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Sample records for rhabdomyolysis

  1. [Rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Rosa, Nuno Guimarães; Silva, Gil; Teixeira, Alves; Rodrigues, Fernando; Araújo, José Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a common entity that often has a multifactorial etiology. It usually affects healthy individuals, following trauma, excessive physical activity, convulsive crisis, alcohol and other drugs consumption or infections. Accumulation of intracellular calcium, activation of proteases and lipases, production of free radicals and the infiltration by inflammatory cells, are some of the mechanisms responsible for muscular necrosis. Myoglobinuric acute renal failure (ARF) is only possible in the presence of myoglobin, liberated by the muscle cells, and of hypovolemia/renal hypoperfusion. One of the most important complications of this entity is electrolyte disturbance (hyperkalemia, hypocalcemia, metabolic acidosis), that can be aggravated by the establishment of ARF. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis relies on the elevation of creatine kinase and on the presence of myoglobinuria. The main therapeutic goals are removal of precipitating factors, handling of biochemical complications, prevention and treatment of ARF using renal replacement techniques when necessary. Early diagnosis and treatment are of critical importance in epidemic forms of rhabdomyolysis (e. g. earthquakes) often associated with ARF. In this setting, the quick access to the dialysis equipment and human resources can be compromised and conservative measures, as an early and vigorous hydratation associated with a forced alkaline diuresis, can improve the prognosis of this complication. PMID:16584660

  2. Rhabdomyolysis updated

    PubMed Central

    Efstratiadis, G; Voulgaridou, A; Nikiforou, D; Kyventidis, A; Kourkouni, E; Vergoulas, G

    2007-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis constitutes a common cause of acute renal failure and presents paramount interest. A large variety of causes with different pathogenetic mechanisms can involve skeletal muscles resulting in rhabdomyolysis with or without acute renal failure. Crush syndrome, one of the most common causes of rhabdomyolysis presents increased clinical interest, particularly in areas often involved by earthquakes, such as Greece and Turkey. Drug abusers are another sensitive group of young patients prone to rhabdomyolysis, which attracts the clinical interest of a variety of medical specialties. We herein review the evidence extracted from updated literature concerning the data related to pathogenetic mechanisms and pathophysiology as well as the management of this interesting syndrome. PMID:19582207

  3. Diagnostic evaluation of rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Nance, Jessica R; Mammen, Andrew L

    2015-06-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by severe acute muscle injury resulting in muscle pain, weakness, and/or swelling with release of myofiber contents into the bloodstream. Symptoms develop over hours to days after an inciting factor and may be associated with dark pigmentation of the urine. Serum creatine kinase and urine myoglobin levels are markedly elevated. Clinical examination, history, laboratory studies, muscle biopsy, and genetic testing are useful tools for diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis, and they can help differentiate acquired from inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis. Acquired causes include substance abuse, medication or toxic exposures, electrolyte abnormalities, endocrine disturbances, and autoimmune myopathies. Inherited predisposition to rhabdomyolysis can occur with disorders of glycogen metabolism, fatty acid β-oxidation, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Less common inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis include structural myopathies, channelopathies, and sickle-cell disease. This review focuses on the differentiation of acquired and inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis and proposes a practical diagnostic algorithm. Muscle Nerve 51: 793-810, 2015. PMID:25678154

  4. Diagnostic Evaluation of Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Nance, Jessica R.; Mammen, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by severe acute muscle injury resulting in muscle pain, weakness, and/or swelling with release of myofiber contents into the bloodstream. Symptoms develop over hours to days following an inciting factor and may be associated with dark pigmentation of the urine. Serum creatine kinase and urine myoglobin levels are markedly elevated. The clinical examination, history, laboratory studies, muscle biopsy, and genetic testing are useful tools for diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis, and they can help differentiate acquired from inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis. Acquired causes include substance abuse, medication or toxic exposures, electrolyte abnormalities, endocrine disturbance, and autoimmune myopathies. Inherited predisposition to rhabdomyolysis can occur with disorders of glycogen metabolism, fatty acid beta-oxidation, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Less common inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis include structural myopathies, channelopathies, and sickle cell disease. This review focuses on the differentiation of acquired and inherited causes of rhabdomyolysis and proposes a practical diagnostic algorithm. PMID:25678154

  5. [Metabolic rhabdomyolysis during statin therapy].

    PubMed

    Vergely, N; Leca, V; Antoine, J-C; Germain, N; Khalfallah, Y; Estour, B

    2009-08-01

    The occurrence of rhabdomyolysis during statin treatment for dyslipidemia is a well-known side effect. However, the differential diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis is large. We report on a patient treated with statin who presented a rhabdomyolysis. The persistence of laboratory abnormalities allowed to discover a metabolic rhabdomyolysis, namely a carnitine palmitoyltransférase II deficiency. The diagnosis of the genetic abnormality allows to modify the therapeutic care. PMID:19419805

  6. Acute rhabdomyolysis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Yamina; Mamoune, Asmaa; Mauvais, François-Xavier; Habarou, Florence; Lallement, Laetitia; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Ottolenghi, Chris; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2015-07-01

    Rhabdomyolysis results from the rapid breakdown of skeletal muscle fibers, which leads to leakage of potentially toxic cellular content into the systemic circulation. Acquired causes by direct injury to the sarcolemma are most frequent. The inherited causes are: i) metabolic with failure of energy production, including mitochondrial fatty acid ß-oxidation defects, LPIN1 mutations, inborn errors of glycogenolysis and glycolysis, more rarely mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency, purine defects and peroxysomal α-methyl-acyl-CoA-racemase defect (AMACR), ii) structural causes with muscle dystrophies and myopathies, iii) calcium pump disorder with RYR1 gene mutations, iv) inflammatory causes with myositis. Irrespective of the cause of rhabdomyolysis, the pathology follows a common pathway, either by the direct injury to sarcolemma by increased intracellular calcium concentration (acquired causes) or by the failure of energy production (inherited causes), which leads to fiber necrosis. Rhabdomyolysis are frequently precipitated by febrile illness or exercise. These conditions are associated with two events, elevated temperature and high circulating levels of pro-inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. To illustrate these points in the context of energy metabolism, protein thermolability and the potential benefits of arginine therapy, we focus on a rare cause of rhabdomyolysis, aldolase A deficiency. In addition, our studies on lipin-1 (LPIN1) deficiency raise the possibility that several diseases involved in rhabdomyolysis implicate pro-inflammatory cytokines and may even represent primarily pro-inflammatory diseases. Thus, not only thermolability of mutant proteins critical for muscle function, but also pro-inflammatory cytokines per se, may lead to metabolic decompensation and rhabdomyolysis. PMID:25778939

  7. Rhabdomyolysis: the hidden killer.

    PubMed

    Criner, Judy A; Appelt, Mavis; Coker, Chantal; Conrad, Shirley; Holliday, Jackie

    2002-06-01

    Rhabdomyolysis can strike anyone given the right circumstances. Combining vigorous exercise, drugs, and extreme heat puts one at risk. However, there are many causes for "rhabdo." With early recognition and treatment, a devastating outcome can be prevented. Education is the key! PMID:12080571

  8. Rhabdomyolysis: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Patrick A.; Helmstetter, John A.; Kaye, Adam M.; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyolysis is a complex medical condition involving the rapid dissolution of damaged or injured skeletal muscle. Methods This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, causes, presentation, diagnosis, complications, management, and anesthetic considerations related to rhabdomyolysis. Results Any form of muscle damage––and by extension any entity that causes muscle damage––can initiate rhabdomyolysis. One of the most important treatment goals when rhabdomyolysis is suspected is avoiding acute kidney injury. Conclusion All clinicians should be aware of common causes, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:25829882

  9. Laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Merante, Alfonso; Gareri, Pietro; Marigliano, Norma Maria; De Fazio, Salvatore; Bonacci, Elvira; Torchia, Carlo; Russo, Gaetano; Lacroce, Pasquale; Lacava, Roberto; Castagna, Alberto; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ruotolo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes a case of laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis in an elderly patient. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for the onset of confusion, tremors, an inability to walk, and a fever that she had been experiencing for 36 hours. She often took high dosages of lactulose and sorbitol syrup as a laxative (about 70 g/day). During her physical examination, the patient was confused, drowsy, and she presented hyposthenia in her upper and lower limbs, symmetric and diffuse moderate hyporeflexia, and her temperature was 37.8°C. Laboratory tests revealed severe hyponatremia with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypochloremia, and metabolic alkalosis. Moreover, rhabdomyolysis markers were found. The correction of hydroelectrolytic imbalances with saline, potassium and sodium chlorure, calcium gluconate was the first treatment. During her hospitalization the patient presented acute delirium, treated with haloperidol and prometazine chloridrate intramuscularly. She was discharged 12 days later, after resolution of symptoms, and normalized laboratory tests. Over-the-counter drugs such as laxatives are usually not considered dangerous; on the other hand, they may cause serum electrolytic imbalance and rhabdomyolysis. A careful monitoring of all the drugs taken by the elderly is one of the most important duties of a physician since drug interactions and their secondary effects may be fatal. PMID:20396636

  10. A case of flax seed induced rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Anushre; Kumar, Ritesh; Ramanan, Harini; Khandige, Nalini; Prabhu, Krishnananda

    2012-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical and a biochemical syndrome that occurs due to a skeletal muscle injury. The main cause of rhabdomyolysis is a muscle crush injury, toxins, ischaemia and metabolic disorders. Rare cases of rhabdomyolysis have been reported which had been caused by drugs and after insect stings. The breakdown products of the damaged muscle cells are released into the bloodstream; some of these, such as the protein myoglobin, are harmful for the kidneys and they may lead to kidney failure. The symptoms of rhabdomyolysis depend on the severity of the condition. The milder forms of rhabdomyolysis may not cause any muscle symptoms, and the diagnosis is based on abnormal blood tests. The most reliable test in the diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis is the blood level of Creatine Kinase (CK) which is released by the damaged muscles. Here in, we report an unusual case of flax seed induced rhabdomyolysis to alert the medical community about this rare complication. PMID:23373049

  11. Hair dye poisoning and rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Bokutz, Munira; Nasir, Nosheen; Mahmood, Faisal; Sajid, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Hair dye ingestion is a rare cause of toxicity in Pakistan. We are presenting the case report of a 55 year old male who presented with accidental hair dye ingestion and developed laryngeal oedema requiring emergent tracheostomy. He had also developed aspiration pneumonitis and chemical oesophagitis. However, the most alarming manifestation was rhabdomyolysis. Hair dye toxicity can be fatal if not recognized early. There is no antidote available. Rhabdomyolysis is a complication and needs to be managed aggressively in order to prevent long term morbidity. PMID:25976581

  12. Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, David C.; Borchers, James

    2014-01-01

    Context: Exertional rhabdomyolysis is a relatively uncommon but potentially fatal condition affecting athletes that requires prompt recognition and appropriate management. Evidence Acquisition: A search of the PubMed database from 2003 to 2013 using the term exertional rhabdomyolysis was performed. Further evaluation of the bibliographies of articles expanded the evidence. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) is a relatively uncommon condition with an incidence of approximately 29.9 per 100,000 patient years but can have very serious consequences of muscle ischemia, cardiac arrhythmia, and death. The athlete will have pain, weakness, and swelling in the muscles affected as well as significantly elevated levels of creatine kinase (CK). Hydration is the foundation for any athlete with ER; management can also include dialysis or surgery. Stratifying the athlete into high- or low-risk categories can determine if further workup is warranted. Conclusion: Exertional rhabdomyolysis evaluation requires a history, physical examination, and serology for definitive diagnosis. Treatment modalities should include rest and hydration. Return to play and future workup should be determined by the risk stratification of the athlete. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): C. PMID:24982707

  13. Acute kidney injury due to rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Rafael Siqueira Athayde; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Liborio, Alexandre Braga; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2008-09-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical and biochemical syndrome that occurs when skeletal muscle cells disrupt and release creatine phosphokinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and myoglobin into the interstitial space and plasma. The main causes of rhabdomyolysis include direct muscular injury, strenuous exercise, drugs, toxins, infections, hyperthermia, seizures, meta-bolic and/or electrolyte abnormalities, and endocrinopathies. Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 33-50% of patients with rhabdomyolysis. The main pathophysiological mechanisms of renal injury are renal vasoconstriction, intraluminal cast formation, and direct myoglobin toxicity. Rhabdo-myolysis can be asymptomatic, present with mild symptoms such as elevation of muscular en-zymes, or manifest as a severe syndrome with AKI and high mortality. Serum CK five times higher than the normal value usually confirms rhabdomyolysis. Early diagnosis and saline volume expansion may reduce the risk of AKI. Further studies are necessary to establish the importance of bicarbonate and mannitol in the prevention of AKI due to rhabdomyolysis. PMID:18711286

  14. Fatal rhabdomyolysis in a flame burn patient.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, D; Hudson, D A

    1997-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis due to flame burns is not well described. A case of fatal rhabdomyolysis in an epileptic patient who sustained 65 per cent body surface area, very deep, flame burns is described. It appears as if the sustained muscle compression from the restrictive, circumferential eschar was the major factor in the aetiology of the rhabdomyolysis. Despite aggressive fluid management, the patient died of acute renal failure and adult respiratory distress syndrome. We have subsequently identified three other cases of pigmenturia occurring following burns. It would seem as if rhabdomyolysis following extensive full thickness burns may be more common than previously suggested. Fluid requirements are in excess of those proposed by traditional protocols. Rhabdomyolysis in flame burn patients indicates a poor prognosis. PMID:9426917

  15. A Case of Phenytoin-induced Rhabdomyolysis in Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Jo, Sungyang; Park, Kye Won; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Ahm

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin is a commonly used antiepileptic drug, especially when treating status epilepticus. Here, we present a patient who suffered from status epilepticus and developed rhabdomyolysis after being treated with phenytoin. As multiple seizures itself can induce rhabdomyolysis, it is difficult to recognize that phenytoin can be the cause of rhabdomyolysis in status epilepticus patients. Even though phenytoin is a rare cause of rhabdomyolysis, we should discern that phenytoin can be a causative drug to bring about rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27390679

  16. Low-Intensity Repetitive Exercise Induced Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Mina; Hayden, Nicholas; Garcia, Brandon; Tucci, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare condition caused by the proteins of damaged muscle cells entering the bloodstream and damaging the kidneys. Common symptoms of rhabdomyolysis are muscle pain and fatigue in conjunction with dark urine; kidney damage is a common symptom among these patients. We present a case of a 23-year-old woman who displayed myalgia in the upper extremities caused by low-intensity and high-repetition exercise. She was successfully diagnosed and treated for exertional rhabdomyolysis. This patient had no significant medical history that would induce this condition. We urge the emergency medical community to observe and monitor patients that complain of myalgia to ensure they are not suffering from rhabdomyolysis even in atypical cases. PMID:26693360

  17. Rhabdomyolysis After Cosmetic Laser-Assisted Liposuction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-yong; Chang, Hak

    2015-08-01

    A 34-year-old-female patient visited our emergency room for symptoms of disturbance of urination and shortness of breath. She was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury after laser-assisted liposuction and required hemodialysis. Although laser-assisted liposuction is a well-used procedure, it can cause local complications, such as burns and skin irregularities, as well as systemic complications, such as infection, fever, and emboli. However, laser-assisted, liposuction-induced rhabdomyolysis has not been reported. Repetitive exercises, trauma, and crush injury are the major causes of rhabdomyolysis. In this study, a unique case of rhabdomyolysis that developed after laser-assisted liposuction is reported. PMID:26085224

  18. Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after gardening.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Acute nontraumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis may arise when the energy supply to muscle is insufficient to meet demands, particularly in physically untrained individuals. We report on a psychiatric patient who developed large bruises and hemorrhagic blisters on both hands and arms, rhabdomyolysis of both forearm muscles with a moderate compartment syndrome, and consecutive acute renal failure following excessive work in the garden. Although specifically asked, the patient denied any hard physical work or gardening, and heteroanamnestic data were not available. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was easy to establish, but until reliable anamnestic data were obtained, the etiology remained uncertain. Four days after arrival, the patient recalled working hard in the garden. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis was finally reached, and the importance of anamnestic data was once more confirmed. PMID:25954536

  19. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Renal Failure after Gardening

    PubMed Central

    Vucicevic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    Acute nontraumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis may arise when the energy supply to muscle is insufficient to meet demands, particularly in physically untrained individuals. We report on a psychiatric patient who developed large bruises and hemorrhagic blisters on both hands and arms, rhabdomyolysis of both forearm muscles with a moderate compartment syndrome, and consecutive acute renal failure following excessive work in the garden. Although specifically asked, the patient denied any hard physical work or gardening, and heteroanamnestic data were not available. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was easy to establish, but until reliable anamnestic data were obtained, the etiology remained uncertain. Four days after arrival, the patient recalled working hard in the garden. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis was finally reached, and the importance of anamnestic data was once more confirmed. PMID:25954536

  20. Frequent rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kim, Tae-Joon; Moon, Jangsup; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Byun, Jung-Ick; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical presentation and provocation factors of rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Among the 16 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in our institutional cohort, nine patients had elevated CK enzyme levels and clinical evidence of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis was more frequent after immunotherapy. The use of dopamine receptor blocker (DRB) increased the risk of rhabdomyolysis. None of the patients without rhabdomyolysis received DRBs. Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent complication in anti-NMDAR encephalitis and more common after immunotherapy and the use of DRBs increases the risk. Therefore, DRBs should be administered carefully in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:27609293

  1. Isotretinoin induced rhabdomyolysis? A case report.

    PubMed

    Trauner, M A; Ruben, B S

    1999-11-01

    Isotretinoin, an effective therapy for nodulocystic acne and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, has many known side effects. However, its association with elevated creatine kinase levels and its potential to cause rhabdomyolysis is not well established. We describe a patient with a significant elevation in creatine kinase after beginning therapy with isotretinoin for dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. The implications of isotretinoin causing rhabdomyolysis are discussed. PMID:10673455

  2. Rhabdomyolysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shafuddin AA, Weisbord SD, Palevsky PM, et al. Acute kidney injury. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, et al, eds. Brenner and Rector's The Kidney . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 30. Read More Acute kidney failure Acute tubular necrosis Alcohol use disorder ...

  3. Rhabdomyolysis Presenting as Orbital Apex Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wi, Jae Min; Chi, Mijung

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a condition in which striated muscle tissue breaks down rapidly and releases muscular cell constituents into extracellular fluid and the circulation. Renal symptoms, such as acute renal failure, are major complications of rhabdomyolysis. However, no previous report of rhabdomyolysis associated with orbital complication has been issued. Here, we report the first patient of rhabdomyolysis presenting as orbital apex syndrome. A 66-year-old man presented with right periorbital swelling with erythematous patches and conjunctival chemosis. In addition, swelling, redness, and vesicles were observed in both lower legs. He was found in a drunken state with the right side of his face pressed against a table. Ophthalmic examination showed right eye fixation in all directions and ischemic change of retina. Blood testing showed elevated muscle enzyme associated with muscle destruction. And computed tomography of the orbit showed swelling of right extraocular muscles and crowding of right orbital apex. Under a diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis-associated orbital apex syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion, intravenous steroid and antibiotics therapy with intraocular pressure-lowering topicals were begun. Clinical presentation, treatment course, and follow-up are discussed. PMID:26703071

  4. Rhabdomyolysis as a complication of canine babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, L S; Lobetti, R G

    1996-06-01

    Rhabdomyolysis was diagnosed in two dogs with babesiosis. The first animal presented with muscle pain and caramel-coloured urine, and had markedly elevated serum myoglobin and muscle enzymes. Acute renal failure complicated the clinical picture. The second dog exhibited muscle pain and tremors, together with neurological signs and pulmonary oedema, and died soon after admission. Muscle necrosis and haemorrhage were found at necropsy. In human malaria, a disease clinically similar to canine babesiosis, rhabdomyolysis is unusual, but clinically silent muscle damage appears to be common. Likewise, biochemical evidence of muscle damage is readily found in experimental bovine babesiosis. Muscle enzymes were mildly elevated in three dogs with severe babesiosis and pigmenturia but there was no obvious muscle damage, indicating that this might also apply to canine babesiosis. The pathogenesis of infection-associated rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure remains unclear, but inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide could play an important role. PMID:8965483

  5. Fatal rhabdomyolysis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique; Bonfa, Eloisa

    2011-09-01

    The authors describe herein the sixth lupus case that evolved with rhabdomyolysis. A 36-year-old woman with systemic lupus erythematosus was admitted to our hospital with malaise, myalgia, dysphagia, fever, preserved muscle strength, leukocytosis (15,600 cells), and increased creatine kinase of 1,358 IU/L that reached 75,000 IU/L in few days. She denied the use of myotoxic drugs and alcohol. Urine 1 showed false positive for hemoglobinuria (myoglobin) without erythrocytes in the sediment, confirming the diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis. Secondary causes were excluded. She was treated with hyperhydration and alkalinization of urine. Despite treatment, the patient developed pulmonary congestion and she died. The authors also review in this article rhabdomyolysis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:21127876

  6. Alcohol abuse-related severe acute pancreatitis with rhabdomyolysis complications

    PubMed Central

    SU, MAO-SHENG; JIANG, YING; YAN, XIAO-YUAN HU; ZHAO, QING-HUA; LIU, ZHI-WEI; ZHANG, WEN-ZHI; HE, LEI

    2013-01-01

    Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. One of the major risk factors of both acute pancreatitis and rhabdomyolysis is alcohol abuse. However, only a few studies have reported the prognosis and association of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and rhabdomyolysis in alcohol abuse patients. In the present study, we report two cases presenting with SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis following high-dose alcohol intake. The disease onset, clinical manifestations, laboratory data, diagnosis and treatment procedure of each patient were recorded, and the association with rhabdomyolysis was analyzed. Alcohol consumption was the most predominant cause of SAP and rhabdomyolysis in these patients. SAP-related rhabdomyolysis was primarily induced by the toxicity associated with pancreatic necrosis. The laboratory tests revealed that the concentration of serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin increased and acute renal failure symptoms were present, which provided an exact diagnosis for SAP-induced rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis and subsequent hypermyoglobinuria severely impaired kidney function and aggravated hypocalcemia. The therapy of early stage SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis involved liquid resuscitation support. When first stage treatment fails, blood purification should be performed immediately. Both patients developed multiple organ failure (MOF) and succumbed to the disease. Considering the two cases presented, we conclude that alcohol-related SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis may have a poor clinical prognosis. PMID:23251265

  7. Rhabdomyolysis After Ankle Strain and Light Cycling.

    PubMed

    Hu, James; Ng, David

    2016-09-01

    A 35-year-old female presented to the emergency room with severe upper leg and back pain, which began 3 days after low-intensity cycling and falling from a stationary bike. She developed rhabdomyolysis with a maximum serum creatine kinase level of 72,358 U/L. This case report demonstrates that rhabdomyolysis has a wide range and spectrum of causes and risk factors. Although uncommon, this condition can occur after low-intensity exercise despite absence of other significant risk factors. Thus, clinicians should maintain a high clinical suspicion when initial history, physical examination, and laboratory tests suggest this diagnosis. PMID:27540443

  8. Rhabdomyolysis induced by excessive coffee drinking.

    PubMed

    Chiang, W-F; Liao, M-T; Cheng, C-J; Lin, S-H

    2014-08-01

    Excessive ingestion of caffeine-containing beverages is a rare cause of rhabdomyolysis. Here, we describe the case of a 44-year-old woman presented with nausea, vomiting, palpitations, and tea-colored urine 6 h after drinking a liter of black coffee containing approximately 565 mg of caffeine for mental alertness. Laboratory studies were notable for myoglobinuria and markedly elevated plasma creatine kinase (CK) level of 7315 U/L. With volume expansion and alkalization, her plasma CK level returned to normal within 5 days. Rhabdomyolysis should be considered a potential health hazard from excessive consumption of caffeine-containing products. PMID:24220878

  9. Rhabdomyolysis After Ankle Strain and Light Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, James; Ng, David

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old female presented to the emergency room with severe upper leg and back pain, which began 3 days after low-intensity cycling and falling from a stationary bike. She developed rhabdomyolysis with a maximum serum creatine kinase level of 72,358 U/L. This case report demonstrates that rhabdomyolysis has a wide range and spectrum of causes and risk factors. Although uncommon, this condition can occur after low-intensity exercise despite absence of other significant risk factors. Thus, clinicians should maintain a high clinical suspicion when initial history, physical examination, and laboratory tests suggest this diagnosis. PMID:27540443

  10. Successful reintroduction of statin therapy after statin-associated rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Simons, Janet E; Holbrook, Anne M; Don-Wauchope, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    The case report demonstrates the successful use of an alternative statin after a statin-related episode of rhabdomyolysis. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis is a serious adverse event with a very low incidence and is considered the most severe of the muscle-related side effects of the statins. Rechallenge with statins is not a recommended practice after rhabdomyolysis. The patient experienced a myocardial infarct 1 y after the episode of rhabdomyolysis. He used alternative lipid-lowering therapy for 2 y. His low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was not meeting typical secondary prevention targets. An alternative statin was introduced and the patient has been followed for 4 years without recurrence of the rhabdomyolysis. This case suggests it may be time to reconsider the accepted practice of permanently avoiding statin therapy after rhabdomyolysis. PMID:26228678

  11. Methocarbamol suspension for the treatment of rhabdomyolysis in equines.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Bobby N

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis in equines occurs in horses due to physical overexertion or underlying pathologic myopathy. Methocarbamol is a muscle relaxant that can be used in equines to treat symptoms associated with Rhabdomyolysis. Methocarbamol is available as a solution for injection but is not commercially available as an oral suspension. This article focuses on the treatment of Tying-up caused by overexertion, and details the treatment of Rhabdomyolysis with an oral suspension that was prepared for a veterinarian by a compounding pharmacist. PMID:24459784

  12. Rhabdomyolysis in adolescent athletes: review of cases.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Kevin; Gregory, Andrew; Desai, Neerav; Diamond, Alex

    2016-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome characterized by muscle pain, weakness and myoglobinuria and ranges in severity from asymptomatic to life threatening with acute kidney failure. While a common condition in adult populations, it is understudied in pediatrics and the majority of adolescent cases are likely exercise-induced, caused by strenuous exercise in athletes. Recently, in our pediatric sports medicine practice, we have seen numerous cases of late adolescent high school athletes who present with severe muscle pain and were found to have elevated creatine kinase levels. The cases review potential contributing factors including characteristics of the workout, use of supplements, caffeine, medication, and metabolic or genetic predisposition. Treatment for exercised-induced rhabdomyolysis rarely requires more than rehydration. Return to play should be progressive, individualized, and include acclimatization and monitoring of hydration status, though guidelines require further review. PMID:27031535

  13. Exertional Rhabdomyolysis: What Is It and Why Should We Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David Q.; Carlson, Kelli A.; Marzano, Amy; Garrahy, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Exertional rhabdomyolysis gained increased attention recently when 13 football players from the University of Iowa developed this condition after an especially demanding practice session and were hospitalized. Exertional rhabdomyolysis may lead to severe kidney stress, kidney failure, and even sudden death. Anyone who does physical exercise at a…

  14. Rhabdomyolysis developing after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matake, Kunishige; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Irie, Hiroyuki; Aibe, Hitoshi; Sugitani, Atsushi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    A 25-year-old man with hepatocellular carcinoma developed severe muscular weakness and pain 15 days after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was made based on myalgia localized in the bilateral upper extremities (bilateral trapezius, deltoid, biceps brachii, and teres major muscles) on magnetic resonance imaging and increased levels of muscle-derived serum enzymes. In this case, some drugs administered during the clinical course of TACE (diclofenac, famotidine, and cefotiam dihydrochloride) were suspected to be involved in the rhabdomyolysis, but the exact cause of rhabdomyolysis was not identified. The symptoms were completely improved by right trisegmentectomy of the liver following conservative treatment. PMID:19680719

  15. Hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis: an unusual presentation of Sjogren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cherif, Eya; Ben Hassine, Lamia; Kechaou, Ines; Khalfallah, Narjess

    2013-01-01

    Hypokalaemic rhabdomyolysis represents a medical emergency requiring rapid diagnosis and appropriate aetiological treatment. Renal tubular acidosis is a common cause of hypokalemia which can be idiopathic or secondary to systemic disorders such as Sjogren's syndrome. It can remain asymptomatic or manifest with metabolic abnormalities including hypokalemia paralysis, hypocalcaemia and hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. Rhabdomyolysis presenting with severe hypokalemia as the first manifestation of Sjogren's syndrome is rare. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who presented to our department with severe weakness of all limbs. Laboratory examination demonstrated hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis caused by distal renal tubular acidosis. Investigations revealed Sjogren's syndrome as the underlying cause of the metabolic disorders. PMID:24165505

  16. Colchicine-Induced Rhabdomyolysis: An Autopsy Case.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Murat Nihat; Özgün, Ayşe; Daş, Taner; Kumru, Durmuş; Şam, Bülent; Koç, Sermet

    2016-06-01

    Colchicine is derived from Colchicum autumnale and Gloriosa superba and is used to treat acute gout and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Musculoskeletal adverse effects range from myopathy to rhabdomyolysis. An 18-year-old woman, with a 2-year history of FMF treated with colchicine, took 9 colchicine pills (4.5 mg) to relieve severe abdominal pain. On the sixth day of hospitalization, the patient's condition worsened, and she died. As this was a case of fatal poisoning, a forensic autopsy was performed, and the cause of death was determined to be complications of muscle destruction due to colchicine intoxication with the findings of myocytolysis, positive antimyoglobin antibody staining kidney tubules. Colchicine toxicity begins with gastrointestinal symptoms. Multiorgan effects follow the gastrointestinal effects. Serious outcomes of colchicine toxicity are rhabdomyolysis, bone marrow suppression, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In chronic diseases that require lifelong treatment with medications, adverse effects can arise with long periods of use. Our patient had been treated for FMF with colchicine for 2 years but took too many colchicine pills to relieve her severe abdominal pain. Warning patients about the effects of high doses of drugs and providing information about their toxic effects and what to do "in case" of overuse could be lifesaving. PMID:27049658

  17. Rhabdomyolysis in a young vegetarian athlete.

    PubMed

    Borrione, Paolo; Spaccamiglio, Angela; Salvo, Raffaella Antonella; Mastrone, Antonietta; Fagnani, Federica; Pigozzi, Fabio

