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Sample records for rhabdovirus dna-vaccine depends

  1. Biotechnology and DNA vaccines for aquatic animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    Biotechnology has been used extensively in the development of vaccines for aquaculture. Modern molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning and microarray analysis have facilitated antigen discovery, construction of novel candidate vaccines, and assessments of vaccine efficacy, mode of action, and host response. This review focuses on DNA vaccines for finfish to illustrate biotechnology applications in this field. Although DNA vaccines for fish rhabdoviruses continue to show the highest efficacy, DNA vaccines for several other viral and bacterial fish pathogens have now been proven to provide significant protection against pathogen challenge. Studies of the fish rhabdovirus DNA vaccines have elucidated factors that affect DNA vaccine efficacy as well as the nature of the fish innate and adaptive immune responses to DNA vaccines. As tools for managing aquatic animal disease emergencies, DNA vaccines have advantages in speed, flexibility, and safety, and one fish DNA vaccine has been licensed.

  2. Protection of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus four days after specific or semi-specific DNA vaccination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPatra, S.E.; Corbeil, S.; Jones, G.R.; Shewmaker, W.D.; Lorenzen, N.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2001-01-01

    A DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was shown to provide significant protection as soon as 4 d after intramuscular vaccination in 2 g rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) held at 15??C. Nearly complete protection was also observed at later time points (7, 14, and 28 d) using a standardized waterborne challenge model. In a test of the specificity of this early protection, immunization of rainbow trout with a DNA vaccine against another fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, provided a significant level of cross-protection against IHNV challenge for a transient period of time, whereas a rabies virus DNA vaccine was not protective. This indication of distinct early and late protective mechanisms was not dependent on DNA vaccine doses from 0.1 to 2.5 ??g. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Protection of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus four days after specific or semi-specific DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    LaPatra, S E; Corbeil, S; Jones, G R; Shewmaker, W D; Lorenzen, N; Anderson, E D; Kurath, G

    2001-07-16

    A DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was shown to provide significant protection as soon as 4 d after intramuscular vaccination in 2 g rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) held at 15 degrees C. Nearly complete protection was also observed at later time points (7, 14, and 28 d) using a standardized waterborne challenge model. In a test of the specificity of this early protection, immunization of rainbow trout with a DNA vaccine against another fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, provided a significant level of cross-protection against IHNV challenge for a transient period of time, whereas a rabies virus DNA vaccine was not protective. This indication of distinct early and late protective mechanisms was not dependent on DNA vaccine doses from 0.1 to 2.5 microg. PMID:11427277

  4. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  5. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  6. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals. PMID:22355456

  7. Fish Rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; Winton, J.

    2008-01-01

    Many important viral pathogens of fish are members of the family Rhabdoviridae. The viruses in this large group cause significant losses in populations of wild fish as well as among fish reared in aquaculture. Fish rhabdoviruses often have a wide host and geographic range, and infect aquatic animals in both freshwater and seawater. The fish rhabdoviruses comprise a diverse collection of isolates that can be placed in one of two quite different groups: isolates that are members of the established genusNovirhabdovirus, and those that are most similar to members of the genus Vesiculovirus. Because the diseases caused by fish rhabdoviruses are important to aquaculture, diagnostic methods for their detection and identification are well established. In addition to regulations designed to reduce the spread of fish viruses, a significant body of research has addressed methods for the control or prevention of diseases caused by fish rhabdoviruses, including vaccination. The number of reported fish rhabdoviruses continues to grow as a result of the expansion of aquaculture, the increase in global trade, the development of improved diagnostic methods, and heightened surveillance activities. Fish rhabdoviruses serve as useful components of model systems to study vertebrate virus disease, epidemiology, and immunology.

  8. The dose-dependent effect on protection and humoral response to a DNA vaccine against Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis (IHN) virus in subyearling rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPatra, Scott E.; Corbeil, Serge; Jones, Gerald R.; Shewmaker, William D.; Kurath, Gael

    2000-01-01

    A dose–response study that used the DNA vaccine pIHNw-G against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) showed that complete and highly significant (P < 0.001) protection against a virus injection challenge can be attained in subyearling rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (145–160 g, 8- to 10-months-old) 6 weeks after a single intramuscular injection with doses as low as 1 μg. Complete protection was also reproducibly demonstrated at higher vaccine doses; however, no protection was observed with a 0.1-μg dose. Virus-neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish that had been vaccinated with different doses of the DNA vaccine and then sham-infected; there appeared to be a dose-dependent effect, with higher titers obtained with higher doses of vaccine. The DNA-vaccinated animals that survived virus challenge had significantly (P < 0.05) higher neutralizing antibody titers than sham-infected, DNA-vaccinated control fish. Additionally, the titers detected in the IHN survivors exhibited a significant (P < 0.05) dose-dependent effect, with the highest titers being present in fish that received the highest vaccine doses.

  9. Overview of recent DNA vaccine development for fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.

    2005-01-01

    Since the first description of DNA vaccines for fish in 1996, numerous studies of genetic immunisation against the rhabdovirus pathogens infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) have established their potential as both highly efficacious biologicals and useful basic research tools. Single small doses of rhabdovirus DNA constructs provide extremely strong protection against severe viral challenge under a variety of conditions. DNA vaccines for several other important fish viruses, bacteria, and parasites are under investigation, but they have not yet shown high efficacy. Therefore, current research is focussed on mechanistic studies to understand the basis of protection, and on improvement of the nucleic acid vaccine applications against a wider range of fish pathogens.

  10. Virus-Like Particle Secretion and Genotype-Dependent Immunogenicity of Dengue Virus Serotype 2 DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan U.; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chuang, Shih-Te

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV), composed of four distinct serotypes, is the most important and rapidly emerging arthropod-borne pathogen and imposes substantial economic and public health burdens. We constructed candidate vaccines containing the DNA of five of the genotypes of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and evaluated the immunogenicity, the neutralizing (Nt) activity of the elicited antibodies, and the protective efficacy elicited in mice immunized with the vaccine candidates. We observed a significant correlation between the level of in vitro virus-like particle secretion, the elicited antibody response, and the protective efficacy of the vaccines containing the DNA of the different DENV genotypes in immunized mice. However, higher total IgG antibody levels did not always translate into higher Nt antibodies against homologous and heterologous viruses. We also found that, in contrast to previous reports, more than 50% of total IgG targeted ectodomain III (EDIII) of the E protein, and a substantial fraction of this population was interdomain highly neutralizing flavivirus subgroup-cross-reactive antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody 1B7-5. In addition, the lack of a critical epitope(s) in the Sylvatic genotype virus recognized by interdomain antibodies could be the major cause of the poor protection of mice vaccinated with the Asian 1 genotype vaccine (pVD2-Asian 1) from lethal challenge with virus of the Sylvatic genotype. In conclusion, although the pVD2-Asian 1 vaccine was immunogenic, elicited sufficient titers of Nt antibodies against all DENV-2 genotypes, and provided 100% protection against challenge with virus of the homologous Asian 1 genotype and virus of the heterologous Cosmopolitan genotype, it is critical to monitor the potential emergence of Sylvatic genotype viruses, since vaccine candidates under development may not protect vaccinated humans from these viruses. IMPORTANCE Five genotype-specific dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) DNA vaccine

  11. DNA vaccines in veterinary use

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Laurel; Werner, David B

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines represent a new frontier in vaccine technology. One important application of this technology is in the veterinary arena. DNA vaccines have already gained a foothold in certain fields of veterinary medicine. However, several important questions must be addressed when developing DNA vaccines for animals, including whether or not the vaccine is efficacious and cost effective compared with currently available options. Another important question to consider is how to apply this developing technology in a wide range of different situations, from the domestic pet to individual fish in fisheries with several thousand animals, to wildlife programs for disease control. In some cases, DNA vaccines represent an interesting option for vaccination, while in others, currently available options are sufficient. This review will examine a number of diseases of veterinary importance and the progress being made in DNA vaccine technology relevant to these diseases, and we compare these with the conventional treatment options available. PMID:19722897

  12. DNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Benjamin; Jeang, Jessica; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as an attractive immunotherapeutic approach against cancer due to its simplicity, stability, and safety. Results from numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that DNA vaccines are well tolerated by patients and do not trigger major adverse effects. DNA vaccines are also very cost effective and can be administered repeatedly for long-term protection. Despite all the practical advantages, DNA vaccines face challenges in inducing potent antigen specific cellular immune responses as a result of immune tolerance against endogenous self-antigens in tumors. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against self-antigens have been investigated including encoding of xenogeneic versions of antigens, fusion of antigens to molecules that activate T cells or trigger associative recognition, priming with DNA vectors followed by boosting with viral vector, and utilization of immunomodulatory molecules. This review will focus on discussing strategies that circumvent immune tolerance and provide updates on findings from recent clinical trials. PMID:25625927

  13. Intralymphatic immunization enhances DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Kevin J.; Erdmann, Iris; Basch, Veronique; Sierro, Sophie; Kramps, Thomas A.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Oehen, Stefan; Kündig, Thomas M.

    2001-03-01

    Although DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit potent immune responses in animal models, initial clinical trials in humans have been disappointing, highlighting a need to optimize their immunogenicity. Naked DNA vaccines are usually administered either i.m. or intradermally. The current study shows that immunization with naked DNA by direct injection into a peripheral lymph node enhances immunogenicity by 100- to 1,000-fold, inducing strong and biologically relevant CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Because injection directly into a lymph node is a rapid and easy procedure in humans, these results have important clinical implications for DNA vaccination.

  14. Introduction of translation stop codons into the viral glycoprotein gene in a fish DNA vaccine eliminates induction of protective immunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.M.; Kurath, G.

    2006-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was mutated to introduce two stop codons to prevent glycoprotein translation while maintaining the plasmid DNA integrity and RNA transcription ability. The mutated plasmid vaccine, denoted pIHNw-G2stop, when injected intramuscularly into fish at high doses, lacked detectable glycoprotein expression in the injection site muscle, and did not provide protection against lethal virus challenge 7 days post-vaccination. These results suggest that the G-protein itself is required to stimulate the early protective antiviral response observed after vaccination with the nonmutated parental DNA vaccine. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  15. Secretion of dengue virus envelope protein ectodomain from mammalian cells is dependent on domain II serotype and affects the immune response upon DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Slon Campos, J L; Poggianella, M; Marchese, S; Bestagno, M; Burrone, O R

    2015-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is currently among the most important human pathogens and affects millions of people throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Although it has been a World Health Organization priority for several years, there is still no efficient vaccine available to prevent infection. The envelope glycoprotein (E), exposed on the surface on infective viral particles, is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. For this reason it has been used as the antigen of choice for vaccine development efforts. Here we show a detailed analysis of factors involved in the expression, secretion and folding of E ectodomain from all four DENV serotypes in mammalian cells, and how this affects their ability to induce neutralizing antibody responses in DNA-vaccinated mice. Proper folding of E domain II (DII) is essential for efficient E ectodomain secretion, with DIII playing a significant role in stabilizing soluble dimers. We also show that the level of protein secreted from transfected cells determines the strength and efficiency of antibody responses in the context of DNA vaccination and should be considered a pivotal feature for the development of E-based DNA vaccines against DENV. PMID:26358704

  16. Mucosal DNA vaccination with highly attenuated Shigella is superior to attenuated Salmonella and comparable to intramuscular DNA vaccination for T cells against HIV.

    PubMed

    Vecino, William H; Morin, Paul M; Agha, Rabia; Jacobs, William R; Fennelly, Glenn J

    2002-07-01

    An immunization strategy using attenuated bacteria to deliver DNA vaccine plasmids to mucosal sites may induce protective T cell responses against sexual HIV transmission. In a murine intranasal (i.n.) immunization model, we demonstrate that transiently persistent Deltaasd Shigella flexneri strain 15D harboring DNA vaccines induces HIV- and SIV-specific gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) producing CD8+ T cells among splenocytes more efficiently than either a longer persisting DeltaaroD Salmonella typhimurium strain SL7207 or transiently persistent S. typhi strain Ty21a harboring DNA vaccines. Also, the frequency of antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) producing cells induced by Shigella 15D harboring a DNA vaccine were comparable to that induced by intramuscular (i.m.) immunization with purified DNA vaccine. Moreover, the magnitude of mucosal and systemic antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses after immunization were dependent upon the route (i.m. vs. i.n.) of inoculation, with i.n. Shigella 15D DNA vaccines generating higher levels of HIV-specific IgA in vaginal washings than i.m. purified DNA vaccine. Deltaasd S. flexneri is a promising vector for mucosal DNA vaccine immunization against HIV. PMID:12036602

  17. Can VHS Virus Bypass the Protective Immunity Induced by DNA Vaccination in Rainbow Trout?

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus to serum neutralization, suggesting that the passaging did not promote the selection of virus populations able to bypass the neutralization by serum antibodies. Also, in the in vivo approach, where virus was passaged several times in vaccinated fish, no increased virulence nor increased persistence in vaccinated fish was observed in comparison with the parental virus. However, some of the vaccinated fish did get infected and could transmit the infection to naïve cohabitant fish. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine induced a robust protection, but also that the immunity was non-sterile. It is consequently important not to consider vaccinated fish as virus free in veterinary terms. PMID:27054895

  18. Maize rhabdovirus-vector transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    oth of the plant-infecting rhabdovirus genera, Nucleorhabdovirus and Cytorhabdovirus, contain viruses that infect maize (Zea mays L.). The maize infecting rhabdoviruses are transmitted by hemipteran insects in the families Cicadellidae and Delphacidae in a persistent propagative manner. This chapt...

  19. Technologies for enhanced efficacy of DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Fadi; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2012-01-01

    Despite many years of research, human DNA vaccines have yet to fulfill their early promise. Over the past 15 years, multiple generations of DNA vaccines have been developed and tested in preclinical models for prophylactic and therapeutic applications in the areas of infectious disease and cancer, but have failed in the clinic. Thus, while DNA vaccines have achieved successful licensure for veterinary applications, their poor immunogenicity in humans when compared with traditional protein-based vaccines has hindered their progress. Many strategies have been attempted to improve DNA vaccine potency including use of more efficient promoters and codon optimization, addition of traditional or genetic adjuvants, electroporation, intradermal delivery and various prime–boost strategies. This review summarizes these advances in DNA vaccine technologies and attempts to answer the question of when DNA vaccines might eventually be licensed for human use. PMID:22309668

  20. Dose-dependent protection against or exacerbation of disease by a polylactide glycolide microparticle-adsorbed, alphavirus-based measles virus DNA vaccine in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Nair, Nitya; Adams, Robert J; Zink, M Christine; Lee, Eun-Young; Polack, Fernando P; Singh, Manmohan; O'Hagan, Derek T; Griffin, Diane E

    2008-04-01

    Measles remains an important cause of vaccine-preventable child mortality. Development of a low-cost, heat-stable vaccine for infants under the age of 6 months could improve measles control by facilitating delivery at the time of other vaccines and by closing a window of susceptibility prior to immunization at 9 months of age. DNA vaccines hold promise for development, but achieving protective levels of antibody has been difficult and there is an incomplete understanding of protective immunity. In the current study, we evaluated the use of a layered alphavirus DNA/RNA vector encoding measles virus H (SINCP-H) adsorbed onto polylactide glycolide (PLG) microparticles. In mice, antibody and T-cell responses to PLG-formulated DNA were substantially improved compared to those to naked DNA. Rhesus macaques received two doses of PLG/SINCP-H delivered either intramuscularly (0.5 mg) or intradermally (0.5 or 0.1 mg). Antibody and T-cell responses were induced but not sustained. On challenge, the intramuscularly vaccinated monkeys did not develop rashes and had lower viremias than vector-treated control monkeys. Monkeys vaccinated with the same dose intradermally developed rashes and viremia. Monkeys vaccinated intradermally with the low dose developed more severe rashes, with histopathologic evidence of syncytia and intense dermal and epidermal inflammation, eosinophilia, and higher viremia compared to vector-treated control monkeys. Protection after challenge correlated with gamma interferon-producing T cells and with early production of high-avidity antibody that bound wild-type H protein. We conclude that PLG/SINCP-H is most efficacious when delivered intramuscularly but does not provide an advantage over standard DNA vaccines for protection against measles. PMID:18287579

  1. DNA Vaccines: Experiences in the Swine Model.

    PubMed

    Accensi, Francesc; Rodríguez, Fernando; Monteagudo, Paula L

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is one of the most fascinating vaccine-strategies currently in development. Two of the main advantages of DNA immunization rely on its simplicity and flexibility, being ideal to dissect both the immune mechanisms and the antigens involved in protection against a given pathogen. Here, we describe several strategies used to enhance the immune responses induced and the protection afforded by experimental DNA vaccines tested in swine and provide with very basic protocol describing the generation and in vivo application of a prototypic DNA vaccine. Only time will tell the last word regarding the definitive implementation of DNA vaccination in the field. PMID:26458829

  2. Nanogram quantities of a DNA vaccine protect rainbow trout fry against heterologous strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a rhabdovirus affecting trout and salmon, was investigated. The minimal dose of vaccine required, the protection against heterologous strains, and the titers of neutralizing antibodies produced were used to evaluate the potential of the vaccine as a control pharmaceutical. Results indicated that a single dose of as little as 1–10 ng of vaccine protected rainbow trout fry against waterborne challenge by IHNV. An optimal dose of 100 ng per fish was selected to assure strong protection under various conditions. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish vaccinated with concentrations of DNA ranging from 5 to 0.01 μg. Furthermore, the DNA vaccine protected fish against a broad range of viral strains from different geographic locations, including isolates from France and Japan, suggesting that the vaccine could be used worldwide. A single dose of this DNA vaccine induced protection in fish at a lower dose than is usually reported in mammalian DNA vaccine studies.

  3. Efficacy of an infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus DNA vaccine in Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye O. nerka salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; LaPatra, S.E.; Kurath, G.

    2005-01-01

    The level of protective immunity was determined for Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye/kokanee salmon (anadromous and landlocked) O. nerka following intramuscular vaccination with a DNA vaccine against the aquatic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). A DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of IHNV protected Chinook and sockeye/kokanee salmon against waterborne or injection challenge with IHNV, and relative percent survival (RPS) values of 23 to 86% were obtained under a variety of lethal challenge conditions. Although this is significant protection, it is less than RPS values obtained in previous studies with rainbow trout (O. mykiss). In addition to the variability in the severity of the challenge and inherent host susceptibility differences, it appears that use of a cross-genogroup challenge virus strain may lead to reduced efficacy of the DNA vaccine. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in both Chinook and sockeye that had been vaccinated with 1.0 and 0.1 ??g doses of the DNA vaccine, and vaccinated fish responded to viral challenges with higher antibody titers than mock-vaccinated control fish. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  4. c-DNA vaccination against parasitic infections: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Kofta, W; Wedrychowicz, H

    2001-09-12

    Recently developed technology for DNA vaccination appears to offer the good prospect for the development of a multivalent vaccines that will effectively activate both the humoral and cell mediated mechanisms of the immune system. Currently, DNA vaccination against such important parasitic diseases like malaria, leishmaniosis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, schistosomosis, fasciolosis offers several new opportunities. However, the outcome of vaccination depends very much on vaccine formulations, dose and route of vaccine delivery, and the species and even strain of the vaccinated host. To overcome these problems much research is still needed, specifically focused on cloning and testing of new c-DNA sequences in the following: genome projects: different ways of delivery: design of vectors containing appropriate immunostimulatory sequences and very detailed studies on safety. PMID:11522401

  5. Novel approaches to tuberculosis prevention: DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R

    2014-03-01

    It is estimated that there are approximately eight million new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) worldwide annually. There is only 1 vaccine available for prevention: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). This has variable efficacy and is only protective for certain extrapulmonary TB cases in children, therefore new strategies for the creation of novel vaccines have emerged. One of the promising approaches is the DNA vaccine, used as a direct vaccination or as a prime-boost vaccine. This review describes the experimental data obtained during the design of DNA vaccines for TB. PMID:24450840

  6. Fish DNA vaccine against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: efficacy of various routes of immunization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, Serge; Kurath, Gael; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    The DNA vaccine, pIHNVw-G, contains the gene for the glycoprotein (G) of the rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a major pathogen of salmon and trout. The relative efficacy of various routes of immunisation with pIHNVw-G was evaluated using 1.8 g rainbow trout fry vaccinated via intramuscular injection, scarification of the skin, intraperitoneal injection, intrabuccal administration, cutaneous particle bombardment using a gene gun, or immersion in water containing DNA vaccine-coated beads. Twenty-seven days after vaccination neutralising antibody titres were determined, and 2 days later groups of vaccinated and control unvaccinated fish were subjected to an IHNV immersion challenge. Results of the virus challenge showed that the intramuscular injection and the gene gun immunisation induced protective immunity in fry, while intraperitoneal injection provided partial protection. Neutralising antibodies were not detected in sera of vaccinated fish regardless of the route of immunisation used, suggesting that cell mediated immunity may be at least partially responsible for the observed protection.

  7. Protective immunity and lack of histopathological damage two years after DNA vaccination against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Corbeil, Serge; Elliott, Diane G.; Anderson, Eric D.; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine pIHNw-G encodes the glycoprotein of the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Vaccine performance in rainbow trout was measured 3, 6, 13, 24, and 25 months after vaccination. At three months all fish vaccinated with 0.1 μg pIHNw-G had detectable neutralizing antibody (NAb) and they were completely protected from lethal IHNV challenge with a relative percent survival (RPS) of 100% compared to control fish. Viral challenges at 6, 13, 24, and 25 months post-vaccination showed protection with RPS values of 47–69%, while NAb seroprevalence declined to undetectable levels. Passive transfer experiments with sera from fish after two years post-vaccination were inconsistent but significant protection was observed in some cases. The long-term duration of protection observed here defined a third temporal phase in the immune response to IHNV DNA vaccination, characterized by reduced but significant levels of protection, and decline or absence of detectable NAb titers. Examination of multiple tissues showed an absence of detectable long-term histopathological damage due to DNA vaccination.

  8. Polymer multilayer tattooing for enhanced DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demuth, Peter C.; Min, Younjin; Huang, Bonnie; Kramer, Joshua A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Barouch, Dan H.; Hammond, Paula T.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2013-04-01

    DNA vaccines have many potential benefits but have failed to generate robust immune responses in humans. Recently, methods such as in vivo electroporation have demonstrated improved performance, but an optimal strategy for safe, reproducible, and pain-free DNA vaccination remains elusive. Here we report an approach for rapid implantation of vaccine-loaded polymer films carrying DNA, immune-stimulatory RNA, and biodegradable polycations into the immune-cell-rich epidermis, using microneedles coated with releasable polyelectrolyte multilayers. Films transferred into the skin following brief microneedle application promoted local transfection and controlled the persistence of DNA and adjuvants in the skin from days to weeks, with kinetics determined by the film composition. These ‘multilayer tattoo’ DNA vaccines induced immune responses against a model HIV antigen comparable to electroporation in mice, enhanced memory T-cell generation, and elicited 140-fold higher gene expression in non-human primate skin than intradermal DNA injection, indicating the potential of this strategy for enhancing DNA vaccination.

  9. Micro- and nanoparticulates for DNA vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Farris, Eric; Brown, Deborah M; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Pannier, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as a promising alternative to traditional protein-based vaccines for the induction of protective immune responses. DNA vaccines offer several advantages over traditional vaccines, including increased stability, rapid and inexpensive production, and flexibility to produce vaccines for a wide variety of infectious diseases. However, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines delivered as naked plasmid DNA is often weak due to degradation of the DNA by nucleases and inefficient delivery to immune cells. Therefore, biomaterial-based delivery systems based on micro- and nanoparticles that encapsulate plasmid DNA represent the most promising strategy for DNA vaccine delivery. Microparticulate delivery systems allow for passive targeting to antigen presenting cells through size exclusion and can allow for sustained presentation of DNA to cells through degradation and release of encapsulated vaccines. In contrast, nanoparticle encapsulation leads to increased internalization, overall greater transfection efficiency, and the ability to increase uptake across mucosal surfaces. Moreover, selection of the appropriate biomaterial can lead to increased immune stimulation and activation through triggering innate immune response receptors and target DNA to professional antigen presenting cells. Finally, the selection of materials with the appropriate properties to achieve efficient delivery through administration routes conducive to high patient compliance and capable of generating systemic and local (i.e. mucosal) immunity can lead to more effective humoral and cellular protective immune responses. In this review, we discuss the development of novel biomaterial-based delivery systems to enhance the delivery of DNA vaccines through various routes of administration and their implications for generating immune responses. PMID:27048557

  10. An in silico DNA vaccine against Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Abolfazl; Rasooli, Iraj; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Owlia, Parviz; Rahbar, Mohammad Reza; Amani, Jafar; Khalili, Saeed

    2011-09-16

    Listeria monocytogenes causes listeriosis with mortality rate >20%. Listeriolysin-O (LLO), a pore-forming hemolysin, belongs to the family of cholesterol-dependent toxins (CDTX) and plays roles in the pathogenicity. In this study bioinformatic analyses were carried out on LLO sequence as a major immunodominant listerial antigen toward designing a DNA vaccine stimulating cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). Mouse and human constructs were designed based on predicted T cell epitopes and MHC class I binders, which were then tandemly fused together. LLO-derived construct codons and a variety of critical gene expression efficiency parameters were optimized. Post-translational modifications such as glycosylation, phosphorylation were analysed. The constructs corresponded to LLO sequences of L. monocytogenes in BLAST search. Neither human nor mouse construct was allergen. Secretory pathway was location of the human construct that enhances immune induction and contribute to the efficacy of the vaccine candidate. mRNAs from optimized DNA sequences of both human and mouse constructs are more stable than the native and are suitable for initiation of translation. The constructs contain several sites for phosphorylation that could improve its degradation and subsequent entry into the MHC class I pathway. Addition of GPI anchor, myristoylation and ubiquitin signals or proline (P), glutamic acid (E), serine (S), threonine (T) (PEST)-like motifs at the N-terminal of constructs increase efficacy of the DNA vaccine. Close physical contact between the favorable immunogen and the suitable CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) promotes immune response. Vectors for checking the expression of constructs in mammalian cells and for harboring the foreign genes as DNA vaccine are suggested. PMID:21791233

  11. DNA vaccination in skin enhanced by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Kate E; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines are a next generation branch of vaccines which offer major benefits over their conventional counterparts. However, to be effective in large mammals and humans, an enhancing delivery technology is required. Electroporation is a physical technique which results in improved delivery of large molecules through the cell membrane. In the case of plasmid DNA, electroporation enhances both the uptake and expression of the delivered DNA. The skin is an attractive tissue for DNA vaccination in a clinical setting due to the accessibility of the target, the ease of monitoring, and most importantly the immunocompetent nature of the dermis. Electroporation in the skin has the benefit of being minimally invasive and generally well tolerated. Previous studies have determined that optimized electroporation parameters (such as electrical field intensity, pulse length, pulse width, and plasmid formulation) majorly impact the efficiency of DNA delivery to the skin. We provide an overview of DNA vaccination in skin and muscle. In addition, we detail a protocol for the successful intradermal electroporation of plasmid DNA to guinea pig skin, an excellent dermatological animal model. The work detailed here suggests that the technique is safe and effective and could be highly applicable to a clinical setting. PMID:24715285

  12. Trial watch: DNA vaccines for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Vacchelli, Erika; Garcia, Pauline; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    The foundation of modern vaccinology dates back to the 1790s, when the English physician Edward Jenner uncovered the tremendous medical potential of prophylactic vaccination. Jenner's work ignited a wave of nationwide vaccination campaigns abating the incidence of multiple life-threatening infectious diseases and culminating with the eradication of natural smallpox virus, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The possibility of using vaccines against cancer was first proposed at the end of the 19th century by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it was not until the 1990s that such a hypothesis began to be intensively investigated, following the realization that the immune system is not completely unresponsive to tumors and that neoplastic cells express immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Nowadays, anticancer vaccines are rapidly moving from the bench to the bedside, and a few prophylactic and therapeutic preparations have already been approved by FDA for use in humans. In this setting, one interesting approach is constituted by DNA vaccines, i.e., TAA-encoding circularized DNA constructs, often of bacterial origin, that are delivered to patients as such or by means of specific vectors, including (but not limited to) liposomal preparations, nanoparticles, bacteria and viruses. The administration of DNA vaccines is most often performed via the intramuscular or subcutaneous route and is expected to cause (1) the endogenous synthesis of the TAA by myocytes and/or resident antigen-presenting cells; (2) the presentation of TAA-derived peptides on the cell surface, in association with MHC class I molecules; and (3) the activation of potentially therapeutic tumor-specific immune responses. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating DNA vaccines as therapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23734328

  13. Safety and efficacy of DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Stenler, Sofia; Blomberg, Pontus; Smith, CI Edvard

    2014-01-01

    While DNA vaccination using plasmid vectors is highly attractive, there is a need for further vector optimization regarding safety, stability, and efficiency. In this commentary, we review the minicircle vector (MC), which is an entity devoid of plasmid bacterial sequences, as an alternative to the traditional plasmid construct. The commentary highlights the recent discovery by Stenler et al. (2014) that the small size of an MC enables improved resistance to the shearing forces associated with e.g. pneumatic delivery methods. This observation may have implications for the regulatory agencies’ requirement of plasmid integrity and quality. PMID:24553064

  14. Pharmacokinetics and risk evaluation of DNA vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Feng; Li, Wei; Lu, Ming-Bo; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2013-01-01

    DNA plasmid immunization is a novel approach of preventive and therapeutic vaccine. More than 100 DNA vaccines have been on preclinical or clinical phase trials, and four kinds of DNA vaccines for livestock have been approved by USDA, CFIA, and APVMA. Schistosomiasis is a worldwide parasitic disease, and vaccine immunization is supposed to be a promising approach to control the health crisis. On the basis of former preclinical studies, we further focused on the pharmacokinetics and risk evaluation of DNA vaccine in vivo. In the present study, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) report gene was fused with Schistosoma japonicum 23 kDa transmembrane protein antigen gene (Sj23) and constructed into DNA vaccine pVIVO2-Sj23.EGFP. After intramuscularly injecting 100 μg of purified DNA vaccine plasmid to immunizate BALB/c mice, we studied the tissue distribution of DNA plasmid and expressed Sj23.EGFP antigen, the persistence time of elicited antibodies, and the risk of DNA vaccine transferred into intestinal microorganisms. The results showed that DNA vaccine plasmid could be distributed into all tissues of the body after injection; however, only few organs including the injected muscle were detected DNA vaccine at postimmunization until the 100 days by PCR technology; the detection of green fluorescence protein displayed that DNA vaccine could be expressed in almost every tissue and organs; the ELISA assay indicated the immune antibody against Sj23 could persist over 70 days; and the DNA vaccine transferring intestinal flora results was negative. The results indicated that the DNA vaccine has systemic protection and long-lasting effectivity and is safe to intestinal flora. PMID:22990210

  15. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  16. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    PubMed Central

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-01-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2–24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:10823919

  17. Rabies DNA vaccines for protection and therapeutic treatment.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2003-07-01

    DNA vaccines have shown efficacy in preclinical animal models in preventing or even treating a variety of diseases caused by infectious agents, malignancies or immunological disorders. One of the main perceived advantages of DNA vaccines for use in less developed countries is their low cost. Nevertheless, in general, immune responses elicited by DNA vaccines are less potent than those induced by traditional vaccines or second generation viral recombinant vaccines, and their efficacy in human Phase I trials has been disappointing. DNA vaccines have shown good efficacy in preventing rabies in some experimental animal models; their performance in postexposure treatment has been less impressive. Considering that rabies is nearly always fatal, efficacious vaccines are available and treatment in most cases is initiated after exposure, the development of current DNA vaccines to rabies for use in humans is, at the current time, not appropriate. PMID:12831368

  18. Evaluation of the protective immunogencity of the N, P, M, NV and G proteins of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss using DNA vaccines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Jones, J.; Vincent, B.; Hsu, Y.-L; Kurath, G.

    1999-01-01

    The protective immunogenicity of the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix protein (M), non-virion protein (NV) and glycoprotein (G) of the rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was assessed in rainbow trout using DNA vaccine technology. DNA vaccines were produced by amplifying and cloning the viral genes in the plasmid pCDNA 3.1. The protective immunity elicited by each vaccine was evaluated through survival of immunized fry after challenge with live virus. Neutralizing antibody titers were also determined in vaccinated rainbow troutOncorhynchus mykiss fry (mean weight 2 g) and 150 g sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. The serum from the 150 g fish was also used in passive immunization studies with naïve fry. Our results showed that neither the internal structural proteins (N, P and M) nor the NV protein of IHNV induced protective immunity in fry or neutralizing antibodies in fry and 150 g fish when expressed by a DNA vaccine construct. The G protein, however, did confer significant protection in fry up to 80 d post-immunization and induced protective neutralizing antibodies. We are currently investigating the role of different arms of the fish immune system that contribute to the high level of protection against IHNV seen in vaccinated fish.

  19. Induction of protective immunity against Eimeria tenella, Eimeria necatrix, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria acervulina infections using multivalent epitope DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Ren, Zhe; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-06-01

    Avian coccidiosis is mostly caused by mixed infection of several Eimeria species under natural conditions and immunity to avian coccidiosis is largely dependent on T-cell immune response. In this study, 14 T-cell epitope fragments from eight antigens of Eimeria tenella (E. tenella), Eimeria necatrix (E. necatrix), Eimeria maxima (E. maxima) and Eimeria acervulina (E. acervulina) were ligated with pVAX1 producing 14 monovalent DNA vaccines, respectively. Protective immunity of the monovalent DNA vaccines was assessed by in vivo challenge experiments and then four most protective fragments of each species were chosen to construct multivalent epitope DNA vaccines with or without chicken IL-2 as genetic adjuvant. Protective efficacies of the epitope DNA vaccines on chickens against E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. maxima and E. acervulina were evaluated. The results showed that the constructed multivalent epitope DNA vaccines significantly increased body weight gain, alleviated enteric lesions and reduced oocyst output of the infected birds. Especially, the multivalent epitope DNA vaccines of pVAX1-NA4-1-TA4-1-LDH-2-EMCDPK-1 and pVAX1-NA4-1-TA4-1-LDH-2-EMCDPK-1-IL-2 not only significantly increased body weight gain, alleviated enteric lesions and reduced oocyst output of the infected birds, but also resulted in anti-coccidial index (ACI) more than 170 against E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. maxima and E. acervulina, which indicated they could induce protective immunity against E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. maxima and E. acervulina. Our findings suggest the constructed multivalent epitope DNA vaccines are the potential candidate multivalent vaccines against mixed infection of Eimeria. PMID:25921712

  20. Enhancement of DNA vaccine potency through coadministration of CIITA DNA with DNA vaccines via gene gun.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daejin; Hoory, Talia; Monie, Archana; Ting, Jenny Pan-Yun; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2008-05-15

    Administration of DNA vaccines via gene gun has emerged as an important form of Ag-specific immunotherapy. The MHC CIITA is a master regulator of MHC class II expression and also induces expression of class I molecules. We reasoned that the gene gun administration of CIITA DNA with DNA vaccines employing different strategies to improve MHC I and II processing could enhance DNA vaccine potency. We observed that DC-1 cells transfected with CIITA DNA lead to higher expression of MHC I and II molecules, leading to enhanced Ag presentation through the MHC I/II pathways. Furthermore, our data suggested that coadministration of DNA-encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 Ag (CRT/E6) with CIITA DNA leads to enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. In addition, coadministration of the combination of CRT/E6 DNA with CIITA DNA and DNA encoding the invariant chain (Ii) linked to the pan HLA-DR-reactive epitope (Ii-PADRE) further enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses in vaccinated mice. Treatment with the combination vaccine was also shown to enhance the antitumor effects and to prolong survival in TC-1 tumor-bearing mice. Vaccination with the combination vaccine also led to enhanced E6-specific CD8(+) memory T cells and to long-term protection against TC-1 tumors and prolonged survival in vaccinated mice. Thus, our findings suggest that the combination of CIITA DNA with CRT/E6 and Ii-PADRE DNA vaccines represents a potentially effective means to combat tumors in the clinical setting. PMID:18453624

  1. DNA vaccination of poultry: The current status in 2015.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Marine; Chemaly, Marianne; Dory, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a promising alternative strategy for developing new human and animal vaccines. The massive efforts made these past 25 years to increase the immunizing potential of this kind of vaccine are still ongoing. A relatively small number of studies concerning poultry have been published. Even though there is a need for new poultry vaccines, five parameters must nevertheless be taken into account for their development: the vaccine has to be very effective, safe, inexpensive, suitable for mass vaccination and able to induce immune responses in the presence of maternal antibodies (when appropriate). DNA vaccination should meet these requirements. This review describes studies in this field performed exclusively on birds (chickens, ducks and turkeys). No evaluations of avian DNA vaccine efficacy performed on mice as preliminary tests have been taken into consideration. The review first describes the state of the art for DNA vaccination in poultry: pathogens targeted, plasmids used and different routes of vaccine administration. Second, it presents strategies designed to improve DNA vaccine efficacy: influence of the route of administration, plasmid dose and age of birds on their first inoculation; increasing plasmid uptake by host cells; addition of immunomodulators; optimization of plasmid backbones and codon usage; association of vaccine antigens and finally, heterologous prime-boost regimens. The final part will indicate additional properties of DNA vaccines in poultry: fate of the plasmids upon inoculation, immunological considerations and the use of DNA vaccines for purposes other than preventing infectious diseases. PMID:26620840

  2. Strategies and hurdles using DNA vaccines to fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccinations against fish viral diseases as IHNV at commercial level in Canada against VHSV at experimental level are both success stories. DNA vaccination strategies against many other viral diseases have, however, not yet yielded sufficient results in terms of protection. There is an obvious need to combat many other viral diseases within aquaculture where inactivated vaccines fail. There are many explanations to why DNA vaccine strategies against other viral diseases fail to induce protective immune responses in fish. These obstacles include: 1) too low immunogenicity of the transgene, 2) too low expression of the transgene that is supposed to induce protection, 3) suboptimal immune responses, and 4) too high degradation rate of the delivered plasmid DNA. There are also uncertainties with regard distribution and degradation of DNA vaccines that may have implications for safety and regulatory requirements that need to be clarified. By combining plasmid DNA with different kind of adjuvants one can increase the immunogenicity of the transgene antigen – and perhaps increase the vaccine efficacy. By using molecular adjuvants with or without in combination with targeting assemblies one may expect different responses compared with naked DNA. This includes targeting of DNA vaccines to antigen presenting cells as a central factor in improving their potencies and efficacies by means of encapsulating the DNA vaccine in certain carriers systems that may increase transgene and MHC expression. This review will focus on DNA vaccine delivery, by the use of biodegradable PLGA particles as vehicles for plasmid DNA mainly in fish. PMID:24552235

  3. What you always needed to know about electroporation based DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Gothelf, Anita; Gehl, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinations are increasingly used to fight infectious disease, and DNA vaccines offer considerable advantages, including broader possibilities for vaccination and lack of need for cold storage. It has been amply demonstrated, that electroporation augments uptake of DNA in both skin and muscle, and it is foreseen that future DNA vaccination may to a large extent be coupled with and dependent upon electroporation based delivery. Understanding the basic science of electroporation and exploiting knowledge obtained on optimization of DNA electrotransfer to muscle and skin, may greatly augment efforts on vaccine development. The purpose of this review is to give a succinct but comprehensive overview of electroporation as a delivery modality including electrotransfer to skin and muscle. As well, this review will speculate and discuss future uses for this powerful electrotransfer technology. PMID:23111168

  4. DNA vaccines: a review of developments.

    PubMed

    Webster, R G; Robinson, H L

    1997-10-01

    Immunisation with purified DNA is a powerful technique for inducing immune responses. The concept is very simple, involving insertion of the gene encoding the antigen of choice into a bacterial plasmid, and injection of the plasmid into the host where the antigen is expressed and induces humoral and cellular immunity. This technology can induce immunity to all antigens that can be encoded by DNA; this includes all protein, but not carbohydrate, antigens. DNA immunisation appears to result in presentation of antigens to the host's immune system in a natural form, similar to that achieved with live attenuated vaccines. The most efficacious routes for DNA immunisation are bombardment with particles coated with DNA (gene-gun), followed by intramuscular and intradermal administration. The efficiency of transfection of host cells is low, but sufficient to induce immunological responsiveness. The DNA plasmid is retained in the transfected cells in an unintegrated form for the life of the cell. The majority of transfected cells are eliminated, but residual expression has been detected for longer periods. In animal model systems, DNA immunisation has been shown to induce protective immunity to influenza, herpes, rabies, hepatitis B and lymphocytic choriomeningitis viruses, and to malaria and mycobacteria. However, strategies to induce protective immunity to HIV and other disease agents remain to be developed. DNA vaccines permit modulation of the immune response by altering the route or method of DNA administration, by including immunostimulatory sequences in the plasmid, and by co-administration of cytokine genes with the gene encoding the antigen of interest. A T helper 1 response provides cell-mediated immune killing of infected cells and neutralising antibody production, while a T helper 2 response induces IgE and allergic responses. The advantages of DNA immunisation are: similarity to live attenuated vaccination but without the possibility of contamination with

  5. Distribution and variation of NV genes in fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; Higman, K.H.; Bjorklund, H.V.

    1997-01-01

    The fish rhabdovirus infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) contains a non-virion (NV) gene between the glycoprotein (G) and polymerase (L) genes on its RNA genome. The present study investigated three other fish rhabdovirus genomes and found that the NV gene of hirame rhabdovirus is closely related to the NV of IHNV, whereas the viral haemorrhagic septicemia NV gene showed evidence of significant divergence. Most importantly, spring viraemia of carp virus, the only vesiculovirus-like fish rhabdovirus examined, did not have an NV gene at its genomic RNA G-L junction. These results suggest that the presence of an NV gene is characteristic of the unassigned fish rhabdovirus subgroup previously classified as lyssaviruses, and that the NV gene is not essential for replication in fish cells per se, since it is absent in a vesiculovirus-like fish rhabdovirus.

  6. Regulatory T Cells Suppress Natural Killer Cells during Plasmid DNA Vaccination in Mice, Blunting the CD8+ T Cell Immune Response by the Cytokine TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Frimpong-Boateng, Kwesi; van Rooijen, Nico; Geiben-Lynn, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Background CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses to self- and foreign-antigens. Tregs may also suppress early innate immune responses to vaccine antigens and might decrease vaccine efficacy. NK and NKT cells are the first responders after plasmid DNA vaccination and are found at the site of inoculation. Earlier reports demonstrated that NKT cells could improve plasmid DNA efficacy, a phenomenon not found for NK cells. In fact, it has been shown that under certain disease conditions, NK cells are suppressed by Tregs via their release of IL-10 and/or TGFβ. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that NK cell function is suppressed by Tregs in the setting of plasmid DNA vaccination. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we show that Tregs directly inhibit NK cell function during plasmid DNA vaccination by suppressing the potentially 10-fold, NK cell-mediated, augmentation of plasmid DNA antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. We found that this phenomenon is dependent on the secretion of cytokine TGFβ by Tregs, and independent of IL-10. Conclusions Our data indicate a crucial function for Tregs in blocking plasmid DNA vaccine-elicited immune responses, revealing potentially novel strategies for improving the efficiency of plasmid DNA vaccines including chemical- or antibody-induced localized blockage of Treg-mediated suppression of NK cells at the site of plasmid DNA vaccine inoculation. PMID:20808850

  7. Electroporation Enhances Immunogenicity of a DNA Vaccine Expressing Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Surface Antigen in Woodchucks▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Katherine H.; Ascenzi, Mary A.; Bellezza, Christine A.; Bezuidenhout, Abraham J.; Cote, Paul J.; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Hannaman, Drew; Luxembourg, Alain; Evans, Claire F.; Tennant, Bud C.; Menne, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The development of therapeutic vaccines for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been hampered by host immune tolerance and the generally low magnitude and inconsistent immune responses to conventional vaccines and proposed new delivery methods. Electroporation (EP) for plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine delivery has demonstrated the enhanced immunogenicity of HBV antigens in various animal models. In the present study, the efficiency of the EP-based delivery of pDNA expressing various reporter genes first was evaluated in normal woodchucks, and then the immunogenicity of an analog woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) surface antigen (WHsAg) pDNA vaccine was studied in this model. The expression of reporter genes was greatly increased when the cellular uptake of pDNA was facilitated by EP. The EP of WHsAg-pDNA resulted in enhanced, dose-dependent antibody and T-cell responses to WHsAg compared to those of the conventional hypodermic needle injection of WHsAg-pDNA. Although subunit WHsAg protein vaccine elicited higher antibody titers than the DNA vaccine delivered with EP, T-cell response rates were comparable. However, in WHsAg-stimulated mononuclear cell cultures, the mRNA expression of CD4 and CD8 leukocyte surface markers and Th1 cytokines was more frequent and was skewed following DNA vaccination compared to that of protein immunization. Thus, the EP-based vaccination of normal woodchucks with pDNA-WHsAg induced a skew in the Th1/Th2 balance toward Th1 immune responses, which may be considered more appropriate for approaches involving therapeutic vaccines to treat chronic HBV infection. PMID:21389124

  8. Poly-L-lysine-coated nanoparticles: a potent delivery system to enhance DNA vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Minigo, Gabriela; Scholzen, Anja; Tang, Choon K; Hanley, Jennifer C; Kalkanidis, Martha; Pietersz, Geoffrey A; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2007-01-26

    DNA formulations provide the basis for safe and cost efficient vaccines. However, naked plasmid DNA is only poorly immunogenic and new effective delivery strategies are needed to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines. In this study, we present a novel approach for the delivery of DNA vaccines using inert poly-L-lysine (PLL) coated polystyrene particles, which greatly enhance DNA immunogenicity. Intradermal injection of plasmid DNA encoding for chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA) complexed with PLL-coated polystyrene nanoparticles induced high levels of CD8 T cells as well as OVA-specific antibodies in C57BL/6 mice and furthermore inhibited tumour growth after challenge with the OVA expressing EG7 tumour cell line. Importantly, vaccine efficacy depended critically on the size of the particles used as well as on the presence of the PLL linker. Our data show that PLL-coated polystyrene nanoparticles of 0.05 microm but not 0.02 microm or 1.0 microm in diameter are highly effective for the delivery of DNA vaccines. PMID:17052812

  9. Targeting DNA vaccines to myeloid cells using a small peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein Ags to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, which results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able to prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient Ag presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WNV-neutralizing Abs that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses. PMID:25270431

  10. Vector Design for Improved DNA Vaccine Efficacy, Safety and Production

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a disruptive technology that offers the promise of a new rapidly deployed vaccination platform to treat human and animal disease with gene-based materials. Innovations such as electroporation, needle free jet delivery and lipid-based carriers increase transgene expression and immunogenicity through more effective gene delivery. This review summarizes complementary vector design innovations that, when combined with leading delivery platforms, further enhance DNA vaccine performance. These next generation vectors also address potential safety issues such as antibiotic selection, and increase plasmid manufacturing quality and yield in exemplary fermentation production processes. Application of optimized constructs in combination with improved delivery platforms tangibly improves the prospect of successful application of DNA vaccination as prophylactic vaccines for diverse human infectious disease targets or as therapeutic vaccines for cancer and allergy. PMID:26344110

  11. DNAVaxDB: the first web-based DNA vaccine database and its data analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the first DNA vaccine studies were done in the 1990s, thousands more studies have followed. Here we report the development and analysis of DNAVaxDB (http://www.violinet.org/dnavaxdb), the first publically available web-based DNA vaccine database that curates, stores, and analyzes experimentally verified DNA vaccines, DNA vaccine plasmid vectors, and protective antigens used in DNA vaccines. All data in DNAVaxDB are annotated from reliable resources, particularly peer-reviewed articles. Among over 140 DNA vaccine plasmids, some plasmids were more frequently used in one type of pathogen than others; for example, pCMVi-UB for G- bacterial DNA vaccines, and pCAGGS for viral DNA vaccines. Presently, over 400 DNA vaccines containing over 370 protective antigens from over 90 infectious and non-infectious diseases have been curated in DNAVaxDB. While extracellular and bacterial cell surface proteins and adhesin proteins were frequently used for DNA vaccine development, the majority of protective antigens used in Chlamydophila DNA vaccines are localized to the inner portion of the cell. The DNA vaccine priming, other vaccine boosting vaccination regimen has been widely used to induce protection against infection of different pathogens such as HIV. Parasitic and cancer DNA vaccines were also systematically analyzed. User-friendly web query and visualization interfaces are available in DNAVaxDB for interactive data search. To support data exchange, the information of DNA vaccines, plasmids, and protective antigens is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). DNAVaxDB is targeted to become a timely and vital source of DNA vaccines and related data and facilitate advanced DNA vaccine research and development. PMID:25104313

  12. DNAVaxDB: the first web-based DNA vaccine database and its data analysis.

    PubMed

    Racz, Rebecca; Li, Xinna; Patel, Mukti; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2014-01-01

    Since the first DNA vaccine studies were done in the 1990s, thousands more studies have followed. Here we report the development and analysis of DNAVaxDB (http://www.violinet.org/dnavaxdb), the first publically available web-based DNA vaccine database that curates, stores, and analyzes experimentally verified DNA vaccines, DNA vaccine plasmid vectors, and protective antigens used in DNA vaccines. All data in DNAVaxDB are annotated from reliable resources, particularly peer-reviewed articles. Among over 140 DNA vaccine plasmids, some plasmids were more frequently used in one type of pathogen than others; for example, pCMVi-UB for G- bacterial DNA vaccines, and pCAGGS for viral DNA vaccines. Presently, over 400 DNA vaccines containing over 370 protective antigens from over 90 infectious and non-infectious diseases have been curated in DNAVaxDB. While extracellular and bacterial cell surface proteins and adhesin proteins were frequently used for DNA vaccine development, the majority of protective antigens used in Chlamydophila DNA vaccines are localized to the inner portion of the cell. The DNA vaccine priming, other vaccine boosting vaccination regimen has been widely used to induce protection against infection of different pathogens such as HIV. Parasitic and cancer DNA vaccines were also systematically analyzed. User-friendly web query and visualization interfaces are available in DNAVaxDB for interactive data search. To support data exchange, the information of DNA vaccines, plasmids, and protective antigens is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). DNAVaxDB is targeted to become a timely and vital source of DNA vaccines and related data and facilitate advanced DNA vaccine research and development. PMID:25104313

  13. DNA vaccines and their applications in veterinary practice: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dhama, K; Mahendran, Mahesh; Gupta, P K; Rai, A

    2008-06-01

    Inoculation of plasmid DNA, encoding an immunogenic protein gene of an infectious agent, stands out as a novel approach for developing new generation vaccines for prevention of infectious diseases of animals. The potential of DNA vaccines to act in presence of maternal antibodies, its stability and cost effectiveness and the non-requirement of cold chain have heightened the prospects. Even though great strides have been made in nucleic acid vaccination, still there are many areas that need further research for its wholesome practical implementation. Major areas of concern are vaccine delivery, designing of suitable vectors and cytotoxic T cell responses. Also, the induction of immune responses by DNA vaccines is inconclusive due to the lack of knowledge regarding the concentration of the protein expressed in vivo. Alternative delivery systems having higher transfection efficiency and the use of cytokines, as immunomodulators, needs to be further explored. Recently, efforts are being made to modulate and prolong the active life of dendritic cells, in order to make antigen presentation a more efficacious one. For combating diseases like acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), influenza, malaria and tuberculosis in humans; and foot and mouth disease, Aujesky's disease, swine fever, rabies, canine distemper and brucellosis in animals, DNA vaccine clinical trials are underway. This review highlights the salient features of DNA vaccines, and measures to enhance their efficacy so as to devise an effective and novel vaccination strategy against animal diseases. PMID:18425596

  14. DNA vaccines, electroporation and their applications in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Si-Hyeong; Danishmalik, Sayyed Nilofar; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2015-01-01

    Numerous animal studies and recent clinical studies have shown that electroporation-delivered DNA vaccines can elicit robust Ag-specific CTL responses and reduce disease severity. However, cancer antigens are generally poorly immunogenic, requiring special conditions for immune response induction. To date, many different approaches have been used to elicit Ag-specific CTL and anti-neoplastic responses to DNA vaccines against cancer. In vivo electroporation is one example, whereas others include DNA manipulation, xenogeneic antigen use, immune stimulatory molecule and immune response regulator application, DNA prime-boost immunization strategy use and different DNA delivery methods. These strategies likely increase the immunogenicity of cancer DNA vaccines, thereby contributing to cancer eradication. However, cancer cells are heterogeneous and might become CTL-resistant. Thus, understanding the CTL resistance mechanism(s) employed by cancer cells is critical to develop counter-measures for this immune escape. In this review, the use of electroporation as a DNA delivery method, the strategies used to enhance the immune responses, the cancer antigens that have been tested, and the escape mechanism(s) used by tumor cells are discussed, with a focus on the progress of clinical trials using cancer DNA vaccines. PMID:25984993

  15. Analysis of DNA-vaccinated fish reveals viral antigen in muscle, kidney and thymus, and transient histopathologic changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.M.; Elliott, D.G.; Kurath, G.

