime, Silvio; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI holds great promise for imaging pH. However, routine CEST measurement varies not only with pH-dependent chemical exchange rate but also with CEST agent concentration, providing pH-weighted information. Conventional ratiometric CEST imaging normalizes the confounding concentration factor by analyzing the relative CEST effect from different exchangeable groups, requiring CEST agents with multiple chemically distinguishable labile proton sites. Recently, an RF power-based ratiometric CEST MRI approach has been developed for concentration-independent pH MRI using CEST agents with a single exchangeable group. To facilitate quantification and optimization of the new ratiometric analysis, we quantitated RF power-based ratiometric CEST ratio (rCESTR) and derived its signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio. Using creatine as a representative CEST agent containing a single exchangeable site, our study demonstrated that optimized RF power-based ratiometric analysis provides good pH sensitivity. We showed that rCESTR follows a base-catalyzed exchange relationship with pH independent of creatine concentration. The pH accuracy of RF power-based ratiometric MRI was within 0.15–0.20 pH unit. Furthermore, absolute exchange rate can be obtained from the proposed ratiometric analysis. To summarize, RF power-based ratiometric CEST analysis provides concentration-independent pH-sensitive imaging and complements conventional multiple labile proton groups-based ratiometric CEST analysis. PMID:25807919

  12. Primary measurement of total ultrasonic power with improved accuracy in rf voltage measurement.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P K; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Yudhisther; Gupta, Reeta; Joshi, Deepa

    2010-10-01

    Out of the various existing ultrasonic power measurement techniques, the radiation force balance method using microbalance is most widely used in low power (below 1 W) regime. The major source of uncertainty associated with this technique is the error in ac voltage measurement applied to the transducer for the generation of ultrasonic waves. The sources that deteriorate the ac voltage measurement accuracy include cable length and impedance mismatch. We introduce a new differential peak to peak measurement approach to reduce the ac voltage measurement error. The method holds the average peak amplitude of each polarity. Ultralow offset difference amplifier is used to measure peak to peak voltage. The method is insensitive to the variations in the dc offset of the source. The functionality of this method has been tested and compared with the conventional rf voltage measurement method. The output of this proposed technique is dc, which can be measured with an error of less than 0.1%. PMID:21034111

  13. Stray RF Power Estimates From EC Exploitation During ITER Plasma Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandini, F.; Henderson, M.; Nazare, C.; Darbos, C.; Gassmann, T.; Purohit, D.; Omori, T.

    2011-12-01

    The EC H&CD system of ITER tokamak is an essential tool for all the phases of ITER operation. Different levels of EC power are required through all the plasma discharge: up to 6.7 MW for assisting the breakdown and burn through, up to 20 MW for current drive and saw-teeth control from the equatorial launcher and up to 20 MW for NTM stabilization from the upper launchers. The assistance to breakdown and burn through is characterized by a very low (if not negligible) RF power absorption by the plasma. A significant level of stray radiation may also arise from partial absorption due to non-optimal plasma parameters and/or wrong injected polarization. The stray power radiated in the vacuum chamber is estimated as a first step toward mitigating potential harmful consequence to in-vessel structures and diagnostics. Power loading of the chamber walls (peek power and average power density for straight beam propagation in the empty chamber) and diffuse stray radiation effects are simulated to infer suitable strategies to avoid damage to first wall and to microwave sensitive components.

  14. Stray RF Power Estimates From EC Exploitation During ITER Plasma Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, F.; Henderson, M.; Darbos, C.; Gassmann, T.; Purohit, D.; Omori, T.; Nazare, C.

    2011-12-23

    The EC H and CD system of ITER tokamak is an essential tool for all the phases of ITER operation. Different levels of EC power are required through all the plasma discharge: up to 6.7 MW for assisting the breakdown and burn through, up to 20 MW for current drive and saw-teeth control from the equatorial launcher and up to 20 MW for NTM stabilization from the upper launchers. The assistance to breakdown and burn through is characterized by a very low (if not negligible) RF power absorption by the plasma. A significant level of stray radiation may also arise from partial absorption due to non-optimal plasma parameters and/or wrong injected polarization. The stray power radiated in the vacuum chamber is estimated as a first step toward mitigating potential harmful consequence to in-vessel structures and diagnostics. Power loading of the chamber walls (peek power and average power density for straight beam propagation in the empty chamber) and diffuse stray radiation effects are simulated to infer suitable strategies to avoid damage to first wall and to microwave sensitive components.

  15. Implantable RF power converter for small animal in vivo biological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chaimanonart, Nattapon; Olszens, Keith; Zimmerman, Mark; Ko, Wen; Young, Darrin

    2005-01-01

    A miniature, long-term, implantable radio frequency (RF) power converter for freely moving samll animal in vivo biological monitoring is proposed. An environment consisting of a laboratory mouse inside a cage is used for a prototype monitoring system design. By employing an inductive coupling network, a prototype implant device with a dimension of approximately 6 m x 6 mm x 1 mm and a weight of 100 mg including medical-grade silicone coating can wirelessly receive an input FR power from an array of external coils positioned underneath the cage. Each coil is designed to be 5 cm x 5 cm, comparable to a typical mouse size for minimizing power coupling variation. The received AC voltage is further rectified by a half-wave rectivier to supply DC current to a 3 kω resistance, representing a typical bio-implant microsystem loading. The proposed RF power converter was implanted in the peritoneal cavity of a laboratory mouse for performance evaluation. With a 5-turn external coil loop separated from a 30-turn internal coil by 1cm distance and centered to each other, an optimal voltage gain of 3.5 can be achieved with a 10 MHz operating frequency to provide a maximum rectified output DC voltage of 21 V. The DC voltage varies at different animal tilting angles and positions with a minimum voltage of 4 V at 60° tilting angle near the corner of the external coil. This variation can be further minimized by overlapping the external loops layout. PMID:17281418

  16. Effects of various deposition times and RF powers on CdTe thin film growth using magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorannevis, Z.; Akbarnejad, E.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is a p-type II-VI compound semiconductor, which is an active component for producing photovoltaic solar cells in the form of thin films, due to its desirable physical properties. In this study, CdTe film was deposited using the radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system onto a glass substrate. To improve the properties of the CdTe film, effects of two experimental parameters of deposition time and RF power were investigated on the physical properties of the CdTe films. X-ray Diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectrophotometer were used to study the structural, morphological and optical properties of the CdTe samples grown at different experimental conditions, respectively. Our results suggest that film properties strongly depend on the experimental parameters and by optimizing these parameters, it is possible to tune the desired structural, morphological and optical properties. From XRD data, it is found that increasing the deposition time and RF power leads to increasing the crystallinity as well as the crystal sizes of the grown film, and all the films represent zinc blende cubic structure. Roughness values given from AFM images suggest increasing the roughness of the CdTe films by increasing the RF power and deposition times. Finally, optical investigations reveal increasing the film band gaps by increasing the RF power and the deposition time.

  17. Effects of various deposition times and RF powers on CdTe thin film growth using magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorannevis, Z.; Akbarnejad, E.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is a p-type II-VI compound semiconductor, which is an active component for producing photovoltaic solar cells in the form of thin films, due to its desirable physical properties. In this study, CdTe film was deposited using the radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system onto a glass substrate. To improve the properties of the CdTe film, effects of two experimental parameters of deposition time and RF power were investigated on the physical properties of the CdTe films. X-ray Diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectrophotometer were used to study the structural, morphological and optical properties of the CdTe samples grown at different experimental conditions, respectively. Our results suggest that film properties strongly depend on the experimental parameters and by optimizing these parameters, it is possible to tune the desired structural, morphological and optical properties. From XRD data, it is found that increasing the deposition time and RF power leads to increasing the crystallinity as well as the crystal sizes of the grown film, and all the films represent zinc blende cubic structure. Roughness values given from AFM images suggest increasing the roughness of the CdTe films by increasing the RF power and deposition times. Finally, optical investigations reveal increasing the film band gaps by increasing the RF power and the deposition time.

  18. Nonlinear plasma experiments in geospace with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    SciTech Connect

    Sheerin, J. P.; Cohen, Morris B.

    2015-12-10

    The ionosphere is the ionized uppermost layer of our atmosphere (from 70 – 500 km altitude) where free electron densities yield peak critical frequencies in the HF (3 – 30 MHz) range. The ionosphere thus provides a quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. High power RF experiments on ionospheric plasma conducted in the U.S. have been reported since 1970. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 – 10 MHz to the ionosphere with microsecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP’s unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of unique nonlinear plasma experiments in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and telescopes and cameras for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. One of the primary missions of HAARP, has been the generation of ELF (300 – 3000 Hz) and VLF (3 – 30 kHz) radio waves which are guided to global distances in the Earth

  19. Nonlinear plasma experiments in geospace with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Cohen, Morris B.

    2015-12-01

    The ionosphere is the ionized uppermost layer of our atmosphere (from 70 - 500 km altitude) where free electron densities yield peak critical frequencies in the HF (3 - 30 MHz) range. The ionosphere thus provides a quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. High power RF experiments on ionospheric plasma conducted in the U.S. have been reported since 1970. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with microsecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of unique nonlinear plasma experiments in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and telescopes and cameras for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. One of the primary missions of HAARP, has been the generation of ELF (300 - 3000 Hz) and VLF (3 - 30 kHz) radio waves which are guided to global distances in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. We review

  20. Gyroharmonic converter as a high power cm-wavelength rf source for future e--e+ colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshfield, J. L.; Ganguly, A. K.; Wang, Changbiao

    1995-07-01

    The principles governing gyroharmonic conversion for production of high-power cm-wavelength rf power to drive a future e--e+ collider are reviewed. Results of projected performance of the Yale 14.28 GHz converter are presented, as predicted using a seamless slow-time-scale simulation code that follows the beam particles through a cyclotron autoresonance acceleration region, through an rf absorbing drift tube, and through a fifth-harmonic traveling-wave output section. Approximate scaling relations are developed to give converter parameters with power levels appropriate for collider applications. Possible means to control beam quality, and thus to retain good converter efficiency, are described. A single-beam, multiple-source converter concept is suggested that may make unnecessary more than one gun and gun modulator to supply a large number of accelerator rf feeds.

  1. High power test results of the first SRRC/ANL high current L-band RF gun.

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. H.

    1998-09-11

    A joint program is underway between the SRRC (Synchrotrons Radiation Research Center, Taiwan) and ANL (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) for developing a high current L-band photocathode rf guns. We have constructed an L-Band (1.3 Ghz), single cell rf photocathode gun and conducted low power tests at SRRC. High power rf conditioning of the cavity has been completed at ANL. In this paper we report on the construction and high power test results. So far we have been able to achieve > 120 MV/m axial electric field with minimal dark current. This gun will be used to replace the AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator)[l] high current gun.

  2. Effects of discharge power on the structural and optical properties of TGZO thin films prepared by RF magnetron sputtering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jin-hua; Lu, Zhou; Zhong, Zhi-you; Long, Lu; Long, Hao

    2016-05-01

    The transparent semiconductors of Ti and Ga-incorporated ZnO (TGZO) thin films were prepared by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering onto glass substrates. The effects of discharge power on the physical properties of thin films are studied. Experimental results show that all nanocrystalline TGZO thin films possess preferential orientation along the (002) plane. The discharge power significantly affects the crystal structure and optical properties of thin films. When the discharge power is 200 W, the TGZO thin film has the optimal crystalline quality and optical properties, with the narrowest full width at half-maximum ( FWHM) of 1.76×10-3 rad, the largest average grain size of 82.4 nm and the highest average transmittance of 84.3% in the visible range. The optical gaps of thin films are estimated by the Tauc's relation and observed to increase firstly and then decrease with the increase of the discharge power. In addition, the optical parameters, including refractive index, extinction coefficient, dielectric function and dissipation factor of the thin films, are determined by optical characterization methods. The dispersion behavior of the refractive index is also analyzed using the Sellmeier's dispersion model.

  3. An overview of the VASIMR engine: High power space propulsion with RF plasma generation and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, F. R. Chang

    2001-10-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) is a high power, radio frequency-driven magnetoplasma rocket, capable of exhaust modulation at constant power. While the plasma is produced by a helicon discharge, the bulk of the energy is added in a separate downstream stage by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Axial momentum is obtained by the adiabatic expansion of the plasma in a magnetic nozzle. Exhaust variation in the VASIMR is primarily achieved by the selective partitioning of the RF power to the helicon and ICRH systems, with the proper adjustment of the propellant flow. However, other complementary techniques are also being studied. Operational and performance considerations favor the light gases. The physics and engineering of this device have been under study since the late 1970s. A NASA-led, research effort, involving several terms in the United States, continues to explore the scientific and technological foundations of this concept. The research involves theory, experiment, engineering design, mission analysis, and technology development. Experimentally, high density, stable plasma discharges have been generated in Helium, Hydrogen and Deuterium, as well as mixtures of these gases. Key issues involve the optimization of the helicon discharge for high-density operation and the efficient coupling of ICRH to the plasma, prior to acceleration by the magnetic nozzle. Theoretically, the dynamics of the magnetized plasma are being studied from kinetic and fluid perspectives. Plasma acceleration by the magnetic nozzle and subsequent detachment has been demonstrated in numerical simulations. These results are presently undergoing experimental verification. A brisk technology development effort for space-qualified, compact, solid-state RF equipment, and high temperature superconducting magnets is under way in support of this project. A conceptual point design for an early space demonstrator on the International Space Station has been defined

  4. Active experiments in geospace plasmas with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, James

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere provides a relatively quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with millisecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of nonlinear plasma experiments in the inter¬action region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and optics for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. Applications are made to the controlled study of fundamental nonlinear plasma processes of relevance to laboratory plasmas, ionospheric irregularities affecting spacecraft communication and navigation systems, artificial ionization mirrors, wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, active global magnetospheric experiments, and many more.

  5. Impedance matched, high-power, rf antenna for ion cyclotron resonance heating of a plasma

    DOEpatents

    Baity, Jr., Frederick W.; Hoffman, Daniel J.; Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-01-01

    A resonant double loop radio frequency (rf) antenna for radiating high-power rf energy into a magnetically confined plasma. An inductive element in the form of a large current strap, forming the radiating element, is connected between two variable capacitors to form a resonant circuit. A real input impedance results from tapping into the resonant circuit along the inductive element, generally near the midpoint thereof. The impedance can be matched to the source impedance by adjusting the separate capacitors for a given tap arrangement or by keeping the two capacitances fixed and adjustng the tap position. This results in a substantial reduction in the voltage and current in the transmission system to the antenna compared to unmatched antennas. Because the complete circuit loop consisting of the two capacitors and the inductive element is resonant, current flows in the same direction along the entire length of the radiating element and is approximately equal in each branch of the circuit. Unidirectional current flow permits excitation of low order poloidal modes which penetrate more deeply into the plasma.

  6. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  7. Heat flux decay length during RF power operation in the Tore Supra tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corre, Y.; Gunn, J. P.; Firdaouss, M.; Carpentier, S.; Chantant, M.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Gardarein, J.-L.; Lipa, M.; Loarer, T.; Courtois, X.; Guilhem, D.; Saint-Laurent, F.

    2014-01-01

    The upgrade of its ion cyclotron resonance (ICRH) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) heating systems makes the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak particularly well suited to address the physics and technology of high-power and steady-state plasma-surface interactions. High radio frequency (RF) heating powers have been successfully applied up to 12.2 MW coupled to the plasma, in which about 7.85 MW flows through the scrape-off layer. Thermal calculation based on thermography measurements gives the heat flux density distribution on the TS toroidal limiter located at the bottom of the machine. The target heat flux densities are divided by the incidence angle of the field lines with the surface and mapped to the magnetic flux surface to evaluate the power flowing in the scrape-off layer (SOL). The power profile shows a narrow component near the last closed flux surface and a wide component in the rest of the SOL. The narrow component is attributed to significant cross-field heat flux density around the plasma contact point, about 0.8% of the parallel heat flux density in the SOL, when incident angles are nearly tangential to the surface. The wide component is used to derive the experimental heat flux decay length (λq) and parallel heat flux in the SOL. The power widths are measured for a series of 1 MA/3.8 T discharges involving a scan of RF injected power 3.5 ⩽ Ptot ⩽ 12.2 MW. Independently of the heating power, we measured λq,OMP = 14.5 ± 1.5 mm at the outer mid-plane and parallel heat flux in the SOL in the range 130\\le Q_{\\parallel}^{LCFS}\\le 490\\,MW\\,m^{-2} . TS values obtained with L-mode limiter plasmas are broader than those derived from L-mode divertor plasmas, confirming earlier results obtained with an ohmically heated plasma leaning on the inboard wall of TS.

  8. Steady-state operation of a large-area high-power RF ion source for the neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Doo-Hee; Park, Min; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Tae-Seong; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul

    2014-10-01

    A large-area high-power RF-driven ion source is being developed in Germany for the heating and current drive (H&CD) of an ITER device. Negative hydrogen ion sources are the major components of neutral beam injection systems in future large-scale fusion devices such as an the ITER and the DEMO. The first and the second long-pulse ion sources (LPIS-1 and LPIS-2) have been successfully developed with a magnetic-bucket plasma generator, including a filament heating structure for the first NBI (NBI-1) system of the KSTAR tokamak. A development plan exists for a large-area high-power RF ion source for steady-state operation (more than 300 seconds) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to extract positive ions, which can be used for the NBI heating and current drive systems, and to extract negative ions for future fusion devices such as a Fusion Neutron Source and Korea — DEMO. The RF ion source consists of a driver region, including a helical antenna and a discharge chamber, and an expansion region (magnetic bucket of the prototype LPIS-1). RF power can be transferred at up to 10 kW with a fixed frequency of 2 MHz through an optimized RF matching system. An actively water-cooled Faraday shield is located inside the driver region of the ion source for stable and steady-state operation of the RF discharge. The uniformities of the plasma parameters are measured at the lowest area of the expansion bucket by using two RF-compensated electrostatic probes along the directions of the short and the long dimensions of the expansion region.

  9. Low Cost RF Amplifier for Community TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Syafaruddin; Sasongko, Sudi Mariyanto Al; Made Budi Suksmadana, I.; Mustiko Okta Muvianto, Cahyo; Ariessaputra, Suthami

    2016-01-01

    he capability of television to deliver audio video makes this media become the most effective method to spread information. This paper presents an experiment of RF amplifier design having low-cost design and providing sufficient RF power particularly for community television. The RF amplifier consists of two stages of amplifier. The first stage amplifier was used to leverage output of TV modulator from 11dBm to enable to drive next stage amplifier. CAD simulation and fabrication were run to reach optimum RF amplifier design circuit. The associated circuit was made by determining stability circle, stability gain, and matching impedance. Hence, the average power of first stage RF amplifier was 24.68dBm achieved. The second stage used RF modules which was ready match to 50 ohm for both input and output port. The experiment results show that the RF amplifier may operate at frequency ranging from 174 to 230MHz. The average output power of the 2nd stage amplifier was 33.38 Watt with the overall gain of 20.54dB. The proposed RF amplifier is a cheap way to have a stable RF amplifier for community TV. The total budget for the designed RF amplifier is only a 1/5 compared to local design of final TV amplifier.

  10. A low power dual-band multi-mode RF front-end for GNSS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhang; Zhiqun, Li; Zhigong, Wang

    2010-11-01

    A CMOS dual-band multi-mode RF front-end for the global navigation satellite system receivers of all GPS, Bei-Dou, Galileo and Glonass systems is presented. It consists of a reconfigurable low noise amplifier (LNA), a broadband active balun, a high linearity mixer and a bandgap reference (BGR) circuit. The effect of the input parasitic capacitance on the input impedance of the inductively degenerated common source LNA is analyzed in detail. By using two different LC networks at the input port and the switched capacitor at the output port, the LNA can work at two different frequency bands (1.2 GHz and 1.5 GHz) under low power consumption. The active balun uses a hybrid-connection structure to achieve high bandwidth. The mixer uses the multiple gated transistors technique to acquire a high linearity under low power consumption but does not deteriorate other performances. The measurement results of the proposed front-end achieve a noise figure of 2.1/2.0 dB, again of 33.9/33.8 dB and an input 1-dB compression point of 0/1 dBm at 1227.6/1575.42 MHz. The power consumption is about 16 mW under a 1.8 V power supply.

  11. Inductively-Coupled RF Powered O2 Plasma as a Sterilization Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Mogul, R.; Khare, B.; Chan, S. L.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Low-temperature or cold plasmas have been shown to be effective for the sterilization of sensitive medical devices and electronic equipment. Low-temperature plasma sterilization procedures possess certain advantages over other protocols such as ethylene oxide, gamma radiation, and heat due to the use of inexpensive reagents, the insignificant environmental impacts and the low energy requirements. In addition, plasmas may also be more efficacious in the removal of robust microorganisms due to their higher chemical reactivity. Together, these attributes render cold plasma sterilization as ideal for the surface decontamination requirements for NASA Planetary Protection. Hence, the work described in this study involves the construction, characterization, and application of an inductively-coupled, RF powered oxygen (O2) plasma.

  12. Spallation Neutron Source high-power Rf transmitter design for high availablility, ease of installation and cost containment

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J. T. , III; Rees, D. E.; Hardek, T. W.; Lynch, M. T.; Roybal, W. T.; Tallerico, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    The availability goals and installation schedule for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have driven the availability and installation of the SNS linac's high-power RF systems. This paper discusses how the high-power RF systems' availability and installation goals have been addressed in the RF transmitter design and procurement. Design features that allow R1; component failures to be quickly diagnosed and repaired are also presented. Special attention has been given lo interlocks, PLC fault logging and real-time interfaces to thc accelerator's Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) archive system. The availability and cost motivations for the use of different RF transmitter designs in the normalconducting and super-conducting sections of the linac are reviewed. Factory iicceptance tests used to insure fully functional equipment and thereby reduce the time spent on installation and cotnmissioning of the RF transmitters are discussed. Transmitter installation experience and klystron conditioning experience is used to show how these design features have helped and will continue to help the SNS linac to meet its availability and schedule goals.

  13. IEEE-802.15.4-based low-power body sensor node with RF energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thang Viet; Chung, Wan-Young

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the design and implementation of a low-voltage and low-power body sensor node based on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard to collect electrocardiography (ECG) and photoplethysmography (PPG) signals. To achieve compact size, low supply voltage, and low power consumption, the proposed platform is integrated into a ZigBee mote, which contains a DC-DC booster, a PPG sensor interface module, and an ECG front-end circuit that has ultra-low current consumption. The input voltage of the proposed node is very low and has a wide range, from 0.65 V to 3.3 V. An RF energy harvester is also designed to charge the battery during the working mode or standby mode of the node. The power consumption of the proposed node reaches 14 mW in working mode to prolong the battery lifetime. The software is supported by the nesC language under the TinyOS environment, which enables the proposed node to be easily configured to function as an individual health monitoring node or a node in a wireless body sensor network (BSN). The proposed node is used to set up a wireless BSN that can simultaneously collect ECG and PPG signals and monitor the results on the personal computer. PMID:25227063

  14. A PLANAR, RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE LAUNCHER AND EXTRACTOR FOR A DUAL-MODED RF POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher D.

    2000-11-21

    The desire to reduce the amount of low-loss, circular-waveguide delay line required in a pulse-compressing power distribution system for the Next Linear Collider has led to the pursuit of multi-moded schemes [1]. In such a system, power is delivered to different destinations through the same waveguide via different propagating modes. Current plans [2] utilize two modes, with manipulations done primarily in overmoded rectangular guide. We describe two key components of the system, a four-input/four-output, dual-mode launcher and an extractor for diverting one mode from the delay line to an accelerator feed while allowing the other to pass on to an upstream feed. These novel passive waveguide devices utilize the rectangular TE10 and TE20 modes. Because they must carry up to 600 MW pulsed rf power, H-planar symmetry is maintained in their designs to allow the use of overheight waveguide, and features that invite breakdown, such as coupling slots, irises, and septa, are avoided. Special rectangular-to-circular tapers [3] will be used to convert between the above modes and the circular TE11{sup o} (TE12{sup o}) and TE01{sup o} delay line modes, respectively. Rectangular waveguide for relative ease of handling. Mode converters, including special cross-section tapers [3] will be used to transform between the above circular waveguide modes and the TE20 and TE10 rectangular waveguide modes, respectively.

  15. A new method for RF power generation for two-beam linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, H.; Corsini, R.; DAmico, T.; Delahaye, J.P.; Guignard, G.; Johnson, C.; Millich, A.; Pearce, P.; Rinolfi, L.; Riche, A.; Schulte, D.; Thorndahl, L.; Valentini, M.; Wilson, I.; Ruth, R.D.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we discuss a new approach to two-beam acceleration. The energy for RF production is initially stored in a long-pulse electron beam which is efficiently accelerated to about 1.2 GeV by a fully loaded, conventional, low frequency ({approximately}1 GHz) linac. The beam pulse length is twice the length of the high-gradient linac. Segments of this long pulse beam are compressed using combiner rings to create a sequence of higher peak power drive beams with gaps in between. This train of drive beams is distributed from the end of the linac against the main beam direction down a common transport line so that each drive beam can power a section of the main linac. After a 180-degree turn, each high-current, low-energy drive beam is decelerated in low-impedance decelerator structures, and the resulting power is used to accelerate the low-current, high-energy beam in the main linac. The method discussed here seems relatively inexpensive, is very flexible and can be used to accelerate beams for linear colliders over the entire frequency and energy range. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. A new method for RF power generation for two-beam linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, H.; Corsini, R.; D'Amico, T.; Delahaye, J. P.; Guignard, G.; Johnson, C.; Millich, A.; Pearce, P.; Rinolfi, L.; Riche, A.; Schulte, D.; Thorndahl, L.; Valentini, M.; Wilson, I.; Ruth, R. D.

    1999-05-07

    In this paper we discuss a new approach to two-beam acceleration. The energy for RF production is initially stored in a long-pulse electron beam which is efficiently accelerated to about 1.2 GeV by a fully loaded, conventional, low frequency ({approx}1 GHz) linac. The beam pulse length is twice the length of the high-gradient linac. Segments of this long pulse beam are compressed using combiner rings to create a sequence of higher peak power drive beams with gaps in between. This train of drive beams is distributed from the end of the linac against the main beam direction down a common transport line so that each drive beam can power a section of the main linac. After a 180-degree turn, each high-current, low-energy drive beam is decelerated in low-impedance decelerator structures, and the resulting power is used to accelerate the low-current, high-energy beam in the main linac. The method discussed here seems relatively inexpensive, is very flexible and can be used to accelerate beams for linear colliders over the entire frequency and energy range.

  17. Ultrasound characterization of the infertile male testis with rf power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Jonathan A.; Silverman, Ronald H.; Rondeau, Mark; Coleman, D. J.; Schlegel, Peter

    2002-04-01

    Objective: To investigate and diagnose testicular pathology in patients with testicular dysfunction using the technique of ultrasound power spectrum analysis. Methods: Testicular ultrasound studies with power spectrum tissue characterization analysis were performed on men with testicular abnormalities as well as normal controls. Semen analysis, biopsy data, microscopic intra-operative findings and data pertaining to testicular function were collected for each surgically evaluated subject. Ultrasound data were analyzed for power spectrum characteristics of microscopic scatterer size and concentration within discrete areas of testicular tissue. Results: Patients with varicoceles and greater than 2x106 sperm/ml on semen analysis had larger average scatterer size (107.7 micrometers ) and lower scatterer concentration (-15.02 dB) than non-obstructed, azoospermic patients with varicoceles (92.4 micrometers and -11.41 dB, respectively). Subjects with obstructed azoospermia had slightly larger average tissue scatterer size (108.1 micrometers ) and lower concentration (-15.73 dB) while normal control data revealed intermediate values of size (102.3 micrometers ) and concentration (-13.1 dB) of scatterers. Spectral data from pure testicular seminoma lesions had the lowest average scatterer size (82.3 micrometers ) with low relative concentration (-14.7 dB). Summary: Ultrasound tissue characterization based on RF spectrum analysis may distinguish different types of testicular pathology including obstructed and non-obstructed azoospermia and tissue changes due to varicocele and tumor.