    2009-11-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare but potentially life-threatening disorder. The long list of known risk factors includes trauma, drug intoxication, alcoholism, hyperpyrexia, vascular occlusion, infections, electrolyte imbalances, heat intolerance, seizures, severe exertion, and substance abuse. Exercise-induced muscle damage is commonly experienced after physical activity, and different studies showed that the amount of protein consumed seems to affect its magnitude. In this regard, some concern has been raised about vegetarian athletes. We present a case of rhabdomyolysis that occurred in a young athlete following a poorly planned vegetarian diet. The athlete experienced progressive weakness and intermittent muscle aches particularly in the legs, malaise, episodic tachycardia, and nausea. Serum creatine kinase was markedly elevated (9952 units/liter), and a mild alteration of transaminase values was observed. The patient was hydrated intravenously and recovered fully within 5 days. The controlled introduction of a planned amount of protein in the diet allowed the athlete to carry on with his sporting activity fully without any further muscle problems. Physical exercise mainly engages the muscular system, and a balanced diet is essential to ensure the energy demands and the anabolic response. A vegetarian diet per se is not associated with detrimental effects in athletes, but an optimal protein intake should be achieved through careful planning with an emphasis on protein-rich plant foods. PMID:19661778

  18. Sertraline-Induced Rhabdomyolysis: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Mitchell; Kish, Troy

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to report a case of sertraline-induced rhabdomyolysis in a female patient with a history of depression. A 25-year-old Hispanic woman with a history of depression reported to the emergency department (ED) with a chief complaint of muscle swelling and soreness and dark urine. The patient's creatine phosphokinase was 15,103 U/L. Despite treatment with IV normal saline, the patient's symptoms persisted and the creatine phosphokinase continued to rise to a peak of 16,778 U/L on day 2. The patient reported completing a strenuous, although routine, exercise the day before arriving at the ED, and her medication history was only significant for sertraline. Of note, 6 weeks before her visit to the ED, sertraline was increased from 100 mg daily to 150 mg daily. The patient's rhabdomyolysis was attributed to sertraline in conjunction with recent exercise. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced rhabdomyolysis has been documented in 5 case reports. Similar to most reports, our patient presented with rhabdomyolysis in the presence of both SSRI use and exercise. Unlike the majority of previous reports, our patient was not taking other medications with documented association to rhabdomyolysis and had performed routine exercise before presenting with rhabdomyolysis. Although the mechanism of SSRI-induced rhabdomyolysis is not known, a theory posits that sertraline may have a role in muscle contraction and relaxation, leading to shorter time to contracture and longer time of contraction. The use of sertraline and other SSRIs may be associated with development of rhabdomyolysis, especially in the presence of strenuous exercise. PMID:25581857

  19. Rhabdomyolysis After Performing Blood Flow Restriction Training: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Shogo; Suzuki, Yukio; Azuma, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-07-01

    Tabata, S, Suzuki, Y, Azuma, K, and Matsumoto, H. Rhabdomyolysis after performing blood flow restriction training: a case report. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2064-2068, 2016-Rhabdomyolysis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition related to resistance training. Despite numerous reports of low-intensity blood flow restriction (BFR) training inducing muscle hypertrophy and increasing strength, few reports of rhabdomyolysis related to BFR training have been published. Here, we report a 30-year-old obese Japanese man admitted to our hospital the day after his first BFR training session with complaints of severe muscle pain in his upper and lower extremities, high fever, and pharyngeal pain. He was diagnosed with acute rhabdomyolysis based on a serum creatine phosphokinase level of 56,475 U·L and a urine myoglobin level of >3,000 ng·ml, and with acute tonsillitis based on a white blood cell count of 17,390 and C-reactive protein level of 10.43 mg·dl. A number of factors are suspected to be related to the onset and exacerbation of rhabdomyolysis, including excessive muscular training with BFR, bacterial infection, and medication. After 10 days of hospitalization with intravenous fluids and antibacterial drugs, he recovered without complications. This case indicates that BFR training should be conducted with careful consideration of the physical condition and strength of the individual to prevent serious complications, such as rhabdomyolysis. PMID:26677831

  20. Return to physical activity after exertional rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Francis G; Brennan, Fred H; Campbell, William; Heled, Yuval; Deuster, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) is a condition characterized by muscle pain, swelling, and weakness following some exertional stress, with or without concomitant heat stress. Athletes who experience ER often present to the emergency department, the training room, or the physician's office seeking guidance and care for this condition, often feeling it is simply normal delayed onset muscle soreness. The astute clinician must perform a thorough history and focused exam, in addition to ordering a serum creatine kinase (CK) and urinalysis. In this clinical setting, a CK equal to or greater than five times normal or a urine dipstick testing positive for blood with no demonstrable red blood cells upon microscopic assessment confirms the diagnosis. A urine or serum myoglobin is more definitive when expeditiously available. After treatment for ER, the provider must risk-stratify the athlete for risk of recurrence, consider further testing, and make the difficult decision on when, if, and under what conditions the athlete can safely return to play. PMID:19005354

  1. Doxylamine overdose as a potential cause of rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Leybishkis, B; Fasseas, P; Ryan, K F

    2001-07-01

    Doxylamine succinate, an over-the-counter antihistamine, is commonly used as a nighttime sleep aid in the short-term management of insomnia. It is also used in combination with antitussive and decongestant agents for the temporary relief of common cold symptoms. Doxylamine is frequently involved in accidental and intentional overdoses. Rhabdomyolysis and secondary acute renal failure are rare but potentially serious complications, making early recognition and treatment essential. With the large number of nonprescription antihistamines and sleep aids available to the general public, it is important to keep in mind that overdose is a potential problem. The complications associated with overdose of these medications are just as life threatening as those associated with prescription drugs. A high index of suspicion and evaluation of rhabdomyolysis is warranted in antihistamine toxicity. We report an observation of severe rhabdomyolysis associated with doxylamine overdose. PMID:11465247

  2. Tsutsugamushi infection-associated acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Young, Park Chi; Hae, Chung Choon; Lee, Kim Hyun; Hoon, Chung Jong

    2003-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication that emerges in a variety of infectious diseases, such as tsutsugamushi infection. In this study, we report a 71-year-old female patient with tsutsugamushi infection who exhibiting rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. On admission, an eschar, which is characteristic of tsutsugamushi infection, was found on her right flank area. Moreover, her tsutsugamushi antibody titer was 1:40960. The elevated values of serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), aldolase, creatinine and dark brown urine secondary to myoglobinuria are consistent with indications of rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure due to tsutsugamushi infection. Her health improved without any residual effects after treatment with doxycyclin and hydration with normal saline. PMID:14717236

  3. Sports Induced Cardiac Arrest: A Case of Missed Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Parshotam L; Luthra, Neeru; Nain, Prabhdeep Singh

    2015-09-01

    Exercise induced rhabdomyolysis although uncommon, is well known in strenuous and exhaustive sports like marathons, cycling and wrestlers. But it is not known in Kabaddi players. We report a case of nearly fatal rhabdomyolysis which was missed during early resuscitation in emergency room and lead to cardiac arrest due to catastrophic metabolic acidosis and severe -hyperkalemia. After high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and return of spontaneous rhythm, emergency resuscitative exploratory laparotomy was performed for suspected bladder injury which was negative. He had remarkable recovery over 24 h following diagnosis and aggressive supportive management including peritoneal dialysis. Heat stroke and rhabdomyolysis should be suspected early in players playing strenuous sports in tropical countries even during winter. High degree of suspicion and early aggressive general support is the key to success for unusual clinical presentation of any such clinical entity. PMID:26500986

  4. Sports Induced Cardiac Arrest: A Case of Missed Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Parshotam L; Nain, Prabhdeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Exercise induced rhabdomyolysis although uncommon, is well known in strenuous and exhaustive sports like marathons, cycling and wrestlers. But it is not known in Kabaddi players. We report a case of nearly fatal rhabdomyolysis which was missed during early resuscitation in emergency room and lead to cardiac arrest due to catastrophic metabolic acidosis and severe -hyperkalemia. After high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and return of spontaneous rhythm, emergency resuscitative exploratory laparotomy was performed for suspected bladder injury which was negative. He had remarkable recovery over 24 h following diagnosis and aggressive supportive management including peritoneal dialysis. Heat stroke and rhabdomyolysis should be suspected early in players playing strenuous sports in tropical countries even during winter. High degree of suspicion and early aggressive general support is the key to success for unusual clinical presentation of any such clinical entity. PMID:26500986

  5. Genetic polymorphisms associated with exertional rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Deuster, Patricia A; Contreras-Sesvold, Carmen L; O'Connor, Francis G; Campbell, William W; Kenney, Kimbra; Capacchione, John F; Landau, Mark E; Muldoon, Sheila M; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Heled, Yuval

    2013-08-01

    Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) occurs in young, otherwise healthy, individuals principally during strenuous exercise, athletic, and military training. Although many risk factors have been offered, it is unclear why some individuals develop ER when participating in comparable levels of physical exertion under identical environmental conditions and others do not. This study investigated possible genetic polymorphisms that might help explain ER. DNA samples derived from a laboratory-based study of persons who had never experienced an episode of ER (controls) and clinical ER cases referred for testing over the past several years were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes. These included angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), α-actinin-3 (ACTN3), creatine kinase muscle isoform (CKMM), heat shock protein A1B (HSPA1B), interleukin 6 (IL6), myosin light chain kinase (MYLK), adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 (AMPD1), and sickle cell trait (HbS). Population included 134 controls and 47 ER cases. The majority of ER cases were men (n = 42/47, 89.4 %); the five women with ER were Caucasian. Eighteen African Americans (56.3 %) were ER cases. Three SNPs were associated with ER: CKMM Ncol, ACTN3 R577X, and MYLK C37885A. ER cases were 3.1 times more likely to have the GG genotype of CKMM (odds ratio/OR = 3.1, confidence interval/CI 1.33-7.10), 3.0 times for the XX genotype of ACTN3 SNP (OR = 2.97, CI 1.30-3.37), and 5.7 times for an A allele of MYLK (OR = 21.35, CI 2.60-12.30). All persons with HbS were also ER cases. Three distinct polymorphisms were associated with ER. Further work will be required to replicate these findings and determine the mechanism(s) whereby these variants might confer susceptibility. PMID:23543093

  6. [Rhabdomyolysis in a medical student induced by body-building exercise (rhabdomyolysis following acute muscular exertion)].

    PubMed

    Arányi, J; Radó, J

    1992-08-01

    A medical student sportsman had been admitted to the hospital because of weakness and painful swelling of the muscle as well as dark urine appearing after carrying out an excessive body-building performance. On the basis of indirect evidences pigmenturia "per exclusionem" was a manifestation of urinary myoglobin excretion. The development of an "acute exertional rhabdomyolysis" was confirmed by the increased serum enzyme levels and myoglobinuria. The outcome of the illness was fortunate, as acute renal failure could be avoided. On the basis of survey of the literature it can be stated, that this presumably frequently occurring, but rarely recognized disease may have importance from clinical, sporting medicine and pathophysiological point of view. PMID:1495807

  7. The role of myoglobin degradation in nephrotoxicity after rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Zorova, Ljubava D; Pevzner, Irina B; Chupyrkina, Anastasia A; Zorov, Savva D; Silachev, Denis N; Plotnikov, Egor Y; Zorov, Dmitry B

    2016-08-25

    The fate of myoglobin in renal cells was explored in an animal model of rhabdomyolysis known as the pathology highly related to oxidative stress resulting in impairment of renal functioning. The working hypothesis was that the proper degradation of myoglobin in rhabdomyolytic kidney can activate the reparative processes in the tissue. We found that incubation of myoglobin with kidney cells causes its accumulation in the cytoplasm. In rhabdomyolytic rats, the level of heme and free iron in cytoplasm and mitochondria of kidney cells is remarkably increased while inhibition of proteolysis results in further elevation of myoglobin content in the renal tissue. Heme oxygenase and ferritin levels were found to be increased in the kidney tissue at rhabdomyolysis and simulating conditions performed by i/v injection of myoglobin. In addition, the level of peroxidized lipids was high in rhabdomyolytic kidney and became even higher after inhibition of proteolysis by aprotinin. Elevated levels of carbonylated proteins were also observed after rhabdomyolysis, however, if prior to induction of rhabdomyolysis the injection of myoglobin was done, the level of carbonylated proteins dropped versus unprimed kidney tissue thus affording protection to the kidney against oxidative stress. Injection of myoglobin to the rat results in impairment of renal functioning and inhibition of myoglobin degradation in the rhabdomyolytic animal aggravates acute renal failure, demonstrating that degradation of myoglobin is somehow beneficial although it may result in undesired release of free iron which can participate in toxic redox cycling. PMID:27329933

  8. A Case of Occult Compartment Syndrome and Nonresolving Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Minnema, Brian J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Quraishi, Nasir A.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    Case report A 32-year-old African male presented with 10 hours of severe back pain. Initial computed tomography scan of the back showed no abnormality, and initial laboratory investigations were consistent with rhabdomyolysis. Despite stopping potential causative medications, aggressive intravenous hydration, and urine alkalinization, his creatinine kinase continued to steadily climb. Thirty-six hours after admission, a magnetic resonance imaging of his back was done because of new swelling over the right paraspinal muscles and loss of sensation in this region. Marked swelling of the right erector spinae muscles was observed, and right and left compartment pressure measurements were 108 and 21 mm Hg, respectively. He had urgent fasciotomy after which his rhabdomyolysis and pain recovered. Conclusion Our case highlights the need for early consideration of compartment syndrome as a possible cause of back pain in the setting of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis can present in the absence of late complications such as neurological and vascular compromise. PMID:18350340

  9. [Clinico-pharmacologic explanation models of cerivastatin associated rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Zeitlinger, Markus; Müller, Markus

    2003-01-01

    Because of fatal cases of rhabdomyolysis the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor cerivastatin had to be withdrawn from the global market in 2001. The high frequency and severity of cerivastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis caused concerns about the safety of the entire class of HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins). Still, the frequency of deadly incidents of rhabdomyolysis with cerivastatin was 16 to 80 times higher than with other statins. This seems to be due to a combination of several pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of cerivastatin. Cerivastatin shows the highest oral bioavailability within its class. Interactions with other drugs like gemfibrocil may cause further elevation of cerivastatin plasma levels, thereby leading to higher frequencies of side effects in peripheral organs. With approximately 1 pM cerivastatin shows the lowest IC50 for inhibition of HMG-CoA-reductase of all statins. The combination of high systemic drug levels and high intrinsic activity potentially leads to apoptosis and energy-depletion of skeletal-muscle cells. Therefore cerivastatin-associated fatal rhabdomyolysis seems to be based on specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of cerivastatin, and is not a general characteristic of all members of this drug-class. The experiences with cerivastatin support the importance of clinical studies even about well established drugs, and underline the relevance of precise reporting of adverse events by each physician. PMID:12879633

  10. Two Cases of Rhabdomyolysis (Haff Disease) After Eating Carp Fish

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Joey V.; Sein, Saw; Lyon, Claudia; Apergis, George

    2016-01-01

    Unexplained rhabdomyolysis after eating fish is a rare condition caused by an unidentified toxin. Most of the incidences in the United States have been linked to consuming buffalo fish or crawfish. We present 2 cases of Haff disease in which the patients consumed grass carp as opposed to the usual suspects of buffalo fish or crawfish.

  11. Rhabdomyolysis due to Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Administration following a Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Augustyn, Alexander; Lisa Alattar, Mona; Naina, Harris

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis, a syndrome of muscle necrosis, is a life-threatening event. Here we describe the case of a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia who underwent a haploidentical stem cell transplant and subsequently developed rhabdomyolysis after beginning trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) prophylaxis therapy. Rechallenge with TMP/SMX resulted in a repeat episode of rhabdomyolysis and confirmed the association. Withdrawal of TMP/SMX led to sustained normalization of creatine kinase levels in the patient. A high index of suspicion is necessary to identify TMP/SMX as the cause of rhabdomyolysis in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26557399

  12. Rhabdomyolysis as presenting feature of acute HIV-1 seroconversion in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Jason; Katner, Harold; Core, S Brent; Dozier, Jean; Patel, Chintan; Davis, Chanty

    2016-04-01

    Acute rhabdomyolysis is a rare phenomenon in the emergency setting almost exclusively associated with trauma, drugs, and recent upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infection. Rare reports in the literature have highlighted adult patients presenting with rhabdomyolysis as 1 component in a constellation of symptoms in acute HIV-1 seroconversion; however, there are few reports of rhabdomyolysis as the sole presenting symptom. This case highlights the importance of investigating HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases in pediatric cases of rhabdomyolysis in the emergency care setting. PMID:26584564

  13. Synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis resulting in rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Argamany, Jacqueline R; Reveles, Kelly R; Duhon, Bryson

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid usage has increased in the past decade. Concurrently, emergency management of associated adverse effects due to synthetic cannabinoid usage has also risen. Reported toxicities include psychosis, seizures, cardiotoxicity, acute kidney injury, and death. While cannabis was first described as a cause of acute hyperemesis in 2004, a more recent case series also describes the association between cannabinoid hyperemesis and risk of acute renal failure. Synthetic cannabinoids have also been reported to cause acute hyperemesis and acute renal failure; however, the risk of rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure has yet to be elucidated. In this article, we report the first known case of synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis leading to rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. PMID:26422191

  14. Acute-onset rhabdomyolysis secondary to sitagliptin and atorvastatin interaction

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Waqas; Kurian, Saji; Bishnoi, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a serious medical condition in which the skeletal muscle tissue gets damaged and breaks down at rapid rates, potentially leading to death if not managed early on. Rhabdomyolysis in adults has several etiologies such as crush injuries, prolonged immobilization, strenuous exercise, hormonal or metabolic causes, infections, and drug–drug interactions. We present a case report of the interaction of two drugs that are used commonly in the general population. We here discuss a case of a 60-year-old female who presented to the hospital with complaints of generalized weakness, muscle aches, and atypical chest pain for a week after her primary care physician started her on sitagliptin while she was already on atorvastatin. After review of literature, this is the second known case of such an interaction causing acute breakdown of skeletal musculature. PMID:27199569

  15. Rhabdomyolysis Due to Severe Hypophosphatemia in Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Shah, S K; Shah, L; Bhattarai, S; Giri, M

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome characterized by injury to skeletal muscle fibers with disruption and release of toxic metabolites into circulation. It is characterized by triad of muscle weakness, myalgia and dark urine and is associated with increased creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. A severely malnourished 10 year old girl with severe diabetic ketoacidosis as hemr initial presentation of type 1 diabetes mellitus developed rhabdomyolysis (CK- 12,000 U/L) with non-oliguric renal failure during her initial course of hospital stay. The possible cause of her RM was attributed to severe hypophosphatemia (minimum serum phosphate, 0.8 mg/dL). Management of diabetic ketoacidosis phosphate supplementation and urinary alkalinization with diuresis improved her clinical course. She was discharged on Day 9 with Insulin. We recommend frequent monitoring of serum phosphate during early period of DKA, particularly in malnourished children, and its normalization in case of severe hypophosphatemia. PMID:26994037

  16. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Arvind; Singh, Varun Kumar; Nanda, Satyan

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare but potentially lethal complication of severe dengue fever. We present a case of 21-year-old man with fever, bodyache and black coloured and decreasing amount of urine. He was positive for NS1 (non-structural protein-1) antigen and IgM antibody for dengue. Platelet count was below 20 × 10(9)/L and kidney function test was deranged. Urine was positive for myoglobin. The patient was managed emergently on conservative lines and improved in 10 days. Rhabdomyolysis should always be kept in mind in a patient with severe dengue, as its early detection and prompt management can prevent further progression to acute renal failure. PMID:26174727

  17. Acute-onset rhabdomyolysis secondary to sitagliptin and atorvastatin interaction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Waqas; Kurian, Saji; Bishnoi, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a serious medical condition in which the skeletal muscle tissue gets damaged and breaks down at rapid rates, potentially leading to death if not managed early on. Rhabdomyolysis in adults has several etiologies such as crush injuries, prolonged immobilization, strenuous exercise, hormonal or metabolic causes, infections, and drug-drug interactions. We present a case report of the interaction of two drugs that are used commonly in the general population. We here discuss a case of a 60-year-old female who presented to the hospital with complaints of generalized weakness, muscle aches, and atypical chest pain for a week after her primary care physician started her on sitagliptin while she was already on atorvastatin. After review of literature, this is the second known case of such an interaction causing acute breakdown of skeletal musculature. PMID:27199569

  18. Rare times rare: The hyponatremia, rhabdomyolysis, anterior compartment syndrome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Ina; Gelber, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Lesson Primary polydipsia occurs in up to 25% of patients with chronic psychiatric disorders (especially schizophrenia), related to the disease, its treatment or both. Urine output fails to match intake >10 L/day and water intoxication may develop. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of hyponatremia, and an acute anterior compartment syndrome of the leg, an emergency, may be very rarely associated. PMID:27186379

  19. FATAL RHABDOMYOLYSIS IN DENGUE HEMORRHAGIC FEVER: A CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Siriyakorn, Nirada; Insiripong, Somchai

    2015-01-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is caused by dengue virus infection. The classical manifestations consist of fever, thrombocytopenia, and hemoconcentration. However, its unusual complications may be fatal, such as prolong shock, massive bleeding, volume overload, and unusual manifestations, for example, severe rhabdomyolysis. Here we report a case of 17-year old Thai man who was referred to our hospital because of 7-day fever with thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration and right pleural effusion. The serology tests confirmed to be dengue infection. He developed various complications: severe hepatitis, coagulopathy, and heavy proteinuria; encephalopathy that needed a respiratory ventilator. On day 12 of fever, he had myalgia and passed dark urine. Serum creatinine and serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) were found abnormally high. He was diagnosed as severe rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury, and immediate hemodialysis was performed. He did not respond to treatment and expired within three hours. Although the mechanism of severe rhabdomyolysis in dengue fever is not clearly known, it may theoretically be proposed such as direct muscle cell injury leading to myositis by dengue virus, myotoxic cytokines which are produced in response to viral infection, dehydration or hypophosphatemia. PMID:26506741

  20. Statin-Induced Rhabdomyolysis: A Comprehensive Review of Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Polyana; Robles, Priscila Games

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify case reports of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and summarize common predisposing factors, symptoms, diagnostic findings, functional outcomes, characteristics, treatment, and rehabilitation. Method: MEDLINE, CINAHL, SCOPUS, and PEDro databases were searched (1990–2013) for relevant case reports using the search terms “Statins,” “Rhabdomyolysis,” “Myalgia,” “Muscle damage,” “Muscle injury,” and “Myopathy.” Relevance (based on title and abstract) was assessed by one investigator; two investigators independently reviewed the relevant articles to determine inclusion in the review. Results: A total of 112 cases met the inclusion criteria. The majority were in men (70%) and people over 45 years of age (mean 64 [SD 14] years). Simvastatin was the most commonly reported statin (n=55); the majority of cases reported the use of concomitant medications such as fibrates (n=25). Weakness (n=65) and muscle pain (n=64) were the most common symptoms. In 19 cases, the patient was referred to rehabilitation, but the case reports do not include descriptions of the treatment. Conclusion: Statin-induced rhabdomyolysis was more commonly reported when statins were used in conjunction with other drugs, which potentiated its effect. Research is needed to identify the role of exercise and rehabilitation following statin-induced rhabdomyoloysis since muscle damage may be severe and may have long-term effects on muscle function. PMID:24799748

  1. [Rhabdomyolysis associated with dengue fever in a lupic patient].

    PubMed

    Verdolin, Louise D; Borner, Alice R; Mussi, Henrique; Gismondi, Ronaldo A; Schau, Bruno; Ramos, Ricardo C

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the case of a woman with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) that developed rhabdomyolysis after being infected by dengue virus. There are only a few cases of SLE accompanied by rhabdomyolysis, none of them associated with dengue fever. Initially, the woman presented high fever, myalgia, muscular weakness, mild headache, polyarthralgia and thrombocytopenia reminding a lupus flare, but since the number of people infected by dengue at that time was high and the symptoms from both conditions are similar, a dengue serology was requested. After a few days, the patient developed rhabdomyolysis. She was then submitted to immunosuppressive drugs, urinary alkalization and vigorous hydration, which improved her muscle damage and inflammatory condition. The positive dengue serology was only available after the therapy above had been established. She was discharged in an asymptomatic state. This case demonstrates how alike dengue fever and a lupus flare are, warning clinicians that, especially during an epidemic, both diseases should be carefully differentiated in order to establish a correct and efficient therapy. PMID:25627228

  2. Frostbite with rhabdomyolysis and renal failure: radionuclide study. [/sup 99m/Tc

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthall, L.; Kloiber, R.; Gagnon, R.; Damtew, B.; Lough, J.

    1981-08-01

    There is a growing list of muscle lesions exhibiting concentration of bone-seeking /sup 99m/Tc-labeled phosphate complexes; however, rhabdomyolysis due to cold injury has not been included. We performed a multiradiopharmaceutical study that yielded interesting results on a patient who sustained frostbite injury of the legs that led to rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

  3. Recurrent exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis due to low intensity fitness exercise in a healthy young patient

    PubMed Central

    Karre, Premnath Reddy; Gujral, Jeetinder

    2011-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is an uncommon but life threatening condition that develops due to breakdown of muscle and release of intracellular components into the circulation. A 24-year-old man otherwise healthy was admitted to our hospital because of muscle aches and weakness as well as cola coloured urine developed 3 days after carrying out the low intensity exercise. Diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was made with creatine kinase (CK) levels of 214 356 U/l. He was treated for a similar condition at age 21. A muscle biopsy was done and the findings were normal. Rhabdomyolysis can develop with low intensity exercise; thus, it be considered in healthy young people. Young people with recurrent rhabdomyolysis due to low intensity exercise, in the absence of obvious medical and physical causes, should be evaluated further to rule out uncommon metabolic diseases. Our case demonstrates that complications especially renal failure in patients with rhabdomyolysis do not correspond to CK levels. PMID:22700603

  4. Therapeutic Effects of Procainamide on Endotoxin-Induced Rhabdomyolysis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chih-Chin; Hii, Hiong-Ping; Tsao, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Shiu-Jen; Ka, Shuk-Man; Liao, Mei-Hui; Wu, Chin-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Overt systemic inflammatory response is a predisposing mechanism for infection-induced skeletal muscle damage and rhabdomyolysis. Aberrant DNA methylation plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of excessive inflammatory response. The antiarrhythmic drug procainamide is a non-nucleoside inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) used to alleviate DNA hypermethylation. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of procainamide on the syndromes and complications of rhabdomyolysis rats induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Rhabdomyolysis animal model was established by intravenous infusion of LPS (5 mg/kg) accompanied by procainamide therapy (50 mg/kg). During the experimental period, the changes of hemodynamics, muscle injury index, kidney function, blood gas, blood electrolytes, blood glucose, and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were examined. Kidneys and lungs were exercised to analyze superoxide production, neutrophil infiltration, and DNMTs expression. The rats in this model showed similar clinical syndromes and complications of rhabdomyolysis including high levels of plasma creatine kinase, acute kidney injury, hyperkalemia, hypocalcemia, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. The increases of lung DNMT1 expression and plasma IL-6 concentration were also observed in rhabdomyolysis animals induced by LPS. Treatment with procainamide not only inhibited the overexpression of DNMT1 but also diminished the overproduction of IL-6 in rhabdomyolysis rats. In addition, procainamide improved muscle damage, renal dysfunction, electrolytes disturbance, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, and hypoglycemia in the rats with rhabdomyolysis. Moreover, another DNMT inhibitor hydralazine mitigated hypoglycemia, muscle damage, and renal dysfunction in rhabdomyolysis rats. These findings reveal that therapeutic effects of procainamide could be based on the suppression of DNMT1 and pro-inflammatory cytokine in endotoxin-induced rhabdomyolysis. PMID:26918767

  5. Therapeutic Effects of Procainamide on Endotoxin-Induced Rhabdomyolysis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chih-Chin; Hii, Hiong-Ping; Tsao, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Shiu-Jen; Ka, Shuk-Man; Liao, Mei-Hui; Wu, Chin-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Overt systemic inflammatory response is a predisposing mechanism for infection-induced skeletal muscle damage and rhabdomyolysis. Aberrant DNA methylation plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of excessive inflammatory response. The antiarrhythmic drug procainamide is a non-nucleoside inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) used to alleviate DNA hypermethylation. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of procainamide on the syndromes and complications of rhabdomyolysis rats induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Rhabdomyolysis animal model was established by intravenous infusion of LPS (5 mg/kg) accompanied by procainamide therapy (50 mg/kg). During the experimental period, the changes of hemodynamics, muscle injury index, kidney function, blood gas, blood electrolytes, blood glucose, and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were examined. Kidneys and lungs were exercised to analyze superoxide production, neutrophil infiltration, and DNMTs expression. The rats in this model showed similar clinical syndromes and complications of rhabdomyolysis including high levels of plasma creatine kinase, acute kidney injury, hyperkalemia, hypocalcemia, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. The increases of lung DNMT1 expression and plasma IL-6 concentration were also observed in rhabdomyolysis animals induced by LPS. Treatment with procainamide not only inhibited the overexpression of DNMT1 but also diminished the overproduction of IL-6 in rhabdomyolysis rats. In addition, procainamide improved muscle damage, renal dysfunction, electrolytes disturbance, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, and hypoglycemia in the rats with rhabdomyolysis. Moreover, another DNMT inhibitor hydralazine mitigated hypoglycemia, muscle damage, and renal dysfunction in rhabdomyolysis rats. These findings reveal that therapeutic effects of procainamide could be based on the suppression of DNMT1 and pro-inflammatory cytokine in endotoxin-induced rhabdomyolysis. PMID:26918767

  6. Statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in patient with renal failure and underlying undiagnosed hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ambapkar, Sachinkumar N; Shetty, Naresh; Dwivedy, Arpita; Malve, Harshad Onkarrao

    2016-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome characterized by muscle necrosis which causes the release of myoglobin into the bloodstream. The manifestations of this syndrome range from asymptomatic elevation of serum muscle enzymes to life-threatening cases associated with extremely high enzyme levels, electrolyte imbalance, and acute renal failure. Symptoms of rhabdomyolysis include dark urine, muscle weakness, and fatigue. Statins are commonly used drugs for the prevention and management of dyslipidemia. We present an interesting and critical case on statin-induced rhabdomyolysis with renal failure and previously undiagnosed idiopathic hypothyroidism. PMID:27275082

  7. Electroconvulsive in a Schizophrenic Patient With Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome and Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    San Gabriel, Maria Chona P; Eddula-Changala, Bharathi; Tan, Yonghong; Longshore, Carrol T

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a middle-aged man with a chronic history of schizoaffective disorder, depressed type, stable on a second-generation antipsychotic. Psychotic symptoms recurred contingent to medication noncompliance necessitating hospitalization. Treatment was complicated by the development of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). In addition, subsequent medication rechallenges failed because of recurrent rhabdomyolysis and atypical NMS. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) treatment was initiated, affording remission of psychotic symptoms and nonrecurrence of NMS and rhabdomyolysis. Our experience confirmed the efficacy of ECT treatment in providing symptom relief of psychosis complicated by recurrent episodes of NMS and atypical NMS. Likewise, it illustrated the efficacy of ECT treatment for rhabdomyolysis. PMID:25243752