    2005-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was used in a systematic study to analyze vaccine tissue distribution, persistence, expression patterns, and histopathologic effects. Vaccine plasmid pIHNw-G, containing the gene for the viral glycoprotein, was detected immediately after intramuscular injection in all tissues analyzed, including blood, but at later time points was found primarily in muscle tissue, where it persisted to 90 days. Glycoprotein expression was detected in muscle, kidney, and thymus tissues, with levels peaking at 14 days and becoming undetectable by 28 days. Histologic examination revealed no vaccine-specific pathologic changes at the standard effective dose of 0.1 ??g DNA per fish, but at a high dose of 50 ??g an increased inflammatory response was evident. Transient damage associated with needle injection was localized in muscle tissue, but by 90 days after vaccination no damage was detected in any tissue, indicating the vaccine to be safe and well tolerated. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005.

  16. DNA vaccines for cervical cancer: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chien-Fu; Monie, Archana; Alvarez, Ronald D; Wu, T-C

    2007-12-31

    More than 99% of cervical cancers have been associated with human papillomaviruses (HPVs), particularly HPV type 16. The clear association between HPV infection and cervical cancer indicates that HPV serves as an ideal target for development of preventive and therapeutic vaccines. Although the recently licensed preventive HPV vaccine, Gardasil, has been shown to be safe and capable of generating significant protection against specific HPV types, it does not have therapeutic effect against established HPV infections and HPV-associated lesions. Two HPV oncogenic proteins, E6 and E7, are consistently co-expressed in HPV-expressing cervical cancers and are important in the induction and maintenance of cellular transformation. Therefore, immunotherapy targeting E6 and/or E7 proteins may provide an opportunity to prevent and treat HPV-associated cervical malignancies. It has been established that T cell-mediated immunity is one of the most crucial components to defend against HPV infections and HPV-associated lesions. Therefore, effective therapeutic HPV vaccines should generate strong E6/E7-specific T cell-mediated immune responses. DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive approach for antigen-specific T cell-mediated immunotherapy to combat cancers. Intradermal administration of DNA vaccines via a gene gun represents an efficient way to deliver DNA vaccines into professional antigen-presenting cells in vivo. Professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, are the most effective cells for priming antigen-specific T cells. Using the gene gun delivery system, we tested several DNA vaccines that employ intracellular targeting strategies for enhancing MHC class I and class II presentation of encoded model antigen HPV-16 E7. Furthermore, we have developed a strategy to prolong the life of DCs to enhance DNA vaccine potency. More recently, we have developed a strategy to generate antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell immune responses to further enhance DNA vaccine

  17. Effect of sperm DNA vaccine on fertility of female mice.

    PubMed

    Naz, Rajesh K

    2006-07-01

    Our laboratory has identified a sperm-specific dodecamer peptide sequence, designated as YLP(12), vaccination with which causes a long-term reversible immunocontraceptive effect in female mice. In the present study, the effects of YLP(12) DNA vaccine were examined. YLP(12) 36 bp cDNA was cloned into pVAX1 vector to prepare the DNA vaccine. Two additional vaccine constructs were made by in frame cloning of one and two CpG repeats in the YLP(12)-cDNA vaccine. Five groups of female mice were immunized intradermally by using gene gun with YLP(12)-cDNA, YLP(12)-cDNA-CpG, YLP(12)-cDNA-CpG-CpG, YLP(12)-cDNA mixed with exogenous synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), or vector DNA alone, respectively. Vaccination with all three constructs and the YLP(12) vaccine mixed with exogenous ODN raised antibody response both in the sera as well as locally in the vaginal tract. There was no antibody response in the mice injected with the vector alone. In sera, the highest titers were obtained for the IgG class for all constructs and formulation followed by IgA class. In vaginal washings the highest titers were obtained for the IgA class followed by IgG class. Within the IgG class, the titers for the IgG2a subclass were significantly greater than the IgG1 subclass. Immunization with all constructs and formulation caused a significant (P < 0.05 to <0.001) reduction (20-43%) in fertility of female mice. The highest reductions were seen in mice immunized with YLP(12)-cDNA-CpG-CpG (two repeats) (43% reduction) and with the YLP(12) vaccine administered with exogenous CpG ODN (42% reduction). T lymphocytes obtained from DNA-vaccinated mice showed clearly distinguished comparative RT-PCR analysis of cytokine mRNA expression for Th1 and Th2 immune responses compared to T lymphocytes obtained from control animals injected with vector DNA. Expression of both Th1 cytokines (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) was enhanced after DNA vaccination as compared to controls, with

  18. Protective immune responses to biolistic DNA vaccination of Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2.

    PubMed

    Joseph, S K; Sambanthamoorthy, S; Dakshinamoorthy, G; Munirathinam, G; Ramaswamy, K

    2012-10-01

    Biolistic vaccination using gene gun is developed as a safer tool for delivery of DNA vaccines, a technique that combines high vaccine efficiency with lower antigen dosage and lower cost per vaccine dose. In this study, we compared the protective responses in mice after delivering the Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript-2 (BmALT-2) DNA vaccine using the conventional intradermal approach or with the needleless gene gun delivery approach. BmALT-2 is a leading vaccine candidate against B. malayi, a lymphatic filarial parasite of human. After optimizing the DNA dose and gene gun parameters for delivery into mouse skin, groups of mice were biolistically vaccinated with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. Groups of mice vaccinated intradermally with 5 μg or 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX was used for comparison of vaccine efficacy. Results demonstrated that gene gun vaccination with 5 μg of BmALT-2pVAX conferred significant protection against challenge infection that was comparable to the degree of protection conferred by intradermal vaccination with 100 μg of BmALT-2pVAX. This observation was further supported by an in vitro antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. Analysis of the immune response showed that the gene gun vaccination predominantly induced an IgG1 antibody response and significantly high Th2 cytokine response (IL-4) from spleen cells compared to intradermal BmALT-2 DNA delivery that induced predominantly an IgG2a and Th1 cytokine response (IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α). These findings show that host protective responses could be achieved with 20 fold decrease in DNA dose using a gene gun and could prove to be an efficient delivery method in BmALT-2 DNA vaccination against lymphatic filariasis. PMID:22885273

  19. Sublingual Immunization of Trivalent Human Papillomavirus DNA Vaccine in Baculovirus Nanovector for Protection against Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Cho, Hansam; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Heo, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Yeondong; Gwon, Yong-Dae; Park, Ki Hoon; Jin, Hyerim; Kim, Jinyoung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the immunogenicity of a sublingually delivered, trivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA vaccine encapsidated in a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus nanovector. The HERV envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus-based DNA vaccine, encoding HPV16L1, -18L1 and -58L1 (AcHERV-triHPV), was constructed and sublingually administered to mice without adjuvant. Following sublingual (SL) administration, AcHERV-triHPV was absorbed and distributed throughout the body. At 15 minutes and 1 day post-dose, the distribution of AcHERV-triHPV to the lung was higher than that to other tissues. At 30 days post-dose, the levels of AcHERV-triHPV had diminished throughout the body. Six weeks after the first of three doses, 1×108 copies of SL AcHERV-triHPV induced HPV type-specific serum IgG and neutralizing antibodies to a degree comparable to that of IM immunization with 1×109 copies. AcHERV-triHPV induced HPV type-specific vaginal IgA titers in a dose-dependent manner. SL immunization with 1×1010 copies of AcHERV-triHPV induced Th1 and Th2 cellular responses comparable to IM immunization with 1×109 copies. Molecular imaging revealed that SL AcHERV-triHPV in mice provided complete protection against vaginal challenge with HPV16, HPV18, and HPV58 pseudoviruses. These results support the potential of SL immunization using multivalent DNA vaccine in baculovirus nanovector for induction of mucosal, systemic, and cellular immune responses. PMID:25789464

  20. Control of HPV-associated tumors by innovative therapeutic HPV DNA vaccine in the absence of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are particularly problematic for HIV + and solid organ transplant patients with compromised CD4+ T cell-dependent immunity as they produce more severe and progressive disease compared to healthy individuals. There are no specific treatments for chronic HPV infection, resulting in an urgent unmet need for a modality that is safe and effective for both immunocompromised and otherwise normal patients with recalcitrant disease. DNA vaccination is attractive because it avoids the risks of administration of live vectors to immunocompromised patients, and can induce potent HPV-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. We have developed a DNA vaccine (pNGVL4a-hCRTE6E7L2) encoding calreticulin (CRT) fused to E6, E7 and L2 proteins of HPV-16, the genotype associated with approximately 90% vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile and oropharyngeal HPV-associated cancers and the majority of cervical cancers. Administration of the DNA vaccine by intramuscular (IM) injection followed by electroporation induced significantly greater HPV-specific immune responses compared to IM injection alone or mixed with alum. Furthermore, pNGVL4a-hCRTE6E7L2 DNA vaccination via electroporation of mice carrying an intravaginal HPV-16 E6/E7-expressing syngeneic tumor demonstrated more potent therapeutic effects than IM vaccination alone. Of note, administration of the DNA vaccine by IM injection followed by electroporation elicited potent E6 and E7-specific CD8+ T cell responses and antitumor effects despite CD4+ T cell-depletion, although no antibody response was detected. While CD4+ T cell-depletion did reduce the E6 and E7-specific CD8+ T cell response, it remained sufficient to prevent subcutaneous tumor growth and to eliminate circulating tumor cells in a model of metastatic HPV-16+ cancer. Thus, the antibody response was CD4-dependent, whereas CD4+ T cell help enhanced the E6/E7-specific CD8+ T cell immunity, but was not required. Taken together, our data suggest that

  1. Rabies DNA vaccines for protection and therapeutic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lodmell, D L

    1999-02-01

    Rabies is a successful zoonotic disease that has persisted over time, achieving worldwide distribution in a variety of species. Annually, in developing countries with limited access to high-quality antirabies biologics, approximately 50,000 individuals and millions of animals die of rabies. Many of these countries continue to use vaccines produced in sheep, goat or suckling mouse brain, with ultraviolet light or phenol inactivation of the virus. Although there are several efficacious rabies vaccines derived from cultured cells, such as the human diploid cell vaccine, they are costly to produce and prohibitively expensive for developing countries. DNA vaccines offer a new and powerful approach for the generation of needed vaccines. They are stable, inexpensive to produce, easy to construct and induce a full spectrum of long-lasting humoral and cellular immune responses. This review concerns the present state of rabies DNA vaccines, and addresses the technology that may enhance their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:15992067

  2. Prospects and progress of DNA vaccines for treating hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Chen, Margaret; Jagya, Neetu; Bansal, Ruchi; Frelin, Lars; Sällberg, Matti

    2016-05-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a global cause of liver disease. The preventive HBV vaccine has effectively reduced the disease burden. However, an estimated 340 million chronic HBV cases are in need of treatment. Current standard therapy for chronic HBV blocks reverse transcription. As this therapy blocks viral maturation and not viral protein expression, any immune inhibition exerted by these proteins will remain throughout therapy. This may help to explain why these drugs rarely induce off-therapy responses. Albeit some restoration of immune function occurs during therapy, this is clearly insufficient to control replication. Central questions when considering therapeutic DNA vaccination as an addition to blocking virus production are as follows: what does one hope to achieve? What do we think is wrong and how can the vaccination correct this? We here discuss different scenarios with respect to the lack of success of tested DNA vaccines, and suggest strategies for improvement. PMID:26652035

  3. The glycoprotein genes and gene junctions of the fish rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus and hirame rhabdovirus: Analysis of relationships with other rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjorklund, H.V.; Higman, K.H.; Kurath, G.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein genes and all of the internal gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) and hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) have been determined from cDNA clones generated from viral genomic RNA. The SVCV glycoprotein gene sequence is 1588 nucleotides (nt) long and encodes a 509 amino acid (aa) protein. The HIRRV glycoprotein gene sequence comprises 1612 nt, coding for a 508 aa protein. In sequence comparisons of 15 rhabdovirus glycoproteins, the SVCV glycoprotein gene showed the highest amino acid sequence identity (31.2-33.2%) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), Chandipura virus (CHPV) and vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSIV). The HIRRV glycoprotein gene showed a very high amino acid sequence identity (74.3%) with the glycoprotein gene of another fish pathogenic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), but no significant similarity with glycoproteins of VSIV or rabies virus (RABV). In phylogenetic analyses SVCV was grouped consistently with VSIV, VSNJV and CHPV in the Vesiculovirus genus of Rhabdoviridae. The fish rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) showed close relationships with each other, but only very distant relationships with mammalian rhabdoviruses. The gene junctions are highly conserved between SVCV and VSIV, well conserved between IHNV and HIRRV, but not conserved between HIRRV/IHNV and RABV. Based on the combined results we suggest that the fish lyssa-type rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and VHSV may be grouped in their own genus within the family Rhabdoviridae. Aquarhabdovirus has been proposed for the name of this new genus.

  4. Enhancement of DNA vaccine efficacy by intracellular targeting strategies.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Elisabete Borges; Henriques, Ana Margarida; Fevereiro, Miguel; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel; Monteiro, Gabriel Amaro

    2014-01-01

    Immune response against an encoded antigenic protein can be elicited by including targeting sequences to DNA vaccines that promote protein sorting to processing pathways, related with antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complexes (MHC). Candidate DNA vaccines coding for neuraminidase 3 of the avian influenza virus were designed to encode different sequences that direct the protein to specific cellular compartments such as endoplasmic reticulum (i.e., adenovirus E1A), lysosomes (i.e., LAMP), and the combination of protein targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum and lysosome (i.e., E1A-LAMP). The DNA vaccine prototypes were engineered by biomolecular techniques and subsequently produced in E. coli cells. The biological activity of the vaccines was tested firstly in vitro, in Chinese hamster ovary cells, through flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Then, an essential in vivo study was performed in chickens, in order to evaluate the efficacy of DNA prototype vaccines, by measuring the antibody production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:24715281

  5. Poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate) with well-defined chain-length for DNA vaccine delivery to dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Weihang; Panus, David; Palumbo, R. Noelle; Tang, Rupei; Wang, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate) (PAEM) homopolymers with defined chain-length and narrow molecular weight distribution were synthesized using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), and a comprehensive study was conducted to evaluate the colloidal properties of PAEM/plasmid DNA polyplexes, the uptake and subcellular trafficking of polyplexes in antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs), and the biological performance of PAEM as a potential DNA vaccine carrier. PAEM of different chain-length (45, 75 and 150 repeating units) showed varying strength in condensing plasmid DNA into narrowly dispersed nanoparticles with very low cytotoxicity. Longer polymer chain-length resulted in higher levels of overall cellular uptake and nuclear uptake of plasmid DNA, but shorter polymer chains favored intracellular and intra-nuclear release of free plasmid from the polyplexes. Despite its simple chemical structure, PAEM transfected DCs very efficiently in vitro in media with or without serum and led to phenotypic maturation of DCs. When a model antigen-encoding ovalbumin plasmid was used, transfected DCs stimulated the activation of naïve CD8+ T cells to produce high levels of interferon-γ. The efficiency of transfection, DC maturation, and CD8+ T cell activation showed varying degrees of polymer chain-length dependence. These structurally defined cationic polymers may have much potential as efficient DNA vaccine carriers and immunostimulatory adjuvants. They may also serve as a model material system for elucidating structural and intracellular mechanisms of polymer-mediated DNA vaccine delivery. PMID:22082257

  6. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (p<0.0001) than individual construct vaccination. From this pilot study we could envisage that the chimeric DNA vaccine construct may offer an attractive strategy in controlling co-infection of leishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design. PMID:19559111

  7. Therapy of tuberculosis in mice by DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lowrie, D B; Tascon, R E; Bonato, V L; Lima, V M; Faccioli, L H; Stavropoulos, E; Colston, M J; Hewinson, R G; Moelling, K; Silva, C L

    1999-07-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to kill about 3 million people every year, more than any other single infectious agent. This is attributed primarily to an inadequate immune response towards infecting bacteria, which suffer growth inhibition rather than death and subsequently multiply catastrophically. Although the bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine is widely used, it has major limitations as a preventative measure. In addition, effective treatment requires that patients take large doses of antibacterial drug combinations for at least 6 months after diagnosis, which is difficult to achieve in many parts of the world and is further restricted by the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. In these circumstances, immunotherapy to boost the efficiency of the immune system in infected patients could be a valuable adjunct to antibacterial chemotherapy. Here we show in mice that DNA vaccines, initially designed to prevent infection, can also have a pronounced therapeutic action. In heavily infected mice, DNA vaccinations can switch the immune response from one that is relatively inefficient and gives bacterial stasis to one that kills bacteria. Application of such immunotherapy in conjunction with conventional chemotherapeutic antibacterial drugs might result in faster or more certain cure of the disease in humans. PMID:10421369

  8. Synthetic DNA vaccine strategies against persistent viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Talbott, Kendra T; Choo, Daniel K; Shedlock, Devon J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    The human body has developed an elaborate defense system against microbial pathogens and foreign antigens. However, particular microbes have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to evade immune surveillance, allowing persistence within the human host. In an effort to combat such infections, intensive research has focused on the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic countermeasures to suppress or clear persistent viral infections. To date, popular therapeutic strategies have included the use of live-attenuated microbes, viral vectors and dendritic-cell vaccines aiming to help suppress or clear infection. In recent years, improved DNA vaccines have now re-emerged as a promising candidate for therapeutic intervention due to the development of advanced optimization and delivery technologies. For instance, genetic optimization of synthetic plasmid constructs and their encoded antigens, in vivo electroporation-mediated vaccine delivery, as well as codelivery with molecular adjuvants have collectively enhanced both transgene expression and the elicitation of vaccine-induced immunity. In addition, the development of potent heterologous prime–boost regimens has also provided significant contributions to DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Herein, the authors will focus on these recent improvements to this synthetic platform in relation to their application in combating persistent virus infection. PMID:23659301

  9. Transposon leads to contamination of clinical pDNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, I; Gomez-Eerland, R; van den Berg, J H; Oosterhuis, K; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G; Beijnen, J H; Nuijen, B

    2013-07-11

    We report an unexpected contamination during clinical manufacture of a Human Papilomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine, with a transposon originating from the Escherichia coli DH5 host cell genome. During processing, presence of this transposable element, insertion sequence 2 (IS2) in the plasmid vector was not noticed until quality control of the bulk pDNA vaccine when results of restriction digestion, sequencing, and CGE analysis were clearly indicative for the presence of a contaminant. Due to the very low level of contamination, only an insert-specific PCR method was capable of tracing back the presence of the transposon in the source pDNA and master cell bank (MCB). Based on the presence of an uncontrolled contamination with unknown clinical relevance, the product was rejected for clinical use. In order to prevent costly rejection of clinical material, both in-process controls and quality control methods must be sensitive enough to detect such a contamination as early as possible, i.e. preferably during plasmid DNA source generation, MCB production and ultimately during upstream processing. However, as we have shown that contamination early in the process development pipeline (source pDNA, MCB) can be present below limits of detection of generally applied analytical methods, the introduction of "engineered" or transposon-free host cells seems the only 100% effective solution to avoid contamination with movable elements and should be considered when searching for a suitable host cell-vector combination. PMID:23707695

  10. Immune response in mice and swine to DNA vaccines derived from the Pasteurella multocida toxin gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA vaccines were constructed with either a 5’-truncated or full-length, genetically detoxified toxin gene from Pasteurella multocida and two different DNA vaccine vectors, distinguished by the presence or absence of a secretion signal sequence. Optimal PMT-specific antibody responses and spleen cel...

  11. Multivalent Human Papillomavirus L1 DNA Vaccination Utilizing Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kihyuck; Jiang, Rosie; Jagu, Subhashini; Wang, Joshua W.; Wang, Chenguang; Christensen, Neil D.; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Naked DNA vaccines can be manufactured simply and are stable at ambient temperature, but require improved delivery technologies to boost immunogenicity. Here we explore in vivo electroporation for multivalent codon-optimized human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 and L2 DNA vaccination. Methods Balb/c mice were vaccinated three times at two week intervals with a fusion protein comprising L2 residues ∼11−88 of 8 different HPV types (11−88×8) or its DNA expression vector, DNA constructs expressing L1 only or L1+L2 of a single HPV type, or as a mixture of several high-risk HPV types and administered utilizing electroporation, i.m. injection or gene gun. Serum was collected two weeks and 3 months after the last vaccination. Sera from immunized mice were tested for in-vitro neutralization titer, and protective efficacy upon passive transfer to naive mice and vaginal HPV challenge. Heterotypic interactions between L1 proteins of HPV6, HPV16 and HPV18 in 293TT cells were tested by co-precipitation using type-specific monoclonal antibodies. Results Electroporation with L2 multimer DNA did not elicit detectable antibody titer, whereas DNA expressing L1 or L1+L2 induced L1-specific, type-restricted neutralizing antibodies, with titers approaching those induced by Gardasil. Co-expression of L2 neither augmented L1-specific responses nor induced L2-specific antibodies. Delivery of HPV L1 DNA via in vivo electroporation produces a stronger antibody response compared to i.m. injection or i.d. ballistic delivery via gene gun. Reduced neutralizing antibody titers were observed for certain types when vaccinating with a mixture of L1 (or L1+L2) vectors of multiple HPV types, likely resulting from heterotypic L1 interactions observed in co-immunoprecipitation studies. High titers were restored by vaccinating with individual constructs at different sites, or partially recovered by co-expression of L2, such that durable protective antibody titers were achieved for each type

  12. Administration of HPV DNA vaccine via electroporation elicits the strongest CD8+ T cell immune responses compared to intramuscular injection and intradermal gene gun delivery.

    PubMed

    Best, Simon R; Peng, Shiwen; Juang, Chi-Mou; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hannaman, Drew; Saunders, John R; Wu, T-C; Pai, Sara I

    2009-09-01

    DNA vaccines are an attractive approach to eliciting antigen-specific immunity. Intracellular targeting of tumor antigens through its linkage to immunostimulatory molecules such as calreticulin (CRT) can improve antigen processing and presentation through the MHC class I pathway and increase cytotoxic CD8+ T cell production. However, even with these enhancements, the efficacy of such immunotherapeutic strategies is dependent on the identification of an effective route and method of DNA administration. Electroporation and gene gun-mediated particle delivery are leading methods of DNA vaccine delivery that can generate protective and therapeutic levels of immune responses in experimental models. In this study, we perform a head-to-head comparison of three methods of vaccination--conventional intramuscular injection, electroporation-mediated intramuscular delivery, and epidermal gene gun-mediated particle delivery--in the ability to generate antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses as well as anti-tumor immune responses against an HPV-16 E7 expressing tumor cell line using the pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccine. Vaccination via electroporation generated the highest number of E7-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which correlated to improved outcomes in the treatment of growing tumors. In addition, we demonstrate that electroporation results in significantly higher levels of circulating protein compared to gene gun or intramuscular vaccination, which likely enhances calreticulin's role as a local tumor anti-angiogenesis agent. We conclude that electroporation is a promising method for delivery of HPV DNA vaccines and should be considered for DNA vaccine delivery in human clinical trials. PMID:19622402

  13. Construction, purification, and evaluation of multivalent DNA vaccine against Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lu; Liu, Hai-Feng; Lu, Ming-Bo; Long, Quan-Ke; Shi, You-En; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2011-01-01

    DNA vaccine encoding a multivalent antigen is a novel approach of protective immunization. Four Schistosoma japonicum candidate antigen genes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SjGAPDH), 23 kDa transmembrane protein (Sj23), 14 kDa fatty-acid binding protein (SjFABP) and 26 kDa glutathione-S-transferase (Sj26), are recombined into two pieces of fusion genes SjFABP.Sj23 and Sj26.SjGAPDH, respectively. Tetravalent DNA vaccine pVIVO2-SjFABP.Sj23/Sj26.SjGAPDH is constructed by co-expressing these two fusion genes. The super-coiled DNA vaccines for large-scale clinic application were purified by sequential chromatographies including group separation chromatography and affinitive chromatographies. The purified DNA vaccines were evaluated for in vivo and in vitro transfection assay. The immunoprotective properties of the different kinds of constructed DNA vaccines were appraised by pharmacological trials. The pharmacological trials results showed that tetravalent DNA vaccine has higher protective efficiency than other tested DNA vaccines. PMID:20852891

  14. Intranasal DNA Vaccine for Protection against Respiratory Infectious Diseases: The Delivery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingying; Yuen, Pak-Wai; Lam, Jenny Ka-Wing

    2014-01-01

    Intranasal delivery of DNA vaccines has become a popular research area recently. It offers some distinguished advantages over parenteral and other routes of vaccine administration. Nasal mucosa as site of vaccine administration can stimulate respiratory mucosal immunity by interacting with the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Different kinds of DNA vaccines are investigated to provide protection against respiratory infectious diseases including tuberculosis, coronavirus, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) etc. DNA vaccines have several attractive development potential, such as producing cross-protection towards different virus subtypes, enabling the possibility of mass manufacture in a relatively short time and a better safety profile. The biggest obstacle to DNA vaccines is low immunogenicity. One of the approaches to enhance the efficacy of DNA vaccine is to improve DNA delivery efficiency. This review provides insight on the development of intranasal DNA vaccine for respiratory infections, with special attention paid to the strategies to improve the delivery of DNA vaccines using non-viral delivery agents. PMID:25014738

  15. Protective immunity of grass carp immunized with DNA vaccine against Aeromonas hydrophila by using carbon nanotubes as a carrier molecule.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Gong, Yu-Xin; Liu, Guang-Lu; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2016-08-01

    To reduce the economic losses caused by diseases in aquaculture industry, more efficient and economic prophylactic measures should be urgently investigated. In this research, the effects of a novel functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) applied as a delivery vehicle for DNA vaccine administration in juvenile grass carp against Aeromonas hydrophila were studied. Our results showed that SWCNTs loaded with DNA vaccine induced a better protection to juvenile grass carp against A. hydrophila. Moreover, SWCNTs conjugated with DNA vaccine provided significantly protective immunity compared with free DNA vaccine. Thereby, SWCNTs may be considered as a potential efficient DNA vaccine carrier to enhance the immunological activity. PMID:27343373

  16. A combined DNA vaccine provides protective immunity against Mycobacterium bovis and Brucella abortus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xi-Dan; Yu, Da-Hai; Chen, Su-Ting; Li, Shu-Xia; Cai, Hong

    2009-04-01

    We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a combined DNA vaccine containing six genes encoding immunodominant antigens from Mycobacterium bovis and Brucella abortus. The number of lymph node and spleen cultures positive for M. bovis and B. abortus from calves immunized with the combined DNA vaccine was significantly reduced (p < 0.01) compared with unvaccinated calves after challenge with virulent M. bovis and B. abortus 544. The combined DNA vaccine group displayed stronger antigen-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses and antigen-specific IFN-gamma ELISPOT activities 2 months after final immunization and after challenge. Antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in the combined DNA vaccine group were higher than either the Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-positive or S19-positive control group. Likewise, more calves in the DNA vaccine group exhibited antigen-specific IgG titers and had higher IgG titers than those in the BCG- or S19-immunized groups 2 months after the final immunization. Moreover, two antigens in the combined DNA vaccine induced significant antigen-specific IFN-gamma responses 6 months after challenge (p < 0.05). Bacterial counts and pathological analyses of the challenged animals indicated that the combined DNA vaccine provided significantly better protection than the BCG vaccine against M. bovis, and the protection level induced by the combined DNA vaccine was comparable to S19 against B. abortus. This is the first report to demonstrate that a single combined DNA vaccine protects cattle against two infectious diseases. PMID:19364278

  17. Bicistronic DNA Vaccines Simultaneously Encoding HIV, HSV and HPV Antigens Promote CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Vinicius C.; Diniz, Mariana O.; Cariri, Francisco A. M. O.; Ventura, Armando M.; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Almeida, Rafael R.; Campos, Marco A.; Lima, Graciela K.; Ferreira, Luís C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide are currently infected with human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). For this enormous contingent of people, the search for preventive and therapeutic immunological approaches represents a hope for the eradication of latent infection and/or virus-associated cancer. To date, attempts to develop vaccines against these viruses have been mainly based on a monovalent concept, in which one or more antigens of a virus are incorporated into a vaccine formulation. In the present report, we designed and tested an immunization strategy based on DNA vaccines that simultaneously encode antigens for HIV, HSV and HPV. With this purpose in mind, we tested two bicistronic DNA vaccines (pIRES I and pIRES II) that encode the HPV-16 oncoprotein E7 and the HIV protein p24 both genetically fused to the HSV-1 gD envelope protein. Mice i.m. immunized with the DNA vaccines mounted antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, including in vivo cytotoxic responses, against the three antigens. Under experimental conditions, the vaccines conferred protective immunity against challenges with a vaccinia virus expressing the HIV-derived protein Gag, an HSV-1 virus strain and implantation of tumor cells expressing the HPV-16 oncoproteins. Altogether, our results show that the concept of a trivalent HIV, HSV, and HPV vaccine capable to induce CD8+ T cell-dependent responses is feasible and may aid in the development of preventive and/or therapeutic approaches for the control of diseases associated with these viruses. PMID:23951135

  18. Infectious bursal disease DNA vaccination conferring protection by delayed appearance and rapid clearance of invading viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Yi; Hsieh, Ming Kun; Tung, Chun-Yu; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2011-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the kinetics of viral load and immune response in protection against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) by DNA vaccination. Chickens were DNA-vaccinated and challenged with IBDV one week after the third vaccination. Tissues were collected at 12 hours postinfection (HPI), 1 day postinfection (DPI), 3, 5, 7 and 10 DPI. The vaccinated chickens had less viral RNA, with delayed appearance and shorter duration in the bursa of Fabricius, spleen, and cecal tonsil than the challenged control chickens. Their ELISA and neutralizing antibody titers were decreased at 12 HPI and significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those in the challenged control chickens at later time points. Their spleen IFNγ expression was up-regulated compared to that in the DNA-vaccinated chickens without IBDV challenge. These results indicate that DNA vaccination confers protection against IBDV challenge by delayed appearance and rapid clearance of the invading viruses. PMID:21984266

  19. Prospects for developing an effective particle-mediated DNA vaccine against influenza.

    PubMed

    Yager, Eric J; Dean, Hansi J; Fuller, Deborah Heydenburg

    2009-09-01

    Vaccine strategies capable of conferring broad protection against both seasonal and pandemic strains of influenza are urgently needed. DNA vaccines are an attractive choice owing to their capacity to induce robust humoral and cellular immune responses at low doses and because they can be developed and manufactured rapidly to more effectively meet the threat of an influenza epidemic or pandemic. Particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED), or the gene gun, is a DNA vaccine delivery technology shown to induce protective levels of antibody and T-cell responses in animals and humans against a wide variety of diseases, including influenza. This review focuses on current advances toward the development of an effective PMED DNA vaccine against influenza, including strategies to enhance vaccine immunogenicity, the potential for PMED-based DNA vaccines to improve protection in the vulnerable elderly population, and the prospects for a vaccine capable of providing cross-protection against both seasonal and pandemic strains of influenza. PMID:19722894

  20. Co-administration of interleukins 7 and 15 with DNA vaccine improves protective immunity against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Li, Zhong-Yuan; Petersen, Eskild; Liu, Wen-Ge; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligatory intracellular parasite, which can infect all warm-blooded animals including humans. Cytokines, including IL-15 and IL-7, play a critical role in the regulation of the homeostasis of naive and memory T cells. Co-administration the DNA vaccine with cytokines may improve its efficacy. IL-7 and IL-15 from splenic tissues of Kunming mice were cloned, and eukaryotic plasmid pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 was constructed. Kunming mice were administrated with DNA vaccine expressing T. gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (TgCDPK1), pVAX-CDPK1, in the presence or absence of IL-7 and IL-15 plasmids (pVAX-IL-7-IL-15), immune responses were analyzed including lymphoproliferative assay, cytokine and serum antibody measurements, flow cytometric surface markers on lymphocytes, and thus protective immunity against acute and chronic T. gondii infection was estimated. Mice injected with pVAX-CDPK1 supplemented with pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 showed higher Toxoplasma-specific IgG2a titers, Th1 responses associated with the production of IFN-γ, IL-2 as well as cell-mediated cytotoxic activity where stronger frequencies of IFN-γ secreting CD8+ and CD4+ T cells (CD8+/CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cells) compared to controls. Co-administration of pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 and pVAX-CDPK1 significantly (P < 0.05) increased survival time (18.07 ± 5.43 days) compared with pVAX-CDPK1 (14.13 ± 3.85 days) or pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 (11.73 ± 1.83 days) alone, and pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 + pVAX-CDPK1 significantly reduced the number of brain cysts (73.5%) in contrast to pVAX-CDPK1 (46.0%) or pVAX-IL-7-IL-15 alone (45.0%). Our results indicate that supplementation of DNA vaccine with IL-7 and IL-15 would facilitate specific humoral and cellular immune responses elicited by DNA vaccine against acute and chronic T. gondii infection in mice. PMID:26706605

  1. DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis: a promising approach for prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Samant, M

    2016-05-01

    The visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani parasite severely affects large populations in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The arsenal of drugs available is limited, and resistance is common in clinical field isolates. Therefore, vaccines could be an important alternative for prevention against VL. Recently, some investigators advocated the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines, which induces the T cell-based immunity against VL. The vaccine antigens are selected as conserved in various Leishmania species and provide a viable strategy for DNA vaccine development. Our understanding for DNA vaccine development against VL is not enough and much technological advancement is required. Improved formulations and methods of delivery are required, which increase the uptake of DNA vaccine by cells; optimization of vaccine vectors/encoded antigens to augment and direct the host immune response in VL. Despite the many genes identified as vaccine candidates, the disappointing potency of the DNA vaccines in VL underscores the challenges encountered in the efforts to translate efficacy in preclinical models into clinical realities. This review will provide a brief background of DNA vaccines including the insights gained about the design, strategy, safety issues, varied candidates, progress and challenges that play a role in their ability against VL. PMID:27009772

  2. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satparkash; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Cheema, Pawanjit Singh; Sandey, Maninder; Ranjan, Rajeev; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2011-04-01

    Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS), an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA) has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS. PMID:24031690

  3. Rabies DNA vaccine in the horse: strategies to improve serological responses.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Laurent; Minke, Jules; Dufay, Nathalie; Baudu, Philippe; Audonnet, Jean Christophe

    2003-11-01

    In order for DNA vaccines to become a practical alternative to conventional vaccines their ability to induce antibody responses in large mammals needs to be improved. We used DNA vaccination against rabies in the horse as a model to test the potential of two different strategies to enhance antibody responses in a large mammalian species. The administration of the DNA vaccine in the presence of aluminum phosphate improved both the onset and the intensity of serological responses but was not potent enough to achieve seroconversion in all vaccinated ponies. However, when the DNA vaccine was formulated with the cationic lipid DMRIE-DOPE instead of aluminum phosphate, a very strong impact on both onset and intensity of serological responses was observed. This latter strategy ensured excellent seroconversion in all vaccinated ponies after a primary course of two injections, demonstrating a clear improvement of the homogeneity of the induced responses. These data indicate that rabies DNA vaccination is feasible in horses and further suggests that properly formulated DNA vaccines can generate immune responses in large veterinary species at a level comparable to the responses achieved with conventional vaccines. PMID:14575772

  4. Electroporation delivery of DNA vaccines: prospects for success.

    PubMed

    Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B

    2011-06-01

    A number of noteworthy technology advances in DNA vaccines research and development over the past few years have led to the resurgence of this field as a viable vaccine modality. Notably, these include--optimization of DNA constructs; development of new DNA manufacturing processes and formulations; augmentation of immune responses with novel encoded molecular adjuvants; and the improvement in new in vivo delivery strategies including electroporation (EP). Of these, EP mediated delivery has generated considerable enthusiasm and appears to have had a great impact in vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy by increasing antigen delivery upto a 1000 fold over naked DNA delivery alone. This increased delivery has resulted in an improved in vivo immune response magnitude as well as response rates relative to DNA delivery by direct injection alone. Indeed the immune responses and protection from pathogen challenge observed following DNA administration via EP in many cases are comparable or superior to other well studied vaccine platforms including viral vectors and live/attenuated/inactivated virus vaccines. Significantly, the early promise of EP delivery shown in numerous pre-clinical animal models of many different infectious diseases and cancer are now translating into equally enhanced immune responses in human clinical trials making the prospects for this vaccine approach to impact diverse disease targets tangible. PMID:21530212

  5. Protocols for Developing Novel Chikungunya Virus DNA Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chung, Christopher; Ugen, Kenneth E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Muthumani, Kar

    2016-01-01

    To date, there have been several million infections by the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-transmitted emerging pathogen that is considered to be taxonomically an Old World RNA virus. Although original CHIKV outbreaks were restricted to India, East Asian countries, Northern Italy, and France, a recent sharp rise had been identified in 41 countries or territories in the Caribbean, Central America, South America, and North America. A total of 1,012,347 suspected and 22,579 laboratory-confirmed CHIKV cases have been reported from these areas, which signals an increasing risk to the US mainland. Unlike past epidemics that were usually associated with Ae. aegypti transmission, the Caribbean outbreak was associated with Ae. albopictus transmission as the principal mosquito vector. In addition, the substantial increase in the number of deaths during this epidemic, as well as incidence of neurologic disease, suggests that CHIKV may have become more virulent. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or therapeutics available for CHIKV or its associated disease pathologies. Therefore, development of new vaccines and therapies that could confer immunity and/or treat clinical symptoms of CHIKV is greatly desired. This chapter describes the use of entirely cutting edge technologies/methodologies developed by our group for the development and evaluation of novel DNA vaccines against CHIKV. PMID:27233283

  6. Immunogenicity of varicella zoster virus glycoprotein E DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    BAO, LIDAO; WEI, GUOMIN; GAN, HONGMEI; REN, XIANHUA; MA, RUILIAN; WANG, YI; LV, HAIJUN

    2016-01-01

    In the present study a eukaryotic expression vector of varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein E (gE) was constructed and enabled to express in COS7 cells. Furthermore, a specific immune response against the VZV gE eukaryotic expression plasmid was induced in BALB/c mice. The VZV gE gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector, pcDNA3.1. The recombinant vector was subsequently transfected into COS7 cells using a liposome transfection reagent. The recombinant protein was instantaneously expressed by the transfected cells, as detected by immunohistochemistry, and the recombinant pcDNA-VZV gE plasmid was subsequently used to immunize mice. Tissue expression levels were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. In addition, the levels of serum antibodies and spleen lymphocyte proliferation activity were investigated. The amplified target gene included the full-length gE gene (~2.7 kb), and the recombinant expression vector induced gE expression in COS7 cells. In addition, the expression plasmid induced sustained expression in vivo following immunization of mice. Furthermore, the plasmid was capable of inducing specific antibody production and effectively stimulating T cell proliferation. Effective humoral and cellular immunity was triggered in the mice immunized with the VZV gE eukaryotic expression vector. The results of the present study laid the foundation for future research into a VZV DNA vaccine. PMID:27168804

  7. DNA Vaccination: Using the Patient's Immune System to Overcome Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eschenburg, Georg; Stermann, Alexander; Preissner, Robert; Meyer, Hellmuth-Alexander; Lode, Holger N.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of today. Optimization of standard treatment protocols consisting of the main columns of chemo- and radiotherapy followed or preceded by surgical intervention is often limited by toxic side effects and induction of concomitant malignancies and/or development of resistant mechanisms. This requires the development of therapeutic strategies which are as effective as standard therapies but permit the patients a life without severe negative side effects. Along this line, the development of immunotherapy in general and the innovative concept of DNA vaccination in particular may provide a venue to achieve this goal. Using the patient's own immune system by activation of humoral and cellular immune responses to target the cancer cells has shown first promising results in clinical trials and may allow reduced toxicity standard therapy regimen in the future. The main challenge of this concept is to transfer the plethora of convincing preclinical and early clinical results to an effective treatment of patients. PMID:21197271

  8. Efficacy of a glycoprotein DNA vaccine against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) in Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii Valenciennes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, L.M.; Lorenzen, Niels; LaPatra, S.E.; Grady, C.A.; Roon, S.E.; O’Reilly, J.; Gregg, J.L.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and its associated disease state, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS), is hypothesized to be a proximate factor accounting for the decline and failed recovery of Pacific herring populations in Prince William Sound, AK (Marty et al. 1998, 2003, 2010). Survivors of laboratory-induced VHSV epizootics develop resistance to subsequent viral exposure (Kocan et al. 2001; Hershberger et al. 2007, 2010), which is likely the result of immune system recognition of the viral glycoprotein (G) (Lecocq-Xhonneux et al. 1994), a surface antigen that contains neutralizing epitopes (Lorenzen, Olesen & Jorgensen 1990; Jørgensen et al. 1995) and cell attachment domains (Lecocq-Xhonneux et al. 1994; Estepa & Coll 1996). These properties have proven useful in the development of G-gene-based DNA vaccines for VHSV and a related rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) (Anderson et al. 1996; Heppell et al. 1998; Corbeil et al. 1999; Einer-Jensen et al. 2009). Rainbow trout fingerlings, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), vaccinated with 1 µg of either the VHS or IHN vaccine are protected from VHS when exposed to virus as early as 4 days (44 degree days) post-vaccination (p.v.) (Lorenzen et al. 2002). At later time points (80 days p.v.; 880 degree days), the level of cross-protection against VHS by IHN vaccination is either completely lost (60 days p.v.; 660 degree days) (3 g rainbow trout; 1 µg vaccine dose) (Lorenzen et al. 2002) or present at intermediate levels (6.5 g rainbow trout; 1 µg vaccine dose) (Einer-Jensen et al. 2009). Comparatively, VHS vaccination remains effective as long as 9 months (2520 degree days) p.v. (100 g rainbow trout; 0.5 µg vaccine dose) (McLauchlan et al. 2003). These results suggest that IHN and VHS vaccination activate a rapid transitory innate immune response against VHSV that is followed by long-term adaptive immunity in VHS-vaccinated trout (Lorenzen et al. 2002).