  18. Transparent conducting Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering with dc and rf powers applied in combination

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, Tadatsugu; Ohtani, Yuusuke; Miyata, Toshihiro; Kuboi, Takeshi

    2007-07-15

    A newly developed Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin-film magnetron-sputtering deposition technique that decreases resistivity, improves resistivity distribution, and produces high-rate depositions has been demonstrated by dc magnetron-sputtering depositions that incorporate rf power (dc+rf-MS), either with or without the introduction of H{sub 2} gas into the deposition chamber. The dc+rf-MS preparations were carried out in a pure Ar or an Ar+H{sub 2} (0%-2%) gas atmosphere at a pressure of 0.4 Pa by adding a rf component (13.56 MHz) to a constant dc power of 80 W. The deposition rate in a dc+rf-MS deposition incorporating a rf power of 150 W was approximately 62 nm/min, an increase from the approximately 35 nm/min observed in dc magnetron sputtering with a dc power of 80 W. A resistivity as low as 3x10{sup -4} {omega} cm and an improved resistivity distribution could be obtained in AZO thin films deposited on substrates at a low temperature of 150 deg. C by dc+rf-MS with the introduction of hydrogen gas with a content of 1.5%. This article describes the effects of adding a rf power component (i.e., dc+rf-MS deposition) as well as introducing H{sub 2} gas into dc magnetron-sputtering preparations of transparent conducting AZO thin films.

  19. Thermal Considerations of Space Solar Power Concepts with 3.5 GW RF Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the thermal challenge of the Space Solar Power (SSP) design concepts with a 3.5 GW radio-frequency (RF) output. High efficiency klystrons are thermally more favored than solid state (butterstick) to convert direct current (DC) electricity to radio-frequency (RF) energy at the transmitters in these concepts. Using klystrons, the heat dissipation is 0.72 GW. Using solid state, the heat dissipation is 2.33 GW. The heat dissipation of the klystrons is 85% at 500C, 10% at 300C, and 5% at 125C. All the heat dissipation of the solid state is at 100C. Using klystrons, the radiator area is 74,500 square m Using solid state, the radiator area is 2,362,200 square m Space constructable heat pipe radiators are assumed in the thermal analysis. Also, to make the SSP concepts feasible, the mass of the heat transport system must be minimized. The heat transport distance from the transmitters to the radiators must be minimized. It can be accomplished by dividing the radiator into a cluster of small radiators, so that the heat transport distances between the klystrons and radiators can be minimized. The area of each small radiator is on the order of 1 square m. Two concepts for accommodating a cluster of small radiators are presented. If the distance between the transmitters and radiators is 1.5 m or less, constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) are acceptable for heat transport. If the distance exceeds 1.5 m, loop heat pipes (LHPs) are needed.

  20. Remote plasma cleaning of optical surfaces: Cleaning rates of different carbon allotropes as a function of RF powers and distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuxart, M. González; Reyes-Herrera, J.; Šics, I.; Goñi, A. R.; Fernandez, H. Moreno; Carlino, V.; Pellegrin, E.

    2016-01-01

    An extended study on an advanced method for the cleaning of carbon contaminations from large optical surfaces using a remote inductively coupled low-pressure RF plasma source (GV10x DownStream Asher) is reported. Technical and scientific features of this scaled up cleaning process are analysed, such as the cleaning efficiency for different carbon allotropes (amorphous and diamond-like carbon) as a function of feedstock gas, RF power (from 30 to 300 W), and source-object distances (415 to 840 mm). The underlying physical phenomena for these functional dependences are discussed.

  1. Effect of RF power on structural and magnetic properties of La doped Bi2Fe4O9 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhiya, M.; Pugazhvadivu, K. S.; Balakrishnan, L.; Tamilarasan, K.

    2016-05-01

    Effect of RF power on structural and magnetic properties of lanthanum (La3+) doped Bi2Fe4O9 thin films grown on p-Si substrates by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering has studied in this investigation. It is observed that the sputtering power affects the crystalline nature and magnetic properties of grown thin films. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrum confirms that the Bi2Fe4O9 (BFO) thin films were crystallized well with orthorhombic structure. The BFO thin films which was prepared at sputtering power of 100 W have good crystallinity than those prepared at 40 W. The magnetic properties are investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer. The magnetic hysteresis perceptive loop shows that the anti-ferromagnetic behavior of the sample at room temperature. These results confirms that the crystallinity and magnetic properties of the BFO thin films were enhanced at the higher sputtering power (100 W).

  2. Design of an RF Antenna for a Large0Bore, High Power, Steady State Plasma Processing Chamber for Material Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Freeman, R.L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  3. Design and Construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHZ Klystron To Be Used As RF Power Source For LHC/RF Component Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Chris

    2003-05-05

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented.

  4. Quantification of the error induced on Langmuir probe determined electron temperature and density due to an RF plasma potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Nischal; Donovan, David; Martin, Elijah

    2015-11-01

    An RF plasma potential can significantly effect the IV characteristic of a Langmuir probe if not properly compensated. A substantial research effort in the low temperature plasma community has been carried out to determine this effect and how to achieve the required compensation for accurate measurements. However, quantification of the error induced on the extracted electron temperature and density from an uncompensated Langmuir probe due to an RF plasma potential has not been explored. The research presented is the first attempt to quantify this error in terms of RF plasma potential magnitude, electron temperature, and electron density. The Langmuir probe IV characteristic was simulated using empirical formulas fitted to the Laframboise simulation results. The RF effected IV characteristic was simulated by adding a sinusoidal variation to the plasma potential and computing the time average numerically. The error induced on the electron temperature and density was determined by fitting the RF effected IV characteristic to the empirical formulas representing the standard Laframboise simulation results. Experimental results indicating the accuracy of this quantification will be presented.

  5. Integrated RF-DC converter and PCB antenna for UHF wireless powering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincetti, L.; Maini, M.; Scorcioni, S.; Larcher, L.; Bertacchini, A.; Tacchini, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, a broadband differential RF-DC CMOS converter realized in CMOS 130 nm technology with a customized PCB antenna with inductive coupling feeding for RF energy scavenging is presented. Experimental results show that output DC voltage higher than 1V from 800MHz to 970MHz can be obtained with a load of 1kΩ.

  6. RF rectifiers for EM power harvesting in a Deep Brain Stimulating device.

    PubMed

    Hosain, Md Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah; Kaynak, Akif; Berk, Michael

    2015-03-01

    A passive deep brain stimulation (DBS) device can be equipped with a rectenna, consisting of an antenna and a rectifier, to harvest energy from electromagnetic fields for its operation. This paper presents optimization of radio frequency rectifier circuits for wireless energy harvesting in a passive head-mountable DBS device. The aim is to achieve a compact size, high conversion efficiency, and high output voltage rectifier. Four different rectifiers based on the Delon doubler, Greinacher voltage tripler, Delon voltage quadrupler, and 2-stage charge pumped architectures are designed, simulated, fabricated, and evaluated. The design and simulation are conducted using Agilent Genesys at operating frequency of 915 MHz. A dielectric substrate of FR-4 with thickness of 1.6 mm, and surface mount devices (SMD) components are used to fabricate the designed rectifiers. The performance of the fabricated rectifiers is evaluated using a 915 MHz radio frequency (RF) energy source. The maximum measured conversion efficiency of the Delon doubler, Greinacher tripler, Delon quadrupler, and 2-stage charge pumped rectifiers are 78, 75, 73, and 76 % at -5 dBm input power and for load resistances of 5-15 kΩ. The conversion efficiency of the rectifiers decreases significantly with the increase in the input power level. The Delon doubler rectifier provides the highest efficiency at both -5 and 5 dBm input power levels, whereas the Delon quadrupler rectifier gives the lowest efficiency for the same inputs. By considering both efficiency and DC output voltage, the charge pump rectifier outperforms the other three rectifiers. Accordingly, the optimised 2-stage charge pumped rectifier is used together with an antenna to harvest energy in our DBS device. PMID:25600671

  7. ELECTRODYNAMIC CONSTRAINTS ON HOMOGENEITY AND RF POWER DEPOSITION IN MULTIPLE COIL EXCITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, Riccardo; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Grant, Aaron K.; Zhu, Yudong

    2009-01-01

    The promise of increased SNR and spatial/spectral resolution continues to drive MR technology toward higher magnetic field strengths. SAR management and B1 inhomogeneity correction become critical issues at the high frequencies associated with high field MR. In recent years, multiple coil excitation techniques have been recognized as potentially powerful tools for controlling SAR while simultaneously compensating for B1 inhomogeneities. This work explores electrodynamic constraints on transmit homogeneity and SAR, for both fully parallel transmission and its time-independent special case known as RF shimming. Ultimate intrinsic SAR – the lowest possible SAR consistent with electrodynamics for a particular excitation profile but independent of transmit coil design – is studied for different field strengths, object sizes and pulse acceleration factors. The approach to the ultimate intrinsic limit with increasing numbers of finite transmit coils is also studied, and the tradeoff between homogeneity and SAR is explored for various excitation strategies. In the case of fully parallel transmission, ultimate intrinsic SAR shows flattening or slight reduction with increasing field strength, in contradiction to the traditionally cited quadratic dependency, but consistent with established electrodynamic principles. PMID:19165885

  8. RF Power to Plasma Increase Using EBG Surfaces in IC and LH Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadamuz, Saul; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2009-11-01

    High impedance surfaces or electromagnetic band gap (EBG) surfaces have proved themselves to be useful in wireless communications applications due to their unique characteristics such as no propagating surface wave support, no conduction of RF current for a given bandwidth, in-phase electromagnetic reflection and non-inverted image of the electric charge in front of them [1]. These characteristics make possible to design compact antennas achieving better performance in terms of radiation and input impedance. ICRF and LH antennas in plasma experiments can take advantage of using EBG surfaces. One of the main issues in ICRF plasma heating is the high mismatch between the feeding lines and the antenna inputs. The adoption of EBG surfaces in the ICRF antenna structure and the advantages offered by a predictive designing tool as TOPICA [2] offer the possibility to improve significantly the coupled power to plasma. The adoption of EBG surfaces in the LH waveguides permits to reduce the major dimension of waveguides not affecting the propagation. It is then possible to manufacture compact LH arrays of waveguides. [4pt] [1] IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech., vol. 47, pp. 2059--2074, Nov. 1999. [0pt] [2] Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476.

  9. A photonic frequency octo-tupler with reduced RF drive power and extended spurious sideband suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mehedi; Hall, Trevor J.

    2016-07-01

    A Mach-Zehnder interferometer with each arm containing a pair of Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZM) in series is proposed as a means of optoelectronic frequency multiplication (octo-tupling and 24-tupling). All harmonics including the carrier are suppressed except those with order equal to an odd multiple of four. The circuit requires no electrical or optical filters. There is no requirement to carefully adjust the modulation index to achieve correct operation of the octo-tupler. A transfer matrix representation is used to describe the operation of the architecture. The theoretical predictions are validated by simulations performed using an industry standard software tool. The simulations also allow an assessment of the impact on the circuit operation of deviations from the ideal of its components such as the finite extinction ratio of the MZMs, power imbalances and phase error at the couplers and phase error of the applied RF signals. Finally, a comparison is made with an alternative functionally equivalent single-stage parallel MZM circuit. One finding is that the intrinsic conversion efficiency of the proposed circuit is improved by 3 dB over the alternative. The proposed circuit is suitable for integration in material platforms supporting linear electro-optic modulation such as LiNbO3, silicon, III-V or hybrid technology.

  10. Design of a 0.18 μm CMOS multi-band compatible low power GNSS receiver RF frontend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Li; Yiqi, Zhuang; Qiang, Long; Zhao, Jin; Zhenrong, Li; Gang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a fully integrated multi-band RF receiver frontend for GNSS applications on L-band. A single RF signal channel with a low-IF architecture is adopted for multi-band operation on the RF section, which mainly consists of a low noise amplifier (LNA), a down-converter, polyphase filters and summing circuits. An improved cascode source degenerated LNA with a multi-band shared off-chip matching network and band switches is implemented in the first amplifying stage. Also, a re-designed wideband double balance mixer is implemented in the down conversion stage, which provides better gain, noise figure and linearity performances. Using a TSMC 0.18 μm 1P4M RF CMOS process, a compact 1.27 GHz/1.575 GHz dual-band GNSS frontend is realized in the proposed low-IF topology. The measurements exhibit the gains of 45 dB and 43 dB, and noise figures are controlled at 3.35 dB and 3.9 dB of the two frequency bands, respectively. The frontend model consumes about 11.8-13.5 mA current on a 1.8 V power supply. The core occupies 1.91 × 0.53 mm2 while the total die area with ESD is 2.45 × 2.36 mm2.

  11. Dual-Functional On-Chip AlGaAs/GaAs Schottky Diode for RF Power Detection and Low-Power Rectenna Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Abdul Manaf; Mustafa, Farahiyah; Rahman, Shaharin Fadzli Abd; Rahman, Abdul Rahim Abdul

    2011-01-01

    A Schottky diode has been designed and fabricated on an n-AlGaAs/GaAs high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT) structure. Current-voltage (I–V) measurements show good device rectification, with a Schottky barrier height of 0.4349 eV for Ni/Au metallization. The differences between the Schottky barrier height and the theoretical value (1.443 eV) are due to the fabrication process and smaller contact area. The RF signals up to 1 GHz are rectified well by the fabricated Schottky diode and a stable DC output voltage is obtained. The increment ratio of output voltage vs input power is 0.2 V/dBm for all tested frequencies, which is considered good enough for RF power detection. Power conversion efficiency up to 50% is obtained at frequency of 1 GHz and input power of 20 dBm with series connection between diode and load, which also shows the device’s good potential as a rectenna device with further improvement. The fabricated n-AlGaAs/GaAs Schottky diode thus provides a conduit for breakthrough designs for RF power detectors, as well as ultra-low power on-chip rectenna device technology to be integrated in nanosystems. PMID:22164066

  12. Design and performance of high voltage power supply with crowbar protection for 3-Φ  high power rf amplifier system of cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    The superconducting cyclotron at VECC consists of three rf cavities separated at 120° and each cavity is fed power from an individual rf amplifier, based on a tetrode tube, in the frequency range of 9–27 MHz. All the three tetrode tubes are powered by individual power supplies for their biasing which are fabricated and commissioned with the rf system of the cyclotron. The dc power to the anodes of all three tubes is fed from a high voltage power supply rated at 20 kV dc, 22 A along with suitable interlocks and crowbar protection. The tubes are protected by a single ignitron based crowbar system against an internal arc fault by diverting the stored energy very fast, minimizing the deposited amount of energy at load and allowing the fault to clear. The performance and protective capability of the crowbar system is demonstrated by using wire survivability test. The design criteria of anode power supply along with the crowbar protection system, in-house development, testing and performance is presented in this paper.

  13. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and T{sub e} fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-05-15

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  14. Simulation of SAR in the Human Body to Determine Effects of RF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michiyama, Tetsuyuki; Nikawa, Yoshio

    The body area network (BAN) has attracted attention because of its potential for high-grade wireless communication technology and its safety and high durability. Also, human area transmission of a BAN propagating at an ultra-wide band (UWB) has been demonstrated recently. When considering the efficiency of electromagnetic (EM) propagation inside the human body for BAN and hyperthermia treatment using RF, it is important to determine the mechanism of EM dissipation in the human body. A body heating system for hyperthermia must deposit EM energy deep inside the body. Also, it is important that the EM field generated by the implant system is sufficiently strong. In this study, the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution is simulated using an EM simulator to consider the biological transmission mechanism and its effects. To utilize the EM field distribution using an implant system for hyperthermia treatment, the SAR distribution inside the human body is simulated. As a result, the SAR distribution is concentrated on the surface of human tissue, the muscle-bolus interface, the pancreas, the stomach, the spleen and the regions around bones. It can also be concentrated in bone marrow and cartilage. From these results, the appropriate location for the implant system is revealed on the basis of the current distribution and differences in the wave impedance of interfacing tissues. The possibility of accurate data transmission and suitable treatment planning is confirmed.

  15. Coupling Factor Determination in the Control of Unintentionally Generated RF Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollum, Matthew B.; Clark, Tony L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiated emissions and susceptibility requirements imposed in bands where intentional RF reception or transmission does not occur is problematical. It is often desired to compare radiated emissions with radiated susceptibility performance to assess system level compatibility. For reasons purely theoretical and because of practical measurement limitations, this not realistic. McCollum and Clark proposed a limit and test method that provided a direct comparison of radiated emissions and radiated susceptibility performance in those cases where only unintentional emissions and reception are of interest (non-tunable electronics). This test method, referred to as bulk current emissions (BCE) testing, and its associated limit is a complementary test method to bulk current injection testing and radiated susceptibility testing. Previous work utilized victim and culprit circuits with low common-mode loop impedance. Forward work identified in this publication was to determine how different loop impedance on culprit and victim circuits affected cable-to-cable coupling and the corresponding BCE test limit. Cable coupling factors for victim and culprit circuits with different loop impedance are investigated.

  16. Determination of the spatial characteristics of an RF electrodeless discharge by the method of emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Denisova, N. V.; Revalde, G.; Skudra, A.

    2006-11-15

    The spatial distribution of the density of mercury atoms in the 7{sup 3}S state in a spherical RF electrode-less gas-discharge lamp is reconstructed by the method of emission tomography. The local values of the corresponding emission coefficients, which are proportional to the density of mercury atoms in the 7{sup 3}S state, are determined from integral (over the plasma volume) measurements of the lamp radiation at a wavelength of 546.1 nm with the help of an algorithm based on the maximum entropy method. The results obtained show that, for all of the operating modes under study, the profile of the density of mercury atoms in the 7{sup 3}S state has a minimum in the center of the lamp and a maximum near its wall. At a generator current of 100 mA and cold-spot temperature of 41 deg. C, the density of mercury atoms in the 7{sup 3}S state is observed to drop substantially both in the center of the lamp and near its wall, the density in the center being reduced to almost zero. An explanation of this phenomenon is proposed.

  17. Power gain assessment of ITO based Transparent Gate Recessed Channel (TGRC) MOSFET for RF/wireless applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Gupta, Neha; Chaujar, Rishu

    2016-03-01

    In this work, power gain assessment and intrinsic delay of Transparent Gate Recessed Channel (TGRC) MOSFET have been observed for RF applications and the results so obtained have been compared with Conventional Recessed Channel (CRC) MOSFET. Simulation results show that TGRC architecture has significantly improved the power gains in terms of maximum available power gain (Gma), maximum transducer power gain (GMT), maximum stable power gain (Gms) and appreciable reduction in intrinsic delay as compared to CRC-MOSFET owing to indium tin oxide (ITO) in recessed channel as a conducting gate material and thus providing its efficacy for low power switching applications. Further, effect of gate length scaling has also been observed on TGRC MOSFET and it has been found that the cut-off frequency (fT) and maximum oscillator frequency (fMAX) enhances by 66% and 36% respectively as channel length scales down to 20 nm. Further, the effect of negative junction depth, oxide thickness and substrate doping have also been investigated for TGRC-MOSFET. This TCAD assessment has been done at frequencies of several THz which fortify its use for high frequency RF/wireless applications.

  18. RF discharge impedance measurements using a new method to determine the stray impedances

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, L.P.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Hoog, F.J. de )

    1999-06-01

    The impedance of a capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge in a tubular fluorescent lamp filled with neon and mercury is measured. The stray impedances in the electrical network are determined using a new method that requires no extra instruments. The reflection of power is used to determine the stray impedances. Making use of a simple discharge impedance model, the electron density in the lamp is estimated.

  19. High repetition rate multi-channel source of high-power rf-modulated pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmaskulov, M. R.; Pedos, M. S.; Rukin, S. N.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Yalandin, M. I.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the results of testing a high voltage pulse generator based on parallel gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission lines filled with saturable ferrite. The generator is capable of producing almost identical stable rf-modulated nanosecond high voltage pulses in each of the two, or four, parallel output channels. The output voltage amplitude in each channel can reach -285 or -180 kV, respectively, with a rf modulation depth of up to 60%. Drive pulses were produced as the packets of duration 1-5 s at a pulse repetition frequency of 800 Hz using a driver equipped with all-solid-state switches. Splitting the driver pulse provided electric field strengths in the channels which were below the breakdown field strength of the transmission lines. As a result, the use of nonlinear transmission lines of reduced diameter made it possible to increase the center frequency of the excited rf oscillations to ˜2 GHz.

  20. The impact of RF-plasma power in carrier relaxation dynamics of unintentional doped GaN epitaxial layers grown by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Nisha; Anand, Kritika; Barvat, Arun; Pal, Prabir; Singh, Dilip K.; Jewariya, Mukesh; Ragam, Srinivasa; Adhikari, Sonachand; Maurya, Kamlesh K.; Khanna, Suraj P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, unintentionally doped GaN samples were prepared on GaN template by radio frequency (RF)-plasma MBE technique using two different RF-plasma powers. Photoluminescence (PL), steady state photoconductivity (PC) and ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy measurements have been carried out to characterize the samples. The effect of RF-plasma power towards unintentional doping and giving rise to yellow luminescence (YL) is discussed. Our PC measurements show relatively faster decay for sample grown with higher RF-plasma power. In addition, the ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy results show the presence of various defect levels with different relaxation times. A faster ultrafast relaxation time from the conduction band to the closest defect level and conduction band to the next defect level was observed for the sample grown with higher plasma power. A comparatively low defect density and faster carrier relaxation observed in higher RF-plasma power grown samples is caused by lower impurities and gallium vacancies. The results imply that RF-plasma power is very important parameter for the growth of epitaxial GaN films and undesirable impurities and gallium vacancies might get incorporated in the epitaxial GaN films.

  1. Parallel RF force driven by the inhomogeneity of power absorption in magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhe; Chen, Jiale; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2013-06-01

    A nonlinear parallel force can be exerted through the inhomogeneity of rf resonant absorption in a magnetized plasma. While providing no integrated force over a plasma volume, this force can redistribute momentum parallel to the magnetic field. Because flows and currents parallel to the magnetic field encounter different resistances, this redistribution can play a large role, in addition to the role played by the direct absorption of parallel momentum. For nearly perpendicular propagating waves in a tokamak plasma, this additional force is expected to affect significantly the toroidal rf-driven current and the toroidal flow drive. PMID:25167505

  2. 60kV, 10Amp DC power supply multiple input control and monitoring provision for the operation of various high power RF generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Kirit M.; Srinivas, Y. S. S.; Kulkarni, S. V.; ICRH-RF Group

    2010-02-01

    A 60 kV, 10 A DC power supply is used for testing of high power RF and microwave tubes e.g. Klystron, Gyrotron. Two 500 kW, 3.7 GHz klystrons, and one 82.6 GHz Gyrotron are located in SST1 Hall where as 200 kW; 28 GHz Gyrotron is located in Aditya Hall. The same power supply is required to operate, control and monitor various systems at different locations with easy change over from one system to other as per experimental requirements. An off line, control change over system, is designed to accomplish the above requirements, with control panels installed at desired different locations. The input (0 to 11 kV) A.C. voltage to power supply is given from a motorized voltage variation system (VVS). The control panels provide indication of A.C. input voltage to power supply from 11 kV potential transformers of VVS. In addition, the control panel is provided with 11 kV circuit breaker status indication and control i.e. Emergency OFF switch. The control panels are designed and developed indigenously which are successfully installed and are in continuous use for the safe and easy operation of different high power rf systems from the same DC power supply. The paper presents the design of the controls, monitoring and indications. Safety aspects of the system are also highlighted.

  3. An RF-powered micro-reactor for the detection of astrobiological target molecules on planetary bodies.

    PubMed

    Scott, Valerie J; Tse, Margaret; Shearn, Michael J; Siegel, Peter H; Amashukeli, Xenia

    2012-08-01

    We describe a sample-processing micro-reactor that utilizes 60 GHz RF radiation with approximately 730 mW of output power. The instrument design and performance characterization are described and then illustrated with modeling and experimental studies. The micro-reactor's efficiency on affecting hydrolysis of chemical bonds similar to those within large complex molecules was demonstrated: a disaccharide-sucrose-was hydrolyzed completely under micro-reactor conditions. The products of the micro-reactor-facilitated hydrolysis were analyzed using mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance analytical techniques. PMID:22938313

  4. An autonomous battery-less sensor module powered by piezoelectric energy harvesting with RF transmission of multiple measurement signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Marco; Ferrari, Vittorio; Guizzetti, Michele; Marioli, Daniele

    2009-08-01

    An energy-autonomous battery-less sensor module is presented, entirely powered by a piezoelectric energy converter driven by mechanical vibrations from the environment. The module manages and stores the converted energy, interfaces to one or more passive sensors and periodically sends the corresponding measurement signals over a radio-frequency (RF) link. As an additional variant, the module can send a programmable identification (ID) code on the RF carrier, in order to enable module tagging and tracking by the external receiver unit. The module's general architecture is presented and the strategy used for sensor signal conditioning and transmission is illustrated. The architecture and principle have been experimentally validated on a fabricated prototype including a piezoelectric bimorph converter, two passive sensors made by a resistive-capacitive sensor pair and purposely designed electronic circuitry based on low-power off-the-shelf components. In the tested experimental conditions, the prototype features a typical time interval between measurement-and-transmission events of a few tens of seconds, with event durations of the order of tens of milliseconds, corresponding to an operation duty cycle of the order of 0.1%. Peak power consumption during transmission is of the order of 20 mW and operative range is of the order of meters in a laboratory environment. The obtained results show that the proposed approach has attractive characteristics because of the total absence of batteries and, despite the inherent intermittent operation, provides significant measurement performances in terms of achievable sensitivity and resolution.

  5. Acoustic, piezoelectric, and dielectric nonlinearities of AlN in coupled resonator filters for high RF power levels.

    PubMed

    Sahyoun, Walaa; Duchamp, Jean-Marc; Benech, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Coupled resonator filters (CRFs) are the new generation of BAW filters recently designed for the front-end modules of mobile transmission systems. Looking for designers' requirements, CRF devices have been characterized and modeled. The model based on equivalent circuits relies on material constants such as stiffness and electro-coupling coefficients, and works only for linear-mode propagation. Because of their positions between antennas and power amplifiers, they often work under high RF power, inducing nonlinear response in the AlN piezoelectric layer. In this work, we analyze for the first time the nonlinear behavior of AlN material particularly for coupled BAW resonators. To characterize the nonlinear effects in CRFs, we measure the 1-dB gain compression point (P1dB) and the intercept point (IP(3)). Then, we develop a nonlinear model of CRFs using harmonic balance (HB) simulation in commercially available software. The HB environment allows fitting simulations to measurements in terms of P(1dB) and IP(3). We find that a high RF power induces nonlinear changes in the material constants' real parts: elastic stiffness c(33) (4.9%), piezoelectric e(33) (17.4%), and permittivity ϵ(33) (5.2%). These nonlinear variations of material constants describe the nonlinear behavior of CRF devices using the same deposit process for AlN material. PMID:21989879

  6. Investigation of the B1 field distribution and RF power deposition in a birdcage coil as functions of the number of coil legs at 4.7 T, 7.0 T, and 11.7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Han, Sang-Doc; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2015-06-01

    The proper design of birdcage (BC) coils plays a very important role in the acquisition of highresolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of small animals such as rodents. In this context, we investigate multiple-leg (8-, 16-, 32-, 64-, and 128-leg) BC coils operating at ultra-high fields (UHF) of 7.0 T and 11.7 T and a high-field (HF) of 4.7 T for rodent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Primarily, Our study comparatively examines the parameters of the radiofrequency (RF) transmission (|B1 +|)-field, the magnetic flux (|B1|)-field, and RF power deposition (RF-PD) as functions of the number of BC-coil legs via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations under realistic loading conditions with a biological phantom. In particular, the specific ratio |E/B1 +| is defined for predicting RF-PD values in different coil structures. Our results indicate that the optimal number of legs of the BC coil can be chosen for different resonance frequencies of 200 MHz, 300 MHz, and 500 MHz and that this choice can be lead to superior |B1 +|-field intensity and |B1|-field homogeneity and decreased RF-PD. We believe that our approach to determining the optimal number of legs for a BC coil can contribute to rodent MR imaging.