  8. Rhabdomyolysis in the Setting of Induced Hypothyroidism and Statin Therapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jbara, Yaser; Bricker, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Mild elevation of creatine kinase (CK) is common in untreated hypothyroidism, but severe myositis and overt rhabdomyolysis are rare. Similarly, muscle pain and CK elevation are potential side effects of statin therapy, yet rhabdomyolysis is likewise rare in the absence of medication interactions adversely affecting statin metabolism. The coexistence of statin therapy and hypothyroid states may synergistically increase the risk of myopathy. We describe a case of rhabdomyolysis attributable to induced hypothyroidism in a patient on chronic statin medication who was anticipating adjuvant radioiodine (131I) therapy for a thyroid carcinoma PMID:25960964

  9. Bench-to-bedside review: Rhabdomyolysis – an overview for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Alardín, Ana L; Varon, Joseph; Marik, Paul E

    2005-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis ranges from an asymptomatic illness with elevation in the creatine kinase level to a life-threatening condition associated with extreme elevations in creatine kinase, electrolyte imbalances, acute renal failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Muscular trauma is the most common cause of rhabdomyolysis. Less common causes include muscle enzyme deficiencies, electrolyte abnormalities, infectious causes, drugs, toxins and endocrinopathies. Weakness, myalgia and tea-colored urine are the main clinical manifestations. The most sensitive laboratory finding of muscle injury is an elevated plasma creatine kinase level. The management of patients with rhabdomyolysis includes early vigorous hydration. PMID:15774072

  10. Statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in patient with renal failure and underlying undiagnosed hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ambapkar, Sachinkumar N.; Shetty, Naresh; Dwivedy, Arpita; Malve, Harshad Onkarrao

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome characterized by muscle necrosis which causes the release of myoglobin into the bloodstream. The manifestations of this syndrome range from asymptomatic elevation of serum muscle enzymes to life-threatening cases associated with extremely high enzyme levels, electrolyte imbalance, and acute renal failure. Symptoms of rhabdomyolysis include dark urine, muscle weakness, and fatigue. Statins are commonly used drugs for the prevention and management of dyslipidemia. We present an interesting and critical case on statin-induced rhabdomyolysis with renal failure and previously undiagnosed idiopathic hypothyroidism. PMID:27275082

  11. Poststernotomy Osteomyelitis Presenting with Severe Sepsis and Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Eugene M.; Lyle, Melissa; Cawcutt, Kelly; Temesgen, Zelalem

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male, who recently underwent a composite valve graft of the aortic root and ascending aorta for bicuspid aortic valve and aortic root aneurysm, was hospitalized for severe sepsis, rhabdomyolysis (creatine kinase 29000 U/L), and severe liver dysfunction (AST > 7000 U/L, ALT 4228 U/L, and INR > 10). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were consistent with sternal osteomyelitis with a 1.5 cm abscess at the inferior sternotomy margin, which was contiguous with pericardial thickening. Aspiration and culture of this abscess did not yield any organisms, so he was treated with vancomycin and cefepime empirically for 4 weeks. Because this patient was improving clinically on antibiotics and did not show external signs of wound infection, there was no compelling indication for sternectomy. This patient's unusual presentation with osteomyelitis and rhabdomyolysis has never been reported and is crucial for clinicians to recognize in order to prevent delays in diagnosis. PMID:27143974

  12. Rhabdomyolysis. The role of diagnostic and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Keltz, Eran; Khan, Fahmi Yousef; Mann, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Summary Rhabdomyolysis, literally meaning the breakdown of muscle tissue, is a common syndrome with many causes, acquired ones such as exertion, trauma, infections, temperature extremes, drugs, toxins, electrolyte and endocrine abnormalities, and congenital ones such as myopathies and connective tissue disorders. All results in a common pathophysiologic pathway which ends with the dispersing of muscle tissue content into the circulation. Rhabdomyolysis has characteristic clinical, laboratory and radiologic features, but does require a high index of suspicion so that the diagnosis would not be missed. The sensitivity and specificity of the various characteristics, as well as clinical guidelines, are discussed in this paper. The syndrome may present with several complications, e.g. arrhythmias, electrolyte abnormalities, acute renal injury, acidosis, volume depletion, compartment syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The prognosis is highly variable and depends on the underlying etiologies and complications, but is in general considered as good. The milestone of treatment is vigorous fluid resuscitation. Treatment options, in practice and in research, are discussed in the following pages. PMID:24596694

  13. TASER® Electronic Control Device-Induced Rhabdomyolysis and Renal Failure: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Many law enforcement agencies around the United States are employing the use of TASER® electronic control devices (TASER® International Inc.) to subdue combative suspects. Since its inception the TASER® has had a temporal association with reports of rhabdomyolysis. Case reports have reported TASER® induced rhabdomyolysis as mild but serious cases have also been reported. Herein we present the case of a single patient who was admitted to our health network with severe rhabdomyolysis after receiving TASER® shocks and review the pertinent literature. No direct link has been established between clinically significant rhabdomyolysis and TASER® device application but this case serves as an example of a sparsely documented but serious complication that may occur in patients who are at risk for restraint by an electronic control device. PMID:26557540

  14. Severe Rhabdomyolysis Caused by Plasmodium vivax Malaria in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, André M.; Alexandre, Márcia A. A.; Mourão, Maria P. G.; Santos, Valquir S.; Nagahashi-Marie, Suely K.; Alecrim, Maria G. C.; Lacerda, Marcus V. G.

    2010-01-01

    Severe rhabdomyolysis (creatine phosphokinase = 29,400U/L) developed in a 16-year-old boy from Manaus, Brazil, after he started treatment with chloroquine for infection with Plasmodium vivax. Treatment led to myoglobinuria and acute renal failure. After hemodialysis, the patient improved and a muscle biopsy specimen showed no myophosphorylase or deaminase deficiency. This case of rhabdomyolysis associated with P. vivax infection showed no comorbidities. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Although rhabdomyolysis is generally reported as a complication of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, leading to metabolic and renal complications,1 it has been reported in a patient with P. vivax infection with myoadenylate deaminase deficiency.2 We report a case in a patient without typical muscle enzyme deficiencies in which severe rhabdomyolysis developed while the patients was being treated with chloroquine for a confirmed P. vivax infection. PMID:20682866

  15. TASER(®) Electronic Control Device-Induced Rhabdomyolysis and Renal Failure: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gleason, James Benjamin; Ahmad, Ibrahim

    2015-10-01

    Many law enforcement agencies around the United States are employing the use of TASER(®) electronic control devices (TASER(®) International Inc.) to subdue combative suspects. Since its inception the TASER(®) has had a temporal association with reports of rhabdomyolysis. Case reports have reported TASER(®) induced rhabdomyolysis as mild but serious cases have also been reported. Herein we present the case of a single patient who was admitted to our health network with severe rhabdomyolysis after receiving TASER(®) shocks and review the pertinent literature. No direct link has been established between clinically significant rhabdomyolysis and TASER(®) device application but this case serves as an example of a sparsely documented but serious complication that may occur in patients who are at risk for restraint by an electronic control device. PMID:26557540

  16. Spinning-induced Rhabdomyolysis: Eleven Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daejin; Ko, Eun-Jung; Cho, HyeJeong; Park, Su Hyung; Lee, Sang Hwan; Cho, Nam-gil; Lee, So-Young; Jeong, Hye Yun

    2015-01-01

    Non-traumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis (exRML) occurs in individuals with normal muscles when the energy supplied to the muscle is insufficient. Here, we report 11 cases of spinning-induced rhabdomyolysis and review related literature. Spinning is a kind of indoor bicycle sport. The 11 patients who were diagnosed with exRML and admitted to CHA Bundang Medical Center were female and their ages ranged from 15 to 46 years. Two to three days prior to the presentation, the patients had attended a spinning class for the first time. All the patients had been otherwise healthy without any known medical illnesses. They were successfully treated without any complications, except mild non-symptomatic hypocalcemia. However, in the literature, severe complications such as compartment syndrome or acute kidney injury had been reported in relation to exRML including spinning-induced rhabdomyolysis. This spinning exercise needs prior guidelines and specific warnings to prevent exertional rhabdomyolysis. PMID:26848305

  17. Specific macrophage subtypes influence the progression of rhabdomyolysis-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Belliere, Julie; Casemayou, Audrey; Ducasse, Laure; Zakaroff-Girard, Alexia; Martins, Frédéric; Iacovoni, Jason S; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte; Pipy, Bernard; Chauveau, Dominique; Schanstra, Joost P; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2015-06-01

    Rhabdomyolysis can be life threatening if complicated by AKI. Macrophage infiltration has been observed in rat kidneys after glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis, but the role of macrophages in rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI remains unknown. Here, in a patient diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis, we detected substantial macrophage infiltration in the kidney. In a mouse model of rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI, diverse renal macrophage phenotypes were observed depending on the stage of the disease. Two days after rhabdomyolysis, F4/80(low)CD11b(high)Ly6b(high)CD206(low) kidney macrophages were dominant, whereas by day 8, F4/80(high)CD11b(+)Ly6b(low)CD206(high) cells became the most abundant. Single-cell gene expression analyses of FACS-sorted macrophages revealed that these subpopulations were heterogeneous and that individual cells simultaneously expressed both M1 and M2 markers. Liposomal clodronate-mediated macrophage depletion significantly reduced the early infiltration of F4/80(low)CD11b(high)Ly6b(high)CD206(low) macrophages. Furthermore, transcriptionally regulated targets potentially involved in disease progression, including fibronectin, collagen III, and chemoattractants that were identified via single-cell analysis, were verified as macrophage-dependent in situ. In vitro, myoglobin treatment induced proximal tubular cells to secrete chemoattractants and macrophages to express proinflammatory markers. At day 30, liposomal clodronate-mediated macrophage depletion reduced fibrosis and improved both kidney repair and mouse survival. Seven months after rhabdomyolysis, histologic lesions were still present but were substantially reduced with prior depletion of macrophages. These results suggest an important role for macrophages in rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI progression and advocate the utility of long-term follow-up for patients with this disease. PMID:25270069

  18. Specific Macrophage Subtypes Influence the Progression of Rhabdomyolysis-Induced Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Belliere, Julie; Casemayou, Audrey; Ducasse, Laure; Zakaroff-Girard, Alexia; Martins, Frédéric; Iacovoni, Jason S.; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte; Pipy, Bernard; Chauveau, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis can be life threatening if complicated by AKI. Macrophage infiltration has been observed in rat kidneys after glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis, but the role of macrophages in rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI remains unknown. Here, in a patient diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis, we detected substantial macrophage infiltration in the kidney. In a mouse model of rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI, diverse renal macrophage phenotypes were observed depending on the stage of the disease. Two days after rhabdomyolysis, F4/80lowCD11bhighLy6bhighCD206low kidney macrophages were dominant, whereas by day 8, F4/80highCD11b+Ly6blowCD206high cells became the most abundant. Single-cell gene expression analyses of FACS-sorted macrophages revealed that these subpopulations were heterogeneous and that individual cells simultaneously expressed both M1 and M2 markers. Liposomal clodronate-mediated macrophage depletion significantly reduced the early infiltration of F4/80lowCD11bhighLy6bhighCD206low macrophages. Furthermore, transcriptionally regulated targets potentially involved in disease progression, including fibronectin, collagen III, and chemoattractants that were identified via single-cell analysis, were verified as macrophage-dependent in situ. In vitro, myoglobin treatment induced proximal tubular cells to secrete chemoattractants and macrophages to express proinflammatory markers. At day 30, liposomal clodronate-mediated macrophage depletion reduced fibrosis and improved both kidney repair and mouse survival. Seven months after rhabdomyolysis, histologic lesions were still present but were substantially reduced with prior depletion of macrophages. These results suggest an important role for macrophages in rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI progression and advocate the utility of long-term follow-up for patients with this disease. PMID:25270069

  19. Primary aldosteronism associated with severe rhabdomyolysis due to profound hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Goto, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Kishimoto, Miyako; Minowada, Shigeru; Aibe, Hitoshi; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Kajio, Hiroshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    A 55-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital with severe weakness. Without measurement of serum electrolyte concentrations, diuretic therapy for hypertension was started 2 weeks prior to admission. Laboratory findings showed profound hypokalemia (1.4 mEq/L), and extreme elevation of the serum creatinine phosphokinase levels (15,760 IU/L), suggesting that the patient had hypokalemic paralysis and hypokalemia-induced rhabdomyolysis. Further evaluations, including adrenal venous sampling strongly suggested that he had primary aldosteronism. He was treated successfully by laparoscopic adrenalectomy. This case provides an important lesson that serum electrolyte concentrations should be measured in hypertensive patients before the administration of antihypertensive agents. PMID:19218772

  20. A case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure induced by rhabdomyolysis; possible involvement of hypophosphatemia or phosphate depletion.

    PubMed

    Wada, S; Nagase, T; Koike, Y; Kugai, N; Nagata, N

    1992-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl with anorexia nervosa first presented with malnutrition, liver dysfunction, and rhabdomyolysis. Administration of fluid and nutrition saved her from the initial critical state, but acute renal failure followed. Laboratory examination revealed intrinsic renal failure induced by rhabdomyolysis. Latent phosphate depletion and refeeding-induced hypophosphatemia was implicated as the cause of rhabdomyolysis; however coexisting hypotension, dehydration, and liver dysfunction may have contributed to the renal failure. The patient recovered from azotemia by hemodialysis. This is the first reported case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure resulting from rhabdomyolysis induced by hypophosphatemia or phosphate depletion. PMID:1633352

  1. Severe Rhabdomyolysis without Systemic Involvement: A Rare Case of Idiopathic Eosinophilic Polymyositis

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Ayesha; Choksi, Vivek; Chu, Andrew; Mankodi, Dhruti; Shaharyar, Sameer; O'Brien, Keith; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Eosinophilic polymyositis (EPM) is a rare cause of rhabdomyolysis characterized by eosinophilic infiltrates in the muscle. We describe the case of a young patient with eosinophilic polymyositis causing isolated severe rhabdomyolysis without systemic involvement. Case Presentation. A 22-year-old Haitian female with no past medical history presented with progressive generalized muscle aches without precipitating factors. Examination of the extremities revealed diffuse muscle tenderness. Laboratory findings demonstrated peripheral eosinophilia and high creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) and transaminase levels. Workup for the common causes of rhabdomyolysis were negative. Her CPK continued to rise to greater than 100,000 units/L so a muscle biopsy was performed which showed widespread eosinophilic infiltrate consistent with eosinophilic polymyositis. She was started on high dose systemic corticosteroids with improvement of her symptoms, eosinophilia, and CPK level. Discussion. This case illustrates a systematic workup of rhabdomyolysis in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Many differential diagnoses must be considered before establishing a diagnosis of idiopathic eosinophilic polymyositis. To our knowledge, our case of eosinophilic polymyositis is unique as it presented with severe rhabdomyolysis without another organ involvement. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for this physically debilitating disease to aid in prompt diagnosis. PMID:26229703

  2. A rare autopsy case of traumatic rhabdomyolysis associated with intermittent assault.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Fumiko; Makino, Yohsuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Inokuchi, Go; Ishii, Namiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Abe, Hiroko; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Hashimoto, Mari; Sakuma, Ayaka; Nagasawa, Sayaka; Saito, Hisako; Yajima, Daisuke; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic rhabdomyolysis generally occurs after severe blunt trauma and is acute in onset, associated with severe disease, and potentially lethal. Accordingly, diagnosis of traumatic rhabdomyolysis in patients without massive subcutaneous or intramuscular hemorrhage is difficult, especially in the postmortem period, which is limited in terms of the availability of biochemical examination tools and accurate history of illness. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of death from traumatic rhabdomyolysis among individuals who did not pursue medical consultation. A previously healthy man in his early sixties had been punched and kicked several times in the previous 2months, but he had not gone to a hospital. He suddenly lost consciousness at his workplace approximately 5days after the most recent assault, and cardiopulmonary arrest occurred when the emergency service arrived. He died the same day, and a medicolegal autopsy was performed. Although several sites of minor subcutaneous and muscle hemorrhage were observed, the cause of death was unclear upon macroscopic assessment. Immunohistochemical staining revealed acute renal failure caused by rhabdomyolysis. We herein report a rare case of fatal traumatic rhabdomyolysis, seemingly associated with minor and apparently nonlethal muscle injury. PMID:27161922

  3. A Case of Mushroom Poisoning with Russula subnigricans: Development of Rhabdomyolysis, Acute Kidney Injury, Cardiogenic Shock, and Death

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mushroom exposures are increasing worldwide. The incidence and fatality of mushroom poisoning are reported to be increasing. Several new syndromes in mushroom poisoning have been described. Rhabdomyolytic mushroom poisoning is one of new syndromes. Russula subnigricans mushroom can cause delayed-onset rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury in the severely poisoned patient. There are few reports on the toxicity of R. subnigricans. This report represents the first record of R. subnigricans poisoning with rhabdomyolysis in Korea, describing a 51-year-old man who suffered from rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, severe hypocalcemia, respiratory failure, ventricular tachycardia, cardiogenic shock, and death. Mushroom poisoning should be considered in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis of unknown cause. Furthermore, R. subnigricans should be considered in the mushroom poisoning with rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27366018

  4. BIOPSY PROVEN ACUTE TUBULAR NECROSIS DUE TO RHABDOMYOLYSIS IN A DENGUE FEVER PATIENT: A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Repizo, Liliany P.; Malheiros, Denise M.; Yu, Luis; Barros, Rui T.; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Renal histology results are very scarce in dengue-associated rhabdomyolysis patients developing acute kidney injury (AKI). We report a case of dengue fever-induced AKI associated to rhabdomyolysis with a renal biopsy showing acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and renal deposition of myoglobin. A 28-year-old patient who presented dengue fever (DF) complicated by severe AKI and rhabdomyolysis is described. The patient required hemodialysis for three weeks. A renal biopsy revealed ATN with positive staining for myoglobin in the renal tubuli. The patient was discharged with recovered renal function. In conclusion, this case report described a biopsy proven ATN associated to DF-induced rhabdomyolysis, in which renal deposition of myoglobin was demonstrated. We suggest that serum creatine phosphokinase should be monitored in DF patients to allow for an early diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis and the institution of renal protective measures. PMID:24553615

  5. Update: Exertional rhabdomyolysis, active component, U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps, 2011-2015.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Among active component members of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps in 2015, there were 456 incident episodes of rhabdomyolysis likely due to physical exertion or heat stress ("exertional rhabdomyolysis"). Annual rates of incident diagnoses of exertional rhabdomyolysis increased 17% between 2014 and 2015. In 2015, the highest incidence rates occurred in service members who were male; younger than 20 years of age; black, non-Hispanic; members of the Marine Corps and Army; recruit trainees; and in combat-specific occupations. Most cases of exertional rhabdomyolysis were diagnosed at installations that support basic combat/recruit training or major ground combat units of the Army or Marine Corps. Medical care providers should consider exertional rhabdomyolysis in the differential diagnosis when service members (particularly recruits) present with muscular pain and swelling, limited range of motion, or the excretion of dark urine (e.g., myoglobinuria) after strenuous physical activity, particularly in hot, humid weather. PMID:27030929

  6. A Case of Mushroom Poisoning with Russula subnigricans: Development of Rhabdomyolysis, Acute Kidney Injury, Cardiogenic Shock, and Death.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jong Tae; Han, Jin Hyung

    2016-07-01

    Mushroom exposures are increasing worldwide. The incidence and fatality of mushroom poisoning are reported to be increasing. Several new syndromes in mushroom poisoning have been described. Rhabdomyolytic mushroom poisoning is one of new syndromes. Russula subnigricans mushroom can cause delayed-onset rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury in the severely poisoned patient. There are few reports on the toxicity of R. subnigricans. This report represents the first record of R. subnigricans poisoning with rhabdomyolysis in Korea, describing a 51-year-old man who suffered from rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, severe hypocalcemia, respiratory failure, ventricular tachycardia, cardiogenic shock, and death. Mushroom poisoning should be considered in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis of unknown cause. Furthermore, R. subnigricans should be considered in the mushroom poisoning with rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27366018

  7. Molecular analysis of LPIN1 in Jordanian patients with rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Jaradat, Saied A.; Amayreh, Wajdi; Al-Qa'qa', Kefah; Krayyem, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recessive mutations in LPIN1, which encodes a phosphatidate phosphatase enzyme, are a frequent cause of severe rhabdomyolysis in childhood. Hence, we sequenced the 19 coding exons of the gene in eight patients with recurrent hereditary myoglobinuria from four unrelated families in Jordan. The long-term goal is to facilitate molecular genetic diagnosis without the need for invasive procedures such as muscle biopsies. Three different mutations were detected, including the novel missense mutation c.2395G>C (Gly799Arg), which was found in two families. The two other mutations, c.2174G>A (Arg725His) and c.1162C>T (Arg388X), have been previously identified, and were found to cosegregate with the disease phenotype in the other two families. Intriguingly, patients homozygous for Arg725His were also homozygous for the c.1828C>T (Pro610Ser) polymorphism, and were exercise-intolerant between myoglobinuria episodes. Notably, patients homozygous for Arg388X were also homozygous for the c.2250G>C silent variant (Gly750Gly). Taken together, the data provide family-based evidence linking hereditary myoglobinuria to pathogenic variations in the C-terminal lipin domain of the enzyme. This finding highlights the functional significance of this domain in the absence of structural information. This is the first analysis of LPIN1 in myoglobinuria patients of Jordanian origin, and the fourth such analysis worldwide. PMID:26909335

  8. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and rhabdomyolysis in a patient with succinate coenzyme Q reductase (complex II) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Micheletti, M V; Lavoratti, G; Gasperini, S; Donati, M A; Pela, I

    2011-07-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. Besides diarrhea-associated HUS, due to verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli, in children HUS without prodromal diarrhea may be associated with other infectious and autoimmune diseases, genetic defects of the complement-regulator alternative-pathway, and inborn errors of vitamin B12 metabolism. Rhabdomyolysis is the dissolution of skeletal muscle due to various causes, including inborn errors of metabolism. Recurrent rhabdomyolysis and HUS have been previously described in one patient with a genetic defect of oxidative phosphorylation. We report the case of a 2-year-old boy with recurrent HUS and rhabdomyolysis in whom a succinate coenzyme Q reductase (complex II) deficiency was diagnosed. We hypothesize that defects of oxidative phosphorylation could be another etiological factor in atypical HUS. PMID:21722608

  9. Hypokalemia-Induced Rhabdomyolysis by Primary Aldosteronism Coexistent With Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Ha; Chon, Suk

    2015-01-01

    We describes a patient with hypokalemia-induced rhabdomyolysis due to primary aldosteronism (PA), who suffered from slowly progressive muscle weakness after laparoscopic adrenalectomy, and was later diagnosed with coexisting sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM). A 54-year-old Asian male presented with severe muscle weakness of both lower extremities. Laboratory findings showed profound hypokalemia, and extreme elevation of the serum creatine phosphokinase levels, suggestive of hypokalemia-induced rhabdomyolysis. Further evaluation strongly suggested PA by an aldosterone-producing adenoma, which was successfully removed surgically. However, muscle weakness slowly progressed one year after the operation and a muscle biopsy demonstrated findings consistent with sIBM. This case is the first report of hypokalemia-induced rhabdomyolysis by PA coexistent with sIBM, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26605182

  10. An unusual cause of rhabdomyolysis in emergency setting: challenges of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Mikhail; Yatsynovich, Yan; Lionte, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare phenomenon that may be challenging to recognize in an emergency setting. Drugs are one of the common causes. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is a commonly used antibiotic effective in the treatment of upper and lower respiratory tract infections as well as renal, urinary, and gastrointestinal tract infections. It has variable side effects, ranging from mild symptoms of fatigue and insomnia to a potentially life-threatening Steven-Johnson syndrome and renal failure. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of therapy with this drug and is commonly seen in immunocompromised patients or those with an allogenic stem cell transplant. In this article, we report a case of rhabdomyolysis in an immunocompetent patient who has undergone treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and a possible drug interaction with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, with the latter acting as an aggravating factor of this complication. PMID:24997105

  11. Meloxicam-induced rhabdomyolysis in the context of an acute ross river viral infection.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, Mahmood; Limaye, Vidya; Hissaria, Pravin

    2012-01-01

    Acute rhabdomyolysis is a clinical and laboratory syndrome resulting from the breakdown of skeletal muscle, with the release of intracellular contents into the circulatory system, which can cause potentially lethal complications. Here, we present the case of a patient who developed acute rhabdomyolysis after consumption of meloxicam for jaw pain and experienced generalized myalgias in the context of an acute febrile illness with generalized urticaria. Further investigation indicated elevated muscle enzymes and acute renal failure. Serological analysis revealed that the patient was positive for Ross River virus (RRV) IgM. Genetic studies to detect CYP2C9 polymorphisms were negative. Meloxicam was discontinued. He responded to conservative measures within 2 weeks. Oral aspirin challenge was negative, suggesting a drug-specific effect of meloxicam rather than a class effect. Our case indicates a causative role for meloxicam and/or acute RRV in rhabdomyolysis. PMID:22211172

  12. Potential factors involved in the causation of rhabdomyolysis following status asthmaticus.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hongmei; Cheng, Huanji; Liu, Li; Yin, Jianing

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare but potentially fatal complication of status asthmaticus. Since the first case was reported in 1978, only a few dozen cases have been described till date. We performed a literature review with the aim to characterize the pathophysiological basis of the occurrence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with status asthmaticus. Excessive exertion of respiratory muscles, hypoxia and acidosis, electrolyte imbalance, infections, some drugs used for asthma control, use of mechanical ventilation, prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation, higher age of the patient and some underlying diseases or genetic factors appear to be involved in its causation. In patients with status asthmaticus, it is important to pay more attention to these factors and to closely monitor creatine kinase levels in blood so as to ensure early detection of rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27555875

  13. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate imaging in acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1986-10-01

    Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) imaging was performed in five patients with acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis. Four patients had phencyclidine intoxication and one had viral pneumonia. During the acute phase, marked uptake of pyrophosphate was seen in all patients in several muscle groups, but always in the thigh adductors. The results show that phencyclidine intoxication can result in diffuse muscle uptake of Tc-PYP without overt evidence of muscle injury. Tc-PYP imaging may provide a clue to the cause of acute renal failure in patients with suspected rhabdomyolysis in whom elevations of serum creatine phosphokinase concentrations are equivocal.

  14. [Rhabdomyolysis in a well-trained woman after unusually intense exercise].