  9. Construction of Eimeria tenella multi-epitope DNA vaccines and their protective efficacies against experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Huang, Xinmei; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-08-15

    The search for effective vaccines against chicken coccidiosis remains a challenge because of the complex organisms with multiple life cycle stages of Eimeria. Combination of T-cell epitopes from different stages of Eimeria life cycle could be an optimal strategy to overcome the antigen complexity of the parasite. In this study, 4 fragments with concentrated T-cell epitopes from the sporozoite antigen SO7 and the merozoite antigen MZ5-7 of Eimeria tenella were cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 in different forms, with or without chicken cytokines IL-2 or IFN-γ genes as genetic adjuvants, to construct multistage, multi-epitope DNA vaccines against Eimeria tenella. Transcription and expression of the multi-epitope DNA vaccines in vivo were detected by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot. On the basis of survival rate, lesion score, body weight gain, oocyst decrease ratio and the anti-coccidial index (ACI), Animal experiments were carried out to evaluate the protective efficacy against Eimeria tenella. Results showed the constructed DNA vaccines were transcribed and translated successfully in vivo. Animal experiment showed that the multi-epitopes DNA vaccines were more effective to stimulate immune response than single fragment. Compared with the DNA vaccines composed with less T-cell epitopes, DNA vaccine pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2 containing 4 fragments with concentrated T-epitopes provided the highest ACI of 180.39. DNA vaccines composed of antigens from two developmental stages were more effective than the single-stage ones. Especially DNA vaccine pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2 provided the most effective protection with the ACI of 180.39. Furthermore, cytokines IL-2 or IFN-γ could improve the efficacy of the multi-epitope DNA vaccines significantly. Overall, pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2-IFN-γ provided the most effective protection with the ACI of 189.92. The multi-epitope DNA vaccines revealed in this study provide new candidates for Eimeria vaccine development

  10. Optimization of electroporation-enhanced intradermal delivery of DNA vaccine using a minimally invasive surface device.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Yang, Maria; Armendi, Philip; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P; Bello, Alexander; Khan, Amir S; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2012-06-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) is an efficient nonviral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity in animals and humans. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines is an attractive strategy because of the immunocompetence of skin tissue. We have previously reported a minimally invasive surface intradermal EP (SEP) device for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines. Robust antibody responses were induced after vaccine delivery via surface EP in several tested animal models. Here we further investigated the optimal EP parameters for efficient delivery of DNA vaccines, with a specific emphasis on eliciting cellular immunity in addition to robust humoral responses. In a mouse model, using applied voltages of 10-100 V, transgene expression of green fluorescent protein and luciferase reporter genes increased significantly when voltages as low as 10 V were used as compared with DNA injection only. Tissue damage to skin was undetectable when voltages of 20 V and less were applied. However, inflammation and bruising became apparent at voltages above 40 V. Delivery of DNA vaccines encoding influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin (H5HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 at applied voltages of 10-100 V elicited robust and sustained antibody responses. In addition, low-voltage (less than 20 V) EP elicited higher and more sustained cellular immune responses when compared with the higher voltage (above 20 V) EP groups after two immunizations. The data confirm that low-voltage EP, using the SEP device, is capable of efficient delivery of DNA vaccines into the skin, and establishes that these parameters are sufficient to elicit both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. The SEP device, functioning within these parameters, may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV infection, malaria, and tuberculosis that require both cellular and humoral immune

  11. Optimization of Electroporation-Enhanced Intradermal Delivery of DNA Vaccine Using a Minimally Invasive Surface Device

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M.; Yang, Maria; Armendi, Philip; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P.; Bello, Alexander; Khan, Amir S.; Broderick, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In vivo electroporation (EP) is an efficient nonviral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity in animals and humans. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines is an attractive strategy because of the immunocompetence of skin tissue. We have previously reported a minimally invasive surface intradermal EP (SEP) device for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines. Robust antibody responses were induced after vaccine delivery via surface EP in several tested animal models. Here we further investigated the optimal EP parameters for efficient delivery of DNA vaccines, with a specific emphasis on eliciting cellular immunity in addition to robust humoral responses. In a mouse model, using applied voltages of 10–100 V, transgene expression of green fluorescent protein and luciferase reporter genes increased significantly when voltages as low as 10 V were used as compared with DNA injection only. Tissue damage to skin was undetectable when voltages of 20 V and less were applied. However, inflammation and bruising became apparent at voltages above 40 V. Delivery of DNA vaccines encoding influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin (H5HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 at applied voltages of 10–100 V elicited robust and sustained antibody responses. In addition, low-voltage (less than 20 V) EP elicited higher and more sustained cellular immune responses when compared with the higher voltage (above 20 V) EP groups after two immunizations. The data confirm that low-voltage EP, using the SEP device, is capable of efficient delivery of DNA vaccines into the skin, and establishes that these parameters are sufficient to elicit both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. The SEP device, functioning within these parameters, may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV infection, malaria, and tuberculosis that require both cellular

  12. Fish Rhabdovirus Cell Entry Is Mediated by Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Bearzotti, Monique; Delmas, Bernard; Lamoureux, Annie; Loustau, Anne-Marie; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bremont, Michel

    1999-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated against rainbow trout gonad cells (RTG-2) have been selected for their ability to protect cells from the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infection, a salmonid rhabdovirus. Protection from infection was restricted to the salmonid-derived cell lines indicating species specificity of the blocking MAbs. Surprisingly, the blocking activity of these MAbs was also effective against other nonantigenically related fish rhabdoviruses. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy observations demonstrated that the three MAbs were all directed against an abundant cell plasma membrane component, and immunoprecipitation studies indicated that the target consisted of a heterodimeric complex with molecular masses of 200 and 44 kDa. Biochemical data provided the following evidence that fibronectin is part of this complex and that it could represent the main receptor for fish rhabdoviruses. (i) An antiserum generated against the 200-kDa protein reacted against the recombinant rainbow trout fibronectin expressed in Escherichia coli. (ii) The purified rainbow trout fibronectin was able to bind specifically to VHSV. To our knowledge, this is the first identification of a cellular component acting as a primary receptor for a virus replicating in lower vertebrates and, more interestingly, for viruses belonging to the Rhabdoviridae family. PMID:10438860

  13. First isolation of hirame rhabdovirus from freshwater fish in Europe.

    PubMed

    Borzym, E; Matras, M; Maj-Paluch, J; Baud, M; De Boisséson, C; Talbi, C; Olesen, N J; Bigarré, L

    2014-05-01

    A rhabdovirus was isolated in cell culture inoculated with tissue material from diseased grayling, Thymallus thymallus (L.), originating from a fish farm affected by a mortality episode in Poland. Diagnostics tests showed that the virus was not related to novirhabdoviruses known in Europe, nor to vesiculovirus-like species, except perch rhabdovirus (PRhV) with which it shared moderate serological relations. However, RT-PCR with PRhV probes gave negative results. To identify the virus, a random-priming sequence-independent single primer amplification was adopted. Surprisingly, two of the obtained sequences exhibited a high identity (>99%) with hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV), a novirhabdovirus usually found in fish in marine Asiatic countries, for instance Japan, China and Korea. The full-length sequence of the phosphoprotein gene (P) demonstrated a higher identity of the present isolate with HIRRV from China compared with the Korean isolate. An identical viral sequence was also found in brown trout, Salmo trutta trutta L., affected by mortalities in a second farm in the same region, after a likely contamination from the grayling farm. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HIRRV in Europe, and in two hosts from fresh water that have not been described before as susceptible species. PMID:23962315

  14. Specificity of DNA vaccines against the U and M genogroups of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penaranda, M.M.D.; LaPatra, S.E.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a fish rhabdovirus that causes significant mortality in salmonid species. In North America IHNV has three major genogroups designated U, M, and L. Host-specificity of the M and U genogroups of IHNV has been established both in the field and in experimental challenges, with M isolates being more prevalent and more virulent in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and U isolates being more prevalent and highly virulent in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). In this study, efficacy of DNA vaccines containing either M (pM) or U (pU) virus glycoprotein genes was investigated during intra- and cross-genogroup challenges in rainbow trout. In virus challenges at 7 days post-vaccination (early antiviral response), both pM and pU were highly protective against either M or U IHNV. In challenges at 28 days post-vaccination (specific antiviral response), both pM and pU were protective against M IHNV but the homologous pM vaccine was significantly more protective than pU in one of two experiments. At this stage both pM and pU induced comparably high protection against U IHNV challenge. Correlates of protection were also investigated by assessing the expression of the interferon-stimulated gene Mx-1 and the production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) following pM or pU DNA vaccination. Mx-1 gene expression, measured at 4 and 7 days post-vaccination as an indicator of the host innate immune response, was found to be significantly higher after pM than pU vaccination in some cases. Neutralizing antibody was produced in response to the two vaccines, but antibody titers did not show consistent correlation with protection. The results show that the rainbow trout innate and adaptive immune responses have some ability to distinguish between the U and M genogroup IHNV, but overall the pM and pU vaccines were protective against both homologous and cross-genogroup challenges.

  15. Enhancement of HCV polytope DNA vaccine efficacy by fusion to an N-terminal fragment of heat shock protein gp96.

    PubMed

    Pishraft-Sabet, Leila; Kosinska, Anna D; Rafati, Sima; Bolhassani, Azam; Taheri, Tahereh; Memarnejadian, Arash; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Roggendorf, Michael; Samimi-Rad, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    Induction of a strong hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immune response plays a key role in control and clearance of the virus. A polytope (PT) DNA vaccine containing B- and T-cell epitopes could be a promising vaccination strategy against HCV, but its efficacy needs to be improved. The N-terminal domain of heat shock protein gp96 (NT(gp96)) has been shown to be a potent adjuvant for enhancing immunity. We constructed a PT DNA vaccine encoding four HCV immunodominant cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes (two HLA-A2- and two H2-D(d)-specific motifs) from the Core, E2, NS3 and NS5B antigens in addition to a T-helper CD4+ epitope from NS3 and a B-cell epitope from E2. The NT(gp96) was fused to the C- or N-terminal end of the PT DNA (PT-NT(gp96) or NT(gp96)-PT), and their potency was compared. Cellular and humoral immune responses against the expressed peptides were evaluated in CB6F1 mice. Our results showed that immunization of mice with PT DNA vaccine fused to NT(gp96) induced significantly stronger T-cell and antibody responses than PT DNA alone. Furthermore, the adjuvant activity of NT(gp96) was more efficient in the induction of immune responses when fused to the C-terminal end of the HCV DNA polytope. In conclusion, the NT(gp96) improved the efficacy of the DNA vaccine, and this immunomodulatory effect was dependent on the position of the fusion. PMID:25348271

  16. Cellular and Molecular Interactions of Rhabdoviruses with their Insect and Plant Hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rhabdoviruses form a large family (Rhabdoviridae) whose host ranges include humans, other vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. There are about 75 plant-infecting rhabdoviruses described, several of which are economically important pathogens that are persistently transmitted to their plant ho...

  17. Immune response induced by candidate Sarcoptes scabiei var. cuniculi DNA vaccine encoding paramyosin in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaobin; Xie, Yue; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Lai, Songjia; Yang, Guangyou

    2014-07-01

    Sarcoptes scabiei is the causal agent of the highly contagious disease sarcoptic mange (scabies) that affects animals and humans worldwide. An increasing number of cases of treatment failure is being reported because of drug resistance. The development of a specific vaccine would be a sustainable option for control of this disease. In this study, we cloned and expressed a S. scabiei gene encoding paramyosin (PAR) and investigated the immune response elicited by DNA encoding PAR in mice. The ability of the DNA vaccine to express antigen in COS-7 cells was confirmed by RT-PCR and IFA. The immune response induced by DNA vaccine was investigated by ELISA, splenocyte proliferation assay, and cytokine production assay. Compared to the pVAX1 control group, the PAR DNA vaccination group showed the higher levels of IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgE, IgM, stronger lymphocyte proliferation in mouse spleen, and larger production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ in the supernatant of cultures from splenocytes. These results indicated that the PAR DNA vaccine induced a mixed Th1/Th2 response in mice. In conclusion, our results revealed that the S. scabiei PAR DNA vaccine induced both a humoral and cellular immune response, which would provide basic data for the further study to develop an effective vaccine against sarcoptic mange. PMID:24729069

  18. Polyplex-releasing microneedles for enhanced cutaneous delivery of DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Won; Lee, Min Sang; Kim, Kyu Ri; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Kyuri; Park, Jong Sung; Matsumoto, Yoh; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Lee, Haeshin; Lee, Doo Sung; Jeong, Ji Hoon

    2014-04-10

    Microneedle (MN)-based DNA vaccines have many advantages over conventional vaccines administered by hypodermic needles. However, an efficient strategy for delivering DNA vaccines to intradermal cells has not yet been established. Here, we report a new approach for delivering polyplex-based DNA vaccines using MN arrays coated with a pH-responsive polyelectrolyte multilayer assembly (PMA). This approach enabled rapid release of polyplex upon application to the skin. In addition to the polyplex-releasing MNs, we attempted to further maximize the vaccination by developing a polymeric carrier that targeted resident antigen presenting cells (APCs) rich in the intradermal area, as well as a DNA vaccine encoding a secretable fusion protein containing amyloid beta monomer (Aβ1-42), an antigenic determinant. The resulting vaccination system was able to successfully induce a robust humoral immune response compared to conventional subcutaneous injection with hypodermal needles. In addition, antigen challenge after immunization elicited an immediate and strong recall immune response due to immunogenic memory. These results suggest the potential utility of MN-based polyplex delivery systems for enhanced DNA vaccination. PMID:24462900

  19. Increased immunogenicity of avian influenza DNA vaccine delivered to the skin using a microneedle patch

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Song, Jae-Min; Lipatov, Aleksandr S.; Choi, Seong-O; Lee, Jeong Woo; Donis, Ruben O.; Compans, Richard W.; Kang, Sang-Moo; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Effective public health responses to an influenza pandemic require an effective vaccine that can be manufactured and administered to large populations in the shortest possible time. In this study, we evaluated a method for vaccination against avian influenza virus that uses a DNA vaccine for rapid manufacturing and delivered by a microneedle skin patch for simplified administration and increased immunogenicity. We prepared patches containing 700 µm-long microneedles coated with an avian H5 influenza hemagglutinin DNA vaccine from A/Viet Nam/1203/04 influenza virus. The coating DNA dose increased with DNA concentration in the coating solution and the number of dip coating cycles. Coated DNA was released into the skin tissue by dissolution within minutes. Vaccination of mice using microneedles induced higher levels of antibody responses and hemagglutination inhibition titers, and improved protection against lethal infection with avian influenza as compared to conventional intramuscular delivery of the same dose of the DNA vaccine. Additional analysis showed that the microneedle coating solution containing carboxymethylcellulose and a surfactant may have negatively affected the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine. Overall, this study shows that DNA vaccine delivery by microneedles can be a promising approach for improved vaccination to mitigate an influenza pandemic. PMID:22504442

  20. Comprehensive gene expression profiling following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Nichols, Krista M.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler, Paul; Hansen, John D.; Herwig, Russell P.; Park, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine based on the glycoprotein gene of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus induces a non-specific anti-viral immune response and long-term specific immunity against IHNV. This study characterized gene expression responses associated with the early anti-viral response. Homozygous rainbow trout were injected intra-muscularly (I.M.) with vector DNA or the IHNV DNA vaccine. Gene expression in muscle tissue (I.M. site) was evaluated using a 16,008 feature salmon cDNA microarray. Eighty different genes were significantly modulated in the vector DNA group while 910 genes were modulated in the IHNV DNA vaccinate group relative to control group. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to examine expression of selected immune genes at the I.M. site and in other secondary tissues. In the localized response (I.M. site), the magnitudes of gene expression changes were much greater in the vaccinate group relative to the vector DNA group for the majority of genes analyzed. At secondary systemic sites (e.g. gill, kidney and spleen), type I IFN-related genes were up-regulated in only the IHNV DNA vaccinated group. The results presented here suggest that the IHNV DNA vaccine induces up-regulation of the type I IFN system across multiple tissues, which is the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity.

  1. Ag85A DNA Vaccine Delivery by Nanoparticles: Influence of the Formulation Characteristics on Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Poecheim, Johanna; Barnier-Quer, Christophe; Collin, Nicolas; Borchard, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    The influence of DNA vaccine formulations on immune responses in combination with adjuvants was investigated with the aim to increase cell-mediated immunity against plasmid DNA (pDNA) encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85A. Different ratios of pDNA with cationic trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles were characterized for their morphology and physicochemical characteristics (size, zeta potential, loading efficiency and pDNA release profile) applied in vitro for cellular uptake studies and in vivo, to determine the dose-dependent effects of pDNA on immune responses. A selected pDNA/TMC nanoparticle formulation was optimized by the incorporation of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) as an immunostimulatory agent. Cellular uptake investigations in vitro showed saturation to a maximum level upon the increase in the pDNA/TMC nanoparticle ratio, correlating with increasing Th1-related antibody responses up to a definite pDNA dose applied. Moreover, TMC nanoparticles induced clear polarization towards a Th1 response, indicated by IgG2c/IgG1 ratios above unity and enhanced numbers of antigen-specific IFN-γ producing T-cells in the spleen. Remarkably, the incorporation of MDP in TMC nanoparticles provoked a significant additional increase in T-cell-mediated responses induced by pDNA. In conclusion, pDNA-loaded TMC nanoparticles are capable of provoking strong Th1-type cellular and humoral immune responses, with the potential to be further optimized by the incorporation of MDP. PMID:27626449

  2. Molecularly engineered poly(ortho ester) microspheres for enhanced delivery of DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun; Ge, Qing; Ting, David; Nguyen, David; Shen, Hui-Rong; Chen, Jianzhu; Eisen, Herman N.; Heller, Jorge; Langer, Robert; Putnam, David

    2004-03-01

    Genetic vaccination using plasmid DNA presents a unique opportunity for achieving potent immune responses without the potential limitations of many conventional vaccines. Here we report the design of synthetic biodegradable polymers specifically for enhancing DNA vaccine efficacy in vivo. We molecularly engineered poly(ortho ester) microspheres that are non-toxic to cells, protect DNA from degradation, enable uptake by antigen-presenting cells, and release DNA rapidly in response to phagosomal pH. One type of microsphere of poly(ortho esters) that releases DNA vaccines in synchrony with the natural development of adaptive immunity, elicited distinct primary and secondary humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and suppressed the growth of tumour cells bearing a model antigen. This polymer microparticulate system could, with further study, have implications for advancing the clinical utility of DNA vaccines as well as other nucleic-acid-based therapeutics against viral infections and cancer.

  3. Encoded novel forms of HSP70 or a cytolytic protein increase DNA vaccine potency

    PubMed Central

    Garrod, Tamsin; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Yu, Stanley; Gargett, Tessa; Gowans, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    In humans, DNA vaccines have failed to demonstrate the equivalent levels of immunogenicity that were shown in smaller animals. Previous studies have encoded adjuvants, predominantly cytokines, within these vaccines in an attempt to increase antigen-specific immune responses. However, these strategies have lacked breadth of innate immune activation and have led to disappointing results in clinical trials. Damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) have been identified as pattern recognition receptor (PRR) agonists. DAMPs can bind to a wide range of PRRs on dendritic cells (DCs) and thus our studies have aimed to utilize this characteristic to act as an adjuvant in a DNA vaccine approach. Specifically, HSP70 has been identified as a DAMP, but has been limited by its lack of accessibility to PRRs in and on DCs. Here, we discuss the promising results achieved with the inclusion of membrane-bound or secreted HSP70 into a DNA vaccine encoding HIV gag as the model immunogen. PMID:25483501

  4. Turning self-destructing Salmonella into a universal DNA vaccine delivery platform

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wei; Brovold, Matthew; Koeneman, Brian A.; Clark-Curtiss, Josephine; Curtiss, Roy

    2012-01-01

    We previously developed a biological containment system using recombinant Salmonella Typhimurium strains that are attenuated yet capable of synthesizing protective antigens. The regulated delayed attenuation and programmed self-destructing features designed into these S. Typhimurium strains enable them to efficiently colonize host tissues and allow release of the bacterial cell contents after lysis. To turn such a recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV) strain into a universal DNA vaccine-delivery vehicle, our approach was to genetically modify RASV strains to display a hyperinvasive phenotype to maximize Salmonella host entry and host cell internalization, to enable Salmonella endosomal escape to release a DNA vaccine into the cytosol, and to decrease Salmonella-induced pyroptosis/apoptosis that allows the DNA vaccine time to traffic to the nucleus for efficient synthesis of encoded protective antigens. A DNA vaccine vector that encodes a domain that contributes to the arabinose-regulated lysis phenotype but has a eukaryotic promoter was constructed. The vector was then improved by insertion of multiple DNA nuclear-targeting sequences for efficient nuclear trafficking and gene expression, and by increasing nuclease resistance to protect the plasmid from host degradation. A DNA vaccine encoding influenza WSN virus HA antigen delivered by the RASV strain with the best genetic attributes induced complete protection to mice against a lethal influenza virus challenge. Adoption of these technological improvements will revolutionize means for effective delivery of DNA vaccines to stimulate mucosal, systemic, and cellular protective immunities, and lead to a paradigm shift in cost-effective control and prevention of a diversity of diseases. PMID:23129620

  5. Taking electroporation-based delivery of DNA vaccination into humans: a generic clinical protocol.

    PubMed

    Tjelle, Torunn Elisabeth; Rabussay, Dietmar; Ottensmeier, Christian; Mathiesen, Iacob; Kjeken, Rune

    2008-01-01

    We are presently aware of two early-phase DNA vaccine clinical trials in humans using electroporation-enhanced vaccine delivery. Moreover, two phase I immunogenetherapy studies are in progress and several tolerability studies have been performed on healthy volunteers. We have used knowledge from these studies to compose a template for clinical protocols involving electroporation-mediated gene delivery. In this template the emphasis will be on aspects related to electroporation. In addition, we will discuss general topics concerning electroporation-augmented DNA vaccination in human subjects. PMID:18370225

  6. Clinical development of intramuscular electroporation: providing a "boost" for DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amir S; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines has helped to eradicate or control the spread of numerous infectious diseases. However, there are many more diseases that have proved more difficult to eliminate using conventional vaccines. The recent innovation of DNA vaccines may provide a "boost" to the development efforts. While the early efforts of DNA vaccines in the clinic were disappointing, the use of in vivo electroporation has helped to provide some basis for optimism. Now, there are several ongoing clinical studies of vaccines against such diseases as malaria, HIV, hepatitis C, and even various types of cancer. This review will highlight three recently published clinical studies using intramuscular DNA administration with electroporation. PMID:24510832

  7. The Murine Intravaginal HSV-2 Challenge Model for Investigation of DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Marshak, Joshua O.; Dong, Lichun; Koelle, David M.

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines have been licensed in veterinary medicine and have promise for humans. This format is relatively immunogenic in mice and guinea pigs, the two principle HSV-2 animal models, permitting rapid assessment of vectors, antigens, adjuvants, and delivery systems. Limitations include the relatively poor immunogenicity of naked DNA in humans and the profound differences in HSV-2 pathogenesis between host species. Herein, we detail lessons learned over the last few years investigating candidate DNA vaccines in the progesterone-primed female mouse vaginal model of HSV-2 infection as a guide to investigators in the field. PMID:24671693

  8. Immune-Enhancing Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana Pollen Polysaccharides on DNA Vaccine Expressing Bordetella avium ompA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fujie; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Zhenhong; Yu, Cuilian; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Li, Bing; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the causative agent of bordetellosis, which remains to be the cause of severe losses in the turkey industry. Given the lack of vaccines that can provide good protection, developing a novel vaccine against B. avium infection is crucial. In this study, we constructed a eukaryotic expression plasmid, which expressed the outer membrane protein A (ompA) of B. avium, to prepare a B. avium recombinant ompA-DNA vaccine. Three concentrations (low, middle, and high) of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS), a known immunomodulator, were used as adjuvants, and their immune conditioning effects on the developed DNA vaccine were examined. The pure ompA-DNA vaccine, Freund's incomplete adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine, and the empty plasmid served as the controls. The chickens in each group were separately inoculated with these vaccines three times at 1, 7, and 14 days old. Dynamic changes in antibody production, cytokine secretion, and lymphocyte count were then determined from 7 to 49 days after the first inoculation. Protective rates of the vaccines were also determined after the third inoculation. Results showed that the pure DNA vaccine obviously induced the production of antibodies, the secretion of cytokines, and the increase in CD(4+) and CD(8+) T lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood, as well as provided a protective rate of 50% to the B. avium-challenged chickens. The chickens inoculated with the TPPPS adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine and Freund's adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine demonstrated higher levels of immune responses than those inoculated with pure ompA-DNA vaccine, whereas only the ompA-DNA vaccine with 200 mg/mL TPPPS completely protected the chickens against B. avium infection. These findings indicate that the B. avium ompA-DNA vaccine combined with TPPPS is a potentially effective B. avium vaccine. PMID:26870023

  9. Immune-Enhancing Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana Pollen Polysaccharides on DNA Vaccine Expressing Bordetella avium ompA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fujie; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Zhenhong; Yu, Cuilian; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Li, Bing; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the causative agent of bordetellosis, which remains to be the cause of severe losses in the turkey industry. Given the lack of vaccines that can provide good protection, developing a novel vaccine against B. avium infection is crucial. In this study, we constructed a eukaryotic expression plasmid, which expressed the outer membrane protein A (ompA) of B. avium, to prepare a B. avium recombinant ompA-DNA vaccine. Three concentrations (low, middle, and high) of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS), a known immunomodulator, were used as adjuvants, and their immune conditioning effects on the developed DNA vaccine were examined. The pure ompA-DNA vaccine, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine, and the empty plasmid served as the controls. The chickens in each group were separately inoculated with these vaccines three times at 1, 7, and 14 days old. Dynamic changes in antibody production, cytokine secretion, and lymphocyte count were then determined from 7 to 49 days after the first inoculation. Protective rates of the vaccines were also determined after the third inoculation. Results showed that the pure DNA vaccine obviously induced the production of antibodies, the secretion of cytokines, and the increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood, as well as provided a protective rate of 50% to the B. avium-challenged chickens. The chickens inoculated with the TPPPS adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine and Freund’s adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine demonstrated higher levels of immune responses than those inoculated with pure ompA-DNA vaccine, whereas only the ompA-DNA vaccine with 200 mg/mL TPPPS completely protected the chickens against B. avium infection. These findings indicate that the B. avium ompA-DNA vaccine combined with TPPPS is a potentially effective B. avium vaccine. PMID:26870023

  10. Characterization of Durham virus, a novel rhabdovirus that encodes both a C and SH protein

    PubMed Central

    Allison, A. B.; Palacios, G.; Rosa, A. Travassos da; Popov, V. L.; Lu, L.; Xiao, S. Y.; DeToy, K.; Briese, T.; Lipkin, W. Ian; Keel, M. K.; Stallknecht, D. E.; Bishop, G. R.; Tesh, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    The family Rhabdoviridae is a diverse group of non-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses that are distributed worldwide and infect a wide range of hosts including vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. Of the 114 currently recognized vertebrate rhabdoviruses, relatively few have been well characterized at both the antigenic and genetic level; hence, the phylogenetic relationships between many of the vertebrate rhabdoviruses remain unknown. The present report describes a novel rhabdovirus isolated from the brain of a moribund American coot (Fulica americana) that exhibited neurological signs when found in Durham County, North Carolina, in 2005. Antigenic characterization of the virus revealed that it was serologically unrelated to 68 other known vertebrate rhabdoviruses. Genomic sequencing of the virus indicated that it shared the highest identity to Tupaia rhabdovirus (TUPV), and as only previously observed in TUPV, the genome encoded a putative C protein in an overlapping open reading frame (ORF) of the phosphoprotein gene and a small hydrophobic protein located in a novel ORF between the matrix and glycoprotein genes. Phylogenetic analysis of partial amino acid sequences of the nucleoprotein and polymerase proteins indicated that, in addition to TUPV, the virus was most closely related to avian and small mammal rhabdoviruses from Africa and North America. In this report, we present the morphological, pathological, antigenic, and genetic characterization of the new virus, tentatively named Durham virus (DURV), and discuss its potential evolutionary relationship to other vertebrate rhabdoviruses. PMID:20863863

  11. A DN-mda5 Transgenic Zebrafish 1 Model Demonstrates that Mda5 Plays an Important Role in Snakehead Rhabdovirus Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, KA; Charette, JR; Pietraszewski, MJ; Wingfield, DJ; Shim, JS; Millard, PJ; Kim, CH

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma Differentiation-Associated protein 5 (MDA5) is a member of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) family, which is a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that detects viral nucleic acids. Here we show an Mda5-dependent response to rhabdovirus infection in vivo using a dominant-negative mda5 transgenic zebrafish. Dominant-negative mda5 zebrafish embryos displayed an impaired antiviral immune response compared to wild-type counterparts that can be rescued by recombinant full-length Mda5. To our knowledge, we have generated the first dominant-negative mda5 transgenic zebrafish and demonstrated a critical role for Mda5 in the antiviral response to rhabdovirus. PMID:25634485

  12. Synergistic antitumor efficacy of combined DNA vaccines targeting tumor cells and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yu; Wu, Shuai; Wang, Zicheng; Wang, Lin; Du, Zhiyan; Gao, Jiangping; Yu, Jiyun

    2015-09-18

    To further enhance the antitumor efficacy of DNA vaccine, we proposed a synergistic strategy that targeted tumor cells and angiogenesis simultaneously. In this study, a Semliki Forest Virus (SFV) replicon DNA vaccine expressing 1-4 domains of murine VEGFR2 and IL12 was constructed, and was named pSVK-VEGFR2-GFc-IL12 (CAVE). The expression of VEGFR2 antigen and IL12 adjuvant molecule in 293T cells in vitro were verified by western blot and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Then CAVE was co-immunized with CAVA, a SFV replicon DNA vaccine targeting survivin and β-hCG antigens constructed previously. The antitumor efficacy of our combined replicon vaccines was evaluated in mice model and the possible mechanism was further investigated. The combined vaccines could elicit efficient humoral and cellular immune responses against survivin, β-hCG and VEGFR2 simultaneously. Compared with CAVE or CAVA vaccine alone, the combined vaccines inhibited the tumor growth and improved the survival rate in B16 melanoma mice model more effectively. Furthermore, the intratumoral microvessel density was lowest in combined vaccines group than CAVE or CAVA alone group. Therefore, this synergistic strategy of DNA vaccines for tumor treatment results in an increased antitumor efficacy, and may be more suitable for translation to future research and clinic. PMID:26253468

  13. Induction of Neutralization Antibodies in Mice by Dengue-2 Envelope DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    PÉREZ-VÉLEZ, MARIEL E.; GARCÍA-NIEVES, TERESITA; COLÓN-SÁNCHEZ, CANDIMAR; MARTÍNEZ, IDALÍ

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue (DEN) viruses have become a public health problem that affects approximately 100 million people worldwide each year. Prevention measures rely on vector control programs, which are inefficient. Therefore, a vaccine is urgently needed. Methods The main goal of our laboratory is to develop an efficient tetravalent DEN DNA vaccine. In this study, we constructed four DEN-2 DNA vaccines expressing prM/env genes, using the homologous leader sequence (VecD2, VRD2E) or the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) secretory signal (VecD2tpa, VRD2tpa). In vitro expression was tested by transient transfections and Western blot. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the vaccine candidates was evaluated in BALB/c mice, using intramuscular (IM) and intradermal (ID) vaccination routes. Results Envelope (E) protein expression was detected in transfected COS-7 or 293T cells. We found statistical differences in the antibody responses induced by these vaccine candidates. In addition, the strongest antibody responses and protection were observed when the vaccines were delivered intramuscularly. Moreover, the tPA leader sequence did not significantly improve the vaccine immunogenicity since VecD2 and VecD2tpa induced similar antibody responses. Conclusions We demonstrated that most of our DNA vaccine candidates could induce antibody responses and partial protection against DEN-2 virus in mice. These results provide valuable information for the design and construction of a tetravalent DEN DNA vaccine. PMID:19715116

  14. DNA vaccines against infectious agents: recent strategies for enhancing immune responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been widespread efforts to develop plasmid DNA vaccines against animal and human pathogens, and for use as therapies in the treatment of cancers, autoimmune diseases, and allergies. The impetus for this research activity was based on early promising results in laboratory animals that sho...

  15. Pilot study of p62 DNA vaccine in dogs with mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Gabai, Vladimir; Venanzi, Franco M; Bagashova, Elena; Rud, Oksana; Mariotti, Francesca; Vullo, Cecilia; Catone, Giuseppe; Sherman, Michael Y; Concetti, Antonio; Chursov, Andrey; Latanova, Anastasia; Shcherbinina, Vita; Shifrin, Victor; Shneider, Alexander

    2014-12-30

    Our previous data demonstrated profound anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of p62 (sqstm1) DNA vaccine in rodents with various types of transplantable tumors. Testing anti-cancer medicine in dogs as an intermediary step of translational research program provides two major benefits. First, clinical data collected in target animals is required for FDA/USDA approval as a veterinary anti-cancer drug or vaccine. It is noteworthy that the veterinary community is in need of novel medicine for the prevention and treatment of canine and feline cancers. The second more important benefit of testing anti-cancer vaccines in dogs is that spontaneous tumors in dogs may provide invaluable information for human trials. Here, we evaluated the effect(s) of p62 DNA vaccine on mammary tumors of dogs. We found that p62 DNA vaccine administered i.m. decreased or stabilized growth of locally advanced lesions in absence of its overall toxic effects. The observed antitumor activity was associated with lymphocyte infiltration and tumor encapsulation via fibrotic reaction. This data justifies both human clinical trials and veterinary application of p62 DNA vaccine. PMID:25296974

  16. Smallpox DNA vaccine delivered by novel skin electroporation device protects mice against intranasal poxvirus challenge.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Jay W; Golden, Joseph W; Ferro, Anthony M; King, Alan D

    2007-02-26

    Previously, we demonstrated that an experimental smallpox DNA vaccine comprised of four vaccinia virus genes (4pox) administered by gene gun elicited protective immunity in mice challenged with vaccinia virus, and in nonhuman primates challenged with monkeypox virus (Hooper JW, et al. Smallpox DNA vaccine protects nonhuman primates against lethal monkeypox. J Virol 2004;78:4433-43). Here, we report that this 4pox DNA vaccine can be efficiently delivered by a novel method involving skin electroporation using plasmid DNA-coated microneedle arrays. Mice vaccinated with the 4pox DNA vaccine mounted robust antibody responses against the four immunogens-of-interest, including neutralizing antibody titers that were greater than those elicited by the traditional live virus vaccine administered by scarification. Moreover, vaccinated mice were completely protected against a lethal (>10LD(50)) intranasal challenge with vaccinia virus strain IHD-J. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a protective immune response being elicited by microneedle-mediated skin electroporation. PMID:17240007

  17. A DNA vaccine targeting angiomotin inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, Lars; Ambrosino, Elena; Birot, Olivier; Tullus, Carl; Veitonmäki, Niina; Levchenko, Tetyana; Carlson, Lena-Maria; Musiani, Piero; Iezzi, Manuela; Curcio, Claudia; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica; Kiessling, Rolf

    2006-06-01

    Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors have shown promise in preclinical trials, but clinical use has been hindered by low half-life in circulation and high production costs. Here, we describe a strategy that targets the angiostatin receptor angiomotin (Amot) by DNA vaccination. The vaccination procedure generated antibodies that detected Amot on the endothelial cell surface. Purified Ig bound to the endothelial cell membrane and inhibited endothelial cell migration. In vivo, DNA vaccination blocked angiogenesis in the matrigel plug assay and prevented growth of transplanted tumors for up to 150 days. We further demonstrate that a combination of DNA vaccines encoding Amot and the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human EGF receptor 2 (Her-2)/neu oncogene inhibited breast cancer progression and impaired tumor vascularization in Her-2/neu transgenic mice. No toxicity or impairment of normal blood vessels could be detected. This work shows that DNA vaccination targeting Amot may be used to mimic the effect of angiostatin. cancer vaccines | neoplasia | neovascularization | breast cancer | angiostatin

  18. GITRL as a genetic adjuvant enhances enterovirus 71 VP1 DNA vaccine immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Tang, Xinyi; Yin, Kai; Tian, Jie; Rui, Ke; Ma, Jie; Mao, Chaoming; Chen, Jianguo; Lu, Liwei; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Shengjun

    2015-05-01

    VP1 protein is the immunodominant capsid protein of enterovirus 71 (EV71) which is responsible for large outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease. It has been reported that glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR) and its ligand (GITRL) are involved in modulating both innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, a DNA vaccine vector encoding EV71 VP1 gene and mGITRL gene (pIRES/VP1/mGITRL) was constructed. And female Balb/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with the DNA vaccine. Compared with the groups immunized with pIRES, pIRES/VP1, pIRES/mGITRL and PBS, the inoculation of pIRES/VP1/mGITRL induced a higher levels of EV71 VP1-specific antibody and specific antibody-forming cells. However, significantly higher levels of CD4(+)Th1, Th2 and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)T cells were found in the pIRES/VP1/mGITRL group compared with control groups. Our results demonstrate that a novel DNA vaccine, expressing VP1 and mGITRL, could effectively elicit both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against EV71 VP1 in mice. Thus, the mGITRL may be used as molecular adjuvant for EV71 DNA vaccine. PMID:25772201

  19. Towards a metalloprotease-DNA vaccine against piscine cryptobiosis caused by Cryptobia salmositica.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chung-Wei; Jesudhasan, Palmy; Woo, Patrick T K

    2008-01-01

    Cysteine protease is a metabolic enzyme, whereas metalloprotease is the virulent factor in cryptobiosis caused by Cryptobia salmositica. Recombinant DNA vaccines were produced with the insertion of either the metalloprotease or cysteine protease gene of C. salmositica into plasmid vectors (pEGFP-N). As expected, fishes (Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo salar) injected intramuscularly with the metalloprotease-DNA (MP-DNA) vaccine (50 microg/fish) were consistently more anemic (lower packed cell volume, PCV) than controls (injected only with the plasmid) at 3-5 weeks post-inoculation. Also, there were no difference in PCV between fish injected with the cysteine-DNA plasmids and the controls. In addition, agglutinating antibodies against Cryptobia were detected only in the blood of MP-DNA-vaccinated fish at 5-7 weeks post-vaccination and not in cysteine-DNA plasmids and the control groups. MP-DNA-vaccinated fish when challenged with the pathogen had consistently lower parasitemia, delayed peak parasitemia, and faster recovery compared with the controls. All fish vaccinated with attenuated strain were protected when challenged with the pathogen; this positive control group confirmed that the two vaccines operate through different mechanisms. PMID:17932691

  20. GRA7 provides protective immunity in cocktail DNA vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Jongert, E; de Craeye, S; Dewit, J; Huygen, K

    2007-09-01

    In a previous study, single-gene vaccination with GRA1, GRA7 or ROP2 was shown to elicit partial protection against Toxoplasma gondii. In this study, the contribution of each antigen in the evoked humoral and cellular immune responses was evaluated after vaccination with plasmid mixtures containing GRA1, GRA7 and ROP2. Cocktail DNA vaccinated mice developed high antibody titers against the antigens from two-gene DNA vaccine cocktails, but lower titres when immunized with the three-gene cocktail. High numbers of IFN-gamma secreting splenocytes were generated predominantly against GRA7. Brain cyst burden was reduced by 81% in mice vaccinated with the three-gene mixture and they were completely protected against acute toxoplasmosis. Similar high levels of brain cyst reductions were obtained after vaccination with cocktails composed of GRA1 and GRA7 (89% reduction), or GRA7 and ROP2 (79% reduction), but not with the cocktail composed of GRA1 and ROP2. In low dose single-gene vaccinations, IFN-gamma and strong protection could only be elicited by GRA7. Hence, the presence of GRA7 in the DNA vaccine formulation was important for optimal protection and this was correlated with GRA7-specific IFN-gamma production. We propose GRA7 as a main component in cocktail DNA vaccines for vaccination against T. gondii. PMID:17727568

  1. Pilot study of p62 DNA vaccine in dogs with mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bagashova, Elena; Rud, Oksana; Mariotti, Francesca; Vullo, Cecilia; Catone, Giuseppe; Sherman, Michael Y.; Concetti, Antonio; Chursov, Andrey; Latanova, Anastasia; Shcherbinina, Vita; Shneider, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated profound anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of p62 (sqstm1) DNA vaccine in rodents with various types of transplantable tumors. Testing anti-cancer medicine in dogs as an intermediary step of translational research program provides two major benefits. First, clinical data collected in target animals is required for FDA/USDA approval as a veterinary anti-cancer drug or vaccine. It is noteworthy that the veterinary community is in need of novel medicine for the prevention and treatment of canine and feline cancers. The second more important benefit of testing anti-cancer vaccines in dogs is that spontaneous tumors in dogs may provide invaluable information for human trials. Here, we evaluated the effect(s) of p62 DNA vaccine on mammary tumors of dogs. We found that p62 DNA vaccine administered i.m. decreased or stabilized growth of locally advanced lesions in absence of its overall toxic effects. The observed antitumor activity was associated with lymphocyte infiltration and tumor encapsulation via fibrotic reaction. This data justifies both human clinical trials and veterinary application of p62 DNA vaccine. PMID:25296974

  2. DNA vaccine constructs against enterovirus 71 elicit immune response in mice

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative viral agent responsible for large outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), a common rash illness in children and infants. There is no effective antiviral treatment for severe EV71 infections and no vaccine is available. The objectives of this study were to design and construct a DNA vaccine against Enterovirus 71 using the viral capsid protein (VP1) gene of EV71 and to verify the functionality of the DNA vaccine in vitro and in vivo. Methods The VP1 gene of EV71 from two local outbreak isolates were amplified using PCR and then inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector, pVAX1. The 3.9 kb recombinant constructs were transformed into competent E. coli cells and the positive clones were screened and selected using PCR analysis, restriction digestion analysis and DNA sequencing. The constructs were then tested for protein expression in Vero cells. Subsequently, in the in vivo studies, female Balb/c mice were immunized with the DNA vaccine constructs. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and virus neutralizing assay were performed to detect the presence of anti-VP1 IgG in mice and its neutralizing effect against the EV71. Results The pVAX1 vector was successfully cloned with the VP1 gene from each of the isolate (S2/86/1 and 410/4) in the correct orientation and in-frame. The DNA vaccine constructs with the VP1 gene were shown to be expressed in a cell-free in vitro expression system. The VP1 protein was successfully expressed in the mammalian cell line and was detected using RT-PCR, Indirect Immunofluorescence Assay (IFA) and western blotting. The anti-VP1 IgG levels in mice immunized with the DNA vaccine constructs increased after the first booster but declined following the second booster. The anti-VP1 IgG in the mice immunized with the DNA vaccine constructs exhibited neutralising activity against EV71. Conclusion The promising results obtained in the present study have prompted further testing

  3. Electroporation mediated DNA vaccination directly to a mucosal surface results in improved immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Amante, Dinah; Smith, Trevor RF; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2013-01-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has been shown to be a highly efficient non-viral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity, when the site of immunization is the skin or muscle of animals and humans. However, the route of entry for many microbial pathogens is via the mucosal surfaces of the human body. We have previously reported on minimally invasive, surface and contactless EP devices for enhanced DNA delivery to dermal tissue. Robust antibody responses were induced following vaccine delivery in several tested animal models using these devices. Here, we investigated extending the modality of the surface device to efficiently deliver DNA vaccines to mucosal tissue. Initially, we demonstrated reporter gene expression in the epithelial layer of buccal mucosa in a guinea pig model. There was minimal tissue damage in guinea pig mucosal tissue resulting from EP. Delivery of a DNA vaccine encoding influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 elicited robust and sustained systemic IgG antibody responses following EP-enhanced delivery in the mucosa. Upon further analysis, IgA antibody responses were detected in vaginal washes and sustained cellular immune responses were detected in animals immunized at the oral mucosa with the surface EP device. This data confirms that DNA delivery and EP targeting mucosal tissue directly results in both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. These responses are seen both in the mucosa and systemically in the blood. Direct DNA vaccine delivery enhanced by EP in mucosa may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV, HPV and pneumonia that enter at mucosal sites and require both cellular and humoral immune responses for protection. PMID:23954979

  4. Electroporation mediated DNA vaccination directly to a mucosal surface results in improved immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Amante, Dinah; Smith, Trevor R F; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2013-10-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has been shown to be a highly efficient non-viral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity, when the site of immunization is the skin or muscle of animals and humans. However, the route of entry for many microbial pathogens is via the mucosal surfaces of the human body. We have previously reported on minimally invasive, surface and contactless EP devices for enhanced DNA delivery to dermal tissue. Robust antibody responses were induced following vaccine delivery in several tested animal models using these devices. Here, we investigated extending the modality of the surface device to efficiently deliver DNA vaccines to mucosal tissue. Initially, we demonstrated reporter gene expression in the epithelial layer of buccal mucosa in a guinea pig model. There was minimal tissue damage in guinea pig mucosal tissue resulting from EP. Delivery of a DNA vaccine encoding influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 elicited robust and sustained systemic IgG antibody responses following EP-enhanced delivery in the mucosa. Upon further analysis, IgA antibody responses were detected in vaginal washes and sustained cellular immune responses were detected in animals immunized at the oral mucosa with the surface EP device. This data confirms that DNA delivery and EP targeting mucosal tissue directly results in both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. These responses are seen both in the mucosa and systemically in the blood. Direct DNA vaccine delivery enhanced by EP in mucosa may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV, HPV and pneumonia that enter at mucosal sites and require both cellular and humoral immune responses for protection. PMID:23954979

  5. Innovative DNA vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, A; Zeng, Q; Kang, T H; Peng, S; Roosinovich, E; Pai, S I; Hung, C-F

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly type 16, has been associated with a subset of head and neck cancers. The viral-encoded oncogenic proteins E6 and E7 represent ideal targets for immunotherapy against HPV-associated head and neck cancers. DNA vaccines have emerged as attractive approaches for immunotherapy due to its simplicity, safety and ease of preparation. Intradermal administration of DNA vaccine by means of gene gun represents an efficient method to deliver DNA directly into dendritic cells for priming antigen-specific T cells. We have previously shown that a DNA vaccine encoding an invariant chain (Ii), in which the class II-associated Ii peptide (CLIP) region has been replaced by a Pan-DR-epitope (PADRE) sequence to form Ii-PADRE, is capable of generating PADRE-specific CD4+ T cells in vaccinated mice. In the current study, we hypothesize that a DNA vaccine encoding Ii-PADRE linked to E6 (Ii-PADRE-E6) will further enhance E6-specific CD8+ T cell immune responses through PADRE-specific CD4+ T-helper cells. We found that mice vaccinated with Ii-PADRE-E6 DNA generated comparable levels of PADRE-specific CD4+ T-cell immune responses, as well as significantly stronger E6-specific CD8+ T-cell immune responses and antitumor effects against the lethal challenge of E6-expressing tumor compared with mice vaccinated with Ii-E6 DNA. Taken together, our data indicate that vaccination with Ii-E6 DNA with PADRE replacing the CLIP region is capable of enhancing the E6-specific CD8+ T-cell immune response generated by the Ii-E6 DNA. Thus, Ii-PADRE-E6 represents a novel DNA vaccine for the treatment of HPV-associated head and neck cancer and other HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:20981112

  6. Targeting with bovine CD154 enhances humoral immune responses induced by a DNA vaccine in sheep.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Sharmila; Griebel, Philip J; Babiuk, Lorne A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2003-01-15

    CD40-CD154 interactions play an important role in regulating humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, these interactions have been exploited for the development of therapeutic and preventive treatments. The objective of this study was to test the ability of bovine CD154 to target a plasmid-encoded Ag to CD40-expressing APCs. To achieve this, a plasmid coding for bovine CD154 fused to a truncated secreted form of bovine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein D (tgD), pSLIAtgD-CD154, was constructed. The chimeric tgD-CD154 was expressed in vitro in COS-7 cells and reacted with both glycoprotein D- and CD154-specific Abs. Both tgD and tgD-CD154 were capable of binding to epithelial cells, whereas only tgD-CD154 bound to B cells. Furthermore, dual-labeling of ovine PBMCs revealed that tgD-CD154 was bound by primarily B cells. The functional integrity of the tgD-CD154 chimera was confirmed by the induction of both IL-4-dependent B cell proliferation and tgD-specific lymphoproliferative responses in vitro. Finally, sheep immunized with pSLIAtgD-CD154 developed a more rapid primary tgD-specific Ab response and a significantly stronger tgD-specific secondary response when compared with animals immunized with pSLIAtgD and control animals. Similarly, virus-neutralizing Ab titers were significantly higher after secondary immunization with pSLIAtgD-CD154. These results demonstrate that using CD154 to target plasmid-expressed Ag can significantly enhance immune responses induced by a DNA vaccine. PMID:12517965

  7. An Epitope-Substituted DNA Vaccine Improves Safety and Immunogenicity against Dengue Virus Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chung-Tao; Li, Pi-Chun; Liu, I-Ju; Liao, Mei-Ying; Chiu, Chiung-Yi; Chao, Day-Yu; Wu, Han-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a global disease, is divided into four serotypes (DENV1-4). Cross-reactive and non-neutralizing antibodies against envelope (E) protein of DENV bind to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) of cells, and thereby exacerbate viral infection by heterologous serotypes via antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). Identification and modification of enhancing epitopes may mitigate enhancement of DENV infection. In this study, we characterized the cross-reactive DB21-6 and DB39-2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against domain I-II of DENV; these antibodies poorly neutralized and potently enhanced DENV infection both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, two enhancing mAbs, DB21-6 and DB39-2, were observed to compete with sera antibodies from patients infected with dengue. The epitopes of these enhancing mAbs were identified using phage display, structural prediction, and mapping of virus-like particle (VLP) mutants. N8, R9, V12, and E13 are the reactive residues of DB21-6, while N8, R9, and E13 are the reactive residues of DB39-2. N8 substitution tends to maintain VLP secretion, and decreases the binding activity of DB21-6 and DB39-2. The immunized sera from N8 substitution (N8R) DNA vaccine exerted greater neutralizing and protective activity than wild-type (WT)-immunized sera, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, treatment with N8R-immunized sera reduced the enhancement of mortality in AG129 mice. These results support identification and substitution of enhancing epitope as a novel strategy for developing safe dengue vaccines. PMID:26135599

  8. Virus neutralizing antibody response in mice and dogs with a bicistronic DNA vaccine encoding rabies virus glycoprotein and canine parvovirus VP2.