  7. Estimation of Scatterer Diameter by Normalized Power Spectrum of High-Frequency Ultrasonic RF Echo for Assessment of Red Blood Cell Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Taku; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, as one of the determinants of blood viscosity, plays an important role in blood rheology, including the condition of blood. RBC aggregation is induced by the adhesion of RBCs when the electrostatic repulsion between RBCs weakens owing to increases in protein and saturated fatty acid levels in blood, excessive RBC aggregation leads to various circulatory diseases. This study was conducted to establish a noninvasive quantitative method for assessment of RBC aggregation. The power spectrum of ultrasonic RF echoes from nonaggregating RBCs, which shows the frequency property of scattering, exhibits Rayleigh behavior. On the other hand, ultrasonic RF echoes from aggregating RBCs contain the components of reflection, which have no frequency dependence. By dividing the measured power spectrum of echoes from RBCs in the lumen by that of echoes from a posterior wall of the vein in the dorsum manus, the attenuation property of the propagating medium and the frequency responses of transmitting and receiving transducers are removed from the former spectrum. RBC aggregation was assessed by the diameter of a scatterer, which was estimated by minimizing the square difference between the measured normalized power spectrum and the theoretical power spectrum. In this study, spherical scatterers with diameters of 5, 11, 15, and 30 µm were measured in basic experiments. The estimated scatterer diameters were close to the actual diameters. Furthermore, the transient change of the scatterer diameters were measured in an in vivo experiment with respect to a 24-year-old healthy male during the avascularization using a cuff. The estimated diameters (12-22 µm) of RBCs during avascularization were larger than the diameters (4-8 µm) at rest and after recirculation. These results show the possibility of the use of the proposed method for noninvasive assessment of RBC aggregation.

  8. Absolute OH density determination by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in an atmospheric pressure RF plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Q.; Nikiforov, A. Yu.; Li, L.; Vanraes, P.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Lu, X. P.; Leys, C.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the ground state OH density is measured in high pressure plasma by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. The OH density determination is based on the simulation of the intensity fraction of fluorescence from the laser-excited level of OH (A) in the total detected LIF signal. The validity of this approach is verified in an atmospheric pressure Ar + H2O plasma jet sustained by a 13.56 MHz power supply. The transition line P1 (4) from OH (A, v' = 1, J' = 3) → OH (X, v'' = 0, J'' = 4) is used for the LIF excitation. The absolute OH density is determined to be 2.5 × 1019 m-3 at 1 mm away from the jet nozzle. It corresponds to a dissociation of 0.06% of the water vapor in the working gas. Different mechanisms of OH (X) production in the core of the plasma jet are discussed and analyzed.

  9. Broadband tunable microwave photonic phase shifter with low RF power variation in a high-Q AlN microring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianwen; Sun, Changzheng; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Jian; Wang, Lai; Han, Yanjun; Hao, Zhibiao; Li, Hongtao; Luo, Yi; Yan, Jianchang; Wei, Tong Bo; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Junxi

    2016-08-01

    An all-optically tunable microwave photonic phase shifter is demonstrated based on an epitaxial aluminum nitride (AlN) microring with an intrinsic quality factor of 3.2×106. The microring adopts a pedestal structure, which allows overcoupling with 700 nm gap size and facilitates the fabrication process. A phase shift for broadband signals from 4 to 25 GHz is demonstrated by employing the thermo-optic effect and the separate carrier tuning technique. A phase tuning range of 0°-332° is recorded with a 3 dB radio frequency (RF) power variation and 48 mW optical power consumption. In addition, AlN exhibits intrinsic second-order optical nonlinearity. Thus, our work presents a novel platform with a low propagation loss and the capability of electro-optic modulation for applications in integrated microwave photonics. PMID:27472628

  10. On the feasibility of superjunction thick-SOI power LDMOS transistors for RF base station applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, I.; Roig, J.; Flores, D.; Hidalgo, S.; Rebollo, J.

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of applying the superjunction (SJ) concept to a thick-SOI LDMOS transistor for base station applications is studied in this paper. An extensive comparison with conventional RF LDMOS structures is performed in terms of breakdown voltage (VBR) versus drift resistance (Rdr) values. Unlike conventional LDMOS structures, the Rdr value in SJ LDMOS structures not only depends on the doping concentration but especially on the characteristics of P and N pillars. The charge compensation due to inter-diffusion between adjacent pillars is responsible for the observed Rdr increase. In order to accomplish an optimum pillar formation with the minimum possible transition between P and N pillars with inherent net doping reduction, high energy multi-implantations and a small thermal budget must be used. Moreover, the distance between P and N pillar implantation windows must be properly set to alleviate the doping inter-diffusion effect. The VBR/Rdr ratio value is a good indicator to evaluate the SJ LDMOS feasibility for RF applications.

  11. Design, construction and operational results of the IGBT controlled solid state modulator high voltage power supply used in the high power RF systems of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator of the accelerator production of tritium (APT) project

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.T. III; Rees, D.; Przeklasa, R.S.; Scott, M.C.

    1998-12-31

    The 1700 MeV, 100 mA Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Proton Linac will require 244 1 MW, continuous wave RF systems. 1 MW continuous wave klystrons are used as the RF source and each klystron requires 95 kV, 17 A of beam voltage and current. The cost of the DC power supplies is the single largest percentage of the total RF system cost. Power supply reliability is crucial to overall RF system availability and AC to DC conversion efficiency affects the operating cost. The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will serve as the prototype and test bed for APT. The design of the RF systems used in LEDA is driven by the need to field test high efficiency systems with extremely high reliability before APT is built. The authors present a detailed description and test results of one type of advanced high voltage power supply system using Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) that has been used with the LEDA High Power RF systems. The authors also present some of the distinctive features offered by this power supply topology, including crowbarless tube protection and modular construction which allows graceful degradation of power supply operation.

  12. High-field actively detuneable transverse electromagnetic (TEM) coil with low-bias voltage for high-power RF transmission.

    PubMed

    Avdievich, Nikolai I; Bradshaw, Ken; Kuznetsov, Andrey M; Hetherington, Hoby P

    2007-06-01

    The design and construction of a 4T (170 MHz) transverse electromagnetic (TEM) actively detuneable quadrature head coil is described. Conventional schemes for active detuning require high negative bias voltages (>300 V) to prevent leakage of RF pulses with amplitudes of 1-2 kW. To extend the power handling capacity and avoid the use of high DC bias voltages, we developed an alternate method of detuning the volume coil. In this method the PIN diodes in the detuning circuits are shorted when the RF volume coil is tuned, and negatively biased with -12 V when the coil is detuned. To preserve the high Q(U)/Q(L) ratio of the TEM coil, we modified the method of Nabetani and Watkins (Proceedings of the 13th Annual Meeting of ISMRM, Kyoto, Japan, 2004, abstract 1574) by utilizing a high-impedance (approximately 200 Omega), lumped-element, quarter-wavelength transformer. A Q(U) of 500 was achieved for the detuneable TEM, such that incorporation of the detuning network had minimal effect (<1 dB) on the performance of the coil in vivo. PMID:17534919

  13. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on CCEM key comparison CCEM.RF-K10.CL (GT-RF/99-2) 'Power in 50 Ω coaxial lines, frequency: 50 MHz to 26 GHz' measurement techniques and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Dieter; Inoue, T.; Michaud, A.

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the results and the measuring methods of an international key comparison between twelve national metrology institutes (NMIs) and is concerning the calibration factor of RF power sensors in the coaxial 3.5 mm line for frequencies up to 26 GHz. Two RF power travelling standards fitted with male PC 3.5 mm connectors were measured at seven frequencies. The following NMIs participated: NMIJ (Japan), NRC (Canada), NIST (USA), METAS (Switzerland), CSIR-NML (South Africa), NMIA (Australia), NPL (UK), SiQ (Slovenia), IEN (Italy), VNIIFTRI (Russian Federation), SPRING (Singapore) and PTB (Germany), as the pilot laboratory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  14. A new methodology for determining recombination parameters using an RF photoconductance instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, R.A.; Cuevas, A.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of minority-carrier lifetime in silicon wafers provide an effective technique for process control and device-physics optimization. For example, detailed measurements of minority-carrier lifetime vs. injection level can allow a nearly complete experimental optimization of a solar cell design and process. This extended abstract describes a methodology that allows this fully characterization by using a relatively simple RF photoconductance-decay tool. By analyzing the quasi-steady-state photoconductance as a function of incident light intensity, information corresponding to an I{sub sc}-V{sub oc} curve can be obtained from a non-contacted silicon wafer. This information is available at various stages during the solar cell fabrication process. The use of steady-state photoconductance instead of transient photoconductance makes use of simple electronics and light sources, yet it has the capability to measure lifetimes down into the 100 ns range.

  15. A high-efficiency, low-noise power solution for a dual-channel GNSS RF receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Shi; Taishan, Mo; Jianlian, Le; Yebing, Gan; Chengyan, Ma; Tianchun, Ye

    2012-08-01

    A high-efficiency low-noise power solution for a dual-channel GNSS RF receiver is presented. The power solution involves a DC—DC buck converter and a followed low-dropout regulator (LDO). The pulse-width-modulation (PWM) control method is adopted for better noise performance. An improved low-power high-frequency PWM control circuit is proposed, which halves the average quiescent current of the buck converter to 80 μA by periodically shutting down the OTA. The size of the output stage has also been optimized to achieve high efficiency under a light load condition. In addition, a novel soft-start circuit based on a current limiter has been implemented to avoid inrush current. Fabricated with commercial 180-nm CMOS technology, the DC—DC converter achieves a peak efficiency of 93.1% under a 2 MHz working frequency. The whole receiver consumes only 20.2 mA from a 3.3 V power supply and has a noise figure of 2.5 dB.

  16. A Fully Integrated RF-Powered Contact Lens With a Single Element Display.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J; Yu-Te Liao; Lingley, Andrew; Mirjalili, R; Parviz, B; Otis, B

    2010-12-01

    We present progress toward a wirelessly-powered active contact lens comprised of a transparent polymer substrate, loop antenna, power harvesting IC, and micro-LED. The fully integrated radio power harvesting and power management system was fabricated in a 0.13 μm CMOS process with a total die area of 0.2 mm(2). It utilizes a small on-chip capacitor for energy storage to light up a micro-LED pixel. We have demonstrated wireless power transfer at 10 cm distance using the custom IC and on-lens antenna. PMID:23853383

  17. Study on the L–H transition power threshold with RF heating and lithium-wall coating on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Xu, G. S.; Nielsen, A. H.; Gao, W.; Duan, Y. M.; Liu, H. Q.; Wang, L.; Li, M. H.; Wang, M.; Zhang, X. J.; Chen, R.; Wang, H. Q.; Sun, Z.; Ding, S. Y.; Yan, N.; Liu, S. C.; Shao, L. M.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Li, J.; Zhang, L.; Wan, B. N.; the EAST Team

    2016-05-01

    The power threshold for low (L) to high (H) confinement mode transition achieved by radio-frequency (RF) heating and lithium-wall coating is investigated experimentally on EAST for two sets of walls: an all carbon wall (C) and molybdenum chamber and a carbon divertor (Mo/C). For both sets of walls, a minimum power threshold P thr of ~0.6 MW was found when the EAST operates in a double null (DN) divertor configuration with intensive lithium-wall coating. When operating in upper single null (USN) or lower single null (LSN), the power threshold depends on the ion  ∇B drift direction. The low density dependence of the L–H power threshold, namely an increase below a minimum density, was identified in the Mo/C wall for the first time. For the C wall only the single-step L–H transition with limited injection power is observed whereas also the so-called dithering L–H transition is observed in the Mo/C wall. The dithering behaves distinctively in a USN, DN and LSN configuration, suggesting the divertor pumping capability is an important ingredient in this transition since the internal cryopump is located underneath the lower divertor. Depending on the chosen divertor configuration, the power across the separatrix P loss increases with neutral density near the lower X-point in EAST with the Mo/C wall, consistent with previous results in the C wall (Xu et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 072001). These findings suggest that the edge neutral density, the ion  ∇B drift as well as the divertor pumping capability play important roles in the L–H power threshold and transition behaviour.

  18. Intermodulation components in the transmitter RF output due to high voltage power supply ripple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    The economic feasibility of eliminating the 400-Hz motor-generator sets used to provide power to the high-voltage power supplies of the 20-kW transmitters and replace them with a 60-Hz high-voltage power supply was investigated. The efficiency of a power supply that runs from the 60-Hz line directly would pay for itself in about seven years and could be designed so that the transmitter would meet all the incidental phase and amplitude modulation specifications.

  19. Cold Test Measurements on the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Gierman, S.M.

    2010-12-03

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. Based on longitudinal phase space measurements showing a correlated energy spread the gun was removed and re-characterized in 2002. The low power RF measurements performed on the gun are described below. Perturbative bead measurements were performed to determine the field ratio in the two-cell gun, and network analyzer measurements were made to characterize the mode structure. A second probe was installed to monitor the RF field in the first cell, and a diagnostic was developed to monitor the high-power field ratio. Calibration of the RF probes, a model for analyzing RF measurements, and Superfish simulations of bead and RF measurements are described.

  20. TRAK_RF - Electromagnetic Field and Charged Particle Simulations in RF Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Stanley; Rees, Daniel

    1997-05-01

    An integrated software system has been developed to model electromagnetic fields and charged particle orbits in high-power RF devices. The primary application is simulation of electron multipactoring in linac vacuum windows for Accelerator Production of Tritium(G. Lawrence, et.al., Conventional and Superconducting RF Linac Design for the APT Project, in Proc. 1996 Int'l. Linear Acc. Conf. (Geneva, 1996), to be published.). The finite-element frequency-domain field solver can determine resonant fields such as cutoff and propagating modes of waveguides and TE(mnp) and TM(mnp) modes of cylindrical structures. In contrast to codes like Superfish, TRAK_RF makes direct determinations of power dissipation and phase shifts resulting ffrom lossy materials and walls. Furthermore, the program can handle scattering solutions, simulating free-space conditions with resistive termination boundary layers. TRAK_RF has advanced particle tracking capabilities to investigate a variety of innovative window designs. The program can simutaneously apply three numerical solutions for electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic fields on independent conformal triangular meshes. The finite-element method allows an unambiguous determination of particle collisions with material surfaces. It is possible to define up to 32 material types with energy-dependent secondary emission coefficients. TRAK_RF has a versatile automatic mesh generator with an interactive drafting utility for boundary input. Other applications include cavity design, radar and communications, microwave systems, and beam optics in RF accelerators.

  1. Systematic uncertainties in RF-based measurement of superconducting cavity quality factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbauer, J. P.; Pischalnikov, Yu.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Schappert, W.; Smith, S.

    2016-09-01

    Q0 determinations based on RF power measurements are subject to at least three potentially large systematic effects that have not been previously appreciated. Instrumental factors that can systematically bias RF based measurements of Q0 are quantified and steps that can be taken to improve the determination of Q0 are discussed.

  2. Systematic uncertainties in RF-based measurement of superconducting cavity quality factors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holzbauer, J. P.; Pischalnikov, Yu.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Schappert, W.; Smith, S.

    2016-05-10

    Q0 determinations based on RF power measurements are subject to at least three potentially large systematic effects that have not been previously appreciated. Here, instrumental factors that can systematically bias RF based measurements of Q0 are quantified and steps that can be taken to improve the determination of Q0 are discussed.

  3. Characterization of an annular helicon plasma source powered by an outer or inner RF antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a novel annular helicon plasma source which can be powered by either an outer radio-frequency antenna or an inner antenna. A low pressure argon plasma (5× {{10}-4} Torr), with an ion mean free path comparable to the dimension of the plasma source, is created by a constant radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) power of 310 W and a convergent-divergent (nozzle shape) magnetic field is used to guide the plasma motion, similar to the parametric setup of previous experiments for helicon thrusters. Three electrostatic probes (a retarding field energy analyser, an emissive probe and a Langmuir probe) are used to spatially characterize the plasma dynamics. The primary result is that there is an ion beam when the outer antenna is powered and no ion beam with the inner antenna powered even though there is a considerable potential drop in both cases. The plasma plume in the diffusion chamber is carefully characterized and compared for the two antenna regimes. Its structure is shown to be greatly influenced by the presence of an ion beam and the variation of antenna location. A plasma wake is also observed in the plume behind the inner tube interface and related cross-field transport of ions and electrons in this region is briefly discussed.

  4. Plasma Response to the Application of 30 MHz RF Power in the NSTX Device

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Wilson; R.E. Bell; S. Bernabei; J.C. Hosea; B.P. LeBlanc; T.K. Mau; J. Menard; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; R. Pinsker; C.K. Phillips; A. Rosenberg; P.M. Ryan; S. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; J.B. Wilgen; Y. Takase

    2001-05-08

    Radio-frequency power at 30 MHz has been applied in a variety of situations to National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas. The response of the plasma is observed in order to study both the physics of High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating and as a tool to extend the performance of NSTX plasmas. In this paper we will discuss the progress made to date towards these goals.

  5. Planck Constant Determination from Power Equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Equating mechanical to electrical power links the kilogram, the meter, and the second to the practical realizations of the ohm and the volt derived from the quantum Hall and the Josephson effects, yielding an SI determination of the Planck constant. The NIST watt balance uses this power equivalence principle, and in 1998 measured the Planck constant with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 8.7 x 10-8, the most accurate determination to date. The next generation of the NIST watt balance is now being assembled. Modification to the experimental facilities have been made to reduce the uncertainty components from vibrations and electromagnetic interference. A vacuum chamber has been installed to reduce the uncertainty components associated with performing the experiment in air. Most of the apparatus is in place and diagnostic testing of the balance should begin this year. Once a combined relative standard uncertainty of one part in 10-8 has been reached, the power equivalence principle can be used to monitor the possible drift in the artifact mass standard, the kilogram, and provide an accurate alternative definition of mass in terms of fundamental constants. *Electricity Division, Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory, Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. Contribution of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, not subject to copyright in the U.S.

  6. RF heating of nanoclusters for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Letfullin, Alla R.; George, Thomas F.

    2015-03-01

    Nanodrugs selectively delivered to a tumor site can be activated by radiation for drug release, or nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as a drug themselves by producing biological damage in cancer cells through thermal, mechanical ablations or charged particle emission. Radio-frequency (RF) waves have an excellent ability to penetrate into the human body without causing healthy tissue damage, which provides a great opportunity to activate/heat NPs delivered inside the body as a contrast agent for diagnosis and treatment purposes. However the heating of NPs in the RF range of the spectrum is controversial in the research community because of the low power load of RF waves and low absorption of NPs in the RF range. To resolve these weaknesses in the RF activation of NPs and dramatically increase absorption of contrast agents in tumor, we suggest aggregating the nanoclusters inside or on the surface of the cancer cells. We simulate space distribution of temperature changes inside and outside metal and dielectric nanopraticles/nanoclusters, determine the number of nanoparticles needed to form a cluster, and estimate the thermal damage area produced in surrounding medium by nanopraticles/nanoclusters heated in the RF field.

  7. Nonlinear Plasma Experiments in Geospace with Gigawatts of RF Power at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Rayyan, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2014-10-01

    The HAARP phased-array HF transmitter at Gakona, AK delivers up to 3.6 GW (ERP) of HF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with millisecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of nonlinear plasma experiments in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma including stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), artificial aurora, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and telescopes and cameras for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the plasma line, and suprathermal electrons. Applications are made to the study and control of irregularities affecting spacecraft communication and navigation systems.

  8. RF dosimetry: a comparison between power absorption of female and male numerical models from 0.1 to 4 ghz.

    PubMed

    Sandrini, L; Vaccari, A; Malacarne, C; Cristoforetti, L; Pontalti, R

    2004-11-21

    Realistic numerical models of human subjects and their surrounding environment represent the basic points of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic dosimetry. This also involves differentiating the human models in men and women, possibly with different body shapes and postures. In this context, the aims of this paper are, firstly, to propose a female dielectric anatomical model (fDAM) and, secondly, to compare the power absorption distributions of a male and a female model from 0.1 to 4 GHz. For realizing the fDAM, a magnetic resonance imaging tomographer to acquire images and a recent technique which avoids the discrete segmentation of body tissues into different types have been used. Simulations have been performed with the FDTD method by using a novel filtering-based subgridding algorithm. The latter is applied here for the first time to dosimetry, allowing an abrupt mesh refinement by a factor of up to 7. The results show that the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) of the female model is higher than that of the male counterpart, mainly because of a thicker subcutaneous fat layer. In contrast, the maximum averaged SAR over 1 g (1gA-SAR) and 10 g (10gA-SAR) does not depend on gender, because it occurs in regions where no subcutaneous fat layer is present. PMID:15609567

  9. High-frequency performances of superjunction laterally diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors for RF power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo-Yuan; Chen, Kun-Ming; Chiu, Chia-Sung; Huang, Guo-Wei; Chang, Edward Yi

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the dc and high-frequency performances of laterally diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor (LDMOS) transistors with superjunction (SJ) structures. The SJ-LDMOS transistors were fabricated using a 0.5-µm CMOS process. By utilizing a modified SJ/RESURF layout (Type I) or a tapered SJ layout (Type II) in our devices, better high-frequency performances and higher breakdown voltages are achieved compared with conventional SJ counterpart, owing to the suppression of the substrate-assisted depletion effect and the reduction of the drain resistance. For Type I device with an optimal SJ layout dimension, the cutoff frequency and the breakdown voltage are 3.7 GHz and 68 V, respectively. For Type II device with a smallest p-pillar width near the drain, they can be enhanced further and reach to 4.9 GHz and 83 V. These experimental results suggest that the SJ-LDMOS can be used in the RF power amplifiers.

  10. Feasibility study of monitoring of plasma etching chamber conditions using superimposed high-frequency signals on rf power transmission line.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Y; Uesugi, F

    2015-10-01

    An in situ monitoring system that can detect changes in the conditions of a plasma etching chamber has been developed. In the system, low-intensity high-frequency signals are superimposed on the rf power transmission line used for generating plasma. The system measures reflected high-frequency signals and detects the change in their frequency characteristics. The results indicate that the system detects the changes in the conditions in etching chambers caused by the changes in the electrode gap and the inner wall condition and demonstrate the effectiveness of the system. The system can easily be retrofitted to mass-production equipment and it can be used with or without plasma discharge. Therefore, our system is suitable for in situ monitoring of mass-production plasma etching chambers. The system is expected to contribute to development of predictive maintenance, which monitors films deposited on the inner wall of the chamber and prevents equipment faults caused by misalignment of chamber parts in mass-production equipment. PMID:26520984

  11. A comparison of lower and higher LET heavy ion irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathi, M. N.; Pushpa, N.; Vinayakprasanna, N. H.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2016-06-01

    The Silicon NPN rf power transistors were irradiated with 180 MeV Au14+ and 150 MeV Ag12+ ions in the dose range of 1 Mrad to 100 Mrad. The SRIM simulation was used to understand the energy loss and range of these ions in the transistor structure. The different electrical parameters such as Gummel characteristics, excess base current (∆IB), dc current gain (hFE), transconductance (gm), displacement damage factor (K) and output characteristics were studied systematically before and after irradiation. These results were compared with lower linear energy transfer (LET) ions such as 50 MeV Li3+, 95 MeV O7+, 100 MeV F8+, 140 MeV Si10+ and 175 MeV Ni13+ ions in the same dose range. The degradation for 180 MeV Au14+ and 150 MeV Ag12+ ion irradiated transistors was significantly more when compared to lower LET ions, indicating that the transistors are vulnerable to higher LET ion irradiations. Isochronal annealing study was conducted on the irradiated transistors to analyze the recovery in different electrical parameters. After isochronal annealing, the recovery in hFE and other electrical parameters was around 67% for Ag12+ ion irradiated transistors and 60% for Au14+ ion irradiated transistors.

  12. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-01

    The prototype rf-driven H- ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H- ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (TPE) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used TPE of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H- ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  13. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-15

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup −} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup −} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup −} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  14. DOE planning workshop on rf theory and computations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the two-day workshop-meeting was to review the status of rf heating in magnetic fusion plasmas and to determine the outstanding problems in this area. The term rf heating was understood to encompass not only bulk plasma heating by externally applied electromagnetic power but also current generation in toroidal plasmas and generation of thermal barriers in tandem mirror plasmas.

  15. ADX: A high Power Density, Advanced RF-Driven Divertor Test Tokamak for PMI studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, Dennis; ADX Team

    2015-11-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment, ADX; a divertor test tokamak dedicated to address critical gaps in plasma-material interactions (PMI) science, and the world fusion research program, on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. Basic ADX design features are motivated and discussed. In order to assess the widest range of advanced divertor concepts, a large fraction (>50%) of the toroidal field volume is purpose-built with innovative magnetic topology control and flexibility for assessing different surfaces, including liquids. ADX features high B-field (>6 Tesla) and high global power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) in order to access the full range of parallel heat flux and divertor plasma pressures foreseen for reactors, while simultaneously assessing the effect of highly dissipative divertors on core plasma/pedestal. Various options for efficiently achieving high field are being assessed including the use of Alcator technology (cryogenic cooled copper) and high-temperature superconductors. The experimental platform would also explore advanced lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron range of frequency actuators located at the high-field side; a location which is predicted to greatly reduce the PMI effects on the launcher while minimally perturbing the core plasma. The synergistic effects of high-field launchers with high total B on current and flow drive can thus be studied in reactor-relevant boundary plasmas.

  16. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  17. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Patrick H.; Yu, David U. L.

    1995-01-01

    A digital-to analogue converter for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration.

  18. RF impedance method for nondestructive moisture content determination for in-shell peanuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandala, C. V. K.; Nelson, S. O.

    2007-04-01

    A method was developed earlier for estimating the moisture content (mc) in samples of wheat, corn and peanut kernels, nondestructively, by measuring their complex impedance values. In this method, capacitance (C), phase angle (θ) and dissipation factor (D) were measured with an impedance analyser at 1 and 5 MHz on a parallel-plate capacitor holding a few kernels of a particular commodity between the plates. These values were then used in an empirical equation based on the parameters C, θ and D, and the moisture content was calculated. The calculated mc values were within 1% of the air-oven values for about 85% of the kernel samples tested in the moisture range from 6% to 20% for wheat, corn and peanuts. However, it would be useful during drying and processing of peanuts, if the mc could be determined without shelling them. In this work, the feasibility of determining the moisture content of in-shell peanuts (pods) by similar impedance measurements was investigated. Values of capacitance, phase angle and dissipation factor measured at 24 °C and at three frequencies were used in a modified prediction equation and the moisture content was estimated within 1% of the air-oven values for over 90% of the pod samples tested in the moisture range from 6% to 25%. The method is rapid and nondestructive and may be used in the development of a commercial instrument.

  19. Auxiliary coil controls temperature of RF induction heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Auxiliary coil controls the temperature of an RF induction furnace that is powered by a relatively unstable RF generator. Manual or servoed adjustments of the relative position of the auxiliary coil, which is placed in close proximity to the RF coil, changes the looseness of the RF coil and hence the corresponding heating effect of its RF field.

  20. Recent Studies of RF Breakdown Physics in Normal Conducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, Valery; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    The operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The behavior of the rf breakdown depends on multiple parameters, including the input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Here we discuss recent experimental data and theoretical studies of rf breakdown physics.

  1. Multiplying probe for accurate power measurements on an RF driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet applied to the COST reference microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijer, P. A. C.; Sobota, A.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a new multiplying probe for measuring the power dissipated in a miniature capacitively coupled, RF driven, atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μAPPJ—COST Reference Microplasma Jet—COST RMJ) is presented. The approach aims for substantially higher accuracy than provided by traditionally applied methods using bi-directional power meters or commercially available voltage and current probes in conjunction with digitizing oscilloscopes. The probe is placed on a miniature PCB and designed to minimize losses, influence of unknown elements, crosstalk and variations in temperature. The probe is designed to measure powers of the order of magnitude of 0.1-10 W. It is estimated that it measures power with less than 2% deviation from the real value in the tested power range. The design was applied to measure power dissipated in COST-RMJ running in helium with a small addition of oxygen.

  2. Multi-MW 22.8 GHz Harmonic Multiplier - RF Power Source for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-07-26

    Electrodynamic and particle simulation studies have been carried out to optimize design of a two-cavity harmonic frequency multiplier, in which a linear electron beam is energized by rotating fields near cyclotron resonance in a TE111 cavity in a uniform magnetic field, and in which the beam then radiates coherently at the nth harmonic into a TEn11 output cavity. Examples are worked out in detail for 7th and 2nd harmonic converters, showing RF-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 45% and 88%, respectively at 19.992 GHz (K-band) and 5.712 GHz (C-band), for a drive frequency of 2.856 GHz. Details are shown of RF infrastructure (S-band klystron, modulator) and harmonic converter components (drive cavity, output cavities, electron beam source and modulator, beam collector) for the two harmonic converters to be tested. Details are also given for the two-frequency (S- and C-band) coherent multi-MW test stand for RF breakdown and RF gun studies.