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christian; Jensen, Mogens Pfeiffer

    2014-06-16

    A 35-year-old woman was acutely hospitalized with oedema of the upper limbs, reduced force, severe movement reduction and muscle pain in both upper extremities. Her symptoms started after three days of intense exercise doing kayaking and a lot of pull-ups in crossfit. Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome, characterized by muscle necrosis. Usually there is a marked elevation of creatine kinase (CK) concentration with symptoms as described and myoglobinuria (dark coloured urine). After hard muscular work there will often be asymptomatic, but significant elevations in CK concentration, and in rare cases life-threatening rhabdomyolysis with electrolyte imbalances and acute kidney failure. PMID:25352283

  15. Primary Sjö-gren's syndrome presenting with distal, renal tubular acidosis and rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, E B S; Fernando, M E; Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Bhoopathy, R M; Jayanth, J J; Samuel, J

    2006-12-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (PSS) is rare in India. Clinically manifest renal disease in PSS is uncommon and is usually an autoimmune tubulointerstitial nephritis presenting with distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) or a urinary concentrating defect. Hypokalemic paralysis due to dRTA in PSS is rare but well documented in medical literature. Rhabdomyolysis as a consequence of hypokalemia in PSS is exceptional. We report a case of PSS with dRTA and rhabdomyolysis causing prolonged respiratory failure and quadriparesis. PMID:17334013

  16. Fatal theophylline poisoning with rhabdomyolysis. A potential role for dantrolene treatment.

    PubMed

    Parr, M J; Willatts, S M

    1991-07-01

    A fatal case of theophylline poisoning is described. The patient developed rhabdomyolysis, renal failure and compartment syndrome, as well as the more usual features of severe theophylline poisoning. Dantrolene appeared to be useful in controlling the hypermetabolic state associated with the overdose and may have a role in future treatment. PMID:1862895

  17. Acute Rhabdomyolysis Associated with Coadministration of Levofloxacin and Simvastatin in a Patient with Normal Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Paparoupa, Maria; Pietrzak, Sebastian; Gillissen, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of severe acute rhabdomyolysis in association with coadministration of levofloxacin and simvastatin in a patient with normal renal function. A 70-year-old Caucasian male was treated due to community acquired pneumonia with levofloxacin in a dosage of 500 mg once and then twice a day. On the 8th day of hospitalization the patient presented with acute severe rhabdomyolysis requiring an intensive care support. After discontinuation of levofloxacin and concomitant medication with simvastatin 80 mg/day, clinical and laboratory effects were totally reversible. Up to now, levofloxacin has been reported to induce rhabdomyolysis mainly in patients with impaired renal function, as the medication has a predominant renal elimination. In our case renal function remained normal during the severe clinical course. According to a recent case report rhabdomyolysis was observed due to interaction of simvastatin and ciprofloxacin. To our best knowledge this is the first case of interaction between simvastatin and levofloxacin to be reported. This case emphasizes the need of close monitoring of creatine kinase in patients under more than one potentially myotoxic medication especially when patients develop muscle weakness. PMID:25140181

  18. Mutations in RYR1 are a common cause of exertional myalgia and rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Dlamini, N; Voermans, N C; Lillis, S; Stewart, K; Kamsteeg, E-J; Drost, G; Quinlivan, R; Snoeck, M; Norwood, F; Radunovic, A; Straub, V; Roberts, M; Vrancken, A F J E; van der Pol, W L; de Coo, R I F M; Manzur, A Y; Yau, S; Abbs, S; King, A; Lammens, M; Hopkins, P M; Mohammed, S; Treves, S; Muntoni, F; Wraige, E; Davis, M R; van Engelen, B; Jungbluth, H

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene are a common cause of neuromuscular disease, ranging from various congenital myopathies to the malignant hyperthermia (MH) susceptibility trait without associated weakness. We sequenced RYR1 in 39 unrelated families with rhabdomyolysis and/or exertional myalgia, frequent presentations in the neuromuscular clinic that often remain unexplained despite extensive investigations. We identified 9 heterozygous RYR1 mutations/variants in 14 families, 5 of them (p.Lys1393Arg; p.Gly2434Arg; p.Thr4288_Ala4290dup; p.Ala4295Val; and p.Arg4737Gln) previously associated with MH. Index cases presented from 3 to 45 years with rhabdomyolysis, with or without exertional myalgia (n=12), or isolated exertional myalgia (n=2). Rhabdomyolysis was commonly triggered by exercise and heat and, less frequently, viral infections, alcohol and drugs. Most cases were normally strong and had no personal MH history. Inconsistent additional features included heat intolerance, and cold-induced muscle stiffness. Muscle biopsies showed mainly subtle changes. Familial RYR1 mutations were confirmed in relatives with similar or no symptoms. These findings suggest that RYR1 mutations may account for a substantial proportion of patients presenting with unexplained rhabdomyolysis and/or exertional myalgia. Associated clinico-pathological features may be subtle and require a high degree of suspicion. Additional family studies are paramount in order to identify potentially MH susceptible relatives. PMID:23628358

  19. Exertional rhabdomyolysis: attrition through exercise, a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jason M; Fisher, Scott D; Robbins, David P

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a common syndrome that can range from asymptomatic to a severe life-threatening condition. It is the result of acute muscle fiber necrosis leading to cell lysis and subsequent transfer of those byproducts into the circulatory system.1-3 The most significant constituent of these byproducts is myoglobin, which has been known to cause renal failure in 10?50% of patients that develop rhabdomyolysis.4,5 In addition, the electrolytes contained within these cells are leached into the blood stream, which can lead to significant electrolyte abnormalities. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis is broad and includes inherited diseases, drugs, toxins, muscle compression or overexertion, infections, and more. This syndrome may carry a mortality rate ranging from 7?80%.3,6 We describe five patients assigned to various companies within 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) that developed exertional rhabdomyolysis of the bilateral upper extremities between June 2011 and January 2012. In this case series we will describe the events leading up to the diagnosis, lack of risk factors or family history, diagnostic criteria, treatment, and future concerns related to the condition. PMID:23032321

  20. Exertional rhabdomyolysis after spinning: case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ramme, Austin J; Vira, Shaleen; Alaia, Michael J; VAN DE Leuv, Jonathan; Rothberg, Robert C

    2016-06-01

    Spinning is a popular indoor stationary cycling program that uses group classes as a motivational tool. Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) is frequently reported in athletes and military recruits; however, infrequently it has been reported after spinning class. ER is diagnosed by clinical history, physical exam, and laboratory values. Hydration, electrolyte management, and pain control are key components to treatment of this condition. Severe cases can be complicated by acute renal failure, compartment syndrome, arrhythmia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. We describe three cases of admission due to rhabdomyolysis after spinning. The diagnosis, admission criteria, and medical treatment of ER are presented in the context of a literature review. A retrospective review of three cases with review of the current literature. The medical and laboratory records of three patient cases were reviewed. A search of the PubMed database was used to perform a comprehensive review of exertional rhabdomyolysis. Our institution's IRB reviewed this study. We report three cases of exertional rhabdomyolysis after spinning and describe the diagnostic workup and medical management of these patients. The diagnosis of ER is made by clinical history, physical exam, and laboratory values. The disease spectrum ranges from mild to severe with the potential of serious complications in some patients. We demonstrate three cases of ER in deconditioned individuals who presented to the emergency department for evaluation. Careful medical management and patient monitoring resulted in improved patient symptomatology and eventual return to physical activity. PMID:25665750

  1. Rhabdomyolysis-Associated Mutations in Human LPIN1 Lead to Loss of Phosphatidic Acid Phosphohydrolase Activity.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, George G; Collier, Sara L; Chen, Zhouji; Eaton, James M; Connolly, Anne M; Bucelli, Robert C; Pestronk, Alan; Harris, Thurl E; Finck, Brian N

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is an acute syndrome due to extensive injury of skeletal muscle. Recurrent rhabdomyolysis is often caused by inborn errors in intermediary metabolism, and recent work has suggested that mutations in the human gene encoding lipin 1 (LPIN1) may be a common cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children. Lipin 1 dephosphorylates phosphatidic acid to form diacylglycerol (phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase; PAP) and acts as a transcriptional regulatory protein to control metabolic gene expression. Herein, a 3-year-old boy with severe recurrent rhabdomyolysis was determined to be a compound heterozygote for a novel c.1904T>C (p.Leu635Pro) substitution and a previously reported genomic deletion of exons 18-19 (E766-S838_del) in LPIN1. Western blotting with patient muscle biopsy lysates demonstrated a marked reduction in lipin 1 protein, while immunohistochemical staining for lipin 1 showed abnormal subcellular localization. We cloned cDNAs to express recombinant lipin 1 proteins harboring pathogenic mutations and showed that the E766-S838_del allele was not expressed at the RNA or protein level. Lipin 1 p.Leu635Pro was expressed, but the protein was less stable, was aggregated in the cytosol, and was targeted for proteosomal degradation. Another pathogenic single amino acid substitution, lipin 1 p.Arg725His, was well expressed and retained its transcriptional regulatory function. However, both p.Leu635Pro and p.Arg725His proteins were found to be deficient in PAP activity. Kinetic analyses demonstrated a loss of catalysis rather than diminished substrate binding. These data suggest that loss of lipin 1-mediated PAP activity may be involved in the pathogenesis of rhabdomyolysis in lipin 1 deficiency. PMID:25967228

  2. CAV3 mutations causing exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis: Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies.

    PubMed

    Scalco, Renata Siciliani; Gardiner, Alice R; Pitceathly, Robert D S; Hilton-Jones, David; Schapira, Anthony H; Turner, Chris; Parton, Matt; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Manzur, Adnan Y; Childs, Anne-Marie; Feng, Lucy; Murphy, Elaine; Lamont, Phillipa J; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Wallefeld, William; Davis, Mark R; Laing, Nigel G; Holton, Janice L; Fialho, Doreen; Bushby, Kate; Hanna, Michael G; Phadke, Rahul; Jungbluth, Heinz; Houlden, Henry; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is often due to a combination of environmental trigger(s) and genetic predisposition; however, the underlying genetic cause remains elusive in many cases. Mutations in CAV3 lead to various neuromuscular phenotypes with partial overlap, including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD1C), rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy and isolated hyperCKemia. Here we present a series of eight patients from seven families presenting with exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis caused by mutations in CAV3 diagnosed by next generation sequencing (NGS) (n = 6). Symptoms included myalgia (n = 7), exercise intolerance (n = 7) and episodes of rhabdomyolysis (n = 2). Percussion-induced rapid muscle contractions (PIRCs) were seen in five out of six patients examined. A previously reported heterozygous mutation in CAV3 (p.T78M) and three novel variants (p.V14I, p.F41S, p.F54V) were identified. Caveolin-3 immunolabeling in muscle was normal in 3/4 patients; however, immunoblotting showed more than 50% reduction of caveolin-3 in five patients compared with controls. This case series demonstrates that exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis may be caused by CAV3 mutations and broadens the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies. In our series, immunoblotting was a more sensitive method to detect reduced caveolin-3 levels than immunohistochemistry in skeletal muscle. Patients presenting with muscle pain, exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis should be routinely tested for PIRCs as this may be an important clinical clue for caveolinopathies, even in the absence of other "typical" features. The use of NGS may expand current knowledge concerning inherited diseases, and unexpected/atypical phenotypes may be attributed to well-known human disease genes. PMID:27312022

  3. Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis and transient loss of deambulation as outset of partial carnitine palmityl transferase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Bersani, Giulia; Compagnone, Adele; Zampetti, Anna; De Nisco, Alessia; Sacco, Emanuela; Marrocco, Raffaella

    2011-06-01

    We report the case of a 13-year-old boy with an abrupt onset of leg pain and muscle weakness, incapability of deambulation and a laboratory picture of exercise-induced acute rhabdomyolysis. Intravenous hyperhydration and forced diuresis were adopted to avoid renal complications. No evidence of articular or residual muscular damage was appreciated in the short-term. The recurrence of rhabdomyolysis required a muscular biopsy showing a disturbance of fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. PMID:19855973

  4. Induction of heme oxygenase is a rapid, protective response in rhabdomyolysis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Nath, K A; Balla, G; Vercellotti, G M; Balla, J; Jacob, H S; Levitt, M D; Rosenberg, M E

    1992-01-01

    Heme proteins such as myoglobin or hemoglobin, when released into the extracellular space, can instigate tissue toxicity. Myoglobin is directly implicated in the pathogenesis of renal failure in rhabdomyolysis. In the glycerol model of this syndrome, we demonstrate that the kidney responds to such inordinate amounts of heme proteins by inducing the heme-degradative enzyme, heme oxygenase, as well as increasing the synthesis of ferritin, the major cellular repository for iron. Prior recruitment of this response with a single preinfusion of hemoglobin prevents kidney failure and drastically reduces mortality (from 100% to 14%). Conversely, ablating this response with a competitive inhibitor of heme oxygenase exacerbates kidney dysfunction. We provide the first in vivo evidence that induction of heme oxygenase coupled to ferritin synthesis is a rapid, protective antioxidant response. Our findings suggest a therapeutic strategy for populations at a high risk for rhabdomyolysis. Images PMID:1634613

  5. [Anesthetic management of a patient with carnitine palmitoyltransferase deficiency with a history of rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sayaka; Sugita, Michiko; Nakahara, Eriko; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2013-03-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) makes the fatty acids available through beta-oxidation. Deficiency of CPT causes difficulties of muscle cells to metabolize fatty acid. In affected patients, exercise, fast for a prolonged period, and stress, lead to exhaustion of the store of glucose in the body, and rhabdomyolysis may occur, since muscle can not utilize fatty acid as an alternative energy source. Therefore, anesthetic management of CPT deficiency needs infusion of glucose continuously, avoiding the use of the drugs that cause rhabdomyolysis and suppressing the surgical stress. A 67-year-old man, who had previous history of rhabdmyolysis during the postoperative period, and diagnosed CPT deficiency was scheduled for total gastrectomy. General anesthesia was induced with remifentanil, thiamylal and rocuronium after epidural catheter insertion. During surgery, general anesthesia was maintained with remifentanil, sevoflurane, and blood glucose was monitored frequently, with continuous glucose infusion. No complications occurred during anesthesia and perioperative course was uneventful. PMID:23544345

  6. Role of dipstick in detection of haeme pigment due to rhabdomyolysis in victims of Bam earthquake.

    PubMed

    Amini, M; Sharifi, A; Najafi, I; Eghtesadi-Araghi, P; Rasouli, M R

    2010-09-01

    Avoiding life-threatening complications of rhabdomyolysis depends on early diagnosis and prompt management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of urinary dipstick test in the detection of haeme pigment in patients who were at risk of acute renal failure (ARF) due to rhabdomyolysis after suffering injury in the Bam earthquake. Serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) level was used as the gold standard for prediction of ARF. ARF developed in 8 (10%) of 79 patients studied. We found no significant differences in the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of dipstick urine and serum CPK tests for identifying patients who were at risk of ARF. However, dipstick urine test is an easy test that can be performed quickly at an earthquake site. PMID:21218726

  7. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-11-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease. PMID:25392908

  8. A Thermolabile Aldolase A Mutant Causes Fever-Induced Recurrent Rhabdomyolysis without Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease. PMID:25392908

  9. Acetaminophen inhibits hemoprotein-catalyzed lipid peroxidation and attenuates rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Boutaud, Olivier; Moore, Kevin P.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Harry, David; Howie, Alexander J.; Wang, Shuhe; Carney, Clare K.; Masterson, Tina S.; Amin, Taneem; Wright, David W.; Wilson, Michael T.; Oates, John A.; Roberts, L. Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Hemoproteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin, once released from cells can cause severe oxidative damage as a consequence of heme redox cycling between ferric and ferryl states that generates radical species that induce lipid peroxidation. We demonstrate in vitro that acetaminophen inhibits hemoprotein-induced lipid peroxidation by reducing ferryl heme to its ferric state and quenching globin radicals. Severe muscle injury (rhabdomyolysis) is accompanied by the release of myoglobin that becomes deposited in the kidney, causing renal injury. We previously showed in a rat model of rhabdomyolysis that redox cycling between ferric and ferryl myoglobin yields radical species that cause severe oxidative damage to the kidney. In this model, acetaminophen at therapeutic plasma concentrations significantly decreased oxidant injury in the kidney, improved renal function, and reduced renal damage. These findings also provide a hypothesis for potential therapeutic applications for acetaminophen in diseases involving hemoprotein-mediated oxidative injury. PMID:20133658

  10. Adult Patient with Novel H1N1 Infection Presented with Encephalitis, Rhabdomyolysis, Pneumonia and Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Atul K; Shah, Shalin; Ranjan, Rajiv; Shah, Sudhir V

    2012-07-01

    Neurological complications of influenza are well known. Influenza A is commonly associated with neurological complications. Neurological complications especially encephalitis is described in the pediatric age group of patients with current pandemic novel H1N1 infection. We are describing a case of novel H1N1 infection presenting with multi-system involvement (encephalitis, bilateral pneumonia, severe rhabdomyolysis leading to renal failure and polyneuropathy) in adult patient. PMID:23055650

  11. Adult Patient with Novel H1N1 Infection Presented with Encephalitis, Rhabdomyolysis, Pneumonia and Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Atul K; Shah, Shalin; Ranjan, Rajiv; Shah, Sudhir V

    2012-01-01

    Neurological complications of influenza are well known. Influenza A is commonly associated with neurological complications. Neurological complications especially encephalitis is described in the pediatric age group of patients with current pandemic novel H1N1 infection. We are describing a case of novel H1N1 infection presenting with multi-system involvement (encephalitis, bilateral pneumonia, severe rhabdomyolysis leading to renal failure and polyneuropathy) in adult patient. PMID:23055650

  12. A case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure resulting from rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Mezaki, T; Hirono, N; Udaka, F; Kameyama, M

    1990-01-01

    Symptoms of acute renal failure were observed in an anorexia patient who had a history of frequent vomiting. The acute renal failure might have resulted from rhabdomyolysis subsequent to a disturbance of electrolyte balance. This acute renal failure might have resulted in death if not treated. We postulate that even a mild case of anorexia nervosa should be carefully observed to prevent such possible tragedy. PMID:2330820

  13. [Rhabdomyolysis after radical nephrectomy in the lateral decubitus position: report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Shibamori, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Matsuki, Masahiro; Matsuda, Yohei; Kato, Shuichi; Takei, Fumiyasu; Yanase, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare perioperative complication, however, potentially lead to fatal outcome. We experienced 2 cases of rhabdomyolysis after radical nephrectomy and nephroureterectomy in the lateral decubitus position. (Case 1) A 40-years old man was seen in our hospital because of asymptomatic grosshematuria. Computed tomography revealed right renal pelvic cancer, cT3N0M0. Right radical nephroureterectomy, lymph node dissection, partial cystectomy was underwent, and the operation was finished without any trouble. At the post-operative day 1, serum creatinine level was elevated to the point of 4.2 mg/dl, and serum creatine kinase was 1,945 IU/l. Continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) was done at intensive-care unit (ICU), and serum creatinine and creatine kinase level were decreased. At the post-operative day 1, urine myoglobin level was prominently elevated (2,943.7 ng/ml), so we diagnosed acute renal failure due to rhabdomyolysis. (Case 2) A 40-years old man was incidentally pointed out of right renal tumor that was seen as renal cell carcinoma, cT1aN0M0. Open partial nephrectomy was underwent, and there was no trouble during the operation. After recovering from anesthesia, the patient felt left thigh pain strongly. Serum creatine kinase was 888 IU/L after the operation. At the postoperative day 1, serum creatine kinase level was markedly increased (31,138 IU/L). Serum creatinine level was 1.34 mg/dl. Urine and serum myoglobin level was prominently elevated (89,000 ng/ml and 8,634 ng/ml, respectively). We diagnosed it rhabdomyolysis, and he received large amount of fluid intravenously at intensive-care unit. Serum creatine kinase was peak out at the post-operative day 3 (20,709 IU/L), and hemodialysis was not performed. PMID:25757354

  14. Predictors and outcomes of increases in creatine phosphokinase concentrations or rhabdomyolysis risk during statin treatment

    PubMed Central

    van Staa, Tjeerd P; Carr, Daniel F; O’Meara, Helen; McCann, Gerry; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim was to evaluate clinical risk factors associated with myotoxicity in statin users. Methods This was a cohort study of patients prescribed a statin in UK primary care practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Outcomes of interest were creatine phosphokinase (CPK) concentrations and clinical records of rhabdomyolysis. Results The cohort comprised 641 703 statin users. Simvastatin was most frequently prescribed (66.3%), followed by atorvastatin (24.4%). CPK was measured in 127 209 patients: 81.4% within normal range and 0.7% above Rhabdomyolysis was recorded in 59 patients. Patients with concomitant prescribing of CYP3A4-interacting drugs had an increased odds ratio (OR) of rhabdomyolysis compared with controls (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.18, 11.61) and >four times ULN CPK compared with normal CPK (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.01, 1.60). Rosuvastatin users had higher risk of >four times ULN CPK (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.22, 2.15) as did patients with larger daily doses of other statin types. A recent clinical record of myalgia was associated with an increased OR of >four times ULN CPK (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.37, 2.18). In patients who were rechallenged to statins and had repeat CPK measurements after >four times ULN CPK abnormalities, 54.8% of the repeat CPK values were within normal range, 32.1% between one to three times and 13.0% >four times ULN. Conclusions The frequencies of substantive CPK increases and rhabdomyolysis during statin treatment were low, with highest risks seen in those on large daily doses or interacting drugs and on rosuvastatin. CPK measurements appeared to have been done in a haphazard manner and better guidance is needed. PMID:24602118

  15. Hypokalemic quadriparesis and rhabdomyolysis as a rare presentation of distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Bhat, Manzoor; Ahmad Laway, Bashir; Mustafa, Farhat; Shafi Kuchay, Mohammad; Mubarik, Idrees; Ahmad Palla, Nazir

    2014-01-01

    Distal renal tubular acidosis is a syndrome of abnormal urine acidification and is characterized by hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, hypokalemia, hypercalciurea, nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. Despite the presence of persistent hypokalemia, acute muscular paralysis is rarely encountered in males. Here, we will report an eighteen year old male patient who presented with flaccid quadriparesis and was subsequently found to have rhabdomyolysis, severe short stature, skeletal deformities and primary distal renal tubular acidosis. PMID:25250276

  16. Acute Kidney Injury and Quadriparesis Due to Rosuvastatin Induced Rhabdomyolysis- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vanikar, Aruna V.; Trivedi, Hargovind L.

    2015-01-01

    Statins as lipid lowering drugs, are safe and effective in reducing cardiovascular disease risk, but rarely produce myopathy like myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. We report the case of Rosuvastatin induced rhabdomyolytic acute renal failure and quadriparesis in a 67-year old male, a known case of type-2 diabetes mellitus and with a history of coronary angioplasty four months back. He was on antihypertensive, oral hypoglycemic and antiplatelet medications with Rosuvastatin 40mg/day. He was admitted with altered sensorium, breathlessness, vomiting, muscle weakness and decreased urine output and had raised serum creatinine, creatinine phosphokinase and myoglobin. After ruling out all other causation for rhabdomyolysis, we stopped Rosuvastatin and started supportive management and hemodialysis. Patient showed gradual recovery in renal function and quadriparesis. Patient was discharged with good urine output and on antihypertensive, hypoglycemic drug and diet restrictions for lipid control. He recovered completely and had normal renal function with well controlled lipid level on follow up of 6 months after discharge. Thus, prompt diagnosis of Rhabdomyolysis due to Rosuvastatin in absence of other aetiology and the multidisciplinary management can prevent further complication with favorable outcome. PMID:26155510

  17. A Substrate Pharmacophore for the Human Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter Identifies Compounds Associated with Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Diao, Lei; Polli, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The human Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter (hOCTN2), is a high affinity cation/carnitine transporter expressed widely in human tissues and is physiologically important for the homeostasis of L-carnitine. The objective of this study was to elucidate the substrate requirements of this transporter via computational modelling based on published in vitro data. Nine published substrates of hOCTN2 were used to create a common features pharmacophore that was validated by mapping other known OCTN2 substrates. The pharmacophore was used to search a drug database and retrieved molecules that were then used as search queries in PubMed for instances of a side effect (rhabdomyolysis) associated with interference with L-carnitine transport. The substrate pharmacophore was comprised of two hydrogen bond acceptors, a positive ionizable feature and ten excluded volumes. The substrate pharmacophore also mapped 6 out of 7 known substrate molecules used as a test set. After searching a database of ~800 known drugs, thirty drugs were predicted to map to the substrate pharmacophore with L-carnitine shape restriction. At least 16 of these molecules had case reports documenting an association with rhabdomyolysis and represent a set for prioritizing for future testing as OCTN2 substrates or inhibitors. This computational OCTN2 substrate pharmacophore derived from published data partially overlaps a previous OCTN2 inhibitor pharmacophore and is also able to select compounds that demonstrate rhabdomyolysis, further confirming the possible linkage between this side effect and hOCTN2. PMID:22339151

  18. Acute Kidney Injury and Quadriparesis Due to Rosuvastatin Induced Rhabdomyolysis- A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Kamlesh S; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2015-05-01

    Statins as lipid lowering drugs, are safe and effective in reducing cardiovascular disease risk, but rarely produce myopathy like myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. We report the case of Rosuvastatin induced rhabdomyolytic acute renal failure and quadriparesis in a 67-year old male, a known case of type-2 diabetes mellitus and with a history of coronary angioplasty four months back. He was on antihypertensive, oral hypoglycemic and antiplatelet medications with Rosuvastatin 40mg/day. He was admitted with altered sensorium, breathlessness, vomiting, muscle weakness and decreased urine output and had raised serum creatinine, creatinine phosphokinase and myoglobin. After ruling out all other causation for rhabdomyolysis, we stopped Rosuvastatin and started supportive management and hemodialysis. Patient showed gradual recovery in renal function and quadriparesis. Patient was discharged with good urine output and on antihypertensive, hypoglycemic drug and diet restrictions for lipid control. He recovered completely and had normal renal function with well controlled lipid level on follow up of 6 months after discharge. Thus, prompt diagnosis of Rhabdomyolysis due to Rosuvastatin in absence of other aetiology and the multidisciplinary management can prevent further complication with favorable outcome. PMID:26155510

  19. Tubular von Hippel-Lindau Knockout Protects against Rhabdomyolysis-Induced AKI

    PubMed Central

    Fähling, Michael; Mathia, Susanne; Paliege, Alexander; Koesters, Robert; Mrowka, Ralf; Peters, Harm; Persson, Pontus Börje; Neumayer, Hans-Hellmut; Bachmann, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Renal hypoxia occurs in AKI of various etiologies, but adaptation to hypoxia, mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), is incomplete in these conditions. Preconditional HIF activation protects against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, yet the mechanisms involved are largely unknown, and HIF-mediated renoprotection has not been examined in other causes of AKI. Here, we show that selective activation of HIF in renal tubules, through Pax8-rtTA–based inducible knockout of von Hippel-Lindau protein (VHL-KO), protects from rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI. In this model, HIF activation correlated inversely with tubular injury. Specifically, VHL deletion attenuated the increased levels of serum creatinine/urea, caspase-3 protein, and tubular necrosis induced by rhabdomyolysis in wild-type mice. Moreover, HIF activation in nephron segments at risk for injury occurred only in VHL-KO animals. At day 1 after rhabdomyolysis, when tubular injury may be reversible, the HIF-mediated renoprotection in VHL-KO mice was associated with activated glycolysis, cellular glucose uptake and utilization, autophagy, vasodilation, and proton removal, as demonstrated by quantitative PCR, pathway enrichment analysis, and immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, a HIF-mediated shift toward improved energy supply may protect against acute tubular injury in various forms of AKI. PMID:23970125

  20. Severe hypokalemia and thyrotoxic paralysis from painless thyroiditis complicated by life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyung Yoon; Lee, Su-Hyun; Park, Hoon Suk; Ko, Sun-Hee; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Kim, Hyung Wook

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with lower extremity paralysis and severe hypokalemia. His thyroid function test showed thyrotoxicosis. Despite attempts to correct his hypokalemia, he developed pulseless polymorphic ventricular tachycardia two hours later. He was successfully resuscitated after defibrillation. We performed continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration for 10 days due to acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis. We observed life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia requiring urgent defibrillation, as well as rhabdomyolysis requiring dialysis during the transient thyrotoxic phase of painless thyroiditis. Pay attention to the possibility of the development of life-threatening ventricular tachycardia associated with hypokalemia in the setting of thyroiditis and thyrotoxic paralysis. PMID:25130115

  1. Acute kidney injury mediated by oxidative stress in Egyptian horses with exertional rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    el-Ashker, Maged R

    2011-06-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiologic process of acute renal failure associated with exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) in Egyptian horses. ER was tentatively diagnosed in 31 Baladi horses based on case history, physical examination findings and confirmed by elevation of plasma creatine kinase (CK) and urine myoglobin concentrations. According to severity of the condition, the diseased horses were categorized into two main groups; the first group included 18 horses with minimal clinical signs and plasma CK <60 000 IU/L; whereas, the second group included 13 horses with overt clinical signs and plasma CK >100 000 IU/L). It was found that plasma creatol (CTL) was positively correlated (p < 0.01) with plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) (r = 0.775), nitric oxide (NO) (r = 0.768), methyguanididne (MG) (r = 0.995), CK (r = 0.768), urine glucose (r = 0.778), urine protein (r = 0.767), renal failure index (RFI) (r = 0.814) and urine sodium (r = 0.799) and negatively correlated (p < 0.01) with total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (r = -0.795), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (r = -0.815), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) (r = -0.675), Vitamin C (r = -0.830), urine creatinine (r = -0.800), urine/plasma creatinine ratio (r = -0.827) and urine/plasma urea ratio (r = -0.807). The correlation between these biochemical variables might suggest a possible role of oxidative stress in renal injury associated with severe rhabdomyolysis in horses. It is suggested that exaggeration of oxidative stress associated with increased muscle membrane leakage plays a key role in acute kidney injury in Baladi horses with severe rhabdomyolysis. PMID:21461642

  2. Severe Rhabdomyolysis Associated with Simvastatin and Role of Ciprofloxacin and Amlodipine Coadministration

    PubMed Central

    De Schryver, Nicolas; Wittebole, Xavier; Van den Bergh, Peter; Haufroid, Vincent; Goffin, Eric; Hantson, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Simvastatin is among the most commonly used prescription medications for cholesterol reduction and the most common statin-related adverse drug reaction is skeletal muscle toxicity. Multiple factors have been shown to influence simvastatin-induced myopathy. In addition to age, gender, ethnicity, genetic predisposition, and dose, drug-drug interactions play a major role. This is particularly true for drugs that are extensively metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4. We describe a particularly severe case of rhabdomyolysis after the introduction of ciprofloxacin, a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, in a patient who previously tolerated the simvastatin-amlodipine combination. PMID:25883814

  3. Herbal-drug interaction induced rhabdomyolysis in a liposarcoma patient receiving trabectedin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyolysis is an uncommon side effect of trabectedin which is used for the second line therapy of metastatic sarcoma after anthracycline and ifosfamide failure. This side effect may be due to pharmacokinetic interactions caused by shared mechanisms of metabolism involving the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system in the liver. Here, for the first time in literature, we describe the unexpected onset of heavy toxicity, including rhabdomyolysis, after the fourth course of trabectedin in a patient with retroperitoneal liposarcoma who at the same time was taking an alternative herbal medicine suspected of triggering this adverse event. Case presentation This is the case of a 56 year old Caucasian man affected by a relapsed de-differentiated liposarcoma who, after the fourth cycle of second-line chemotherapy with trabectedin, complained of sudden weakness, difficulty walking and diffuse muscle pain necessitating complete bed rest. Upon admission to our ward the patient showed grade (G) 4 pancytopenia and a marked increase in liver lytic enzymes, serum levels of myoglobin, creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and lactate dehydrogenase. No cardiac or kidney function injuries were present. Based on these clinical and laboratory features, our conclusive diagnosis was of rhabdomyolysis induced by trabectedin. The patient did not report any trauma or muscular overexertion and no co-morbidities were present. He had not received any drugs during treatment with trabectedin, but upon further questioning the patient informed us he had been taking a folk medicine preparation of chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) daily during the last course of trabectedin and in the 2 subsequent weeks. One week after hospitalization and cessation of intake of chokeberry extract, CPK and other markers of myolysis slowly returned to standard range, and the patient noted a progressive recovery of muscle strength. The patient was discharged on day 14 when a blood transfusion and parenteral hydration

  4. Hashimoto's thyroiditis presenting as Hoffman's syndrome, rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Gasim Salaheldin; Zaid, Hassan Musa; Moloney, Manus

    2014-01-01

    An otherwise healthy young man presented with gradual progressive fatigue for the past 12 months disturbing his daily activities. Clinical examination revealed marked generalised muscular hypertrophy including the temporalis muscles bilaterally. Investigation revealed that the patient was grossly hypothyroid due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis with rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. The finding of muscle weakness and pseudohypertrophy in association with hypothyroidism is called Hoffman’s syndrome. The patient was hydrated and thyroxine replacement initiated. On follow-up, the patient showed clinical as well as biochemical improvement. PMID:25100806

  5. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE RENAL FAILURE WITH DELAYED HYPERCALCEMIA SECONDARY TO SARCOCYSTIS NEURONA-INDUCED MYOSITIS AND RHABDOMYOLYSIS IN A CALIFORNIA SEA LION (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Alexander, Amy B; Hanley, Christopher S; Duncan, Mary C; Ulmer, Kyle; Padilla, Luis R

    2015-09-01

    A 3-yr-old captive-born California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) developed Sarcocystis neurona-induced myositis and rhabdomyolysis that led to acute renal failure. The sea lion was successfully managed with fluid therapy, antiprotozoals, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, antiemetics, gastroprotectants, and diuretics, but developed severe delayed hypercalcemia, a syndrome identified in humans after traumatic or exertion-induced rhabdomyolysis. Treatment with calcitonin was added to the management, and the individual recovered fully. The case emphasizes that animals with rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure risk developing delayed hypercalcemia, which may be life threatening, and calcium levels should be closely monitored past the resolution of renal failure. PMID:26352981

  6. A Case of Primary Hypoparathyroidism Presenting with Acute Kidney Injury Secondary to Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Zeki; Gursu, Meltem; Uzun, Sami; Karadag, Serhat; Cebeci, Egemen; Ozturk, Savas; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is the most common cause of symmetric calcification of the basal ganglia. Herein, a case of primary hypoparathyroidism with severe tetany, rhabdomyolysis, and acute kidney injury is presented. A 26-year-old male was admitted to the emergency clinic with leg pain and cramps, nausea, vomiting, and decreased amount of urine. He had been treated for epilepsy for the last 10 years. He was admitted to the emergency department for leg pain, cramping in the hands and legs, and agitation multiple times within the last six months. He was prescribed antidepressant and antipsychotic medications. He had a blood pressure of 150/90 mmHg, diffuse abdominal tenderness, and abdominal muscle rigidity on physical examination. Pathological laboratory findings were as follows: creatinine, 7.5 mg/dL, calcium, 3.7 mg/dL, alanine transaminase, 4349 U/L, aspartate transaminase, 5237 U/L, creatine phosphokinase, 262.000 U/L, and parathyroid hormone, 0 pg/mL. There were bilateral symmetrical calcifications in basal ganglia and the cerebellum on computerized tomography. He was diagnosed as primary hypoparathyroidism and acute kidney injury secondary to severe rhabdomyolysis. Brain calcifications, although rare, should be considered in dealing with patients with neurological symptoms, symmetrical cranial calcifications, and calcium metabolism abnormalities. PMID:27034860