    PubMed

    Patial, Sonika; Chaturvedi, V K; Rai, A; Saini, M; Chandra, Rajesh; Saini, Y; Gupta, Praveen K

    2007-05-16

    A bicistronic DNA vaccine against rabies and parvovirus infection of dogs was developed by subcloning rabies glycoprotein and canine parvovirus (CPV) VP2 genes into a bicistronic vector. After characterizing the expression of both the proteins in vitro, the bicistronic DNA vaccine was injected in mice and induced immune response was compared with monocistronic DNA vaccines. There was no significant difference in ELISA and virus neutralizing (VN) antibody responses against rabies and CPV in mice immunized with either bicistronic or monocistronic DNA vaccine. Further, there was significantly similar protection in mice immunized with either bicistronic or monocistronic rabies DNA vaccine on rabies virus challenge. Similarly, dogs immunized with monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccines developed comparable VN antibodies against rabies and CPV. This study indicated that bicistronic DNA vaccine can be used in dogs to induce virus neutralizing immune responses against both rabies and CPV. PMID:17391817

  9. Quantitative real-time PCR study on persistence of pDNA vaccine pVax-Hsp60 TM814 in beef muscles

    PubMed Central

    Orság, Petr; Kvardová, Veronika; Raška, Milan; Miller, Andrew D; Ledvina, Miroslav; Turánek, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Background Application of plasmid DNA for immunization of food-producing animals established new standards of food safety. The addition of foreign products e.g. pDNA into the food chain should be carefully examined to ensure that neither livestock animals nor consumers develop unpredicted or undesirable side-effects. Methods A quantitative real-time PCR (QRTPCR) methodology was developed to study the biodistribution and persistence of plasmid DNA vaccine pDNAX (pVAX-Hsp60 TM814) in mice and beef cattle. The linear quantification range and the sensitivity of the method was found to be 10 – 109 copies per reaction (500 ng/gDNA) and 3 copies per reaction, respectively. Results Persistence of pDNAX in mice muscle tissue was restricted to injection site and the amount of pDNAX showed delivery formulation dependent (naked pDNA, electroporation, cationic liposome complexes) and mouse age-dependent clearance form injection site but pDNAX was still detectable even after 365 days. The QRTPCR analysis of various muscle tissue samples of vaccinated beef bulls performed 242–292 days after the last revaccination proved that residual pDNAX was found only in the injection site. The highest plasmid levels (up to 290 copies per reaction) were detected in the pDNAX:CDAN/DOPE group similarly to mice model. No pDNA was detected in the samples from distant muscles and draining lymph nodes. Conclusion Quantitative real-time PCR (QRTPCR) assay was developed to assess the residual pDNA vaccine pVAX-Hsp60 TM814 in mice and beef cattle. In beef cattle, ultra low residual level of pDNA vaccine was only found at the injection site. According to rough estimation, consumption of muscles from the injection site represents almost an undetectable intake of pDNA (400 fg/g muscle tissue) for consumers. Residual plasmid in native state will hardly be found at measurable level following further meat processing. This study brings supportive data for animal and food safety and hence for further

  10. DNA Vaccines Encoding Antigen Targeted to MHC Class II Induce Influenza-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses, Enabling Faster Resolution of Influenza Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Laura; Kinnear, Ekaterina; McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Grodeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Lindeberg, Mona M.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines are effective but imperfect, failing to cover against emerging strains of virus and requiring seasonal administration to protect against new strains. A key step to improving influenza vaccines is to improve our understanding of vaccine-induced protection. While it is clear that antibodies play a protective role, vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells can improve protection. To further explore the role of CD8+ T cells, we used a DNA vaccine that encodes antigen dimerized to an immune cell targeting module. Immunizing CB6F1 mice with the DNA vaccine in a heterologous prime-boost regime with the seasonal protein vaccine improved the resolution of influenza disease compared with protein alone. This improved disease resolution was dependent on CD8+ T cells. However, DNA vaccine regimes that induced CD8+ T cells alone were not protective and did not boost the protection provided by protein. The MHC-targeting module used was an anti-I-Ed single chain antibody specific to the BALB/c strain of mice. To test the role of MHC targeting, we compared the response between BALB/c, C57BL/6 mice, and an F1 cross of the two strains (CB6F1). BALB/c mice were protected, C57BL/6 were not, and the F1 had an intermediate phenotype; showing that the targeting of antigen is important in the response. Based on these findings, and in agreement with other studies using different vaccines, we conclude that, in addition to antibody, inducing a protective CD8 response is important in future influenza vaccines. PMID:27602032

  11. DNA Vaccines Encoding Antigen Targeted to MHC Class II Induce Influenza-Specific CD8(+) T Cell Responses, Enabling Faster Resolution of Influenza Disease.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Laura; Kinnear, Ekaterina; McDonald, Jacqueline U; Grodeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Lindeberg, Mona M; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines are effective but imperfect, failing to cover against emerging strains of virus and requiring seasonal administration to protect against new strains. A key step to improving influenza vaccines is to improve our understanding of vaccine-induced protection. While it is clear that antibodies play a protective role, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells can improve protection. To further explore the role of CD8(+) T cells, we used a DNA vaccine that encodes antigen dimerized to an immune cell targeting module. Immunizing CB6F1 mice with the DNA vaccine in a heterologous prime-boost regime with the seasonal protein vaccine improved the resolution of influenza disease compared with protein alone. This improved disease resolution was dependent on CD8(+) T cells. However, DNA vaccine regimes that induced CD8(+) T cells alone were not protective and did not boost the protection provided by protein. The MHC-targeting module used was an anti-I-E(d) single chain antibody specific to the BALB/c strain of mice. To test the role of MHC targeting, we compared the response between BALB/c, C57BL/6 mice, and an F1 cross of the two strains (CB6F1). BALB/c mice were protected, C57BL/6 were not, and the F1 had an intermediate phenotype; showing that the targeting of antigen is important in the response. Based on these findings, and in agreement with other studies using different vaccines, we conclude that, in addition to antibody, inducing a protective CD8 response is important in future influenza vaccines. PMID:27602032

  12. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  13. DNA Vaccine that Targets Hemagglutinin to MHC Class II Molecules Rapidly Induces Antibody-Mediated Protection against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Mjaaland, Siri; Roux, Kenneth H.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik

    2013-01-01

    New influenza A viruses with pandemic potential periodically emerge due to viral genomic reassortment. In the face of pandemic threats, production of conventional egg-based vaccines is time consuming and of limited capacity. We have developed in this study a novel DNA vaccine in which viral hemagglutinin (HA) is bivalently targeted to MHC class II (MHC II) molecules on APCs. Following DNA vaccination, transfected cells secreted vaccine proteins that bound MHC II on APCs and initiated adaptive immune responses. A single DNA immunization induced within 8 d protective levels of strain-specific Abs and also cross-reactive T cells. During the Mexican flu pandemic, a targeted DNA vaccine (HA from A/California/07/2009) was generated within 3 wk after the HA sequences were published online. These results suggest that MHC II–targeted DNA vaccines could play a role in situations of pandemic threats. The vaccine principle should be extendable to other infectious diseases. PMID:23956431

  14. Synthetic DNA Vaccines: Improved Vaccine Potency by Electroporation and Co-Delivered Genetic Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Flingai, Seleeke; Czerwonko, Matias; Goodman, Jonathan; Kudchodkar, Sagar B.; Muthumani, Kar; Weiner, David B.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, DNA vaccines have undergone a number of technological advancements that have incited renewed interest and heightened promise in the field. Two such improvements are the use of genetically engineered cytokine adjuvants and plasmid delivery via in vivo electroporation (EP), the latter of which has been shown to increase antigen delivery by nearly 1000-fold compared to naked DNA plasmid delivery alone. Both strategies, either separately or in combination, have been shown to augment cellular and humoral immune responses in not only mice, but also in large animal models. These promising results, coupled with recent clinical trials that have shown enhanced immune responses in humans, highlight the bright prospects for DNA vaccines to address many human diseases. PMID:24204366

  15. Laboratory and field evaluation of Schistosoma japonicum DNA vaccines in sheep and water buffalo in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, F; Zhang, Y; Ye, P; Lin, J; Cai, Y; Shen, W; Bickle, Q D; Taylor, M G

    2001-11-12

    Vaccines are needed to control zoonotic Schistosoma japonicum infection and several vaccine candidates have now been identified. Two of these (Sj28GST and Sj23) have shown particular promise in sheep when injected with Freund's adjuvants. The objective of the present work was to find a vaccine formulation which may have potential for widespread use in the field. DNA vaccine formulations of these antigens were produced and tested first in sheep under laboratory conditions and then in both the laboratory and the field in water buffalo. In both host species partial protection as evidenced by a reduction in parasite counts in vaccinated compared with control animals was induced by both vaccines, and in water buffalo the vaccines were shown to be partially protective in the field as well as in the laboratory. These results suggest that the two DNA vaccines tested here may have potential for large-scale field use. PMID:11672910

  16. B cells Can Modulate the CD8 Memory T Cell after DNA Vaccination Against Experimental Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although B cells are important as antigen presenting cells (APC) during the immune response, their role in DNA vaccination models is unknown. Methods In this study in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate the ability of B cells to protect mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Results In vitro and in vivo studies showed that B cells efficiently present antigens after naked plasmid pcDNA3 encoding M. leprae 65-kDa heat shock protein (pcDNA3-Hsp65) internalization and protect B knock-out (BKO) mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. pcDNA3-Hsp65-transfected B cells adoptively transferred into BKO mice rescued the memory phenotypes and reduced the number of CFU compared to wild-type mice. Conclusions These data not only suggest that B cells play an important role in the induction of CD8 T cells but also that they improve bacterial clearance in DNA vaccine model. PMID:21401938

  17. Low-dose radiation enhances therapeutic HPV DNA vaccination in tumor-bearing hosts.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chih-Wen; Trimble, Cornelia; Zeng, Qi; Monie, Archana; Alvarez, Ronald D; Huh, Warner K; Hoory, Talia; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2009-05-01

    Current therapeutic approaches to treatment of patients with bulky cervical cancer are based on conventional in situ ablative modalities including cisplatin-based chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The 5-year survival of patients with nonresectable disease is dismal. Because over 99% of squamous cervical cancer is caused by persistent infection with an oncogenic strain of human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly type 16 and viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 are functionally required for disease initiation and persistence, HPV-targeted immune strategies present a compelling opportunity in which to demonstrate proof of principle. Sublethal doses of radiation and chemotherapeutic agents have been shown to have synergistic effect in combination with either vaccination against cancer-specific antigens, or with passive transfer of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Here, we explored the combination of low-dose radiation therapy with DNA vaccination with calreticulin (CRT) linked to the mutated form of HPV-16 E7 antigen (E7(detox)), CRT/E7(detox) in the treatment of E7-expressing TC-1 tumors. We observed that TC-1 tumor-bearing mice treated with radiotherapy combined with CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccination generated significant therapeutic antitumor effects and the highest frequency of E7-specific CD8(+) T cells in the tumors and spleens of treated mice. Furthermore, treatment with radiotherapy was shown to render the TC-1 tumor cells more susceptible to lysis by E7-specific CTLs. In addition, we observed that treatment with radiotherapy during the second DNA vaccination generated the highest frequency of E7-specific CD8(+) T cells in the tumors and spleens of TC-1 tumor-bearing mice. Finally, TC-1 tumor-bearing mice treated with the chemotherapy in combination with radiation and CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccination generate significantly enhanced therapeutic antitumor effects. The clinical implications of the study are discussed. PMID:18815785

  18. Effect of vesicle size on tissue localization and immunogenicity of liposomal DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Myrra G; Camps, Marcel G M; Henriksen-Lacey, Malou; Franken, Kees; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Perrie, Yvonne; Bouwstra, Joke A; Ossendorp, Ferry; Jiskoot, Wim

    2011-06-24

    The formulation of plasmid DNA (pDNA) in cationic liposomes is a promising strategy to improve the potency of DNA vaccines. In this respect, physicochemical parameters such as liposome size may be important for their efficacy. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of vesicle size on the in vivo performance of liposomal pDNA vaccines after subcutaneous vaccination in mice. The tissue distribution of cationic liposomes of two sizes, 500 nm (PDI 0.6) and 140 nm (PDI 0.15), composed of egg PC, DOPE and DOTAP, with encapsulated OVA-encoding pDNA, was studied by using dual radiolabeled pDNA-liposomes. Their potency to elicit cellular and humoral immune responses was investigated upon application in a homologous and heterologous vaccination schedule with 3 week intervals. It was shown that encapsulation of pDNA into cationic lipsomes resulted in deposition at the site of injection, and strongest retention was observed at large vesicle size. The vaccination studies demonstrated a more robust induction of OVA-specific, functional CD8+ T-cells and higher antibody levels upon vaccination with small monodisperse pDNA-liposomes, as compared to large heterodisperse liposomes or naked pDNA. The introduction of a PEG-coating on the small cationic liposomes resulted in enhanced lymphatic drainage, but immune responses were not improved when compared to non-PEGylated liposomes. In conclusion, it was shown that the physicochemical properties of the liposomes are of crucial importance for their performance as pDNA vaccine carrier, and cationic charge and small size are favorable properties for subcutaneous DNA vaccination. PMID:21565240

  19. Coexpressed RIG-I agonist enhances humoral immune response to influenza virus DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luke, Jeremy M; Simon, Gregory G; Söderholm, Jonas; Errett, John S; August, J Thomas; Gale, Michael; Hodgson, Clague P; Williams, James A

    2011-02-01

    Increasing levels of plasmid vector-mediated activation of innate immune signaling pathways is an approach to improve DNA vaccine-induced adaptive immunity for infectious disease and cancer applications. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a critical cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) pattern receptor required for innate immune activation in response to viral infection. Activation of RIG-I leads to type I interferon (IFN) and inflammatory cytokine production through interferon promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1)-mediated activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and NF-κB signaling. DNA vaccines coexpressing antigen and an expressed RNA (eRNA) RIG-I agonist were made, and the effect of RIG-I activation on antigen-specific immune responses to the encoded antigen was determined. Plasmid vector backbones expressing various RIG-I ligands from RNA polymerase III promoters were screened in a cell culture assay for RIG-I agonist activity, and optimized, potent RIG-I ligands were developed. One of these, eRNA41H, combines (i) eRNA11a, an immunostimulatory dsRNA expressed by convergent transcription, with (ii) adenovirus VA RNAI. eRNA41H was integrated into the backbone of DNA vaccine vectors expressing H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA). The resultant eRNA vectors potently induced type 1 IFN production in cell culture through RIG-I activation and combined high-level HA antigen expression with RNA-mediated type I IFN activation in a single plasmid vector. The eRNA vectors induced increased HA-specific serum antibody binding avidity after naked DNA intramuscular prime and boost delivery in mice. This demonstrates that DNA vaccine potency may be augmented by the incorporation of RIG-I-activating immunostimulatory RNA into the vector backbone. PMID:21106745

  20. Enhancement of the immunogenicity of an infectious laryngotracheitis virus DNA vaccine by a bicistronic plasmid encoding glycoprotein B and interleukin-18.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Ying; Zhao, Li; Wei, Zhan-Yong; Cui, Bao-An; Wang, Zhen-Ya; Li, Xin-Sheng; Xia, Ping-An; Liu, Jin-Peng

    2010-08-01

    A DNA vaccine against infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) can induce specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity. However, compared to conventional vaccines, DNA vaccines usually induce poor antibody responses. To determine if co-expression of a cytokine can result in a more potent ILTV DNA vaccine, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a monocistronic vector encoding the glycoprotein B (gB) of ILTV was compared to that of a bicistronic vector separately encoding the gB and chicken interleukin-18. Humoral and cellular responses induced by the DNA vaccines administered to the quadriceps muscle of chickens were evaluated. There were significant differences in antibody levels elicited by either monocistronic or bicistronic DNA vaccines as determined by ELISA. The percentages of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD8(+) and CD3(+)CD4(+) subgroups of peripheral blood T-lymphocytes in chickens immunized with the bicistronic DNA vaccine were higher than those in chickens immunized with monocistronic DNA vaccine. When chickens were challenged with a virulent CG strain of ILTV, the protective efficacy was enhanced significantly after immunization with the bicistronic DNA vaccine. These results demonstrated that co-expression of an adjuvant cytokine from a bicistronic DNA vaccine may be an effective approach to increasing ILTV DNA vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:20553764

  1. Chicken IL-7 as a potent adjuvant enhances IBDV VP2 DNA vaccine immunogenicity and protective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Huo, Shanshan; Zuo, Yuzhu; Li, Nan; Li, Xiujin; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Liyue; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Jianlou; Cui, Dan; He, Pingyou; Xu, Jian; Li, Yan; Zhu, Xiutong; Zhong, Fei

    2016-09-25

    Our previous work has demonstrated that the mammalian interleukin-7 (IL-7) gene can enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Whether chicken IL-7 (chIL-7) possesses the ability to enhance the immunogenicity of VP2 DNA vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) remained unknown. To investigate this, we constructed a VP2 antigenic region (VP2366) gene and chIL-7 gene vectors, co-immunized chicken with these vectors and analyzed the effects of the chIL-7 gene on VP2366 gene immunogenicity. Results showed that co-administrated chIL-7 gene with VP2 DNA vaccine significantly increased specific serum antibody titers against IBDV, and enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-4 productions. More importantly, chIL-7 gene significantly increased VP2366 gene-induced protection against virulent IBDV infection, indicating that the chIL-7 gene possessed the capacity to enhance VP2366 DNA vaccine immunogenicity, and therefore might function as a novel adjuvant for IBDV VP2 DNA vaccine. Mechanically, chIL-7 could stimulate the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) expressions in vitro and in vivo, which might be involved in chIL-7 enhancement of the immunogenicity of VP2 DNA vaccine. PMID:27599941

  2. Effects of DDA, CpG-ODN, and plasmid-encoded chicken IFN-gamma on protective immunity by a DNA vaccine against IBDV in chickens.

    PubMed

    Roh, Ha Jung; Sung, Haan Woo; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2006-12-01

    This study examined the adjuvant effects of dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), and chicken interferon-gamma (ChIFN-gamma) on a DNA vaccine (pcDNA-VP243) against the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). A plasmid encoding chicken IFN-ã was constructed. Twice at 2-week intervals, two-week-old chickens were injected intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with either a DNA vaccine alone or a DNA vaccine together with the respective adjuvants. On week 2 after the second immunization, the chickens were orally challenged with the highly virulent IBDV. The groups that received the DNA vaccines plus either DDA or CpG-ODN showed significantly lower survival rates than the group that received the DNA vaccine alone. However, the survival rates for the DNA vaccine alone and for the DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-gamma were similar. The chickens had no detectable antibodies to the IBDV before the challenge but all the surviving chickens in all groups except for the normal control group showed the induction of antibodies to the IBDV at day 10 after the challenge. As judged by the lymphocyte proliferation assays using the a WST-8 solution performed on the peripheral blood and splenic lymphocytes, the stimulation indices (SI) of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in all groups except for the normal control group were similar immediately before the challenge. At 10 days post-challenge, the SI for DNA vaccine plus either CpG-ODN or ChIFN-gamma was similar to that of the DNA vaccine control group. For splenic lymphocytes, the SI in the DNA vaccine plus CpG-ODN and DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-gamma groups were higher than for the DNA vaccine control. These results suggest that DDA actually compromises the protection against the IBDV by DNA vaccine, and CpG-ODN and IFN-gamma had no significant effect. PMID:17106228

  3. Nano-Delivery Vehicles/Adjuvants for DNA Vaccination Against HIV.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaqiong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Jinchao; Zhang, Xin

    2016-03-01

    More than 75 million people has been infected HIV and it is responsible for nearly 36 million deaths on a global scale. As one of the deadliest infectious diseases, HIV is becoming the urgent issue of the global epidemic to tackle. In order to settle this problem from the source, some effective prevention strategies should be developed to control the pandemic of HIV. Vaccines, especially DNA vaccines, could be the optimal way to control the spread of HIV due to the unparalleled superiority that DNA vaccines could generate long-term humoral and cellular immune responses which could provide protective immunity for HIV. But the naked DNA could hardly enter into cells and is easily degraded by DNases and lysosomes, so designing effective delivery system is a promising strategy. Since delivery system could be constructed to promote efficient delivery of DNA into mammalian cells, protect them from degradation, and also could be established to be a target system to arrive at certain position of expectation. The current review discusses the potential of various nano-delivery vehicles/adjuvants such as polymer, lipid, liposome, peptide and inorganic material in improving efficiency of diverse modalities available for HIV DNA vaccines. PMID:27455611

  4. Evaluation of Different DNA Vaccines against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Stefano; Ramadori, Giorgio; Villa, Riccardo; Borghetti, Paolo; de Angelis, Elena; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Corradi, Attilio; Amici, Augusto; Ferrari, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there have been different experiences with the plasmid DNA vaccination. In this area and with the hypothesis to demonstrate the effectiveness of different plasmids encoding porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome (PRRS), five DNA vaccines against PRRS were evaluated for their innocuity and efficacy in pigs. Eighteen animals were divided into five groups which were injected with five (A, B, C, D, E) different DNA vaccines. Albeit, none of the proposed vaccines were able to protect the animals against PRRS virus. Only vaccines A and B were able to reduce the clinical signs of the infection. ELISA IgM were detected 30 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine A or B. ELISA IgG were detected 90 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine B or C. Neutralizing antibody were detected Post Challenge Days 61 (PCD) in all groups. In the pigs inoculated with Vaccine C, IFN-γ were detected 90 days after first vaccination, and after challenge exposure they increased. In the other groups, the IFN-γ were detected after challenge infection. Pigs injected with each of the vaccines A, B, C, D and E showed a significantly higher level of CD4−CD8+ lymphocytes (p < 0.001) after infection in comparison with their controls. PMID:26344342

  5. Immunogenicity in mice and rabbits of DNA vaccines expressing woodchuck hepatitis virus antigens.

    PubMed

    Luxembourg, Alain; Hannaman, Drew; Wills, Ken; Bernard, Robert; Tennant, Bud C; Menne, Stephan; Cote, Paul J

    2008-07-29

    The licensed vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an effective means to prevent infection, but is not an effective therapeutic strategy to treat established chronic infections when used alone. In an animal model of chronic HBV infection (the woodchuck experimentally infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV)), the combination of conventional vaccine and potent antiviral drugs has shown promise as a potential therapeutic intervention. This approach might be improved further through the application of newer vaccine technologies. In the present study, we evaluated electroporation (EP)-based intramuscular (i.m.) delivery of a codon-optimized DNA vaccine for the WHV surface antigen (WHsAg) in mice and rabbits. In mice, this immunization procedure compared favorably to vaccination by i.m. injection of the DNA vaccine or i.m. administration of a recombinant WHsAg-alum vaccine, exhibiting characteristics expected to be beneficial for a therapeutic vaccine strategy. These included dose efficiency, consistency, vigorous induction of antibody responses to WHsAg, as well as a Th1 bias. Following scale-up to rabbits, a species that approximates the size of the woodchuck, the EP dosing regimen was markedly more effective than conventional i.m. injection of the DNA vaccine. Taken together, these results provide the foundation for studies of EP-based DNA immunization in the woodchuck in order to further assess its potential as an immunotherapeutic approach for treatment of chronic HBV infection in humans. PMID:18556096

  6. Targeting Improves the Efficacy of a DNA Vaccine against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Paul J.; De Rose, Robert; Boyle, Jefferey S.; McWaters, Peter; Kelly, Julie; Tennent, Jan M.; Lew, Andrew M.; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y.

    1999-01-01

    A large-scale DNA vaccination trial was performed with sheep to investigate whether an antigen targeted by CTLA-4 enhanced and accelerated the humoral immune response. Vaccination with genetically detoxified phospholipase D (ΔPLD) has been shown to be effective, at least partially, against Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, the causal agent of caseous lymphadenitis in sheep. CTLA-4 binds to B7 on antigen-presenting cells and thus was used to direct the fusion antigens to sites of immune induction. Here we demonstrated that targeting ΔPLD as a CTLA-4 fusion protein significantly enhanced the speed, magnitude, and longevity of the antibody response compared to that obtained with DNA encoding ΔPLD. While all groups of sheep vaccinated with DNA encoding ΔPLD were afforded better protection against an experimental challenge with C. pseudotuberculosis than those immunized with an irrelevant plasmid or those left unimmunized, the best protection was provided by the targeted DNA vaccine. We propose that targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells offers a generic strategy for enhancing the efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:10569760

  7. Adjuvant effects of interleukin-18 in DNA vaccination against infectious bursal disease virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Li; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Yulong; Qin, Liting; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Xiaomei

    2013-04-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is an important cytokine with multiple functions in innate and acquired immunity. In this study, chicken IL-18 was evaluated for its adjuvant effects on the protective immunity of a DNA vaccine carrying the VP243 gene of IBDV. Groups of 14-day-old SPF chickens were given twice at 2-week intervals with 100 μg of the plasmid DNA vaccine pCAGVP243, pCAGVP243-IL-18 and the blank vector pCAGGS, respectively, and challenged with vvIBDV (HLJ0504 strain) 2 weeks later. Chickens immunized with plasmid pCAGVP243-IL-18 carrying both VP243 and IL-18 genes induced significantly higher levels of antibodies, lymphocyte proliferation responses and of the cytokines IL-4 and IFN-γ than those injected with pCAGVP243 encoding the VP243 gene alone. Furthermore, pCAGVP243-IL-18 provided higher protection (93%) against vvIBDV challenge in chickens than pCAGVP243 (60%), as evidenced by the absence of clinical signs, mortality, and bursal atrophy. These results indicated that the cytokine IL-18 could enhance the immune responses and protection efficacy of DNA vaccine against IBDV infection in chickens, highlighting the potential value of chicken IL-18 as an adjuvant in the prevention of vvIBDV infection. PMID:23395585

  8. Optimal designs of an HA-based DNA vaccine against H7 subtype influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Jia, Na; Li, Jun; Han, Yaping; Cao, Wuchun; Wang, Shixia; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2014-01-01

    The outbreak of a novel H7N9 influenza virus in 2013 has raised serious concerns for the potential of another avian-source pandemic influenza. Effective vaccines against H7N9 virus are important in the prevention and control of any major outbreak. Novel vaccination technologies are useful additions to existing approaches. In the current report, DNA vaccine studies were conducted to identify the optimal design of an H7 HA antigen using the HA gene from a previously reported H7N7 virus that is lethal in humans as the model antigen. New Zealand White rabbits were immunized with DNA vaccines expressing 1 of 3 forms of H7 HA antigen inserts encoding the HA gene from the same H7N7 virus. High-level H7 HA-specific IgG was detected by ELISA, and functional antibodies were confirmed by hemagglutination inhibition assay and pseudotyped virus-based neutralization assay against viruses expressing HA antigens from either the previous H7N7 virus or the novel H7N9 virus. HA antigen design under the tissue plasminogen activator leader (tPA) was the most immunogenic. The data presented in the current report confirm the immunogenicity of the H7 HA antigen and provide useful guidance to prepare for an optimized H7 HA DNA vaccine to help to control the emerging H7N9 virus if and when it is needed. PMID:25424804

  9. Canine distemper virus DNA vaccination of mink can overcome interference by maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent; Pertoldi, Cino; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2015-03-10

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is highly contagious and can cause severe disease against which conventional live vaccines are ineffective in the presence of maternal antibodies. Vaccination in the presences of maternal antibodies was challenged by vaccination of 5 days old and 3 weeks old mink kits with CDV DNA vaccines. Virus neutralising (VN) antibody responses were induced in mink kits vaccinated with a plasmid encoding the haemaglutinin protein (H) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-H) or a combination of the H, fusion (F) and nucleoprotein (N) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-HFN). These DNA vaccinated kits were protected against virulent experimental infection with field strains of CDV. The pCDV-H was more efficient in inducing protective immunity in the presence of maternal antibodies compared to the pCDV-HFN. The results show that DNA vaccination with the pCDV-H or pCDV-HFN (n=4) only given once at 5 days of age induces virus specific immune response in neonatal mink and protection against virulent CDV exposure later in life. PMID:25637861

  10. DNA vaccine protects ornamental koi (Cyprinus carpio koi) against North American spring viremia of carp virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, E.J.; Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) in the United States constitutes a potentially serious alien pathogen threat to susceptible fish stocks in North America. A DNA vaccine with an SVCV glycoprotein (G) gene from a North American isolate was constructed. In order to test the vaccine a challenge model utilizing a specific pathogen-free domestic koi stock and a cold water stress treatment was also developed. We have conducted four trial studies demonstrating that the pSGnc DNA vaccine provided protection in vaccinated fish against challenge at low, moderate, and high virus doses of the homologous virus. The protection was significant (p < 0.05) as compared to fish receiving a mock vaccine construct containing a luciferase reporter gene and to non-vaccinated controls in fish ranging in age from 3 to 14 months. In all trials, the SVCV-G DNA immunized fish were challenged 28-days post-vaccination (546 degree-days) and experienced low mortalities varying from 10 to 50% with relative percent survivals ranging from 50 to 88%. The non-vaccinated controls and mock construct vaccinated fish encountered high cumulative percent mortalities ranging from 70 to 100%. This is the first report of a SVCV DNA vaccine being tested successfully in koi. These experiments prove that the SVCV DNA (pSGnc) vaccine can elicit specific reproducible protection and validates its potential use as a prophylactic vaccine in koi and other vulnerable North American fish stocks.

  11. Early Activation of Teleost B Cells in Response to Rhabdovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abós, Beatriz; Castro, Rosario; González Granja, Aitor; Havixbeck, Jeffrey J.; Barreda, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To date, the response of teleost B cells to specific pathogens has been only scarcely addressed. In this work, we have demonstrated that viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a fish rhabdovirus, has the capacity to infect rainbow trout spleen IgM-positive (IgM+) cells, although the infection is not productive. Consequently, we have studied the effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell functionality, comparing these effects to those elicited by a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, poly(I·C). We found that poly(I·C) and VHSV significantly upregulated TLR3 and type I interferon (IFN) transcription in spleen and blood IgM+ cells. Further effects included the upregulated transcription of the CK5B chemokine. The significant inhibition of some of these effects in the presence of bafilomycin A1 (BAF), an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, suggests the involvement of an intracellular TLR in these responses. In the case of VHSV, these transcriptional effects were dependent on viral entry into B cells and the initiation of viral transcription. VHSV also provoked the activation of NF-κB and the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) cell surface expression on IgM+ cells, which, along with the increased transcription of the costimulatory molecules CD80/86 and CD83, pointed to VHSV-induced IgM+ cell activation toward an antigen-presenting profile. Finally, despite the moderate effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell proliferation, a consistent effect on IgM+ cell survival was detected. IMPORTANCE Innate immune responses to pathogens established through their recognition by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) have been traditionally ascribed to innate cells. However, recent evidence in mammals has revealed that innate pathogen recognition by B lymphocytes is a crucial factor in shaping the type of immune response that is mounted. In teleosts, these immediate effects of viral encounter on B lymphocytes have not been addressed to date. In our study, we

  12. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27170532

  13. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27170532

  14. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-05-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles.

  15. DNA Vaccines: MHC II-Targeted Vaccine Protein Produced by Transfected Muscle Fibres Induces a Local Inflammatory Cell Infiltrate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Løvås, Tom-Ole; Gundersen, Kristian; Bogen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination with naked DNA holds great promise but immunogenicity needs to be improved. DNA constructs encoding bivalent proteins that bind antigen-presenting cells (APC) for delivery of antigen have been shown to enhance T and B cell responses and protection in tumour challenge experiments. However, the mechanism for the increased potency remains to be determined. Here we have constructed DNA vaccines that express the fluorescent protein mCherry, a strategy which allowed tracking of vaccine proteins. Transfected muscle fibres in mice were visualized, and their relationship to infiltrating mononuclear cells could be determined. Interestingly, muscle fibers that produced MHC class II-specific dimeric vaccine proteins with mCherry were for weeks surrounded by a localized intense cellular infiltrate composed of CD45+, MHC class II+ and CD11b+ cells. Increasing numbers of eosinophils were observed among the infiltrating cells from day 7 after immunization. The local infiltrate surrounding mCherry+ muscle fibers was dependent on the MHC II-specificity of the vaccine proteins since the control, a non-targeted vaccine protein, failed to induce similar infiltrates. Chemokines measured on day 3 in immunized muscle indicate both a DNA effect and an electroporation effect. No influence of targeting was observed. These results contribute to our understanding for why targeted DNA vaccines have an improved immunogenicity. PMID:25299691

  16. Molecular Detection of Adenoviruses, Rhabdoviruses, and Paramyxoviruses in Bats from Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Conrardy, Christina; Tao, Ying; Kuzmin, Ivan V.; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Breiman, Robert F.; Anderson, Larry J.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Tong, Suxiang

    2014-01-01

    We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays. Of 217 bat fecal swabs examined, 4 bats were adenovirus DNA-positive, 11 bats were paramyxovirus RNA-positive, and 2 bats were rhabdovirus RNA-positive. Three bats were coinfected by two different viruses. By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking. Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus. PMID:24865685

  17. Molecular detection of adenoviruses, rhabdoviruses, and paramyxoviruses in bats from Kenya.

    PubMed

    Conrardy, Christina; Tao, Ying; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Breiman, Robert F; Anderson, Larry J; Rupprecht, Charles E; Tong, Suxiang

    2014-08-01

    We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays. Of 217 bat fecal swabs examined, 4 bats were adenovirus DNA-positive, 11 bats were paramyxovirus RNA-positive, and 2 bats were rhabdovirus RNA-positive. Three bats were coinfected by two different viruses. By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking. Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus. PMID:24865685

  18. A ribonuclease protection assay can distinguish spring viremia of carp virus from pike fry rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahne, W.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Thirteen rhabdovirus isolates from 10 teleost fish species as well as reference strains of spring viraemia of carp virus (SVCV) and pike fry rhabdovirus (PFRV) cross-reacted in an indirect immunofluorescence assay and were thus indistinguishable by this method. A ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) using a super(32)P-labeled RNA probe made from a cloned copy of the full length SVCV glycoprotein (G) gene was able to discriminate clearly between the type strains of SVCV and PFRV and among the 13 rhabdovirus isolates. Results for the RPA were generally in agreement with standard serum neutralisation assays; however, the RPA was also able to detect genomic differences between isolates of SVCV. These results have implications for fish disease control programs for SVCV.

  19. DNA vaccine prime and recombinant FPV vaccine boost: an important candidate immunization strategy to control bluetongue virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Junping; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Feng, Yufei; Lv, Shuang; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Wu, Donglai

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue (BT), an important sheep disease that caused great economic loss to the sheep industry. There are 26 BTV serotypes based on the outer protein VP2. However, the serotypes BTV-1 and BTV-16 are the two most prevalent serotypes in China. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing viral infections. Therefore, the need for an effective vaccine against BTV is urgent. In this study, DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) vaccines expressing VP2 alone or VP2 in combination with VP5 or co-expressing the VP2 and VP5 proteins of BTV-1 were evaluated in both mice and sheep. Several strategies were tested in mice, including DNA vaccine prime and boost, rFPV vaccine prime and boost, and DNA vaccine prime and rFPV vaccine boost. We then determined the best vaccine strategy in sheep. Our results indicated that a strategy combining a DNA vaccine prime (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) followed by an rFPV vaccine boost (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) induced a high titer of neutralizing antibodies in sheep. Therefore, our data suggest that a DNA vaccine consisting of a pCAG-(VP2+VP5) prime and an rFPV-(VP2+VP5) boost is an important candidate for the design of a novel vaccine against BTV-1. PMID:26048472

  20. Protective immunity conferred by porcine circovirus 2 ORF2-based DNA vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Sylla, Seydou; Cong, Yan-Long; Sun, Yi-Xue; Yang, Gui-Lian; Ding, Xue-Mei; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Zhou, Yu-Long; Yang, Minnan; Wang, Chun-Feng; Ding, Zhuang

    2014-07-01

    Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) associated with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) has caused the swine industry significant health challenges and economic damage. Although inactivated and subunit vaccines against PMWS have been used widely, so far no DNA vaccine is available. In this study, with the aim of exploring a new route for developing a vaccine against PCV2, the immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine was evaluated in mice. The pEGFP-N1 vector was used to construct a PCV2 Cap gene recombinant vaccine. To assess the immunogenicity of pEGFP-Cap, 80 BALB/c mice were immunized three times at 2 weekly intervals with pEGFP-Cap, LG-strain vaccine, pEGFP-N1 vector or PBS and then challenged with PCV2. IgG and cytokines were assessed by indirect ELISA and ELISA, respectively. Specimens stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) techniques were examined histopathologically. It was found that vaccination of the mice with the pEGFP-Cap induced solid protection against PCV2 infection through induction of highly specific serum IgG antibodies and cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-10), and a small PCV2 viral load. The mice treated with the pEGFP-Cap and LG-strain developed no histopathologically detectable lesions (HE stain) and IHC techniques revealed only a few positive cells. Thus, this study demonstrated that recombinant pEGFP-Cap substantially alleviates PCV2 infection in mice and provides evidence that a DNA vaccine could be an alternative to PCV2 vaccines against PMWS. PMID:24845706

  1. DNA vaccination with VP2 gene fragment confers protection against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Satya Narayan; Prince, Prabhu Rajaiah; Madhumathi, Jayaprakasam; Arunkumar, Chakkaravarthy; Roy, Parimal; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri; Antony, Usha

    2014-06-25

    Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) causes immunosuppression in young chickens by destruction of antibody producing B cells in the Bursa of Fabricius and poses a potential threat to the poultry industry. We have examined the protective efficacy of a subunit DNA vaccine against IBDV infection in chickens in this study. An immunodominant VP2 gene fragment (VP252-417) was cloned into CMV promoter based DNA vaccine vector pVAX1 and in vitro expression of the DNA encoded antigens was confirmed by transfection of CHO cells with vaccine constructs followed by RT-PCR and western blot analysis using IBDV-antiserum. Two weeks old chickens were immunized intramuscularly with pVAXVP252-417 and the in vivo transcription of the plasmid DNA was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis of DNA injected muscle tissue at different intervals of post immunization. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that the plasmid DNA was extensively distributed in muscle, spleen, kidney, liver, and bursa tissues. Chickens immunized with pVAXVP252-417 developed high titer (1:12,000) of anti-VP252-417 antibodies. Further, chicken splenocytes from pVAXVP252-417 immunized group showed a significantly high proliferation to the whole viral and recombinant antigen (P<0.01) compared to control groups, which implies that pVAXVP252-417 codes for immunogenic fragment which has epitopes capable of eliciting both B and T cell responses. This is evident by the fact that, pVAXVP252-417 immunized chicken conferred 75% protection against virulent IBDV (vIBDV) challenge compared to the control group. Thus, the present study confirms that the immunodominant VP2 fragment can be used as a potential DNA vaccine against IBDV infection in chickens. PMID:24745626

  2. The swine CD81 enhances E2-based DNA vaccination against classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenliang; Mao, Li; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Xia; Yang, Leilei; Zhang, Wenwen; Jiang, Jieyuan

    2015-07-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and economically important viral disease that affects the pig industry worldwide. The glycoprotein E2 of CSFV can induce neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity, and is widely used for novel vaccine development. The objective of this study was to explore whether a tetraspanin molecule CD81 could improve the immune responses of an E2-based DNA vaccine. Plasmids pVAX-CD81, pVAX-E2 and pVAX-CD81-E2 were constructed and the expression of target proteins was confirmed in BHK-21 cells by indirect immunofluorescence assay. BALB/c mice were divided into 5 groups and immunized with different plasmids (pVAX-E2, pVAX-CD81-E2, pVAX-E2+pVAX-CD81, pVAX-CD81 and PBS) three times with two weeks interval. The results showed that the introduction of CD81 promoted higher humoral and cellular immune responses than E2 expression alone (P<0.05). In addition, immunization with pVAX-CD81-E2 induced stronger immune responses than pVAX-E2+pVAX-CD81. Furthermore, four groups of pigs were immunized with pVAX-E2, pVAX-CD81-E2, pVAX-CD81 and PBS, respectively. Humoral and cellular immune responses detection showed similar results with those in mice. Compared to pVAX-E2, pVAX-CD81-E2 induced higher titers of neutralizing antibodies after viral challenge and conferred stronger protection. These results confirmed the capacity of swine CD81 enhancing the humoral and cellular responses with an adjuvant effect on CSFV DNA vaccine. This is the first report demonstrating the adjuvant effect of CD81 to enhance the DNA vaccination for swine pathogen. PMID:26051512

  3. Immunogenicity of Virus Like Particle Forming Baculoviral DNA Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Yong-Dae; Kim, Sehyun; Cho, Yeondong; Heo, Yoonki; Cho, Hansam; Park, Kihoon; Lee, Hee-Jung; Choi, Jiwon; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza H1N1 in 2009, representing the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, was transmitted to over a million individuals and claimed 18,449 lives. The current status in many countries is to prepare influenza vaccine using cell-based or egg-based killed vaccine. However, traditional influenza vaccine platforms have several limitations. To overcome these limitations, many researchers have tried various approaches to develop alternative production platforms. One of the alternative approach, we reported the efficacy of influenza HA vaccination using a baculoviral DNA vaccine (AcHERV-HA). However, the immune response elicited by the AcHERV-HA vaccine, which only targets the HA antigen, was lower than that of the commercial killed vaccine. To overcome the limitations of this previous vaccine, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, baculovirus-based, virus-like-particle (VLP)–forming DNA vaccine (termed AcHERV-VLP) against pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (pH1N1). BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-VLP (1×107 FFU AcHERV-VLP, i.m.) and compared with mice immunized with the killed vaccine or mice immunized with AcHERV-HA. As a result, AcHERV-VLP immunization produced a greater humoral immune response and exhibited neutralizing activity with an intrasubgroup H1 strain (PR8), elicited neutralizing antibody production, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in splenocytes, and diminished virus shedding in the lung after challenge with a lethal dose of influenza virus. In conclusion, VLP-forming baculovirus DNA vaccine could be a potential vaccine candidate capable of efficiently delivering DNA to the vaccinee and VLP forming DNA eliciting stronger immunogenicity than egg-based killed vaccines. PMID:27149064

  4. DC targeting DNA vaccines induce protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Cao, Wei; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Zhao, Guang-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anti-CD11c antibodies target to the CD11c receptor that mediates antigen presentation to T cells by dendritic cells (DCs). To exploit these properties for immunization purposes, we obtained DC-targeting DNA vaccines by fusing tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu ectodomain to single chain antibody fragment (scFv) from N418 (scFvN418), a monoclonal antibody binding the mouse DC-restricted surface molecule CD11c, and explored its antitumoral efficacy and underlying mechanisms in mouse breast cancer models. Methods: Induction of humoral and cellular immune responses and antitumoral activity of the DNA vaccines were tested in transplantable HER2/neu-expressing murine tumor models and in transgenic BALB-neuT mice developing spontaneous Neu-driven mammary carcinomas. Results: Upon injection of the breast tumor cell line D2F2/E2 (stably expressing human wild-type HER2), scFvN418-HER2 immunized mice were protected against tumor growth. Even more important for clinical applications, we were able to substantially slow the growth of implanted D2F2/E2 cells by injection of scFvN418-HER2 conjugates into tumor bearing hosts. The existing tumors were eradicated by treatment with scFvN418-HER2 combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CTX), which can make a temporary regulatory T cells (Treg) depletion. What’s more, in combination with the low-dose CTX, vaccination with scFvN418-neu significantly retarded the development of spontaneous mammary carcinomas in transgenic BALB-neuT mice. Conclusion: Our results show that DNA vaccine which targeting of dendritic cells in situ by the means of antibody-antigen conjugates may be a novel way to induce long-lasting antitumor immunity. PMID:26770347

  5. Immunogenicity of Virus Like Particle Forming Baculoviral DNA Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1.

    PubMed

    Gwon, Yong-Dae; Kim, Sehyun; Cho, Yeondong; Heo, Yoonki; Cho, Hansam; Park, Kihoon; Lee, Hee-Jung; Choi, Jiwon; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza H1N1 in 2009, representing the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, was transmitted to over a million individuals and claimed 18,449 lives. The current status in many countries is to prepare influenza vaccine using cell-based or egg-based killed vaccine. However, traditional influenza vaccine platforms have several limitations. To overcome these limitations, many researchers have tried various approaches to develop alternative production platforms. One of the alternative approach, we reported the efficacy of influenza HA vaccination using a baculoviral DNA vaccine (AcHERV-HA). However, the immune response elicited by the AcHERV-HA vaccine, which only targets the HA antigen, was lower than that of the commercial killed vaccine. To overcome the limitations of this previous vaccine, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, baculovirus-based, virus-like-particle (VLP)-forming DNA vaccine (termed AcHERV-VLP) against pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (pH1N1). BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-VLP (1×107 FFU AcHERV-VLP, i.m.) and compared with mice immunized with the killed vaccine or mice immunized with AcHERV-HA. As a result, AcHERV-VLP immunization produced a greater humoral immune response and exhibited neutralizing activity with an intrasubgroup H1 strain (PR8), elicited neutralizing antibody production, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in splenocytes, and diminished virus shedding in the lung after challenge with a lethal dose of influenza virus. In conclusion, VLP-forming baculovirus DNA vaccine could be a potential vaccine candidate capable of efficiently delivering DNA to the vaccinee and VLP forming DNA eliciting stronger immunogenicity than egg-based killed vaccines. PMID:27149064

  6. Immunogenicity of a novel engineered HIV-1 clade C synthetic consensus-based envelope DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Corbitt, Natasha; Pankhong, Panyupa; Shin, Thomas; Khan, Amir; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B

    2011-09-22

    DNA vaccines require significant engineering in order to generate strong CTL responses in both non-human primates and humans. In this study, we designed a clade C env gene (EY3E1-C) to decrease the genetic distances of virus isolates within clade C and focus the induced T cell responses to conserved clade C epitopes. After generating a consensus sequence by analyzing full-length clade C env early transmitter sequences, several modifications were performed to increase the expression of the EY3E1-C, including codon/RNA optimization, addition of Kozak sequence and addition of an IgE leader sequence. We also shortened the V1 and V2 loops to approximate early transmitter isolate sequences and the cytoplasmic tail was truncated to prevent envelope recycling. When studied as a DNA vaccine in Balb/c mice, compared to a primary codon-optimized clade C envelope DNA vaccine (p96ZM651gp140-CD5), this novel construct is up to three times more potent in driving CTL responses. Importantly this construct not only induces stronger cross-reactive cellular responses within clade C, it also induces stronger immune responses against clade B and group M envelope peptide pools than p96ZM651gp140-CD5. Epitope mapping demonstrated that EY3E1-C was able to induce clade C envelope-specific immune responses against 15 peptide pools, clade B envelope-specific immune responses against 19 peptide pools and group M envelope-specific immune responses against 16 peptide pools out of 29, respectively, indicating that a significant increase in the breadth of induced immune responses. The analysis of antibody responses suggested that vaccination of pEY3E1-C could induce a clade C envelope-specific antibody response. The cellular immune responses of pEY3E1-C could be further enhanced when the DNA was delivered by using electroporation (EP). Thus, the synthetic engineered consensus EY3E1-C gene is capable of eliciting stronger and broader CTL responses than primary clade C envelopes. This finding

  7. Bursal transcriptome of chickens protected by DNA vaccination versus those challenged with infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Chun; Kim, Bong-Suk; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) infection destroys the bursa of Fabricius, causing immunosuppression and rendering chickens susceptible to secondary bacterial or viral infections. IBDV large-segment-protein-expressing DNA has been shown to confer complete protection of chickens from infectious bursal disease (IBD). The purpose of the present study was to compare DNA-vaccinated chickens and unvaccinated chickens upon IBDV challenge by transcriptomic analysis of bursa regarding innate immunity, inflammation, immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport. One-day-old specific-pathogen-free chickens were vaccinated intramuscularly three times at weekly intervals with IBDV large-segment-protein-expressing DNA. Chickens were challenged orally with 8.2 × 10(2) times the egg infective dose (EID)50 of IBDV strain variant E (VE) one week after the last vaccination. Bursae collected at 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days post-challenge (dpc) were subjected to real-time RT-PCR quantification of bursal transcripts related to innate immunity, inflammation, immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport. The expression levels of granzyme K and CD8 in DNA-vaccinated chickens were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those in unvaccinated chickens upon IBDV challenge at 0.5 or 1 dpc. The expression levels of other genes involved in innate immunity, inflammation, immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport were not upregulated or downregulated in DNA-vaccinated chickens during IBDV challenge. Bursal transcripts related to innate immunity and inflammation, including TLR3, MDA5, IFN-α, IFN-β, IRF-1, IRF-10, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, granzyme A, granzyme K and IL-10, were upregulated or significantly (p < 0.05) upregulated at 3 dpc and later in unvaccinated chickens challenged with IBDV. The expression levels of genes related to immune cell regulation, apoptosis and glucose transport, including CD4, CD8, IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12(p40), IL-18, GM-CSF, GATA-3

  8. Isolation and molecular characterization of Fikirini rhabdovirus, a novel virus from a Kenyan bat.

    PubMed

    Kading, Rebekah C; Gilbert, Amy T; Mossel, Eric C; Crabtree, Mary B; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Markotter, Wanda; Weil, M Ryan; Montgomery, Joel M; Rupprecht, Charles E; Miller, Barry R

    2013-11-01

    Zoonotic and vector-borne pathogens have comprised a significant component of emerging human infections in recent decades, and bats are increasingly recognized as reservoirs for many of these disease agents. To identify novel pathogens associated with bats, we screened tissues of bats collected in Kenya. Virus isolates were identified by next generation sequencing of viral nucleic acid preparations from the infected cell culture supernatant and characterized. Here we report the identification of Fikirini rhabdovirus, a novel rhabdovirus isolated from a bat, Hipposideros vittatus, captured along the Kenyan coast. PMID:23939976

  9. The relative immunogenicity of DNA vaccines delivered by the intramuscular needle injection, electroporation and gene gun methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chunghua; Zhang, Lu; Li, Jun; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2008-04-16

    Immunogenicity of DNA vaccines varies significantly due to many factors including the inherent immunogenicity of the protein antigen encoded in the DNA vaccine, the optimal immune responses that can be achieved in different animal models and in humans with different genetic backgrounds and, to a great degree, the delivery methods used to administer the DNA vaccines. Based on published results, only the gene gun-mediated delivery approach has been able to elicit protective levels of immune responses in healthy, adult volunteers by DNA immunization alone without the use of another vaccine modality as a boost. Recent results from animal studies suggest that electroporation is also effective in eliciting high level immune responses. However, there have been no reports to identify the similarities and differences between these two leading physical delivery methods for DNA vaccines against infectious disease targets. In the current study, we compared the relative immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine expressing a hemagglutinin (HA) antigen from an H5N1 influenza virus in two animal models (rabbit and mouse) when delivered by either intramuscular needle immunization (IM), gene gun (GG) or electroporation (EP). HA-specific antibody, T cell and B cell responses were analyzed. Our results indicate that, overall, both the GG and EP methods are more immunogenic than the IM method. However, EP and IM stimulated a Th-1 type antibody response and the antibody response to GG was Th-2 dominated. These findings provide important information for the further selection and optimization of DNA vaccine delivery methods for human applications. PMID:18378365

  10. Enhanced non-inflammasome mediated immune responses by mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposomes for HIV DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chenmeng; Liu, Jiandong; Yang, Jun; Li, Yan; Weng, Jie; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA vaccine can induce cellular and humoral immunity. A safe and effective HIV DNA vaccine is urgent need to prevent the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The major drawback of DNA vaccines is the low immunogenicity, which is caused by the poor delivery to antigen presenting cells and insufficient antigen expression. Sparked by the capability of endosomal/lysosomal escape of the zwitterionic lipid distearoyl phosphoethanol-amine-polycarboxybetaine (DSPE-PCB), we attempted to develop a zwitterionic-based cationic liposome with enhanced immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. The mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposome (man-ZCL) was constructed as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for HIV vaccination. Man-ZCL could complex with DNA antigens to form a tight structure and protect them from nuclei enzyme degradation. Benefited from the capability of the specific mannose receptor mediated antigen processing cells targeting and enhanced endosomal/lysosomal escape, the man-ZCL lipoplexes were supposed to promote antigen presentation and the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In vitro and in vivo results revealed that man-ZCL lipoplexes showed enhanced anti-HIV immune responses and lower toxicity compared with CpG/DNA and Lipo2k/DNA, and triggered a Th1/Th2 mixed immunity. An antigen-depot effect was observed in the administration site, and this resulted in enhanced retention of DNA antigens in draining lymph nodes. Most importantly, the man-ZCL could assist to activate T cells through a non-inflammasome pathway. These findings suggested that the man-ZCL could be potentially applied as a safe and efficient DNA adjuvant for HIV vaccines. PMID:26851653

  11. Secure splenic delivery of plasmid DNA and its application to DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Kodama, Yukinobu; Muro, Takahiro; Higuchi, Norihide; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Kitahara, Takashi; Miyakoda, Mana; Yui, Katsuyuki; Sasaki, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    In this experiment, we developed a novel safe and effective gene delivery vector coated with γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA-coated complexes). The γ-PGA-coated complex was composed of chiseled spherical nano-particles with anionic charges. The plasmid DNA/polyethyleneimine complex (non-coated complex) showed high transgene efficiency in the spleen and lung after intravenous administration in mice, with high liver toxicity and lethality. On the other hand, γ-PGA-coated complex selectively showed high transgene efficiency in the spleen without such toxicity. Furthermore, the γ-PGA-coated complex highly accumulated and showed high gene expression in the marginal zone of the spleen. Those results strongly indicated that γ-PGA-coated complex was suitable as a DNA vaccine vector. We therefore applied γ-PGA-coated complex to melanoma DNA vaccine, pUb-M. The γ-PGA-coated complex containing pUb-M significantly inhibited the growth and metastasis of a melanoma cell line, B16-F10 cells. In conclusion, we developed a splenic gene vector, γ-PGA-coated complex, as a novel technology for clinical vaccination. PMID:24189423

  12. Immunogenicity of a novel enhanced consensus DNA vaccine encoding the leptospiral protein LipL45

    PubMed Central

    Vijayachari, P; Vedhagiri, K; Mallilankaraman, K; Mathur, PP; Sardesai, NY; Weiner, DB; Ugen, KE; Muthumani, K

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a bacterial zoonotic disease caused by an infection with a spirochete belonging to the genus Leptospira. In animals, leptospirosis displays a wide range of pathologies, including fever, abortion, icterus, and uveitis. Conversely, infection in humans is associated with multi-organ injury, resulting in an increased rate of fatalities. Pathogenic leptospires are able to translocate through cell monolayers at a rate significantly greater than that of non-pathogenic leptospires. Thus, vaccine approaches have been focused on targeting bacterial motility, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), lipoproteins, outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) and other potential virulence factors. Previous studies have indicated that leptospiral proteins elicit long-lasting immunological memory in infected humans. In the study reported here, the efficacy of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine developed against the Leptospira membrane lipoprotein LipL45 was tested. After in vivo electroporation (EP) mediated intramuscular immunization with a synthetic LipL45 DNA vaccine (pLipL45) immunized mice developed a significant cellular response along with the development of anti-LipL45-specific antibodies. Specifically, the pLipL45 vaccine induced a significant Th1 type immune response, indicated by the higher production of IL-12 and IFN-γ cytokines. The results presented here are the first demonstration that a LipL45 based DNA immunogen has potential as a anti-Leptospira vaccine. PMID:26020621

  13. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Sparger, Ellen E. Dubie, Robert A.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Cole, Kelly S.; Chang, W.L.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2008-05-10

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus.