  3. High Power Experiment of X-Band Thermionic Cathode RF Gun for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Meng, De; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Matsuo, Kenichi; Sakae, Hisaharu; Yamamoto, Masashi

    2006-11-27

    We are currently developing a compact monochromatic X-ray source based on laser-electron collision. To realize remarkably compact-, high-intensity- and highly-stable-system, we adopt an X-band multi-bunch liner accelerator (linac) and reliable Q-switch laser. The X-ray yields by the multi-bunch electron beam and Q-switch Nd: YAG laser of 1.4 J/10 ns (FWHM) (532 nm, second harmonic) is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec for 10 Hz operation). The injector of the system consists of a 3.5-cell X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet. So far we have achieved beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun. The peak beam energy is 2 MeV. This experimental high energy ({approx}2 MeV) beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun is the first in the world. In this paper, we describe the system of the Compton scattering X-ray source based on the X-band linac, experimental results of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and the details of the experimental setup for Compton scattering X-ray generation that are under construction.

  4. RF potentials analysis using TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, Daniele; Sorba, Marco; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) heating is fully dependent on edge plasma conditions and particularly on the acceleration of charged particles which can damage the antennas and surroundings. Rectified RF field induces drifts on ions that can hit the first wall, causing hot spots, sputtering, impurities, fuel dilution and, eventually, disruption. These phenomena mainly depend on the antenna geometry and materials, on the plasma density profile at the edge and on the connection patterns. The heat flux attributed to accelerated ions is somehow proportional to the RF potential in front of the antenna. Because of this, the understanding of the RF potential generation in front of the antenna is crucial for every high RF power systems, in order to predict the deleterious particle flux and therefore mitigate its effect by means of a proper design. The TOPICA code, an innovative tool realized for the analysis and design of ICRH and LH antennas, has been upgraded to evaluate the RF potential in front of the antenna. The solution of the Maxwell's equations in plasma combined with the RF field map at the plasma edge (standard outputs of TOPICA calculation) allow for the computation of the RF fields also in the plasma region. A new TOPICA module has been developed to account for a rigorous procedure to obtain the RF potentials and RF potential mitigation techniques through antenna geometrical modifications have been studied and will be presented.

  5. 47 CFR 73.765 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Determining operating power. 73.765 Section 73... BROADCAST SERVICES International Broadcast Stations § 73.765 Determining operating power. The operating power specified in § 73.751 shall be determined by use of a calibrated dummy load or by any other...

  6. 47 CFR 73.567 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Determining operating power. 73.567 Section 73... BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.567 Determining operating power. The procedures for determining operating power described in § 73.267 are applicable to noncommercial education...

  7. Micro-emitter heating by rf current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    One factor limiting the accelerating gradients in radiofrequency (rf) cavities are field emission currents emitted by micro-emitters. The value of emitter heating power plays a key role in theories of an rf cavity processing allowing to enhance the accelerating gradient. In this paper, the emitter heating by rf current is studied. This heating mechanism associates with a large heating power (by several orders of magnitude higher than the power of field emission current) and demonstrates explicit dependence on the frequency of the electromagnetic rf field (scales with the square of the rf field frequency).

  8. LHC Beam Diffusion Dependence on RF Noise: Models And Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Van Winkle, D.; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; /CERN

    2010-09-14

    Radio Frequency (RF) accelerating system noise and non-idealities can have detrimental impact on the LHC performance through longitudinal motion and longitudinal emittance growth. A theoretical formalism has been developed to relate the beam and RF loop dynamics with the bunch length growth [1]. Measurements were conducted at LHC to validate the formalism, determine the performance limiting RF components, and provide the foundation for beam diffusion estimates for higher energies and intensities. A brief summary of these results is presented in this work. During a long store, the relation between the energy lost to synchrotron radiation and the noise injected to the beam by the RF accelerating voltage determines the growth of the bunch energy spread and longitudinal emittance. Since the proton synchrotron radiation in the LHC is very low, the beam diffusion is extremely sensitive to RF perturbations. The theoretical formalism presented in [1], suggests that the noise experienced by the beam depends on the cavity phase noise power spectrum, filtered by the beam transfer function, and aliased due to the periodic sampling of the accelerating voltage signal V{sub c}. Additionally, the dependence of the RF accelerating cavity noise spectrum on the Low Level RF (LLRF) configurations has been predicted using time-domain simulations and models [2]. In this work, initial measurements at the LHC supporting the above theoretical formalism and simulation predictions are presented.

  9. Investigation of Readout RF Pulse Impact on the Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Min; Jan, Meei-Ling; Liang, Hsin-Chin; Chang, Chia-Hao; Wu, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Wang, Fu-Nien

    2015-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging (CEST-MRI) is capable of both microenvironment and molecular imaging. The optimization of scanning parameters is important since the CEST effect is sensitive to factors such as saturation power and field homogeneity. The aim of this study was to determine if the CEST effect would be altered by changing the length of readout RF pulses. Both theoretical computer simulation and phantom experiments were performed to examine the influence of readout RF pulses. Our results showed that the length of readout RF pulses has unremarkable impact on the Z-spectrum and CEST effect in both computer simulation and phantom experiment. Moreover, we demonstrated that multiple refocusing RF pulses used in rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) sequence induced no obvious saturation transfer contrast. Therefore, readout RF pulse has negligible effect on CEST Z-spectrum and the optimization of readout RF pulse length can be disregarded in CEST imaging protocol. PMID:26455576

  10. Investigation of Readout RF Pulse Impact on the Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-Min; Jan, Meei-Ling; Liang, Hsin-Chin; Chang, Chia-Hao; Wu, Yi-Chun; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Wang, Fu-Nien

    2015-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging (CEST-MRI) is capable of both microenvironment and molecular imaging. The optimization of scanning parameters is important since the CEST effect is sensitive to factors such as saturation power and field homogeneity. The aim of this study was to determine if the CEST effect would be altered by changing the length of readout RF pulses. Both theoretical computer simulation and phantom experiments were performed to examine the influence of readout RF pulses. Our results showed that the length of readout RF pulses has unremarkable impact on the Z-spectrum and CEST effect in both computer simulation and phantom experiment. Moreover, we demonstrated that multiple refocusing RF pulses used in rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) sequence induced no obvious saturation transfer contrast. Therefore, readout RF pulse has negligible effect on CEST Z-spectrum and the optimization of readout RF pulse length can be disregarded in CEST imaging protocol. PMID:26455576

  11. Multi-harmonic RF test stand for RF breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y.; Shchelkunov, S.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Solyak, N.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2012-12-21

    A multi-harmonic RF test stand is under construction at Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. It includes a frequency multiplier which can generate high power harmonics efficiently that are phase locked to the fundamental drive frequency. In a bi-modal asymmetric cavity powered by this RF source, the cavity may experience reduced exposure time to peak fields and sweeping of peak fields across their surfaces, and strong asymmetry between surfaces that may experience cathode-and anode-like fields; these phenomena are to be assessed for their influence on RF breakdown probabilities.

  12. RF Sheath Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2007-11-01

    RF sheath formation on the antennas and walls in ICRF-heated experiments can reduce the heating efficiency, limit the coupled power, and cause damage to plasma-facing structures. The sheaths are driven by a slow wave component of the rf field due to a mismatch between the magnetic field and the boundary (antenna or wall). Quantitative modeling of the highly nonlinear sheaths may now be feasible for the first time in massively-parallel-processing (MPP) codes developed in the RF SciDAC project. Recently, a new approach to sheath modeling was proposed,ootnotetextD.A. D'Ippolito and J.R. Myra, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102508 (2006). in which the sheath physics is incorporated into the RF wave computation by using a modified boundary condition (BC) on the RF fields in both wave propagation and antenna codes. Here, we illustrate the use of the sheath BC for near-field sheaths by a model calculation that includes electromagnetic effects and a simple antenna coupling model. Properties of the model (such as the role of sheath-plasma waves) and implications for antenna codes such as TOPICAootnotetextV. Lancellotti et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, S476 (2006). will be discussed.

  13. 18 CFR 284.503 - Market-power determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Market-power determination. 284.503 Section 284.503 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... RELATED AUTHORITIES Applications for Market-Based Rates for Storage § 284.503 Market-power...

  14. 18 CFR 284.503 - Market-power determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Market-power determination. 284.503 Section 284.503 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... RELATED AUTHORITIES Applications for Market-Based Rates for Storage § 284.503 Market-power...

  15. 18 CFR 284.503 - Market-power determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Market-power determination. 284.503 Section 284.503 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... RELATED AUTHORITIES Applications for Market-Based Rates for Storage § 284.503 Market-power...

  16. 18 CFR 284.503 - Market-power determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Market-power determination. 284.503 Section 284.503 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... RELATED AUTHORITIES Applications for Market-Based Rates for Storage § 284.503 Market-power...

  17. 18 CFR 284.503 - Market-power determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Market-power determination. 284.503 Section 284.503 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... RELATED AUTHORITIES Applications for Market-Based Rates for Storage § 284.503 Market-power...

  18. Plasma core reactor simulations using RF uranium seeded argon discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental results are described in which pure uranium hexafluoride was injected into an argon-confined, steady-state, RF-heated plasma to investigate characteristics of plasma core nuclear reactors. The 80 kW (13.56 MHz) and 1.2 MW (5.51 MHz) rf induction heater facilities were used to determine a test chamber flow scheme which offered best uranium confinement with minimum wall coating. The cylindrical fused-silica test chamber walls were 5.7-cm-ID by 10-cm-long. Test conditions included RF powers of 2-85 kW, chamber pressures of 1-12 atm, and uranium hexafluoride mass-flow rates of 0.005-0.13 g/s. Successful techniques were developed for fluid-mechanical confinement of RF-heated plasmas with pure uranium hexafluoride injection.

  19. Racetrack microtron rf system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)/Los Alamos cw racetrack microtron is described. The low-power portion consists of five 75-W amplifers that drive two input ports in each of two chopper deflection cavities and one port in the prebuncher cavity. A single 500-kW klystron drives four separate 2380-MHz cavity sections: the two main accelerator sections, a capture section, and a preaccelerator section. The phases and amplitudes in all cavities are controlled by electronic or electromechanical controls. The 1-MW klystron power supply and crowbar system were purchased as a unit; several modifications are described that improve power-supply performance. The entire rf system has been tested and shipped to the NBS, and the chopper-buncher system has been operated with beam at the NBS. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  20. 2 MW CW RF load for gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Ives, R.; Marsden, David; Mizuhara, Max; Collins, George; Neilson, Jeff; Borchard, Philipp

    2011-07-01

    Final design and assembly are in progress for a 2MW CW RF load for gyrotrons. Such loads are required for testing high power gyrotrons for electron cyclotron heating of fusion plasmas. The research is building on experience with a 1 MW load to increase the power capability, reduce backscattered RF power, and improve the mechanical design. (author)

  1. A novel device for determining ultrasonic power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeqiri, B.; Shaw, A.; Gélat, P. N.; Bell, D.; Sutton, Y. C.

    2004-01-01

    A novel concept for an ultrasonic power meter is presented which utilises the pyro-electric effect of a thin membrane of the piezo-electric polymer, pvdf. One side of the membrane is in intimate contact with a polyurethane-based acoustical absorber. The attenuation coefficient of this material is very high, ensuring that the majority of the ultrasonic energy passing through the pvdf membrane is absorbed within a thin layer of the interface, resulting in a rapid increase in temperature. Through the pyro-electric effect, this temperature increase results in a voltage across the electrodes of the membrane. Under specific conditions, the generated voltage is proportional to the rate of temperature rise and, immediately after switch on of ultrasound, the rate of temperature rise is proportional to the delivered ultrasonic power. This paper describes details of the concept, and includes theoretical calculations of the expected behaviour. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated through careful studies of several low-megahertz NPL reference therapy-level transducers, covering an applied power range of 250 mW to 8 W. Results are encouraging, suggesting that this novel solid-state power meter concept holds considerable promise for a rapid, simple, relatively low cost, power measurement method, appropriate for use at the physiotherapist level.

  2. Modulation-format-independent OSNR monitoring insensitive to cascaded filtering effects by low-cost coherent receptions and RF power measurements.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhenhua; Zhong, Kangping; Zhou, Xian; Lu, Chao; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Lu, Yanzhao; Li, Liangchuan

    2015-06-15

    Optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) monitoring is indispensable for ensuring robust and flexible optical networks that provide failure diagnosis, dynamic lightpath provisioning and modulation format adaptation. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a low-cost, modulation-format-independent OSNR monitoring scheme utilizing reduced-complexity coherent receptions, electrical filtering and radio frequency (RF) power measurements. By measuring the RF power of the coherently received baseband signals at three different frequency components, the proposed OSNR monitor is also insensitive to spectral narrowing induced by cascaded wavelength selective switches (WSSs). We experimentally demonstrate accurate data-format-transparent and filtering-effect-insensitive OSNR monitoring for 25-Gbaud dual-polarization (DP-) transmissions with QPSK, 16-QAM and 64-QAM signals over various distances with different amount of filtering effects by cascaded WSSs. We further characterize the influence of different system parameters, such as the bandwidth of the electrical low-pass filter, the laser frequency offset and laser linewidth on the accuracy of the proposed OSNR monitor. The robustness of the proposed OSNR monitoring scheme to fiber nonlinearities, calibration parameter mismatches and variations of WSS parameters are also investigated. PMID:26193572

  3. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  4. Self-induced steady-state magnetic field in the negative ion sources with localized rf power deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivarova, A.; Todorov, D.; Lishev, St.

    2016-02-01

    The study is in the scope of a recent activity on modeling of SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) which is under development regarding the neutral beam injection heating system of ITER. The regime of non-ambipolarity in the source, established before, is completed here by introducing in the model the steady state magnetic field, self-induced in the discharge due to the dc current flowing in it. Strong changes in the discharge structure are reported.

  5. Self-induced steady-state magnetic field in the negative ion sources with localized rf power deposition.

    PubMed

    Shivarova, A; Todorov, D; Lishev, St

    2016-02-01

    The study is in the scope of a recent activity on modeling of SPIDER (Source for Production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) which is under development regarding the neutral beam injection heating system of ITER. The regime of non-ambipolarity in the source, established before, is completed here by introducing in the model the steady state magnetic field, self-induced in the discharge due to the dc current flowing in it. Strong changes in the discharge structure are reported. PMID:26932036

  6. Electrical isolation of RF plasma discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.; Anderson, H.; Splichal, M.P.

    1992-12-01

    Plasmas excited by radio-frequency (rf) power have nonlinear impedance characteristics. This causes the plasma state to depend on the nature of the circuitry that supplies electrical power to the plasma. This dependency occurs because the harmonics of the drive frequency, which are generated by the plasma nonlinearity, interact with the impedance of the external circuitry at the harmonic frequencies. The authors describe the use of a low-pass rf filter in the power feed to the plasma in the GEC RF Reference Cell. The filter successfully isolates the plasma and eliminates its sensitivity to changes in the rf generator, cable plant, and matching network.

  7. Recent work on an RF ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation of an rf ion thruster using an immersed coupler in an argon discharge is reported. The conical coil, used to couple rf power into the discharge, is placed inside the discharge vessel. The discharge was self-sustained by 100-150 MHz rf power at low environmental pressures. The ion extraction was accomplished by conventional accelerated grid optics from an unoptimized 8 cm diameter ion thruster.

  8. RF breakdown experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, L.; Vlieks, A.; Pearson, C.; Caryotakis, G.; Luhmann, N.C.

    1999-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the conditioning of klystrons, accelerator sections, and rf components for the next linear collider (NLC), as well as other high gradient accelerators and high power microwave sources. SLAC is conducting a series of experiments using an X-band traveling wave ring to characterize the processes and trigger mechanisms associated with rf breakdown. The goal of the research is to identify materials, processes, and manufacturing methods that will increase the breakdown threshold and minimize the time required for conditioning. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. The TESLA RF System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choroba, S.

    2003-12-01

    The TESLA project proposed by the TESLA collaboration in 2001 is a 500 to 800GeV e+/e- linear collider with integrated free electron laser facility. The accelerator is based on superconducting cavity technology. Approximately 20000 superconducting cavities operated at 1.3GHz with a gradient of 23.4MV/m or 35MV/m will be required to achieve the energy of 500GeV or 800GeV respectively. For 500GeV ˜600 RF stations each generating 10MW of RF power at 1.3GHz at a pulse duration of 1.37ms and a repetition rate of 5 or 10Hz are required. The original TESLA design was modified in 2002 and now includes a dedicated 20GeV electron accelerator in a separate tunnel for free electron laser application. The TESLA XFEL will provide XFEL radiation of unprecedented peak brilliance and full transverse coherence in the wavelength range of 0.1 to 6.4nm at a pulse duration of 100fs. The technology of both accelerators, the TESLA linear collider and the XFEL, will be identical, however the number of superconducting cavities and RF stations for the XFEL will be reduced to 936 and 26 respectively. This paper describes the layout of the entire RF system of the TESLA linear collider and the TESLA XFEL and gives an overview of its various subsystems and components.

  10. New power politics will determine generation's path

    SciTech Connect

    Maize, K.; Neville, A.; Peltier, R.

    2009-01-15

    The US power industry's story in 2009 will be all about change, to borrow a now-familiar theme. Though the new administration's policy specifics had not been revealed as this report was prepared, it appears that flat load growth in 2009 will give the new Obama administration a unique opportunity to formulate new energy policy without risking that the lights will go out. New coal projects are now facing increasing difficulties. It looks as though the electricity supply industry will continue to muddle through. It may see an advancement in infrastructure investment, significant new generation or new technology development. It also faces the possibility that policies necessary to achieving those goals will not materialize, for political and economic reasons. 4 figs.

  11. Design, fabrication and characterization of a Schottky diode on an AlGaAs/GaAs HEMT structure for on-chip RF power detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Farahiyah; Parimon, Norfarariyanti; Hashim, Abdul Manaf; Abd Rahman, Shaharin Fadzli; Abdul Rahman, Abdul Rahim; Osman, Mohd Nizam

    2010-02-01

    A Schottky diode was designed and fabricated on an n-AlGaAs/GaAs high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure for RF power detection. The processing steps used in the fabrication were the conventional steps used in standard GaAs processing. Current-voltage measurements showed that the devices had rectifying properties with a barrier height of 0.5289-0.5468 eV. The fabricated Schottky diodes detected RF signals well and their cut-off frequencies up to 20 GHz were estimated in direct injection experiments. To achieve a high cut-off frequency, a smaller Schottky contact area is required. The feasibility of direct integration with the planar dipole antenna via a coplanar waveguide transmission line without insertion of matching circuits was discussed. A higher cut-off frequency can also be achieved by reducing the length of the coplanar waveguide transmission line. These preliminary results represent a breakthrough as regards direct on-chip integration technology, towards the realization of a ubiquitous network society.

  12. Silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous SiC matrix for third-generation solar cells: Microstructure control by RF discharge power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qijin; Levchenko, Igor; Song, Denyuan; Xu, Shuyan; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2015-04-01

    A low-frequency (460 kHz), low-pressure, thermally non-equilibrium, high-density inductively coupled plasma (ICP) has been used to synthesize a novel, advanced photovoltaic material suitable for fabrication of third-generation solar cells. Silicon quantum dots (SQDs) embedded in an amorphous silicon carbide matrix were prepared at a very low substrate temperature of approximately 200°C without any hydrogen dilution. The effect of the radio-frequency (RF) power of the plasma discharge on the morphology and structure of the embedded quantum dots was studied. A brief discussion on the possible mechanisms of the quantum dot formation in the ICP is presented. This study is relevant to third-generation photovoltaic solar cells.

  13. Lifetime characterization of powercapacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Afshin

    2007-04-01

    RF MEMS switches provide a low-cost, high performance solution for many RF/microwave applications these switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, switched filters reflector array antennas for military and commercial markets. In this paper, progress in characterizing of THALES capacitive MEMS devices under high RF power is presented. The design, fabrication and testing of capacitive RF MEMS switches for microwave/mm- wave applications on high-resistivity silicon substrate is presented. The switches tested demonstrated power handling capabilities of 1W (30 dBm) for continuous RF power. The reliability of these switches was tested at various power levels indicating that under continuous RF power. In addition a description of the power failures and their associated operating conditions is presented. The PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads have been developed. Best-case lifetimes of 10 10 cycles have been achieved in several switches from different lots under 30 dbm RF power.

  14. Lifetime characterization of capacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Afshin; Dean, Thierry; Polizzi, Jean-Philippe

    2004-12-01

    RF MEMS switches provide a low-cost, high performance solution to many RF/microwave applications and these switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, switched filters and reflector array antennas for military and commercial markets. In this paper, progress in characterizing of THALES capacitive MEMS devices under high RF power is presented. The design, fabrication and testing of capacitive RF MEMS switches for microwave/mm- wave applications on high-resistivity silicon substrate is presented. The switches tested demonstrated power handling capabilities of 1W (30 dbm) for continuous RF power. The reliability of these switches was tested at various power levels indicating that under continuous RF power. In addition a description of the power failures and their associated operating conditions is presented. The PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads have been developed. Best-case lifetimes of 1010 cycles have been achieved in several switches from different lots under 30 dbm RF power.

  15. Lifetime characterization of capacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Afshin; Dean, Thierry; Mancuso, Yves

    2005-05-01

    RF MEMS switches provide a low-cost, high performance solution to many RF/microwave applications and these switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, switched filters and reflector array antennas for military and commercial markets. In this paper, progress in characterizing of THALES capacitive MEMS devices under high RF power is presented. The design, fabrication and testing of capacitive RF MEMS switches for microwave/mm- wave applications on high-resistivity silicon substrate is presented. The switches tested demonstrated power handling capabilities of 1W (30 dbm) for continuous RF power. The reliability of these switches was tested at various power levels indicating that under continuous RF power. In addition a description of the power failures and their associated operating conditions is presented. The PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads have been developed. Best-case lifetimes of 1010 cycles have been achieved in several switches from different lots under 30 dbm RF power.

  16. Lifetime characterization of capacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Afshin; Dean, Thierry; Polizzi, Jean-Philippe

    2005-01-01

    RF MEMS switches provide a low-cost, high performance solution to many RF/microwave applications and these switches will be important building blocks for designing phase shifters, switched filters and reflector array antennas for military and commercial markets. In this paper, progress in characterizing of THALES capacitive MEMS devices under high RF power is presented. The design, fabrication and testing of capacitive RF MEMS switches for microwave/mm- wave applications on high-resistivity silicon substrate is presented. The switches tested demonstrated power handling capabilities of 1W (30 dbm) for continuous RF power. The reliability of these switches was tested at various power levels indicating that under continuous RF power. In addition a description of the power failures and their associated operating conditions is presented. The PC-based test stations to cycle switches and measure lifetime under DC and RF loads have been developed. Best-case lifetimes of 1010 cycles have been achieved in several switches from different lots under 30 dbm RF power.

  17. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid factor (RF) is a blood test that measures the amount of the RF antibody in the blood. ... these conditions still have a "normal" or low RF. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different ...

  18. Determination of the number density of excited and ground Zn atoms during rf magnetron sputtering of ZnO target

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Gangwar, R. K.; Stafford, L.

    2015-07-15

    A combination of optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS) and optical emission spectroscopy measurements was used to monitor the number density of Zn atoms in excited 4s4p ({sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable states as well as in ground 4s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) state in a 5 mTorr Ar radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering plasma used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. OAS measurements revealed an increase by about one order of magnitude of Zn {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable atoms by varying the self-bias voltage on the ZnO target from −115 to −300 V. Over the whole range of experimental conditions investigated, the triplet-to-singlet metastable density ratio was 5 ± 1, which matches the statistical weight ratio of these states in Boltzmann equilibrium. Construction of a Boltzmann plot using all Zn I emission lines in the 200–500 nm revealed a constant excitation temperature of 0.33 ± 0.04 eV. In combination with measured populations of Zn {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable atoms, this temperature was used to extrapolate the absolute number density of ground state Zn atoms. The results were found to be in excellent agreement with those obtained previously by actinometry on Zn atoms using Ar as the actinometer gas [L. Maaloul and L. Stafford, J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 31, 061306 (2013)]. This set of data was then correlated to spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements of the deposition rate of Zn atoms on a Si substrate positioned at 12 cm away from the ZnO target. The deposition rate scaled linearly with the number density of Zn atoms. In sharp contrast with previous studies on RF magnetron sputtering of Cu targets, these findings indicate that metastable atoms play a negligible role on the plasma deposition dynamics of Zn-based coatings.

  19. Double rf system for bunch shortening

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1990-11-01

    It was suggested by Zisman that the combination of the two systems (double rf system) may be more effective to shorten a bunch, compromising between the desirable and the undesirable effects mentioned above. In this paper, we demonstrate that a double rf system is, in fact, quite effective in optimizing the rf performance. The parameters used are explained, and some handy formulae for bunch parameters are derived. We consider an example of bunch shortening by adding a higher-harmonic rf system to the main rf system. The parameters of the main rf system are unchanged. The double rf system, however, can be used for another purpose. Namely, the original bunch length can be obtained with a main rf voltage substantially lower than for a single rf system without necessitating a high-power source for the higher-harmonic cavities. Using a double rf system, the momentum acceptance remains large enough for ample beam lifetime. Moreover, the increase in nonlinearity of the rf waveform increases the synchrotron tune spread, which potentially helps a beam to be stabilized against longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities. We will show some examples of this application. We discuss the choice of the higher-harmonic frequency.

  20. The dependence of the sporicidal effects on the power and pressure of RF-generated plasma processes.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Klaus S; Nordby, Bolette; Grün, Reinar

    2005-07-01

    The sporicidal effect of 20 different radio-frequency plasma processes produced by combining five different gas mixtures [O(2), Ar/H(2) (50/50%), Ar/H(2) (5/95%), O(2)/H(2) (50/50%), O(2)/H(2) (95/5%)] with four power/pressure settings were tested. Sporicidal effects of oxygen-containing plasmas were dependent on power at low pressure settings but not at high pressure settings. In the absence of oxygen no power dependency was observed at either high or low pressure settings. Survivor curves obtained with the use of nonoxygen plasmas typically had a tailing tendency. Only a mixture-optimized Ar/H(2) (15/85%) plasma process was not encumbered by tailing, and produced a decimal reduction time (D value) below 2 min for Bacillus stearothermophilus spores. Scanning electron microscopy showed that a CF(4)/O(2) plasma did more damage to the substrate than the 15/85% Ar/H(2) plasma. The present results indicate that UV irradiation inactivation is swift and power and pressure independent. Additionally, it is produced at low energy. However, it is not complete. Inactivation through etching is highly power and pressure dependent; finally, inactivation by photodesorption is moderately power and pressure dependent. A sterilization process relying on this mechanism is very advantageous because it combines a highly sporicidal effect with low substrate damage. PMID:15765503

  1. THE DESIGN OF AN RF ANTENNA FOR A LARGE-BORE, HIGH POWER, STEADY STATE PLASMA PROCESSING CHAMBER FOR MATERIAL SEPARATION - CRADA FINAL REPORT for CRADA Number ORNL00-0585

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D. A.; Freeman, R. L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  2. A no-load RF calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The described device can be used to measure the output of any dc powered RF source. No dummy load is required for the measurements. The device is, therefore, called the 'no-load calorimeter' (NLC). The NLC measures the power actually fed to the antenna or another useful load. It is believed that the NLC can compete successfully with directional coupler type systems in measuring the output of high-power RF sources.

  3. CMOS-compatible RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakamraju, Narendra V.; Kim, Bruce; Phillips, Stephen M.

    2004-08-01

    Mobile technologies have relied on RF switches for a long time. Though the basic function of the switch has remained the same, the way they have been made has changed in the recent past. In the past few years work has been done to use MEMS technologies in designing and fabricating an RF switch that would in many ways replace the electronic and mechanical switches that have been used for so long. The work that is described here is an attempt to design and fabricate an RF MEMS switch that can handle higher RF power and have CMOS compatible operating voltages.

  4. A LOW NOISE RF SOURCE FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HAYES,T.

    2004-07-05

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires a low noise rf source to ensure that beam lifetime during a store is not limited by the rf system. The beam is particularly sensitive to noise from power line harmonics. Additionally, the rf source must be flexible enough to handle the frequency jump required for rebucketing (transferring bunches from the acceleration to the storage rf systems). This paper will describe the design of a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) based system that provides both the noise performance and the flexibility required.