  7. Rhabdomyolysis and Cardiomyopathy in a 20-Year-Old Patient with CPT II Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vavlukis, M.; Eftimov, A.; Zafirovska, P.; Caparovska, E.; Pocesta, B.; Kedev, S.; Dimovski, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To raise the awareness of adult-onset carnitite palmitoyltransferase II deficiency (CPT II) by describing clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of the disease occurring in early adulthood. Method. Review of the case characteristics and literature review. Results. We report on a 20-year-old man presenting with dyspnea, fatigue, fever, and myoglobinuria. This was the second episode with such symptoms (the previous one being three years earlier). The symptoms occurred after intense physical work, followed by a viral infection resulting in fever treated with NSAIDs. Massive rhabdomyolysis was diagnosed, resulting in acute renal failure necessitating plasmapheresis and hemodialysis, acute hepatic lesion, and respiratory insufficiency. Additionally, our patient had cardiomyopathy with volume overload. After a detailed workup, CPT II deficiency was suspected. We did a sequencing analysis for exons 1, 3, and 4 of the CPT II gene and found that the patient was homozygote for Ser 113 Leu mutation in exon 3 of the CPT II gene. The patient recovery was complete except for the cardiomiopathy with mildly impaired systolic function. Conclusion. Whenever a patient suffers recurrent episodes of myalgia, followed by myoglobinuria due to rhabdomyolysis, we should always consider the possibility of this rare condition. The definitive diagnose of this condition is achieved by genetic testing. PMID:24563797

  8. A Case of Primary Hypoparathyroidism Presenting with Acute Kidney Injury Secondary to Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Sumnu, Abdullah; Aydin, Zeki; Gursu, Meltem; Uzun, Sami; Karadag, Serhat; Cebeci, Egemen; Ozturk, Savas; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is the most common cause of symmetric calcification of the basal ganglia. Herein, a case of primary hypoparathyroidism with severe tetany, rhabdomyolysis, and acute kidney injury is presented. A 26-year-old male was admitted to the emergency clinic with leg pain and cramps, nausea, vomiting, and decreased amount of urine. He had been treated for epilepsy for the last 10 years. He was admitted to the emergency department for leg pain, cramping in the hands and legs, and agitation multiple times within the last six months. He was prescribed antidepressant and antipsychotic medications. He had a blood pressure of 150/90 mmHg, diffuse abdominal tenderness, and abdominal muscle rigidity on physical examination. Pathological laboratory findings were as follows: creatinine, 7.5 mg/dL, calcium, 3.7 mg/dL, alanine transaminase, 4349 U/L, aspartate transaminase, 5237 U/L, creatine phosphokinase, 262.000 U/L, and parathyroid hormone, 0 pg/mL. There were bilateral symmetrical calcifications in basal ganglia and the cerebellum on computerized tomography. He was diagnosed as primary hypoparathyroidism and acute kidney injury secondary to severe rhabdomyolysis. Brain calcifications, although rare, should be considered in dealing with patients with neurological symptoms, symmetrical cranial calcifications, and calcium metabolism abnormalities. PMID:27034860

  9. Exertional rhabdomyolysis in an acutely detrained athlete/exercise physiology professor.

    PubMed

    Pearcey, Gregory E P; Bradbury-Squires, David J; Power, Kevin E; Behm, David G; Button, Duane C

    2013-11-01

    The authors report a case of exercise-induced (exertional) rhabdomyolysis in a male athlete/exercise physiology professor who started a high-intensity resistance training program after a period of detraining. The subject performed 1 high-intensity resistance training session that consisted of 48 total sets of push-ups (24) and chin-ups (24) with no rest between the sets. Two days after the exercise session, the subject reported "Cola colored" urine. On arriving at the hospital, test results indicated elevated myoglobin and creatine kinase (CK) levels (59 159 U/L; normal is 20-200 U/L). Treatment included intravenous hydration with sodium bicarbonate to reduce myoglobin, blood work to monitor CK levels, and acupuncture from the shoulder to hand. Three weeks posttreatment, the subject started to exercise again. This case study illustrates that unaccustomed exercise in the form of high-intensity resistance training may be harmful (ie, severe delayed onset muscle soreness or even worse, as reported in this case, rhabdomyolysis) to detrained athletes. PMID:23727696

  10. Continuous veno-venous hemofiltration for massive rhabdomyolysis after malignant hyperthermia: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shudong; Xu, Hui; Zhu, Yesen; Jiang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    We present 2 cases of fulminant malignant hyperthermia (MH), complicated with massive rhabdomyolysis. The patients were successfully treated in the intensive care unit of our university teaching hospital, despite the lack of availability of dantrolene in our country, by early application of continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH). Both male patients developed fulminant malignant hyperthermia during anesthesia for oromaxillofacial surgery. CVVH was employed when the values of creatine phosphokinase (CPK), myoglobin (Mb), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) increased significantly. After emergency treatment and CVVH therapy, the values of CPK, Mb, and LDH in the blood plasma of the patients decreased significantly. The complications, including acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome were also treated without any obvious organ damage. Early detection and management are the keys to treat MH successfully. CVVH is a valuable therapeutic application in the initial/critical management of severe rhabdomyolysis. If these complications occur even with initial treatment with dantrolene, our experiences may be useful adjunctive treatments to consider. PMID:23506280

  11. Suspected myofibrillar myopathy in Arabian horses with a history of exertional rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    VALBERG, S. J.; McKENZIE, E. C.; EYRICH, L. V.; SHIVERS, J.; BARNES, N. E.; FINNO, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Reasons for performing study Although exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) is common in Arabian horses, there are no dedicated studies describing histopathological characteristics of muscle from Arabian horses with ER. Objectives To prospectively identify distinctive histopathological features of muscle from Arabian endurance horses with a history of ER (pro-ER) and to retrospectively determine their prevalence in archived samples from Arabian horses with exertional myopathies (retro-ER). Study design Prospective and retrospective histopathological description. Methods Middle gluteal muscle biopsies obtained from Arabian controls (n = 14), pro-ER (n = 13) as well as archived retro-ER (n = 25) muscle samples previously classified with type 2 polysaccharide storage myopathy (15/25), recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis (7/25) and no pathology (3/25) were scored for histopathology and immunohistochemical staining of cytoskeletal proteins. Glutaraldehyde-fixed samples (2 pro-ER, one control) were processed for electron microscopy. Pro-ER and retro-ER groups were compared with controls using Mann–Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Results Centrally located myonuclei in mature myofibres were found in significantly more (P<0.05) pro-ER (12/13) and retro-ER (21/25) horses than controls (4/14). Degenerating myofibres were not evident in any biopsies. Retro-ER horses had amylase-resistant polysaccharide (6/25, P<0.05) and higher scores for cytoplasmic glycogen, rimmed vacuoles and rod-like bodies. A few control horses (3/14) and significantly (P<0.05) more pro-ER (12/13) and retro-ER (18/25) horses had disrupted myofibrillar alignment and large desmin and αβ-crystallin positive cytoplasmic aggregates. Prominent Z-disc degeneration and focal myofibrillar disruption with regional accumulation of β-glycogen particles were identified on electron microscopy of the 2 pro-ER samples. Conclusions In a subset of Arabian horses with intermittent episodes of exertional

  12. Severe rhabdomyolysis from red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus) envenoming despite antivenom.

    PubMed

    Lim, Adeline Y L; Singh, Puneet N; Isbister, Geoffrey K

    2016-07-01

    Envenoming by the Australian red-bellied black snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus) causes non-specific systemic symptoms, anticoagulant coagulopathy, myotoxicity and local effects. Current management for systemic envenoming includes administration of one vial of tiger snake antivenom within 6 h of the bite to prevent myotoxicity. We present a case of severe rhabdomyolysis in a 16 year old male which developed despite early administration of one vial of tiger snake antivenom. Free venom was detected after the administration of antivenom concurrent with rapidly decreasing antivenom concentrations. The case suggests that insufficient antivenom was administered and the use of larger doses of antivenom need to be explored for red-bellied black snake envenoming. PMID:27039255

  13. [Rhabdomyolysis induced by succinylcholine chloride and sevoflurane in an elderly man].

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, F; Taoda, M; Uchihashi, Y; Satoh, T

    1996-11-01

    An 81-year-old man was scheduled for cervical lymph node biopsy. His laboratory data were within normal ranges. After induction of anesthesia with thiopental 175 mg and succinylcholine chloride (SCC) 40 mg, moderate masseter spasm was observed. Anesthesia was maintained with nitrous oxide, oxygen and sevoflurane. After the operation he had severe muscle pain and CK was elevated up to 81,400IU.l-1. The body temperature was not elevated above 37.2 degrees C during and after the operation. The skinned fiber examination, performed one month later, showed his calcium-induced-calcium-release (CICR) to be within normal ranges. We diagnosed him as rhabdomyolysis induced by coadministration of SCC and sevoflurane, especially SCC. We concluded that even in an elderly man, SCC should be administered cautiously. PMID:8953878

  14. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis triggered by drug-drug interaction with itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Dybro, Anne Mette; Damkier, Per; Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch; Hellfritzsch, Maja

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman had been treated with high-dose simvastatin for several years. After systemic treatment with the antifungal agent itraconazole, she developed muscle pain and highly elevated levels of creatine kinase and myoglobin. Muscle biopsy was compatible with statin-associated rhabdomyolysis, probably caused by a drug-drug interaction between simvastatin and itraconazole. The patient made full recovery. Three commonly used statins-simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin-are metabolised by the liver enzyme CYP3A4. Several potent inhibitors of this enzyme are known, for example, azole antifungal agents such as itraconazole and posaconazole. If antifungal treatment is indicated in a patient using a CYP3A4-metabolised statin, we recommend (1) topical administration of the antifungal agent if possible, (2) the use of a non-CYP3A4-inhibiting antifungal drug such as terbinafine or (3) temporary discontinuation of statin treatment. PMID:27605198

  15. Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure following use of succinylcholine and enflurane: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lee, S C; Abe, T; Sato, T

    1987-09-01

    A case of succinylcholine and enflurane induced rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuric acute renal failure in a mentally retarded patient is presented. The report illustrates some principles of management and the correlation of laboratory findings with the syndrome. When using general anesthesia in mentally retarded patients it is recommended that: 1) a careful personal and family past anesthetic history be taken; 2) drugs and apparatus for treatment of the crisis be available before anesthesia is induced; 3) the use of succinylcholine and potent inhalation anesthetic agents be avoided; 4) there is early diagnosis by prompt recognition of the clinical signs; and 5) that body temperature monitoring and frequent observation of vital signs during and after an operation be carried out. PMID:3476700

  16. [Carbohydrate and nitrogenous metabolism condition in the rat tissue under experimental rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Okhrimenko, S M

    2012-01-01

    Some effects of glycerol injection on indices of the condition of the thiol-disulfide system as well as carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism in rats in vivo were studied. A decrease was revealed in levels of non-protein SH-groups in the liver, kidney and heart, as well as of protein SH-groups in the kidney and heart of rats following glycerol injection. That might be connected with SH-group oxidation under the excessive arrival of free haem into tissues under rhabdomyolysis. A decrease in glycogen and increase in tyrosine aminotransferase activity in the liver were observed. Activation of nitrogenous metabolism following glycerol injection is indicated by the increase of aminotransferase activity in organs, and concentration of blood urea. High concentration of creatinine in the rat serum can reflect malfiltration in kidneys. PMID:22679761

  17. Forty years abuse of baking soda, rhabdomyolysis, glomerulonephritis, hypertension leading to renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Terje; Koistinen, Arvo; Anttinen, Jorma; Wagner, Bodo; Miettinen, Marja

    2008-01-01

    We present a patient who had ingested sodium bicarbonate for treatment of alcoholic dyspepsia during forty years at increasing doses. During the last year he had used more than 50 grams daily. He presented with metabolic alkalosis, epileptic convulsions, subdural hematoma, hypertension and rhabdomyolysis with end stage renal failure, for which he had to be given regular intermittent hemodialysis treatment. Untreated hypertension and glomerulonephritis was probably present prior to all these acute incidents. Examination of the kidney biopsy revealed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis and arterial wall thickening causing nephrosclerosis together with interstitial calcinosis. The combination of all these pathologic changes might be responsible for the development of progressive chronic renal failure ending up with the need for continuous intermittent hemodialysis treatment. PMID:24179353

  18. Rhabdomyolysis After Cooked Seafood Consumption (Haff Disease) in the United States vs China

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Haff disease is a syndrome of myalgia and rhabdomyolysis that occurs after eating cooked seafood. Methods For this descriptive analytical article, a literature search identified the scientific articles on Haff disease and/or rhabdomyolysis after eating cooked seafood in the United States and China. Analysis of those articles focused on identifying the seafood vectors of Haff disease, describing the most commonly recurring clinical and laboratory manifestations of Haff disease, and comparing the Haff disease toxidrome with other similar seafood-borne toxidromes. Statistically significant differences were determined using unpaired t tests and Fisher exact tests. Results Twenty-nine confirmed cases of Haff disease were identified in the United States, and 60 cases were identified in China during 1984-2014. Most of the US cases followed consumption of buffalo fish, and most of the Chinese cases followed consumption of freshwater pomfret. However, Haff disease also followed consumption of the same species of boiled crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in the United States (n=9) and China (n=6). US patients with crayfish-transmitted Haff disease reported significantly more nausea with and without vomiting, chest pain, body and back pain, dyspnea, and diaphoresis than the Chinese patients and were more frequently misdiagnosed as having myocardial infarctions. Conclusion The bioaccumulation of a new, heat-stable freshwater and/or brackish/saltwater algal toxin, similar to palytoxin but primarily myotoxic and not neurotoxic, is suspected of causing Haff disease. At present, only the rapid identification of the seafood vectors of Haff disease will limit disease outbreaks and prevent further cases. PMID:26130980

  19. Eccentric contractions do not induce rhabdomyolysis in malignant hyperthermia susceptible mice.

    PubMed

    Corona, Benjamin T; Rouviere, Clement; Hamilton, Susan L; Ingalls, Christopher P

    2008-11-01

    Recent studies suggest a link between exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis and mutations of the ryanodine receptor (RYR1) associated with malignant hyperthermia (MH). We hypothesized that MH-susceptible mice (RYR1Y522S/wt) would exhibit greater anterior crural muscle [tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles] damage and strength deficits following the performance of a single or repeated bouts of eccentric contractions compared with wild-type (WT) mice. After a single injury bout, RYR1Y522S/wt mice produced more isometric torque than WT mice immediately and 3 and 7 days postinjury. Moreover, EDL muscle isometric specific force deficits were fully recovered for RYR1Y522S/wt but not WT mice 14 days postinjury. The percentage of fibers in TA muscle exhibiting signs of muscle damage 7 and 14 days postinjury were at least three times less in RYR1Y522S/wt than in WT mice. Uninjured and injured EDL muscle from RYR1Y522S/wt mice also displayed greater S-glutathionylation of RYR1 than that from WT mice. During the weekly injury bouts, torque production by RYR1Y522S/wt mice was fully recovered before the third and fourth injury bouts, whereas torque was still reduced for WT mice. Three days after multiple injury bouts, there were approximately 50% fewer fibers exhibiting signs of muscle damage in RYR1Y522S/wt than in WT TA muscle. These findings indicate that the RYR1Y522S/wt mutation protects skeletal muscle from exercise-induced muscle injury and do not support a direct association between MH susceptibility and contraction-induced rhabdomyolysis when core temperature is maintained at lower physiological temperatures during exercise. PMID:18787086

  20. [A steroid-responsive case of severe rhabdomyolysis associated with cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Sato, Keishiro; Yoneda, Makoto; Hayashi, Koji; Nakagawa, Hiroto; Higuchi, Itsuro; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2006-05-01

    A 31-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, complaining of muscular weakness and pain in the legs one month after a common cold. On admission, neurological examinations demonstrated moderate weakness in the arms and mild weakness in the legs with decreased or diminished deep tendon reflexes, and mild dysphagia. Weakness was gradually extended to the arm, throat and respiratory muscles, requiring artificial ventilation. Laboratory examinations demonstrated increased levels of CK (upto 24,380 IU/L) and positive anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) -IgM antibodies in the serum, and myogloburinuria. CMV was not detected in either the blood cells or muscles by PCR. There were no antibodies against viruses including Ebstein-Barr virus and HIV, in the serum. There were no autoantibodies related to collagen diseases in the serum. Systemic PET scan did not show any evidence of malignancy. Bone marrow biopsy did not show any atypical cells. Muscle MRI demonstrated mild atrophy with high intensity signals in part. Muscle biopsy demonstrated scattered necrotic and regenerated muscle fibers without inflammatory cell infiltration. The patient was therefore diagnosed as having rhabdomyolysis associated with CMV infection. After three courses of intravenously administered high dose methylprednislone over three days, muscle weakness improved gradually, and the serum CK level was normalized in two months. The patient recovered and was removed from artificial ventilation three months after the therapy. There were no sign of renal failure. Steroid therapy should be considered for the treatment of rhabdomyolysis or myopathy associated with CMV infection in order to prevent renal failure or fatal progression of the disease. PMID:16886796

  1. Acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and marked selenium deficiency causing severe rhabdomyolysis in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Diego E.; Valberg, Stephanie J.; Magdesian, K. Gary; Hanna, Paul E.; Lofstedt, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of severe rhabdomyolysis in a pregnant mare associated with histopathologic and biochemical features of both selenium deficiency and acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) due to seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM). This case highlights the importance of assessing plasma selenium levels in horses with clinical signs of pasture myopathy as this deficiency may be a contributing or exacerbating factor. PMID:26538673

  2. Treatment of cardiomyopathy and rhabdomyolysis in long-chain fat oxidation disorders using an anaplerotic odd-chain triglyceride

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Charles R.; Sweetman, Lawrence; Roe, Diane S.; David, France; Brunengraber, Henri

    2002-01-01

    The current dietary treatment of long-chain fatty acid oxidation defects (high carbohydrate with medium-even-chain triglycerides and reduced amounts of long-chain fats) fails, in many cases, to prevent cardiomyopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and muscle weakness. We hypothesized that the apparent defect in energy production results from a depletion of the catalytic intermediates of the citric acid cycle via leakage through cell membranes (cataplerosis). We further hypothesized that replacing dietary medium-even-chain fatty acids (precursors of acetyl-CoA) by medium-odd-chain fatty acids (precursors of acetyl-CoA and anaplerotic propionyl-CoA) would restore energy production and improve cardiac and skeletal muscle function. We fed subjects with long-chain defects a controlled diet in which the fat component was switched from medium-even-chain triglycerides to triheptanoin. In three patients with very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, this treatment led rapidly to clinical improvement that included the permanent disappearance of chronic cardiomyopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and muscle weakness (for more than 2 years in one child), and of rhabdomyolysis and weakness in the others. There was no evidence of propionyl overload in these patients. The treatment has been well tolerated for up to 26 months and opens new avenues for the management of patients with mitochondrial fat oxidation disorders. PMID:12122118

  3. Treatment of cardiomyopathy and rhabdomyolysis in long-chain fat oxidation disorders using an anaplerotic odd-chain triglyceride.

    PubMed

    Roe, Charles R; Sweetman, Lawrence; Roe, Diane S; David, France; Brunengraber, Henri

    2002-07-01

    The current dietary treatment of long-chain fatty acid oxidation defects (high carbohydrate with medium-even-chain triglycerides and reduced amounts of long-chain fats) fails, in many cases, to prevent cardiomyopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and muscle weakness. We hypothesized that the apparent defect in energy production results from a depletion of the catalytic intermediates of the citric acid cycle via leakage through cell membranes (cataplerosis). We further hypothesized that replacing dietary medium-even-chain fatty acids (precursors of acetyl-CoA) by medium-odd-chain fatty acids (precursors of acetyl-CoA and anaplerotic propionyl-CoA) would restore energy production and improve cardiac and skeletal muscle function. We fed subjects with long-chain defects a controlled diet in which the fat component was switched from medium-even-chain triglycerides to triheptanoin. In three patients with very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, this treatment led rapidly to clinical improvement that included the permanent disappearance of chronic cardiomyopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and muscle weakness (for more than 2 years in one child), and of rhabdomyolysis and weakness in the others. There was no evidence of propionyl overload in these patients. The treatment has been well tolerated for up to 26 months and opens new avenues for the management of patients with mitochondrial fat oxidation disorders. PMID:12122118

  4. Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure following minimally invasive spine surgery: report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Dakwar, Elias; Rifkin, Stephen I; Volcan, Ildemaro J; Goodrich, J Allan; Uribe, Juan S

    2011-06-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery is increasingly used to treat various spinal pathologies with the goal of minimizing destruction of the surrounding tissues. Rhabdomyolysis (RM) is a rare but known complication of spine surgery, and acute renal failure (ARF) is in turn a potential complication of severe RM. The authors report the first known case series of RM and ARF following minimally invasive lateral spine surgery. The authors retrospectively reviewed data in all consecutive patients who underwent a minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach for interbody fusion with the subsequent development of RM and ARF at 2 institutions between 2006 and 2009. Demographic variables, patient home medications, preoperative laboratory values, and anesthetic used during the procedure were reviewed. All patient data were recorded including the operative procedure, patient positioning, postoperative hospital course, operative time, blood loss, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), creatinine, duration of hospital stay, and complications. Five of 315 consecutive patients were identified with RM and ARF after undergoing minimally invasive lateral transpsoas spine surgery. There were 4 men and 1 woman with a mean age of 66 years (range 60-71 years). The mean body mass index was 31 kg/m2 and ranged from 25 to 40 kg/m2. Nineteen interbody levels had been fused, with a range of 3-6 levels per patient. The mean operative time was 420 minutes and ranged from 315 to 600 minutes. The CPK ranged from 5000 to 56,000 U/L, with a mean of 25,861 U/L. Two of the 5 patients required temporary hemodialysis, while 3 required only aggressive fluid resuscitation. The mean duration of the hospital stay was 12 days, with a range of 3-25 days. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare but known potential complication of spine surgery. The authors describe the first case series associated with the minimally invasive lateral approach. Surgeons must be aware of the possibility of postoperative RM and ARF, particularly in

  5. CD163-Macrophages Are Involved in Rhabdomyolysis-Induced Kidney Injury and May Be Detected by MRI with Targeted Gold-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Carril, Mónica; Padro, Daniel; Guerrero-Hue, Melanie; Tarín, Carlos; Samaniego, Rafael; Cannata, Pablo; Cano, Ainhoa; Villalobos, Juan Manuel Amaro; Sevillano, Ángel Manuel; Yuste, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Praga, Manuel; Egido, Jesús; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in rhabdomyolysis-acute kidney injury (AKI), although the molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage differentiation are poorly understood. We analyzed the expression and regulation of CD163, a membrane receptor mainly expressed by anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, in rhabdomyolysis-AKI and developed targeted probes for its specific detection in vivo by MRI. Intramuscular injection of glycerol in mice promoted an early inflammatory response, with elevated proportion of M1 macrophages, and partial differentiation towards a M2 phenotype in later stages, where increased CD163 expression was observed. Immunohistological studies confirmed the presence of CD163-macrophages in human rhabdomyolysis-AKI. In cultured macrophages, myoglobin upregulated CD163 expression via HO-1/IL-10 axis. Moreover, we developed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles vectorized with an anti-CD163 antibody that specifically targeted CD163 in kidneys from glycerol-injected mice, as determined by MRI studies, and confirmed by electron microscopy and immunological analysis. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that CD163 is present in both human and experimental rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI, suggesting an important role of this molecule in this pathological condition. Therefore, the use of probes targeting CD163-macrophages by MRI may provide important information about the cellular composition of renal lesion in rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27162559

  6. CD163-Macrophages Are Involved in Rhabdomyolysis-Induced Kidney Injury and May Be Detected by MRI with Targeted Gold-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Carril, Mónica; Padro, Daniel; Guerrero-Hue, Melanie; Tarín, Carlos; Samaniego, Rafael; Cannata, Pablo; Cano, Ainhoa; Villalobos, Juan Manuel Amaro; Sevillano, Ángel Manuel; Yuste, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Praga, Manuel; Egido, Jesús; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in rhabdomyolysis-acute kidney injury (AKI), although the molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage differentiation are poorly understood. We analyzed the expression and regulation of CD163, a membrane receptor mainly expressed by anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, in rhabdomyolysis-AKI and developed targeted probes for its specific detection in vivo by MRI. Intramuscular injection of glycerol in mice promoted an early inflammatory response, with elevated proportion of M1 macrophages, and partial differentiation towards a M2 phenotype in later stages, where increased CD163 expression was observed. Immunohistological studies confirmed the presence of CD163-macrophages in human rhabdomyolysis-AKI. In cultured macrophages, myoglobin upregulated CD163 expression via HO-1/IL-10 axis. Moreover, we developed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles vectorized with an anti-CD163 antibody that specifically targeted CD163 in kidneys from glycerol-injected mice, as determined by MRI studies, and confirmed by electron microscopy and immunological analysis. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that CD163 is present in both human and experimental rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI, suggesting an important role of this molecule in this pathological condition. Therefore, the use of probes targeting CD163-macrophages by MRI may provide important information about the cellular composition of renal lesion in rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27162559

  7. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infected gluteal compartment syndrome with rhabdomyolysis in a bodybuilder

    PubMed Central

    Woon, Colin YL; Patel, Kushal R; Goldberg, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) is a rare condition. We present a case of gluteal muscle strain with hematoma formation, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) superinfection, leading to acute GCS, rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. This combination of diagnoses has not been reported in the literature. A 36-year-old Caucasian male presented with buttock pain, swelling and fever after lifting weights. Gluteal compartment pressure was markedly elevated compared with the contralateral side. Investigations revealed elevated white blood cell, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, creatine kinase, creatinine and lactic acid. Urinalysis was consistent with myoglobinuria. Magnetic resonance imaging showed increased T2 signal in the gluteus maximus and a central hematoma. Cultures taken from the emergency debridement and fasciotomy revealed MRSA. He had repeat, debridement 2 d later, and delayed primary closure 3 d after. GCS is rare and must be suspected when patients present with pain and swelling after an inciting event. They are easily diagnosed with compartment pressure monitoring. The treatment of gluteal abscess and compartment syndrome is the same and involves rapid surgical debridement. PMID:27190761

  8. Rhabdomyolysis following Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective, Descriptive, Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Ewila, Hesham; Aboulnaga, Sameh; Tuli, Alejandro Kohn; Singh, Rajvir

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Rhabdomyolysis (RML) following cardiac surgery and its relationship with acute kidney injury (AKI) require investigation. Patients and Methods. All patients undergoing cardiac surgery in our hospital were enrolled in this prospective study during a 1-year period. To investigate the occurrence of RML and its association with AKI, all patients in the study underwent serial assessment of serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin levels. Serial renal function, prior statin treatment, and outcome variables were recorded. Results. In total, 201 patients were included in the study: 185 men and 16 women with a mean age of 52.0 ± 12.4 years. According to the presence of RML (CK of ≥2,500 U/L), the patients were divided into Group I (RML present in 17 patients) and Group II (RML absent in 184 patients). Seven patients in Group I had AKI (41%) where 34 patients in group II had AKI (18.4%), P = 0.025. We observed a significantly longer duration of ventilation, length of stay in the ICU, and hospitalization in Group I (P < 0.001 for all observations). Conclusions. An early elevation of serum CK above 2500 U/L postoperatively in high-risk cardiac surgery could be used to diagnose RML that may predict the concomitance of early AKI. PMID:27034948

  9. Heritability of Recurrent Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in Standardbred and Thoroughbred Racehorses Derived From SNP Genotyping Data.

    PubMed

    Norton, Elaine M; Mickelson, James R; Binns, Matthew M; Blott, Sarah C; Caputo, Paul; Isgren, Cajsa M; McCoy, Annette M; Moore, Alison; Piercy, Richard J; Swinburne, June E; Vaudin, Mark; McCue, Molly E

    2016-11-01

    Recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis (RER) in Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses is characterized by episodes of muscle rigidity and cell damage that often recur upon strenuous exercise. The objective was to evaluate the importance of genetic factors in RER by obtaining an unbiased estimate of heritability in cohorts of unrelated Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses. Four hundred ninety-one Thoroughbred and 196 Standardbred racehorses were genotyped with the 54K or 74K SNP genotyping arrays. Heritability was calculated from genome-wide SNP data with a mixed linear and Bayesian model, utilizing the standard genetic relationship matrix (GRM). Both the mixed linear and Bayesian models estimated heritability of RER in Thoroughbreds to be approximately 0.34 and in Standardbred racehorses to be approximately 0.45 after adjusting for disease prevalence and sex. To account for potential differences in the genetic architecture of the underlying causal variants, heritability estimates were adjusted based on linkage disequilibrium weighted kinship matrix, minor allele frequency and variant effect size, yielding heritability estimates that ranged between 0.41-0.46 (Thoroughbreds) and 0.39-0.49 (Standardbreds). In conclusion, between 34-46% and 39-49% of the variance in RER susceptibility in Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses, respectively, can be explained by the SNPs present on these 2 genotyping arrays, indicating that RER is moderately heritable. These data provide further rationale for the investigation of genetic mutations associated with RER susceptibility. PMID:27489252

  10. Intermittent rhabdomyolysis with adult onset associated with a mutation in the ACADVL gene.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Ana Patrícia; Nogueira, Célia; Rocha, Hugo; Vilarinho, Laura; Evangelista, Teresinha

    2013-12-01

    Deficiency of very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is an autosomal recessive disease. Most common phenotypes occur in the neonatal period or in childhood with cardiomyopathy, hepatomegaly, and hypoketogenic hypoglycemia. Juvenile/adult-onset is characterized by exercise intolerance and recurrent rhabdomyolysis triggered by prolonged exercise or fasting. This article reports a patient with the homozygous mutation c.1097G>A (p.R366H) in the ACADVL gene. In Portugal, VLCAD deficiency became part of the neonatal screening plan in 2004, and as of 2012, 8 early-onset cases have been diagnosed, giving an incidence rate of 1:97.238 per 737.902 newborns. This patient was diagnosed outside of the neonatal screening plan. Beta-oxidation defects pose a diagnostic challenge because of their transient clinical and laboratorial manifestations and the absence of morphological changes in muscle biopsy further complicate matters, especially in the late-onset forms of the disease. The adult phenotype of VLCAD deficiency is highlighted, emphasizing the need for a high suspicion index and the value of tandem mass spectrometry for the diagnosis. PMID:24263034

  11. [Antioxidant effects of L-arginine in the rat heart in experimental rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Filimonenko, V P; Nikitchenko, I V; Kaliman, P A

    2009-01-01

    The glycerol administration in a dose of 1 ml of 50% water solution/100 g b. w. was found to cause considerable accumulation of the total heme in the rat blood serum that is accompanied by an increase of TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates contents and by changes of protein level. Heme entering in the heart tissue is observed in the first hours after glycerol injection. The breaches of heart antioxidant-prooxidant balance are noted in twenty-four hours: TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates accumulation, heme oxygenase and catalase activation, superoxide dismutase activity lowering and reduction of glutathione content elevation. Pretreatment by L-arginine (0.5 h before glycerol administration) almost did not affect the blood serum changes caused by glycerol injection. However in the rat heart L-arginine administration prevents from TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates accumulation and the breaches of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Besides L-arginine causes the ealier heme oxygenase induction. Possible mechanisms of L-arginine protective action in the rat heart under experimental rhabdomyolysis are discussed. PMID:19877424

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infected gluteal compartment syndrome with rhabdomyolysis in a bodybuilder.