  14. Clinical Development of a Cytomegalovirus DNA Vaccine: From Product Concept to Pivotal Phase 3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Larry R.; Wloch, Mary K.; Chaplin, Jennifer A.; Gerber, Michele; Rolland, Alain P.

    2013-01-01

    2013 marks a milestone year for plasmid DNA vaccine development as a first-in-class cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA vaccine enters pivotal phase 3 testing. This vaccine consists of two plasmids expressing CMV antigens glycoprotein B (gB) and phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) formulated with a CRL1005 poloxamer and benzalkonium chloride (BAK) delivery system designed to enhance plasmid expression. The vaccine’s planned initial indication under investigation is for prevention of CMV reactivation in CMV-seropositive (CMV+) recipients of an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT). A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled phase 2 proof-of-concept study provided initial evidence of the safety of this product in CMV+ HCT recipients who underwent immune ablation conditioning regimens. This study revealed a significant reduction in viral load endpoints and increased frequencies of pp65-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells in vaccine recipients compared to placebo recipients. The results of this endpoint-defining trial provided the basis for defining the primary and secondary endpoints of a global phase 3 trial in HCT recipients. A case study is presented here describing the development history of this vaccine from product concept to initiation of the phase 3 trial. PMID:26344340

  15. Construction and nonclinical testing of a Puumala virus synthetic M gene-based DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Brocato, R L; Josleyn, M J; Wahl-Jensen, V; Schmaljohn, C S; Hooper, J W

    2013-02-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Although PUUV-associated HFRS does not result in high case-fatality rates, the social and economic impact is considerable. There is no licensed vaccine or specific therapeutic to prevent or treat HFRS. Here we report the synthesis of a codon-optimized, full-length M segment open reading frame and its cloning into a DNA vaccine vector to produce the plasmid pWRG/PUU-M(s2). pWRG/PUU-M(s2) delivered by gene gun produced high-titer neutralizing antibodies in hamsters and nonhuman primates. Vaccination with pWRG/PUU-M(s2) protected hamsters against infection with PUUV but not against infection by related HFRS-associated hantaviruses. Unexpectedly, vaccination protected hamsters in a lethal disease model of Andes virus (ANDV) in the absence of ANDV cross-neutralizing antibodies. This is the first evidence that an experimental DNA vaccine for HFRS can provide protection in a hantavirus lethal disease model. PMID:23239797

  16. Anti-HER-2 DNA vaccine protects Syrian hamsters against squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Berta, G N; Mognetti, B; Spadaro, M; Trione, E; Amici, A; Forni, G; Di Carlo, F; Cavallo, F

    2005-01-01

    This paper illustrates the efficacy of DNA vaccination through electroporation in the prevention of oral transplantable carcinoma in Syrian hamsters. At 21 and 7 days before tumour challenge, 19 hamsters were vaccinated with plasmids coding for the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rat HER-2 receptor (EC-TM plasmids), whereas 19 control hamsters were injected intramuscularly with the empty plasmid. Immediately following plasmid injection, hamsters of both groups received two square-wave 25 ms, 375 V cm−1 electric pulses via two electrodes placed on the skin of the injection area. At day 0, all hamsters were challenged in the submucosa of the right cheek pouch with HER-2-positive HCPC I cells established in vitro from an 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced oral carcinoma. This challenge gave rise to HER-2-positive buccal neoplastic lesions in 14 controls (73.37%), compared with only seven (36.8%, P<0.0027) vaccinated hamsters. In addition, the vaccinated hamsters displayed both a stronger proliferative and cytotoxic response than the controls and a significant anti-HER-2 antibody response. Most of the hamsters that rejected the challenge displayed the highest antibody titres. These findings suggest that DNA vaccination may have a future in the prevention of HER-2-positive human oral cancer. PMID:16265350

  17. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  18. Immune responses in DNA vaccine formulated with PMMA following immunization and after challenge with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Zarrati, Somayeh; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a major infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Despite of many efforts toward vaccine against Leishmania no effective vaccine has been approved yet. DNA vaccines can generate more powerful and broad immune responses than conventional vaccines. In order to increase immunity, the DNA vaccine has been supplemented with adjuvant. In this study a new nano-vaccine containing TSA recombinant plasmid and poly(methylmethacrylate) nanoparticles (act as adjuvant) was designed and its immunogenicity tested on BALB/c mouse. After three intramuscular injection of nano-vaccine (100 μg), the recombinant TSA protein (20 μg) was injected subcutaneously. Finally as a challenge animals were infected by Leishmania major. After the last injection of nano-vaccine, after protein booster injection, and also after challenge, cellular immune and antibody responses were evaluated by ELISA method. The findings of this study showed the new nano-vaccine was capable of induction both cytokines secretion and specific antibody responses, but predominant Th1 immune response characterized by IFN-γ production compared to control groups. Moreover, results revealed that nano-vaccine was effective in reducing parasite burden in the spleen of Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice. Base on results, current candidate vaccine has potency for further studies. PMID:27413316

  19. Development of novel DNA vaccine for VEGF in murine cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Kyutoku, Mariko; Nakagami, Hironori; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Tomioka, Hideki; Nakagami, Futoshi; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Zhengda, Pang; Jo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jeong Hun; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    We developed DNA vaccine for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which may provide the therapeutic option instead of anti-VEGF antibody, bevacizumab. Plasmid containing VEGF mini-gene was constructed in the insertion of B-cell epitope of Hepatitis B core protein [HBc-VEGF], which was an epitope carrier. High titer of anti-VEGF antibody was observed in BALB/c mice which were intramuscularly immunized with HBc-VEGF by electropolator. In mice inoculated with colon 26 cells, tumor volume and microvessel density was decreased in HBc-VEGF with a significant prolonged survival. Co-treatment of purified IgG from immunized mice with HBc-VEGF showed in vitro neutralizing activity for VEGF-induced ERK phosphorylation and tube formation in cultured endothelial cells. Furthermore, intravitreally injection of this purified IgG reduced the neovessel formation in the mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization models. These results first provided that DNA vaccine against VEGF possessed the anti-angiogenic effect, leading to prolonged survival in mouse cancer model. PMID:24287585

  20. SIV DNA vaccine trial in macaques: post-challenge necropsy in vaccine and control groups.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Manson, K; Wyand, M; Robinson, H L

    1997-06-01

    In this study we describe the histopathologic findings from nine macaques in a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine trial evaluating the ability of a 5-plasmid DNA vaccine to protect against an uncloned SIVmac251 challenge (Lu et al., J. Virol. 1996, 70, 3978-3991). Three vaccinated and one control macaque developed disease and were euthanized in the first year following challenge. The other four vaccinated and one control macaque remained clinically normal and were euthanized at the end of the trial (60 weeks post-challenge). The necropsy data revealed that both diseased and clinically normal macaques had developed typical SIV-related lymphoid changes, inflammatory disorders and opportunistic infections. All animals had variable degrees of follicular and/or paracortical lymphoid hyperplasia suggesting immune activation. All but one vaccinated macaque and both control macaques had SIV-associated opportunistic infections. Within the small groups of animals, the ability to contain opportunistic infections was superior, and the overall lymphoid changes less severe, in the macaques that had received vaccine DNAs by three routes of inoculation (intravenous, intramuscular and gene gun) than in those that had received control DNAs or vaccine DNAs by gene gun only. In the future it will be important to further test how the route and method of DNA inoculation impact the efficacy of immunodeficiency virus vaccines. PMID:9234548

  1. DNA/Amphiphilic Block Copolymer Nanospheres Promote Low-dose DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    McIlroy, Dorian; Barteau, Benoît; Cany, Jeannette; Richard, Peggy; Gourden, Clothilde; Conchon, Sophie; Pitard, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Intramuscular (i.m.) DNA vaccination induces strong cellular immune responses in the mouse, but only at DNA doses that cannot be achieved in humans. Because antigen expression is weak after naked DNA injection, we screened five nonionic block copolymers of poly(ethyleneoxide)-poly(propyleneoxide) (PEO-PPO) for their ability to enhance DNA vaccination using a β-galactosidase (βGal) encoding plasmid, pCMV-βGal, as immunogen. At a high DNA dose, formulation with the tetrafunctional block copolymers 304 (molecular weight [MW] 1,650) and 704 (MW 5,500) and the triblock copolymer Lutrol (MW 8,600) increased βGal-specific interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) responses 2–2.5-fold. More importantly, 704 allowed significant reductions in the dose of antigen-encoding plasmid. A single injection of 2 µg pCMV-βGal with 704 gave humoral and ELISPOT responses equivalent to those obtained with 100 µg naked DNA and conferred protection in tumor vaccination models. However, 704 had no adjuvant properties for βGal protein, and immune responses were only elicited by low doses of pCMV-βGal formulated with 704 if noncoding carrier DNA was added to maintain total DNA dose at 20 µg. Overall, these results show that formulation with 704 and carrier DNA can reduce the dose of antigen-encoding plasmid by at least 50-fold. PMID:19417740

  2. Mixing of M segment DNA vaccines to Hantaan virus and Puumala virus reduces their immunogenicity in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine; Mathiessen, Iacob; Tjelle, Torunn; Hooper, Jay W; Schmaljohn, Connie

    2008-09-19

    To determine if DNA vaccines for two hantaviruses causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, Hantaan virus and Puumala virus, are immunogenic when given in combination, we delivered them to hamsters separately or as mixtures by gene gun or by electroporation. Both vaccines elicited neutralizing antibodies when given alone but when they were delivered as a mixture, antibodies to only one of the two hantaviruses could be detected. In contrast, if the DNAs were given as separate vaccinations to a single animal, responses to both were observed. These studies suggest that the two DNA vaccines will need to be given as separate administrations. PMID:18482782

  3. Antibiotic-free production of a herpes simplex virus 2 DNA vaccine in a high yield cGMP process

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jared; Rodriguez, Stephen; Finlayson, Neil; Williams, Jim; Carnes, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Two DNA vaccine plasmids encoding Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D, NTC8485-O2-gD2 and NTC8485-O2-UgD2tr, were produced at large scale under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) for use in a Phase I human clinical trial. These DNA vaccines incorporate the regulatory agency compliant, minimal, antibiotic-free (AF) NTC8485 mammalian expression vector. Plasmid yields of > 1 g/L were achieved using the HyperGRO™ fed-batch fermentation process, with successful scale up from 10 L process development scale to 320 L culture volume for cGMP production. The DNA vaccines were purified using a low residence time, high shear lysis process and AIRMIXTM technology, followed by chromatographic purification. This combination of optimized plasmid vector, high yield upstream production, and efficient downstream purification resulted in purified HSV-2 DNA vaccines with > 99% total supercoiled plasmid, ≤ 0.2% RNA, ≤ 0.1% host cell genomic DNA, and ≤ 0.1 endotoxin units per mg. PMID:23899469

  4. Long-Term Reduction of High Blood Pressure by Angiotensin II DNA Vaccine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Nakagami, Futoshi; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Kyutoku, Mariko; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-07-01

    Recent research on vaccination has extended its scope from infectious diseases to chronic diseases, including Alzheimer disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The aim of this study was to design DNA vaccines for high blood pressure and eventually develop human vaccine therapy to treat hypertension. Plasmid vector encoding hepatitis B core-angiotensin II (Ang II) fusion protein was injected into spontaneously hypertensive rats using needleless injection system. Anti-Ang II antibody was successfully produced in hepatitis B core-Ang II group, and antibody response against Ang II was sustained for at least 6 months. Systolic blood pressure was consistently lower in hepatitis B core-Ang II group after immunization, whereas blood pressure reduction was continued for at least 6 months. Perivascular fibrosis in heart tissue was also significantly decreased in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. Survival rate was significantly improved in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. This study demonstrated that Ang II DNA vaccine to spontaneously hypertensive rats significantly lowered high blood pressure for at least 6 months. In addition, Ang II DNA vaccines induced an adequate humoral immune response while avoiding the activation of self-reactive T cells, assessed by ELISPOT assay. Future development of DNA vaccine to treat hypertension may provide a new therapeutic option to treat hypertension. PMID:26015450

  5. Delivery of DNA vaccines by agarose hydrogel implants facilitates genetic immunization in cattle.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, J F; Dubois, A; Dispas, M; Paquet, D; Letellier, C; Kerkhofs, P

    2007-01-26

    The present study demonstrates the interest of two slow-release systems as vaccination tools in cattle. Two experiments show that a first intradermal administration of one DNA vaccine dose combined with the slow-release of a second dose conduct to a priming of the bovine herpesvirus 1-specific immune response similar to the one generated by two discrete administrations 4 weeks apart. The first experiment demonstrates the efficacy of the slow-release system with well-characterized Alzet osmotic pumps, whereas the second experiment extends the same concept with innovative agarose hydrogel implants. These latter implants are cheaper and more convenient than the osmotic pumps or repeated intradermal administrations since they contribute to an efficient priming of the immune response in a single manipulation of the animals. PMID:17084488

  6. Improved antibiotic-free DNA vaccine vectors utilizing a novel RNA based plasmid selection system

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Jeremy; Carnes, Aaron E; Hodgson, Clague P; Williams, James A

    2009-01-01

    To ensure safety, regulatory agencies recommend elimination of antibiotic resistance markers from therapeutic and vaccine plasmid DNA vectors. Here, we describe the development and application of a novel antibiotic-free selection system. Vectors incorporate and express a 150 bp RNA-OUT antisense RNA. RNA-OUT represses expression of a chromosomally integrated constitutively expressed counter-selectable marker (sacB), allowing plasmid selection on sucrose. Sucrose selectable DNA vaccine vectors combine antibiotic-free selection with highly productive fermentation manufacturing (>1 gm/L plasmid DNA yields), while improving in vivo expression of encoded proteins and increasing immune responses to target antigens. These vectors are safer, more potent, alternatives for DNA therapy or vaccination. PMID:19559109

  7. Designing and Construction of a DNA Vaccine Encoding Tb10.4 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rashidian, Samira; Teimourpour, Roghayeh; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains as a major cause of death. Construction of a new vaccine against tuberculosis is an effective way to control it. Several vaccines against this disease have been developed. The aim of the present study was to cloning of tb10.4 gene in pcDNA3.1+ plasmid and evaluation of its expression in eukaryotic cells. Methods: Firstly, tb10.4 fragment was amplified by PCR and the PCR product was digested with restriction enzymes. Next, it was cloned into pcDNA3.1+ plasmid. Following that, pcDNA3.1+/tb10.4 recombinant plasmid was transfected into eukaryotic cells. Results: 5700 bp band for pcDNA3.1+/tb10.4 recombinant plasmid and 297 bp fragment for tb10.4 were observed. Cloning and transfection were successful. Conclusion: Successful cloning provides a basis for the development of new DNA vaccines against tuberculosis.

  8. HBV DNA vaccine with adjuvant cytokines induced specific immune responses against HBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Du, De-Wei; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Li, Guang-Yu; Zhou, Yong-Ying

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To seek for an effective method to improve the immune responses induced by DNA vaccine expressing HBV surface antigen (pCR3.1-S) in Balb/c mice (H-2d). METHODS: The pCR3.1-S plasmid and the eukaryotic expression vectors expressing murine IL-2 (pDOR-IL-2) or IL-12 (pWRG3169) were injected into mice subcutaneously. The immune responses to pCR3.1-S and the adjuvant effect of the cytokines plasmid were studied. Meanwhile the effect of pCR3.1-S on anti-translated subcutaneous tumor of P815 mastocytoma cells stably expressing HBsAg (P815-HBV-S) was also studied. Anti-HBs in serum was detected by enzyme-linked immunoadsordent assay (ELISA) and HBsAg specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) activity was measured by 51Cr release assay. After three weeks of DNA immunization, the cells of P815-HBV-S were inoculated into mice subcutaneously and the tumor growth was measured every five days. The survival rate and living periods of mice were also calculated. RESULTS: After 8 wk DNA immunization, the A 450 nm values of sera in mice immunized with pCR3.1, pCR3.1-S and pCR3.1-S codeliveried with IL-2 or IL-12 plasmids were 0.03 ± 0.01, 1.24 ± 0.10, 1.98 ± 0.17 and 1.67 ± 0.12 respectively. Data in mice codeliveried pCR3.1-S with IL-2 or IL-12 plasmids were significantly higher than that of mice injected pCR3.1 or pCR3.1-S only. The HBsAg specific CTL activities in mice coinjected with pCR3.1-S and IL-2 or IL-12 eukaryotic expression vectors were (61.9 ± 7.1)% and (73.3 ± 8.8)%, which were significantly higher than that of mice injected with pCR3.1 (10.1 ± 2.1)% or pCR3.1-S (50.5 ± 6.4)%. The HBsAg specific CTL activities in mice injected with pCR3.1, pCR3.1-S, pCR3.1-S combined with IL-2 or IL-12 eukaryotic expression vectors decreased significantly to (3.2 ± 0.8)%, (10.6 ± 1.4)%, (13.6 ± 1.3)% and (16.9 ± 2.3)% respectively after the spleen cells were treated by anti-CD8+ monoclonal antibody, but presented no significant change to anti-CD4+ monoclonal antibody or

  9. Co-administration of antigen with chemokine MCP-3 or MDC/CCL22 enhances DNA vaccine potency.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinmei; Wang, Lin; Yang, Wenliang; Yu, Ruishuang; Li, Qingli; Pang, Xiaobin

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the utility of chemokine MCP-3 and MDC/CCL22 as molecular adjuvants of DNA vaccines for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) in a Balb/c mouse model. Notably, the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine against BoNT/A was not enhanced using a fusion of the AHc-C antigen with the MCP-3 or MDC/CCL22. Nevertheless, the potency of the DNA vaccine was significantly modulated and enhanced by co-administration of the AHc-C antigen with MCP-3 or MDC/CCL22. This strategy elicited high levels of humoral immune responses and protection against BoNT/A. The enhanced potency was further boosted by co-administration of the AHc-C antigen with both MCP-3 and MDC/CCL22 in Balb/c mice, but not by co-administration of AHc-C antigen with the MCP-3-MDC/CCL22 fusion. Co-immunization with both the MCP-3 and MDC/CCL22 constructs induced the highest levels of humoral immunity and protective potency against BoNT/A. Our results indicated that MCP-3 and MDC/CCL22 are effective molecular adjuvants of the immune responses induced by the AHc-C-expressing DNA vaccine when delivered by co-administration of the individual chemokines, but not when delivered in the form of a chemokine/antigen fusion. Thus, we describe an alternative strategy to the design and optimization of DNA vaccine constructs based on co-administration of the antigen with the chemokine rather than in the form of a chemokine/antigen fusion. PMID:25952465

  10. Evaluation of attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis-mediated inhibin recombinant DNA vaccine in rats.

    PubMed

    Hui, F M; Meng, C L; Guo, N N; Yang, L G; Shi, F X; Mao, D G

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccination has been studied intensively as a potential vaccine technology. We evaluated the effect of an attenuated Salmonella choleraesuis-mediated inhibin DNA vaccine in rats. First, 15 rats were treated with different doses of an inhibin vaccine to evaluate vaccine safety. Next, 30 rats were divided into 3 groups and injected intramuscularly with the inhibin vaccine two (T1) or three times (T2) or with control bacteria (Con) at 4-week intervals. The inhibin antibody levels increased [positive/negative well (P/N) value: T1 vs Con = 2.39 ± 0.01 vs 1.08 ± 0.1; T2 vs Con = 2.36 ± 0.1 vs 1.08 ± 0.1, P < 0.05] at week 2 and were maintained at a high level in T1 and T2 until week 8, although a small decrease in T2 was observed at week 10. Rats in the T1 group showed more corpora lutea compared with the Con group (10.50 ± 0.87 vs 7.4 ± 0.51, P < 0.05). Estradiol (0.439 ± 0.052 vs 0.719 ± 0.063 ng/mL, P < 0.05) and progesterone (1.315 ± 0.2 vs 0.737 ± 0.11 ng/mL, P < 0.05) levels differed significantly at metestrus after week 10 between rats in the T1 and Con groups. However, there were no significant differences in body, ovary, uterus weights, or pathological signs in the ovaries after immunization, indicating that this vaccine is safe. In conclusion, the attenuated S. choleraesuis-mediated inhibin vaccine may be an alternative to naked inhibin plasmids for stimulating ovarian follicular development to increase the ovulation rate in rats. PMID:25117370

  11. A comparison of DNA vaccines for the rabies-related virus, Mokola.

    PubMed

    Nel, L H; Niezgoda, M; Hanlon, C A; Morril, P A; Yager, P A; Rupprecht, C E

    2003-06-01

    Mokola virus, a rabies-related virus, has been reported to date from the African continent only. Like rabies virus, it is highly pathogenic, causes acute encephalitis, and zoonotic events have been documented. Although believed to be rare, there has been an unexplained increase in the number of isolations of the virus in South Africa in recent years. We have cloned and sequenced the glycoprotein (G) and nucleoprotein (N) genes from a South African Mokola virus, and used these in the construction of different DNA vaccines for immunization against Mokola virus. Four vaccines, utilizing different promoters and DNA backbone compositions, were generated and compared for efficacy in protection against Mokola virus. In one of these, both the Mokola virus G and N genes were co-expressed. Two of the single G-expressing DNA vaccines (based on pSG5 and pCI-neo, respectively) protected laboratory mice against lethal challenge, despite major differences in their promoters. However, neither vaccine was fully protective in a single immunization only. Serological assays confirmed titers of virus-neutralizing antibodies after immunization, which increased upon booster vaccine administration. A third construct (based on pBudCE4) was less effective in inducing a protective immune response, despite employing a strong CMV enhancer/promoter also used in the pCI-neo plasmid. Dual expression of Mokola virus G and N genes in pBudCE4 did not enhance its efficacy, under the conditions described. In addition, no significant utility could be demonstrated for a combined prime-boost approach, as no cross-protective immunity was observed against rabies or Mokola viruses from the use of pSG5-mokG or vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus vaccines, respectively, even though both vaccines provided 60-100% protection against homologous virus challenge. PMID:12744896

  12. Protective Immunity to H7N9 Influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O.; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S.; Walters, Jewell N.; Morrow, Matthew P.; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses’ ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases. PMID:24631084

  13. Protective immunity to H7N9 influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S; Walters, Jewell N; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2014-05-19

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses' ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases. PMID:24631084

  14. Enhancement of Poly(orthoester) Microspheres for DNA Vaccine Delivery by Blending with Poly(ethylenimine)

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, David N.; Raghavan, Shyam S.; Tashima, Lauren M.; Lin, Elizabeth C.; Fredette, Stephen J.; Langer, Robert S.; Wang, Chun

    2008-01-01

    Poly(ortho ester) (POE) microspheres have been previously shown to possess certain advantages for the in vivo delivery of DNA vaccines. In particular, timing of DNA release from POE microspheres in response to acidic phagosomal pH was shown to be an important factor in determining immunogenicity, which was hypothesized to be linked to the natural progression of antigen presenting cell uptake, transfection, maturation, and antigen presentation. Here we report in vitro characterization of the enhanced the efficacy of POE microspheres by blending poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), a well-characterized cationic transfection agent, into the POE matrix. Blending of a tiny amount of PEI (approximately 0.04 wt%) with POE caused large alterations in POE microsphere properties. PEI provided greater control over the rate of pH-triggered DNA release by doubling the total release time of plasmid DNA and enhanced gene transfection efficiency of the microspheres up to 50-fold without any significant cytotoxicity. Confocal microscopy with labeled PEI and DNA plasmids revealed that PEI caused a surface-localizing distribution of DNA and PEI within the POE microsphere as well as focal co-localization of PEI with DNA. We provide evidence that upon degradation, the microspheres of POE-PEI blends released electrostatic complexes of DNA and PEI, which are responsible for the enhanced gene transfection. Furthermore, blending PEI into the POE microsphere induced 50% to 60% greater phenotypic maturation and activation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in vitro, judged by up-regulation of co-stimulatory markers on the cell surface. Physically blending PEI with POE is a simple approach for modulating the properties of biodegradable microspheres in terms of gene transfection efficiency and DNA release kinetics. Combined with the ability to induce maturation of antigen-presenting cells, POE-PEI blended microspheres may be excellent carriers for DNA vaccines. PMID:18400294

  15. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as novel carrier for oral DNA vaccines in Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Nana; Xu, Kun; Li, Xinyi; Liu, Yuwan; Bai, Yichun; Zhang, Xiaohan; Han, Baoquan; Chen, Zhilong; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-12-01

    Oral delivery of DNA vaccines represents a promising vaccinating method for fish. Recombinant yeast has been proved to be a safe carrier for delivering antigen proteins and DNAs to some species in vivo. However, whether recombinant yeast can be used to deliver functional DNAs for vaccination to fish is still unknown. In this study, red crucian carp (Carassius auratus) was orally administrated with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring CMV-EGFP expression cassette. On day 5 post the first vaccination, EGFP expression in the hindgut was detected under fluorescence microscope. To further study whether the delivered gene could induce specific immune responses, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) was used as immunogen, and oral administrations were conducted with recombinant S. cerevisiae harboring pCMV-OVA mammalian gene expression cassette as gene delivery or pADH1-OVA yeast gene expression cassette as protein delivery. Each administration was performed with three different doses, and the OVA-specific serum antibody was detected in all the experimental groups by western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ELISA assay also revealed that pCMV-OVA group with lower dose (pCMV-OVA-L) and pADH1-OVA group with moderate dose (pADH1-OVA-M) triggered relatively stronger antibody response than the other two doses. Moreover, the antibody level induced by pCMV-OVA-L group was significantly higher than pADH1-OVA-M group at the same serum dilutions. All the results suggested that recombinant yeast can be used as a potential carrier for oral DNA vaccines and would help to develop more practical strategies to control infectious diseases in aquaculture. PMID:26481518

  16. The MSHA strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa activated TLR pathway and enhanced HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jue; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2012-01-01

    The mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA) has been shown to trigger naïve immune responses through the activation of monocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells (NK cells) and antigen presenting cells (APCs). Based on the hypothesis that PA-MSHA activates natural immunity through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, we scanned several critical TLR pathway molecules in mouse splenocytes using high-throughput real-time QRT-PCR and co-stimulatory molecule in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) following in vitro stimulation by PA-MSHA. PA-MSHA enabled activation of the TLR pathway mediated by NF-κB and JNK signaling in splenocytes, and the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 was up-regulated in BMDCs. We then assessed the adjuvant effect of PA-MSHA for HIV-1 DNA vaccines. In comparison to DNA inoculation alone, co-inoculation with low dosage of PA-MSHA enhanced specific immunoreactivity against HIV-1 Env in both cellular and humoral responses, and promoted antibody avidity maturation. However, high doses of adjuvant resulted in an immunosuppressive effect; a two- or three-inoculation regimen yielded low antibody responses and the two-inoculation regimen exhibited only a slight cellular immunity response. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the utility of PA-MSHA as an adjuvant to a DNA vaccine. Further research is needed to investigate the exact mechanisms through which PA-MSHA achieves its adjuvant effects on innate immune responses, especially on dendritic cells. PMID:23077664

  17. Effective pulmonary delivery of an aerosolized plasmid DNA vaccine via surface acoustic wave nebulization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary-delivered gene therapy promises to mitigate vaccine safety issues and reduce the need for needles and skilled personnel to use them. While plasmid DNA (pDNA) offers a rapid route to vaccine production without side effects or reliance on cold chain storage, its delivery to the lung has proved challenging. Conventional methods, including jet and ultrasonic nebulizers, fail to deliver large biomolecules like pDNA intact due to the shear and cavitational stresses present during nebulization. Methods In vitro structural analysis followed by in vivo protein expression studies served in assessing the integrity of the pDNA subjected to surface acoustic wave (SAW) nebulisation. In vivo immunization trials were then carried out in rats using SAW nebulized pDNA (influenza A, human hemagglutinin H1N1) condensate delivered via intratracheal instillation. Finally, in vivo pulmonary vaccinations using pDNA for influenza was nebulized and delivered via a respirator to sheep. Results The SAW nebulizer was effective at generating pDNA aerosols with sizes optimal for deep lung delivery. Successful gene expression was observed in mouse lung epithelial cells, when SAW-nebulized pDNA was delivered to male Swiss mice via intratracheal instillation. Effective systemic and mucosal antibody responses were found in rats via post-nebulized, condensed fluid instillation. Significantly, we demonstrated the suitability of the SAW nebulizer to administer unprotected pDNA encoding an influenza A virus surface glycoprotein to respirated sheep via aerosolized inhalation. Conclusion Given the difficulty of inducing functional antibody responses for DNA vaccination in large animals, we report here the first instance of successful aerosolized inhalation delivery of a pDNA vaccine in a large animal model relevant to human lung development, structure, physiology, and disease, using a novel, low-power (<1 W) surface acoustic wave (SAW) hand-held nebulizer to produce droplets of p

  18. Approaches towards DNA Vaccination against a Skin Ciliate Parasite in Fish

    PubMed Central

    von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; Sigh, Jens; Kania, Per Walter; Holten-Andersen, Lars; Buchmann, Kurt; Clark, Theodore; Rasmussen, Jesper Skou; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Lorenzen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were immunized with plasmid DNA vaccine constructs encoding selected antigens from the parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. Two immobilization antigens (I-ags) and one cysteine protease were tested as genetic vaccine antigen candidates. Antigenicity was evaluated by immunostaining of transfected fish cells using I-ag specific mono- and polyclonal antibodies. I. multifiliis specific antibody production, regulation of immune-relevant genes and/or protection in terms of parasite burden or mortality was measured to evaluate the induced immune response in vaccinated fish. Apart from intramuscular injection, needle free injection and gene gun delivery were tested as alternative administration techniques. For the I-ags the complement protein fragment C3d and the termini of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus glyco(G)protein (VHSV G) were tested as opsonisation and cellular localisation mediators, respectively, while the full length viral G protein was tested as molecular adjuvant. Expression of I-ags in transfected fish cells was demonstrated for several constructs and by immunohistochemistry it was possible to detect expression of a secreted form of the Iag52B in the muscle cells of injected fish. Up-regulations of mRNA coding for IgM, MHC I, MHC II and TCR β, respectively, were observed in muscle tissue at the injection site in selected trials. In the spleen up-regulations were found for IFN-γ and IL-10. The highest up-regulations were seen following co-administration of I-ag and cysteine protease plasmid constructs. This correlated with a slight elevation of an I. multifiliis specific antibody response. However, in spite of detectable antigen expression and immune reactions, none of the tested vaccination strategies provided significant protection. This might suggest an insufficiency of DNA vaccination alone to trigger protective mechanisms against I. multifiliis or that other or additional parasite antigens are required for

  19. A sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein elicits immune responses and complete protection in mice from lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sonal; Dahiya, Shyam S; Sonwane, Arvind A; Patel, Chhabi Lal; Saini, Mohini; Rai, A; Gupta, Praveen K

    2008-12-01

    A sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding rabies virus glycoprotein (G) was developed by subcloning rabies G gene into a sindbis virus replicon-based vaccine vector (pAlpha). The self-amplification of RNA transcripts and translation efficiency of rabies G was analyzed in pAlpha-Rab-G-transfected mammalian cells using RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. The transfected cells also showed induction of apoptosis which is an important event in the enhancement of immune responses. Further, immune responses induced with replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine (pAlpha-Rab-G) was compared with conventional rabies DNA vaccine and commercial cell culture vaccine (Rabipur) in intramuscularly injected mice. The mice immunized with replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine induced humoral and cell mediated immune responses better than conventional rabies DNA vaccine however, comparable to Rabipur vaccine. On challenge with rabies virus CVS strain, replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine conferred complete protection similar to Rabipur. These results demonstrate that replicon-based rabies DNA vaccine is effective in inducing both humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective vaccine against rabies. PMID:18848857

  20. Influenza nucleoprotein DNA vaccination by a skin targeted, dry coated, densely packed microprojection array (Nanopatch) induces potent antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Germain J P; Zhang, Jin; Ng, Hwee-Ing; Haigh, Oscar L; Yukiko, Sally R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-09-10

    DNA vaccines have many advantages such as thermostability and the ease and rapidity of manufacture; for example, in an influenza pandemic situation where rapid production of vaccine is essential. However, immunogenicity of DNA vaccines was shown to be poor in humans unless large doses of DNA are used. If a highly efficacious DNA vaccine delivery system could be identified, then DNA vaccines have the potential to displace protein vaccines. In this study, we show in a C57BL/6 mouse model, that the Nanopatch, a microprojection array of high density (>21,000 projections/cm(2)), could be used to deliver influenza nucleoprotein DNA vaccine to skin, to generate enhanced antigen specific antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses compared to the conventional intramuscular (IM) delivery by the needle and syringe. Antigen specific antibody was measured using ELISA assays of mice vaccinated with a DNA plasmid containing the nucleoprotein gene of influenza type A/WSN/33 (H1N1). Antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses were measured ex-vivo in splenocytes of mice using IFN-γ ELISPOT assays. These results and our previous antibody and CD4(+) T cell results using the Nanopatch delivered HSV DNA vaccine indicate that the Nanopatch is an effective delivery system of general utility that could potentially be used in humans to increase the potency of the DNA vaccines. PMID:27381247

  1. Removing N-terminal sequences in pre-S1 domain enhanced antibody and B-cell responses by an HBV large surface antigen DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ge, Guohong; Wang, Shixia; Han, Yaping; Zhang, Chunhua; Lu, Shan; Huang, Zuhu

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg) protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal models. However, one form of the the HBsAg antigen, the large S antigen (HBs-L), expressed by DNA vaccine, was not sufficiently immunogenic in eliciting antibody responses. In the current study, we produced a modified large S antigen DNA vaccine, HBs-L(T), which has a truncated N-terminal sequence in the pre-S1 region. Compared to the original HBs-L DNA vaccine, the HBs-L(T) DNA vaccine improved secretion in cultured mammalian cells and generated significantly enhanced HBsAg-specific antibody and B cell responses. Furthermore, this improved HBsL DNA vaccine, along with other HBsAg-expressing DNA vaccines, was able to maintain predominantly Th1 type antibody responses while recombinant HBsAg protein vaccines produced in either yeast or CHO cells elicited mostly Th2 type antibody responses. Our data indicate that HBsAg DNA vaccines with improved immunogenicity offer a useful alternative choice to recombinant protein-based HBV vaccines, particularly for therapeutic purposes against chronic hepatitis infection where immune tolerance led to poor antibody responses to S antigens. PMID:22844502

  2. Wongabel Rhabdovirus Accessory Protein U3 Targets the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, D. Albert; Rodriguez-Andres, Julio; Monaghan, Paul; Cummins, Michelle; McKinstry, William J.; Paradkar, Prasad N.; Moseley, Gregory W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Wongabel virus (WONV) is an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus that infects birds. It is one of the growing array of rhabdoviruses with complex genomes that encode multiple accessory proteins of unknown function. In addition to the five canonical rhabdovirus structural protein genes (N, P, M, G, and L), the 13.2-kb negative-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) WONV genome contains five uncharacterized accessory genes, one overlapping the N gene (Nx or U4), three located between the P and M genes (U1 to U3), and a fifth one overlapping the G gene (Gx or U5). Here we show that WONV U3 is expressed during infection in insect and mammalian cells and is required for efficient viral replication. A yeast two-hybrid screen against a mosquito cell cDNA library identified that WONV U3 interacts with the 83-amino-acid (aa) C-terminal domain of SNF5, a component of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. The interaction was confirmed by affinity chromatography, and nuclear colocalization was established by confocal microscopy. Gene expression studies showed that SNF5 transcripts are upregulated during infection of mosquito cells with WONV, as well as West Nile virus (Flaviviridae) and bovine ephemeral fever virus (Rhabdoviridae), and that SNF5 knockdown results in increased WONV replication. WONV U3 also inhibits SNF5-regulated expression of the cytokine gene CSF1. The data suggest that WONV U3 targets the SWI/SNF complex to block the host response to infection. IMPORTANCE The rhabdoviruses comprise a large family of RNA viruses infecting plants, vertebrates, and invertebrates. In addition to the major structural proteins (N, P, M, G, and L), many rhabdoviruses encode a diverse array of accessory proteins of largely unknown function. Understanding the role of these proteins may reveal much about host-pathogen interactions in infected cells. Here we examine accessory protein U3 of Wongabel virus, an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus that infects birds. We show that U3 enters the

  3. First isolation of a rhabdovirus from perch Perca fluviatilis in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Wahli, Thomas; Bellec, Laure; von Siebenthal, Beat; Cabon, Joëlle; Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike; Morin, Thierry

    2015-10-16

    Perca fluviatilis is a fish species of increasing interest to the Swiss fish farming industry. In recent years, recirculation systems have been specifically set up to increase production. In one of these farms, abnormal spiral swimming associated with elevated mortalities occurred in repeated batches of imported perch shortly after stocking on several occasions. No bacterial or parasitic etiology was detected, but a virus grown in bluegill fry (BF-2) cells was identified as perch rhabdovirus. Subsequent investigations of other samples suggested a viral tropism for the central nervous system (CNS). Phylogenetic analysis of the partial N and entire G gene sequences positioned this isolate in genogroup C of the species Perch rhabdovirus, with high nucleotide and amino acid (aa) sequence identities with the DK5533 strain isolated in Denmark in 1989. Comparative studies using other closely related isolates allowed the distinction of 2 serological patterns among perch rhabdoviruses and the identification of a proline substitution by a serine in position 147 of the glycoprotein potentially involved in antigenic differentiation. Even if perch imported onto the farm tested negative by virus isolation prior to transport, they may have been the origin of this outbreak since CNS tissue was not included in the samples that were analyzed. Another possibility might be a sub-clinical infection with a viral load in resident fish too low to be detected. This study reports the first isolation of a perch rhabdovirus in Switzerland, and emphasizes the necessity of optimizing diagnostic tools that facilitate better control of the risks associated with fish translocation. PMID:26480912

  4. Adelaide River virus nucleoprotein gene: analysis of phylogenetic relationships of ephemeroviruses and other rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Cowley, J A; Walker, P J

    1995-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Adelaide River virus (ARV) genome was determined from the 3' terminus to the end of the nucleoprotein (N) gene. The 3' leader sequence comprises 50 nucleotides and shares a common terminal trinucleotide (3' UGC-), a conserved U-rich domain and a variable AU-rich domain with other animal rhabdoviruses. The N gene comprises 1355 nucleotides from the transcription start sequence (AACAGG) to the poly(A) sequence [CATG(A)7] and encodes a polypeptide of 429 amino acids. The N protein has a calculated molecular mass of 49429 Da and a pI of 5.4 and, like the bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) N protein, features a highly acidic C-terminal domain. Analysis of amino acid sequence relationships between all available rhabdovirus N proteins indicated that ARV and BEFV are closely related viruses (48.3% similarity) which share higher sequence similarity to vesiculoviruses than to lyssaviruses. Phylogenetic trees based on a multiple sequence alignment of all available rhabdovirus N protein sequences demonstrated clustering of viruses according to genome organization, host range and established taxonomic relationships. PMID:9049348

  5. Comparative analysis of antigen-targeting sequences used in DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Joana A; Azzoni, Adriano R; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2010-03-01

    Plasmid vectors can be optimized by including specific signals that promote antigen targeting to the major antigen presentation and processing pathways, increasing the immunogenicity and potency of DNA vaccines. A pVAX1-based backbone was used to encode the Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) reporter gene fused either to ISG (Invariant Surface Glycoprotein) or to TSA (trans-sialidase) Trypanosoma brucei genes. The plasmids were further engineered to carry antigen-targeting sequences, which promote protein transport to the extracellular space (secretion signal), lysosomes (LAMP-1) and to the endoplasmic reticulum (adenovirus e1a). Transfection efficiency was not affected by differences in the size between each construct as no differences in the plasmid copy number per cell were found. This finding also suggests that the addition of both ISG gene and targeting sequences did not add sensitive regions prone to nuclease attack to the plasmid. Cells transfected with pVAX1GFP had a significant higher number of transcripts. This could be a result of lower mRNA stability and/or a lower transcription rate associated with the bigger transcripts. On the other hand, no differences were found between transcript levels of each ISG-GFP plasmids. Therefore, the addition of these targeting sequences does not affect the maturation/stability of the transcripts. Microscopy analysis showed differences in protein localization and fluorescent levels of cells transfected with pVAX1GFP and ISG constructs. Moreover, cells transfected with the lamp and secretory sequences presented a distinct distribution pattern when compared with ISG protein. Protein expression was quantified by flow cytometry. Higher cell fluorescence was observed in cells expressing the cytoplasmic fusion protein (ISG-GFP or TSA-GFP) compared with cells where the protein was transported to the lysosomal pathway. Protein transport to the endoplasmic reticulum does not lead to a decrease in the mean fluorescence values. The

  6. Altered Response Hierarchy and Increased T-Cell Breadth upon HIV-1 Conserved Element DNA Vaccination in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Alicea, Candido; Singh, Ashish K.; Jalah, Rashmi; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I.; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.