  5. Sheath voltage ratio for asymmetric rf discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, M.V.; Lieberman, M.A.; Vahedi, V.; Birdsall, C.K. Department of Computer Sciences and the Electronics Research Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 )

    1991-04-01

    Spherical and cylindrical many-particle models are used to simulate rf (radio frequency) discharges in which the rf powered and the grounded electrodes have different areas. This asymmetry determines the magnitude of the average plasma-to-electrode voltage {ital V}{sub {ital a}} (the ion bombarding energy) at the smaller powered electrode, which is a critical process parameter. A collisionless uniform ionization discharge model predicts that the voltage ratio {ital V}{sub {ital a}}/{ital V}{sub {ital b}} scales as the fourth power of the electrode area ratio {ital A}{sub {ital b}}/{ital A}{sub {ital a}}, where {ital V}{sub {ital b}} is the potential drop at the other electrode. However, measurements indicate a much weaker dependence of {ital V}{sub {ital a}}/{ital V}{sub {ital b}} on the area ratio, which is also observed in our simulations. Over a limited range of area ratios it was found that the power dependence was close to one, in agreement with a local ionization discharge model. The simulation codes used are PDC1 (plasma device cylindrical one-dimensional) and PDS1 (plasma device spherical one-dimensional).

  6. Fast switching, modular high-voltage DC/AC-power supplies for RF-Amplifiers and other applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alex, J.; Schminke, W.

    1995-12-31

    A new kind of high voltage high-power Pulse-Step Modulator (PSM) for broadcast transmitters, accelerator sources, for NBI (Neutral Beam Injection for Plasma Heating), gyrotrons and klystrons has been developed. Since its first introduction in 1984 for broadcast transmitters, more than 100 high-power sound broadcast transmitters had been equipped with the first generation of the PSM modulators, using Gate Turn-Off Thyristors (GTOs) as switching elements. Recently, due to faster switching elements and making use of the latest DSP technologies (Digital Signal Processing), the performance data and areas of application could be extended further. In 1994, a precision high voltage source for MW gyrotrons was installed at CRPP in Lausanne. Supplementary very low cost solutions for lower powers but high voltages had been developed. Hence, today, a large area of applications can be satisfied with the family of solutions. The paper describes the principle of operation, the related control systems and refers to some particular applications of the PSM amplifiers, especially the newest developments and corresponding field results.

  7. Power of a determinant with two physical applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Louck, James D.

    1999-01-01

    An expression formore » the k th power of an n × n determinant in n 2 indeterminates ( z i j ) is given as a sum of monomials. Two applications of this expression are given: the first is the Regge generating function for the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients of the unitary group S U ( 2 ) , noting also the relation to the   3   F 2 hypergeometric series; the second is to the even powers of the Vandermonde determinant, or, equivalently, all powers of the discriminant. The second result leads to an interesting map between magic square arrays and partitions and has applications to the wave functions describing the quantum Hall effect. The generalization of this map to arbitrary square arrays of nonnegative integers, having given row and column sums, is also given.« less

  8. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  9. Electrical characterization of rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.

    1991-08-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) electrical sources are commonly used to generate plasmas for processing of industrial materials and for related experimental work. Published descriptions of such plasmas usually include generator-power measurements, and occasionally include plasma dc-bias measurements. One or both of these quantitites are also used in industrial feedback ccontrol systems for setpoint regulation. Recent work at Sandia an elsewhere with an experimental rf discharge device (the GEC RF Reference Cell'') has shown that power and dc-bias levels are often insufficient information for specifying the state of the plasma. The plasma can have nonlinear electrical characteristics that cause harmonic generation, and the harmonic levels can depend sensitively on the impedance of the external circuitry at harmonic frequencies. Even though the harmonics may be low in amplitude, they can be directly related to large changes in plasma power and to changes in optical emission from the plasma. Consequently, in order for a worker to truly master the plasma-generation process, it is necessary to understand, measure, and control electrical characteristics of the plamsa. In this paper we describe technique that have been developed from work with the Reference Cell for making electrical measurements on rf plasmas, and we describe surprising observations of harmonic behavior. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K K

    2016-08-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday's law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops. PMID:27587114

  11. Scaling of divertor power footprint width in RF-heated type-III ELMy H-mode on the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Guo, H. Y.; Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C.; Gan, K. F.; Wang, H. Q.; Gong, X. Z.; Liang, Y.; Zou, X. L.; Hu, J. S.; Chen, L.; Xu, J. C.; Liu, J. B.; Yan, N.; Zhang, W.; Chen, R.; Shao, L. M.; Ding, S.; Hu, G. H.; Feng, W.; Zhao, N.; Xiang, L. Y.; Liu, Y. L.; Li, Y. L.; Sang, C. F.; Sun, J. Z.; Wang, D. Z.; Ding, H. B.; Luo, G. N.; Chen, J. L.; Gao, X.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J.; the EAST Team

    2014-11-01

    Dedicated experiments for the scaling of divertor power footprint width have been performed in the ITER-relevant radio-frequency (RF)-heated H-mode scheme under the lower single null, double null and upper single null divertor configurations in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) under lithium wall coating conditioning. A strong inverse scaling of the edge localized mode (ELM)-averaged power fall-off width with the plasma current (equivalently the poloidal field) has been demonstrated for the attached type-III ELMy H-mode as λq \\propto Ip-1.05 by various heat flux diagnostics including the divertor Langmuir probes (LPs), infra-red (IR) thermograph and reciprocating LPs on the low-field side. The IR camera and divertor LP measurements show that λq,IR ≈ {λq,div{-LPs}}/{1.3}=1.15Bp,omp-1.25 , in good agreement with the multi-machine scaling trend during the inter-ELM phase between type-I ELMs or ELM-free enhanced Dα (EDA). H-mode. However, the magnitude is nearly doubled, which may be attributed to the different operation scenarios or heating schemes in EAST, i.e., dominated by electron heating. It is also shown that the type-III ELMs only broaden the power fall-off width slightly, and the ELM-averaged width is representative for the inter-ELM period. Furthermore, the inverse Ip (Bp) scaling appears to be independent of the divertor configurations in EAST. The divertor power footprint integral width, fall-off width and dissipation width derived from EAST IR camera measurements follow the relation, λint ≅ λq + 1.64S, yielding λ_intEAST =(1.39+/- 0.03)λqEAST +(0.97+/- 0.35) mm . Detailed analysis of these three characteristic widths was carried out to shed more light on their extrapolation to ITER.

  12. Design of RF MEMS switches without pull-in instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, W. Cyrus; Richards, Gregory P.; Shen, Chongyi; Skorczewski, Tyler; Wang, Min; Zhang, Jingyan; Zhong, Peng; Massad, Jordan E.; Smith, Ralph

    2010-04-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) switches for radio-frequency (RF) signals have certain advantages over solid-state switches, such as lower insertion loss, higher isolation, and lower static power dissipation. Mechanical dynamics can be a determining factor for the reliability of RF MEMS. The RF MEMS ohmic switch discussed in this paper consists of a plate suspended over an actuation pad by four double-cantilever springs. Closing the switch with a simple step actuation voltage typically causes the plate to rebound from its electrical contacts. The rebound interrupts the signal continuity and degrades the performance, reliability and durability of the switch. The switching dynamics are complicated by a nonlinear, electrostatic pull-in instability that causes high accelerations. Slow actuation and tailored voltage control signals can mitigate switch bouncing and effects of the pull-in instability; however, slow switching speed and overly-complex input signals can significantly penalize overall system-level performance. Examination of a balanced and optimized alternative switching solution is sought. A step toward one solution is to consider a pull-in-free switch design. In this paper, determine how simple RC-circuit drive signals and particular structural properties influence the mechanical dynamics of an RF MEMS switch designed without a pull-in instability. The approach is to develop a validated modeling capability and subsequently study switch behavior for variable drive signals and switch design parameters. In support of project development, specifiable design parameters and constraints will be provided. Moreover, transient data of RF MEMS switches from laser Doppler velocimetry will be provided for model validation tasks. Analysis showed that a RF MEMS switch could feasibly be designed with a single pulse waveform and no pull-in instability and achieve comparable results to previous waveform designs. The switch design could reliably close in a timely

  13. rf coupler technology for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Radio frequency (rf) oscillations at critical frequencies have successfully provided a means to convey power to fusion plasmas due to the electrical-magnetic properties of the plasma. While large rf systems to couple power to the plasma have been designed, built, and tested, the main link to the plasma, the coupler, is still in an evolutionary stage of development. Design and fabrication of optimal antennas for fusion applications are complicated by incomplete characterizations of the harsh plasma environment and of coupling mechanisms. A brief description of rf coupler technology required for plasma conditions is presented along with an assessment of the status and goals of coupler development.

  14. Visualizing strain and the Rf- Φ method with an interactive computer program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabinos, Paul; Warren, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The Rf- Φ method is a powerful graphical approach for estimating finite strain of deformed elliptical objects, but one that students commonly find difficult to understand. We developed a program that allows users to explore visually how deforming a set of elliptical objects appears on Rf- Φ plots. A user creates or loads the ellipses and then deforms them by simple shear, pure shear, or rigid rotation. As the ratio of the long to short axis of the ellipses ( Rf) and long-axis orientations ( Φ) change in one window, the Rf- Φ plot continuously and instantaneously updates in another. Users can save snapshots of the deformed elliptical objects and the Rf- Φ plots to record graphical experiments. The program provides both Rf vs. Φ and polar ln( Rf) vs. 2( Φ) plots. The user can 'undeform' ellipses quickly and easily, making it possible to inspect the 'original' shapes and orientations of objects, and to evaluate the plausibility of the determined strain values. Users can export information about the pebbles' shape and orientation to spreadsheets for rigorous statistical analysis. This program is written in Java and so can run on virtually any operating system. Both the source code and the application will be freely available for academic purposes.

  15. Control of the RF waveform at the chuck of an industrial oxide-etch reactor

    SciTech Connect

    BERRY,LEE; MAYNARD,HELEN; MILLER,PAUL A.; MOORE,TONY; PENDLEY,MICHAEL; RESTA,VICTORIA; SPARKS,DENNIS; YANG,QUINGYUN

    2000-05-04

    Radio frequency (rf) power is applied to the chuck of a high-density plasma reactor in order to extract ions and to control the energy of the ions used for the fabrication of microelectronic devices. In many cases, the temporal shape of the rf waveform largely determines the shape of the spectrum of those extracted ions, thereby strongly affecting feature evolution. Using auxiliary rf circuits the authors successfully made major changes to the rf potential waveform at the chuck of an Applied Materials 5300 HDP Omega reactor without affecting the normal functioning of the reactor's control systems. This work established the practical feasibility of techniques for modifying the ion energy distribution functions of industrial reactors.

  16. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  17. Proposed RF Breakdown Studies at the AWA

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Spentzouris, L.; Yusof, Z.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    A study of breakdown mechanism has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. We plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV) to determine the role of explosive electron emission in the breakdown process. Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector [1] that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after the breakdown can shed some light on a number of observations such as the crater formation process.

  18. Surface and optical properties of indium tin oxide layer deposition by RF magnetron sputtering in argon atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudar, H. Hakan; Korkmaz, Şadan; Özen, Soner; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat

    2016-08-01

    This study focused on the characterization and properties of transparent and conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films deposited in argon atmosphere. ITO thin films were coated onto glass substrates by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique at 75 and 100 W RF powers. Structural characteristics of producing films were investigated through X-ray diffraction analysis. UV-Vis spectrophotometer and interferometer were used to determine transmittance, absorbance and reflectance values of samples. The surface morphology of the films was characterized by atomic force microscope. The calculated band gaps were 3.8 and 4.1 eV for the films at 75 and 100 W, respectively. The effect of RF power on crystallinity of prepared films was explored using mentioned analysis methods. The high RF power caused higher poly crystallinity in the produced samples. The thickness and refractive index values for all samples increased respect to an increment of RF power and were calculated as 20, 50 nm and 1.71, 1.86 for samples at 75 and 100 W, respectively. Finally, the estimated grain sizes for all prepared films decreased with increasing of 2 θ degrees, and the number of crystallite per unit volume was calculated. It was found that nearly all properties including sheet resistance and resistivity depend on the RF power.

  19. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, R. E.; Sebastian, T.

    2013-12-01

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps.

  20. Determination of modeling parameters for power IGBTs under pulsed power conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Van Gordon, Jim A; Kovaleski, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    While the power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGRT) is used in many applications, it is not well characterized under pulsed power conditions. This makes the IGBT difficult to model for solid state pulsed power applications. The Oziemkiewicz implementation of the Hefner model is utilized to simulate IGBTs in some circuit simulation software packages. However, the seventeen parameters necessary for the Oziemkiewicz implementation must be known for the conditions under which the device will be operating. Using both experimental and simulated data with a least squares curve fitting technique, the parameters necessary to model a given IGBT can be determined. This paper presents two sets of these seventeen parameters that correspond to two different models of power IGBTs. Specifically, these parameters correspond to voltages up to 3.5 kV, currents up to 750 A, and pulse widths up to 10 {micro}s. Additionally, comparisons of the experimental and simulated data will be presented.

  1. Reliability and availability considerations in the RF systems of ATW-class accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallerico, Paul J.; Lynch, Michael T.; Lawrence, George

    1995-09-01

    In an RF-driven, ion accelerator for waste transmutation or nuclear material production, the overall availability is perhaps the most important specification. The synchronism requirements in an ion accelerator, as contrasted to an electron accelerator, cause a failure of an RF source to have a greater consequence. These large machines also are major capital investments, so the availability determines the return on this capital. RF system design methods to insure a high availability without paying a serious cost penalty are the subject of this paper. The overall availability goal in our present designs is 75% for the entire ATW complex, and from 25 to 35% of the unavailability is allocated to the RF system, since it is one of the most complicated subsystems in the complex. The allowed down time for the RF system (including the linac and all other subsystems) is then only 7 to 9% of the operating time per year, or as little as 613 hours per year, for continuous operation. Since large accelerators consume large amounts of electrical power, excellent efficiency is also required with the excellent availability. The availability also influences the sizes of the RF components: smaller components may fail and yet the accelerator may still meet all specifications. Larger components are also attractive, since the cost of an RF system usually increases as the square root of the number of RF systems utilized. In some cases, there is a reliability penalty that accompanies the cost savings from using larger components. We discuss these factors, and present an availability model that allows one to examine these trade offs, and make rational choices in the RF and accelerator system designs.

  2. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  3. High Power Beam Test and Measurement of Emittance Evolution of a 1.6-Cell Photocathode RF Gun at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Ho; Park, Sung-Ju; Kim, Changbum; Parc, Yong-Woon; Hong, Ju-Ho; Huang, Jung-Yun; Xiang, Dao; Wang, Xijie; Ko, In Soo

    2007-04-01

    A Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) GUN-IV type photocathode rf gun has been fabricated to use in femtosecond electron diffraction (FED), femtosecond far infrared radiation (fs-FIR) facility, and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). The gun consists of a 1.6-cell cavity with a copper cathode, a solenoid magnet, beam diagnostic components and auxiliary systems. We report here the measurement of the basic beam parameters which confirm a successful fabrication of the photocathode RF gun system. The emittance evolution is measured by an emittance meter and compared with the PARMELA simulation, which shows a good agreement.

  4. Matching network for RF plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Pickard, Daniel S.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2007-11-20

    A compact matching network couples an RF power supply to an RF antenna in a plasma generator. The simple and compact impedance matching network matches the plasma load to the impedance of a coaxial transmission line and the output impedance of an RF amplifier at radio frequencies. The matching network is formed of a resonantly tuned circuit formed of a variable capacitor and an inductor in a series resonance configuration, and a ferrite core transformer coupled to the resonantly tuned circuit. This matching network is compact enough to fit in existing compact focused ion beam systems.

  5. Si-based RF MEMS components.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Baker, Michael Sean; Fleming, James Grant; Stewart, Harold D.; Dyck, Christopher William

    2005-01-01

    Radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) are an enabling technology for next-generation communications and radar systems in both military and commercial sectors. RF MEMS-based reconfigurable circuits outperform solid-state circuits in terms of insertion loss, linearity, and static power consumption and are advantageous in applications where high signal power and nanosecond switching speeds are not required. We have demonstrated a number of RF MEMS switches on high-resistivity silicon (high-R Si) that were fabricated by leveraging the volume manufacturing processes available in the Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL), a Class-1, radiation-hardened CMOS manufacturing facility. We describe novel tungsten and aluminum-based processes, and present results of switches developed in each of these processes. Series and shunt ohmic switches and shunt capacitive switches were successfully demonstrated. The implications of fabricating on high-R Si and suggested future directions for developing low-loss RF MEMS-based circuits are also discussed.

  6. Effect of radio frequency discharge power on dusty plasma parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.

    2009-08-01

    The parameters of a two-dimensional dusty plasma consisting of six, 9 mum diameter particles trapped inside a radio frequency (rf) plasma sheath have been measured as a function of rf power in a 13.5 mtorr (1.8 Pa) argon discharge. The center-of-mass and breathing frequencies are found by projecting the cluster's Brownian motion onto the associated normal mode. The center-of-mass frequency (i.e., radial confinement) is insensitive to rf power. The Debye shielding parameter kappa, as found from the breathing frequency, increases from approx =0.5 to 2 as the square root of rf power. The Debye length decreases from approx =2.7 to 0.7 mm as the inverse of the square root of rf power. The average particle charge qapprox =-17 000e is effectively independent of rf power. These results are consistent with an electron temperature that is independent of rf power and an ion density that is directly proportional to rf power, where the Debye length is determined by the ion density in combination with the electron temperature.

  7. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012©. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  8. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  9. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  10. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  11. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

  12. Binary rf pulse compression experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.; Spalek, G.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range, to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at low-power (1-kW) and high-power (15-MW) input levels in initial testing with a TWT and a klystron. Rf pulses initially 770 nsec long have been compressed to 60 nsec. Peak power gains of 1.8 per stage, and 5.5 for three stages, have been measured. This corresponds to a peak power compression efficiency of about 90% per stage, or about 70% for three stages, consistent with the individual component losses. The principle of operation of a binary pulse compressor (BPC) is described in detail elsewhere. We recently have implemented and operated at SLAC a high-power (high-vacuum) three-stage X-band BPC. First results from the high-power three-stage BPC experiment are reported here.

  13. Single echo acquisition MRI using RF encoding.

    PubMed

    Wright, Steven M; McDougall, Mary Preston

    2009-11-01

    Encoding of spatial information in magnetic resonance imaging is conventionally accomplished by using magnetic field gradients. During gradient encoding, the position in k-space is determined by a time-integral of the gradient field, resulting in a limitation in imaging speed due to either gradient power or secondary effects such as peripheral nerve stimulation. Partial encoding of spatial information through the sensitivity patterns of an array of coils, known as parallel imaging, is widely used to accelerate the imaging, and is complementary to gradient encoding. This paper describes the one-dimensional limit of parallel imaging in which all spatial localization in one dimension is performed through encoding by the radiofrequency (RF) coil. Using a one-dimensional array of long and narrow parallel elements to localize the image information in one direction, an entire image is obtained from a single line of k-space, avoiding rapid or repeated manipulation of gradients. The technique, called single echo acquisition (SEA) imaging, is described, along with the need for a phase compensation gradient pulse to counteract the phase variation contained in the RF coil pattern which would otherwise cause signal cancellation in each imaging voxel. Image reconstruction and resolution enhancement methods compatible with the speed of the technique are discussed. MR movies at frame rates of 125 frames per second are demonstrated, illustrating the ability to monitor the evolution of transverse magnetization to steady state during an MR experiment as well as demonstrating the ability to image rapid motion. Because this technique, like all RF encoding approaches, relies on the inherent spatially varying pattern of the coil and is not a time-integral, it should enable new applications for MRI that were previously inaccessible due to speed constraints, and should be of interest as an approach to extending the limits of detection in MR imaging. PMID:19441080

  14. RF current drive and plasma fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Yves; Decker, Joan; Morini, L.; Coda, S.

    2011-12-01

    The role played by electron density fluctuations near the plasma edge on rf current drive in tokamaks is assessed quantitatively. For this purpose, a general framework for incorporating density fluctuations in existing modelling tools has been developed. It is valid when rf power absorption takes place far from the fluctuating region of the plasma. The ray-tracing formalism is modified in order to take into account time-dependent perturbations of the density, while the Fokker-Planck solver remains unchanged. The evolution of the electron distribution function in time and space under the competing effects of collisions and quasilinear diffusion by rf waves is determined consistently with the time scale of fluctuations described as a statistical process. Using the ray-tracing code C3PO and the 3D linearized relativistic bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck solver LUKE, the effect of electron density fluctuations on the current driven by the lower hybrid (LH) and the electron cyclotron (EC) waves is estimated quantitatively. A thin fluctuating layer characterized by electron drift wave turbulence at the plasma edge is considered. The effect of fluctuations on the LH wave propagation is equivalent to a random scattering process with a broadening of the poloidal mode spectrum proportional to the level of the perturbation. However, in the multipass regime, the LH current density profile remains sensitive to the ray chaotic behaviour, which is not averaged by fluctuations. The effect of large amplitude fluctuations on the EC driven current is found to be similar to an anomalous radial transport of the fast electrons. The resulting lower current drive efficiency and broader current profile are in better agreement with experimental observations. Finally, applied to the ITER ELMy H-mode regime, the model predicts a significant broadening of the EC driven current density profile with the fluctuation level, which can make the stabilization of neoclassical tearing mode potentially

  15. Insulator charging in RF MEMS capacitive switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucko, Jay F.

    2005-11-01

    While capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical (RF MEM) switches are poised to provide a low cost, low power alternative to current RF switch technologies, there are still reliability issues limiting switch lifetime. Previous research identified insulator charging as a primary cause of switch failure. Changes in switch pull-in and release voltages were measured to provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for charging and switch failure. A spatial and temporal dependent model was developed to describe silicon nitride's time-dependent charging as a function of applied bias. This model was verified by applying constant biases to metal-silicon nitride-silicon capacitors and tracking flatband voltage shifts. This knowledge of silicon nitride was then applied to MEM switches. Using novel waveforms and exploiting differences in actuation characteristics allowed the determination of charging characteristics and the investigation of switch failure. Results show tunneling is responsible for changes in the pull-in voltages---this includes a super-saturation effect explained by a steady-state trap charge and discharge condition. A program that models switch actuation was enhanced to include the time-dependent tunneling model. Finally, it was discovered insulator charging cannot explain permanent switch failure; instead, stiction from a contaminant on the insulator surface is likely the cause.

  16. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  17. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G.; Sandalidis, Harilaos G.; Aletras, Anthony H.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R = 0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI.

  18. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging.

    PubMed

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G; Sandalidis, Harilaos G; Aletras, Anthony H

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R=0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI. PMID:27310429

  19. Rf System for the NLCTA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Eichner, J.; Fuller, R.W.; Gold, S.L.; Hanna, S.M.; Hoag, H.A.; Holmes, S.G.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, Theodore L.; Loewen, R.J.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.D.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, Z.; Yeremian, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    This paper describes an X-Band RF system for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator. The RF system consists of a 90 MeV injector and a 540 MeV linac. The main components of the injector are two low-Q single-cavity prebunchers and two 0.9-m-long detuned accelerator sections. The linac system consists of six 1.8-m-long detuned and damped detuned accelerator sections powered in pairs. The rf power generation, compression, delivery, distribution and measurement systems consist of klystrons, SLEDII energy compression systems, rectangular waveguides, magic-T's, and directional couplers. The phase and amplitude for each prebuncher is adjusted via a magic-T type phase shifter/attenuator. Correct phasing between the two 0.9 m accelerator sections is obtained by properly aligning the sections and adjusting two squeeze type phase shifters. Bunch phase and bunch length can be monitored with special microwave cavities and measurement systems. The design, fabrication, microwave measurement, calibration, and operation of the sub-systems and their components are briefly presented.

  20. Effects Of Pressure And Power On The Ionic Saturation Current And Self-Bias Voltage In A RF Discharge 13.56 MHz Of (SF{sub 6}, O{sub 2}) At Low Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Alim, M. M.; Zekara, M.; Henni, L.; Tadjine, R.; Lahmar, E.; Henda, K.

    2008-09-23

    In the present work, we are interested in RF plasma discharge for surface texturing in solar cells application. We then present the results of the electrical characterization of plasma reactor at low pressure (<1 Torr) in (SF{sub 6},O{sub 2}) gases mixtures at 13.56 MHz. We've particularly followed the self-bias voltage (V{sub DC}) and the density of ionic current saturation (J{sub s}) depending in various parameters of the discharge as pressure and power.

  1. MODELING AND MEASUREMENTS OF THE DUVFEL PHOTOINJECTOR CAVITY RF PROPERTIES.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSE,J.; GRAVES,W.; HEESE,R.; JOHNSON,E.; KRINSKY,S.; SHEEHY,B.

    2001-06-18

    The 1.6 cell S-band photoinjector cavity has been in operation at the DUVFEL at BNL for the past year. Initial beam measurements indicated a higher than expected emittance and beam divergence at the exit of the gun. field imbalance in the two cells was suspected, but lack of field probes in the cavity prohibited direct confirmation. A detailed SUPERFISH model was constructed of the cavity assembly. Field balance as a function of cathode plate and tuner position was determined using the model. A series of calibrated measurements of both the cavity RF properties and the delivered RF power was undertaken. Electron beam properties were also measured as function of cavity tune. Significant improvements in beam quality were achieved. The simulations and measurements are presented.

  2. Development of a dual-pulse RF driver for an S-band (= 2856 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byeong-No; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Hyungki; Ha, Jang Ho; Park, Hyung Dal; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hui Su; Buaphad, Pikad

    2016-04-01

    The radiation equipment research division of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has developed a Container Inspection System (CIS) using a Radio Frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for port security. The primary purpose of the CIS is to detect nuclear materials and explosives, as well country-specific prohibited substances, e.g., smuggled. The CIS consists of a 9/6 MeV dualenergy electron linear accelerator for distinguishing between organic and inorganic materials. The accelerator consists of an electron gun, an RF accelerating structure, an RF driver, a modulator, electromagnets, a cooling system, a X-ray generating target, X-ray collimator, a detector, and a container moving system. The RF driver is an important part of the configuration because it is the RF power source: it supplies the RF power to the accelerating structure. A unique aspect of the RF driver is that it generates dual RF power to generate dual energy (9/6 MeV). The advantage of this RF driver is that it can allow the pulse width to vary and can be used to obtain a wide range of energy output, and pulse repetition rates up to 300 Hz. For this reason, 140 W (5 MW - 9 MeV) and 37 W (3.4 MW - 6 MeV) power outputs are available independently. A high power test for 20 minutes demonstrate that stable dual output powers can be generated. Moreover, the dual power can be applied to the accelerator which has stable accelerator operation. In this paper, the design, fabrication and high power test of the RF driver for the RF electron linear accelerator (linac) are presented.

  3. 47 CFR 73.51 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by applying an appropriate factor to the input power to the last radio-frequency power amplifier.... (1) If the above formula is not appropriate for the design of the transmitter final amplifier, use a... frequency power amplifier input power. (2) If a station has not been previously in regular operation...

  4. 47 CFR 73.51 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... by applying an appropriate factor to the input power to the last radio-frequency power amplifier.... (1) If the above formula is not appropriate for the design of the transmitter final amplifier, use a... frequency power amplifier input power. (2) If a station has not been previously in regular operation...

  5. 47 CFR 73.51 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... by applying an appropriate factor to the input power to the last radio-frequency power amplifier.... (1) If the above formula is not appropriate for the design of the transmitter final amplifier, use a... frequency power amplifier input power. (2) If a station has not been previously in regular operation...

  6. 47 CFR 73.51 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... by applying an appropriate factor to the input power to the last radio-frequency power amplifier.... (1) If the above formula is not appropriate for the design of the transmitter final amplifier, use a... frequency power amplifier input power. (2) If a station has not been previously in regular operation...

  7. 47 CFR 73.51 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... by applying an appropriate factor to the input power to the last radio-frequency power amplifier.... (1) If the above formula is not appropriate for the design of the transmitter final amplifier, use a... frequency power amplifier input power. (2) If a station has not been previously in regular operation...

  8. Multi-level RF identification system

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  9. RF microalgal lipid content characterization.