    PubMed

    Woon, Colin Yl; Patel, Kushal R; Goldberg, Benjamin A

    2016-05-18

    Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) is a rare condition. We present a case of gluteal muscle strain with hematoma formation, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) superinfection, leading to acute GCS, rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. This combination of diagnoses has not been reported in the literature. A 36-year-old Caucasian male presented with buttock pain, swelling and fever after lifting weights. Gluteal compartment pressure was markedly elevated compared with the contralateral side. Investigations revealed elevated white blood cell, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, creatine kinase, creatinine and lactic acid. Urinalysis was consistent with myoglobinuria. Magnetic resonance imaging showed increased T2 signal in the gluteus maximus and a central hematoma. Cultures taken from the emergency debridement and fasciotomy revealed MRSA. He had repeat, debridement 2 d later, and delayed primary closure 3 d after. GCS is rare and must be suspected when patients present with pain and swelling after an inciting event. They are easily diagnosed with compartment pressure monitoring. The treatment of gluteal abscess and compartment syndrome is the same and involves rapid surgical debridement. PMID:27190761

  13. Refractory status epilepticus, serious rhabdomyolysis, acute liver injury, and pancytopenia after a massive intake of ethyl methanesulfonate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Tajima, Shogo; Takeuchi, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Ethyl methanesulfonate is a mutagenic, alkylating agent and considered harmful to humans at levels greater than a certain threshold; however, the toxicity at high doses remains unclear. We report a case of a Japanese man who presented with status epilepticus, rhabdomyolysis, pancytopenia, and hair loss after accidental ingestion of a massive amount of ethyl methanesulfonate. The patient completely recovered with critical care, including multiple antiepileptic drugs, renal replacement therapy, blood transfusion, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy, and antibacterial/fungal prophylaxis. The case indicates that ethyl methanesulfonate causes neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, hematotoxicity, and renal toxicity, which can be successfully treated with appropriate palliative therapies. PMID:26629236

  14. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 deficiency is protective in rhabdomyolysis-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Boddu, Ravindra; Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Hu, Xianzhen; Moehle, Mark S; Daher, João Paulo Lima; Kamal, Ahmed Ibrahim; Joseph, Reny; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam; Curtis, Lisa M; West, Andrew B

    2015-07-15

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most common known genetic cause of Parkinson's disease, and LRRK2 is also linked to Crohn's and Hansen's disease. LRRK2 is expressed in many organs in mammals but is particularly abundant in the kidney. We find that LRRK2 protein is predominantly localized to collecting duct cells in the rat kidney, with much lower expression in other kidney cells. While genetic knockout (KO) of LRRK2 expression is well-tolerated in mice and rats, a unique age-dependent pathology develops in the kidney. The cortex and medulla of LRRK2 KO rat kidneys become darkly pigmented in early adulthood, yet aged animals display no overt signs of kidney failure. Accompanying the dark pigment we find substantial macrophage infiltration in LRRK2 KO kidneys, suggesting the presence of chronic inflammation that may predispose to kidney disease. Unexpectedly, the dark kidneys of the LRRK2 KO rats are highly resistant to rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury compared with wild-type rats. Biochemical profiling of the LRRK2 KO kidneys using immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses show a massive accumulation of hemoglobin and lipofuscin in renal tubules that account for the pigmentation. The proximal tubules demonstrate a corresponding up-regulation of the cytoprotective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which is capable of mitigating acute kidney injury. The unusual kidney pathology of LRRK2 KO rats highlights several novel physiological roles for LRRK2 and provides indirect evidence for HO-1 expression as a protective mechanism in acute kidney injury in LRRK2 deficiency. PMID:25904107

  15. Altered Energetics of Exercise Explain Risk of Rhabdomyolysis in Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Diekman, E F; Visser, G; Schmitz, J P J; Nievelstein, R A J; de Sain-van der Velden, M; Wardrop, M; Van der Pol, W L; Houten, S M; van Riel, N A W; Takken, T; Jeneson, J A L

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is common in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) and other metabolic myopathies, but its pathogenic basis is poorly understood. Here, we show that prolonged bicycling exercise against a standardized moderate workload in VLCADD patients is associated with threefold bigger changes in phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations in quadriceps muscle and twofold lower changes in plasma acetyl-carnitine levels than in healthy subjects. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that muscle ATP homeostasis during exercise is compromised in VLCADD. However, the measured rates of PCr and Pi recovery post-exercise showed that the mitochondrial capacity for ATP synthesis in VLCADD muscle was normal. Mathematical modeling of oxidative ATP metabolism in muscle composed of three different fiber types indicated that the observed altered energy balance during submaximal exercise in VLCADD patients may be explained by a slow-to-fast shift in quadriceps fiber-type composition corresponding to 30% of the slow-twitch fiber-type pool in healthy quadriceps muscle. This study demonstrates for the first time that quadriceps energy balance during exercise in VLCADD patients is altered but not because of failing mitochondrial function. Our findings provide new clues to understanding the risk of rhabdomyolysis following exercise in human VLCADD. PMID:26881790

  16. Altered Energetics of Exercise Explain Risk of Rhabdomyolysis in Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Diekman, E. F.; Visser, G.; Schmitz, J. P. J.; Nievelstein, R. A. J.; de Sain-van der Velden, M.; Wardrop, M.; Van der Pol, W. L.; Houten, S. M.; van Riel, N. A. W.; Takken, T.; Jeneson, J. A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is common in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) and other metabolic myopathies, but its pathogenic basis is poorly understood. Here, we show that prolonged bicycling exercise against a standardized moderate workload in VLCADD patients is associated with threefold bigger changes in phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations in quadriceps muscle and twofold lower changes in plasma acetyl-carnitine levels than in healthy subjects. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that muscle ATP homeostasis during exercise is compromised in VLCADD. However, the measured rates of PCr and Pi recovery post-exercise showed that the mitochondrial capacity for ATP synthesis in VLCADD muscle was normal. Mathematical modeling of oxidative ATP metabolism in muscle composed of three different fiber types indicated that the observed altered energy balance during submaximal exercise in VLCADD patients may be explained by a slow-to-fast shift in quadriceps fiber-type composition corresponding to 30% of the slow-twitch fiber-type pool in healthy quadriceps muscle. This study demonstrates for the first time that quadriceps energy balance during exercise in VLCADD patients is altered but not because of failing mitochondrial function. Our findings provide new clues to understanding the risk of rhabdomyolysis following exercise in human VLCADD. PMID:26881790

  17. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Watkin, Levi B.; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S.; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y.; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S.; Coe, Bradley P.; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A.; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Yang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3–9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3–9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4–6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3–9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations. PMID:26805781

  18. An Unexpected Interaction between Sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir and Atorvastatin and Colchicine Causing Rhabdomyolysis in a Patient with Impaired Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects roughly 170 million people worldwide. Sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir (Sof/Led) is a new once daily direct acting antiviral combination pill that was approved in October 2014 for use in patients with HCV genotype 1 infection. Coadministration of Sof/Led is studied only with rosuvastatin which shows significantly increased level of drug and is associated with increased risk of myopathy, including rhabdomyolysis. There is no mention of such HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor interaction as a class, as pravastatin did not have any clinically significant interaction with Sof/Led. Other myotoxic drugs, including colchicine are not studied. We present a case of a serious drug interaction between Sof/Led and atorvastatin, in the background of CKD and colchicine use.

  19. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Dialysis as a Result of Concomitant Use of Atypical Neuroleptics and Synthetic Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Aiyu; Tan, Maybel; Maung, Aung; Salifu, Moro; Mallappallil, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The use of synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) is associated with many severe adverse effects that are not observed with marijuana use. We report a unique case of a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring dialysis after use of SCBs combined with quetiapine. Causes for the different adverse effects profile between SCBs and marijuana are not defined yet. Cases reported in literature with SCBs use have been associated with reversible AKI characterized by acute tubular necrosis and interstitial nephritis. Recent studies have showed the involvement of cytochromes P450s (CYPs) in biotransformation of SCBs. The use of quetiapine which is a substrate of the CYP3A4 and is excreted (73%) as urine metabolites may worsen the side effect profiles of both quetiapine and K2. SCBs use should be included in the differential diagnosis of AKI and serum Creatinine Phosphokinase (CPK) level should be monitored. Further research is needed to identify the mechanism of SCBs nephrotoxicity. PMID:26550500

  20. [Effect of L-arginine on pro- and antioxidant status of the rat vessels and lungs in experimental rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Fylymonenko, V P; Nikitchenko, I V; Kaliman, P A

    2009-01-01

    The glycerol administration was found to cause accumulation of the total heme in rat blood serum, vessels and lungs that are accompanied by increase of TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates contents. A decrease of superoxide dismutase activity and an increase of reduced glutathione in lung were observed. Heme entering the vessels and lungs is accompanied by elevation in heme oxygenase activity. Pretreatment by L-arginine (0.5 h before glycerol administration) didn't affect blood serum and vessels changes caused by glycerol injection. However, in lungs, L-arginine prevents TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates accumulation, the decrease ofsuperoxide dismutase activity and causes the ealier heme oxygenase induction. Prooxidant effects of heme in tissues studied and possible mechanisms of L-arginine protective action in lung under experimental rhabdomyolysis are discussed. PMID:20095386

  1. Heme oxygenase activity and some indices of antioxidant protection in rat liver and kidney in glycerol model of rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Strel'chenko, E V; Nikitchenko, I V; Filimonenko, V P

    2003-01-01

    Activity of heme oxygenase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase, the content of reduced glutathione and total heme in the liver and kidneys, and serum absorption spectrum in the Soret band were studied in rats with glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis. Glycerol increased the content of heme-containing metabolites in the serum and the total heme content in the liver and kidneys, and decreased the content of reduced glutathione and catalase activity in the examined organs. Superoxide dismutase activity increased in the liver and decreased in the kidneys. Heme oxygenase activity increased in the liver and kidneys 2 and 6 h postinjection, respectively. The effects of heme delivered to the liver and kidneys from the vascular bed on the antioxidant defense and heme oxygenase activity were studied. PMID:12717508

  2. Investigation of selected biochemical indicators of Equine Rhabdomyolysis in Arabian horses: pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress markers.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Wael Mohamed; El-Bahr, Sabry M

    2010-12-01

    A total of 30 horses were divided into two groups, one served as a control whereas other was rhabdomyolysis diseased horses. After blood collection, the resulted sera were used for estimation of the activities of creatin kinase (CK), aspartate transaminase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lactic acid, triacylglycerol (TAG), glucose, total protein, albumin, globulin, urea, creatinine, Triiodothyronine (T(3)), calcium, sodium, potassium, phosphorus, chloride, vitamin E, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis-α (TNF-α). In addition, whole blood was used for determination of selenium, reduced glutathione (G-SH) and prostaglandin F2-α (PGF2α). The erythrocyte hemolysates were used for the determination of the activities of super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA). The present findings revealed a significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in the values of CK, AST, LDH, glucose, lactate, TAG, urea, creatinine, phosphorus, MDA, TNF- α, IL6 and PGF2- α in diseased horses when compared with the control. Furthermore, the values of calcium, SOD, CAT, TAC, NO and GSH in diseased horses were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower than the control. The other examined parameters were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the examined pro-inflammatory cytokines were useful biomarkers for the diagnosis of Equine rhabdomyolysis (ER) in Arabian horses beside the old examined biomarkers. In the future, efforts should be made to confirm this in other breed. If this could be achieved, it would open up new perspectives in research fields dealing with ER. PMID:20830520

  3. Statin-induced myotoxicity: pharmacokinetic differences among statins and the risk of rhabdomyolysis, with particular reference to pitavastatin.

    PubMed

    Catapano, Alberico L

    2012-03-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are the most widely prescribed therapeutic class of drugs worldwide, with established clinical benefits both in terms of improving serum lipid profiles and reducing cardiovascular events and mortality. Although statins have a favorable risk-to-benefit ratio, they have the potential to cause adverse events which can result in muscular inflammation (myositis), muscle breakdown (rhabdomyolysis) and, ultimately, kidney failure. While the incidence of rhabdomyolysis is approximately 3.4 cases per 100,000 person-years with standard-dose statin therapy, the risk of developing the condition increases substantially at higher therapeutic doses. This effect may be exacerbated by prescribing statins in combination with certain other medications because drug � drug interactions increase statin exposure by interacting with enzymes that would normally be involved in their metabolism and clearance. Co-administration of drugs that inhibit the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes responsible for metabolizing statins, or that interact with the organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) responsible for statin uptake into hepatocytes, substantially increases the risk of developing myotoxicity. Such effects vary among statins according to their metabolic profile. For example, pitavastatin, a novel statin approved for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and combined (mixed) dyslipidemia, is not catabolized by CYP3A4, unlike other lipophilic statins, and may be less dependent on the OATP1B1 transporter for its uptake into hepatocytes before clearance. Such differences in drug � drug interaction profiles among available statins offer the possibility of reducing the risk of myotoxicity among high-risk patients. PMID:22022768

  4. [A case of acute renal failure in neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with rhabdomyolysis--possible contributing role of hyperreninemia].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, K; Maruyama, Y; Nakamura, K; Nagase, M

    1994-10-01

    A schizophrenic woman, aged 45, was admitted complaining of high fever, oliguria, blackish urine, muscle swelling and pain. She had been treated for the past 3 years with haloperidol (8 mg), levomepromazine (150 mg), chlorpromazine (75 mg), lithium carbonate (600 mg), bromocriptine mesilate (7.5 mg), etizolam (1 mg), and flunitrazepam (2 mg), Physical examination revealed her to be an obese and uncommunicatable woman with swelling and weakness of the extremities and abdominal distension without borborygmus. Urine was dark brown and (+) for protein and occult blood. Blood chemistry analysis revealed BUN 71 mg/dl, creatinine 6.8 mg/dl, CPK 143,850 IU and myoglobin 3,980 ng/ml. PRA on the 11th hospital day was 96 ng/ml/hour. This patient fulfilled the Levenson's diagnostic criteria for manifestations of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). High PRA did not decrease after cessation of the diuretics. After treatment with dantrolene sodium and 10 treatments with hemodialysis, azotemia disappeared with the start of diuresis. The PRA also decreased to the normal level. Characteristic acceleration of the central sympathetic stimuli in NMS seemed to have induced hyperreninemia, which together with rhabdomyolysis, might have contributed to the development of acute renal failure. PMID:7815749

  5. Selenium Inhibits Renal Oxidation and Inflammation But Not Acute Kidney Injury in an Animal Model of Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Shanu, Anu; Groebler, Ludwig; Kim, Hyun Bo; Wood, Sarah; Weekley, Claire M.; Aitken, Jade B.; Harris, Hugh H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a manifestation of rhabdomyolysis (RM). Extracellular myoglobin accumulating in the kidney after RM promotes oxidative damage, which is implicated in AKI. Aim: To test whether selenium (Se) supplementation diminishes AKI and improves renal function. Results: Dietary selenite increased Se in the renal cortex, as demonstrated by X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Experimental RM-stimulated AKI as judged by increased urinary protein/creatinine, clusterin, and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), decreased creatinine clearance (CCr), increased plasma urea, and damage to renal tubules. Concentrations of cholesterylester (hydro)peroxides and F2-isoprostanes increased in plasma and renal tissues after RM, while aortic and renal cyclic guanidine monophosphate (cGMP; marker of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability) decreased. Renal superoxide dismutase-1, phospho-P65, TNFα gene, MCP-1 protein, and the 3-chloro-tyrosine/tyrosine ratio (Cl-Tyr/Tyr; marker of neutrophil activation) all increased after RM. Dietary Se significantly decreased renal lipid oxidation, phospho-P65, TNFα gene expression, MCP-1 and Cl-Tyr/Tyr, improved NO bioavailability in aorta but not in the renal microvasculature, and inhibited proteinuria. However, CCr, plasma urea and creatinine, urinary clusterin, and histopathological assessment of AKI remained unchanged. Except for the Se++ group, renal angiotensin-receptor-1/2 gene/protein expression increased after RM with parallel increases in MEK1/2 inhibitor-sensitive MAPkinase (ERK) activity. Innovation: We employed synchrotron radiation to identify Se distribution in kidneys, in addition to assessing reno-protection after RM. Conclusion: Se treatment has some potential as a therapeutic for AKI as it inhibits oxidative damage and inflammation and decreases proteinuria, albeit histopathological changes to the kidney and some plasma and urinary markers of AKI remain unaffected after RM. Antioxid Redox Signal. 18, 756–769

  6. Reduction of the risk of rhabdomyolysis after bariatric surgery with lower fluid administration in the perioperative period: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Matłok, Maciej; Major, Piotr; Małczak, Piotr; Wysocki, Michał; Hynnekleiv, Leif; Nowak, Mateusz; Karcz, Konrad; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2016-04-13

    INTRODUCTION    Obesity is a growing worldwide problem. One of the most effective treatments is a bariatric procedure; however, surgery is associated with the risk of complications, such as staple line leakage, suture line bleeding, and rhabdomyolysis (RML). OBJECTIVES    The objective of our study was to assess the risk of RML after bariatric surgery related to intravenous fluid administration in the perioperative period. PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study involved 194 patients who underwent a bariatric surgery (laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy or laparoscopic gastric bypass). We studied an association between the development of RML and sex, age, weight, duration of surgery, type of surgery, and the volume of intravenously administered fluids during the perioperative period. RESULTS    The median duration of surgery was 132.5 minutes. The median volume of administered fluids was 3150 ml from the introduction of anesthesia to 24 hours after surgery. Biochemical RML (creatine phosphokinase >1000 U/l) was observed in 30 patients (15.46%). RML with clinical manifestations developed in 6 patients. Multivariate logistic regression revealed an increase in the odds ratio of biochemical RML with an increase of weight on the day of surgery, operative time, and volume of intravenous fluids. A multiple regression model showed that every 500 ml of transfused fluid over the median volume increases creatine phosphokinase concentrations in the first postoperative day by 241.77 U/l over the median level, with the operative time and patient's weight remaining at median values. CONCLUSIONS    We observed an association between the administration of lower fluid volumes and a lower risk of RML. We postulate that decreasing intravenous fluid administration may reduce the risk of RML after bariatric surgery. PMID:27074693

  7. Penehyclidine Hydrochloride Pretreatment Ameliorates Rhabdomyolysis-Induced AKI by Activating the Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway and Allevi-ating Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Huang, XuDong; Zhang, LiXia; Yang, XinJun; Wang, LiHui; Chen, YunShuang; Wang, JingHua; Wu, GuangLi

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most severe complications of rhabdomyolysis (RM). The underlying mechanisms and potential preventions need to be investigated. Penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) was reported to ameliorate renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, but the effect of PHC on RM-reduced AKI is unknown. In this study, we established a rat model of RM-induced AKI using an intramuscular glycerol injection in the hind limbs. Rats were pretreated with PHC before the glycerol injection, and the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnPP was introduced to evaluate the effect of HO-1 on RM-induced AKI. PHC pretreatment ameliorated the pathological renal injury and renal dysfunction, and decreased the renal apoptosis rate in RM-induced AKI. PHC significantly up-regulated HO-1 expression, increased HO-1 enzymatic activity and decreased the accumulation of myoglobin in renal tissues. This effect was partly inhibited by ZnPP. PHC pretreatment also effectively up-regulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and down-regulated glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and caspase-12 at both the gene and protein levels. These results suggest that the protective effects of PHC pretreatment on RM-induced AKI occur at least in part through activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway and alleviating endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in rat renal tissues. PMID:26987113

  8. Exertional rhabdomyolysis and exercise intolerance revealing dystrophinopathies.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, D; Baeta Machado, A M; Putzu, G A; Malzac, P; Voelckel, M A; Pellissier, J F

    1997-07-01

    Exercise intolerance associated with myalgias, muscle cramps or myoglobinuria may be associated with a dystrophinopathy. A search for abnormal dystrophin expression (using immunohistochemistry, immunoblot and DNA analysis) was carried out in a series of 15 patients. They were selected because they presented exercise intolerance, negative biochemical tests (lipid, glycogen and mitochondrial metabolism) and abnormal immunohistochemistry with at least one anti-dystrophin antibody (anti-Dys 1, rod domain; anti-Dys 2, C terminus; anti-Dys 3, N terminus). Lack of anti-Dys 1 immunoreactivity was seen in three patients and abnormal immunoreactivity with all three anti-dystrophin antibodies in two. Immunoblot confirmed the dystrophinopathy in these five patients only, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction DNA analysis revealed a deletion in the dystrophin gene in two of these patients, affecting the proximal part of the rod domain in one and the distal part of this domain in the other. The clinical, biological and histopathological features of the five patients reported here, together with the previous cases reported in the literature, are described and reveal that exercise intolerance associated with dystrophinopathy displays characteristic clinical, biological and immunohistochemical features and defines a new dystrophinopathy phenotype. The absence of staining in the rod domain provides a secure diagnosis of this syndrome. Dystrophinopathy is one etiology of idiopathic myoglobinuria, requiring genetic counseling. PMID:9224530

  9. Acute Rhabdomyolysis Following Synthetic Cannabinoid Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Adedinsewo, Demilade A.; Odewole, Oluwaseun; Todd, Taylor

    2016-01-01

    Context: Novel psychoactive substances, including synthetic cannabinoids, are becoming increasingly popular, with more patients being seen in the emergency room following acute ingestion. These substances have been associated with a wide range of adverse effects. However, identification of complications, clinical toxicity, and management remain challenging. Case Report: We present the case of a young African-American male who developed severe agitation and bizarre behavior following acute K2 ingestion. Laboratory studies revealed markedly elevated serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) with normal renal function. The patient was managed with aggressive intravenous (IV) fluid hydration and treatment of underlying psychiatric illness. Conclusion: We recommend the routine evaluation of renal function and CPK levels with early initiation of IV hydration among patients who present to the emergency department following acute ingestion of synthetic cannabinoids to identify potential complications early as well as institute early supportive therapy. PMID:27500131

  10. Traumatic rhabdomyolysis from severe beating--experience of volume diuresis in 200 patients.

    PubMed

    Knottenbelt, J D

    1994-08-01

    Fluid loading with balanced salt solution (BSS) was carried out in 200 patients with extensive soft tissue injuries from severe beatings. Urinary volume and dipstick specific gravity testing were used to monitor renal function with administration of furosemide for persistent oliguria. Acute intrinsic renal failure (AIRF) occurred in 21 patients (10.5%) and five patients died (2.5%); two of hyperkalemia, two of sepsis and one of multiple organ failure. Significantly increased rates of AIRF and death were associated with injury-admission intervals of more than 12 hours, severe metabolic acidosis, low initial hemoglobin, heavy pigmenturia, and high serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. An increased serum creatinine/BUN ratio was noted in four of the five patients who died. An average of 7.5 L fluids was needed in non-AIRF patients to achieve adequate diuresis with a mean positive fluid balance of 4.7 L. No patient without pigmenturia developed AIRF. Balanced salt solution volume diuresis supplemented with furosemide as necessary appears to be safe and effective in preventing AIRF in soft tissue injuries sustained in beatings. PMID:8064919

  11. Evaluation of the severity of traumatic rhabdomyolysis using technetium-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Chang, H R; Kao, C H; Lian, J D; Shu, K H; Cheng, C H; Wu, M J; Chen, C H

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative scoring method was designed to assess the extent of muscle damage. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP) scintigraphy was performed for 9 patients experiencing crush injury in the Chichi (Taiwan) earthquake. The magnitude of muscle uptake of 99mTc-PYP was graded as follows: grade 0, less than bone radioactivity (BRA); grade 1, equal to BRA; grade 2, higher than BRA; or grade 3, greatly higher than BRA. The area of muscle injury was estimated according to the rule of nines. The sum of the muscle injury size multiplied by its corresponding grading was defined as the anterior or posterior score according to the anterior or posterior images. Each image was interpreted by two physicians and average anterior and posterior scores were calculated. The muscle score was defined as the geometric mean of the average anterior and posterior scores. Significant correlations were obtained between the muscle score and duration of time trapped (r = 0.868, p < 0.01), peak serum creatine kinase level (r = 0.866, p < 0.01), peak serum phosphorus level (r = 0.877, p < 0.01) and number of hospital days (r = 0.875, p < 0.01). A negative correlation between the muscle score and blood pH (r = -0.706, p < 0.01) was also observed. We concluded that this scoring method may be used as an adjunct for evaluating the locations of trauma and the severity of crush syndrome, and for predicting the duration of hospital stay. PMID:11423690

  12. Compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis and risk of acute renal failure as complications of the urological surgery.

    PubMed

    Kochiashvili, D; Sutidze, M; Tchovelidze, Ch; Rukhadze, I; Dzneladze, A

    2007-02-01

    Current knowledge related to the risk of CS when operating in these positions (Lloyd Davies and Trendelenburg tilt) is such that it can be deemed negligent to keep patients in this position (with legs higher than the heart) when not absolutely necessary. If it means repositioning and redraping, thus adding a few extra minutes to the episode and costing a small amount in additional drapes, surely this is a small price to pay for excellent perioperative care? If repositioning is impossible to execute, the head-down tilt position should be reversed every two hours, for a short period of time, to allow more natural perfusion of the lower limbs to occur. Raza et al recommend that if the anticipated procedure duration is beyond four hours, the legs should be removed from supports every two hours for a short period to prevent reperfusion injury. The use of Allen stirrups is preferred to calf supports or metal skids. Turnbull and Mills suggest that we should certainly review our use of compression stockings and intermittent compression devices when operating on patients in the Lloyd Davies position. It will be deemed negligent to misdiagnose (ie: mistake for a DVT) or delay treatment (by prolonged re-assessment) of CS postoperatively when patients have been subjected to prolonged surgery in these abnormal positions. Delayed or missed diagnosis may not only be limb-threatening (and cause a very protracted hospital stay)--it can be life-threatening. With today's current knowledge, surgeons undertaking prolonged surgery in abnormal positions must be aware of this, fortunately rare, complication. Practice guidelines within perioperative care should reflect current knowledge and ensure that risk is minimized. Patients who take legal action if they have experienced this condition may be awarded substantial costs against negligence if lack of care can be proven or diagnosis has been delayed. PMID:17404439

  13. Skeletal muscle-specific HMG-CoA reductase knockout mice exhibit rhabdomyolysis: A model for statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Miyahara, Shoko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Ishii, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sone, Hirohito; Ohashi, Ken; Ishibashi, Shun; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2015-10-23

    HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid (MVA); this is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that synthesizes cholesterol. Statins, HMGCR inhibitors, are widely used as cholesterol-reducing drugs. However, statin-induced myopathy is the most adverse side effect of statins. To eludicate the mechanisms underlying statin the myotoxicity and HMGCR function in the skeletal muscle, we developed the skeletal muscle-specific HMGCR knockout mice. Knockout mice exhibited postnatal myopathy with elevated serum creatine kinase levels and necrosis. Myopathy in knockout mice was completely rescued by the oral administration of MVA. These results suggest that skeletal muscle toxicity caused by statins is dependent on the deficiencies of HMGCR enzyme activity and downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway in skeletal muscles rather than the liver or other organs. PMID:26381177

  14. Isolated left upper extremity myositis and severe rhabdomyolysis in an adult with H1N1 Influenza, a case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Razjouyan, Hadie; Atluri, Paavani; Patel, Apoorva; Eng, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Acute viral myositis is a fairly rare condition and usually seen in recovery phase of illness, especially in pediatric or geriatric population. Influenza type A, specifically H1N1 may present with generalized myositis and mild elevation of creatinine kinase in addition to usual manifestations. We would like to discuss an atypical presentation of Type A Influenza (H1N1) in a middle aged male who was never immunized for influenza, presenting with fever, vomiting, anuria and acute severe left upper extremity pain. The most interesting presentation in our patient was that, it was limited to a single extremity, unlike generalized presentation, which was previously reported, acute renal failure warranting renal replacement therapy. This case serves as a reminder for clinicians about atypical manifestations of H1N1 and its threatening metabolic complications. Hence the practitioners should be aware of this rare but possible presentation of certain strains of influenza virus. It also accentuates the importance of being immunized, reminding us of the Old but Golden Adage “Prevention is better than Cure.” PMID:26952148

  15. The priority of Antonino D'Antona in describing rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury, following the Messina earthquake (December 28, 1908). Commentary.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Natale Gaspare; Bisaccia, Carmela; De Santo, Luca Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Following the Messina-Reggio Calabria earthquake (December 28, 1908) outstanding medical reports were published by Franz von Colmers (1875-1960), Antonino D'Antona (1842-1913), and Rocco Caminiti (1868-1940). The reports of D'Antona and Caminiti were heretofore neglected. Colmers, D'Antona and Caminiti described crush-syndrome. D'Antona who cured patients in shock also described two deaths due to uraemia. This gives him a priority in the description of crush syndrome with renal injury which has been traditionally attributed to Bywaters and Beall. PMID:27033609

  16. [Activity of key enzymes of heme metabolism and cytochrome P-450 content in the rat liver in experimental rhabdomyolysis and hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Inshina, N N; Strel'chenko, E V

    2003-01-01

    The 5-aminolevulinate synthase, heme oxygenase, tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase activities, the content of total heme and cytochrome P-450 content in the rat liver and absorption spectrum of blood serum in Soret region under glycerol model of rhabdomiolisis and hemolytic anemia caused by single phenylhydrazine injection have been investigated. The glycerol injection caused a considerable accumulation of heme-containing products in the serum and the increase of the total heme content, holoenzyme, total activity and heme saturation of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase, as well as the increase of the 5-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase activities in the liver during the first hours of its action and the decrease of cytochrome P-450 content in 24 h. Administration of phenylhydrazine lead to the increasing of hemolysis products content in blood serum too, although it was less expressed. The phenylhydrazine injection caused the increase of activities of 5-aminolevulinate synthase, holoenzyme, total activity and heme saturation of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase, as well as decrease of cytochrome P-450 content in the rat liver in 2 h. The increase of the total heme content and heme oxygenase activity has been observed in 24 h. The effect of heme arrival from the blood stream, as well as a direct influence of glycerol and phenylhydrazine on the investigated parameters are discussed. PMID:14577161

  17. Methadone for Fun Sake… Kidneys Are at Stake!!!

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sameer; Wankhedkar, Kashmira; Popis-Matejak, Beata; Baumstein, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Acute renal failure from rhabdomyolysis is a well-established clinical entity; however, rhabdomyolysis exclusively caused by the ingestion of methadone requiring hemodialysis is very uncommon. With a similar mechanism to opiates, methadone can cause rhabdomyolysis and further consequences. Given the increasing use of methadone as a therapy for opiate dependence, clinicians prescribing this medication should be aware of this life-threatening complication. PMID:25782567

  18. Severe obstructive sleep apnea after cerivastatin therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ebben, Matthew R; Sethi, Nitin K; Spielman, Arthur J

    2008-06-15

    All available 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) have been implicated in causing rhabdomyolysis either as monotherapy or in combination with other myotoxic drugs such as cyclosporine, colchicine and fibrates. Cerivastatin (Baycol) is a third generation statin, which has been implicated in cases of fatal rhabdomyolysis. It was voluntary withdrawn from the U.S. market by Bayer after reports of fatal rhabdomyolysis appeared in the literature. We present here a case of an 85-year-old woman who developed rhabdomyolysis and severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) symptoms after having been started on cerivastatin therapy for hypercholesteremia. PMID:18595439

  19. Myoglobin blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle tissue that leads to the release of muscle fiber contents into the blood ( rhabdomyolysis ) Skeletal muscle inflammation ( myositis ) Skeletal muscle ischemia (oxygen deficiency) Skeletal ...