    2014-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and potential decoy epitopes are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. A DNA vaccine candidate comprising of highly conserved p24gag elements (CE) induced robust immunity in all 10 vaccinated macaques, whereas full-length gag DNA vaccination elicited responses to these conserved elements in only 5 of 11 animals, targeting fewer CE per animal. Importantly, boosting CE-primed macaques with DNA expressing full-length p55gag increased both magnitude of CE responses and breadth of Gag immunity, demonstrating alteration of the hierarchy of epitope recognition in the presence of pre-existing CE-specific responses. Inclusion of a conserved element immunogen provides a novel and effective strategy to broaden responses against highly diverse pathogens by avoiding decoy epitopes, while focusing responses to critical viral elements for which few escape pathways exist. PMID:24465991

  7. Improvement of DNA vaccination by adjuvants and sophisticated delivery devices: vaccine-platforms for the battle against infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Advantages of DNA vaccination against infectious diseases over more classical immunization methods include the possibilities for rapid manufacture, fast adaptation to newly emerging pathogens and high stability at ambient temperatures. In addition, upon DNA immunization the antigen is produced by the cells of the vaccinated individual, which leads to activation of both cellular and humoral immune responses due to antigen presentation via MHC I and MHC II molecules. However, so far DNA vaccines have shown most efficient immunogenicity mainly in small rodent models, whereas in larger animals including humans there is still the need to improve effectiveness. This is mostly due to inefficient delivery of the DNA plasmid into cells and nuclei. Here, we discuss technologies used to overcome this problem, including physical means such as in vivo electroporation and co-administration of adjuvants. Several of these methods have already entered clinical testing in humans. PMID:25648133

  8. Altered response hierarchy and increased T-cell breadth upon HIV-1 conserved element DNA vaccination in macaques.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Alicea, Candido; Singh, Ashish K; Jalah, Rashmi; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Le Gall, Sylvie; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2014-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and potential decoy epitopes are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. A DNA vaccine candidate comprising of highly conserved p24(gag) elements (CE) induced robust immunity in all 10 vaccinated macaques, whereas full-length gag DNA vaccination elicited responses to these conserved elements in only 5 of 11 animals, targeting fewer CE per animal. Importantly, boosting CE-primed macaques with DNA expressing full-length p55(gag) increased both magnitude of CE responses and breadth of Gag immunity, demonstrating alteration of the hierarchy of epitope recognition in the presence of pre-existing CE-specific responses. Inclusion of a conserved element immunogen provides a novel and effective strategy to broaden responses against highly diverse pathogens by avoiding decoy epitopes, while focusing responses to critical viral elements for which few escape pathways exist. PMID:24465991

  9. Improvement of the Immunogenicity of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 DNA Vaccine by Recombinant ORF2 Gene and CpG Motifs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Shi, Jian-Li; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Fu, Fang; Yu, Jiang; Yuan, Xiao-Yuan; Peng, Zhe; Cong, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Shao-Jian; Sun, Wen-Bo; Cheng, Kai-Hui; Du, Yi-Jun; Wu, Jia-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Bao; Huang, Bao-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, adjuvant is still important for boosting immunity and improving resistance in animals. In order to boost the immunity of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) DNA vaccine, CpG motifs were inserted. In this study, the dose-effect was studied, and the immunity of PCV2 DNA vaccines by recombinant open reading frame 2 (ORF2) gene and CpG motifs was evaluated. Three-week-old Changbai piglets were inoculated intramuscularly with 200 μg, 400 μg, and 800 μg DNA vaccines containing 14 and 18 CpG motifs, respectively. Average gain and rectum temperature were recorded everyday during the experiments. Blood was collected from the piglets after vaccination to detect the changes of specific antibodies, interleukin-2, and immune cells every week. Tissues were collected for histopathology and polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that compared to those of the control piglets, all concentrations of two DNA vaccines could induce PCV2-specific antibodies. A cellular immunity test showed that PCV2-specific lymphocytes proliferated the number of TH, TC, and CD3+ positive T-cells raised in the blood of DNA vaccine immune groups. There was no distinct pathological damage and viremia occurring in pigs that were inoculated with DNA vaccines, but there was some minor pathological damage in the control group. The results demonstrated that CpG motifs as an adjuvant could boost the humoral and cellular immunity of pigs to PCV2, especially in terms of cellular immunity. Comparing two DNA vaccines that were constructed, the one containing 18 CpG motifs was more effective. This is the first report that CpG motifs as an adjuvant insert to the PCV2 DNA vaccine could boost immunity. PMID:26046831

  10. Chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria acervulina macrophage migration inhibitory factor (E.MIF) induce partial protection against experimental Eimeria infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Zhang, Ruirui; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-09-01

    Chimeric DNA vaccines co-expressing Eimeria acervulina macrophage migration inhibitory factor (E.MIF) and chicken IL-2 (IL-2) or interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were constructed and their efficacies against E. acervulina were evaluated. The open reading frame (ORF) of E.MIF was cloned from E. acervulina merozoites and subcloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 with chicken cytokine gene IFN-γ or IL-2 to construct the DNA vaccines pVAX-E.MIF-IFN-γ, pVAX-E.MIF-IL-2 and pVAX-E.MIF. The in vivo transfection of the target genes was detected by use of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Immunizations were carried out by vaccinating chickens twice with a dose rate of 100 μg intramuscularly. Seven days post second immunization, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 1 × 105 sporulated oocysts of E. acervulina. Seven days later, the duodenum was collected. The results showed that the target genes were expressed effectively in vivo. DNA vaccines and the recombinant E.MIF protein could alleviate body weight loss and duodenal lesions significantly compared to the control groups. Furthermore, pVAX-E.MIF-IL-2 and pVAX-E.MIF-IFN-γ induced anticoccidial indexs (ACIs) of 179.12 and 170, respectively, which were significantly higher than that of pVAX-E.MIF (ACI = 162.31). Our results demonstrated that E.MIF is a potential vaccine candidate against E. acervulina and chicken IFN-γ or IL- 2 may be used as genetic adjuvants to improve the efficacies of DNA vaccines against avian coccidiosis. PMID:26204190

  11. Protective immune response against Toxoplasma gondii elicited by a recombinant DNA vaccine with a novel genetic adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huaiyu; Min, Juan; Zhao, Qunli; Gu, Qinmin; Cong, Hua; Li, Ying; He, Shenyi

    2012-02-27

    Previous immunological studies from our laboratory have demonstrated the potential role of Toxoplasma gondii antigens SAG1 and GRA2 as vaccine candidates. To further evaluate the vaccine's effects, a series of recombinant DNA vaccines pVAX1-SAG1, pVAX1-GRA2 and pVAX1-SAG1-GRA2, termed pSAG1, pGRA2 and pSAG1-GRA2, respectively, were constructed. A plasmid pVAX1-S/PreS2, termed pSPreS2 encoding hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) S and PreS2 as a novel genetic adjuvant, was also constructed. The expression abilities of those DNA plasmids were examined in HFF cells by Western blotting. Then BALB/c mice were intramuscularly immunized with DNA plasmids and followed by challenging with the highly virulent T. gondii RH strain. The results demonstrated that the recombinant DNA vaccine pSAG1-GRA2 was capable of eliciting high levels of antibodies, a Th1 type of immune response with significant production of IFN-γ and low levels of IL-4 or IL-10 in BALB/c mice, and partial protection against the acute phase of toxoplasmosis as compared to pSAG1, pGRA2 and controls. In addition, the adjuvant pSPreS2 formulated with DNA vaccine induced a Th1 type of immune response and therefore might be a novel genetic adjuvant to DNA vaccine for further investigation. PMID:22240340

  12. Synergistic and additive effects of cimetidine and levamisole on cellular immune responses to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Niu, X; Yang, Y; Wang, J

    2013-02-01

    We and others have previously shown that both cimetidine (CIM) and levamisole (LMS) enhance humoral and cellular responses to DNA vaccines via different mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the synergistic and additive effects of CIM and LMS on the potency of antigen-specific immunities generated by a DNA vaccine encoding the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, pVax-S2). Compared with CIM or LMS alone, the combination of CIM and LMS elicited a robust HBsAg-specific cellular response that was characterized by higher IgG2a, but did not further increase HBsAg-specific antibody IgG and IgG1 production. Consistent with these results, the combination of CIM and LMS produced the highest level of IL-2 and IFN-γ in antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, whereas the combination of CIM and LMS did not further increase IL-4 production. Significantly, a robust HBsAg-specific cytotoxic response was also observed in the animals immunized with pVax-S2 in the presence of the combination of CIM and LMS. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that the combination of CIM and LMS promoted dendritic cell (DC) activation and blocked anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β production in CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells. These findings suggest that CIM and LMS have the synergistic and additive ability to enhance cellular response to hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine, which may be mediated by DC activation and inhibition of anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. Thus, the combination of cimetidine and levamisole may be useful as an effective adjuvant in DNA vaccinations for chronic hepatitis B virus infection. PMID:23298196

  13. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  14. Immunogenicity of a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding 42kDa fragment of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Inayat Hussain; Kaushal, Deep C; Chandra, Deepak; Kaushal, Nuzhat A

    2016-10-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the second major human malaria parasite that inflicts debilitating morbidity and consequent economic impact in South-East Asian countries. The relapsing nature of P. vivax along with the emergence of drug-resistant P. vivax strains has emphasized the urgent need for a vaccine. However, the development of an effective vivax vaccine is seriously hampered due to the diversity and variation in parasite antigens and non-availability of suitable animal models. DNA based vaccines represent an alternative approach in inducing immunity to multiple targets from different stages of malaria parasite. DNA prime-boosting strategies induce both antibody mediated and cell-mediated immune responses that are the major mechanisms of protection against malaria parasites. We have earlier studied the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the soluble and refolded forms of recombinant 42kDa fragment of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 (PvMSP-142) using P. cynomolgi rhesus monkey model. In the present study, we have constructed a recombinant DNA vaccine encoding 42kDa fragment of P. vivax MSP-1 and studied the immunogenicity of PvMSP-142 DNA vaccine construct in mice. The 42kDa gene fragment of PvMSP-1 was PCR amplified using gene specific primers and subcloned into pcDNA 3.1 (+) eukaryotic expression vector. In vitro expression of PvMSP-142 plasmid construct was checked by transfection in COS-1 cell line. Indirect immunofluorescence of transfected COS-1 cells probed with monoclonal antibodies against PvMSP-142 exhibited positive fluorescence. Immunization of BALB/c mice with PvMSP-142-pcDNA vaccine construct revealed the immunogenicity of recombinant vaccine plasmid that can be enhanced by prime boosting with recombinant protein corresponding to the DNA vaccine as evidenced by significant elevation of antibody and the cytokines responses. PMID:27311385

  15. Induction of a Protective Response in Mice by the Dengue Virus NS3 Protein Using DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Simone M.; Yorio, Anna Paula; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Vidale, Mariana M.; Costa, Emmerson C. B.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Motta, Marcia A.; Freire, Marcos S.; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2011-01-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serino-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work, we investigate the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on the NS3 protein from DENV2. Different recombinant plasmids were constructed, encoding either the full-length NS3 protein or only its functional domains (protease and helicase), fused or not to a signal peptide (t-PA). The recombinant proteins were successfully expressed in transfected BHK-21 cells, and only plasmids encoding the t-PA signal sequence mediated protein secretion. Balb/c mice were immunized with the different DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. Most animals immunized with plasmids encoding the full-length NS3 or the helicase domain survived challenge, regardless of the presence of the t-PA. However, some mice presented clinical signs of infection with high morbidity (hind leg paralysis and hunched posture), mainly in animal groups immunized with the DNA vaccines based on the helicase domain. On the other hand, inoculation with plasmids encoding the protease domain did not induce any protection, since mortality and morbidity rates in these mouse groups were similar to those detected in the control animals. The cellular immune response was analyzed by ELISPOT with a specific-CD8+ T cell NS3 peptide. Results revealed that the DNA vaccines based on the full-length protein induced the production of INF-γ, thus suggesting the involvement of this branch of the immune system in the protection. PMID:22031819

  16. Mutual enhancement of IL-2 and IL-7 on DNA vaccine immunogenicity mainly involves regulations on their receptor expression and receptor-expressing lymphocyte generation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Liang, Shuang; Li, Xiujin; Wang, Liyue; Zhang, Jianlou; Xu, Jian; Huo, Shanshan; Cao, Xuebin; Zhong, Zhenyu; Zhong, Fei

    2015-07-01

    Our previous study showed that IL-2 and IL-7 could mutually enhance the immunogenicity of canine parvovirus VP2 DNA vaccine, although the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Here, we used the OVA gene as a DNA vaccine in a mouse model to test their enhancement on DNA vaccine immunogenicity and to explore the molecular mechanism. Results showed that both IL-2 and IL-7 genes significantly increased the immunogenicity of OVA DNA vaccine in mice. Co-administration of IL-2 and IL-7 genes with OVA DNA significantly increased OVA-specific antibody titers, T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production compared with IL-2 or IL-7 alone, confirming that IL-2 and IL-7 mutually enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Mechanistically, we have shown that IL-2 significantly stimulated generation of IL-7 receptor-expressing lymphocytes, and that IL-7 significantly induced IL-2 receptor expression. These results contribute to an explanation of the mechanism of the mutual effects of IL-2 and IL-7 on enhancing DNA vaccine immunogenicity and provided a basis for further investigation on their mutual effects on adjuvant activity and immune regulation. PMID:26055295

  17. Cholera toxin B subunit acts as a potent systemic adjuvant for HIV-1 DNA vaccination intramuscularly in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jue; Liu, Ying; Hsi, Jenny; Wang, Hongzhi; Tao, Ran; Shao, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was investigated as a classical mucosal adjuvant that can increase vaccine immunogenicity. In this study, we found out the in vitro efficacy of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) in activating mice bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. In vitro RNA and transcriptional level profiling arrays revealed that CTB guides high levels of Th1 and Th2 type cytokines, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines. Based on the robustness of these profiling results, we examined the induction of HIV Env-specific immunity by CTB co-inoculated with HIV Env DNA vaccine intramuscularly in vivo. CTB enhanced HIV-Env specific cellular immune responses in Env-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT, compared with DNA vaccine alone. Moreover, CTB induced high levels of Env specific humoral response and promoted antibody maturation after the third round of vaccination. This combination immunization strategy induced a Th2-type bias response which is indicative of a high ratio of IgG1/IgG2a. This study reports that CTB as a classical mucosal adjuvant could enhance HIV-1 DNA-based vaccine immunogenicity intramuscularly; therefore, these findings suggest that CTB could serve as an effective candidate adjuvant for DNA vaccination. PMID:24633335

  18. Recombinant DNA technology for melanoma immunotherapy: anti-Id DNA vaccines targeting high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen.

    PubMed

    Barucca, A; Capitani, M; Cesca, M; Tomassoni, D; Kazmi, U; Concetti, F; Vincenzetti, L; Concetti, A; Venanzi, F M

    2014-11-01

    Anti-idiotypic MK2-23 monoclonal antibody (anti-Id MK2-23 mAb), which mimics the high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA), has been used to implement active immunotherapy against melanoma. However, due to safety and standardization issues, this approach never entered extensive clinical trials. In the present study, we investigated the usage of DNA vaccines as an alternative to MK2-23 mAb immunization. MK2-23 DNA plasmids coding for single chain (scFv) MK2-23 antibody were constructed via the insertion of variable heavy (V H) and light (V L) chains of MK2-23 into the pVAC-1mcs plasmids. Two alternative MK2-23 plasmids format V H/V L, and V L/V H were assembled. We demonstrate that both polypeptides expressed by scFv plasmids in vitro retained the ability to mimic HMW-MAA antigen, and to elicit specific anti-HMW-MAA humoral and cellular immunoresponses in immunized mice. Notably, MK2-23 scFv DNA vaccines impaired the onset and growth of transplantable B16 melanoma cells not engineered to express HMW-MAA. This pilot study suggests that optimized MK2-23 scFv DNA vaccines could potentially provide a safer and cost-effective alternative to anti-Id antibody immunization, for melanoma immunotherapy. PMID:25027754

  19. Protection against feline immunodeficiency virus using replication defective proviral DNA vaccines with feline interleukin-12 and -18.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Stephen P; Flynn, J Norman; Rigby, Mark A; Macdonald, Julie; Bruce, Jennifer; Cannon, Celia; Golder, Matthew C; Hanlon, Linda; Harbour, David A; Mackay, Nancy A; Spibey, Norman; Jarrett, Oswald; Neil, James C

    2002-02-22

    A molecular clone of the Glasgow-8 isolate of FIV (FIVGL8) was rendered replication defective by an in-frame deletion in either reverse transcriptase (deltaRT) or integrase (deltaIN) genes for use as DNA vaccines. To test the ability of these multi-gene vaccines to protect against two feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) isolates of differing virulence, cats were immunized using either DNA vaccine alone or co-administered with interleukin-12 (IL-12) and/or interleukin-18 (IL-18) cytokine DNA. Animals were challenged sequentially with FIV-Petaluma (FIVPET) an FIV isolate of relatively low virulence and subsequently with the more virulent FIVGL8. A proportion of vaccinates (5/18 deltaIN and 2/12 deltaRT) were protected against primary challenge with FIV(PET). Five of the vaccinated-protected cats were re-challenged with FIV(PET); four (all deltaIN) remained free of viraemia whilst all naive controls became viraemic. Following subsequent challenge with the more virulent FIVGL8 these four vaccinated-protected animals all became viraemic but showed lower proviral loads than naive cats. This study suggests that while our current DNA vaccines may not produce sterilizing immunity against more virulent isolates of FIV, they may nevertheless significantly reduce the impact of infection. PMID:11858854

  20. Targeted Collection of Plasmid DNA in Large and Growing Animal Muscles 6 Weeks after DNA Vaccination with and without Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Dory, Daniel; Le Moigne, Vincent; Cariolet, Roland; Béven, Véronique; Keranflec'h, André; Jestin, André

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination has been developed in the last two decades in human and animal species as a promising alternative to conventional vaccination. It consists in the injection, in the muscle, for example, of plasmid DNA encoding the vaccinating polypeptide. Electroporation which forces the entrance of the plasmid DNA in cells at the injection point has been described as a powerful and promising strategy to enhance DNA vaccine efficacy. Due to the fact that the vaccine is composed of DNA, close attention on the fate of the plasmid DNA upon vaccination has to be taken into account, especially at the injection point. To perform such studies, the muscle injection point has to be precisely recovered and collected several weeks after injection. This is even more difficult for large and growing animals. A technique has been developed to localize precisely and collect efficiently the muscle injection points in growing piglets 6 weeks after DNA vaccination accompanied or not by electroporation. Electroporation did not significantly increase the level of remaining plasmids compared to nonelectroporated piglets, and, in all the cases, the levels were below the limit recommended by the FDA to research integration events of plasmid DNA into the host DNA. PMID:26380318

  1. Protective antibody responses against Clostridium difficile elicited by a DNA vaccine expressing the enzymatic domain of toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ke; Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiao, Yanling; Lu, Shan; Huang, Zuhu

    2013-01-01

    A DNA vaccination approach was used in the current study to screen for the immunogenicity of different fragments of toxin A and toxin B from Clostridium difficile. With this approach, protein antigens do not need to be produced in vitro and the immunogenicity of candidate C. difficile antigens can be identified directly in animals. Codon optimized toxin gene fragments were individually cloned into the DNA vaccine vector and tested in mice and rabbits for their ability to elicit C. difficile toxin-specific antibody responses. Only a subset of the C. difficile toxin fragments, including the C-terminal receptor binding domain of toxin A and a novel N-terminal enzymatic domain of toxin B, were able to elicit protective antibody responses as determined by protection of target cells in a cytotoxicity assay or by preventing death of mice in a passive antibody protection study. Significantly, antibodies elicited by the novel N-terminus of the toxin B DNA vaccine were able to increase the level of protection when used in combination with anti-toxin A antibodies in a toxin challenge model in mice. PMID:23143772

  2. Fusion of CTLA-4 with HPV16 E7 and E6 Enhanced the Potency of Therapeutic HPV DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lili; Jia, Rong; Zhou, Lili; Guo, Jihua; Fan, Mingwen

    2014-01-01

    Preventive anti-HPV vaccines are effective against HPV infection but not against existing HPV-associated diseases, including cervical cancer and other malignant diseases. Therefore, the development of therapeutic vaccines is urgently needed. To improve anti-tumor effects of therapeutic vaccine, we fused cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) with HPV16 E7 and E6 as a fusion therapeutic DNA vaccine (pCTLA4-E7E6). pCTLA4-E7E6 induced significantly higher anti-E7E6 specific antibodies and relatively stronger specific CTL responses than the nonfusion DNA vaccine pE7E6 in C57BL/6 mice bearing with TC-1 tumors. pCTLA4-E7E6 showed relatively stronger anti-tumor effects than pE7E6 in therapeutic immunization. These results suggest that fusing CTLA-4 with E7E6 is a useful strategy to develop therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines. In addition, fusing the C-terminal of E7 with the N-terminal of E6 impaired the functions of both E7 and E6. PMID:25265018

  3. The use of layered double hydroxides as DNA vaccine delivery vector for enhancement of anti-melanoma immune response.

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Qin, Lili; Wang, Wenrui; Zhu, Rongrong; Yu, Yongchun; Liu, Hui; Wang, Shilong

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that Mg:Al 1:1 layered double hydroxides (LDH(R1)) nanoparticles could be taken up by the MDDCs effectively and had an adjuvant activity for DC maturation. Furthermore, these LDH(R1) nanoparticles could up-regulate the expression of CCR7 and augment the migration of DCs in response to CCL21. In current study, we have evaluated whether LDH(R1) as DNA vaccine delivery carrier can augment the efficacy of DNA vaccine immunization in vivo. Firstly, we found that LDH(R1) was efficient in combining DNA and formed LDH(R1)/DNA complex with an average diameter of about 80-120 nm. Its high transfection efficiency in vivo delivered with a GFP expression plasmid was also observed. After delivery of pcDNA(3)-OVA/LDH(R1) complex by intradermal immunization in C57BL/6 mice, the LDH(R1) induced an enhanced serum antibody response much greater than naked DNA vaccine. Using B16-OVA melanoma as tumor model, we demonstrated that pcDNA(3)-OVA/LDH(R1) complex enhanced immune priming and protection from tumor challenge in vivo. Furthermore, we showed that LDH(R1) induced dramatically more effective CTL activation and skewed T helper polarization to Th1. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that this LDH(R1)/DNA plasmid complex should be a new and promising way in vaccination against tumor. PMID:20934217

  4. VCL-CB01, an injectable bivalent plasmid DNA vaccine for potential protection against CMV disease and infection

    PubMed Central

    Schleiss, Mark R

    2010-01-01

    Vaccines for the prevention of human CMV (hCMV) infection and disease are a major public health priority. Immunization with DNA vaccines encoding key proteins involved in the immune response to hCMV has emerged as a major focus of hCMV vaccine research. Validation of the protective effect of DNA vaccination in animal models has provided support for clinical trials. VCL-CB01, under development byVical Inc for the prevention of hCMV infection and disease, is a poloxamer-formulated, bivalent DNA vaccine that contains plasmids encoding hCMV tegument phosphoprotein 65 and the major hCMV surface glycoprotein B. In a phase I trial in healthy adults, VCL-CB01 was well tolerated. In interim results from a phase II trial in hCMV-seropositive hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, VCL-CB01 increased T-cell responses compared with placebo. The final results from the phase II trial will be of value for developing strategies to prevent hCMV disease in hCMV-seropositive transplant recipients, and may lead to other trials of VCL-CB01 or related vaccines for the prevention of congenital hCMV infection. PMID:19806506

  5. Chemokine-adjuvanted electroporated DNA vaccine induces substantial protection from simian immunodeficiency virus vaginal challenge.

    PubMed

    Kutzler, M A; Wise, M C; Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M A; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D G; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P A; Weiner, D B

    2016-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG responses in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P<0.01) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared with only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where six of nine animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P<0.001). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  6. Chemokine Adjuvanted Electroporated-DNA Vaccine Induces Substantial Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P; Weiner, D B

    2015-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P=0.0016) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared to only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where 6 of 9 animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P=0.0003). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  7. Efficient post-exposure prophylaxis against rabies by applying a four-dose DNA vaccine intranasally.

    PubMed

    Tesoro Cruz, Emiliano; Feria Romero, Iris Angélica; López Mendoza, Juan Gabriel; Orozco Suárez, Sandra; Hernández González, Rafael; Favela, Francisco Blanco; Pérez Torres, Armando; José Alvaro Aguilar Setién

    2008-12-01

    We tested two post-exposure prophylaxes (PEPs) for rabies in laboratory animals; one was a traditional antirabies vaccine for humans via intramuscular route (IM), and the other was a DNA vaccine administered by intranasal route (IN). In contrast to The World Health Organization's recommended five-dose PEP, we gave only four doses without hyper-immune antirabies sera, making the PEP more rigorous. All animals were challenged with challenge virus strain (CVS); 16h later, PEP was applied. All animals that received the PEP with DNA/IN survived, and 87% of the rabbits and 80% of the mice that received the PEP with traditional antirabies vaccine/IM survived. Negative controls succumbed to infection. The expression of G protein was detected in the NALT, cerebellum, cerebral cortex (neocortex), cerebellum and hippocampus, mainly in the glial cells (microglia) and microvessels. On the other hand, plasmid construct was detected in brain and its mRNA expression in medium and posterior encephalon. The efficiency of this DNA/IN PEP is probably due to the early expression of the antigen in the brain stimulating the immune system locally. PMID:18940223

  8. Protection of guinea pigs against Leptospira interrogans serovar Lai by LipL21 DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    He, Han Jiang; Wang, Wen Yu; Wu, Zhong Dao; Lv, Zhi Yue; Li, Jun; Tan, Li Zhi

    2008-10-01

    In this study, the full lipL21 gene fragment encoding outer membrane protein LipL21 was cloned from L. interrogans serovar Lai and inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+). The guinea pigs were immunized with pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21, pcDNA3.1(+) or PBS. Six weeks after the second immunization, the splenocytes were isolated to detect their proliferative ability by lymphocyte transformation experiments. In addition, microscopic agglutination test was used for quantitative detection of specific antibodies. The rest guinea pigs were challenged intraperitoneally with L. interogans sorevar Lai. Then, protective effect was evaluated on the basis of survival and histopathological lesions in the kidneys, lungs, and liver. The lipL21 gene was successfully expressed in COS-7 cells through recombinant pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21. The titer of specific antibodies substantially increased, and the stimulation index of splenocytes increased significantly. Hence, the pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21 could protect the immunized guinea pigs from homotypic Leptospira infection. Furthermore, no obvious pathologic changes were observed in the pcDNA3.1(+)-lipL21 immunized guinea pigs. The results showed that the protective effect with pathogenic strains of Leptospira was shared by LipL21 mediated through a plasmid vector. Consequently, these results indicated that the lipL21 DNA vaccine was a promising candidate for the prevention of leptospirosis. PMID:18954563

  9. C3d enhanced DNA vaccination induced humoral immune response to glycoprotein C of pseudorabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Tiezhu; Fan Huiying; Tan Yadi; Xiao Shaobo; Ling Jieyu; Chen Huanchun; Guo Aizhen . E-mail: aizhen@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2006-09-08

    Murine C3d were utilized to enhance immunogenicity of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gC DNA vaccination. Three copies of C3d and four copies of CR2-binding domain M28{sub 4} were fused, respectively, to truncated gC gene encoding soluble glycoprotein C (sgC) in pcDNA3.1. BALB/c mice were, respectively, immunized with recombinant plasmids, blank vector, and inactivated vaccine. The antibody ELISA titer for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA was 49-fold more than that for sgC DNA, and the neutralizing antibody obtained 8-fold rise. Protection of mice from death after lethal PrV (316 LD{sub 5}) challenge was augmented from 25% to 100%. Furthermore, C3d fusion increased Th2-biased immune response by inducing IL-4 production. The IL-4 level for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA immunization approached that for the inactivated vaccine. Compared to C3d, M28 enhanced sgC DNA immunogenicity to a lesser extent. In conclusion, we demonstrated that murine C3d fusion significantly enhanced gC DNA immunity by directing Th1-biased to a balanced and more effective Th1/Th2 response.

  10. Clearance of persistent HPV infection and cervical lesion by therapeutic DNA vaccine in CIN3 patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Jin; Jin, Hyun-Tak; Hur, Soo-Young; Yang, Hyun Gul; Seo, Yong Bok; Hong, Sung Ran; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Suhyeon; Woo, Jung-Won; Park, Ki Seok; Hwang, Youn-Young; Park, Jaehan; Lee, In-Ho; Lim, Kyung-Taek; Lee, Ki-Heon; Jeong, Mi Seon; Surh, Charles D.; Suh, You Suk; Park, Jong Sup; Sung, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that electroporation-enhanced immunization with a rationally designed HPV DNA vaccine (GX-188E), preferentially targeting HPV antigens to dendritic cells, elicits a significant E6/E7-specific IFN-γ-producing T-cell response in all nine cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3) patients. Importantly, eight out of nine patients exhibit an enhanced polyfunctional HPV-specific CD8 T-cell response as shown by an increase in cytolytic activity, proliferative capacity and secretion of effector molecules. Notably, seven out of nine patients display complete regression of their lesions and viral clearance within 36 weeks of follow up. GX-188E administration does not elicit serious vaccine-associated adverse events at all administered doses. These findings indicate that the magnitude of systemic polyfunctional CD8 T-cell response is the main contributing factor for histological, cytological and virological responses, providing valuable insights into the design of therapeutic vaccines for effectively treating persistent infections and cancers in humans. PMID:25354725

  11. Plasmid DNA Vaccine vector design: impact on efficacy, safety and upstream production

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James A; Carnes, Aaron E; Hodgson, Clague P

    2009-01-01

    Critical molecular and cellular biological factors impacting design of licensable DNA vaccine vectors that combine high yield and integrity during bacterial production with increased expression in mammalian cells are reviewed. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), World Health Organization (WHO) and European Medical Agencies (EMEA) regulatory guidance’s are discussed, as they relate to vector design and plasmid fermentation. While all new vectors will require extensive preclinical testing to validate safety and performance prior to clinical use, regulatory testing burden for follow-on products can be reduced by combining carefully designed synthetic genes with existing validated vector backbones. A flowchart for creation of new synthetic genes, combining rationale design with bioinformatics, is presented. The biology of plasmid replication is reviewed, and process engineering strategies that reduce metabolic burden discussed. Utilizing recently developed low metabolic burden seed stock and fermentation strategies, optimized vectors can now be manufactured in high yields exceeding 2 g/L, with specific plasmid yields of 5% total dry cell weight. PMID:19233255

  12. Epitope analysis and protection by a ROP19 DNA vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Wang, Lin; Lu, Gang; Zhou, Aihua; Zhu, Meiyan; Li, Qihang; Wang, Zhilin; Arken, Miradel; Wang, Ao; He, Shenyi

    2016-01-01

    We used bioinformatics approaches to identify B-cell and T-cell epitopes on the ROP19 protein of Toxoplasma gondii. Then, we constructed plasmids with ROP19 (pEGFP-C1-ROP19) and injected them into BALB/c mice to test the immunoprotection induced by this vaccine candidate. The results showed that immunization with pEGFP-C1-ROP19 induced effective cellular and humoral immune responses in mice; specifically, high serum levels of T. gondii-specific IgG and increased interferon-gamma production by splenocytes. Furthermore, the mice vaccinated with pROP19 had significantly fewer brain cysts (583 ± 160) than the mice injected with phosphate-buffered saline (1350 ± 243) or with the control plasmid, pEGFP-C1 (1300 ± 167). Compared with PBS-treated mice, those immunized with pROP19 had only 43% of the number of brain cysts. These results suggest that the DNA vaccine encoding ROP19 induced a significant immune response and provided protection against a challenge with T. gondii strain PRU cysts. PMID:27055564

  13. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Kaur, Tejinder; Joshi, Jyoti

    2016-07-01

    The current study was designed to examine the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on gp63 and Hsp70 against murine visceral leishmaniasis. Inbred BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously twice at an interval of three weeks with pcDNA3.1(+) encoding T cell epitopes of gp63 and Hsp70 individually and in combination. Animals were challenged intracardially with 10(7) promastigotes of Leishmania donovani 10 days post immunization and sacrificed 1, 2 and 3 months post challenge. The immunized animals revealed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in splenic and hepatic parasite burden as compared to the infected controls. Maximum reduction in parasite load (P < 0.05) was observed in animals treated with a combination of pcDNA/gp63 and pcDNA/Hsp70. These animals also showed heightened DTH response, increased IgG2a, elevated Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and reduced IgG1 and IL-10 levels. Thus, mice immunized with the cocktail vaccine exhibited significantly greater protection in comparison to those immunized with individual antigens. PMID:27533939

  14. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Fischer, William; Wallstrom, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  15. DNA vaccines targeting human papillomavirus-associated diseases: progresses in animal and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyusun Torque

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major cause of cervical cancer and its precancerous diseases. Cervical cancer is the second deadliest cancer killer among women worldwide. Moreover, HPV is also known to be a causative agent of oral, pharyngeal, anal and genital cancer. Recent application of HPV structural protein (L1)-targeted prophylactic vaccines (Gardasil® and Cervarix®) is expected to reduce the incidence of HPV infection and cervical cancer, and possibly other HPV-associated cancers. However, the benefit of the prophylactic vaccines for treating HPV-infected patients is unlikely, underscoring the importance of developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV infection. In this regard, numerous types of therapeutic vaccine approaches targeting the HPV regulatory proteins, E6 and E7, have been tested for their efficacy in animals and clinically. In this communication, we review HPV vaccine types, in particular DNA vaccines, their designs and delivery by electroporation and their immunologic and antitumor efficacy in animals and humans, along with the basics of HPV and its pathogenesis. PMID:23858401

  16. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Kaur, Tejinder; Joshi, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The current study was designed to examine the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on gp63 and Hsp70 against murine visceral leishmaniasis. Inbred BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously twice at an interval of three weeks with pcDNA3.1(+) encoding T cell epitopes of gp63 and Hsp70 individually and in combination. Animals were challenged intracardially with 107 promastigotes of Leishmania donovani 10 days post immunization and sacrificed 1, 2 and 3 months post challenge. The immunized animals revealed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in splenic and hepatic parasite burden as compared to the infected controls. Maximum reduction in parasite load (P < 0.05) was observed in animals treated with a combination of pcDNA/gp63 and pcDNA/Hsp70. These animals also showed heightened DTH response, increased IgG2a, elevated Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and reduced IgG1 and IL-10 levels. Thus, mice immunized with the cocktail vaccine exhibited significantly greater protection in comparison to those immunized with individual antigens. PMID:27533939

  17. Therapeutic potential of an AcHERV-HPV L1 DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Yoon, Jong Kwang; Heo, Yoonki; Cho, Hansam; Cho, Yeondong; Gwon, Yongdae; Kim, Kang Chang; Choi, Jiwon; Lee, Jae Sung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2015-06-01

    Cervical cancer is strongly associated with chronic human papillomavirus infections, among which HPV16 is the most common. Two commercial HPV vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix are effective for preventing HPV infection, but cannot be used to treat existing HPV infections. Previously, we developed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-enveloped recombinant baculovirus capable of delivering the L1 genes of HPV types 16, 18, and 58 (AcHERV-HP16/18/58L1, AcHERV-HPV). Intramuscular administration of AcHERVHPV vaccines induced a strong cellular immune response as well as a humoral immune response. In this study, to examine the therapeutic effect of AcHERV-HPV in a mouse model, we established an HPV16 L1 expressing tumor cell line. Compared to Cervarix, immunization with AcHERVHPV greatly enhanced HPV16 L1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in C57BL/6 mice. Although vaccination could not remove preexisting tumors, strong CTL activity retarded the growth of inoculated tumor cells. These results indicate that AcHERV-HPV could serve as a potential therapeutic DNA vaccine against concurrent infection with HPV 16, 18, and 58. PMID:26025174

  18. An orally administered DNA vaccine targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 inhibits lung carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Xin; Jin, Cong Guo; Zhou, Yong Chun; Navab, Roya; Jakobsen, Kristine Raaby; Chen, Xiao Qun; Li, Jia; Li, Ting Ting; Luo, Lu; Wang, Xi Cai

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of mortality and 5-year survival rate is very low worldwide. Recent studies show that vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) signaling pathway contributes to lung cancer progression. So we hypothesize that an oral DNA vaccine that targets VEGFR-3 carried by attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium strain SL3261 has impacts on lung cancer progression. In this study, the oral VEGFR-3-based vaccine-immunized mice showed appreciable inhibition of tumor growth and tumor lymphatic microvessels in lung cancer mice model. Moreover, the oral VEGFR-3-based vaccine-immunized mice showed remarkable increases in both VEGFR-3-specific antibody levels and cytotoxic activity. Furthermore, the oral VEGFR-3-based vaccine-immunized mice showed a significant increase in the levels of T helper type 1 (Th1) cell intracellular cytokine expression (IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α). After inoculation with murine Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells, CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cell numbers obviously declined in control groups whereas high levels were maintained in the oral VEGFR-3-based vaccine group. These results demonstrated that the oral VEGFR-3-based vaccine could induce specific humoral and cellular immune responses and then significantly inhibit lung carcinoma growth via suppressing lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26376999

  19. Tumor prevention in HPV8 transgenic mice by HPV8-E6 DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Awerkiew, Sabine; Hufbauer, Martin; Schädlich, Lysann; Gissmann, Lutz; Eming, Sabine; Pfister, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    The genus beta human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in individuals with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. Immunosuppressed transplant recipients are prone to harbor particularly high betapapillomavirus DNA loads, which may contribute to their highly increased risk of SCC. Tumor induction in HPV8 transgenic mice correlates with increased expression of viral oncogenes E6 and E2. In an attempt to prevent skin tumor development, we evaluated an HPV8-E6-DNA vaccine, which was able to stimulate a detectable HPV8-E6-specific cell-mediated immune response in 8/15 immunized mice. When skin of HPV8 transgenic mice was grafted onto non-transgenic littermates, the grafted HPV8 transgenic tissue was not rejected and papillomas started to grow within 14 days all over the transplant of 9/9 non-vaccinated and 7/15 not successfully vaccinated mice. In contrast, no papillomas developed in 6/8 successfully vaccinated mice. In the other two of these eight mice, a large ulcerative lesion developed within the initial papilloma growth or papilloma development was highly delayed. As the vaccine completely or partially prevented papilloma development without rejecting the transplanted HPV8 positive skin, the immune system appears to attack only keratinocytes with increased levels of E6 protein, which would give rise to papillomas. PMID:24446083

  20. Induction of Broad Cytotoxic T Cells by Protective DNA Vaccination Against Marburg and Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Shedlock, Devon J; Aviles, Jenna; Talbott, Kendra T; Wong, Gary; Wu, Stephan J; Villarreal, Daniel O; Myles, Devin JF; Croyle, Maria A; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2013-01-01

    Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers have been described as the most virulent viral diseases known to man due to associative lethality rates of up to 90%. Death can occur within days to weeks of exposure and there is currently no licensed vaccine or therapeutic. Recent evidence suggests an important role for antiviral T cells in conferring protection, but little detailed analysis of this response as driven by a protective vaccine has been reported. We developed a synthetic polyvalent-filovirus DNA vaccine against Marburg marburgvirus (MARV), Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), and Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). Preclinical efficacy studies were performed in guinea pigs and mice using rodent-adapted viruses, whereas murine T-cell responses were extensively analyzed using a novel modified assay described herein. Vaccination was highly potent, elicited robust neutralizing antibodies, and completely protected against MARV and ZEBOV challenge. Comprehensive T-cell analysis revealed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of great magnitude, epitopic breadth, and Th1-type marker expression. This model provides an important preclinical tool for studying protective immune correlates that could be applied to existing platforms. Data herein support further evaluation of this enhanced gene-based approach in nonhuman primate studies for in depth analyses of T-cell epitopes in understanding protective efficacy. PMID:23670573

  1. Clearance of persistent HPV infection and cervical lesion by therapeutic DNA vaccine in CIN3 patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jin; Jin, Hyun-Tak; Hur, Soo-Young; Yang, Hyun Gul; Seo, Yong Bok; Hong, Sung Ran; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Suhyeon; Woo, Jung-Won; Park, Ki Seok; Hwang, Youn-Young; Park, Jaehan; Lee, In-Ho; Lim, Kyung-Taek; Lee, Ki-Heon; Jeong, Mi Seon; Surh, Charles D; Suh, You Suk; Park, Jong Sup; Sung, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that electroporation-enhanced immunization with a rationally designed HPV DNA vaccine (GX-188E), preferentially targeting HPV antigens to dendritic cells, elicits a significant E6/E7-specific IFN-γ-producing T-cell response in all nine cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3) patients. Importantly, eight out of nine patients exhibit an enhanced polyfunctional HPV-specific CD8 T-cell response as shown by an increase in cytolytic activity, proliferative capacity and secretion of effector molecules. Notably, seven out of nine patients display complete regression of their lesions and viral clearance within 36 weeks of follow up. GX-188E administration does not elicit serious vaccine-associated adverse events at all administered doses. These findings indicate that the magnitude of systemic polyfunctional CD8 T-cell response is the main contributing factor for histological, cytological and virological responses, providing valuable insights into the design of therapeutic vaccines for effectively treating persistent infections and cancers in humans. PMID:25354725

  2. Mucosal application of cationic poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles as carriers of DNA vaccine and adjuvants to protect chickens against infectious bursal disease.

    PubMed

    Negash, Tamiru; Liman, Martin; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2013-08-12

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is an immunosuppressive virus of chickens. The virus protein (VP) 2 induces neutralizing antibodies, which protect chickens against the disease. The aim of this study was to develop a cationic poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticle (MP) based IBDV-VP2 DNA vaccine (MP-IBDV-DNA) for chickens to be delivered orally and by eye drop route. The tested IBDV-VP2 DNA vaccines were immunogenic for specific-pathogen-free chickens and induced an antibody response after intramuscular application. Co-inoculation with a plasmid encoding chicken IL-2 (chIL-2) or CpG-ODN did not significantly improve protection against IBDV challenge. However, the application of a MP-IBDV-DNA vaccine alone or in combination with a delayed oral and eye drop application of cationic MP loaded with CpG-ODN or chIL-2 improved protection against challenge. The MP-IBDV-DNA-vaccinated chickens showed less pathological and histopathological bursal lesions, a reduced IBDV antigen load as well as T-cell influx into the bursa of Fabricius (BF) compared to the other groups (p<0.05). The addition of chIL-2 loaded MP improved challenge virus clearance from the BF as demonstrated by lower neutralizing antibody titers and reduced IL-4 and IFN-α mRNA expression in the bursa at 7 days postchallenge compared to the other challenged groups. Overall, the efficacy of the IBDV-DNA vaccine was improved by adsorption of the DNA vaccine onto cationic PLGA-MP, which also allowed mucosal application of the DNA vaccine. PMID:23777953

  3. Protective Immunity Elicited by a Divalent DNA Vaccine Encoding Both the L7/L12 and Omp16 Genes of Brucella abortus in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Deyan; Ni, Bing; Li, Peng; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Songle; Han, Yue; Mao, Liwei; He, Yangdong; Wu, Yuzhang; Wang, Xiliang

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity and the protective efficacy of a divalent fusion DNA vaccine encoding both the Brucella abortus L7/L12 protein (ribosomal protein) and Omp16 protein (outer membrane lipoprotein), designated pcDNA3.1-L7/L12-Omp16. Intramuscular injection of this divalent DNA vaccine into BALB/c mice elicited markedly both humoral and cellular immune responses. The specific antibodies exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) over IgG1. In addition, the dual-gene DNA vaccine elicited a strong T-cell proliferative response and induced a large amount of gamma interferon-producing T cells upon restimulation in vitro with recombinant fusion protein L7/L12-Omp16, suggesting the induction of a typical T-helper-1-dominated immune response in vivo. This divalent DNA vaccine could also induce a significant level of protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 544 in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the protection level induced by the divalent DNA vaccine was significantly higher than that induced by the univalent DNA vaccines pcDNA3.1-L7/L12 or pcDNA3.1-Omp16. Taken together, the results of this study verify for the first time that the Omp16 gene can be a candidate target for a DNA vaccine against brucellosis. Additionally, a divalent genetic vaccine based on the L7/L12 and Omp16 genes can elicit a stronger cellular immune response and better immunoprotection than the relevant univalent vaccines can. PMID:16622210

  4. Highly optimized DNA vaccine targeting human telomerase reverse transcriptase stimulates potent antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Thomas H.; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Morrow, Matthew P.; Walters, Jewell N.; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) are detected in over 85% of human cancers. Immunological analysis supports hTERT is a widely applicable target recognized by T cells and can be potentially studied as a broad cancer immune therapeutic, or a unique line of defense against tumor recurrence. There remains an urgent need to develop more potent hTERT vaccines. Here, a synthetic highly optimized full-length hTERT DNA vaccine (phTERT) was designed and the induced immunity was examined in mice and non-human primates. When delivered by electroporation, phTERT elicited strong, broad hTERT-specific CD8 responses including induction of T-cells expressing CD107a, IFN-γ and TNF-α in mice. The ability of phTERT to overcome tolerance was evaluated in a NHP model, whose TERT is 96% homologous to that of hTERT. Immunized monkeys exhibited robust (average 1834 SFU/106 PBMCs), diverse (multiple immunodominant epitopes) IFN-γ responses and antigen-specific perforin release (average 332 SFU/106 PBMCs), suggesting phTERT breaks tolerance and induces potent cytotoxic responses in this human relevant model. Moreover, in an HPV16-associated tumor model, vaccination of phTERT slows tumor growth and improves survival rate in both prophylactic and therapeutic studies. Lastly, in vivo cytotoxicity assay confirmed that phTERT-induced CD8 T cells exhibited specific CTL activity, capable of eliminating hTERT-pulsed target cells. These findings support that this synthetic EP-delivered DNA phTERT may have a role as a broad therapeutic cancer vaccine candidate. PMID:24777680

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Novel PBAE/PLGA Polymer Blend Microparticles for DNA Vaccine Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Balashanmugam, Meenashi Vanathi; Nagarethinam, Sivagurunathan; Jagani, Hitesh; Josyula, Venkata Rao; Alrohaimi, Abdulmohsen; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2014-01-01

    Context. Poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE) with its pH sensitiveness and Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) with huge DNA cargo capacity in combination prove to be highly efficient as DNA delivery system. Objective. To study the effectiveness of novel synthesized PBAE polymer with PLGA blend at different ratios in DNA vaccine delivery. Methods. In the present study, multifunctional polymer blend microparticles using a combination of PLGA and novel PBAE polymers A1 (bis(3-(propionyloxy)propyl)3,3′-(propane-1,3-diyl-bis(methylazanediyl))dipropanoate) and A2 (bis(4-(propionyloxy)butyl)3,3′-(ethane-1,2-diyl-bis(isopropylazanediyl))dipropanoate) at different ratios (85 : 15, 75 : 25, and 50 : 50) were prepared by double emulsion solvent removal method. The microparticles were characterized for cytotoxicity, transfection efficiency, and DNA encapsulation efficiency. Result. It was evident from results that among the microparticles prepared with PLGA/PBAE blend the PLGA : PBAE at 85 : 15 ratio was found to be more effective combination than the microparticles prepared with PLGA alone in terms of transfection efficiency and better DNA integrity. Microparticles made of PLGA and PBAE A1 at 85 : 15 ratio, respectively, were found to be less toxic when compared with microparticles prepared with A2 polymer. Conclusion. The results encourage the use of the synthesized PBAE polymer in combination with PLGA as an effective gene delivery system. PMID:25401137

  6. Targeted DNA vaccines for enhanced induction of idiotype-specific B and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksen, Agnete B.; Sandlie, Inger; Bogen, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Background: Idiotypes (Id) are antigenic determinants localized in variable (V) regions of Ig. Id-specific T and B cells (antibodies) play a role in immunotherapy of Id+ tumors. However, vaccine strategies that enhance Id-specific responses are needed. Methods: Id+ single-chain fragment variable (scFv) from multiple myelomas and B cell lymphomas were prepared in a fusion format that bivalently target surface molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APC). APC-specific targeting units were either scFv from APC-specific mAb (anti-MHC II, anti-CD40) or chemokines (MIP-1α, RANTES). Homodimeric Id-vaccines were injected intramuscularly or intradermally as plasmids in mice, combined with electroporation. Results: (i) Transfected cells secreted plasmid-encoded Id+ fusion proteins to extracellular fluid followed by binding of vaccine molecules to APC. (ii) Targeted vaccine molecules increased Id-specific B and T cell responses. (iii) Bivalency and xenogeneic sequences both contributed to enhanced responses. (iv) Targeted Id DNA vaccines induced tumor resistance against challenges with Id+ tumors. (v) Human MIP-1α targeting units enhanced Id-specific responses in mice, due to a cross reaction with murine chemokine receptors. Thus, targeted vaccines designed for humans can be quality tested in mice. (vi) Human Id+ scFv from four multiple myeloma patients were inserted into the vaccine format and were successfully tested in mice. (vii) Human MIP-1α vaccine proteins enhanced human T cell responses in vitro. (viii) A hypothetical model for how the APC-targeted vaccine molecules enhance Id-specific T and B cells is presented. Conclusion: Targeted DNA Id-vaccines show promising results in preclinical studies, paving the way for testing in patients. PMID:23115759

  7. Schistosoma japonicum: the design and experimental evaluation of a multivalent DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Yu, Longjiang; Liu, Zhi; Zhu, Lu; Hu, Yuan; Zhu, Min; Zhu, Xiaohua; Shi, Youen; Meng, Sijin

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct and evaluate the immunity efficacy of the DNA multivalent vaccine pVIVO(2)SjFABP-23. The vaccine was constructed and produced as follows. Forty BALB/c mice were divided into four groups designated pVIVO(2), pVIVO(2)Sj23, pVIVO(2)SjFABP and pVIVO(2)SjFABP-23. Each mouse was immunized with 100 mug of the corresponding plasmid DNA by intramuscular injection. 28 days post-vaccination, the mice were challenged with S. japonicum cercariae, and the worm and egg burdens were determined 42 days post-challenge. Serum samples were collected from all the mice before and after vaccination and at the end of the experiment, and used for antibody detection. The IFN-gamma and IL-4 levels were quantified in the supernatants of specifically stimulated spleen cells. The number of worms was reduced by 52%, 40% and 42% in mice respectively immunized with pVIVO(2)SjFABP-23, pVIVO(2)Sj23 or pVIVO(2)SjFABP. A respective 61%, 38% and 39% egg reduction was determined relative to those mice that only received the empty pVIVO2 plasmid. pVIVO(2)SjFABP-23 immunization increased IgG levels against SWAP and SEA. Increased IFN-gamma levels were detected in the supernatant of specific stimulated spleen cells from mice immunized with the 3 different constructs. The multivalent DNA vaccine developed induced higher levels of protection than the two monovalent tested vaccines. PMID:16874456

  8. Therapeutic DNA vaccination against colorectal cancer by targeting the MYB oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Cross, Ryan S; Malaterre, Jordane; Davenport, Alexander J; Carpinteri, Sandra; Anderson, Robin L; Darcy, Phillip K; Ramsay, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Cancers can be addicted to continued and relatively high expression of nuclear oncoproteins. This is evident in colorectal cancer (CRC) where the oncoprotein and transcription factor MYB is over expressed and essential to continued proliferation and tumour cell survival. Historically, targeting transcription factors in the context of cancer has been very challenging. Nevertheless, we formulated a DNA vaccine to generate a MYB-specific immune response in the belief MYB peptides might be aberrantly presented on the cell surface of CRC cells. MYB, like many tumour antigens, is weakly immunogenic as it is a 'self' antigen and is subject to tolerance. To break tolerance, a fusion vaccine was generated comprising a full-length MYB complementary DNA (cDNA) flanked by two potent CD4-epitopes derived from tetanus toxoid. Vaccination was achieved against tumours initiated by two distinct highly aggressive, syngeneic cancer cell lines (CT26 and MC38) that express MYB. This was done in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mouse strains respectively. We introduced multiple inactivating mutations into the oncogene sequence for safety and sub-cloned the cDNA into a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-compliant vector. We used low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) to overcome T-regulatory cell immune suppression, and anti-program cell death receptor 1 (anti-PD-1) antibodies to block T-cell exhaustion. Anti-PD-1 administered alone slightly delayed tumour growth in MC38 and more effectively in CT26 bearing mice, while CY treatment alone did not. We found that therapeutic vaccination elicits protection when MC38 tumour burden is low, mounts tumour-specific cell killing and affords enhanced protection when MC38 and CT26 tumour burden is higher but only in combination with anti-PD-1 antibody or low dose CY, respectively. PMID:25671128

  9. Therapeutic DNA vaccination against colorectal cancer by targeting the MYB oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Ryan S; Malaterre, Jordane; Davenport, Alexander J; Carpinteri, Sandra; Anderson, Robin L; Darcy, Phillip K; Ramsay, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Cancers can be addicted to continued and relatively high expression of nuclear oncoproteins. This is evident in colorectal cancer (CRC) where the oncoprotein and transcription factor MYB is over expressed and essential to continued proliferation and tumour cell survival. Historically, targeting transcription factors in the context of cancer has been very challenging. Nevertheless, we formulated a DNA vaccine to generate a MYB-specific immune response in the belief MYB peptides might be aberrantly presented on the cell surface of CRC cells. MYB, like many tumour antigens, is weakly immunogenic as it is a ‘self' antigen and is subject to tolerance. To break tolerance, a fusion vaccine was generated comprising a full-length MYB complementary DNA (cDNA) flanked by two potent CD4-epitopes derived from tetanus toxoid. Vaccination was achieved against tumours initiated by two distinct highly aggressive, syngeneic cancer cell lines (CT26 and MC38) that express MYB. This was done in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mouse strains respectively. We introduced multiple inactivating mutations into the oncogene sequence for safety and sub-cloned the cDNA into a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-compliant vector. We used low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) to overcome T-regulatory cell immune suppression, and anti-program cell death receptor 1 (anti-PD-1) antibodies to block T-cell exhaustion. Anti-PD-1 administered alone slightly delayed tumour growth in MC38 and more effectively in CT26 bearing mice, while CY treatment alone did not. We found that therapeutic vaccination elicits protection when MC38 tumour burden is low, mounts tumour-specific cell killing and affords enhanced protection when MC38 and CT26 tumour burden is higher but only in combination with anti-PD-1 antibody or low dose CY, respectively. PMID:25671128