    PubMed

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Taher, Hanifa; Hilal-Alnaqbi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Most conventional techniques for the determination of microalgae lipid content are time consuming and in most cases are indirect and require excessive sample preparations. This work presents a new technique that utilizes radio frequency (RF) for rapid lipid quantification, without the need for sample preparation. Tests showed that a shift in the resonance frequency of a RF open-ended coaxial resonator and a gradual increase in its resonance magnitude may occur as the lipids content of microalgae cells increases. These response parameters can be then calibrated against actual cellular lipid contents and used for rapid determination of the cellular lipids. The average duration of lipid quantification using the proposed technique was of about 1 minute, which is significantly less than all other conventional techniques, and was achieved without the need for any time consuming treatment steps. PMID:24870372

  10. Reflectometer Sensing of RF Waves in front of the HHFW antenna on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Wilgen, John B; Ryan, Philip Michael; Hanson, Gregory R; Swain, David W; Bernabei, Stefano; Greenough, Nevell; DePasquale, Steve; Phillips, Cynthia; Hosea, Joel; Wilson, Randy

    2006-01-01

    The ability to measure RF driven waves in the edge of the plasma can help to elucidate the role that surface waves and Parametric Decay Instabilities (PDI) play in RF power losses on NSTX. A microwave reflectometer has recently been modified to monitor RF plasma waves in the scrape-off layer in front of the 30 MHz High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) antenna array on NSTX. In RF heated plasmas, the plasma-reflected microwave signal exhibits 30 MHz sidebands, due to the modulation of the cutoff layer by the electrostatic component of the heating wave. Similarly, electrostatic parametric decay waves (when present) are detected at frequencies below the heating frequency, near 28, 26, MHz, separated from the heating frequency by harmonics of the local ion cyclotron frequency of about 2 MHz. In addition, a corresponding frequency matched set of decay waves is also detected near the ion cyclotron harmonics, at 2, 4, MHz. The RF plasma-wave sensing capability is useful for determination of the PDI power threshold as a function of antenna array phasing (including toroidal wavelength), outer gap spacing, and various plasma parameters such as the magnetic field and the plasma current.

  11. Reflectometer sensing of rf waves in front of the high harmonic fast wave antenna on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Wilgen, J. B.; Ryan, P. M.; Hanson, G. R.; Swain, D. W.; Bernabei, S. I.; Greenough, N.; DePasquale, S.; Phillips, C. K.; Hosea, J. C.; Wilson, J. R.

    2006-10-15

    The ability to measure rf driven waves in the edge of the plasma can help to elucidate the role that surface waves and parametric decay instabilities (PDIs) play in rf power losses on NSTX. A microwave reflectometer has recently been modified to monitor rf plasma waves in the scrape-off layer in front of the 30 MHz high harmonic fast wave antenna array on NSTX. In rf heated plasmas, the plasma-reflected microwave signal exhibits 30 MHz sidebands, due primarily to the modulation of the cutoff layer by the electrostatic component of the heating wave. Similarly, electrostatic parametric decay waves (when present) are detected at frequencies below the heating frequency, near 28, 26,... MHz, separated from the heating frequency by harmonics of the local ion cyclotron frequency of about 2 MHz. In addition, a corresponding frequency matched set of decay waves is also detected near the ion cyclotron harmonics at 2, 4,... MHz. The rf plasma-wave sensing capability is useful for determination of the PDI power threshold as a function of antenna array phasing (including toroidal wavelength), outer gap spacing, and various plasma parameters such as the magnetic field and the plasma current.

  12. Spontaneous fission of 256Rf, new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirikhin, A. I.; Yeremin, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Isaev, A. V.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Popov, Yu. A.; Sokol, E. A.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Andel, B.; Asfari, M. Z.; Gall, B.; Yoshihiro, N.; Kalaninova, Z.; Mullins, S.; Piot, J.; Stefanova, E.; Tonev, D.

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous fission properties of the short-lived neutron-deficient 256Rf nucleus produced in the complete fusion reaction with a beam of multiply charged heavy 50Ti ions from the U-400 cyclotron (FLNR, JINR) are experimentally investigated. Its half-life and decay branching ratio are measured. The average number of neutrons per spontaneous fission of 256Rf (bar v = 4.47 ± 0.09) is determined for the first time.

  13. RF tuning element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, William R. (Inventor); Lubecke, Victor M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device for tuning a circuit includes a substrate, a transmission line on the substrate that includes first and second conductors coupled to a circuit to be tuned, and a movable short-circuit for varying the impedance the transmission line presents to the circuit to be tuned. The movable short-circuit includes a dielectric layer disposed atop the transmission line and a distributed shorting element in the form of a conductive member that is configured to be slid along at least a portion of the transmission line atop the dielectric layer. The conductive member is configured to span the first and second conductors of the transmission line and to define at least a first opening that spans the two conductors so that the conductive member includes first and second sections separated by the first opening. The first and second sections of the conductive member combine with the first and second conductors of the transmission line to form first and second low impedance sections of transmission line, and the opening combines with the first and second conductors of the transmission line and the dielectric layer to form a first high impedance section of transmission line intermediate the first and second low impedance sections. Each of the first low impedance section and the first high impedance section have a length along the transmission line of approximately one-quarter wavelength, thus providing a periodic variation of transmission line impedance. That enhances reflection of rf power.

  14. High gradient RF breakdown studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa Leanne

    Higher accelerating gradients are required by future demands for TeV electron linear colliders. With higher energy comes the challenge of handling stronger electromagnetic fields in the accelerator structures and in the microwave sources that supply the power. A limit on the maximum field gradient is imposed by rf electrical breakdown. Investigating methods to achieve higher gradients and to better understand the mechanisms involved in the rf breakdown process has been the focal point of this study. A systematic series of rf breakdown experiments have been conducted at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center utilizing a transmission cavity operating in the TM020 mode. A procedure was developed to examine the high gradient section of the cavity in an electron microscope. The results have revealed that breakdown asymmetry exists between opposing high gradient surfaces. During breakdown, a plasma formation is detected localized near the surface with no visible evidence of an arc traversing the gap. These findings support the theory that high frequency rf breakdown is a single surface phenomenon. Other results from this study have shown that breakdown can occur at relatively low voltages when surface irregularities exist and along grain boundaries. A series of steps have been developed through this study that have significantly reduced the number of breakdowns that occur along grain boundaries. Testing under various vacuum conditions (10-11--10 -5 Torr) have revealed that while the breakdown threshold remained the same, the field emitted current density increased by almost two orders of magnitude. This suggests that the total field emitted current density is not the critical parameter in the initiation of high frequency vacuum breakdown. In the course of this study, microparticles were carefully tracked before and after rf processing. The outcome of this research suggests that expensive cleanroom facilities may not offer any advantage over practicing good cleaning and

  15. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  16. Perfectly matched pulsed 2MHz RF network and CW 30MHz RF matching network for the J-PARC RF-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Namekawa, Y.; Yamazaki, S.; Ohkoshi, K.; Koizumi, I.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Oguri, H.

    2013-02-01

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of an H- ion beam current of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmmṡmrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of more than 50days, a cesiated RF-driven H- ion source using a internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was developed. As similar as the SNS ion source, the 60kW pulsed 2MHz-RF and 200W CW 30MHz-RF systems are used in order to produce pulsed high-temperature 2MHz-RF plasma and CW low-temperature 30MHz-RF plasma. Each matching network for each system is composed of two vacuum variable condensers (VVCs). In order to supply pulsed 60kW-2MHz-RF power from the power supply (PS) on the ground level, a one-turn isolation transformer using FINEMET cores is installed between the PS and the J-PARC ion source. By comprehending the matching networks with the LTspice IV simulations and high- and low- power experiments and setting the parameters properly, the pulsed 2MHz-RF power up to 46 kW is successfully input to the hydrogen plasma without any misfire and with almost no reflected power.

  17. RF Processing of the Couplers for the SNS Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Y.Kang; I.E. Campisi; D. Stout; A. Vassioutchenko; M. Stirbet; M. Drury; T. Powers

    2005-07-10

    All eighty-one fundamental power couplers for the 805 MHz superconducting cavities of the SNS linac have been RF conditioned and installed in the cryomodules successfully. The couplers were RF processed at JLAB or at the SNS in ORNL: more than forty couplers have been RF conditioned in the SNS RF Test Facility (RFTF) after the first forty couplers were conditioned at JLAB. The couplers were conditioned up to 650 kW forward power at 8% duty cycle in traveling and standing waves. They were installed on the cavities in the cryomodules and then assembled with the airside waveguide transitions. The couplers have been high power RF tested with satisfactory accelerating field gradients in the cooled cavities.

  18. Traveling Wave RF Systems for Helical Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Lunin, A.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Romanov, G.; Neubauer, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Thorndahl, L.; /CERN

    2009-05-01

    The great advantage of the helical ionization cooling channel (HCC) is its compact structure that enables the fast cooling of muon beam 6-dimensional phase space. This compact aspect requires a high average RF gradient, with few places that do not have cavities. Also, the muon beam is diffuse and requires an RF system with large transverse and longitudinal acceptance. A traveling wave system can address these requirements. First, the number of RF power coupling ports can be significantly reduced compared with our previous pillbox concept. Secondly, by adding a nose on the cell iris, the presence of thin metal foils traversed by the muons can possibly be avoided. We show simulations of the cooling performance of a traveling wave RF system in a HCC, including cavity geometries with inter-cell RF power couplers needed for power propagation.

  19. Rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.; Fugitt, Jock A.

    2000-01-01

    An rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source is provided. The light source comprises a hollow, elongated chamber and at least one center conductor disposed within the hollow, elongated chamber. A portion of each center conductor extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. At least one gas capable of forming an electronically excited molecular state is contained within each center conductor. An electrical coupler is positioned concentric to the hollow, elongated chamber and the electrical coupler surrounds the portion of each center conductor that extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. A rf-power supply is positioned in an operable relationship to the electrical coupler and an impedance matching network is positioned in an operable relationship to the rf power supply and the electrical coupler.

  20. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  1. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-11-24

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a {pi} mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note [1].

  2. A Design and Performance Analysis Tool for Superconducting RF Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilcher, Th.; Simrock, S. N.; Merminga, L.; Wang, D. X.

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting rf systems are usually operated with continuous rf power or with rf pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms to maximize the overall plug power efficiency. Typical examples are CEBAF at Jefferson Lab and the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. The long pulses allow for effective application of feedback to stabilize the accelerating field in presence of microphonics, Lorentz force detuning, and fluctuations of the beam current. In this paper we describe a set of tools to be used with MATLAB and SIMULINK, which allow to analyse the quality of field regulation for a given design. The tools include models for the cavities, the rf power source, the beam, sources of field perturbations, and the rf feedback system. The rf control relevant electrical and mechanical characteristics of the cavity are described in form of time-varying state space models. The power source is modeled as a current generator and includes saturation characteristics and noise. An arbitrary time structure can be imposed on the beam current to reflect a macro-pulse stucture and bunch charge fluctuations. For rf feedback several schemes can be selected: Traditional amplitude and phase control as well as I/Q control. The choices for the feedback controller include analog or digital approaches and various choices of frequency response. Feedforward can be added to further supress repetitive errors. The results of a performance analysis of the CEBAF and the TESLA Linac rf system using these tools are presented.

  3. A design and performance analysis tool for superconducting RF systems

    SciTech Connect

    T. Schilcher; S.N. Simrock; L. Merminga; D.X. Wang

    1997-05-01

    Superconducting rf systems are usually operated with continuous rf power or with rf pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms to maximize the overall wall plug power efficiency. Typical examples are CEBAF at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) and the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. The long pulses allow for effective application of feedback to stabilize the accelerating field in presence of microphonics, Lorentz force detuning, and fluctuations of the beam current. In this paper the authors describe a set of tools to be used with MATLAB and SIMULINK, which allow to analyze the quality of field regulation for a given design. The tools include models for the cavities, the rf power source, the beam, sources of field perturbations, and the rf feedback system. The rf control relevant electrical and mechanical characteristics of the cavity are described in form of time-varying state space models. The power source is modeled as a current generator and includes saturation characteristics and noise.An arbitrary time structure can be imposed on the beam current to reflect a macro-pulse structure and bunch charge fluctuations. For rf feedback several schemes can be selected: Traditional amplitude and phase control as well as I/Q control. The choices for the feedback controller include analog or digital approaches and various choices of frequency response. Feed forward can be added to further suppress repetitive errors. The results of a performance analysis of the CEBAF and the TESLA Linac rf system using these tools are presented.

  4. Multi-Physics Analysis of the Fermilab Booster RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Awida, M.; Reid, J.; Yakovlev, V.; Lebedev, V.; Khabiboulline, T.; Champion, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    After about 40 years of operation the RF accelerating cavities in Fermilab Booster need an upgrade to improve their reliability and to increase the repetition rate in order to support a future experimental program. An increase in the repetition rate from 7 to 15 Hz entails increasing the power dissipation in the RF cavities, their ferrite loaded tuners, and HOM dampers. The increased duty factor requires careful modelling for the RF heating effects in the cavity. A multi-physic analysis investigating both the RF and thermal properties of Booster cavity under various operating conditions is presented in this paper.

  5. Measurements of the rf surface resistance of high- Tc superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program is being conducted to assess the applicability of high-{Tc} superconductors for use in high power rf and microwave devices. The program involves the measurement of the rf surface resistance of high-{Tc} samples at frequencies between 0.15 and 40 GHz and rf surface magnetic fields as high as 640 gauss. Polycrystalline samples were found to have surface resistances which increase monotonically with rf-field amplitude, saturating at high field at a few percent of the normal-state surface resistance just above {Tc}. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. 47 CFR 73.267 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... input power to the last radio-frequency power amplifier stage of the transmitter, using the following... the design of the transmitter final amplifier, use a formula specified by the transmitter manufacturer... the final amplifier stages have been modified pursuant to FCC approval, the licensee must furnish...

  7. 47 CFR 73.267 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... input power to the last radio-frequency power amplifier stage of the transmitter, using the following... the design of the transmitter final amplifier, use a formula specified by the transmitter manufacturer... the final amplifier stages have been modified pursuant to FCC approval, the licensee must furnish...

  8. 47 CFR 73.267 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... input power to the last radio-frequency power amplifier stage of the transmitter, using the following... the design of the transmitter final amplifier, use a formula specified by the transmitter manufacturer... the final amplifier stages have been modified pursuant to FCC approval, the licensee must furnish...

  9. 47 CFR 73.267 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... input power to the last radio-frequency power amplifier stage of the transmitter, using the following... the design of the transmitter final amplifier, use a formula specified by the transmitter manufacturer... the final amplifier stages have been modified pursuant to FCC approval, the licensee must furnish...

  10. 47 CFR 73.267 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... input power to the last radio-frequency power amplifier stage of the transmitter, using the following... the design of the transmitter final amplifier, use a formula specified by the transmitter manufacturer... the final amplifier stages have been modified pursuant to FCC approval, the licensee must furnish...

  11. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p < 0.01), with little difference in their exchange rate (p = 0.32). In summary, our study extends the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI. PMID:24706610

  12. Antenna technology for beamed space-power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorwich, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Based on present technology, the efficient transfer of RF power in space is feasible. However, many parameters must be taken into consideration when designing the system and the interrelationships of these parameters must also be considered. Once the distance between the orbiting spacecraft is specified and the transmit frequency is chosen, then the maximum size for the transmit and receive antennas is fixed (i.e., Rayleigh Range). Once the level of transmit power and trasmit time is specified, then the minimum number of spacecraft batteries is determined. High power RF transmission allows the satellite designer another option in the design of spacecraft power systems.

  13. Uncertainty quantification in capacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pax, Benjamin J.

    Development of radio frequency micro electrical-mechanical systems (RF MEMS) has led to novel approaches to implement electrical circuitry. The introduction of capacitive MEMS switches, in particular, has shown promise in low-loss, low-power devices. However, the promise of MEMS switches has not yet been completely realized. RF-MEMS switches are known to fail after only a few months of operation, and nominally similar designs show wide variability in lifetime. Modeling switch operation using nominal or as-designed parameters cannot predict the statistical spread in the number of cycles to failure, and probabilistic methods are necessary. A Bayesian framework for calibration, validation and prediction offers an integrated approach to quantifying the uncertainty in predictions of MEMS switch performance. The objective of this thesis is to use the Bayesian framework to predict the creep-related deflection of the PRISM RF-MEMS switch over several thousand hours of operation. The PRISM switch used in this thesis is the focus of research at Purdue's PRISM center, and is a capacitive contacting RF-MEMS switch. It employs a fixed-fixed nickel membrane which is electrostatically actuated by applying voltage between the membrane and a pull-down electrode. Creep plays a central role in the reliability of this switch. The focus of this thesis is on the creep model, which is calibrated against experimental data measured for a frog-leg varactor fabricated and characterized at Purdue University. Creep plasticity is modeled using plate element theory with electrostatic forces being generated using either parallel plate approximations where appropriate, or solving for the full 3D potential field. For the latter, structure-electrostatics interaction is determined through immersed boundary method. A probabilistic framework using generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) is used to create surrogate models to mitigate the costly full physics simulations, and Bayesian calibration and forward

  14. The RF Design of an HOM Polarized RF Gun for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Clendenin, J.E.; Colby, E.R.; Miller, R.A.; Lewellen, J.W.; /Argonne

    2006-11-15

    The ILC requires a polarized electron beam. While a highly polarized beam can be produced by a GaAs-type cathode in a DC gun of the type currently in use at SLAC, JLAB and elsewhere, the ILC injector system can be simplified and made more efficient if a GaAs-type cathode can be combined with a low emittance RF gun. Since this type of cathode is known to be extremely sensitive to vacuum contamination including back bombardment by electrons and ions, any successful polarized RF gun must have a significantly improved operating vacuum compared to existing RF guns. We present a new RF design for an L-Band normal conducting (NC) RF gun for the ILC polarized electron source. This design incorporates a higher order mode (HOM) structure, whose chief virtue in this application is an improved conductance for vacuum pumping on the cathode. Computer simulation models have been used to optimize the RF parameters with two principal goals: first to minimize the required RF power; second to reduce the peak surface field relative to the field at the cathode in order to suppress field emitted electron bombardment. The beam properties have been simulated initially using PARMELA. Vacuum and other practical issues for implementing this design are discussed.

  15. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) - Normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, CEST MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and RF irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the CEST MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work here extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (kws), with little dependence on bulk water T1, T2, RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments. PMID:21842497

  16. Computer codes for RF cavity design

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.

    1992-08-01

    In RF cavity design, numerical modeling is assuming an increasingly important role with the help of sophisticated computer codes and powerful yet affordable computers. A description of the cavity codes in use in the accelerator community has been given previously. The present paper will address the latest developments and discuss their applications to cavity toning and matching problems.

  17. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... safety. MVDDS stations in the 12.2-12.7 GHz frequency band do not operate with output powers that...

  18. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... safety. MVDDS stations in the 12.2-12.7 GHz frequency band do not operate with output powers that...

  19. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... safety. MVDDS stations in the 12.2-12.7 GHz frequency band do not operate with output powers that...

  20. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... safety. MVDDS stations in the 12.2-12.7 GHz frequency band do not operate with output powers that...

  1. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... safety. MVDDS stations in the 12.2-12.7 GHz frequency band do not operate with output powers that...

  2. Cleaning of optical surfaces by capacitively coupled RF discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, P. K. Rai, S. K.; Nayak, M.; Lodha, G. S.; Kumar, M.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Mukherjee, C.

    2014-04-24

    In this paper, we report cleaning of carbon capped molybdenum (Mo) thin film by in-house developed radio frequency (RF) plasma reactor, at different powers and exposure time. Carbon capped Mo films were exposed to oxygen plasma for different durations at three different power settings, at a constant pressure. After each exposure, the thickness of the carbon layer and the roughness of the film were determined by hard x-ray reflectivity measurements. It was observed that most of the carbon film got removed in first 15 minutes exposure. A high density layer formed on top of the Mo film was also observed and it was noted that this layer cannot be removed by successive exposures at different powers. A significant improvement in interface roughness with a slight improvement in top film roughness was observed. The surface roughness of the exposed and unexposed samples was also confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements.

  3. An Inexpensive and Programmable RF Transmitter Setup for Two-coil CASL

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qin; Glielmi, Christopher; Zhou, Lei; Choi, Kisueng; Hu, Xiaoping

    2009-01-01

    An inexpensive and programmable RF transmitter for two-coil continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) system is presented in this paper. While previous implementations of two-coil CASL require the expensive MR RF instruments, the present design utilizes a low-cost system on chip direct digital synthesizer and a mini-size communication RF power amplifier to generate the labeling RF waveform without sacrificing RF performance. Compared with a single RF channel two-coil CASL approach, this design requires minimal scanner hardware modifications. Moreover, this design offers a programmable interface for easy sequence setup and debugging. Performance and ease of use are validated experimentally. PMID:19830266

  4. Reducing the Heat Load on the LCLS 120 Hz RF Gun with RF Pulse Shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.

    2005-01-31

    The LCLS injector must operate at 120 Hz repetition frequency but to date the maximum operating frequency of an S-band rf gun has been 50 Hz. The high fields desired for the LCLS gun operation limit the repetition frequency due to thermal expansion causing rf detuning and field redistribution. One method of addressing the thermal loading problem is too reduce the power lost on the cavity walls by properly shaping the rf pulse incident on the gun. The idea is to reach the steady state field value in the gun faster than the time constant of the gun would allow when using a flat incident rf pulse. By increasing the incident power by about a factor of three and then decreasing the incident power when the field reaches the desired value in the gun, the field build up time can be decreased by more than a factor of three. Using this technique the heat load is also decreased by more than a factor of three. In addition the rf coupling coefficient can be increased from the typical critically coupled designs to an overcoupled design which also helps reduce the field build up time. Increasing the coupling coefficient from 1 to 2 reduces the heat load by another 25% and still limits the reflected power and coupling hole size to manageable levels.

  5. RF Driven Multicusp H- Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.; DeVries, G.J.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Hamm, R.W.; Hauck, C.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; McDonald, D.S.; Williams, M.D.

    1990-06-01

    An rf driven multicusp source capable of generating 1-ms H{sup -} beam pulses with a repetition rate as high as 150 Hz has been developed. This source can be operated with a filament or other types of starter. There is almost no lifetime limitation and a clean plasma can be maintained for a long period of operation. It is demonstrated that rf power as high as 25 kW could be coupled inductively to the plasma via a glass-coated copper-coil antenna. The extracted H{sup -} current density achieved is about 200 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  6. Calculation of rf current drive in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2008-11-01

    The toroidal plasma current is a key parameter for controlling MHD stability and fusion performances in tokamaks. Among the various methods for driving current, rf waves are a flexible and powerful tool. Therefore, their role in the design and optimization of advanced scenarios is considerable. The universal ray-tracing code C3PO coupled with the fully implicit linearized 3-D bounce-averaged relativistic electron Fokker-Planck solver LUKE is an illustration of the present day effort for performing fast and realistic calculations of the rf driven plasma current. The versatility of this tool is highlighted by simulations concerning the lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves.

  7. Role of the C-terminal domains of rice (Oryza sativa L.) bZIP proteins RF2a and RF2b in regulating transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Shunhong; Beachy, Roger N.

    2007-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) transcription factors RF2a and RF2b are bZIP (basic leucine zipper) proteins that interact with, and activate transcription from the RTBV (rice tungro bacilliform virus) promoter. Here we characterize the C-terminal domains of RF2a and RF2b: these domains are rich in glutamine and proline/glutamine, respectively. Affinity pull-down assays demonstrated that the C-terminal domains of RF2a and RF2b can associate to form either homodimers or heterodimers; however, they do not interact with other domains of RF2a or RF2b. Results of in vitro transcription assays using a rice whole-cell extract demonstrate that the C-terminal domains of both RF2a and RF2b activate transcription from the RTBV promoter. In addition, dimerization of the RF2a C-terminal domain is involved in regulating the transcription activation function of RF2a. The predicted helical region within the RF2a C-terminal glutamine-rich domain was determined to be involved in inter-molecular dimerization, and contributed to the regulatory functions of RF2a in these assays. PMID:17371296

  8. Modulator considerations for the SNS RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Reass, W.A.

    1998-12-31

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an intense neutron source for neutron scattering experiments. The project is in the research stage, with construction funding beginning next year. The SNS is comprised of an ion source, a 1,000 MeV, H{sup {minus}} linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, a neutron producing target, and experimental area to utilize the scattering of the neutrons. The linear accelerator is RF driven, and the peak beam current is 27 mA and the beam duty factor is 5.84%. The peak RF power required is 104 MW, and the H{sup {minus}} beam pulse length is 0.97 ms at a 60 Hz repetition rate. The RF pulses must be about 0.1 ms longer than the beam pulses, due to the Q of the accelerating cavities, and the time required to establish control of the cavity fields. The modulators for the klystrons in this accelerator are discussed in this paper. The SNS is designed to be expandable, so the beam power can be doubled or even quadrupled in the future. One of the double-power options is to double the beam pulse length and duty factor. The authors are specifying the klystrons to operate in this twice-duty-factor mode, and the modulator also should be expandable to 2 ms pulses at 60 Hz. Due to the long pulse length and low RF frequency of 805 MHz, the klystron power is specified at 2.5 MW peak, and the RF system will have 56 klystrons at 805 MHz, and three 1.25 MW peak power klystrons at 402.5 MHz for the low energy portion of the accelerator. The low frequency modulators are conventional floating-deck modulation anode control systems.

  9. RUGGED CERAMIC WINDOW FOR RF APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MIKE NEUBAUER

    2012-11-01

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  10. Rugged Ceramic Window for RF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Michael; Johnson, Rolland P.; Rimmer, Robert; Elliot, Tom; Stirbet, Mircea

    2009-05-04

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  11. Analysis of a Mars-stationary orbiting microwave power transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Kenwyn J.

    1990-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of providing efficient RF power transmission from a Mars-stationary orbit to the surface of the planet, an assessment was made focussing on RF propagation in the 2.45- to 300-GHz range. The proposed orbiting system configuration provides for power generation by either photovoltaic array or nuclear reactor, the conversion of the dc output to RF, and subsequent propagation of RF energy from the orbiting array to the Martian surface. On the planet, a rectenna array will convert RF to dc power to be distributed for planetary power needs. Total efficiency of the energy conversion chain from dc to RF in orbit through RF to dc on the planetary surface was derived for several representative frequencies in the range of study. Tradeoffs between component efficiency and transmitting antenna requirements were considered for each of these frequencies. Rectenna element power density thresholds and desired received power levels were used to determine receiving antenna criteria. Recommendations are presented for research into developing technologies which may afford enhanced viability of the proposed microwave power transmission system.

  12. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2012-05-25

    We are investigating a standing wave accelerator structure that uses a rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  13. Short range RF communication for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, Daniel White (Inventor); Hershey, John Erik (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method transmitting a message over at least one of a plurality of radio frequency (RF) channels of an RF communications network is provided. The method comprises the steps of detecting a presence of jamming pulses in the at least one of the plurality of RF channels. The characteristics of the jamming pulses in the at least one of the plurality of RF channels is determined wherein the determined characteristics define at least interstices between the jamming pulses. The message is transmitted over the at least one of the plurality of RF channels wherein the message is transmitted within the interstices of the jamming pulse determined from the step of determining characteristics of the jamming pulses.

  14. Effect of rf Plasma Treatment on the Germination and Phytosanitary State of Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatova, I. I.; Azharonok, V. V.; Goncharik, S. V.; Lushkevich, V. A.; Zhukovsky, A. G.; Gadzhieva, G. I.

    2014-05-01

    Optical spectroscopic techniques are used to study the spectral and energy characteristics and to determine the gas temperature of rf discharges for treating cereal and legume seeds. It is shown that active plasma particles produce a change in the morphology of seed coats. The optimal conditions for plasma processing prior to planting, such that its biological effectiveness is greatest, are realized for a specific discharge power of ~0.35 W/cm3 and an exposure time of 5-7 min.

  15. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  16. Barrier RF Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-08

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  17. Barrier RF Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver ±7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  18. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    A. S. Hofler; P. Evtushenko; M. Krasilnikov

    2007-08-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. RF and SRF gun design is further complicated because the bunches are space charge dominated and require additional emittance compensation. A genetic algorithm has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs for Cornell* and Jefferson Lab**, and we propose studying how the genetic algorithm techniques can be applied to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize gun designs that have been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  19. 47 CFR 73.664 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... frequency amplifier stage and the transmission line meter are to be read and compared with similar readings... final radio-frequency amplifier stage of the transmitter using the following formula: Transmitter output power=Ep × Ip × F Where: Ep=DC input voltage of the final radio-frequency amplifier stage. Ip=DC...