  20. Myoglobinuria with acute renal failure and hot kidneys seen on bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, K.J.; Sty, J.R.; Johnson, F.; Tisdale, P.

    1984-09-01

    We report a case of myoglobinuria secondary to prolonged seizures. The child showed ''hot kidneys'' with bone scintigraphy. The disease entity and etiologies of nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis are discussed.

  1. Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole-Induced Rhabdomyolysis; Gabapentin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients; Purple Glove Syndrome After Oral Phenytoin Administration; Acute Dystonic Reaction After Methylphenidate Initiation; Serotonin Syndrome with Vilazodone Monotherapy; Cabozantinib-Associated Dermatologic Adverse Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mancano, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA's MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:26715798

  2. [Acute poisoning due to oral intake of an organic solvent].

    PubMed

    Holtz, J; Nicole, A; Regamey, C

    1992-11-21

    We report a case of paint thinner intoxication by oral intake, with loss of consciousness, upper gastrointestinal injuries, renal failure, rhabdomyolysis and cervical plexus injury. The clinical picture was similar to other cases reported in the literature. PMID:1448688

  3. Myoglobin blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to: Heart attack Malignant hyperthermia (very rare) Muscular dystrophy Breakdown of muscle tissue that leads to the ... chap 421. Read More Heart attack Malignant hyperthermia Muscular dystrophy Myoglobin urine test Myositis Rhabdomyolysis Update Date 2/ ...

  4. Phenotype Standardization for Statin-Induced Myotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Alfirevic, A; Neely, D; Armitage, J; Chinoy, H; Cooper, R G; Laaksonen, R; Carr, D F; Bloch, K M; Fahy, J; Hanson, A; Yue, Q-Y; Wadelius, M; Maitland-van Der Zee, A H; Voora, D; Psaty, B M; Palmer, C N A; Pirmohamed, M

    2014-01-01

    Statins are widely used lipid-lowering drugs that are effective in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. Although they are generally well tolerated, they can cause muscle toxicity, which can lead to severe rhabdomyolysis. Research in this area has been hampered to some extent by the lack of standardized nomenclature and phenotypic definitions. We have used numerical and descriptive classifications and developed an algorithm to define statin-related myotoxicity phenotypes, including myalgia, myopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. PMID:24897241

  5. Repeated Topical Application of para-Phenylenediamine Induces Renal Histopathological Changes in Rats.

    PubMed

    Bharali, Manuj Kr; Basumatary, Rajeev; Rahman, Taibur; Dutta, Karabi

    2012-05-01

    Hemolytic anemia and rhabdomyolysis have been often reported to be an adverse effect of drug- and chemical-induced toxicity both in experimental and real-life scenario. para-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is a derivative of para-nitroaniline and has been found as an ingredient of almost all hair dye formulations in varying concentrations from 2% to 4% w/v. Earlier studies have reported that the accidental oral ingestion of PPD in humans can lead to acute renal failure because of rhabdomyolysis. In the present investigation, we have tested the chronic topical application of PPD and its effect on the renal histology of Sprague-Dawley rats. The experiment provides clear evidence that topically applied PPD induces hemolytic anemia as evident from the decrease in the total RBC count, packed cell volume, and hemoglobin content apart from rhabdomyolysis which subsequently causes acute renal failure in rats. PMID:22778510

  6. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  7. Rapidly Progressing Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reaction With Acute Kidney Injury After Drug Exposure: An Uncommon Presentation.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Bradley K; Kumar, Avinash B

    2016-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome (TEN) is a rare severe cutaneous adverse drug reaction that involves skin and mucous membranes. We describe a case of TEN presenting with stage III acute kidney injury, rhabdomyolysis, and acute respiratory failure likely triggered by allopurinol for recently diagnosed gout. Prompt diagnosis, multidisciplinary management, including aggressive resuscitation, cardiorespiratory support, intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, and daily wound care resulted in a positive outcome despite a predicted mortality greater than 60%. Although allopurinol is a known triggering agent, TEN presenting with rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury is rare. PMID:24832386

  8. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication. PMID:12046971

  9. [Brown urine : Myoglobin-induced renal failure after concomitant administration of simvastatin and amiodarone].

    PubMed

    Pietsch, U; Müller-Höcker, C; Filipovic, M

    2016-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare but well-known complication of statin therapy. The risk is considerably increased when concomitant drugs are administered that inhibit metabolism and breakdown via the cytochrome CYP3A4. We report a case of myoglobin-induced acute renal failure secondary to the concomitant use of simvastatin and amiodarone. The risk of rhabdomyolysis is mainly determined by the statin dose; in the case of the concomitant use of CYP3A4 inhibitors, a maximal daily dose of 20 mg is recommended to avoid harmful drug interactions. PMID:27142363

  10. Statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Kristofer A; Campbell, William W

    2008-01-01

    Many different classes of medications can cause toxic myopathy. One of the most frequently implicated classes is the statins. Statin myotoxicity ranges from asymptomatic creatine kinase elevations or myalgias to muscle necrosis and fatal rhabdomyolysis. Statins may also cause an autoimmune myopathy requiring immunosuppressive treatment. The mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are unclear. If unrecognized in its early manifestations, complications from continued statin therapy may lead to rhabdomyolysis and death. Risk factors for myotoxicity include concomitant medication use and medical conditions, and the patient's underlying genetic constitution. We review these considerations along with the recommended evaluation and treatment for patients presenting with statin myotoxicity. PMID:18367041

  11. Six-Digit CPK and Mildly Affected Renal Function in McArdle Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mcinnes, Andrew D.; DeGroote, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A previously healthy, white 12-year-old girl presented with diffuse body aches and poor perfusion. She developed severe respiratory failure and marked rhabdomyolysis and was mechanically ventilated. Although her CPK peaked at 500,000 IU/L, her renal function was mildly affected and her creatinine did not exceed the 0.8 mg/dL. The rhabdomyolysis was gradually resolved following aggressive fluid hydration. The patient did not require dialysis and made a complete recovery. Genetic studies revealed the diagnosis of McArdle disease. PMID:25371840

  12. Super vasomol hair dye poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen A S; Talari, Keerthi; Dutta, T K

    2012-01-01

    Hair dye poisoning is not rare but is an emerging poisoning in India. The main component of hair dye causing toxicity is paraphenylenediamine (PPD). Acute poisoning by PPD causes characteristic severe angioedema of the upper airway accompanied by a swollen, dry, hard, and protruding tongue. Systemic intoxication results in multisystem involvement and can cause rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure (ARF). PPD consumption is an uncommon cause of ARF. There is no specific antidote for PPD and treatment is mainly supportive. We report a case of suicidal ingestion of hair dye that presented with cervicofascial edema and later developed rhabdomyolysis and ARF. Our patient improved with dialysis and symptomatic management. PMID:22736909

  13. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Nag, A.; Datta, J.; Das, A.; Agarwal, A. K.; Sinha, D.; Mondal, S.; Ete, T.; Chakraborty, A.; Ghosh, S.

    2014-01-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI). Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a “gravitational” pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp). PMID:25097339

  14. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation.

    PubMed

    Nag, A; Datta, J; Das, A; Agarwal, A K; Sinha, D; Mondal, S; Ete, T; Chakraborty, A; Ghosh, S

    2014-07-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI). Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a "gravitational" pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp). PMID:25097339

  15. Clinical Manifestation and a New "ISCU" Mutation in Iron-Sulphur Cluster Deficiency Myopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollberg, Gittan; Tulinius, Mar; Melberg, Atle; Darin, Niklas; Andersen, Oluf; Holmgren, Daniel; Oldfors, Anders; Holme, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Myopathy with deficiency of succinate dehydrogenase and aconitase is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by childhood-onset early fatigue, dyspnoea and palpitations on trivial exercise. The disease is non-progressive, but life-threatening episodes of widespread weakness, severe metabolic acidosis and rhabdomyolysis may occur. The…

  16. A screening study of drug-drug interactions in cerivastatin users: an adverse effect of clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Floyd, J S; Kaspera, R; Marciante, K D; Weiss, N S; Heckbert, S R; Lumley, T; Wiggins, K L; Tamraz, B; Kwok, P-Y; Totah, R A; Psaty, B M

    2012-05-01

    An analysis of a case-control study of rhabdomyolysis was conducted to screen for previously unrecognized cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP) 2C8 inhibitors that may cause other clinically important drug-drug interactions. Medication use in cases of rhabdomyolysis using cerivastatin (n = 72) was compared with that in controls using atorvastatin (n = 287) for the period 1998-2001. The use of clopidogrel was strongly associated with rhabdomyolysis (odds ratio (OR) 29.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 6.1-143). In a replication effort that used the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), it was found that clopidogrel was used more commonly in patients with rhabdomyolysis receiving cerivastatin (17%) than in those receiving atorvastatin (0%, OR infinity; 95% CI = 5.2-infinity). Several medications were tested in vitro for their potential to cause drug-drug interactions. Clopidogrel, rosiglitazone, and montelukast were the most potent inhibitors of cerivastatin metabolism. Clopidogrel and its metabolites also inhibited cerivastatin metabolism in human hepatocytes. These epidemiological and in vitro findings suggest that clopidogrel may cause clinically important, dose-dependent drug-drug interactions with other medications metabolized by CYP2C8. PMID:22419147

  17. Management of a mixed overdose of calcium channel blockers, β-blockers and statins

    PubMed Central

    Thakrar, Reena; Shulman, Rob; Bellingan, Geoff; Singer, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of extreme mixed overdose of calcium channel blockers, β-blockers and statins. The patient was successfully treated with aggressive resuscitation including cardiac pacing and multiorgan support, glucagon and high-dose insulin for toxicity related to calcium channel blockade and β-blockade, and ubiquinone for treating severe presumed statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and muscle weakness. PMID:24907219

  18. Right bundle branch block: an uncommon cardiotoxic manifestation of hair dye poisoning-a case report.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Subramanian, Saravanan; Thangaraju, Pugazhenthan; Shanmugam, Kani

    2014-01-01

    Hair dye poisoning has been rising in incidence in the recent years. Apart from the commoner manifestations of upper airway edema, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, cardiac toxicity, convulsions and sudden cardiac death are relatively rare complications. We discuss a case of hair dye poisoning manifesting as oropharyngeal edema along with cardiac complication. The patient survived. PMID:24596762

  19. Acute kidney injury after massive attack of Africanised bees.

    PubMed

    Bridi, Ramaiane A; Balbi, Andre Luis; Neves, Precil M; Ponce, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-documented complication of massive attack by Africanised bees and can be observed 48-72 h after the accident. We report a case of Africanised bees attack followed by severe and lethal AKI. A 56-year-old man was admitted to emergency department after a massive attack of Africanised bees (>1000 bee stings). He was unconscious, presenting with hypotension and tachycardia. Mechanical ventilation, volume expansion and care for anaphylaxis were instituted. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) and after 48 h he developed rhabdomyolysis, oliguria, increased creatinine levels, hyperkalaemia and refractory acidosis. A diagnosis of AKI secondary to rhabdomyolysis and shock was made. The patient was treated with a prolonged course of haemodialysis. However, he progressed to refractory shock and died 5 days after admission. PMID:24618864

  20. Clinically symptomatic heterozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pushpa Raj; Deschauer, Marcus; Zierz, Stephan

    2012-12-01

    Two symptomatic patients with heterozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency are reported. Patient 1, a 21-year-old female professional tennis player, suffered from exercise-induced attacks of muscle pain, burning sensations and proximal weakness. Patient 2, a 30-year-old male amateur marathon runner developed muscle cramps and rhabdomyolysis upon extensive exercise and insolation-induced fever. In both patients, the common p.S113L mutation was found in heterozygote state. No second mutation could be found upon sequencing of all the exons of CPT2 gene including exon-intron boundaries. Biochemically, residual CPT activity in muscle homogenate upon inhibition by malonyl-CoA and Triton-X-100 was intermediate between controls and patients with mutations on both alleles. Although CPT II deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder, the reported patients indicate that heterozygotes might also have typical attacks of myalgia, pareses or rhabdomyolysis. PMID:23184072

  1. Expanding the phenotype of GMPPB mutations.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Serrano, Macarena; Ghaoui, Roula; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Johnsen, Russell D; Davis, Mark R; Corbett, Alastair; Reddel, Stephen; Sue, Carolyn M; Liang, Christina; Waddell, Leigh B; Kaur, Simranpreet; Lek, Monkol; North, Kathryn N; MacArthur, Daniel G; Lamont, Phillipa J; Clarke, Nigel F; Laing, Nigel G

    2015-04-01

    Dystroglycanopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases with a broad phenotypic spectrum ranging from severe disorders with congenital muscle weakness, eye and brain structural abnormalities and intellectual delay to adult-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophies without mental retardation. Most frequently the disease onset is congenital or during childhood. The exception is FKRP mutations, in which adult onset is a common presentation. Here we report eight patients from five non-consanguineous families where next generation sequencing identified mutations in the GMPPB gene. Six patients presented as an adult or adolescent-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, one presented with isolated episodes of rhabdomyolysis, and one as a congenital muscular dystrophy. This report expands the phenotypic spectrum of GMPPB mutations to include limb-girdle muscular dystrophies with adult onset with or without intellectual disability, or isolated rhabdomyolysis. PMID:25681410

  2. Bilateral supernumerary kidneys: how much is too much?

    PubMed

    Patel, Ruchir; Singh, Hanish; Willens, David; Drake, Sean

    2014-01-01

    A middle aged African-American woman with a stable history of carnitine palmitoyl transferase II (CPT II) deficiency presented with myalgias for 1 week. Physical examination and laboratory findings were consistent with severe sepsis secondary to pyelonephritis leading to rhabdomyolysis. Subsequent CT of the abdomen revealed bilateral supernumerary kidneys with non-obstructive calculi within the supernumerary kidneys. Abnormal ureteral development of the supernumerary kidneys likely led to an increased risk for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and renal calculi resulting in pyelonephritis. The stress of this infection overwhelmed the muscle CPT II enzyme load, putting her in a state of rhabdomyolysis. In addition to fluids and antibiotics, she was provided a diet rich in carbohydrates and low in fats so as to limit long-chain fatty acid oxidation. Supernumerary nephrectomy was not considered during this admission. During follow-up, she developed obstructive ureteral calculi requiring placement of a right-sided ureteral stent. PMID:24692375

  3. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase to prevent statin-induced myalgia and rhabdomiolysis.

    PubMed

    Alis, Rafael; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Risso-Ballester, Jennifer; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Cortell-Ballester, Jose; Romagnoli, Marco; Blesa, Jose R; Emanuele, Enzo

    2015-03-01

    Although statins remain the cornerstone of lipid-lowering therapy for reducing the burden of atherosclerotic vascular disease, their administration has been associated with muscle-related adverse effects, including myalgia and rhabdomyolysis. Such adverse events are probably due to reduced antioxidant defenses associated with fewer intermediate metabolites in the cholesterol synthesis pathway. We hypothesize that the concomitant inhibition of xanthine oxidase via coadministration of allopurinol with statins could diminish reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related muscle damage, which would have in turn have positive effects on both the incidence of muscle-related adverse events and cardiovascular outcomes. Accordingly, inhibition of xanthine oxidase has been previously shown to be effective for reducing biomarkers of muscle damage following exercise in professional athletes. Because of the widespread statin utilization and increasing trends in their therapeutic use in atherosclerotic vascular diseases, the proposed strategy could have important clinical implications for reducing statin-induced myalgia and rhabdomyolysis. PMID:25568951

  4. Mutations in LPIN1 cause recurrent acute myoglobinuria in childhood.

    PubMed

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Hindi, Tareq; de Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-10-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified six deleterious mutations in the LPIN1 gene in patients who presented at 2-7 years of age with recurrent, massive rhabdomyolysis. The LPIN1 gene encodes the muscle-specific phosphatidic acid phosphatase, a key enzyme in triglyceride and membrane phospholipid biosynthesis. Of six individuals who developed statin-induced myopathy, one was a carrier for Glu769Gly, a pathogenic mutation in the LPIN1 gene. Analysis of phospholipid content disclosed accumulation of phosphatidic acid and lysophospholipids in muscle tissue of the more severe genotype. Mutations in the LPIN1 gene cause recurrent rhabdomyolysis in childhood, and a carrier state may predispose for statin-induced myopathy. PMID:18817903

  5. Bilateral supernumerary kidneys: how much is too much?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ruchir; Singh, Hanish; Willens, David; Drake, Sean

    2014-01-01

    A middle aged African-American woman with a stable history of carnitine palmitoyl transferase II (CPT II) deficiency presented with myalgias for 1 week. Physical examination and laboratory findings were consistent with severe sepsis secondary to pyelonephritis leading to rhabdomyolysis. Subsequent CT of the abdomen revealed bilateral supernumerary kidneys with non-obstructive calculi within the supernumerary kidneys. Abnormal ureteral development of the supernumerary kidneys likely led to an increased risk for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and renal calculi resulting in pyelonephritis. The stress of this infection overwhelmed the muscle CPT II enzyme load, putting her in a state of rhabdomyolysis. In addition to fluids and antibiotics, she was provided a diet rich in carbohydrates and low in fats so as to limit long-chain fatty acid oxidation. Supernumerary nephrectomy was not considered during this admission. During follow-up, she developed obstructive ureteral calculi requiring placement of a right-sided ureteral stent. PMID:24692375

  6. Toxic Effects of Rhamnus alaternus: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ben Ghezala, H; Chaouali, N; Gana, I; Snouda, S; Nouioui, A; Belwaer, I; Ouali, J; Kaddour, M; Masri, W; Ben Salah, D; Amira, D; Ghorbal, H; Hedhili, A

    2015-01-01

    In Tunisia, there are about 478 species of plants commonly used in folk medicine. Medicinal plants and herbal remedies used are responsible for 2% of intoxications listed by Tunisian National Poison Center. Most cases are related to confusion between edible plants and toxic plants lookalikes or to an excessive consumption of therapeutic plants. We report the case of a 58-year-old man admitted to the Emergency Department of the Regional Hospital of Zaghouan (Tunisia), with renal failure and rhabdomyolysis. The patient reported having daily consumption of a homemade tea based on Mediterranean Buckthorn roots, during the last 6 months to treat type 2 diabetes. The aim of this work was to establish an association between the consumption of the herbal remedy and the occurrence of both renal failure and rhabdomyolysis. No similar cases have been reported in recent literature. PMID:26229696

  7. Monitor lizard bite-induced acute kidney injury--a case report.

    PubMed

    Vikrant, Sanjay; Verma, Balbir Singh

    2014-04-01

    Envenomations by venomous lizards are rare. Monitor lizard bite-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is a previously unreported complication in humans. A 55-year-old female was bitten on her right leg during farming activity by a monitor lizard (Varanus bengalensis). The patient experienced severe local pain and bleeding from the wound, coagulopathy, hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis, sepsis, and AKI. Patient was treated with supportive care and peritoneal dialysis but succumbed to a sudden cardiac arrest. Post mortem kidney biopsy revealed pigment induced-acute tubular injury. AKI after monitor lizard envenomation is caused by acute tubular injury in the setting of intravascular hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and sepsis. Coagulopathy and direct nephrotoxicity may be the other contributory factors in causing AKI. PMID:24341640

  8. A potentially life-threatening complication of university orientation activities

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ling Pong

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This case report describes a university student who participated in an orientation activity and developed exertional rhabdomyolysis. METHODS: With prompt intravenous volume expansion started in the accident and emergency department, he made an uneventful recovery despite a marked elevation of creatine kinase. The riskfactors of developing exertional rhabdomyolysis were reviewed. Suggestions based on these risk factors were made to the organizers of such orientation programmes. RESULTS: He was discharged on day 6. On follow-up on day 8 after presentation at theaccident and emergency department, the CK level was 46 000 U/L and it fell to 2600 U/L in another 2 weeks. On follow-up 3 weeks after the incident, he remained well without symptoms. CONCLUSION: For the clinicians, once rhadbomyolysis is suspected or diagnosed, intravenous fluid therapy with a crystalloid should be initiated as soon as possible to prevent the occurrence of acute renal faiure. PMID:25215042

  9. [Demographics, clinical features, treatments, and outcomes of patients who were transferred to emergency facilities in Japan after consuming dangerous drugs].

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Yoshito

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a multicenter survey of patients who were transported to emergency facilities in Japan from January 2006 to December 2012 after consuming dangerous drugs. Participants were 518 patients. Harmful behavior was observed at the scene of poisoning for about 10% of patients, including violence to others, and traffic accidents. Some patients had physical complications such as rhabdomyolysis, renal dysfunction, and hepatic dysfunction. Of the 182 patients admitted to hospitals, 29 needed respirators and 21 were hospitalized for ≥ 7 days. Although most patients completely recovered, consuming dangerous drugs can result in physical complications including rhabdomyolysis, as well as physical or neuropsychiatric symptoms, which may require active interventions such as respirator use or prolonged hospitalization. PMID:26394510

  10. [DRESS syndrome induced by ciprofloxacine].

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Rym; El Aïdli, Sihem; Zaïem, Ahmed; Lakhoua, Ghozlane; Kastalli, Sarrah; Daghfous, Riadh

    2015-04-01

    The Drug rash with hypereosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, or hypersensitivity syndrome, is a severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. It has been exceptionally described with ciprofloxacin. We report a 47-year-old-woman who developed DRESS syndrome, 2 days after taking ciprofloxacin for a urinary infection. She had a generalized maculopapular rash, severe rhabdomyolysis, liver involvement, renal failure and hypereosinophilia. Clinical symptoms had completely resolved after ciprofloxacin withdrawal. Renal failure has decrease after short corticosteroid treatment. PMID:25680964

  11. Case Report: Elevated CPK, an indicator of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hina N.; Jilani, Usman; Arora, Shitij

    2016-01-01

    Polymyositis is a rare disease with incidence rates at about 1 per 100,000 people annually. In this case report we will review a case of proximal muscle weakness with an elevated creatine phosphokinase that was initially misdiagnosed twice as rhabdomyolysis. Therefore, emphasizing that idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a potential cause of myasthenia that must be considered in the differential. The case will also describe the current treatment and treatment response in polymyositis.

  12. Paraphenylenediamine: Blackening more than just hair.

    PubMed

    Gude, Dilip; Bansal, Dharam Pal; Ambegaonkar, Rahul; Prajapati, Jayaram

    2012-06-01

    Paraphenylenediamine is an important constituent of hair dye toxicity of which one could herald fatal complications such as rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, angioneurotic edema, and respiratory failure. We present a case of hair dye poisoning that presented with respiratory distress due to laryngeal edema and later developed trismus, subclinical tetany, apnea, and conduction abnormality on electrocardiogram. This case report highlights the need for a thorough toxicological review of the components of any ingested substance. PMID:23626641

  13. Two Cases of Leptospirosis in French Travelers Returning From Koh Samui, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Christen, Jacques-Robert; Savini, Hélène; Pierrou, Candice; Boisnault, Gilles; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Kraemer, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    We report the first two cases of leptospirosis in French travelers returning from Koh Samui, a famous tourist island in Thailand, in September 2014 and March 2015. The first patient developed a severe form of the disease including hemodynamic instability, interstitial pneumonia, rhabdomyolysis with renal impairment, and deep thrombocytopenia. The second patient had a milder disease, with severe muscle pain, jaundice, and renal impairment. The two patients reported bathing in fresh water in Namuang waterfall. PMID:26412478

  14. Carbon monoxide poisoning and nonoliguric acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Bessoudo, R.; Gray, J.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning in a 37-year-old man was complicated by neurologic damage, skin changes, muscle necrosis and nonoliguric renal failure. The relation between nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in carbon monoxide poisoning is reviewed. Recognition of the acute renal failure in such cases is important, for this complication can be fatal; the prognosis is excellent, however, if proper medical management is provided. PMID:679099

  15. Case Report: Elevated CPK, an indicator of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy?

    PubMed

    Khan, Hina N; Jilani, Usman; Arora, Shitij

    2016-01-01

    Polymyositis is a rare disease with incidence rates at about 1 per 100,000 people annually. In this case report we will review a case of proximal muscle weakness with an elevated creatine phosphokinase that was initially misdiagnosed twice as rhabdomyolysis. Therefore, emphasizing that idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a potential cause of myasthenia that must be considered in the differential. The case will also describe the current treatment and treatment response in polymyositis. PMID:27540467

  16. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries. PMID:10645833

  17. The nature and prevalence of injury during CrossFit training.

    PubMed

    Hak, Paul Taro; Hodzovic, Emil; Hickey, Ben

    2013-11-22

    CrossFit is a constantly varied, high intensity, functional movement strength and conditioning program which has seen a huge growth in popularity around the world since its inception twelve years ago. There has been much criticism as to the potential injuries associated with CrossFit training including rhabdomyolysis and musculoskeletal injuries. However to date no evidence exists in the literature to the injures and rates sustained. The purpose of this study was to determine the injury rates and profiles of CrossFit athletes sustained during routine CrossFit training. An online questionnaire was distributed amongst international CrossFit online forums. Data collected included general demographics, training programs, injury profiles and supplement use. A total of 132 responses were collected with 97 (73.5%) having sustained an injury during CrossFit training. A total of 186 injuries were reported with 9 (7.0%) requiring surgical intervention. An injury rate of 3.1 per 1000 hours trained was calculated. No incidences of rhabdomyolysis were reported. Injury rates with CrossFit training are similar to that reported in the literature for sports such as Olympic weight-lifting, power-lifting and gymnastics and lower than competitive contact sports such as rugby union and rugby league. Shoulder and spine injuries predominate with no incidences of rhabdomyolysis obtained. To our knowledge this is the first paper in the literature detailing the injury rates and profiles with CrossFit participation. PMID:24276294

  18. Active safety monitoring of newly marketed medications in a distributed data network: application of a semi-automated monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Gagne, J J; Glynn, R J; Rassen, J A; Walker, A M; Daniel, G W; Sridhar, G; Schneeweiss, S

    2012-07-01

    We developed a semi-automated active monitoring system that uses sequential matched-cohort analyses to assess drug safety across a distributed network of longitudinal electronic health-care data. In a retrospective analysis, we show that the system would have identified cerivastatin-induced rhabdomyolysis. In this study, we evaluated whether the system would generate alerts for three drug-outcome pairs: rosuvastatin and rhabdomyolysis (known null association), rosuvastatin and diabetes mellitus, and telithromycin and hepatotoxicity (two examples for which alerting would be questionable). Over >5 years of monitoring, rate differences (RDs) in comparisons of rosuvastatin with atorvastatin were -0.1 cases of rhabdomyolysis per 1,000 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.4, 0.1) and -2.2 diabetes cases per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: -6.0, 1.6). The RD for hepatotoxicity comparing telithromycin with azithromycin was 0.3 cases per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: -0.5, 1.0). In a setting in which false positivity is a major concern, the system did not generate alerts for the three drug-outcome pairs. PMID:22588606

  19. Safety of statins.

    PubMed

    Maji, Debasish; Shaikh, Shehla; Solanki, Dharmesh; Gaurav, Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Statins are an established class of drugs with proven efficacy in cardiovascular risk reduction. The concern over statin safety was first raised with the revelation of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis with the use of now withdrawn cerivastatin. Enhanced understanding of the mechanisms behind adverse effects of statins including an insight into the pharmacokinetic properties have minimised fear of statin use among clinicians. Studies reveal that occurrence of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis are rare 1/100000 patient-years. The risk of myopathy/rhabdomyolysis varies between statins due to varying pharmacokinetic profiles. This explains the differing abilities of statins to adverse effects and drug interaction potentials that precipitate adverse effects. Higher dose of rosuvastatin (80 mg/day) was associated with proteinuria and hematuria while lower doses were devoid of such effects. Awareness of drugs interacting with statins and knowledge of certain combinations such as statin and fibrates together with monitoring of altered creatine kinase activity may greatly minimise associated adverse effects. Statins also asymptomatically raise levels of hepatic transaminases but are not correlated with hepatotoxicity. Statins are safe and well tolerated including more recent potent statins such as, rosuvastatin. The benefits of intensive statin use in cardiovascular risk reduction greatly outweigh risks. The present review discusses underlying causes of statin-associated adverse effects including management in high risk groups. PMID:23961479

  20. [Isotretinoin and exercise: can the two walk together?].

    PubMed

    Dalal, Adam; Ben-Barak, Shira; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Constantini, Naama

    2014-02-01

    Since its introduction in 1982, isotretinoin has revolutionized acne treatment, targeting the underlying mechanism of the disease, with effective and long-lasting results. During the first decade of its marketing, several cases of hyperCKemia and rhabdomyolysis were linked to isotretinon therapy. A special concern was given to the possible triggering of muscle toxicity by vigorous exercise. These potential effects discouraged the prescription of isotretinoin to physically active patients or required them to abstain from exercise during treatment. Common musculoskeletal adverse effects of isotretinoin include muscle or joint pains. HyperCKemia is frequently found in patients receiving treatment for rare cases of rhabdomyolysis. Isotretinoin-associated muscle toxicity is usually detected in asymptomatic patients, even though symptoms can appear without hyperCKemia. A possible synergistic effect of isotretinoin and exercise is plausible, although supported by weak evidence and mediated by an unknown mechanism. There are only two reports of myoglobinuria and no reports of decreased renal function in exercising patient under treatment. In conclusion, we believe that current data should not deter physicians from offering isotretinoin to physically active patients nor require them to abstain from exercise. Physicians must explain to patients the possible side effects of treatment, ask them to refrain from an unusual change in their exercise regimen and advise them to avoid other triggers of rhabdomyolysis. Patients should be aware of possible signs of muscle toxicity and inform their doctors about any relevant symptoms. PMID:24716429

  1. Free heme pool and activity of key enzyme of heme synthesis in the rat liver under action of agents affecting reduced glutathione level.