  10. Optimization of a Der p 2-based prophylactic DNA vaccine against house dust mite allergy.

    PubMed

    Pulsawat, Pinya; Pitakpolrat, Patrawadee; Prompetchara, Eakachai; Kaewamatawong, Theerayuth; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Hannaman, Drew; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Jacquet, Alain

    2013-03-01

    DNA vaccines encoding allergens are promising immunotherapeutics to prevent or to treat allergy through induction of allergen-specific Th1 responses. Despite anti-allergy effects observed in small rodents, DNA-based vaccines are weak immunogens in primates and humans and particularly when administered by conventional injection. The goal of the present study was to improve the immunogenicity of a prophylactic vaccine encoding the major house dust mite allergen Der p 2. In this context, we evaluated the influence of different DNA backbones including notably intron and CpG enriched sequence, the DNA dose, the in vivo delivery by electroporation as well as the heterologous prime boost regimen on the vaccine efficiency. We found that a minimal allergen expression level threshold must be reached to induce the production of specific antibodies but beyond this limit, the intensity of the immune response was independent on the DNA dose and allergen expression. The in vivo DNA delivery by electroporation drastically enhanced the production of specific antibodies but not the IFNg secretion. Vaccination of naïve mice with DNA encoding Der p 2 delivered by electroporation even at very low dose (2μg) prevented the development of house dust mite allergy through Th1-skewed immune response characterized by the drastic reduction of allergen-specific IgE, IL-5 and lung inflammation together with the induction of strong specific IgG2a titers and IFNg secretion. CpG cassette in the DNA backbone does not play a critical role in the efficient prophylaxis. Finally, comparable protective immune responses were observed when using heterologous DNA prime/protein boost or homologous DNA prime/boost. Taken together, these data suggest that the potent Th1 response induced by DNA-based vaccine encoding allergens through electroporation provides the rationale for the evaluation of DNA encoding Der p 2 into HDM allergy clinical trials. PMID:23396105

  11. Protective efficacy of a Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry protein 13 plasmid DNA vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Yuan; Yuan, Zi-Guo; Petersen, Eskild; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiu-Xiang; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Li, Hao-Xin; Lv, Zhi-Cheng; Cheng, Tian; Ren, Di; Yang, Gui-Lian; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite infecting humans and other warm-blooded animals, resulting in serious public health problems and economic losses worldwide. Rhoptries are involved in T. gondii invasion and host cell interaction and have been implicated as important virulence factors. In the present study, a DNA vaccine expressing rhoptry protein 13 (ROP13) of T. gondii inserted into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX I was constructed, and the immune protection it induced in Kunming mice was evaluated. Kunming mice were immunized intramuscularly with pVAX-ROP13 and/or with interleukin-18 (IL-18). Then, we evaluated the immune response using a lymphoproliferative assay, cytokine and antibody measurements, and the survival times of mice challenged with the virulent T. gondii RH strain (type I) and the cyst-forming PRU strain (type II). The results showed that pVAX-ROP13 alone or with pVAX/IL-18 induced a high level of specific anti-T. gondii antibodies and specific lymphocyte proliferative responses. Coinjection of pVAX/IL-18 significantly increased the production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10. Further, challenge experiments showed that coimmunization of pVAX-ROP13 with pVAX/IL-18 significantly (P < 0.05) increased survival time (32.3 ± 2.7 days) compared with pVAX-ROP13 alone (24.9 ± 2.3 days). Immunized mice challenged with T. gondii cysts (strain PRU) had a significant reduction in the number of brain cysts, suggesting that ROP13 could trigger a strong humoral and cellular response against T. gondii cyst infection and that it is a potential vaccine candidate against toxoplasmosis, which provided the foundation for further development of effective vaccines against T. gondii. PMID:23015648

  12. Lactococci and lactobacilli as mucosal delivery vectors for therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Food-grade Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) have been safely consumed for centuries by humans in fermented foods. Thus, they are good candidates to develop novel oral vectors, constituting attractive alternatives to attenuated pathogens, for mucosal delivery strategies. Herein, this review summarizes our research, up until now, on the use of LAB as mucosal delivery vectors for therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccines. Most of our work has been based on the model LAB Lactococcus lactis, for which we have developed efficient genetic tools, including expression signals and host strains, for the heterologous expression of therapeutic proteins such as antigens, cytokines and enzymes. Resulting recombinant lactococci strains have been tested successfully for their prophylactic and therapeutic effects in different animal models: i) against human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-induced tumors in mice, ii) to partially prevent a bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-allergic reaction in mice and iii) to regulate body weight and food consumption in obese mice. Strikingly, all of these tools have been successfully transposed to the Lactobacillus genus, in recent years, within our laboratory. Notably, anti-oxidative Lactobacillus casei strains were constructed and tested in two chemically-induced colitis models. In parallel, we also developed a strategy based on the use of L. lactis to deliver DNA at the mucosal level, and were able to show that L. lactis is able to modulate the host response through DNA delivery. Today, we consider that all of our consistent data, together with those obtained by other groups, demonstrate and reinforce the interest of using LAB, particularly lactococci and lactobacilli strains, to develop novel therapeutic protein mucosal delivery vectors which should be tested now in human clinical trials. PMID:21995317

  13. Immunological comparison of DNA vaccination using two delivery systems against canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mehdi; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Saljoughian, Noushin; Doroud, Delaram; Jamshidi, Shahram; Mahdavi, Niousha; Shirian, Sadegh; Daneshbod, Yahya; Hamid Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2015-09-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a fatal disease caused by the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum. Dogs are the primary reservoirs of this parasite, and vaccination of dogs could be an effective method to reduce its transfer to humans. In order to develop a vaccine against VL (apart from the choice of immunogenic candidate antigens), it is necessary to use an appropriate delivery system to promote a proper antigen-specific immune response. In this study, we compared two vaccine delivery systems, namely electroporation and cationic solid-lipid nanoparticle (cSLN) formulation, to administer a DNA vaccine containing the Leishmania donovani A2 antigen, and L. infantum cysteine proteinases of type I (CPA) and II (CPB) without its unusual C-terminal extension. The protective potencies of these two vaccine delivery systems were evaluated against L. infantum challenge in outbred dogs. Our results show that the administration of pcDNA-A2-CPA-CPB(-CTE)GFP vaccine as a prime-boost by either electroporation or cSLN formulation protects the dogs against L. infantum infection. Partial protection in vaccinated dogs is associated with significantly (p<0.05) higher levels of IgG2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α and with low levels of IgG1 and IL-10 as compared to the control group. Protection was also correlated with a low parasite burden and a strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. This study demonstrates that both electroporation and cSLN formulation can be used as efficient vaccine delivery systems against visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:26255093

  14. Neutralizing antibodies respond to a bivalent dengue DNA vaccine or/and a recombinant bivalent antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Weng, Yu-Wei; Huang, Hai-Long; Zhang, Jian-Ming; Yan, Yan-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    There is currently no effective vaccine to prevent dengue infection, despite the existence of multiple studies on potential methods of immunization. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of DNA and/or recombinant protein on levels of neutralizing antibodies. For this purpose, envelope domain IIIs of dengue serotypes 1 and 2 (DEN-1/2)were spliced by a linker (Gly‑Gly‑Ser‑Gly‑Ser)3 and cloned into the prokaryotic expression plasmid pET30a (+) and eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1 (+). The chimeric bivalent protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and one‑step purification by high‑performance liquid chromatography was conducted. Protein expression levels of the DNA plasmid were tested in BHK‑21 cells by indirect immunofluorescent assay. In order to explore a more effective immunization strategy and to develop neutralizing antibodies against the two serotypes, mice were inoculated with recombinant bivalent protein, the DNA vaccine, or the two given simultaneously. Presence of the specific antibodies was tested by ELISA and the presence of the neutralizing antibodies was determined by plaque reduction neutralization test. Results of the analysis indicated that the use of a combination of DNA and protein induced significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies against either DEN‑1 or DEN‑2 (1:64.0 and 1:76.1, respectively) compared with the DNA (1:24.7 and 1:26.9, DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively) or the recombinant protein (1:34.9 and 1:45.3 in DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively). The present study demonstrated that the combination of recombinant protein and DNA as an immunization strategy may be an effective method for the development of a vaccine to prevent dengue virus infection. PMID:25371092

  15. CCL4 as an adjuvant for DNA vaccination in a Her2/neu mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, T; Pham-Duc, M; Gries, M; Dörken, B; Pezzutto, A; Westermann, J

    2016-06-01

    Chemokines are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immune responses. CCL4 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, MIP-1β) is a CC chemokine that has a broad spectrum of target cells including immature dendritic cells, which express the cognate receptor CCR5. We asked whether a plasmid encoding CCL4 is able to improve tumor protection and immune responses in a Her2/neu+ mouse tumor model. Balb/c mice were immunized twice intramuscularly with plasmid DNA on days 1 and 15. On day 25, a tumor challenge was performed with 2 × 10(5) syngeneic Her2/neu+ D2F2/E2 tumor cells. Different groups of mice were vaccinated with pDNA(Her2/neu) plus pDNA(CCL4), pDNA(Her2/neu), pDNA(CCL4) or mock vector alone. Our results show that CCL4 is able to (i) improve tumor protection and (ii) augment a TH1-polarized immune response against Her2/neu. Although Her2/neu-specific humoral and T-cell immune responses were comparable with that induced in previous studies using CCL19 or CCL21 as adjuvants, tumor protection conferred by CCL4 was inferior. Whether this is due to a different spectrum of (innate) immune cells, remains to be clarified. However, combination of CCL19/21 with CCL4 might be a reasonable approach in the future, particularly for DNA vaccination in Her2/neu+ breast cancer in the situation of minimal residual disease. PMID:27056671

  16. A strain of Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus causes high mortality among cultured Largemouth Bass in South China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongmei; Deng, Guocheng; Bai, Junjie; Li, Shengjie; Yu, Lingyun; Quan, Yingchun; Yang, Xiaojing; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zemin; Ye, Xing

    2013-09-01

    In April 2011, 40% mortality of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides juveniles occurred at a farm of Zhongshan City, Guangdong Province, China. Infected fish became lethargic, exhibited corkscrew and irregular swimming, and developed a distended abdomen and crooked body. Fish began to die within 2 d after the appearance of clinical signs. In order to analyze the pathogeny and diagnose the disease earlier, observation of clinical signs, cell infection, titer calculation, electron microscopy, immersion infection assay for fish, and nucleotide sequence analysis were carried out. Fathead minnow (FHM) cell cultures, inoculated with filtrate of liver and spleen homogenates from the diseased fish, developed the obvious cytopathic effect 46 h after inoculation in the primary culture and 24 h at the first passage. Typical rhabdovirus particles, 115-143 nm in length and 62-78 nm in diameter, were observed in infected FHM cells by direct transmission electron microscopy. The isolated virus produced a titer of 10(7.15) TCID50/mL. Immersion-Fish infected with the virus had similar clinical signs and 80% mortality with 10(2.5) LD50/mL. The data indicated that the rhabdovirus was the lethal pathogeny of the current disease. Based on nucleoprotein-gene nucleotide sequence multiple alignment analysis, the newly isolated virus is a strain of Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus (SCRV) under family Rhabdoviridae, which was initially isolated from Mandarin Fish Siniperca chuatsi. Up to the present, at least four virus strains have been isolated from diseased Largemouth Bass, which have had different clinical signs. Comparison of the clinical signs can help in an early diagnosis of the disease. PMID:23915177

  17. Rabies Group-Specific Ribonucleoprotein Antigen and a Test System for Grouping and Typing of Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, L. G.; Dietzschold, B.; Dierks, R. E.; Matthaeus, W.; Enzmann, P.-J.; Strohmaier, K.

    1973-01-01

    Cell-associated ribonucleoprotein (RNP) was isolated from BHK-21 cells infected with several strains of rabies and rabies-related viruses. The RNP-antigen from rabies and related viruses induced the formation of complement-fixing, precipitating, and immunofluorescent antibodies, and proved to be the group-specific antigen common to all rabies viruses. Antigens of the envelope which induce virus-neutralizing antibodies are apparently determinative for the serotype of a virus as evidenced by two-way neutralization tests. A combination of these methods seems to be a useful approach to the serological grouping and typing of rhabdoviruses. Images PMID:4196634

  18. Intravaginal HPV DNA vaccination with electroporation induces local CD8+ T-cell immune responses and antitumor effects against cervicovaginal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y; Peng, S; Qiu, J; Miao, J; Yang, B; Jeang, J; Hung, C-F; Wu, T-C

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have the potential to inhibit the progression of an established HPV infection to precancer and cancer lesions by targeting HPV oncoproteins. We have previously developed a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to E7, CRT/E7 DNA vaccine, for use in the treatment of HPV-associated lesions. Since the transfection efficiency of DNA vaccines administered in vivo is typically low, we examined the use of electroporation as well as different routes of administration to enhance antigen-specific tumor control. We tested the effects of the CRT/E7 DNA vaccine administered intramuscularly or intravaginally, with or without electroporation, on the generation of CD8+ T-cell immunity and therapeutic antitumor effects in HPV16 E7-expressing cervicovaginal tumor-bearing mice. We found that intravaginal vaccination of CRT/E7 DNA followed by electroporation-induced potent E7-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the cervicovaginal tract, compared with intramuscular injection followed by electroporation. Furthermore, tumor-bearing mice vaccinated intravaginally followed by electroporation had an enhanced survival, antitumor effects and local production of IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells compared with those vaccinated intramuscularly with electroporation. Thus, we show that intravaginal CRT/E7 DNA vaccination followed by electroporation generates the most potent therapeutic antitumor effects against an orthotopic E7-expressing tumor model. The current study will have significant clinical implications once a clinically applicable electroporation device for intravaginal use becomes available. PMID:25786869

  19. Electroporation enhances immune responses and protection induced by a bovine viral diarrhea virus DNA vaccine in newborn calves with maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Lawman, Zoe; Wilson, Don; Luxembourg, Alain; Ellefsen, Barry; van den Hurk, Jan V; Hannaman, Drew

    2010-09-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the major pathogens in cattle. In this study, newborn calves with maternal antibodies were vaccinated with a BVDV DNA vaccine, either by conventional intramuscular (IM) injection or with the TriGrid™ Delivery System for IM delivery (TDS-IM). The calves vaccinated with the TDS-IM developed more rapidly and effectively BVDV-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in the presence of maternal antibodies. Overall, the immune responses induced by delivery with the TDS-IM remained stronger than those elicited by conventional IM injection of the BVDV DNA vaccine. Accordingly, electroporation-mediated delivery of the BVDV DNA vaccine resulted in close to complete protection from clinical signs of disease, while conventional IM administration did not fully prevent morbidity and mortality following challenge with BVDV-2. These results demonstrate the TDS-IM to be effective as a delivery system for a BVDV DNA vaccine in newborn calves in the presence of maternal antibodies, which supports the potential of electroporation as a delivery method for prophylactic DNA vaccines. PMID:20670907

  20. Salmonella typhi Ty21a bacterial ghost vector augments HIV-1 gp140 DNA vaccine-induced peripheral and mucosal antibody responses via TLR4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Guangyu; Tong, Shuang; Yu, Hong; Jin, Xia; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2012-08-24

    Because of their stability and ease of manipulation, DNA vaccines have considerable potential for eliciting immune responses. However, they are limited by their weak immunogenicity, especially in humans. To address this challenge, we explored a new strategy of HIV vaccine delivery using Salmonella typhi Ty21a bacterial ghosts (BGs). We found that Ty21a BGs loaded with an HIV gp140 DNA vaccine (Ty21a BG-DNA) were readily taken up by murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, and gp140 was efficiently expressed in these cells. Peripheral and intestinal mucosal anti-gp120 antibody responses in mice vaccinated with BGs-DNA vaccine were significantly higher than those in mice immunized with naked DNA vaccine. The enhancement of antibody responses was associated with BG-induced production of IL-10 through TLR4 pathway. These results demonstrate that Ty21a BGs is a novel and effective delivery vehicle for DNA vaccines, which could therefore be used as a new strategy for development of HIV vaccines. PMID:22819719

  1. A multi-head intradermal electroporation device allows for tailored and increased dose DNA vaccine delivery to the skin.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Jay R; Mendoza, Janess M; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine; Gomez, Alan F; Schmaljohn, Connie S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    The identification of an effective and tolerable delivery method is a necessity for the success of DNA vaccines in the clinic. This article describes the development and validation of a multi-headed intradermal electroporation device which would be applicable for delivering multiple DNA vaccine plasmids simultaneously but spatially separated. Reporter gene plasmids expressing green and red fluorescent proteins were used to demonstrate the impact of spatial separation on DNA delivery to increase the number of transfected cells and avoid interference through visible expression patterns. To investigate the impact of plasmid interference on immunogenicity, a disease target was investigated where issues with multi-valent vaccines had been previously described. DNA-based Hantaan and Puumala virus vaccines were delivered separately or as a combination and the effect of multi-valence was determined by appropriate assays. While a negative impact was observed for both antigenic vaccines when delivered together, these effects were mitigated when the vaccine was delivered using the multi-head device. We also demonstrate how the multi-head device facilitates higher dose delivery to the skin resulting in improved immune responses. This new multi-head platform device is an efficient, tolerable and non-invasive method to deliver multiple plasmid DNA constructs simultaneously allowing the tailoring of delivery sites for combination vaccines. Additionally, this device would allow the delivery of multi-plasmid vaccine formulations without risk of impacted immune responses through interference. Such a low-cost, easy to use device platform for the delivery of multi-agent DNA vaccines would have direct applications by the military and healthcare sectors for mass vaccination purposes. PMID:25839221

  2. A multi-head intradermal electroporation device allows for tailored and increased dose DNA vaccine delivery to the skin.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Jay R; Mendoza, Janess M; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine; Gomez, Alan F; Schmaljohn, Connie S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of an effective and tolerable delivery method is a necessity for the success of DNA vaccines in the clinic. This manuscript describes the development and validation of a multi-headed intradermal electroporation device which would be applicable for delivering multiple DNA vaccine plasmids simultaneously but spatially separated. Reporter gene plasmids expressing green and red fluorescent proteins were used to demonstrate the impact of spatial separation on DNA delivery to increase the number of transfected cells and avoid interference through visible expression patterns. To investigate the impact of plasmid interference on immunogenicity, a disease target was investigated where issues with multi-valent vaccines had been previously described. DNA-based Hantaan and Puumala virus vaccines were delivered separately or as a combination and the effect of multi-valence was determined by appropriate assays. While a negative impact was observed for both antigenic vaccines when delivered together, these effects were mitigated when the vaccine was delivered using the multi-head device. We also demonstrate how the multi-head device facilitates higher dose delivery to the skin resulting in improved immune responses. This new multi-head platform device is an efficient, tolerable and non-invasive method to deliver multiple plasmid DNA constructs simultaneously allowing the tailoring of delivery sites for combination vaccines. Additionally, this device would allow the delivery of multi-plasmid vaccine formulations without risk of impacted immune responses through interference. Such a low-cost, easy to use device platform for the delivery of multi-agent DNA vaccines would have direct applications by the military and healthcare sectors for mass vaccination purposes. PMID:25483486

  3. CD226 as a genetic adjuvant to enhance immune efficacy induced by Ag85A DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Fangli; Zhu, Junfeng; Sang, Lixuan; Han, Xue; Wang, Danan; Shan, Fengping; Li, Shengjun; Sun, Xun; Lu, Changlong

    2015-03-01

    Antigen-85A (Ag85A) is one of the major proteins secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Many studies on animal models have shown that vaccination with the recombinant Ag85A-DNA or Ag85A protein induces powerful immune response. However, these vaccines cannot generate sufficient protective immunity in the systemic compartment. CD226, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is expressed in the majority of NK cells, T cells, monocytes, and platelets, and can be served as a co-stimulator that contributes to multiple innate and adaptive responses. However, there has been no study where either CD226 protein or DNA has been used as an adjuvant for vaccine development. The aim of this study was to develop a novel Ag85A DNA vaccine with CD226 as the genetic adjuvant to increase the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A. Oral vaccination with pcDNA3.1-Ag85A-CD226 DNA induced potent immune responses in mice. CD226 was an effective genetic adjuvant that improved the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A and enhanced the activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and NK cells in mice. Th1 dominant cytokines (i.e. IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α), cellular immunity (i.e. CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)T cells and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+)T cells in splenocytes) and MLNs were also significantly elevated by pcDNA3.1-Ag85A-CD226 DNA vaccination. Our results suggest that CD226 is an effective adjuvant to enhance the immune efficacy induced by Ag85A. Our findings provide a new strategy for the development of a DNA vaccine co-expressing Ag85A and CD226. PMID:25582686

  4. A Comparison of Red Fluorescent Proteins to Model DNA Vaccine Expression by Whole Animal In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kinnear, Ekaterina; Caproni, Lisa J.; Tregoning, John S.

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines can be manufactured cheaply, easily and rapidly and have performed well in pre-clinical animal studies. However, clinical trials have so far been disappointing, failing to evoke a strong immune response, possibly due to poor antigen expression. To improve antigen expression, improved technology to monitor DNA vaccine transfection efficiency is required. In the current study, we compared plasmid encoded tdTomato, mCherry, Katushka, tdKatushka2 and luciferase as reporter proteins for whole animal in vivo imaging. The intramuscular, subcutaneous and tattooing routes were compared and electroporation was used to enhance expression. We observed that overall, fluorescent proteins were not a good tool to assess expression from DNA plasmids, with a highly heterogeneous response between animals. Of the proteins used, intramuscular delivery of DNA encoding either tdTomato or luciferase gave the clearest signal, with some Katushka and tdKatushka2 signal observed. Subcutaneous delivery was weakly visible and nothing was observed following DNA tattooing. DNA encoding haemagglutinin was used to determine whether immune responses mirrored visible expression levels. A protective immune response against H1N1 influenza was induced by all routes, even after a single dose of DNA, though qualitative differences were observed, with tattooing leading to high antibody responses and subcutaneous DNA leading to high CD8 responses. We conclude that of the reporter proteins used, expression from DNA plasmids can best be assessed using tdTomato or luciferase. But, the disconnect between visible expression level and immunogenicity suggests that in vivo whole animal imaging of fluorescent proteins has limited utility for predicting DNA vaccine efficacy. PMID:26091084

  5. Protective cell-mediated immunity by DNA vaccination against Papillomavirus L1 capsid protein in the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Budgeon, Lynn R; Reed, Cynthia A; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D

    2006-01-01

    Papillomavirus major capsid protein L1 has successfully stimulated protective immunity against virus infection by induction of neutralizing antibodies in animal models and in clinical trials. However, the potential impact of L1-induced protective cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses is difficult to measure in vivo because of the coincidence of anti-L1 antibody. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that L1 could activate CMI, using the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model. A unique property of this model is that infections can be initiated with viral DNA, thus bypassing all contributions to protection via neutralizing anti-L1 antibody. DNA vaccines containing either CRPV L1, or subfragments of L1 (amino-terminal two-thirds of L1 [L1N] and the carboxylterminal two-thirds of L1 [L1C]), were delivered intracutaneously into rabbits, using a gene gun. After three booster immunizations, the rabbits were challenged with several viral DNA constructs: wild-type CRPV, CRPV L1ATGko (an L1 ATG knockout mutation), and CRPV-ROPV hybrid (CRPV with a replacement L1 from Rabbit Oral Papillomavirus). Challenge of L1 DNA-vaccinated rabbits with wild-type CRPV resulted in significantly fewer papillomas when compared with challenge with CRPV L1ATGko DNA. Significantly smaller papillomas were found in CRPV L1-, L1N-, and L1C-vaccinated rabbits. In addition, rabbits vaccinated with either L1 or L1N grew significantly fewer and smaller papillomas when challenged with CRPV-ROPV hybrid DNA. Therefore, CRPV L1 DNA vaccination induced CMI responses to CRPV DNA infections that can contribute to protective immunity. Cross-protective immunity against CRPV L1 and ROPV L1 was elicited in these CRPV L1- and subfragment-vaccinated rabbits. PMID:16987067

  6. Eimeria maxima microneme protein 2 delivered as DNA vaccine and recombinant protein induces immunity against experimental homogenous challenge.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingwei; Zhang, Zhenchao; Li, Menghui; Song, Xiaokai; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-10-01

    E. maxima is one of the seven species of Eimeria that infects chicken. Until now, only a few antigenic genes of E. maxima have been reported. In the present study, the immune protective effects against E. maxima challenge of recombinant protein and DNA vaccine encoding EmMIC2 were evaluated. Two-week-old chickens were randomly divided into five groups. The experimental group of chickens was immunized with 100 μg DNA vaccine pVAX1-MIC2 or 200 μg rEmMIC2 protein while the control group of chickens was injected with pVAX1 plasmid or sterile PBS. The results showed that the anti-EmMIC2 antibody titers of both rEmMIC2 protein and pVAX1-MIC2 groups were significantly higher as compared to PBS and pVAX1 control (P<0.05). The splenocytes from both vaccinated groups of chickens displayed significantly greater proliferation compared with the controls (P<0.05). Serum from chickens immunized with pVAX1-MIC2 and rEmMIC2 protein displayed significantly high levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-17, TGF-β and IL-4 (P<0.05) compared to those of negative controls. The challenge experiment results showed that both the recombinant protein and the DNA vaccine could obviously alleviate jejunum lesions, body weight loss, increase oocyst, decrease ratio and provide ACIs of more than 165. All the above results suggested that immunization with EmMIC2 was effective in imparting partial protection against E. maxima challenge and it could be an effective antigen candidate for the development of new vaccines against E. maxima. PMID:26072304

  7. A multi-head intradermal electroporation device allows for tailored and increased dose DNA vaccine delivery to the skin

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jay R; Mendoza, Janess M; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine; Gomez, Alan F; Schmaljohn, Connie S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    The identification of an effective and tolerable delivery method is a necessity for the success of DNA vaccines in the clinic. This article describes the development and validation of a multi-headed intradermal electroporation device which would be applicable for delivering multiple DNA vaccine plasmids simultaneously but spatially separated. Reporter gene plasmids expressing green and red fluorescent proteins were used to demonstrate the impact of spatial separation on DNA delivery to increase the number of transfected cells and avoid interference through visible expression patterns. To investigate the impact of plasmid interference on immunogenicity, a disease target was investigated where issues with multi-valent vaccines had been previously described. DNA-based Hantaan and Puumala virus vaccines were delivered separately or as a combination and the effect of multi-valence was determined by appropriate assays. While a negative impact was observed for both antigenic vaccines when delivered together, these effects were mitigated when the vaccine was delivered using the multi-head device. We also demonstrate how the multi-head device facilitates higher dose delivery to the skin resulting in improved immune responses. This new multi-head platform device is an efficient, tolerable and non-invasive method to deliver multiple plasmid DNA constructs simultaneously allowing the tailoring of delivery sites for combination vaccines. Additionally, this device would allow the delivery of multi-plasmid vaccine formulations without risk of impacted immune responses through interference. Such a low-cost, easy to use device platform for the delivery of multi-agent DNA vaccines would have direct applications by the military and healthcare sectors for mass vaccination purposes. PMID:25839221

  8. DNA vaccination based on pyolysin co-immunized with IL-1β enhances host antibacterial immunity against Trueperella pyogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting; Zhao, Kelei; Zhang, Ziqi; Tang, Ce; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2016-06-24

    Trueperella pyogenes is a commensal and opportunistic pathogen normally causes mastitis, liver abscesses and pneumonia of economically important livestock. To date, no specific control measure was reported to prevent T. pyogenes infections. In this study, we first constructed a recombinant plasmid pVAX1-PLO based on the main virulent factor pyolysin gene as DNA vaccine against T. pyogenes infection. Subsequently, transient expression of pVAX1-PLO and pcDNA3.1/V5-fIL-1β were identified in Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T) by immunofluorescence assay. Humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity between different immunized groups. The results showed that the successful expression of PLO or fIL-1β protein was detected by confocal microscopy for cells transfected with plasmid pVAX1-PLO and/or pcDNA3.1/V5-fIL-1β. The mice immunized with pVAX1-PLO elicited a higher titer of PLO-specific antibody than the control group. The levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 were significantly increased in the pVAX1-PLO immunized mice, while the expression level of IL-4 was slightly increased but not significant. These findings suggested that the DNA vaccine pVAX1-PLO can primarily induce Th1 immune response. The residual Colony-Forming Units (CFUs) from the liver and peritoneal fluid were decreased obviously in the pVAX1-PLO treated mice compared with the control. Importantly, co-immunization with pcDNA3.1/V5-fIL-1β and pVAX1-PLO could enhance host humoral and cellular immune responses and significantly protect mouse from T. pyogenes infection. In conclusion, our study provides a promising strategy against T. pyogenes infections and implies the potential clinical application of combined DNA vaccines in diseases control. PMID:27091688

  9. DNA vaccination with a gene encoding Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry Protein 17 induces partial protective immunity against lethal challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Long; Wang, Yu-Jing; Pei, Yan-Jiang; Bai, Ji-Zhong; Yin, Li-Tian; Guo, Rui; Yin, Guo-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that affects humans and various vertebrate livestock and causes serious economic losses. To develop an effective vaccine against T. gondii infection, we constructed a DNA vaccine encoding the T. gondii rhoptry protein 17 (TgROP17) and evaluated its immune protective efficacy against acute T. gondii infection in mice. The DNA vaccine (p3×Flag-CMV-14-ROP17) was intramuscularly injected to BALB/c mice and the immune responses of the vaccinated mice were determined. Compared to control mice treated with empty vector or PBS, mice immunized with the ROP17 vaccine showed a relatively high level of specific anti-T. gondii antibodies, and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response with predominance of IgG2a production. The immunized mice also displayed a specific lymphocyte proliferative response, a Th1-type cellular immune response with production of IFN-γ and interleukin-2, and increased number of CD8+ T cells. Immunization with the ROP17 DNA significantly prolonged the survival time (15.6 ± 5.4 days, P < 0.05) of mice after challenge infection with the virulent T. gondii RH strain (Type I), compared with the control groups which died within 8 days. Therefore, our data suggest that DNA vaccination with TgROP17 triggers significant humoral and cellular responses and induces effective protection in mice against acute T. gondii infection, indicating that TgROP17 is a promising vaccine candidate against acute toxoplasmosis. PMID:26842927

  10. Construction and Production of Foxp3-Fc (IgG) DNA Vaccine/Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi Niri, Neda; Memarnejadian, Arash; Hadjati, Jamshid; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Shokri, Mehdi; Pilehvar-soltanahmadi, Yones; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: It seems that the success of vaccination for cancer immunotherapy such as Dendritic Cell (DC) based cancer vaccine is hindered through a powerful network of immune system suppressive elements in which regulatory T cell is the common factor. Foxp3 transcription factor is the most specific marker of regulatory T cells. In different studies, targeting an immune response against regulatory cells expressing Foxp3 and their removal have been assessed. As these previous studies could not efficiently conquer the suppressive effect of regulatory cells by their partial elimination, an attempt was made to search for constructing more effective vaccines against regulatory T cells by which to improve the effect of combined means of immunotherapy in cancer. In this study, a DNA vaccine and its respective protein were constructed in which Foxp3 fused to Fc(IgG) can be efficiently captured and processed by DC via receptor mediated endocytosis and presented to MHCII and I (cross priming). Methods: DNA construct containing fragment C (Fc) portion of IgG fused to Foxp3 was designed. DNA construct was transfected into HEK cells to investigate its expression through fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Its specific expression was also assessed by western blot. For producing recombinant protein, FOXP3-Fc fusion construct was inserted into pET21a vector and consequently, Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain BL21 was selected as host cells. The expression of recombinant fusion protein was assayed by western blot analysis. Afterward, fusion protein was purified by SDS PAGE reverse staining. Results: The expression analysis of DNA construct by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy showed that this construct was successfully expressed in eukaryotic cells. Moreover, the Foxp3-Fc expression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE followed by western blot analysis. Additionally, the presence of fusion protein was shown by specific antibody after purification. Conclusion: Due to successful

  11. Modulation of the immune response to DNA vaccine by co-delivery of costimulatory molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fló, J; Tisminetzky, S; Baralle, F

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated methods for modulating immune responses, against herpes simplex virus (HSV), generated from DNA vaccination by co-delivery of genes encoding costimulatory molecules.A strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction was induced in mice co-injected via the intradermal (i.d.) route with a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding the CD80 molecule (pCD80) and a plasmid encoding the glycoprotein D of the HSV-2 (pgD). Furthermore, when spleen cells from these mice were cultured in the presence of inactivated HSV, a significant increase in the expression of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) was observed in the CD4 subset compared with mice immunized only with pgD. Analysis of cytokine synthesis at the single-cell level indicated that CD80 genes induce a significant increase in the number of interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-, IL-2- and IL-4-secreting cells in the spleen. On the other hand, co-administration of the CD80 gene via the intramuscular (i.m.) route did not induce an increase in the cell-mediated immune response. When a plasmid carrying the CD86 gene (pCD86) was co-injected via the i.m. route with the pgD plasmid, a small decrease in the number of IFN-γ-secreting cells was observed. This down-regulation of the immune response was also observed when eukaryotic expression cassettes for CD80 and for CD86 were coadministered with the pgD plasmid via the i.d. route. However, co-injection of pCD86 via the i.m. route produced a small increase in the number of IL-4-secreting cells. When immunized mice were challenged intravaginally with 100 plaque-forming units of virus, only co-injection of the CD80 gene by the i.d. route provoked an adjuvant effect compared with mice immunized with pgD alone. A reduction in the titres of HSV in vaginal washings was observed together with a decrease in the lesion score PMID:10886404

  12. Development of a robust, versatile, and scalable inoculum train for the production of a DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Okonkowski, J; Kizer-Bentley, L; Listner, K; Robinson, D; Chartrain, M

    2005-01-01

    For many microbial fermentation processes, the inoculum train can have a substantial impact on process performance in terms of productivity, profitability, and process control. In general, it is understood that a well-characterized and flexible inoculum train is essential for future scale-up and implementation of the process in a pilot plant or manufacturing setting. A fermentation process utilizing E. coli DH5 for the production of plasmid DNA carrying the HIV gag gene for use as a vaccine is currently under development in our laboratory. As part of the development effort, we evaluated inoculum train schemes that incorporate one, two, or three stages. In addition, we investigated the effect of inoculum viable-cell concentrations, either thawed or actively growing, over a wide range (from 2.5 x 10(4) to 1.0 x 10(8) viable cells/mL or approximately 0.001% to 4% of final working volume). The various inoculum trains were evaluated in terms of final plasmid yield, process time, reproducibility, robustness, and feasibility at large scale. The results of these studies show that final plasmid yield remained in the desired range, despite the number of stages or inoculation viable-cell concentrations comprising the inoculum train. On the basis of these observations and because it established a large database, the first part of these investigations supports an exceptional flexibility in the design of scalable inoculum trains for this DNA vaccine process. This work also highlighted that a slightly higher level of process reproducibility, as measured by the time for the culture to reach mid-exponential growth, was observed when using actively growing versus frozen cells. It also demonstrated the existence of a viable-cell concentration threshold for the one-stage process, since we observed that inoculation of the production stage with very low amounts of viable cells from a frozen source could lead to increased process sensitivity to external factors such as variation in the

  13. Genetic resistance to rhabdovirus infection in teleost fish is paralleled to the derived cell resistance status.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Eloi R; Langevin, Christelle; Tohry, Corinne; Houel, Armel; Ducrocq, Vincent; Benmansour, Abdenour; Quillet, Edwige; Boudinot, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors of resistance and predisposition to viral diseases explain a significant part of the clinical variability observed within host populations. Predisposition to viral diseases has been associated to MHC haplotypes and T cell immunity, but a growing repertoire of innate/intrinsic factors are implicated in the genetic determinism of the host susceptibility to viruses. In a long-term study of the genetics of host resistance to fish rhabdoviruses, we produced a collection of double-haploid rainbow trout clones showing a wide range of susceptibility to Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) waterborne infection. The susceptibility of fibroblastic cell lines derived from these clonal fish was fully consistent with the susceptibility of the parental fish clones. The mechanisms determining the host resistance therefore did not associate with specific host immunity, but rather with innate or intrinsic factors. One cell line was resistant to rhabdovirus infection due to the combination of an early interferon IFN induction--that was not observed in the susceptible cells--and of yet unknown factors that hamper the first steps of the viral cycle. The implication of IFN was well consistent with the wide range of resistance of this genetic background to VSHV and IHNV, to the birnavirus IPNV and the orthomyxovirus ISAV. Another cell line was even more refractory to the VHSV infection through different antiviral mechanisms. This collection of clonal fish and isogenic cell lines provides an interesting model to analyze the relative contribution of antiviral pathways to the resistance to different viruses. PMID:22514610

  14. Genetic Resistance to Rhabdovirus Infection in Teleost Fish Is Paralleled to the Derived Cell Resistance Status

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Eloi R.; Langevin, Christelle; Tohry, Corinne; Houel, Armel; Ducrocq, Vincent; Benmansour, Abdenour; Quillet, Edwige; Boudinot, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors of resistance and predisposition to viral diseases explain a significant part of the clinical variability observed within host populations. Predisposition to viral diseases has been associated to MHC haplotypes and T cell immunity, but a growing repertoire of innate/intrinsic factors are implicated in the genetic determinism of the host susceptibility to viruses. In a long-term study of the genetics of host resistance to fish rhabdoviruses, we produced a collection of double-haploid rainbow trout clones showing a wide range of susceptibility to Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) waterborne infection. The susceptibility of fibroblastic cell lines derived from these clonal fish was fully consistent with the susceptibility of the parental fish clones. The mechanisms determining the host resistance therefore did not associate with specific host immunity, but rather with innate or intrinsic factors. One cell line was resistant to rhabdovirus infection due to the combination of an early interferon IFN induction - that was not observed in the susceptible cells - and of yet unknown factors that hamper the first steps of the viral cycle. The implication of IFN was well consistent with the wide range of resistance of this genetic background to VSHV and IHNV, to the birnavirus IPNV and the orthomyxovirus ISAV. Another cell line was even more refractory to the VHSV infection through different antiviral mechanisms. This collection of clonal fish and isogenic cell lines provides an interesting model to analyze the relative contribution of antiviral pathways to the resistance to different viruses. PMID:22514610

  15. Characterization of a venom gland-associated rhabdovirus in the parasitoid wasp Diachasmimorpha longicaudata.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Tyler J; Carrillo, Daniel; Burke, Gaelen R

    2016-01-01

    Parasitoid wasps reproduce by laying their eggs on or inside of a host insect, which triggers a defense response in the host insect that kills the developing wasp. To counteract the host's lethal response, some parasitoid wasps are associated with symbiotic viruses that alter host metabolism and development to promote successful development of the wasp embryo. These symbiotic viruses display a number of characteristics that differ from those of pathogenic viruses, but are poorly understood with the exception of one group, the polydnaviruses. Here, we characterize the genome of a non-polydnavirus associated with parasitoid wasps, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata rhabdovirus (DlRhV), and assess its role as a potential mutualistic virus. Our results show that the DlRhV genome contains six open reading frames (ORFs). Three ORFs show sequence homology to known viral genes and one ORF encodes a previously identified protein, called parasitism-specific protein 24 (PSP24), that has been hypothesized to play a role in promoting successful parasitism by D. longicaudata. We constructed a phylogeny that shows that DlRhV is most closely related to other insect-infecting rhabdoviruses. Finally, we report that DlRhV infection does not occur in all populations of D. longicaudata, and is not required for successful parasitism. PMID:27374981

  16. Structure-function relationships and mode of replication of animal rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Koprowski, H

    1975-03-01

    Recently accumulated knowledge allows more precise comparison of the structural (and possibly evolutionary) relationships of several different animal rhabdoviruses: vesicular stomatitis virus, rabies virus, Kern Canyon virus, and spring viremia of carp virus. Each virus is composed primarily of a glycoprotein, an RNA-associated nucleoprotein, and one or two membrane proteins. Vesicular stomatitis virus group viruses contain lesser amounts of two additional distinct polypeptides, NS and L. The separate viruses undergo structural polypeptide phosphorylation in vivo according to characteristic patterns. In vesicular stomatitis virus the NS protein is selectively phosphorylated. In rabies group viruses and in spring viremia of carp virus, the nucleoprotein is the predominant phosphoprotein; in these viruses only the phosphorylated moiety is selectively cleaved off with trypsin. In Kern Canyon virus, only membrane protein and glycoprotein are weakly phosphorylated. Each virus possesses a virion-bound protein kinase. Vesicular stomatitis virus group viruses, Kern Canyon virus, and spring viremia of carp virus only contain virion-bound transcriptases of respectively decreasing levels of activity demonstrable in vitro. Vesicular stomatitis and Kern Canyon viruses replicate efficiently in enucleated cells; rabies virus does not. Based upon these observations, it is suggested that vesicular stomatitis virus may represent the most highly evolved of these rhabdoviruses, whereas spring viremia of carp and Kern Canyon viruses may represent "evolutionary links" between the vesicular stomatitis and rabies virus groups. PMID:165494

  17. A Novel Rhabdovirus Associated with Acute Hemorrhagic Fever in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Slikas, Elizabeth; Steffen, Imke; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Sittler, Taylor; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Ruby, J. Graham; Wang, Chunlin; Makuwa, Maria; Mulembakani, Prime; Tesh, Robert B.; Mazet, Jonna; Rimoin, Anne W.; Taylor, Travis; Schneider, Bradley S.; Simmons, Graham; Delwart, Eric; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Chiu, Charles Y.; Leroy, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing was used to discover a novel rhabdovirus (Bas-Congo virus, or BASV) associated with a 2009 outbreak of 3 human cases of acute hemorrhagic fever in Mangala village, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Africa. The cases, presenting over a 3-week period, were characterized by abrupt disease onset, high fever, mucosal hemorrhage, and, in two patients, death within 3 days. BASV was detected in an acute serum sample from the lone survivor at a concentration of 1.09×106 RNA copies/mL, and 98.2% of the genome was subsequently de novo assembled from ∼140 million sequence reads. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BASV is highly divergent and shares less than 34% amino acid identity with any other rhabdovirus. High convalescent neutralizing antibody titers of >1∶1000 were detected in the survivor and an asymptomatic nurse directly caring for him, both of whom were health care workers, suggesting the potential for human-to-human transmission of BASV. The natural animal reservoir host or arthropod vector and precise mode of transmission for the virus remain unclear. BASV is an emerging human pathogen associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in Africa. PMID:23028323

  18. A fusion DNA vaccine encoding middle version of HBV envelope protein fused to interleukin-21 did not enhance HBV-specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Su, Wen-Jing; Wang, Jue; Bai, Xue-Fan; Huang, Chang-Xing; Lian, Jian-Qi

    2014-11-01

    DNA vaccination can generate both humoral and cellular immunity, resulting in potential prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines in variety of conditions, including hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Fusion of cytokine gene is one of the ways to increase the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Interleukin (IL)-21 has been demonstrated to play an immunomodulatory role in HBV infection. Thus, we aimed to investigate the ability of IL-21 in the regulation of middle version of HBV envelop protein (MS) DNA vaccine. Fusion plasmid encoding IL-21 linked with MS was constructed. Normal and HBV transgenic mice were immunized by plasmid. pcDNA-IL-21/S2S induced a comparable level of anti-HBs antibody and HBsAg-specific CD8+ T-cell response with pcDNA-S2S. Furthermore, the level of circulating HBsAg was decreased by induction of anti-HBs antibody and HBsAg-specific CD8+ T-cell response to both pcDNA-IL-21/S2S and pcDNA-S2S vaccination in HBV transgenic mice. Thus, immunization with DNA vaccine encoding HBV MS protein induced both T- and B-cell response by targeting the specific antigen. Furthermore, it was also revealed that MS DNA vaccination could break immune tolerance in HBV transgenic mice. But IL-21 did not strengthen immune response induced by HBV DNA immunization. Our study suggested that MS-expressing plasmid may be useful for both preventive and therapeutic methods in HBV infection. However, IL-21 does not improve the immunogenicity and efficacy of MS DNA vaccination, and thus may not be used as a therapeutic marker for chronic hepatitis B. PMID:25211639

  19. Effect of phylogenetic diversity of velogenic Newcastle disease virus challenge on virus shedding post homologous and heterologous DNA vaccination in chickens.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mahmoud H A; Abdelaziz, Adel M; Kumar, Sachin; Al-Habib, Malik A; Megahed, Mohamed M

    2016-04-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a highly devastating disease for the poultry industry as it causes high economic losses. In this present study, a DNA vaccine containing the F and HN surface antigens of a highly virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV), NDV/1/Chicken/2005 (FJ939313), was successfully generated. Cell transfection test indicated that the vaccine expressed the F and HN genes in Hep-2 cells. The main objective of this study was to compare the extent of protection induced by DNA vaccination after homologous and heterologous NDV-challenge as determined by the amount of NDV shedding after challenge. NDV-antibody-negative chickens were vaccinated either once, twice or thrice intramuscularly at 7, 14 and 21 days old and were challenged 14 days post vaccination with either homologous virus (vaccine-matched velogenic viscerotropic Newcastle disease virus (vvNDV) strain, FJ939313), phylogenetically related to group VII, or a phylogenetically divergent heterologous virus (unmatched vvNDV strain, AY968809), which belongs to genogroup VI and shows 84.1% nucleotide similarity to the NDV-sequences of the DNA vaccine. Our data indicate that birds, which received a single dose of the DNA vaccine were poorly protected, and only 30-40% of these birds survived after challenge with high virus shedding titre. Multiple administration of the DNA vaccine induced high protection rates of 70-90% with reduced virus shedding compared to the non-vaccinated and challenged birds. Generally, homologous challenge led to reduced tracheal and cloacal shedding compared to the heterologous vvNDV strain. This study provides a promising approach for the control of ND in chickens using DNA vaccines, which are phylogenetically closely related to the circulating field strains. PMID:26813237

  20. A DNA vaccine encoding VP22 of herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) and OprF confers enhanced protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xian; Wang, Yan; Xia, Yifan; Zhang, Lijuan; Yang, Qin; Lei, Jun

    2016-08-17

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimicrobial resistance is a major therapeutic challenge. DNA vaccination is an attractive approach for antigen-specific immunotherapy against P. aeruginosa. We explored the feasibility of employing Herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein, VP22, as a molecular tool to enhance the immunogenicity of an OprF DNA vaccine against P. aeruginosa. Recombinant DNA vaccines, pVAX1-OprF, pVAX1-OprF-VP22 (encoding a n-OprF-VP22-c fusion protein) and pVAX1-VP22-OprF (encoding a n-VP22-OprF-c fusion protein) were constructed. The humoral and cellular immune responses and immune protective effects of these DNA vaccines in mice were evaluated. In this report, we showed that vaccination with pVAX1-OprF-VP22 induced higher levels of IgG titer, T cell proliferation rate. It also provided better immune protection against the P. aeruginosa challenge when compared to that induced by pVAX1-OprF or pVAX1-VP22-OprF DNA vaccines. Molecular mechanistic analyses indicated vaccination with pVAX1-OprF-VP22 triggered immune responses characterized by a preferential increase in antigen specific IgG2a and IFN-γ in mice, indicating Th1 polarization. We concluded that VP22 is a potent stimulatory molecular tool for DNA vaccination when fused to the carboxyl end of OprF gene. Our study provides a novel strategy for prevention and treatment of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:27449680

  1. Codon optimization and woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element enhance the immune responses of DNA vaccines against infectious bursal disease virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Gao, Li; Gao, Honglei; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Yulong; Qin, Liting; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Xiaomei

    2013-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) in chickens and to determine whether codon optimization and the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE) could improve the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccines. The VP2, VP243 and codon-optimized VP243 genes of IBDV were cloned into pCAGGS vector, and designated as pCAGVP2, pCAGVP243 and pCAGoptiVP243, respectively. Plasmids pCAGWVP243 and pCAGWoptiVP243 carrying the WPRE elements were also constructed as DNA vaccines. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, 2-week-old chickens were injected intramuscularly with the constructed plasmids twice at 2-week intervals and challenged with very virulent IBDV 2 weeks post-boost. Plasmid pCAGVP243 induced better immune responses than pCAGVP2. Chickens immunized with pCAGoptiVP243 and pCAGWVP243 had higher levels of antibody titers, lymphoproliferation responses and cytokine production compared with pCAGVP243. Furthermore, plasmid pCAGWoptiVP243 induced the highest levels of immune responses among the groups. After challenged, DNA vaccines pCAGVP2, pCAGVP243, pCAGoptiVP243, pCAGWVP243 and pCAGWoptiVP243 conferred protection for 33%, 60%, 80%, 87% and 100% of chickens, respectively, as evidenced by the absence of clinical signs, mortality, and bursal atrophy. These results indicate that codon optimization and WPRE could enhance the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines against IBDV and these two approaches could work together synergistically in a single DNA vaccine. PMID:23631937

  2. Feline Leukemia Virus DNA Vaccine Efficacy Is Enhanced by Coadministration with Interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-18 Expression Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Linda; Argyle, David; Bain, Derek; Nicolson, Lesley; Dunham, Stephen; Golder, Matthew C.; McDonald, Michael; McGillivray, Christine; Jarrett, Oswald; Neil, James C.; Onions, David E.