  20. 47 CFR 73.664 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... frequency amplifier stage and the transmission line meter are to be read and compared with similar readings... final radio-frequency amplifier stage of the transmitter using the following formula: Transmitter output power=Ep × Ip × F Where: Ep=DC input voltage of the final radio-frequency amplifier stage. Ip=DC...

  1. 47 CFR 73.664 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... frequency amplifier stage and the transmission line meter are to be read and compared with similar readings... final radio-frequency amplifier stage of the transmitter using the following formula: Transmitter output power=Ep × Ip × F Where: Ep=DC input voltage of the final radio-frequency amplifier stage. Ip=DC...

  2. 47 CFR 73.664 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... frequency amplifier stage and the transmission line meter are to be read and compared with similar readings... final radio-frequency amplifier stage of the transmitter using the following formula: Transmitter output power=Ep × Ip × F Where: Ep=DC input voltage of the final radio-frequency amplifier stage. Ip=DC...

  3. 47 CFR 73.664 - Determining operating power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... frequency amplifier stage and the transmission line meter are to be read and compared with similar readings... final radio-frequency amplifier stage of the transmitter using the following formula: Transmitter output power=Ep × Ip × F Where: Ep=DC input voltage of the final radio-frequency amplifier stage. Ip=DC...

  4. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    DOEpatents

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  5. LEDA RF distribution system design and component test results

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, W.T.; Rees, D.E.; Borchert, H.L.; McCarthy, M.; Toole, L.

    1998-12-31

    The 350 MHz and 700 MHz RF distribution systems for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) have been designed and are currently being installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Since 350 MHz is a familiar frequency used at other accelerator facilities, most of the major high-power components were available. The 700 MHz, 1.0 MW, CW RF delivery system designed for LEDA is a new development. Therefore, high-power circulators, waterloads, phase shifters, switches, and harmonic filters had to be designed and built for this applications. The final Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) RF distribution systems design will be based on much of the same technology as the LEDA systems and will have many of the RF components tested for LEDA incorporated into the design. Low power and high-power tests performed on various components of these LEDA systems and their results are presented here.

  6. Flexible, reconfigurable, power efficient transmitter and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, James W. (Inventor); Zaki, Nazrul H. Mohd (Inventor); Newman, David Childress (Inventor); Bundick, Steven N. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A flexible, reconfigurable, power efficient transmitter device and method is provided. In one embodiment, the method includes receiving outbound data and determining a mode of operation. When operating in a first mode the method may include modulation mapping the outbound data according a modulation scheme to provide first modulation mapped digital data, converting the first modulation mapped digital data to an analog signal that comprises an intermediate frequency (IF) analog signal, upconverting the IF analog signal to produce a first modulated radio frequency (RF) signal based on a local oscillator signal, amplifying the first RF modulated signal to produce a first RF output signal, and outputting the first RF output signal via an isolator. In a second mode of operation method may include modulation mapping the outbound data according a modulation scheme to provide second modulation mapped digital data, converting the second modulation mapped digital data to a first digital baseband signal, conditioning the first digital baseband signal to provide a first analog baseband signal, modulating one or more carriers with the first analog baseband signal to produce a second modulated RF signal based on a local oscillator signal, amplifying the second RF modulated signal to produce a second RF output signal, and outputting the second RF output signal via the isolator. The digital baseband signal may comprise an in-phase (I) digital baseband signal and a quadrature (Q) baseband signal.

  7. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

    2003-02-24

    This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

  8. Analysis of Slice Transverse Emittance Evolution ina Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Qiang, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-17

    The slice transverse emittance of an electron beam is of critical significance for an x-ray FEL. In a photocathode RF gun, the slice transverse emittance is not only determined by the emission process, but also influenced strongly by the non-linear space charge effect. In this paper, we study the slice transverse emittance evolution in a photocathode RF gun using a simple model that includes effects of RF acceleration, focusing, and space charge force. The results are compared with IMPACT-T space charge simulations and may be used to understand the development of the slice emittance in an RF gun.

  9. Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors

    DOEpatents

    Beachy, Roger N.; Petruccelli, Silvana; Dai, Shunhong

    2007-10-02

    A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

  10. Application of the two-surface method for determining the sound power level of equipment in a power plant environment

    SciTech Connect

    Nuspl, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    The physical size and power requirements of some power plant equipment precludes any type of laboratory test for sound output, yet this information is often desired. Sound data usually is required on a free-field basis at some specified distance, or in terms of sound power level. As its name implies, the two-surface method of determining sound power level requires two enclosing measurement surfaces which are parallel to each other and are at some distance from the equipment under test. Average sound levels are determined from a series of grid measurements on each surface. These levels are derived using energy-averaging techniques and may represent overall, octave, or third-octave measurements. By calculating the difference in sound pressure levels and the area ratio of inner to outer surface, and by using information on hand (namely the inner surface area and average sound level on the inner surface), the sound power level can be calculated.

  11. Electromagnetic limits to radiofrequency (RF) neuronal telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, R. E.; Sebastian, T.

    2013-01-01

    The viability of a radiofrequency (RF) telemetry channel for reporting individual neuron activity wirelessly from an embedded antenna to an external receiver is determined. Comparing the power at the transmitting antenna required for the desired Channel Capacity, to the maximum power that this antenna can dissipate in the body without altering or damaging surrounding tissue reveals the severe penalty incurred by miniaturization of the antenna. Using both Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and thermal damage limits as constraints, and 300 Kbps as the required capacity for telemetry streams 100 ms in duration, the model shows that conventional antennas smaller than 0.1 mm could not support human neuronal telemetry to a remote receiver (1 m away.) Reducing the antenna to 10 microns in size to enable the monitoring of single human neuron signals to a receiver at the surface of the head would require operating with a channel capacity of only 0.3 bps. PMID:24346503

  12. Reduction of RF penetration effects in high field imaging.

    PubMed

    Foo, T K; Hayes, C E; Kang, Y W

    1992-02-01

    A method of correcting for the RF inhomogeneity in the body by dielectric loading of the coil-to-shield space in an RF resonator (coil and shield assembly) is described. The presence of the RF coil and RF shield have significant effects on RF homogeneity. Based on theoretical calculations, a method for adjusting the RF homogeneity by manipulating the axial propagation constant, kappa z, is proposed. This is accomplished by loading the coil-to-shield space with dielectric material of suitable relative permittivity so as to increase kappa z and decrease the radial propagation constant, kappa rho. In this manner, the radial wavelength (lambda rho = 2 pi/kappa rho) can be increased relative to the body dimensions, and the field amplitude variations in the axial plane minimized. Theoretical calculations indicate that a value of between 30 and 40 for the relative permittivity of the dielectric material in the coil-to-shield space would reduce the RF field inhomogeneity from +/- 15% to about +/- 3% over a central 30-cm-diameter region of a homogeneous 40-cm-diameter body at both 64 and 170 MHz. The theoretical model was verified in laboratory measurements of the [formula; see text] field generated in a test coil at 170 MHz which was scaled to correspond to a body at 64 MHz. However, the improved RF field homogeneity would be accompanied by increased RF power requirements and reduced coil sensitivity. PMID:1549043

  13. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.

    1997-09-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning.

  14. Determining the power performance effect from modernization of power equipment and process systems at a nuclear power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenok, L. A.; Kruglikov, P. A.; Smolkin, Yu. V.; Sokolov, K. V.

    2012-05-01

    The main stages of a calculation and experimental analysis of measures aimed at achieving better power performance of a nuclear power station and a procedure for carrying out such analysis are considered. The results of a calculated and experimental assessment of the power-performance effect from modernization of the moisture separators-steam superheaters used in turbine generators Nos. 7 and 8 of Unit 4 at the Leningrad nuclear power station are presented.

  15. Power Analysis and Sample Size Determination in Metabolic Phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Benjamin J; Correia, Gonçalo; Tin, Adrienne; Young, J Hunter; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Lewis, Matthew; Pearce, Jake T M; Elliott, Paul; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Holmes, Elaine; Ebbels, Timothy M D

    2016-05-17

    Estimation of statistical power and sample size is a key aspect of experimental design. However, in metabolic phenotyping, there is currently no accepted approach for these tasks, in large part due to the unknown nature of the expected effect. In such hypothesis free science, neither the number or class of important analytes nor the effect size are known a priori. We introduce a new approach, based on multivariate simulation, which deals effectively with the highly correlated structure and high-dimensionality of metabolic phenotyping data. First, a large data set is simulated based on the characteristics of a pilot study investigating a given biomedical issue. An effect of a given size, corresponding either to a discrete (classification) or continuous (regression) outcome is then added. Different sample sizes are modeled by randomly selecting data sets of various sizes from the simulated data. We investigate different methods for effect detection, including univariate and multivariate techniques. Our framework allows us to investigate the complex relationship between sample size, power, and effect size for real multivariate data sets. For instance, we demonstrate for an example pilot data set that certain features achieve a power of 0.8 for a sample size of 20 samples or that a cross-validated predictivity QY(2) of 0.8 is reached with an effect size of 0.2 and 200 samples. We exemplify the approach for both nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data from humans and the model organism C. elegans. PMID:27116637

  16. 40 CFR 86.129-00 - Road load power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Road load power, test weight, and... power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. Applicability. Section 86.129-94 (a) applies...) The dynamometer's power absorption shall be set for each vehicle's emission test sequence such...

  17. 40 CFR 86.129-00 - Road load power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Road load power, test weight, and... power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. Applicability. Section 86.129-94 (a) applies...) The dynamometer's power absorption shall be set for each vehicle's emission test sequence such...

  18. 40 CFR 86.129-00 - Road load power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Road load power, test weight, and... power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. Applicability. Section 86.129-94 (a) applies...) The dynamometer's power absorption shall be set for each vehicle's emission test sequence such...

  19. 40 CFR 86.129-00 - Road load power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Road load power, test weight, and... power, test weight, and inertia weight class determination. Applicability. Section 86.129-94 (a) applies...) The dynamometer's power absorption shall be set for each vehicle's emission test sequence such...

  20. Determinants of Adolescent Perceptions of Maternal and Paternal Power in the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Gerald W.

    1979-01-01

    Tests the viability of resource theory for explaining adolescent perceptions of parental power. Regression analyses support the resource theory approach. Findings show those potential determinant variables taken together are less influential for adolescent perceptions of maternal than paternal power. Parental power perceptions are not sex-linked…

  1. Booster Synchrotron RF System Upgrade for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sanghyun; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    Recent progress at the SPEAR3 includes the increase in stored current from 100 mA to 200 mA and top-off injection to allow beamlines to stay open during injection. Presently the booster injects 3.0 GeV beam to SPEAR3 three times a day. The stored beam decays to about 150 mA between the injections. The growing user demands are to increase the stored current to the design value of 500 mA, and to maintain it at a constant value within a percent or so. To achieve this goal the booster must inject once every few minutes. For improved injection efficiency, all RF systems at the linac, booster and SPEAR3 need to be phase-locked. The present booster RF system is basically a copy of the SPEAR2 RF system with 358.5 MHz and 40 kW peak RF power driving a 5-cell RF cavity for 1.0 MV gap voltage. These requirements entail a booster RF system upgrade to a scaled down version of the SPEAR3 RF system of 476.3 MHz with 1.2 MW cw klystron output power capabilities. We will analyze each subsystem option for their merits within budgetary and geometric space constraints. A substantial portion of the system will come from the decommissioned PEP-II RF stations.

  2. Preliminary analysis of problem of determining experimental performance of air-cooled turbine III : methods for determining power and efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr; Ziemer, Robert R

    1950-01-01

    Suggested formula are given for determining air-cooled turbine-performance characteristics, such as power and efficiency, as functions of certain parameters. These functions, generally being unknown, are determined from experimental data obtained from specific investigations. Special plotting methods for isolating the effect of each parameter are outlined.

  3. RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling

    DOEpatents

    Popovic, Milorad; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2012-04-17

    A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

  4. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  5. Improved RF Isolation Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. L.; Macconnell, J.

    1985-01-01

    Circuit has high reverse isolation and wide bandwidth. Wideband isolation amplifier has low intermodulation distortion and high reverse isolation. Circuit does not require selected or matched components or directional coupling device. Circuit used in applications requiring high reverse isolation such as receiver intermediate-frequency (IF) strips and frequency distribution systems. Also applicable in RF and video signaling.

  6. 18 CFR 348.1 - Content of application for a market power determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OIL PIPELINE APPLICATIONS FOR MARKET POWER DETERMINATIONS § 348.1 Content of application for a market power determination. (a) If, under § 342.4(b) of this chapter, a carrier seeks to establish that it... position and the information required by paragraph (c) of this section. (b) The carrier's statement...

  7. 18 CFR 348.1 - Content of application for a market power determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... OIL PIPELINE APPLICATIONS FOR MARKET POWER DETERMINATIONS § 348.1 Content of application for a market power determination. (a) If, under § 342.4(b) of this chapter, a carrier seeks to establish that it... position and the information required by paragraph (c) of this section. (b) The carrier's statement...

  8. 18 CFR 348.1 - Content of application for a market power determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OIL PIPELINE APPLICATIONS FOR MARKET POWER DETERMINATIONS § 348.1 Content of application for a market power determination. (a) If, under § 342.4(b) of this chapter, a carrier seeks to establish that it... position and the information required by paragraph (c) of this section. (b) The carrier's statement...

  9. Analysis of power deposition and temperature rise due to presence of an implant inside a 1.5 t MRI RF coil.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, M; Schaefers, G

    2015-08-01

    We numerically investigated power deposition and temperature rise generated due to the presence of a titanium rod placed in a phantom, located inside a 1.5 T coil. The induced power deposition and temperature rise normalized to incident tangential electric field was found to be dependent on distance to the phantom wall. The different dependence of the integral of power deposition over a box surrounded the rod and the temperature rise on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) phantom medium electrical conductivity was observed. The consequences of numerical domain simplification have been analyzed. PMID:26737609

  10. ILC RF System R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The Linac Group at SLAC is actively pursuing a broad range of R&D to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of the L-band (1.3 GHz) rf system proposed for the ILC linacs. Current activities include the long-term evaluation of a 120 kV Marx Modulator driving a 10 MW Multi-Beam Klystron, design of a second-generation Marx Modulator, testing of a sheet-beam gun and beam transport system for a klystron, construction of an rf distribution system with remotely-adjustable power tapoffs, and development of a system to combine the power from many klystrons in low-loss circular waveguide where it would be tapped-off periodically to power groups of cavities. This paper surveys progress during the past few years.

  11. Implementation equations for HS n RF pulses.

    PubMed

    Tesiram, Yasvir A

    2010-06-01

    Implementation equations for the family of stretched hyperbolic secant (HS(n)) pulses are derived in the linear adiabatic range for inversion of spins. These master equations provide convenience relations for relating the peak amplitude RF(max) of the pulse to the frequency sweep (bwdth) range of the pulse and its duration T(p). The bandwidth of the pulse can also be related to the effective coverage (bw(eff)) of the pulse to a defined or chosen spectral region. The choice of pulse determined by the use of these derived expressions guarantees uniform inversion to a prescribed efficiency across the selected spectral region. The performance of HS(n) pulses in determining the cut-off region between spectral regions was also examined. It is found that beyond a unique T(p)bwdth product no additional gain may be obtained by extending pulse durations for a chosen bwdth of pulse. An example of practical implementation of the inversion pulses is presented for adiabatic decoupling using HS(7) and HS(8) pulses. It is shown that despite added B(1) inhomogeneity in the form of additional amplifier power to 400% from optimal, these pulses can still yield reproducible decoupled spectra. PMID:20227899

  12. Simultaneous experimental determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency power-dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents owing to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis. PMID:23606428

  13. Photocathodes for RF photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelato, P.

    1997-02-01

    Over the past ten years photocathodes have been extensively used as high-brightness electron sources in RF guns. In this paper, I present a general review of the alkali-based high quantum efficiency (QE) photoemitters (e.g. Cs 3Sb, K 2CsSb and Cs 2Te), together with a comparative analysis of the different preparation procedures and the results obtained, both in the preparation chambers and in RF guns. The need to increase the photocathode reliability has provided the impetus to get an R&D activity to go over the alchemy of photocathode preparation procedure. In this paper, I will discuss the results so far obtained in different laboratories, both by using traditional investigation strategy (e.g. QE and RF behavior) and by means of surface science techniques as Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Alkali antimonides have been used at first in the RF gun due to the high QE response to the green light of the Nd:YLF second-harmonic radiation. Measurements have confirmed the high reactivity of the alkali antimonide photocathodes to the residual gases: this fact makes their use in RF guns not practical, mainly for short lifetimes. Further investigations have shown that the choice of the substratum preparation procedure and chemical composition plays a fundamental role in the photocathode performance, both from the point of view of the QE and the operative lifetime and ruggedness to gas exposition. Cesium telluride (Cs 2Te) prepared on a molybdenum substratum seems to be, nowadays, the best compromise, in terms of preparation procedure reliability and ruggedness, that now the characteristics and drawbacks of this material are well understood (e.g. the need of an UV laser source). Future possible developments will be discussed. In particular, the measurement and the control of the thermal emittance and the time response could be an important task.

  14. Recent developments in superconducting cavity RF control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simrock, Stefan

    2005-02-01

    Presently a large number of superconducting accelerators under construction or proposed impose stringent requirements on the rf control of the accelerating fields, operability, and reliability. The accelerator application range from linear colliders, UV-FELs and X-FELs, ERL based light sources, high power proton accelerators to heavy ion accelerators. Examples are TESLA and NLC, the European XFEL and Lux, the Cornell ERL based light source, the high power ERL based IR-FEL at JLAB, the neutron spallation source SNS, the heavy ion accelerator RIA, and the energy upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator at JLAB. The requirements on the rf systems range from low to high current, medium to high gradient, and relativistic to non-relativistics beam. With the technology in analog and digital electronics developing rapidly, the technology for rf feedback system is changing more and more from analog or hybrid systems towards fully digital systems. Todays DSPs and FPGAs can process sophisticated feedback algorithms on a time scale of some 100 ns to a few us with ADCs and DACs with about 100 MHz bandwidth at 14 bit and latencies less than 100 ns available to inter-face to the field detectors and field control actuators. Also fast analog multiplier technology allows for field detection and actuators for rf control with high linearity, measurement and control bandwidth while maintaining low noise levels.

  15. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C

    2010-12-13

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun [1], referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee [2]. Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  16. RF Beam Characterization Measurements on the DIII-D ECH System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, Y.; Cengher, M.; Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.; Torrezan, A.

    2015-11-01

    Optimum coupling of electron microwave radiation in a tokamak plasma requires polarization control of a high quality Gaussian rf beam. In the DIII_D installation, the polarization of the rf beam from each gyrotron is controlled by pairs of grooved mirrors located in transmission line miter bends, The polarizer mirror rotation angles are determined by using a computer model that takes into account the specifics of the transmission line geometry, tokamak magnetic field and equilibrium, the launcher mirror angles and the plasma density. The final polarization of each beam is checked with a polarization measurement at the last miter bend position using an rf power monitor with a rotatable rectangular horn or an orthomode transducer in a newly developed diagnostic miter bend. The Gaussian beam quality is determined by propagating the rf beam into free space and performing a phase retrieval analysis or by measurements using a mode sensitive directional coupler integrated into the diagnostic miter. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  17. Theoretical Predictions and Experimental Assessments of the Performance of Alumina RF Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Karen Ann Cummings

    1998-07-01

    Radio frequency (RF) windows are the most likely place for catastrophic failure to occur in input power couplers for particle accelerators. Reliable RF windows are essential for the success of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program because there are over 1000 windows on the accelerator, and it takes more than one day to recover from a window failure. The goals of this research are to analytically predict the lifetime of the windows, to develop a conditioning procedure, and to evaluate the performance of the RF windows. The analytical goal is to predict the lifetime of the windows. The probability of failure is predicted by the combination of a finite element model of the window, Weibull probabilistic analysis, and fracture mechanics. The window assembly is modeled in a finite element electromagnetic code in order to calculate the electric fields in the window. The geometry (i.e. mesh) and electric fields are input into a translator program to generate the mesh and boundary conditions for a finite element thermal structural code. The temperatures and stresses are determined in the thermal/structural code. The geometry and thermal structural results are input into another translator program to generate an input file for the reliability code. Material, geometry and service data are also input into the reliability code. To obtain accurate Weibull and fatigue data for the analytical model, four point bend tests were done. The analytical model is validated by comparing the measurements to the calculations. The lifetime of the windows is then determined using the reliability code. The analytical model shows the window has a good thermal mechanical design and that fast fracture is unlikely to occur below a power level of 9 Mw. The experimental goal is to develop a conditioning procedure and evaluate the performance of RF windows. During the experimental evaluation, much was learned about processing of the windows to improve the RF performance. Methods of

  18. Experimental determination of bone cortex holding power of orthopedic screw.

    PubMed

    Bolliger Neto, R; Rossi, J D; Leivas, T P

    1999-01-01

    Cylindrical specimens of bone measuring 15 mm in diameter were obtained from the lateral cortical layer of 10 pairs of femurs and tibias. A central hole 3.2 mm in diameter was drilled in each specimen. The hole was tapped, and a 4.5 mm cortical bone screw was inserted from the outer surface. The montage was submitted to push-out testing up to a complete strip of the bone threads. The cortical thickness and rupture load were measured, and the shear stress was calculated. The results were grouped according to the bone segment from which the specimen was obtained. The results showed that bone cortex screw holding power is dependent on the bone site. Additionally, the diaphyseal cortical bone tissue is both quantitatively and qualitatively more resistant to screw extraction than the metaphyseal tissue. PMID:10881065

  19. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    1.3 GHz RF test cell capable of operating both at high pressure and in vacuum with replaceable electrodes was designed, built, and power tested in preparation for testing the frequency and geometry effects of RF breakdown at Argonne National Lab. At the time of this report this cavity is still waiting for the 1.3 GHz klystron to be available at the Wakefield Test Facility. (3) Under a contract with Los Alamos National Lab, an 805 MHz RF test cavity, known as the All-Seasons Cavity (ASC), was designed and built by Muons, Inc. to operate either at high pressure or under vacuum. The LANL project to use the (ASC) was cancelled and the testing of the cavity has been continued under the grant reported on here using the Fermilab Mucool Test Area (MTA). The ASC is a true pillbox cavity that has performed under vacuum in high external magnetic field better than any other and has demonstrated that the high required accelerating gradients for many muon cooling beam line designs are possible. (4) Under ongoing support from the Muon Acceleration Program, microscopic surface analysis and computer simulations have been used to develop models of RF breakdown that apply to both pressurized and vacuum cavities. The understanding of RF breakdown will lead to better designs of RF cavities for many applications. An increase in the operating accelerating gradient, improved reliability and shorter conditioning times can generate very significant cost savings in many accelerator projects.

  20. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Di; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B1) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on average

  1. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on

  2. Self-generated stochastic heating in an rf discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic heating arising from the reflection of electrons from moving sheaths as an underlying mechanism for electron power deposition in r.f. discharges. We examined the dynamics of the electron collision with the sheaths in the regime in which the sheath motion is small compared to the average electron velocity to de rive a mop that describes the electron motion. We have shown that for high frequency, ({omega}/2{pi}{approx gt}50MHz), the electrons will strike the moving wall with random phase. At low pressures this stochasticity is an intrinsic property of the dynamics. The stochastic electron heating leads to a power law electron distribution. The stochastic heating was determined in both the slow sheath and fast sheath velocity regimes assuming an incident Maxwellian distribution.

  3. An Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Using RF Interrogation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Choi, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Keum Soo; Pan, Jae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel non-contact optical fiber displacement sensor. It uses a radio frequency (RF) interrogation technique which is based on bidirectional modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical modulator (MZ-EOM). The displacement is measured from the free spectral range (FSR) which is determined by the dip frequencies of the modulated MZ-EOM transfer function. In experiments, the proposed sensor showed a sensitivity of 456 kHz/mm or 1.043 kHz/V in a measurement range of 7 mm. The displacement resolution of the proposed sensor depends on the linewidth and the power of the optical source. Resolution better than 0.05 μm would be achieved if an optical source which has a linewidth narrower than 1.5 nm and a received power larger than −36 dBm is used. Also, the multiplexing characteristic of the proposed sensor was experimentally validated. PMID:26927098

  4. An Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Using RF Interrogation Technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Choi, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Keum Soo; Pan, Jae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel non-contact optical fiber displacement sensor. It uses a radio frequency (RF) interrogation technique which is based on bidirectional modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical modulator (MZ-EOM). The displacement is measured from the free spectral range (FSR) which is determined by the dip frequencies of the modulated MZ-EOM transfer function. In experiments, the proposed sensor showed a sensitivity of 456 kHz/mm or 1.043 kHz/V in a measurement range of 7 mm. The displacement resolution of the proposed sensor depends on the linewidth and the power of the optical source. Resolution better than 0.05 μm would be achieved if an optical source which has a linewidth narrower than 1.5 nm and a received power larger than -36 dBm is used. Also, the multiplexing characteristic of the proposed sensor was experimentally validated. PMID:26927098

  5. Power Requirements Determined for High-Power-Density Electric Motors for Electric Aircraft Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.

    2005-01-01

    Future advanced aircraft fueled by hydrogen are being developed to use electric drive systems instead of gas turbine engines for propulsion. Current conventional electric motor power densities cannot match those of today s gas turbine aircraft engines. However, if significant technological advances could be made in high-power-density motor development, the benefits of an electric propulsion system, such as the reduction of harmful emissions, could be realized.

  6. An improved RF circuit for Overhauser magnetometer excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Di; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-08-01

    Overhauser magnetometer is a high-precision device for magnetostatic field measurement, which can be used in a wide variety of purposes: UXO detection, pipeline mapping and other engineering and environmental applications. Traditional proton magnetometer adopts DC polarization, suffering from low polarization efficiency, high power consumption and low signal noise ratio (SNR). Compared with the traditional proton magnetometer, nitroxide free radicals are used for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). RF excitation is very important for electron resonance in nitrogen oxygen free radical solution, and it is primarily significant for the obtention of high SNR signal and high sensitive field observation. Therefore, RF excitation source plays a crucial role in the development of Overhauser magnetometer. In this paper, an improved design of a RF circuit is discussed. The new RF excitation circuit consists of two parts: Quartz crystal oscillator circuit and RF power amplifier circuit. Simulation and optimization designs for power amplifier circuit based on software ADS are presented. Finally we achieve a continuous and stable sine wave of 60MHz with 1-2.5 W output power, and the second harmonic suppression is close to -20dBc. The improved RF circuit has many merits such as small size, low-power consumption and high efficiency, and it can be applied to Overhauser magnetometer to obtain high sensitive field observation.

  7. Klystron 'efficiency loop' for the ALS storage ring RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Julian, Jim; Baptiste, Kenneth

    2002-05-20

    The recent energy crisis in California has led us to investigate the high power RF systems at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to decrease the energy consumption and power costs. We found the Storage Ring Klystron Power Amplifier system operating as designed but with significant power waste. A simple proportional-integrator (PI) analog loop, which controls the klystron collector beam current, as a function of the output RF power, has been designed and installed. The design considerations, besides efficiency improvement, were to interface to the existing system without major expense. They were to also avoid the klystron cathode power supply filter's resonance in the loop's dynamics, and prevent a conflict with the existing Cavity RF Amplitude Loop dynamics. This efficiency loop will allow us to save up to 700 MW-hours of electrical energy per year and increase the lifetime of the klystron.

  8. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra M. Bhat

    2004-06-28

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications.

  9. Accuracy of velocity and power determination by the Doppler method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottger, J.

    1984-01-01

    When designing a Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) radar antenna one has to trade between the choices to optimize the effective aperture or to optimize the sidelobe suppression. An optimization of the aperture increases the sensitivity. Suppression of side-lobes by tapering attenuates undesirable signals which spoil the estimates of reflectivity and velocity. Generally, any sidelobe effects are equivalent to a broadening of the antenna beam. The return signal is due to a product of the antenna pattern with the varying atmospheric reflectivity structures. Thus, knowing the antenna pattern, it is in principle possible to find the signal spectra, which, however, may be a tedious computational and ambiguous procedure. For vertically pointing main beams the sidelobe effects are efficiently suppressed because of the aspect sensitivity. It follows that sidelobes are a minor problem for spaced antenna methods. However, they can be crucial for Doppler methods, which need off-vertical beams. If a sidelobe is pointing towards the zenith a larger power may be received from the vertical than off-vertical directions, but quantitative estimates of this effect are not yet known. To get an error estimate of sidelobe effects with an off-vertical main beam a 1-dimensional example is considered.