    PubMed

    Barannik, T V; Inshina, N M; Kaliman, P A

    2005-01-01

    The decrease of GSH level in the rat liver was found to be accompanied by an increase of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) heme saturation during first hours after HgCl2, phenylhydrazine (Ph) injection or rhabdomyolysis (the coefficient of correlation -0.978). The activity of the key enzyme of heme synthesis--5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) was 2.5-fold increased in the first hours after Ph injection and rhabdomyolysis. Glutathione injection in vivo as well as CdCl2 caused the increase of GSH content and the inhibition of ALAS. The coefficient of correlation for GSH content and ALAS activity under the action of agents altering both these parameters (CdCl2, Ph, GSH injection and rhabdomyolysis) is 0.938. Taking into account the presence of heme regulatory motif with conserved cystein in many proteins, including ALAS and TDO (accession number in SwissProt database AAH61793 and P21643, respectively), the link between alterations of GSH content, ALAS activity and heme saturation of TDO in the rat liver could be proposed. The further experiments should be performed in order to elucidate the mechanisms of GSH level influence on free heme pool formation in the liver cells. PMID:16846079

  2. Can Gas Replace Protein Function? CO Abrogates the Oxidative Toxicity of Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Shaklai, Mati; Shaklai, Nurith

    2014-01-01

    Outside their cellular environments, hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb) are known to wreak oxidative damage. Using haptoglobin (Hp) and hemopexin (Hx) the body defends itself against cell-free Hb, yet mechanisms of protection against oxidative harm from Mb are unclear. Mb may be implicated in oxidative damage both within the myocyte and in circulation following rhabdomyolysis. Data from the literature correlate rhabdomyolysis with the induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suggesting that either the enzyme or its reaction products are involved in oxidative protection. We hypothesized that carbon monoxide (CO), a product, might attenuate Mb damage, especially since CO is a specific ligand for heme iron. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) was chosen as a substrate in circulation and myosin (My) as a myocyte component. Using oxidation targets, LDL and My, the study compared the antioxidant potential of CO in Mb-mediated oxidation with the antioxidant potential of Hp in Hb-mediated oxidation. The main cause of LDL oxidation by Hb was found to be hemin which readily transfers from Hb to LDL. Hp prevented heme transfer by sequestering hemin within the Hp-Hb complex. Hemin barely transferred from Mb to LDL, and oxidation appeared to stem from heme iron redox in the intact Mb. My underwent oxidative crosslinking by Mb both in air and under N2. These reactions were fully arrested by CO. The data are interpreted to suit several circumstances, some physiological, such as high muscle activity, and some pathological, such as rhabdomyolysis, ischemia/reperfusion and skeletal muscle disuse atrophy. It appear that CO from HO-1 attenuates damage by temporarily binding to deoxy-Mb, until free oxygen exchanges with CO to restore the equilibrium. PMID:25111140

  3. Effects of allopurinol on exercise-induced muscle damage: new therapeutic approaches?

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, F; Pareja-Galeano, H; Perez-Quilis, C; Santos-Lozano, A; Fiuza-Luces, C; Garatachea, N; Lippi, G; Lucia, A

    2015-01-01

    Intensive muscular activity can trigger oxidative stress, and free radicals may hence be generated by working skeletal muscle. The role of the enzyme xanthine oxidase as a generating source of free radicals is well documented and therefore is involved in the skeletal muscle damage as well as in the potential transient cardiovascular damage induced by high-intensity physical exercise. Allopurinol is a purine hypoxanthine-based structural analog and a well-known inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. The administration of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol may hence be regarded as promising, safe, and an economic strategy to decrease transient skeletal muscle damage (as well as heart damage, when occurring) in top-level athletes when administered before a competition or a particularly high-intensity training session. Although continuous administration of allopurinol in high-level athletes is not recommended due to its possible role in hampering training-induced adaptations, the drug might be useful in non-athletes. Exertional rhabdomyolysis is the most common form of rhabdomyolysis and affects individuals participating in a type of intense exercise to which they are not accustomed. This condition can cause exercise-related myoglobinuria, thus increasing the risk of acute renal failure and is also associated with sickle cell trait. In this manuscript, we have reviewed the recent evidence about the effects of allopurinol on exercise-induced muscle damage. More research is needed to determine whether allopurinol may be useful for preventing not only exertional rhabdomyolysis and acute renal damage but also skeletal muscle wasting in critical illness as well as in immobilized, bedridden, sarcopenic or cachectic patients. PMID:25181966

  4. Death from a possible anaphylactic reaction to ecstasy.

    PubMed

    Sauvageau, Anny

    2008-02-01

    Ecstasy (3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA) is a recreational drug widely used among young people in discos or rave parties (1,2). MDMA is taken because it gives a feeling of euphoria, enhances energy and sociability, and heightens sensations and sexual arousal. However, several side effects have been described: headache, nausea, anorexia, xerostomia, insomnia, myalgia, trismus, and bruxism (2,3). More serious complications have also been reported, sometimes even leading to death: hyperthermia, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure, liver failure, and water intoxication (2,3). We report the unusual case of a death due to an apparent allergic reaction following ecstasy ingestion. PMID:18259964

  5. [Dangerous drugs: products containing synthetic chemicals].

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Yoshito

    2016-02-01

    When the patients poisoned with "dangerous drugs", that is, products containing synthetic chemicals such as synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones, are transferred to the emergency facilities, the chemicals really consumed cannot be determined there. So, supportive care may be the most important strategy for treating them. For example, those with serious consciousness disturbance should be supported with ventilator after intubation. Those with remarkable excitatory CNS or sympathetic symptoms, benzodiazepines such as diazepam and midazolam, should be administered. Those with hallucination or delusion, antipsychotics such as haloperidol or risperidone should be administered. Those with rhabdomyolysis, hypermyoglobinemia and acute kidney injury, intravenous fluids and hemodialysis should be introduced. PMID:26915246

  6. Acute renal failure in the "Comrades Marathon" runners.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Y K; Aboo, N; Naicker, S; Parsoo, I

    This study investigated the clinical and biochemical features of acute renal failure in marathon runners. Over a period of 18 years (1969-1986), 19 patients were admitted to the renal unit. The histories and biochemical data of 4 patients seen in 1986 are described. The pathophysiology of acute renal failure is multifactorial and is the combined effect of rhabdomyolysis, dehydration, hypotension, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and hyperuricaemia. Efforts to correct dehydration have resulted in a decrease in the incidence of acute renal failure. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is to be deprecated and efforts should be made to publicize this harmful effect. PMID:2485484

  7. The unsuspected killer: Liquefied petroleum gas overexposure in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sampson, L W J; van der Schyff, N; Cupido, C

    2015-02-01

    A 21-year-old woman with no past medical history of note was found unconscious together with five of her family members after prolonged exposure to liquefied petroleum gas. She was admitted to the intensive care unit at Victoria Hospital, Wynberg, Cape Town, South Africa, following resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity. On examination the following was found: coma without focal neurology; shock requiring fluid resuscitation and adrenaline; probable pneumonitis or aspiration pneumonia; acute rhabdomyolysis with severe metabolic acidosis; and raised serum K+. A carboxyhaemoglobin test was unable to confirm or exclude carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:26242505

  8. Flank pain and acute renal failure after binge drinking: a growing concern?

    PubMed

    Calviño, Jesús; Bravo, Juan; Millán, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Tabares, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    We describe two cases of acute renal failure (ARF) after heavy alcohol intake. Remarkable features included a few days latency period after binge drinking, acute flank pain resembling pyelonephritis, lack of rhabdomyolysis or liver injury, and concomitant intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Renal function improved with conservative treatment, and despite NSAIDs use, hyperkalemia was not clinically significant. Since binge drinking is common in the Western population, early recognition of this syndrome may be helpful when examining a patient with flank pain and ARF of unclear etiology. PMID:23477481

  9. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in a patient presenting with idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hayama, Manabu; Shime, Nobuaki; Mio, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old man presented to our emergency department with fever and dyspnoea. He required vigorous haemodynamic support and mechanical ventilation for hypotensive distributive shock with hypoalbuminaemia, haemoconcentration, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, consistent with idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome. Left lung consolidation and hypoxaemia were observed 6 days after admission. Sputum smear revealed the presence of acute angled branching hyphae, consistent with a diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Antifungal therapy was administered and mechanical ventilation discontinued on day 66. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital on day 185. PMID:24859554

  10. [Pharmacovigilance update].

    PubMed

    Livio, F

    2013-01-01

    Main pharmacovigilance updates in 2012 are reviewed here. Dabigatran: elderly patients with renal failure are at higher risk of bleeding. Dual renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade comprising aliskiren is harmful. Incretins: low risk of acute pancreatitis. Interaction between fusidic acid and statins: many reports of rhabdomyolysis. Interactions between boceprevir/telaprevir and antiretroviral therapies: complex, but manageable. Citalopram, ondansetron: maximum recommended doses are reduced. Atomoxetine: significant increase in blood pressure and heart rate in a fraction of exposed patients. Agomelatine: elevated liver enzymes are common. Fingolimod: bradycardia and heart blocks after first dose - stronger safety recommendations regarding use in patients with heart conditions and strengthened cardiovascular monitoring. PMID:23367709

  11. The greater black krait (Bungarus niger), a newly recognized cause of neuro-myotoxic snake bite envenoming in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Abul; Ghose, Aniruddha; Ahsan, Farid; Rahman, Ridwanur; Amin, Robed; Hassan, Mahtab Uddin; Chowdhury, A Wahed; Kuch, Ulrich; Rocha, Thalita; Harris, John B; Theakston, R David G; Warrell, David A

    2010-11-01

    Prospective studies of snake bite patients in Chittagong, Bangladesh, included five cases of bites by greater black kraits (Bungarus niger), proven by examination of the snakes that had been responsible. This species was previously known only from India, Nepal, Bhutan and Burma. The index case presented with descending flaccid paralysis typical of neurotoxic envenoming by all Bungarus species, but later developed generalized rhabdomyolysis (peak serum creatine kinase concentration 29,960 units/l) with myoglobinuria and acute renal failure from which he succumbed. Among the other four patients, one died of respiratory paralysis in a peripheral hospital and three recovered after developing paralysis, requiring mechanical ventilation in one patient. One patient suffered severe generalized myalgia and odynophagia associated with a modest increase in serum creatine kinase concentration. These are the first cases of Bungarus niger envenoming to be reported from any country. Generalized rhabdomyolysis has not been previously recognized as a feature of envenoming by any terrestrial Asian elapid snake, but a review of the literature suggests that venoms of some populations of Bungarus candidus and Bungarus multicinctus in Thailand and Vietnam may also have this effect in human victims. To investigate this unexpected property of Bungarus niger venom, venom from the snake responsible for one of the human cases of neuro-myotoxic envenoming was injected into one hind limb of rats and saline into the other under buprenorphine analgesia. All animals developed paralysis of the venom-injected limb within two hours. Twenty-four hours later, the soleus muscles were compared histopathologically and cytochemically. Results indicated a predominantly pre-synaptic action (β-bungarotoxins) of Bungarus niger venom at neuromuscular junctions, causing loss of synaptophysin and the degeneration of the terminal components of the motor innervation of rat skeletal muscle. There was oedema and

  12. MR imaging of urgent inflammatory and infectious conditions affecting the soft tissues of the musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Joseph S; Habib, Paula

    2009-07-01

    Soft tissue infections and inflammatory conditions of the musculoskeletal system are a group of disorders commonly seen by emergency room physicians and radiologists. Many of these entities can either be limb- or life-threatening. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the best imaging modality to evaluate these conditions. In this review, the characteristic imaging findings of cellulitis, abscess formation, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, diabetic ischemic infarction, acute and exertional compartment syndromes, and rhabdomyolysis will be emphasized as well as imaging factors that can help to differentiate these disorders. PMID:19132424

  13. [Snake bite in a 53-year-old female tourist].

    PubMed

    Bertheau, S; Aghdassi, A; Otto, M; Hegenscheid, K; Runge, S; Lerch, M M; Simon, P

    2015-02-01

    Snake bites are rare events in Germany and are not life-threatening with usually only mild clinical symptoms. The most widespread venomous snake is the common European adder (Vipera berus). Here we present the case of a 53-year-old woman who was bitten by a common adder. Although the patient was initially in stable condition she developed edematous swelling of the complete lower limb, subcutaneous bleeding, and rhabdomyolysis. The aim of this report is to raise awareness that even in a central European country like Germany snake bites with a life-threatening course can occur and need immediate attention and medical care. PMID:25617003

  14. Statins and myotoxicity: a therapeutic limitation.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Atul; Bansal, Vinay; Chugh, Anita; Mookhtiar, Kasim

    2006-09-01

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors represent the most successful class of drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and dyslipidaemia implicated in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis. However, the popular profile of statins in terms of efficacy has been maligned by its adverse events. The myotoxicity, ranging from mild myopathy to serious rhabdomyolysis, associated with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, during treatment of hypercholesterolaemia is of paramount importance. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare but idiosyncratic muscle wasting disorder of different etiologies. Statin-associated rhabdomyolysis causes skeletal muscle injury by self-perpetuating events leading to fatal irreversible renal damage through a series of biochemical reactions. Preferential distribution and action of statins in liver could be the key to minimise myotoxicity concerns. Hepato-specific distribution of statins is governed by various factors such as physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetic properties and selective transporter-mediated uptake in liver rather in extrahepatic cells. The interactions of statins with concomitant drugs of different classes merit attention for their safety profile. Although pharmacokinetic as well as pharmacodynamic interactions have been implicated in pathophysiology of statin-induced muscle wasting, the underlying mechanism is not clearly understood. Besides, pharmacokinetic and phramcodynamic factors, statin-associated myotoxcity may also implicate pharmacogenomic factors. The pharmacogenomics characterised by CYP polymorphism and other genetic factors is responsible for inter-individual variations to efficacy and tolerability of statins. The pathophysiological mechanisms may include statin-induced differences in cholesterol:phospholipid ratio, isoprenoid levels, small GTP binding proteins and apoptosis. However, the present understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms, does not offer a reliable

  15. Toxic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle tissue is highly sensitive to many substances. Early recognition of toxic myopathies is important, as they potentially are reversible on removal of the offending drug or toxin, with greater likelihood of complete resolution the sooner this is achieved. Clinical features range from mild muscle pain and cramps to severe weakness with rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and even death. The pathogenic bases can be multifactorial. This article reviews some of the common toxic myopathies and their clinical presentation, histopathologic features and possible underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:25037083

  16. Search for rare liver diseases: the case of glycosylation defects mimicking Wilson Disease.

    PubMed

    Socha, Piotr; Vajro, Pietro; Lefeber, Dirk; Adamowicz, Maciej; Tanner, Stuart

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric hepatology appears to be a very specific field of paediatrics which deals mainly with rare diseases although clinical features can be commonly found - like increased activity of transaminases. Some of these rare diseases like Wilson disease are commonly looked for and recently Wilsonian like phenotypes have been described which additionally presented with abnormal glycosylation of the plasma protein transferrin. In a subgroup of those patients with specific additional clinical symptoms (cleft uvula, low blood sugar, rhabdomyolysis and dilated cardiomyopathy) phosphoglucomutase 1 deficiency was identified. We recommend screening for abnormal glycosylation of the plasma protein transferrin in children with unexplained liver injury. PMID:24972800

  17. Thermal dysregulation in Prader-Willi syndrome: a potentially fatal complication in adolescence, not just in infancy.

    PubMed

    McVea, Steven; Thompson, Andrew James; Abid, Noina; Richardson, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a background of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) was admitted to the regional paediatric intensive care unit, with community-acquired pneumonia. Despite a week of intravenous antibiotics, resolution of inflammatory markers and resolving consolidation on radiograph, he remained feverish. Fever of unknown origin investigations were negative and he was diagnosed with central thermal dysregulation secondary to hypothalamic dysfunction in PWS. Following a hyperpyrexia period, secondary rhabdomyolysis and renal failure developed. This was successfully managed with active cooling, ventilation and haemofiltration. After weaning from haemofiltration, the patient was successfully extubated to non-invasive respiratory support. PMID:27358096

  18. Case Series of Synthetic Cannabinoid Intoxication from One Toxicology Center

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Kenneth D.; Leonetti, Adam L.; Bailey, Blake C.; Surmaitis, Ryan M.; Eustice, Eric R.; Kacinko, Sherri; Wheatley, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid use has risen at alarming rates. This case series describes 11 patients exposed to the synthetic cannabinoid, MAB-CHMINACA who presented to an emergency department with life-threatening toxicity including obtundation, severe agitation, seizures and death. All patients required sedatives for agitation, nine required endotracheal intubation, three experienced seizures, and one developed hyperthermia. One developed anoxic brain injury, rhabdomyolysis and died. A significant number were pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment was aggressive sedation and respiratory support. Synthetic cannabinoids pose a major public health risk. Emergency physicians must be aware of their clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27330661

  19. Therapeutic plasma exchange as treatment for propofol infusion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Levin, Phillip D; Levin, Valentin; Weissman, Charles; Sprung, Charles L; Rund, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    Propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS), a rare complication of propofol sedation, is associated with high mortality. There is no specific therapy. A 16-year-old with head injury and status epilepticus is described. Three days after seizure resolution, whilst receiving propofol, he developed severe lactic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, and hemodynamic instability. Suspected PRIS was treated with a single session of therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). This was associated with immediate improvement in hemodynamic status, resolution of lactic acidosis within 24 h, normalization of CPK over 10 days, and a subsequent full recovery. TPE is suggested as a novel therapy for PRIS. PMID:25619501

  20. Musculoskeletal adverse drug reactions: a review of literature and data from ADR spontaneous reporting databases.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Anita; Chiamulera, Christian; Moretti, Ugo; Colcera, Sonia; Fumagalli, Guido; Leone, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be a target organ for adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Drug-induced muscle, bone or connective tissue injuries may be due to, i), primary direct drug action, or, ii), undirected consequence of generalized drug-induced disease. Musculoskeletal ADRs may be only temporarily disabling, such as muscle cramps, as well as in other cases may be serious and life-threatening, such as rhabdomyolysis. In the last few years there has been an increasing awareness of musculoskeletal ADRs. Some recent drug safety issues dealt with serious or uncommon musculoskeletal reactions like rhabdomyolysis associated to statins and tendon rupture associated to fluoroquinolones. In this review, we firstly selected those drug classes having a significantly high percentage of musculoskeletal disorder reports in the WHO adverse drug reaction database, maintained by the Uppsala Monitoring Centre. Secondly, the different musculoskeletal ADRs were closely analyzed through the data obtained from an Italian interregional ADRs spontaneous reporting database. The findings on drugs associated to different musculoskeletal disorders, have been integrated with a review of the epidemiological data available in the literature. For the most involved drugs (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones, corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, retinoids) the underlying musculoskeletal ADR mechanisms were also reviewed and discussed. PMID:18690950

  1. Cocaine and kidney injury: a kaleidoscope of pathology

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Narender; Pullman, James M.; Coco, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is abused worldwide as a recreational drug. It is a potent activator of the sympathetic nervous system leading to intense vasoconstriction, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, platelet activation and decrease in prostaglandins E2 and prostacyclin. Cocaine can lead to widespread systemic adverse effects such as stroke, myocardial infarction, arterial dissection, vascular thrombosis and rhabdomyolysis. In human and rat kidneys, cocaine has been associated with glomerular, tubular, vascular and interstitial injury. It is not uncommon to diagnose cocaine-related acute kidney injury (AKI), malignant hypertension and chronic kidney disease. Cocaine abuse can lead to AKI by rhabdomyolysis, vasculitis, infarction, thrombotic microangiopathy and malignant hypertension. It is reported that 50–60% of people who use both cocaine and heroin are at increased risk of HIV, hepatitis and additional risk factors that can cause kidney diseases. While acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a known cause of AKI, an association of AIN with cocaine is unusual and seldom reported. We describe a patient with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and chronic hepatitis C, who presented with AKI. Urine toxicology was positive for cocaine and a kidney biopsy was consistent with AIN. Illicit drugs such as cocaine or contaminants may have caused AIN in this case and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of causes of AKI in a patient with substance abuse. We review the many ways that cocaine adversely impacts on kidney function. PMID:25859366

  2. Enhydrina schistosa (Elapidae: Hydrophiinae) the most dangerous sea snake in Sri Lanka: three case studies of severe envenoming.

    PubMed

    Kularatne, S A M; Hettiarachchi, R; Dalpathadu, J; Mendis, A S V; Appuhamy, P D S A N; Zoysa, H D J; Maduwage, K; Weerasinghe, V S; de Silva, A

    2014-01-01

    Sea snakes are highly venomous and inhabit tropical waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Enhydrina schistosa is a common species of sea snake that lives in the coastal waters, lagoons, river mouths and estuaries from the Persian Gulf through Sri Lanka and to Southeast Asia. It is considered one of the most aggressive sea snakes in Sri Lanka where fishermen and people wading are at high risk. However, sea snake bites are rarely reported. In this report, we describe three cases where E. schistosa was the offending species. These three patients presented to two hospitals on the west coast of Sri Lanka within the course of 14 months from November 2011 with different degrees of severity of envenoming. The first patient was a 26-year-old fisherman who developed severe myalgia with very high creatine kinase (CK) levels lasting longer than 7 days. The second patient was a 32-year-old fisherman who developed gross myoglobinuria, high CK levels and hyperkalaemia. Both patients recovered and their electromyographic recordings showed myopathic features. The nerve conduction and neuromuscular transmission studies were normal in both patients suggesting primary myotoxic envenoming. The third patient was a 41-year-old man who trod on a sea snake in a river mouth and developed severe myalgia seven hours later. He had severe rhabdomyolysis and died three days later due to cardiovascular collapse. In conclusion, we confirm that E. schistosa is a deadly sea snake and its bite causes severe rhabdomyolysis. PMID:24239658

  3. How electroshock weapons kill!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2010-03-01

    Growing numbers of law enforcement officers now carry an electroshock weapon (ESW). Over 500 U.S. deaths have followed ESW use in the past 26 years; over 450 of these deaths followed use of an electromuscular disruptor in the past 9 years. Most training courses teach that ESWs are safe; that they can kill only by the direct effect of electric current on the heart; and that a death following use of an ESW always has some other cause. All these teachings are false! The last was disproved by Lundquist.^1 Williams^2 ruled out direct electrical effects as a cause of almost all the 213 deaths he studied, leaving disruption of normal physiological processes as the only alternative explanation. Careful study of all such deaths identifies 4 different ways that death has or could have been brought about by the ESW: kidney failure following rhabdomyolysis [rare]; cardiac arrest from hyperkalemia following rhabdomyolysis [undocumented]; lactic acid-induced ventricular fibrillation [conclusive proof impossible]; and [most common] anoxia from so much lactic acid in the circulating blood that it acts as an oxygen scavenger, continuously depleting the blood of oxygen until most of the lactate has been metabolized. ^1M. Lundquist, BAPS 54(1) K1.270(2009). ^2Howard E. Williams, Taser Electronic Control Devices and Sudden In-Custody Death, 2008.

  4. Opioid overdose with gluteal compartment syndrome and acute peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adrish, Muhammad; Duncalf, Richard; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda; Venkatram, Sindhaghatta

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 42 Final Diagnosis: Gluteal compartment syndrome • acute peripheral nauropathy Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Management of emergency care Background: Heroin addiction is common, with an estimated 3.7 million Americans reporting to have used it at some point in their lives. Complications of opiate overdose include infection, rhabdomyolysis, respiratory depression and central or peripheral nervous system neurological complications. Conclusions: We present a 42-year-old male admitted after heroin use with heroin-related peripheral nervous system complication preceded by an acute gluteal compartment syndrome and severe rhabdomyolysis. Case Report: Early diagnosis and surgical intervention of the compartment syndrome can lead to full recovery while any delay in management can be devastating and can lead to permanent disability. The presence of peripheral nervous system injuries may portend a poor prognosis and can also lead to long term disability. Careful neurological evaluation for signs and symptoms of peripheral nervous system injuries is of paramount importance, as these may be absent at presentation in patients with opioid overdose. There is a potential risk of delaying a necessary treatment like fasciotomy in these patients by falsely attributing clinical symptoms to a preexisting neuropathy. Early EMG and nerve conduction studies should be considered when the etiology of underlying neurological weakness is unclear. PMID:24459539

  5. Novel Inhibitors of Human Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter (hOCTN2) via Computational Modeling and In Vitro Testing

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Lei; Ekins, Sean; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The objective was to elucidate the inhibition requirements of the human Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter (hOCTN2). Methods Twenty-seven drugs were screened initially for their potential to inhibit uptake of L-carnitine into a stably transfected hOCTN2-MDCK cell monolayer. A HipHop common features pharmacophore was developed and used to search a drug database. Fifty-three drugs, including some not predicted to be inhibitors, were selected and screened in vitro. Results A common features pharmacophore was derived from initial screening data and consisted of three hydrophobic features and a positive ionizable feature. Among the 33 tested drugs that were predicted to map to the pharmacophore, 27 inhibited hOCTN2 in vitro (40% or less L-carnitine uptake from 2.5μM L-carnitine solution in presence of 500 μM drug, compared to L-carnitine uptake without drug present). Hence, the pharmacophore accurately prioritized compounds for testing. Ki measurements showed low micromolar inhibitors belonged to diverse therapeutic classes of drugs, including many not previously known to inhibit hOCTN2. Compounds were more likely to cause rhabdomyolysis if the Cmax/Ki ratio was higher than 0.0025. Conclusion A combined pharmacophore and in vitro approach found new, structurally diverse inhibitors for hOCTN2 that may possibly cause clinical significant toxicity such as rhabdomyolysis. PMID:19437106

  6. Rosuvastatin safety: lessons from the FDA review and post-approval surveillance.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Michael H

    2004-11-01

    Rosuvastatin is the first statin approved by the regulatory authorities since the withdrawal of cerivastatin. Although highly efficacious, this new statin has generated considerable controversy regarding its safety. Rosuvastatin was approved for clinical use based on the largest pre-approval database for all statins prior to commercial use. In this database, rosuvastatin had a similar safety profile to other approved statins up to the highest approval dose of 40 mg. As with all statins, there is a marked increase in adverse effects when the dose is titrated from 40 to 80 mg, and rosuvastatin demonstrates a similar dose/toxicity relationship. In the pre-approval data trials on 80 mg, there was a 1.0% (n = 16) incidence of myopathy and 7 patients developed rhabdomyolysis. However the rhabdomyolysis, but the incidence rate, when corrected for prescription utilisation, is similar to other statins following initial approval. PMID:15500414

  7. Acute poisoning with Tricholoma equestre.

    PubMed

    Anand, Jacek Sein; Chwaluk, Paweł; Sut, Michał

    2009-01-01

    Four cases, including three adults and one child, suffering from acute poisoning with Tricholoma equestre were described. The patients had eaten from 100 to 400 grams of the mushroom within a few consecutive meals. After consuming about 1000 grams of Tricholoma equestre for 3-4 days, the subjects developed fatigue, muscle weakness, myalgia, and in two cases acute respiratory failure with the need of respiratorotherapy. Maximal serum CK was 48136 U/L in the adults and 306 U/L in children. Maximal serum levels of AST and ALT were 802 U/L and 446 U/L in adults and 39 U/L, and 56 U/L in a child. All routine biochemical tests were within normal range. No other causes of rhabdomyolysis such as parasitic or viral infections, immune diseases, trauma or exposure to medications were found. Patient, aged 72 yrs., who developed acute respiratory failure, died in the second day of hospitalization. In other patients all the above mentioned symptoms and biochemical abnormalities disappeared from 2 to 3 weeks of hospitalization. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of appearance of rhabdo-myolysis after repeated consumption of large quantities of Tricholoma equestre. PMID:19788144

  8. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels. PMID:22001973

  9. Uremic Toxins Enhance Statin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Differentiated Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Hitoshi; Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Shinmoto, Tadakazu; Ogino, Hitomi; Oda, Tomoko; Yoshida, Takuya; Furukubo, Taku; Izumi, Satoshi; Yamakawa, Tomoyuki; Tachiki, Hidehisa; Minegaki, Tetsuya; Nishiguchi, Kohshi

    2014-01-01

    The risk of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis is considerably increased in statin users with end-stage renal failure (ESRF). Uremic toxins, which accumulate in patients with ESRF, exert cytotoxic effects that are mediated by various mechanisms. Therefore, accumulation of uremic toxins might increase statin-induced cytotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of four uremic toxins—hippuric acid, 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionate, indole-3-acetic acid, and 3-indoxyl sulfate—on statin-induced myopathy. Differentiated rhabdomyosarcoma cells were pre-treated with the uremic toxins for seven days, and then the cells were treated with pravastatin or simvastatin. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by viability assays and flow cytometry. Pre-treatment with uremic toxins increased statin- but not cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated). In addition, the pre-treatment increased statin-induced apoptosis, which is one of the cytotoxic factors (p < 0.05 vs. untreated). However, mevalonate, farnesol, and geranylgeraniol reversed the effects of uremic toxins and lowered statin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated). These results demonstrate that uremic toxins enhance statin-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity. The mechanism underlying this effect might be associated with small G-protein geranylgeranylation. In conclusion, the increased severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in patients with ESRF is likely due to the accumulation of uremic toxins. PMID:25192420

  10. Paraphenylenediamine Containing Hair Dye: An Emerging Household Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ambika Prasad; Shaha, Kusa Kumar; Rayamane, Anand P; Dash, Shreemanta Kumar; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar; Mohanty, Sachidananda

    2015-09-01

    Paraphenylenediamine poisoning is among one of the emerging causes of poisoning in Asian countries, because it is a constituent of hair dye formulations and is easily available in market at low cost. Hair dyes are rampantly used in Asian households compared with the western world. Locally, hair dye constituents may have allergic adverse effects, and acute systemic poisoning presents with characteristic angioedema, upper airway obstruction, rhabdomyolysis, methemoglobinemia, myoglobinuria, and acute renal failure. This study reports about the death of a 24-year-old Indian housewife who committed suicide by taking hair dye emulsion. She had an argument with her husband, and because of fit of rage, took a bowlful (80 mL) of hair dye emulsion kept prepared for the use by husband. She developed angioedema, cervical swelling, and rhabdomyolysis and died of acute renal failure within 24 hours. Toxicological analysis of viscera and blood revealed varying levels of paraphenylenediamine. Histopathological samples of kidney showed features of acute tubular necrosis and myoglobin casts in renal tubules. The aim of the study is to create awareness about the adverse effects of the hair dye, its poisoning outcome, and possible preventive measures. PMID:26056768