  10. Superconducting cavities and modulated RF

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1981-02-01

    If a cavity has an infinite Q/sub o/, 81.5% of the energy contained in a pulse incident upon the cavity is transferred into the cavity by the end of the pulse if the cavity Q/sub e/ is chosen so that the cavity time constant is 0.796 pulse width (T/sub a/). As Q/sug o/ decreases, the energy in the cavity at the end of the pulse decreases very slowly as long as T/sub a/ is much less than the unloaded cavity time constant, T/sub co/. SC cavities with very high Q/sub o/ enable one to obtain very high gradients with a low power cw source. At high gradients, however, one often does not attain the high Q/sub o/ predicted by theory. Therefore, if one is inteerested in attaining maximum energy in the cavity, as is the case for RF processing and diagnostics, for a given available source energy there is no point in keeping the power on for longer than 0.1 T/sub co/ because the energy expended after 0.1 T/sub co/ is wasted. Therefore, to attain high fields at moderate Q/sub o/, pulsed operation is indicated. This note derives the fields and energy stored and dissipated in the cavity when Q/sub e/ is optimized for a given T/sub a/. It shows how to use this data to measure Q/sub o/ of an SC cavity as a function of field level, how to process the cavity with high RF fields, how to operate SC cavities in the pulsed mode to obtain higher efficiencies and gradients. Experimental results are also reported.

  11. Improvement in B1+ Homogeneity and Average Flip Angle Using Dual-Source Parallel RF Excitation for Cardiac MRI in Swine Hearts.

    PubMed

    Schär, Michael; Ding, Haiyan; Herzka, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac MRI may benefit from increased polarization at high magnetic field strength of 3 Tesla but is challenged by increased field inhomogeneity. Initial human studies have shown that the radiofrequency (RF) excitation field (B1+) used for signal excitation in the heart is both inhomogeneous and significantly lower than desired, potentially leading to image artifacts and biased quantitative measures. Recently, multi-channel transmit systems have been introduced allowing localized patient specific RF shimming based on acquired calibration B1+ maps. Some prior human studies have shown lower than desired mean flip angles in the hearts of large patients even after RF shimming. Here, 100 cardiac B1+ map pairs before and after RF shimming were acquired in 55 swine. The mean flip angle and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the flip angle in the heart were determined before and after RF shimming. Mean flip angle, CV, and RF shim values (power ratio and phase difference between the two transmit channels) were tested for correlation with cross sectional body area and the Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio. RF shimming significantly increased the mean flip angle in swine heart from 74.4±6.7% (mean ± standard deviation) to 94.7±4.8% of the desired flip angle and significantly reduced CV from 0.11±0.03 to 0.07±0.02 (p<1e-10 for both). These results compare well with several previous human studies, except that the mean flip angle in the human heart only improved to 89% with RF shimming, possibly because the RF shimming routine does not consider safety constraints in very large patients. Additionally, mean flip angle decreased and CV increased with larger cross sectional body area, however, the RF shimming parameters did not correlate with cross sectional body area. RF shim power ratio correlated weakly with Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio but phase difference did not, further substantiating the need for subject specific cardiac RF shimming. PMID:26436658

  12. Improvement in B1+ Homogeneity and Average Flip Angle Using Dual-Source Parallel RF Excitation for Cardiac MRI in Swine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Michael; Ding, Haiyan; Herzka, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac MRI may benefit from increased polarization at high magnetic field strength of 3 Tesla but is challenged by increased field inhomogeneity. Initial human studies have shown that the radiofrequency (RF) excitation field (B1+) used for signal excitation in the heart is both inhomogeneous and significantly lower than desired, potentially leading to image artifacts and biased quantitative measures. Recently, multi-channel transmit systems have been introduced allowing localized patient specific RF shimming based on acquired calibration B1+ maps. Some prior human studies have shown lower than desired mean flip angles in the hearts of large patients even after RF shimming. Here, 100 cardiac B1+ map pairs before and after RF shimming were acquired in 55 swine. The mean flip angle and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the flip angle in the heart were determined before and after RF shimming. Mean flip angle, CV, and RF shim values (power ratio and phase difference between the two transmit channels) were tested for correlation with cross sectional body area and the Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio. RF shimming significantly increased the mean flip angle in swine heart from 74.4±6.7% (mean ± standard deviation) to 94.7±4.8% of the desired flip angle and significantly reduced CV from 0.11±0.03 to 0.07±0.02 (p<<1e-10 for both). These results compare well with several previous human studies, except that the mean flip angle in the human heart only improved to 89% with RF shimming, possibly because the RF shimming routine does not consider safety constraints in very large patients. Additionally, mean flip angle decreased and CV increased with larger cross sectional body area, however, the RF shimming parameters did not correlate with cross sectional body area. RF shim power ratio correlated weakly with Right-Left/Anterior-Posterior ratio but phase difference did not, further substantiating the need for subject specific cardiac RF shimming. PMID:26436658

  13. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crombé, K.; Devaux, S.; D'Inca, R.; Faudot, E.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Heuraux, S.; Jacquot, J.; Louche, F.; Moritz, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  14. Versatile Low Level RF System For Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, James M.

    2011-06-01

    The Low Level RF (LLRF) system is the source of all of the rf signals required for an rf linear accelerator. These signals are amplified to drive accelerator and buncher cavities. It can even provide the synchronizing signal for the rf power for a synchrotron. The use of Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) techniques results in a versatile system that can provide multiple coherent signals at the same or different frequencies with adjustable amplitudes and phase relations. Pulsing the DDS allows rf switching with an essentially infinite on/off ratio. The LLRF system includes a versatile phase detector that allows phase-locking the rf frequency to a cavity at any phase angle over the full 360 deg. range. With the use of stepper motor driven slug tuners multiple cavity resonant frequencies can be phase locked to the rf source frequency. No external phase shifters are required and there is no feedback loop phase setup required. All that is needed is to turn the frequency feedback on. The use of Digital Signal Processing (DSP) allows amplitude and phase control over the entire rf pulse. This paper describes the basic principles of a LLRF system that has been used for both proton accelerators and electron accelerators, including multiple tank accelerators, sub-harmonic and fundamental bunchers, and synchrotrons.

  15. RF and microwave photonics in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daryoush, Afshin S.; Mu, C.; Umchid, S.; Lewin, P.

    2006-09-01

    This paper addresses various "Microwave Photonics" techniques developed for biomedical applications. The first application is using RF photonics technique for calibration of ultrasound transducers operating at high-frequencies without spatial field averaging compromise. In particular a broadband fiber-optic based hydrophone probe is reported for measurements of acoustic fields at the frequencies up to 100 MHz. The fiber probe with a tip diameter of about 8 microns provides a desirable measurement tool eliminating the need for spatial averaging corrections. Power budget calculation of the fiber sensor set-up indicated that high power (200 mW) laser source is essential to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratio. The results of the preliminary measurements allowed the probe sensitivity to be determined. Improvements to the measurement arrangements are discussed to bring this sensitivity (about 1.7mV/MPa) in line with that theoretically calculated (4.3mV/MPa). On the other hand the second application of microwave photonics is in the diffused photon near infra-red spectroscopy. A custom designed broadband NIR spectroscopy system is reported. A high-speed high power optical transmitter is designed over the frequency range from 100MHz up to 3GHz Phantom experiments are performed to extract optical parameters of a turbid media simulating a breast tissue. Both broadband and single-frequency extraction methods are used to extract optical parameters of the phantom model. The comparison shows that the achieved extraction accuracy of optical parameter (μ a, μ s') using broadband extraction method is better than the single frequency technique.

  16. The new RF sources for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Lawrence; Read, Michael; Ferguson, Patrick; Marsden, David; Collins, George; Jackson, R. H.; Bui, Thuc; Kimura, Takuji; Eisen, Edward

    2012-12-21

    Several new RF sources are being developed for accelerator and collider applications. Assembly is nearing completion of a multiple beam inductive output tube at 352 MHz. An annular beam klystron is being developed to produce 10 MW pulses at 1.3 GHz. The annular beam approach provides significant cost reduction over similar multiple beam devices. Fabrication is underway on a 10 kW, periodic permanent magnet klystron at 2.815 GHz. Permanent magnets eliminate the solenoid and associated power supplies and cooling requirements to reduce operational cost. Investigations are beginning on a novel approach for driving accelerator cavities using pulse shaping to increase coupling efficiency and dramatically reduce RF power requirements.

  17. Analysis and design of RF power and data link using amplitude modulation of Class-E for a novel bone conduction implant.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Hamidreza; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents analysis and design of a radio frequency power and data link for a novel Bone Conduction Implant (BCI) system. Patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss and single-sided deafness can be rehabilitated by bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA). Whereas the conventional hearing aids transmit sound to the tympanic membrane via air conduction, the BAHA transmits sound via vibrations through the skull directly to the cochlea. It uses a titanium screw that penetrates the skin and needs life-long daily care; it may cause skin infection and redness. The BCI is developed as an alternative to the percutaneous BAHA since it leaves the skin intact. The BCI comprises an external audio processor with a transmitter coil and an implanted unit called the bridging bone conductor with a receiver coil. Using amplitude modulation of the Class-E power amplifier that drives the inductive link, the sound signal is transmitted to the implant through the intact skin. It was found that the BCI can generate enough output force level for candidate patients. Maximum power output of the BCI was designed to occur at 5-mm skin thickness and the variability was within 1.5 dB for 1-8-mm skin thickness variations. PMID:22907959

  18. RF system considerations for large high-duty-factor linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.; Ziomek, C.D.; Tallerico, P.J.; Regan, A.H.; Eaton, L.; Lawrence, G.

    1994-09-01

    RF systems are often a major cost item for linacs, but this is especially true for large high-duty-factor linacs (up to and including CW) such as the Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) or the Accelerator for Transmutation of nuclear Waste (ATW). In addition, the high energy and high average beam current of these machines (approximately 1 GeV, 100--200 mA) leads to a need for excellent control of the accelerating fields in order to minimize the possibility of beam loss in the accelerator and the resulting activation. This paper will address the key considerations and limitations in the design of the RF system. These considerations impact the design of both the high power RF components and the RF controls. As might be expected, the two concerns sometimes lead to conflicting design requirements. For example minimum RF operating costs lead to a desire for operation near saturation of the high power RF generators in order to maximize the operating efficiency. Optimal control of the RF fields leads to a desire for maximum overdrive capability in those same generators in order to respond quickly to disturbances of the accelerator fields.

  19. Alternative RF coupling configurations for H- ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briefi, S.; Gutmann, P.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    RF heated sources for negative hydrogen ions both for fusion and accelerators require very high RF powers in order to achieve the required H- current what poses high demands on the RF generators and the RF circuit. Therefore it is highly desirable to improve the RF efficiency of the sources. This could be achieved by applying different RF coupling concepts than the currently used inductive coupling via a helical antenna, namely Helicon coupling or coupling via a planar ICP antenna enhanced with ferrites. In order to investigate the feasibility of these concepts, two small laboratory experiments have been set up. The PlanICE experiment, where the enhanced inductive coupling is going to be investigated, is currently under assembly. At the CHARLIE experiment systematic measurements concerning Helicon coupling in hydrogen and deuterium are carried out. The investigations show that a prominent feature of Helicon discharges occurs: the so-called low-field peak. This is a local improvement of the coupling efficiency at a magnetic field strength of a few mT which results in an increased electron density and dissociation degree. The full Helicon mode has not been achieved yet due to the limited available RF power and magnetic field strength but it might be sufficient for the application of the coupling concept to ion sources to operate the discharge in the low-field-peak region.

  20. Effects Of Environmental And Operational Stresses On RF MEMS Switch Technologies For Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jah, Muzar; Simon, Eric; Sharma, Ashok

    2003-01-01

    Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) have been heralded for their ability to provide tremendous advantages in electronic systems through increased electrical performance, reduced power consumption, and higher levels of device integration with a reduction of board real estate. RF MEMS switch technology offers advantages such as low insertion loss (0.1- 0.5 dB), wide bandwidth (1 GHz-100 GHz), and compatibility with many different process technologies (quartz, high resistivity Si, GaAs) which can replace the use of traditional electronic switches, such as GaAs FETS and PIN Diodes, in microwave systems for low signal power (x < 500 mW) applications. Although the electrical characteristics of RF MEMS switches far surpass any existing technologies, the unknown reliability, due to the lack of information concerning failure modes and mechanisms inherent to MEMS devices, create an obstacle to insertion of MEMS technology into high reliability applications. All MEMS devices are sensitive to moisture and contaminants, issues easily resolved by hermetic or near-hermetic packaging. Two well-known failure modes of RF MEMS switches are charging in the dielectric layer of capacitive membrane switches and contact interface stiction of metal-metal switches. Determining the integrity of MEMS devices when subjected to the shock, vibration, temperature extremes, and radiation of the space environment is necessary to facilitate integration into space systems. This paper will explore the effects of different environmental stresses, operational life cycling, temperature, mechanical shock, and vibration on the first commercially available RF MEMS switches to identify relevant failure modes and mechanisms inherent to these device and packaging schemes for space applications. This paper will also describe RF MEMS Switch technology under development at NASA GSFC.

  1. UNCERTAIN SYSTEM MODELING OF SNS RF CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    S. KWON; A. REGAN; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    This paper addresses the modeling problem of the linear accelerator RF system for SNS. The cascade of the klystron and the cavity is modeled as a nominal system. In the real world, high voltage power supply ripple, Lorentz Force Detuning, microphonics, cavity RF parameter perturbations, distortions in RF components, and loop time delay imperfection exist inevitably, which must be analyzed. The analysis is based on the accurate modeling of the disturbances and uncertainties. In this paper, a modern control theory is applied for modeling the disturbances, uncertainties, and for analyzing the closed loop system robust performance.

  2. RF Field Visualization of RF Ablation at the Larmor Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John; Scott, Greig

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an effective minimally invasive treatment for tumors. One primary source of difficulty is monitoring and controlling the ablation region. Currently, RF ablation is performed at 460 kHz, for which MRI could play a role given its capability for temperature monitoring and tumor visualization. If instead the ablation were to be performed at the MRI Larmor frequency, then the MR capability for B1 field mapping could be used to directly visualize the RF fields created by the ablation currents. Visualizing the RF fields may enable better control of the ablation currents, enabling better control of lesion shape and size and improving repeatability. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing RF ablations at 64 MHz and show preliminary results from imaging the RF fields from the ablation. The post-ablation RF fields show an increase in current density in the ablated region, consistent with an increase in conductivity of the ablated tissue. PMID:21775256

  3. ANALYZING SURFACE ROUGHNESS DEPENDENCE OF LINEAR RF LOSSES

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.; Xu, Chen

    2012-09-01

    Topographic structure on Superconductivity Radio Frequency (SRF) surfaces can contribute additional cavity RF losses describable in terms of surface RF reflectivity and absorption indices of wave scattering theory. At isotropic homogeneous extent, Power Spectrum Density (PSD) of roughness is introduced and quantifies the random surface topographic structure. PSD obtained from different surface treatments of niobium, such Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP), Electropolishing (EP), Nano-Mechanical Polishing (NMP) and Barrel Centrifugal Polishing (CBP) are compared. A perturbation model is utilized to calculate the additional rough surface RF losses based on PSD statistical analysis. This model will not consider that superconductor becomes normal conducting at fields higher than transition field. One can calculate the RF power dissipation ratio between rough surface and ideal smooth surface within this field range from linear loss mechanisms.

  4. Plasma core reactor simulations using RF uranium seeded argon discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted using the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) 80 kW and 1.2 MW RF induction heater systems to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self-critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor (PCR). A nonfissioning, steady-state RF-heated argon plasma seeded with pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was used. An overall objective was to achieve maximum confinement of uranium vapor within the plasma while simultaneously minimizing the uranium compound wall deposition. Exploratory tests were conducted using the 80 kW RF induction heater with the test chamber at approximately atmospheric pressure and discharge power levels on the order of 10 kW. Four different test chamber flow configurations were tested to permit selection of the configuration offering the best confinement characteristics for subsequent tests at higher pressure and power in the 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility.

  5. Rf system for the NSLS coherent infrared radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, W.; Biscardi, R.; Keane, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Thomas, M.; Wang, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    The existing NSLS X-ray Lithography Source (XLS Phase I) is being considered for a coherent synchrotron radiation source. The existing 211 MHz warm cavity will be replaced with a 5-cell 2856 MHz superconducting RF cavity, driven by a series of 2 kW klystrons. The RF system will provide a total V{sub RF} of 1.5 MV to produce {sigma}{sub L} = 0.3 mm electron bunches at an energy of 150 MeV. Superconducting technology significantly reduces the required space and power needed to achieve the higher voltage. It is the purpose of this paper to describe the superconducting RF system and cavity, power requirements, and cavity design parameters such as input coupling, Quality Factor, and Higher Order Modes.

  6. Determining Reliability Parameters for a Closed-Cycle Small Combined Heat and Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysokomorny, Vladimir S.; Vysokomornaya, Olga V.; Piskunov, Maxim V.

    2016-02-01

    The paper provides numerical values of the reliability parameters for independent power sources within the ambient temperature and output power range corresponding to the operation under the climatic conditions of Eastern Siberia and the Far East of the Russian Federation. We have determined the optimal values of the parameters necessary for the reliable operation of small CHP plants (combined heat and power plants) providing electricity for isolated facilities.

  7. The IPNS second harmonic RF upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, M. E.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; Horan, D.; Kustom, R. L.; Lien, M. K.; McMichael, G. E.; Moser, M. R.; Nassiri, A.; Wang, S.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) is used to accelerate protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV, at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The original ring design included two identical rf systems, each consisting of an accelerating cavity, cavity bias supply, power amplifiers and low-level analog electronics. The original cavities are located 180 degrees apart in the ring and provide a total peak accelerating voltage of {approx}21 kV over the 2.21-MHz to 5.14-MHz revolution frequency sweep. A third rf system has been constructed and installed in the RCS. The third rf system is capable of operating at the fundamental revolution frequency for the entire acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak accelerating voltage of up to {approx}11 kV, or at the second harmonic of the revolution frequency for the first {approx}4 ms of the acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak voltage of up to {approx}11 kV for bunch shape control. We describe here the hardware implementation and operation to date of the third rf cavity in the second harmonic mode.

  8. RF Voltage Measurements on ICRF Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, G. L.; Goulding, R. H.; Hoffman, D. J.; Wilgen, J. B.; Zhang, H. M.; Ryan, P. M.; Syed, G. M. S.; Kaye, A. S.

    1996-11-01

    Particle and heat flux on the plasma facing surfaces of high-power RF antennas used in fusion devices can result in damage to the antenna structures. High impedance capacitive probe measurements of the RF voltages on Faraday shields of several loop antennas indicate that voltages as high as 30% of the drive voltage can exist for 0/0 phasing (D.J. Hoffman, et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 355), 368 (Palm Spgs., CA, 1995).. These voltages can contribute to increased energy deposition on the antenna owing to increased RF sheath voltages. We report on continued efforts to understand the source and to control these RF voltages. E and B field distributions have been measured on the mock-up of the JET A2 antenna using standard B-dot probes and novel E-field probes positioned with a new automated scanning system. These data are compared with calculated fields from 3-D antenna models. The measurements demonstrate the dependency of the surface E-fields on the phasing of the strap currents and show the charge accumulation at the antenna top and bottom predicted by the models.

  9. Neutron emission from JET DT plasmas with RF heating on minority hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, H.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Gorini, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Källne, J.; Tardocchi, M.; EFDA-JET Workprogramme, contributors to the

    2002-07-01

    The neutron emission spectrum from d+t→α+n reactions has been measured as a means to study the plasma response to radio frequency (RF) power coupled to hydrogen and deuteron minority components (through fundamental and second harmonic, respectively) in a tritium discharge at JET. The spectrum was measured with the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer and was analysed in terms of two spectral components due to thermal (TH) and high-energy (HE) deuterons interacting with the bulk ion population of thermal tritons. The results were used to derive information on the deuteron population in terms of temperatures (TTH and THE) as well as corresponding particle and kinetic energy densities of the plasma; the bulk ion temperature (Ti = TTH) was determined both before (with Ohmic heating only) and during the RF pulse. Similar information on protons was derived from other measurements in order to estimate the different RF effects on protons and deuterons. This paper illustrates qualitatively the type of empirical ion kinetic information that can be obtained from neutron emission spectroscopy; the data serves as a basis for comparison with results of predictive and interpretative models on RF effects in plasmas.

  10. Influence of Intense Beam in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas Filled RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Collura, M.G.; Jana, M.R.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Johnson, R.P.; Franagan, G.; /Muons, Inc. /IIT

    2012-05-01

    The influence of an intense beam in a high-pressure gas filled RF cavity has been measured by using a 400 MeV proton beam in the Mucool Test Area at Fermilab. The ionization process generates dense plasma in the cavity and the resultant power loss to the plasma is determined by measuring the cavity voltage on a sampling oscilloscope. The energy loss has been observed with various peak RF field gradients (E), gas pressures (p), and beam intensities in nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Observed RF energy dissipation in single electron (dw) in N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} gases was 2 10{sup -17} and 3 10{sup -17} Joules/RF cycle at E/p = 8 V/cm/Torr, respectively. More detailed dw measurement have been done in H{sub 2} gas at three different gas pressures. There is a clear discrepancy between the observed dw and analytical one. The discrepancy may be due to the gas density effect that has already been observed in various experiments.

  11. Determination of steam wetness in the steam-generating equipment of nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorburov, V. I.; Gorburov, D. V.; Kuz'min, A. V.

    2012-05-01

    Calculation and experimental methods for determining steam wetness in horizontal steam generators for nuclear power stations equipped with VVER reactors, namely, the classic salt technique and calculations based on operating parameters are discussed considered and compared.

  12. Determining the Optimum Power Load in Jump Squat Using the Mean Propulsive Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Loturco, Irineu; Nakamura, Fabio Yuzo; Tricoli, Valmor; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar Cavinato; Kitamura, Katia; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Gil, Saulo; Pereira, Lucas Adriano; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    The jump squat is one of the exercises most frequently used to improve lower body power production, which influences sports performance. However, the traditional determination of the specific workload at which power production is maximized (i.e., optimum power load) is time-consuming and requires one-repetition maximum tests. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify whether elite athletes from different sports would produce maximum mean propulsive power values at a narrow range of mean propulsive velocities, resulting in similar jump heights. One hundred and nine elite athletes from several individual/team sport disciplines underwent repetitions at maximal velocity with progressive loads, starting at 40% of their body mass with increments of 10% to determine the individual optimum power zone. Results indicated that regardless of sport discipline, the athletes’ optimum mean propulsive power was achieved at a mean propulsive velocity close to 1.0 m.s−1 (1.01 ± 0.07 m.s−1) and at a jump height close to 20 cm (20.47 ± 1.42 cm). Data were narrowly scattered around these values. Therefore, jump squat optimum power load can be determined simply by means of mean propulsive velocity or jump height determination in training/testing settings, allowing it to be implemented quickly in strength/power training. PMID:26444293

  13. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  14. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W. Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-10

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  15. Low-level RF control for the AFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, C.; Kinross-Wright, J.; Plato, J.

    1994-09-01

    A limiting factor in the performance of the Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser (AFEL) is the stability of the RF accelerating field. A high-performance low-level RF control system has been implemented that uses analog feedback and digital feed forward to regulate the RF field. This low-level RF control system has achieved long-term amplitude and phase stabilities better than {+-}0.25% and {+-}0.33{degree} respectively. In order to improve the RF field stability further, a detailed system analysis and design is proceeding. Subsystem measurements are being used to model the system performance, predict the performance-limiting components, and determine possible improvements. Results to-date, modeling analyses, and suggested future improvements are presented.

  16. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  17. RF packaging for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevon, C.; Monfraix, P.; Paillard, M.; Schaffauser, C.; Vendier, O.

    2002-12-01

    Alcatel Space has been working in the field of RF hybrids for a long time. This paper presents the evolution of microwave packaging, up to 40 GHz, towards more and more miniaturisation. RF packaging presents challenging trade-offs between electrical performances and manufacturability, the higher the frequency; the more these two parameters are intertwined. An important step in the field of miniaturisation was the use, beginning of 90's, of MMICs based on GaAs - Gallium Arsenide - and micropackages, following by the introduction of mixed LF/MMwave MCM. Now a good choice could be made between those MCMs and advanced micropackages. The next evolution is the use of flip-chip interconnection to minimise the length of RF connections. In term of bonding reliability, the results give values over more than five times the limits from the standards, even after 500 thermal cycles. The association of power flip-chip which high thermal conductive substrates like Aluminum Nitride - could give at least 40% reduction in the Rth for an amplifier with MMIC mounted flip-chip with emitter bumps. The glob-top technology is not yet used for higher frequencies (i.e. some or some tens of GHz). However, the results presented in this paper show that glob-top are compatible with GaAs MMICs working up to 12 GHz. With some specific design rules, the right encapsulant and the associated processes, there are little degradations of the electrical performances of a Low Level Amplifier working at 10.7 - 12.7 GHz. This has been also checked after thermal cycles.Another emergent technology with MEMS - MicroElectroMechanical Systems - could be used soon for space application, especially for very small switches with low losses. This will be made only if they could be encapsulated with an adapted packaging and if the reliability is full demonstrated following space criteria. Now, those different technologies could be associated with other miniaturization new concepts adapted to the microwave needs, such

  18. Integrated design and analysis of rf heating and current drive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.M.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    The design, analysis, and performance evaluation of rf power systems ultimately requires accurate modeling of a chain of subsystems starting with the rf transmitter and ending with the power absorption in the plasma. A collection of computer codes is used at ORNL to calculate the plasma loading and wave spectrum for a three-dimensional rf antenna, the transmission/reflection properties of the Faraday shield and its effect on the electrical characteristics and phase velocity of the antenna, the internal coupling among antenna array components and the incorporation of the antenna array into a transmission line model of the phase control, tuning, matching, and power distribution system. Some codes and techniques are more suited for the rapid evaluation of system design progressions, while others are more applicable to the detailed analysis of final designs or existing hardware. The interaction of codes and the accuracy of calculations will be illustrated by the process of determining the plasma loading as a function of phasing and density profiles for the TFTR ICRH antennas and comparing the results to measurements. An example of modeling a complex antenna geometry will be the comparison of calculations with the measured electrical response of a four-strap mockup of the JET A2 antenna array which was loaned to ORNL by the JET ICRH team.

  19. A 300 mV sub-threshold region 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator and frequency divider with transformer technique for ultralow power RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yasunori; Ishikawa, Keisuke; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    A new ultralow voltage 2.4 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) and a divide-by-2 frequency divider circuits operating in a CMOS sub-threshold region using a transformer technique have been developed. In the sub-threshold region, the CMOS transistor high frequency performances are decreased to the point where oscillation and frequency division are challenging to achieve. The new proposed VCO uses the transformer feedback complementary VCO technique to improves VCO negative feedback gain. The circuits have been fabricated in a 65 nm standard CMOS process. The oscillation frequency is designed at 2.4 GHz under a 300 mV supply voltage. The total power consumption is 202 µW with noise performance of -96 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. The new proposed frequency divider circuit consists of two stages master-slave D-type flip-flop (DFF). The DFF differential input is coupled to a transformer circuit instead of transistors to reduce the number of stacks. The minimum operating supply voltage is 300 mV with power consumption of 34 µW with a free-run frequency of 1.085 GHz.

  20. Determination of ankle muscle power in normal gait using an EMG-to-force processing approach.

    PubMed

    Bogey, R A; Gitter, A J; Barnes, L A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of individual ankle muscles to the net ankle power and to examine each muscle's role in propulsion or support of the body during normal, self-selected-speed walking. An EMG-to-force processing (EFP) model was developed which scaled muscle tendon unit force output to gait EMG, with that muscle's power output being the product of muscle force and contraction velocity. Net EFP power was determined by summing individual ankle muscle power. Net ankle power was also calculated for these subjects via inverse dynamics. Closeness of fit of the power curves of the two methods was used to validate the model. The curves were highly correlated (r(2)=.91), thus the model was deconstructed to analyze the power contribution and role of each ankle muscle during normal gait. Key findings were that the plantar flexors control tibial rotation in single support, and act to propel the entire limb into swing phase. The dorsiflexors provide positive power for swing phase foot clearance, negative power to control early stance phase foot placement, and a second positive power burst to actively advance the tibia in the transition from double to single support. Co-contraction of agonists and antagonists was limited to only a small percentage of the gait cycle. PMID:19201619