    2001-01-01

    The expectation that cell-mediated immunity is important in the control of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection led us to test a DNA vaccine administered alone or with cytokines that favored the development of a Th1 immune response. The vaccine consisted of two plasmids, one expressing the gag/pol genes and the other expressing the env gene of FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. The genetic adjuvants were plasmids encoding the feline cytokines interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-18, or gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Kittens were immunized by three intramuscular inoculations of the FeLV DNA vaccine alone or in combination with plasmids expressing IFN-γ, IL-12, or both IL-12 and IL-18. Control kittens were inoculated with empty plasmid. Following immunization, anti-FeLV antibodies were not detected in any kitten. Three weeks after the final immunization, the kittens were challenged by the intraperitoneal inoculation of FeLV-A/Glasgow-1 and were then monitored for a further 15 weeks for the presence of virus in plasma and, at the end of the trial, for latent virus in bone marrow. The vaccine consisting of FeLV DNA with the IL-12 and IL-18 genes conferred significant immunity, protecting completely against transient and persistent viremia, and in five of six kittens protecting against latent infection. None of the other vaccines provided significant protection. PMID:11507187

  3. Broadly neutralizing DNA vaccine with specific mutation alters the antigenicity and sugar-binding activities of influenza hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Wei; Liao, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Yaoxing; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Ren, Chien-Tai; Wu, Chung-Yi; Cheng, Ting-Jen Rachel; Ho, David D.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2011-01-01

    The rapid genetic drift of influenza virus hemagglutinin is an obstacle to vaccine efficacy. Previously, we found that the consensus hemagglutinin DNA vaccine (pCHA5) can only elicit moderate neutralization activities toward the H5N1 clade 2.1 and clade 2.3 viruses. Two approaches were thus taken to improve the protection broadness of CHA5. The first one was to include certain surface amino acids that are characteristic of clade 2.3 viruses to improve the protection profiles. When we immunized mice with CHA5 harboring individual mutations, the antibodies elicited by CHA5 containing P157S elicited higher neutralizing activity against the clade 2.3 viruses. Likewise, the viruses pseudotyped with hemagglutinin containing 157S became more susceptible to neutralization. The second approach was to update the consensus sequence with more recent H5N1 strains, generating a second-generation DNA vaccine pCHA5II. We showed that pCHA5II was able to elicit higher cross-neutralization activities against all H5N1 viruses. Comparison of the neutralization profiles of CHA5 and CHA5II, and the animal challenge studies, revealed that CHA5II induced the broadest protection profile. We concluded that CHA5II combined with electroporation delivery is a promising strategy to induce antibodies with broad cross-reactivities against divergent H5N1 influenza viruses. PMID:21321237

  4. Development and evaluation of a Salmonella typhimurium flagellin based chimeric DNA vaccine against infectious bursal disease of poultry.

    PubMed

    Deb, Rajib; Dey, Sohini; Madhan Mohan, C; Gaikwad, Satish; Kamble, Nitin; Khulape, Sagar A; Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Maity, Hemanta Kumar; Pathak, Dinesh Chandra

    2015-10-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute immunosuppressive disease of young chicks, caused by a double-stranded RNA virus. VP2 being the major capsid protein of the virus is an ideal vaccine candidate possessing the neutralizing epitopes. The present study involves the use of flagellin (fliC) as a genetic adjuvant to improve the immune response of VP2 based DNA vaccine against IBD. Our findings revealed that birds immunized with plasmid pCIVP2fliC showed robust immune response than pCIVP2 immunized groups. Further, challenge study proved that genetic fusion of fliC and VP2 can provide a comparatively higher level of protection against vvIBDV challenge in chickens than VP2 alone. These results thus indicate that Salmonella flagellin could enhance the immune responses and protection efficacy of a DNA vaccine candidate against IBDV infection in chickens, highlighting the potential of flagellin as a genetic adjuvant in the prevention of vvIBDV infection. PMID:26412511

  5. Designation of a Novel DKK1 Multiepitope DNA Vaccine and Inhibition of Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Sibo; Li, Shentao; Du, Yuxuan; Dou, Yunpeng; Li, Zhanguo; Yuan, Huihui; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a secretory inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling, plays a critical role in certain bone loss diseases. Studies have shown that serum levels of DKK1 are significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and are correlated with the severity of the disease, which indicates the possibility that bone erosion in RA may be inhibited by neutralizing the biological activity of DKK1. In this study, we selected a panel of twelve peptides using the software DNASTAR 7.1 and screened high affinity and immunogenicity epitopes in vitro and in vivo assays. Furthermore, we optimized four B cell epitopes to design a novel DKK1 multiepitope DNA vaccine and evaluated its bone protective effects in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of RA. High level expression of the designed vaccine was measured in supernatant of COS7 cells. In addition, intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice with this vaccine was also highly expressed and sufficient to induce the production of long-term IgG, which neutralized natural DKK1 in vivo. Importantly, this vaccine significantly attenuated bone erosion in CIA mice compared with positive control mice. These results provide evidence for the development of a DNA vaccine targeted against DKK1 to attenuate bone erosion. PMID:26075259

  6. [Preparation and immunogenicity of silk fibroin/chitosan microspheres for DNA vaccine delivery against infectious bursal disease virus].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Lv, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Cun; Zhu, Xingrong; Shi, Tuanyuan; Zhong, Shi; Meng, Zhiqi

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the immunities of biodegradable microsphere as a release delivery system for DNA vaccine against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus, in our study, silk fibroin/chitosan microsphere adjuvant was prepared with a precipitation/coacervation method. Both glutaraldehyde and Na2SO4 solution were used in cross-linking. No immune chicken were intramuscularly inoculated at 14 day-old and boosted 2 weeks later. The results show that glutaraldehyde destroyed the DNA activity of the vaccine whereas Na2SO4 solution did not. Factors of the chitosan concentration 0.5% (pH 5.0), silk fibroin concentration 0.6%, plasmid DNA (500 microg/mL) dissolved in 2% Na2SO4 solution were optimized to produce microsphere, with a loading capacity of 89.14%. The average particle size of SF-CS/pCI-VP2/4/3 microsphere is 1.98 microm, and it can protect the loading DNA vaccine from DNase I digestion. Data from anti IBDV ELISA antibodies in the serum show that immunization activity of the microsphere groups were generally higher than plasmid vaccine group (P < 0.05), and the SF/CS compound microspheres group was better than that of sole CS microsphere group. The developed SF/CS microspheres are a very promising vaccine delivery system. PMID:25007575

  7. Development of a New DNA Vaccine for Alzheimer Disease Targeting a Wide Range of Aβ Species and Amyloidogenic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yoh; Niimi, Naoko; Kohyama, Kuniko

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been determined that not only Aβ oligomers, but also other Aβ species and amyloidogenic peptides are neurotoxic in Alzheimer disease (AD) and play a pivotal role in AD pathogenesis. In the present study, we attempted to develop new DNA vaccines targeting a wide range of Aβ species. For this purpose, we first performed in vitro assays with newly developed vaccines to evaluate Aβ production and Aβ secretion abilities and then chose an IgL-Aβx4-Fc-IL-4 vaccine (designated YM3711) for further studies. YM3711 was vaccinated to mice, rabbits and monkeys to evaluate anti-Aβ species antibody-producing ability and Aβ reduction effects. It was found that YM3711 vaccination induced significantly higher levels of antibodies not only to Aβ1-42 but also to AD-related molecules including AβpE3-42, Aβ oligomers and Aβ fibrils. Importantly, YM3711 significantly reduced these Aβ species in the brain of model mice. Binding and competition assays using translated YM3711 protein products clearly demonstrated that a large part of antibodies induced by YM3711 vaccination are directed at conformational epitopes of the Aβ complex and oligomers. Taken together, we demonstrate that YM3711 is a powerful DNA vaccine targeting a wide range of AD-related molecules and is worth examining in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:24086465

  8. Ag85A/ESAT-6 chimeric DNA vaccine induces an adverse response in tuberculosis-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Bai, Xuejuang; Zhang, Junxian; Song, Jingying; Yang, Yourong; Yu, Qi; Li, Ning; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) antigens encoded by the 6 kDa early secretory antigenic target (esat-6) and antigen 85A (ag85a) genes are known to exert protective effects against tuberculosis in animal models. In addition, these antigens represent vaccine components that were tested in early human clinical trials. In the present study, a chimeric DNA vaccine was constructed that contained two copies of the esat-6 gene inserted into the ag85a gene from M. tb. BALB/c mice were treated with this chimeric vaccine following infection with either M. tb H37Rv or a clinical multi drug resistant tuberculosis isolate. Treatment of both groups of mice with the chimeric vaccine resulted in accelerated mortality. These findings are in contrast with previous results, which indicated that DNA vaccines expressing the individual antigens were either beneficial or at least not harmful. The results of the present study suggested that the ESAT-6 antigen is not suitable for inclusion in therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27279275

  9. Dendritic cell targeted liposomes-protamine-DNA complexes mediated by synthetic mannosylated cholestrol as a potential carrier for DNA vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Chen, Simu; Jiang, Yuhong; Jiang, Jiayu; Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Xun

    2013-07-01

    To construct mannosylated liposomes/protamine/DNA (LPD) carriers for DNA vaccine targeting to dendritic cells (DCs), a mannosylated cholesterol derivative (Man-C6-Chol) was synthesized via simple ester linkage and amide bonds. Then, the Man-C6-Chol was applied to LPD formulation as a synthetic ligand. The physicochemical properties of mannosylated LPD (Man-LPD) were first evaluated, including the size and zeta potential, morphology and the ability to protect DNA against DNase I degradation. Man-LPD showed a small size with a stable viral-like structure. In comparison to non-mannose liposomes/LPD (Man-free liposomes/LPD), mannosylated liposomes/LPD (Man-liposomes/Man-LPD) exhibited higher efficiency in both intracellular uptake (2.3-fold) and transfection (4.5-fold) in vitro. Subsequent MTT assays indicated that the LPD carriers had low toxicity on the tested cells. Afterwards, the investigation into the maturation activation on primary bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) showed that both Man-LPD and Man-free LPD induced remarkable up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD40 on BMDCs. Inspired by these studies, we can conclude that the synthetic mannosylated LPD targeting to DCs was a potential carrier for DNA vaccine.

  10. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Semliki forest virus replicon-based DNA vaccines encoding goatpox virus structural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Min; Jin Ningyi; Liu Qi; Huo Xiaowei; Li Yang; Hu Bo; Ma Haili; Zhu Zhanbo; Cong Yanzhao; Li Xiao; Jin Minglan; Zhu Guangze

    2009-08-15

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is an acute feverish and contagious disease in goats often associated with high morbidity and high mortality. To resolve potential safety risks and vaccination side effects of existing live attenuated goatpox vaccine (AV41), two Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon-based bicistronic expression DNA vaccines (pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA) which encode GTPV structural proteins corresponding to the Vaccinia virus proteins A27, L1, A33, and B5, respectively, were constructed. Then, theirs ability to induce humoral and cellular response in mice and goats, and protect goats against virulent virus challenge were evaluated. The results showed that, vaccination with pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA in combination could elicit strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and goats, provide partial protection against viral challenge in goats, and reduce disease symptoms. Additionally, priming vaccination with the above-mentioned DNA vaccines could significantly reduce the goats' side reactions from boosting vaccinations with current live vaccine (AV41), which include skin lesions at the inoculation site and fevers. Data obtained in this study could not only facilitate improvement of the current goatpox vaccination strategy, but also provide valuable guidance to suitable candidates for evaluation and development of orthopoxvirus vaccines.

  11. Mannosylated protamine as a novel DNA vaccine carrier for effective induction of anti-tumor immune responses.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhaoyan; Dai, Shuang; Jiao, Yan; Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Yuekui; Wang, Bo; Zong, Li

    2016-06-15

    Gene immunotherapy has been developed as a promising strategy for inhibition of tumor growth. In the study, mannosylated protamine sulphate (MPS) was used as a novel DNA vaccine carrier to enhance transfection efficiency and anti-tumor immune responses. Anti-GRP DNA vaccine (pGRP) was selected as a model gene and condensed by MPS to form MPS/pGRP nanoparticles. The cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of MPS/pGRP nanoparticles in macrophages were evaluated. The effect of the nanoparticles in enhancing GRP-specific humoral immune response was then evaluated by nasal vaccination of nanoparticles in mice. The results demonstrated that both the cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of MPS nanoparticles in macrophages were higher than those of protamine nanoparticles. MPS/pGRP nanoparticles stimulated the production of higher titers (3.9×10(3)) of specific antibodies against GRP than those of protamine/pGRP nanoparticles (6.4×10(2), p<0.01) and intramuscular injection pGRP solution (2.5×10(3), p<0.05). Furthermore, the inhibitory rate in MPS/pGRP nanoparticles group (65.80%) was significantly higher than that in protamine/pGRP nanoparticles group (35.13%) and pGRP solution group (43.39%). Hence, it is evident that MPS is an efficient targeting gene delivery carrier which could improve in vitro transfection efficiency as well as anti-tumor immunotherapy in mice. PMID:27106528

  12. Ag85A/ESAT-6 chimeric DNA vaccine induces an adverse response in tuberculosis-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Bai, Xuejuang; Zhang, Junxian; Song, Jingying; Yang, Yourong; Yu, Qi; Li, Ning; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-08-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) antigens encoded by the 6 kDa early secretory antigenic target (esat-6) and antigen 85A (ag85a) genes are known to exert protective effects against tuberculosis in animal models. In addition, these antigens represent vaccine components that were tested in early human clinical trials. In the present study, a chimeric DNA vaccine was constructed that contained two copies of the esat‑6 gene inserted into the ag85a gene from M. tb. BALB/c mice were treated with this chimeric vaccine following infection with either M. tb H37Rv or a clinical multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis isolate. Treatment of both groups of mice with the chimeric vaccine resulted in accelerated mortality. These findings are in contrast with previous results, which indicated that DNA vaccines expressing the individual antigens were either beneficial or at least not harmful. The results of the present study suggested that the ESAT-6 antigen is not suitable for inclusion in therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27279275

  13. West Nile virus seroconversion in penguins after vaccination with a killed virus vaccine or a DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michelle R; Langan, Jennifer N; Johnson, Yvette J; Ritchie, Branson W; Van Bonn, William

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the serologic response of penguins to West Nile virus (WNV) vaccines, four species of exclusively indoor-housed penguins, negative for WNV by serology, were evaluated: Humboldt (Spheniscus humboldti), Magellanic (Spheniscus magellanicus), Gentoo (Pygoscelis papua), and Rockhopper (Eudyptes chrysoscome) penguins. Birds were inoculated with either a killed virus vaccine or a plasmid-mediated DNA WNV vaccine, and postinoculation serology was evaluated. Both vaccines induced seroconversion in all four species, and no adverse reactions were noted. Postvaccination serology results varied across species and vaccine types. However, in all four species, the killed virus vaccine resulted in a greater seroconversion rate than the DNA vaccine and in a significantly shorter time period. Additionally, the duration of the seropositive titer was significantly longer in those birds vaccinated with the killed virus vaccine compared with those vaccinated with the DNA vaccine. A subset of unvaccinated penguins serving as negative controls remained negative throughout the duration of the study despite the presence of WNV in the geographic locations of the study, suggesting that indoor housing may minimize exposure to the virus and may be an additional means of preventing WNV infection in penguins. PMID:19110700

  14. MPG-based nanoparticle: An efficient delivery system for enhancing the potency of DNA vaccine expressing HPV16E7.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Tayebeh; Bolhassani, Azam; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-06-22

    DNA vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 have not been successful in clinical trials, due to the lack of an appropriate delivery system. In this study, a peptide-based gene delivery system, MPG, which forms stable non-covalent nanoparticles with nucleic acids, was used for in vitro and in vivo delivery of HPV16 E7 DNA as a model antigen. The results demonstrated that at Nitrogen/Phosphate (N/P) ratio over 10:1, this peptide can effectively condense plasmid DNA into stable nanoparticles with an average size of 180-210nm and a positive surface charge. The transfection efficiency of MPG-based nanoparticles was shown to be comparable with Polyethyleneimine (PEI). The efficient protein expression detected by western blotting and flow cytometry supports the potential of MPG-based nanoparticles as a potent delivery system in DNA vaccine formulations. Immunization with MPG/E7DNA nanoparticles at an N/P ratio of 10:1 induced a stronger Th1 cellular immune response with a predominant interferon-γ (IFN-γ) profile than those induced by E7DNA alone in a murine tumor model. These findings suggest that MPG peptide as a novel gene delivery system could have promising applications in improving HPV therapeutic vaccines. PMID:26001433

  15. A recombinant DNA vaccine protects mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor against lethal challenge with Usutu virus.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Cañas-Arranz, Rodrigo; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2016-04-19

    Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus whose circulation had been confined to Africa since it was first detected in 1959. However, in the last decade USUV has emerged in Europe causing episodes of avian mortality and sporadic severe neuroinvasive infections in humans. Remarkably, adult laboratory mice exhibit limited susceptibility to USUV infection, which has impaired the analysis of the immune responses, thus complicating the evaluation of virus-host interactions and of vaccine candidates against this pathogen. In this work, we showed that mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor (IFNAR (-/-) mice) were highly susceptible to USUV infection and provided a lethal challenge model for vaccine testing. To validate this infection model, a plasmid DNA vaccine candidate encoding the precursor of membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of USUV was engineered. Transfection of cultured cells with this plasmid resulted in expression of USUV antigens and the assembly and secretion of small virus-like particles also known as recombinant subviral particles (RSPs). A single intramuscular immunization with this plasmid was sufficient to elicit a significant level of protection against challenge with USUV in IFNAR (-/-) mice. The characterization of the humoral response induced revealed that DNA vaccination primed anti-USUV antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies. Overall, these results probe the suitability of IFNAR (-/-) mice as an amenable small animal model for the study of USUV host virus interactions and vaccine testing, as well as the feasibility of DNA-based vaccine strategies for the control of this pathogen. PMID:26993334

  16. Soluble multi-trimeric TNF superfamily ligand adjuvants enhance immune responses to a HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavelu, Saravana K.; Snarsky, Victoria; Termini, James M.; Gupta, Sachin; Barzee, Suzanne; Wright, Jacqueline A.; Khan, Wasif N.; Kornbluth, Richard S.; Stone, Geoffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA vaccines remain an important component of HIV vaccination strategies, typically as part of a prime/boost vaccination strategy with viral vector or protein boost. A number of DNA prime/viral vector boost vaccines are currently being evaluated for both preclinical studies and in Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. These vaccines would benefit from molecular adjuvants that increase correlates of immunity during the DNA prime. While HIV vaccine immune correlates are still not well defined, there are a number of immune assays that have been shown to correlate with protection from viral challenge including CD8+ T cell avidity, antigen-specific proliferation, and polyfunctional cytokine secretion. Methodology and Principal Findings Recombinant DNA vaccine adjuvants composed of a fusion between Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) and either CD40 Ligand (CD40L) or GITR Ligand (GITRL) were previously shown to enhance HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccines. Here we show that similar fusion constructs composed of the TNF superfamily ligands (TNFSFL) 4-1BBL, OX40L, RANKL, LIGHT, CD70, and BAFF can also enhanced immune responses to a HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine. BALB/c mice were vaccinated intramuscularly with plasmids expressing secreted Gag and SP-D-TNFSFL fusions. Initially, mice were analyzed 2 weeks or 7 weeks following vaccination to evaluate the relative efficacy of each SP-D-TNFSFL construct. All SP-D-TNFSFL constructs enhanced at least one Gag-specific immune response compared to the parent vaccine. Importantly, the constructs SP-D-4-1BBL, SP-D-OX40L, and SP-D-LIGHT enhanced CD8+ T cell avidity and CD8+/CD4+ T cell proliferation 7 weeks post vaccination. These avidity and proliferation data suggest that 4-1BBL, OX40L, and LIGHT fusion constructs may be particularly effective as vaccine adjuvants. Constructs SP-D-OX40L, SP-D-LIGHT, and SP-D-BAFF enhanced Gag-specific IL-2 secretion in memory T cells, suggesting these adjuvants can increase the number of self-renewing Gag-specific CD8

  17. Plant rhabdoviruses: new insights and research needs in the interplay of negative-strand RNA viruses with plant and insect hosts.

    PubMed

    Mann, Krin S; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2014-08-01

    Rhabdoviruses are taxonomically classified in the family Rhabdoviridae, order Mononegavirales. As a group, rhabdoviruses can infect plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Plant cyto- and nucleorhabdoviruses infect a wide variety of species across both monocot and dicot families, including agriculturally important crops such as lettuce, wheat, barley, rice, maize, potato and tomato. Plant rhabdoviruses are transmitted by and replicate in hemipteran insects such as aphids (Aphididae), leafhoppers (Cicadellidae), or planthoppers (Delphacidae). These specific interactions between plants, viruses and insects offer new insights into host adaptation and molecular virus evolution. This review explores recent advances as well as knowledge gaps in understanding of replication, RNA silencing suppression and movement of plant rhabdoviruses with respect to both plant and insect hosts. PMID:24610553

  18. Rhabdovirus-like endogenous viral elements in the genome of Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells are actively transcribed: Implications for adventitious virus detection.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-07-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf) cell lines are used to produce several biologicals for human and veterinary use. Recently, it was discovered that all tested Sf cell lines are persistently infected with Sf-rhabdovirus, a novel rhabdovirus. As part of an effort to search for other adventitious viruses, we searched the Sf cell genome and transcriptome for sequences related to Sf-rhabdovirus. To our surprise, we found intact Sf-rhabdovirus N- and P-like ORFs, and partial Sf-rhabdovirus G- and L-like ORFs. The transcribed and genomic sequences matched, indicating the transcripts were derived from the genomic sequences. These appear to be endogenous viral elements (EVEs), which result from the integration of partial viral genetic material into the host cell genome. It is theoretically impossible for the Sf-rhabdovirus-like EVEs to produce infectious virus particles as 1) they are disseminated across 4 genomic loci, 2) the G and L ORFs are incomplete, and 3) the M ORF is missing. Our finding of transcribed virus-like sequences in Sf cells underscores that MPS-based searches for adventitious viruses in cell substrates used to manufacture biologics should take into account both genomic and transcribed sequences to facilitate the identification of transcribed EVE's, and to avoid false positive detection of replication-competent adventitious viruses. PMID:27236849

  19. Characterization of the Tupaia Rhabdovirus Genome Reveals a Long Open Reading Frame Overlapping with P and a Novel Gene Encoding a Small Hydrophobic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Springfeld, Christoph; Darai, Gholamreza; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses are negative-stranded RNA viruses of the order Mononegavirales and have been isolated from vertebrates, insects, and plants. Members of the genus Lyssavirus cause the invariably fatal disease rabies, and a member of the genus Vesiculovirus, Chandipura virus, has recently been associated with acute encephalitis in children. We present here the complete genome sequence and transcription map of a rhabdovirus isolated from cultivated cells of hepatocellular carcinoma tissue from a moribund tree shrew. The negative-strand genome of tupaia rhabdovirus is composed of 11,440 nucleotides and encodes six genes that are separated by one or two intergenic nucleotides. In addition to the typical rhabdovirus genes in the order N-P-M-G-L, a gene encoding a small hydrophobic putative type I transmembrane protein of approximately 11 kDa was identified between the M and G genes, and the corresponding transcript was detected in infected cells. Similar to some Vesiculoviruses and many Paramyxovirinae, the P gene has a second overlapping reading frame that can be accessed by ribosomal choice and encodes a protein of 26 kDa, predicted to be the largest C protein of these virus families. Phylogenetic analyses of the tupaia rhabdovirus N and L genes show that the virus is distantly related to the Vesiculoviruses, Ephemeroviruses, and the recently characterized Flanders virus and Oita virus and further extends the sequence territory occupied by animal rhabdoviruses. PMID:15890917

  20. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Thomas; Nilles, Matthew L.; Kwilas, Steve A.; Josleyn, Matthew D.; Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Schiltz, James; Royals, Michael; Ballantyne, John; Hooper, Jay W.; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA) for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000). Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50). Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8), or no-treatment (n=8), developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral biological product

  1. Enhancing immune responses of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine by co-inoculating plasmid IL-12 or GM-CSF expressing vector in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Li, J; Kong, L; Li, B; Ding, X

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative viral agent for large outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease in children and infants, yet there is no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment for severe EV71 infection. The immunogenicity of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine and the immunoregulatory activity of interleukin-12 (IL-12) or granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were investigated. DNA vaccine plasmids, pcDNA-VP1, pcDNA-IL-12 and pcDNA-GM-CSF were constructed and inoculated into BALB/c mice with or without pcDNA-IL-12 or pcDNA-GM-CSF by intramuscular injection. Cellular and humoral immune responses were assessed by indirect ELISA, lymphocyte proliferation assays, cytokine release assay and FACS. The VP1 DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and can induce specific humoral and cellular immunity in BALB/c mice, while IL-2 or GM-CSF plays an immunoadjuvant role and enhances specific immune responses. This study provides a frame of reference for the design of DNA vaccines against EV71. PMID:27188732

  2. The ability of Hepatitis B surface antigen DNA vaccine to elicit cell-mediated immune responses, but not antibody responses, was affected by the deglysosylation of S antigen.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yiping; Huang, Zuhu; Lin, Yan; Li, Jun; Chou, Te-Hui; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2008-09-19

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection remains a major worldwide infectious disease with serious long-term morbidity and mortality. The limited selections of drug treatment are not able to control the progress of disease in people with active and persistent HBV infection. Immunotherapy to control the degree of viral infection is one possible alternative solution to this challenge. HBV DNA vaccines, with their strong ability to induce cell-mediated immune responses, offer an attractive option. HBV surface protein is important in viral immunity. Re-establishing anti-S immunity in chronic HBV infected patients will bring significant benefit to the patients. Previous studies have shown that HBV S DNA vaccines are immunogenic in a number of animal studies. In the current study, we further investigated the effect of glycosylation to the expression and immunogenicity of S DNA vaccines. Our results demonstrate that deglycosylation at the two potential N-linked glycosylation sites in S protein resulted in a significant decrease of S-specific cell-mediated immune responses, but did not affect anti-S antibody responses. This finding provides important direction to the development of S DNA vaccines to elicit the optimal and balanced antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to treat people with HBV chronic infections. PMID:18462847

  3. A HIV-Tat/C4-binding protein chimera encoded by a DNA vaccine is highly immunogenic and contains acute EcoHIV infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tomusange, Khamis; Wijesundara, Danushka; Gummow, Jason; Garrod, Tamsin; Li, Yanrui; Gray, Lachlan; Churchill, Melissa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Gowans, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines are cost-effective to manufacture on a global scale and Tat-based DNA vaccines have yielded protective outcomes in preclinical and clinical models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), highlighting the potential of such vaccines. However, Tat-based DNA vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, and despite the administration of multiple doses and/or the addition of adjuvants, these vaccines are not in general use. In this study, we improved Tat immunogenicity by fusing it with the oligomerisation domain of a chimeric C4-binding protein (C4b-p), termed IMX313, resulting in Tat heptamerisation and linked Tat to the leader sequence of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) to ensure that the bulk of heptamerised Tat is secreted. Mice vaccinated with secreted Tat fused to IMX313 (pVAX-sTat-IMX313) developed higher titres of Tat-specific serum IgG, mucosal sIgA and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, and showed superior control of EcoHIV infection, a surrogate murine HIV challenge model, compared with animals vaccinated with other test vaccines. Given the crucial contribution of Tat to HIV-1 pathogenesis and the precedent of Tat-based DNA vaccines in conferring some level of protection in animal models, we believe that the virologic control demonstrated with this novel multimerised Tat vaccine highlights the promise of this vaccine candidate for humans. PMID:27358023

  4. A HIV-Tat/C4-binding protein chimera encoded by a DNA vaccine is highly immunogenic and contains acute EcoHIV infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tomusange, Khamis; Wijesundara, Danushka; Gummow, Jason; Garrod, Tamsin; Li, Yanrui; Gray, Lachlan; Churchill, Melissa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Gowans, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines are cost-effective to manufacture on a global scale and Tat-based DNA vaccines have yielded protective outcomes in preclinical and clinical models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), highlighting the potential of such vaccines. However, Tat-based DNA vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, and despite the administration of multiple doses and/or the addition of adjuvants, these vaccines are not in general use. In this study, we improved Tat immunogenicity by fusing it with the oligomerisation domain of a chimeric C4-binding protein (C4b-p), termed IMX313, resulting in Tat heptamerisation and linked Tat to the leader sequence of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) to ensure that the bulk of heptamerised Tat is secreted. Mice vaccinated with secreted Tat fused to IMX313 (pVAX-sTat-IMX313) developed higher titres of Tat-specific serum IgG, mucosal sIgA and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, and showed superior control of EcoHIV infection, a surrogate murine HIV challenge model, compared with animals vaccinated with other test vaccines. Given the crucial contribution of Tat to HIV-1 pathogenesis and the precedent of Tat-based DNA vaccines in conferring some level of protection in animal models, we believe that the virologic control demonstrated with this novel multimerised Tat vaccine highlights the promise of this vaccine candidate for humans. PMID:27358023

  5. [DNA vaccination via in vivo electroporation can elicit specific immune response against highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viral structural antigens in mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Chen, Hong; Tan, Wen-jie; Deng, Yao; Wang, Min; Liu, Yuan; Yin, Xiao; Zhang, Ke; Guan, Jie; Zhou, Jian-fang; Shu, Yue-long; Ruan, Li

    2010-05-01

    This study aims to develop inexpensive and effective experimental vaccines against highly pathogenic H5N1 Avian Influenza (HPAI) virus and to optimize their immunization programs. To this end, we first synthesized the codon-optimized hemagglutinin gene (HAop) and neuraminidase gene (NAop), both of which were derived from a H5N1 virus (Anhui strain), and constructed successfully the DNA vaccines containing a single cistronic construct (HAwt, HAop, or NAop) or a bicistronic construct (HAop/M2 or NAop/M1) of H5N1 influenza virus origin. Their expression was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) and Western blotting. Then twice vaccination of mice with the DNA vaccines by injection intramuscularly or in vivo electroporation (EP) via two different routes was evaluated and analyzed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, NA-specific antibody detection, micro-neutralizing antibody test and IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. Our results showed that the DNA vaccines with coden-optimized HAop and NAop constructs could quickly elicit a strong immune response by in vivo EP, especially the cellular immune response against HA and NA; the in vivo EP via intradermal route induced stronger humoral immune responses than those via intramuscular route. Our findings will pave a way for further development of novel DNA-based H5N1 vaccine and for the optimization of the immunization programs of DNA vaccine. PMID:20572336

  6. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate. PMID:26111521

  7. A combined DNA vaccine encoding BCSP31, SOD, and L7/L12 confers high protection against Brucella abortus 2308 by inducing specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da-Hai; Hu, Xi-Dan; Cai, Hong

    2007-06-01

    We constructed a combined DNA vaccine comprising genes encoding the antigens BCSP31, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and L7/L12 and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Immunization of mice with the combined DNA vaccine offered high protection against Brucella abortus (B. abortus) infection. The vaccine induced a vigorous specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) response, with higher IgG2a than IgG1 titers. Cytokine profiling performed at the same time showed a biased Th1-type immune response with significantly increased interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulation. CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T cells accumulated at significantly higher levels after administration of the vaccine. Granzyme B-producing CD8(+) T cells were significantly higher in number in samples prepared from combined DNA-vaccinated mice compared with S19-vaccinated mice, demonstrating that the cytotoxicity lysis pathway is involved in the response to Brucella infection. The success of our combined DNA vaccine in a mouse model suggests its potential efficacy against brucellosis infection in large animals. PMID:17570767

  8. Rhabdovirus Matrix Protein Structures Reveal a Novel Mode of Self-Association

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Gholami, Alireza; Talbi, Chiraz; Owens, Raymond J.; Stuart, David I.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Bourhy, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    The matrix (M) proteins of rhabdoviruses are multifunctional proteins essential for virus maturation and budding that also regulate the expression of viral and host proteins. We have solved the structures of M from the vesicular stomatitis virus serotype New Jersey (genus: Vesiculovirus) and from Lagos bat virus (genus: Lyssavirus), revealing that both share a common fold despite sharing no identifiable sequence homology. Strikingly, in both structures a stretch of residues from the otherwise-disordered N terminus of a crystallographically adjacent molecule is observed binding to a hydrophobic cavity on the surface of the protein, thereby forming non-covalent linear polymers of M in the crystals. While the overall topology of the interaction is conserved between the two structures, the molecular details of the interactions are completely different. The observed interactions provide a compelling model for the flexible self-assembly of the matrix protein during virion morphogenesis and may also modulate interactions with host proteins. PMID:19112510

  9. A hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) DNA vaccine delivered using a spring-powered jet injector elicits a potent neutralizing antibody response in rabbits and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kwilas, Steve; Kishimori, Jennifer M; Josleyn, Matthew; Jerke, Kurt; Ballantyne, John; Royals, Michael; Hooper, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) cause most of the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in North and South America, respectively. The chances of a patient surviving HPS are only two in three. Previously, we demonstrated that SNV and ANDV DNA vaccines encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins elicit high-titer neutralizing antibodies in laboratory animals, and (for ANDV) in nonhuman primates (NHPs). In those studies, the vaccines were delivered by gene gun or muscle electroporation. Here, we tested whether a combined SNV/ANDV DNA vaccine (HPS DNA vaccine) could be delivered effectively using a disposable syringe jet injection (DSJI) system (PharmaJet, Inc). PharmaJet intramuscular (IM) and intradermal (ID) needle-free devices are FDA 510(k)-cleared, simple to use, and do not require electricity or pressurized gas. First, we tested the SNV DNA vaccine delivered by PharmaJet IM or ID devices in rabbits and NHPs. Both IM and ID devices produced high-titer anti-SNV neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits and NHPs. However, the ID device required at least two vaccinations in NHP to detect neutralizing antibodies in most animals, whereas all animals vaccinated once with the IM device seroconverted. Because the IM device was more effective in NHP, the Stratis(®) (PharmaJet IM device) was selected for follow-up studies. We evaluated the HPS DNA vaccine delivered using Stratis(®) and found that it produced high-titer anti-SNV and anti-ANDV neutralizing antibodies in rabbits (n=8/group) as measured by a classic plaque reduction neutralization test and a new pseudovirion neutralization assay. We were interested in determining if the differences between DSJI delivery (e.g., high-velocity liquid penetration through tissue) and other methods of vaccine injection, such as needle/syringe, might result in a more immunogenic DNA vaccine. To accomplish this, we compared the HPS DNA vaccine delivered by DSJI versus needle/syringe in NHPs (n=8/group). We found

  10. Characterization of the components and activity of Sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J D; Jackson, A O

    1997-01-01

    Sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV) is the best-characterized member of a group of plant rhabdoviruses that replicate in the host cell nucleus. Using a recently developed method for partial purification of active SYNV polymerase by salt extraction of nuclei from infected plant tissue (J. D. O. Wagner et al, J. Virol. 70:468-477, 1996), we have identified the nucleocapsid (N), M2, and L proteins as polymerase complex components (based on copurification with the polymerase activity and by coimmunoprecipitation assays). Furthermore, the L protein was shown by antibody inhibition analysis to be a functional component of the polymerase. A second complex of M2 and L proteins, thought to be a precursor to the polymerase complex, was also identified. In addition, we conducted a detailed characterization of SYNV RNA synthesis in vitro. The results demonstrate that the RNAs are transcribed sequentially, beginning with the N mRNA and followed successively by the remaining five mRNAs in the order of their genome organization. Gene expression conforms to a cascade pattern, with synthesis of the 3'-proximal N mRNA occurring at the highest level, followed by consecutively lower levels of transcription from each subsequent gene. The reaction conditions favor transcription over minus-sense RNA replication, which, we posit, is inhibited near specific signal sequences located on the antigenomic template. The results support the concept that the mechanism of transcription is highly conserved among diverse rhabdoviruses and are compatible with a unified model for the regulation of genomic and antigenomic RNA synthesis. PMID:9032374

  11. Mapping the neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, C.; Chien, M.S.; Landolt, M.L.; Batts, W.; Winton, J.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the fish rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), were used to select 20 MAb escape mutants. The nucleotide sequence of the entire glycoprotein (G) gene was determined for six mutants representing differing cross-neutralization patterns and each had a single nucleotide change leading to a single amino acid substitution within one of three regions of the protein. These data were used to design nested PCR primers to amplify portions of the G gene of the 14 remaining mutants. When the PCR products from these mutants were sequenced, they also had single nucleotide substitutions coding for amino acid substitutions at the same, or nearby, locations. Of the 20 mutants for which all or part of the glycoprotein gene was sequenced, two MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 230-231 (antigenic site I) and the remaining MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 272-276 (antigenic site II). Two MAbs that selected mutants mapping to amino acids 272-276, selected other mutants that mapped to amino acids 78-81, raising the possibility that this portion of the N terminus of the protein was part of a discontinuous epitope defining antigenic site II. CLUSTAL alignment of the glycoproteins of rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and IHNV revealed similarities in the location of the neutralizing epitopes and a high degree of conservation among cysteine residues, indicating that the glycoproteins of three different genera of animal rhabdoviruses may share a similar three-dimensional structure in spite of extensive sequence divergence.

  12. Limitations of plasmid vaccines to complex viruses: selected myxoma virus antigens as DNA vaccines were not protective.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mathew M; van Leeuwen, Barbara H; Kerr, Peter J

    2004-11-25

    Myxoma virus, a poxvirus of the genus Leporipoxvirus, is the causative agent of the disease myxomatosis which is highly lethal in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Current vaccines to protect against myxomatosis are either attenuated live strains of the virus or the antigenically related rabbit fibroma virus. We examined the immune response of outbred domestic rabbits to the individual myxoma virus antigens M055R, M073R, M115L and M121R, delivered as DNA vaccines co-expressing rabbit interleukin-2 or interleukin-4. M115L and M121R were also delivered simultaneously. None of the vaccine constructs were able to protect the rabbits from disease or reduce mortality after challenge with virulent myxoma virus, despite induction of antigen-specific cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. PMID:15531037

  13. Vaxfectin-formulated influenza DNA vaccines encoding NP and M2 viral proteins protect mice against lethal viral challenge.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Gretchen S; Planchon, Rodrick; Wei, Qun; Rusalov, Denis; Geall, Andrew; Enas, Joel; Lalor, Peggy; Leamy, Vicky; Vahle, Ruth; Luke, Catherine J; Rolland, Alain; Kaslow, David C; Smith, Larry R

    2007-01-01

    Next generation influenza vaccines containing conserved antigens may enhance immunity against seasonal or pandemic influenza virus strains. Using a plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccine approach, we systematically tested combinations of NP, M1, and M2 antigens derived from consensus sequences for protection against lethal influenza challenge and compared formulations for adjuvanting low pDNA vaccine doses. The highest level of protection at the lowest pDNA doses was provided by Vaxfectin-formulated NP + M2. Vaxfectin adjuvanticity was confirmed with a low dose of HA pDNA. These promising proof-of-concept data support the clinical development of Vaxfectin-formulated pDNA encoding NP + M2 consensus proteins. PMID:17637571

  14. Glycoprotein-Specific Antibodies Produced by DNA Vaccination Protect Guinea Pigs from Lethal Argentine and Venezuelan Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Joseph W.; Maes, Piet; Kwilas, Steven A.; Ballantyne, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several members of the Arenaviridae can cause acute febrile diseases in humans, often resulting in lethality. The use of convalescent-phase human plasma is an effective treatment in humans infected with arenaviruses, particularly species found in South America. Despite this, little work has focused on developing potent and defined immunotherapeutics against arenaviruses. In the present study, we produced arenavirus neutralizing antibodies by DNA vaccination of rabbits with plasmids encoding the full-length glycoprotein precursors of Junín virus (JUNV), Machupo virus (MACV), and Guanarito virus (GTOV). Geometric mean neutralizing antibody titers, as measured by the 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50), exceeded 5,000 against homologous viruses. Antisera against each targeted virus exhibited limited cross-species binding and, to a lesser extent, cross-neutralization. Anti-JUNV glycoprotein rabbit antiserum protected Hartley guinea pigs from lethal intraperitoneal infection with JUNV strain Romero when the antiserum was administered 2 days after challenge and provided some protection (∼30%) when administered 4 days after challenge. Treatment starting on day 6 did not protect animals. We further formulated an IgG antibody cocktail by combining anti-JUNV, -MACV, and -GTOV antibodies produced in DNA-vaccinated rabbits. This cocktail protected 100% of guinea pigs against JUNV and GTOV lethal disease. We then expanded on this cocktail approach by simultaneously vaccinating rabbits with a combination of plasmids encoding glycoproteins from JUNV, MACV, GTOV, and Sabia virus (SABV). Sera collected from rabbits vaccinated with the combination vaccine neutralized all four targets. These findings support the concept of using a DNA vaccine approach to generate a potent pan-arenavirus immunotherapeutic. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are an important family of emerging viruses. In infected humans, convalescent-phase plasma containing neutralizing antibodies can

  15. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans

    PubMed Central

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline; Karlsson, Ingrid; Krog, Jesper S; Williams, James A; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute to public health by diminishing the risk of emerging highly pathogenic reassortants. Current inactivated protein vaccines against swine influenza produce only short-lived immunity and have no efficacy against heterologous strains. DNA vaccines are a potential alternative with advantages such as the induction of cellular and humoral immunity, inherent safety and rapid production time. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding selected influenza proteins of pandemic origin and demonstrated broad protective immune responses in ferrets and pigs. In this study, we evaluated our DNA vaccine expressed by next-generation vectors. These new vectors can improve gene expression, but they are also efficiently produced on large scales and comply with regulatory guidelines by avoiding antibiotic resistance genes. In addition, a new needle-free delivery of the vaccine, convenient for mass vaccinations, was compared with intradermal needle injection followed by electroporation. We report that when our DNA vaccine is expressed by the new vectors and delivered to the skin with the needle-free device in the rabbit model, it can elicit an antibody response with the same titers as a conventional vector with intradermal electroporation. The needle-free delivery is already in use for traditional protein vaccines in pigs but should be considered as a practical alternative for the mass administration of broadly protective influenza DNA vaccines. PMID:25746201

  16. Rabies DNA vaccine encoding lysosome-targeted glycoprotein supplemented with Emulsigen-D confers complete protection in preexposure and postexposure studies in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Saxena, Ankur; Rai, Anant; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of rabies and the inability of currently used vaccination strategies to provide highly potent and cost-effective therapy indicate the need for an improved rabies vaccine. Thus, DNA vaccine based on lysosome-targeted glycoprotein of the rabies virus was evaluated in BALB/c mice. It imparted partial protection (60%) against challenge with 20 LD(50) of the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of rabies virus. To improve the outcome of vaccination, to ultimately enhance the immune response, we investigated different routes for DNA vaccine delivery, varied doses of DNA, and the influence of adjuvant supplementation. The highest immune response pertaining to IgG antibody titer, with a predominantly IgG1/IgG2a subclass distribution, effective cellular immunity, and a high level of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNAs) was attained by the optimized DNA vaccine formulation comprising intramuscular administration of 100 microg of DNA vaccine supplemented with Emulsigen-D. In preexposure prophylaxis, a 3-dose regimen of this formulation generated a high RVNA titer (32 IU/ml) and conferred complete protection against challenge with 20 LD(50) of CVS. For postexposure efficacy analysis, rabies was experimentally induced with 50 LD(50) of CVS. Subsequent therapy with 5 doses of the formulation completely prevented rabies in BALB/c mice, which maintained protective RVNA titers of 4 IU/ml. The World Health Organization recommended rabies protective titer threshold is 0.5 IU/ml. Thus, this optimized DNA vaccine formulation provides an avenue for preventing and controlling rabies. PMID:19741168

  17. A novel prototype device for electroporation-enhanced DNA vaccine delivery simultaneously to both skin and muscle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; McCoy, Jay R; Mendoza, Janess M; Yan, Jian; Kemmerrer, Steve V; Khan, Amir S; Weiner, David B; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2011-09-01

    Electroporation (EP) of either muscle or skin has proven to be an efficient method for increasing DNA-based vaccine delivery and immunogenicity in small and large animals. Previous comparative studies in large animals suggest that intramuscular (i.m.) DNA EP delivery appears to favor cellular immunity, while intradermal (i.d.) EP delivery may favor humoral immunity. While current EP devices are primarily designed either for i.m. or i.d. delivery, we developed a novel prototype Dual-Depth Device (DDD) for EP-mediated simultaneous i.d. and i.m. delivery of DNA-based vaccines with an attempt to elicit superior antibody and cellular immune responses. We performed comparisons of DDD EP delivery with standard i.d. EP, standard i.m. EP, and combined delivery of i.d. and i.m. EP at separate sites, for the ability to induce antigen-specific immune responses. In a guinea pig model using a SynCon™ DNA vaccine encoding the influenza virus H5 hemaglutinin (H5HA), vaccination via DDD or combined delivery induced higher antibody titers than via either i.d. or i.m. delivery alone. In a mouse model using a DNA vaccine encoding the nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1, the resulting trend of antibody responses was similar to that detected in guinea pig study. Importantly, cellular immune responses in the DDD or combined delivery groups were significantly stronger than that in either i.d. or i.m. delivery groups. We conclude that EP-mediated DNA-based vaccine delivery to both skin and muscle is superior to delivery to either tissue alone for induction of antigen-specific antibody and cellular immunity. PMID:21199706

  18. Immunogenicity of a Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Glycoprotein D DNA Vaccine Complexed with Bovine Neutrophil Beta-Defensin 3

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie-Dyck, Sarah; Latimer, Laura; Atanley, Ethel; Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Attah-Poku, Sam; Babiuk, Lorne A.

    2014-01-01

    Protective efficacy against bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) has been demonstrated to be induced by a plasmid encoding bovine neutrophil beta-defensin 3 (BNBD3) as a fusion construct with truncated glycoprotein D (tgD). However, in spite of the increased cell-mediated immune responses induced by this DNA vaccine, the clinical responses of BoHV-1-challenged cattle were not reduced over those observed in animals vaccinated with the plasmid encoding tgD alone; this might have been because the vaccine failed to improve humoral responses. We hypothesized that an alternative vaccine design strategy that utilized the DNA vaccine pMASIA-tgD as a complex with BNBD3 might improve humoral responses while maintaining robust Th1-type cell-mediated responses. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with pMASIA-tgD complexed with 0, 0.01875, 0.1875, or 1.875 nmol of a stable synthesized analog of BNBD3 (aBNBD3). The best results were seen in mice immunized with the vaccine composed of pMASIA-tgD complexed to 0.1875 nmol aBNBD3. In this group, humoral responses were improved, as evidenced by increased virus neutralization, tgD-specific early IgG1, and later IgG2a titers, while the strong cell-mediated immune responses, measured based on specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting cells, were maintained relative to pMASIA-tgD. Modulation of the immune response might have been due in part to the effect of BNBD3 on dendritic cells (DCs). In vitro studies showed that murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) pretreated with aBNBD3 were activated, as evidenced by CD11c downregulation, and were functionally mature, as shown by increased allostimulatory ability. Native, synthetic, and analog forms of BNBD3 were equally capable of inducing functional maturation of BMDCs. PMID:25378352

  19. Enhanced Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Bacillus anthracis PA-D4 Protects Mice against Anthrax Spore Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Young; Chang, Dong Suk; Kim, Yeonsu; Kim, Chang Hwan; Hur, Gyeung Haeng; Yang, Jai Myung; Shin, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax has long been considered the most probable bioweapon-induced disease. The protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. In the current study, we evaluated the efficiency of a genetic vaccination with the fourth domain (D4) of PA, which is responsible for initial binding of the anthrax toxin to the cellular receptor. The eukaryotic expression vector was designed with the immunoglobulin M (IgM) signal sequence encoding for PA-D4, which contains codon-optimized genes. The expression and secretion of recombinant protein was confirmed in vitro in 293T cells transfected with plasmid and detected by western blotting, confocal microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results revealed that PA-D4 protein can be efficiently expressed and secreted at high levels into the culture medium. When plasmid DNA was given intramuscularly to mice, a significant PA-D4-specific antibody response was induced. Importantly, high titers of antibodies were maintained for nearly 1 year. Furthermore, incorporation of the SV40 enhancer in the plasmid DNA resulted in approximately a 15-fold increase in serum antibody levels in comparison with the plasmid without enhancer. The antibodies produced were predominantly the immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) type, indicating the predominance of the Th1 response. In addition, splenocytes collected from immunized mice produced PA-D4-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The biodistribution study showed that plasmid DNA was detected in most organs and it rapidly cleared from the injection site. Finally, DNA vaccination with electroporation induced a significant increase in immunogenicity and successfully protected the mice against anthrax spore challenge. Our approach to enhancing the immune response contributes to the development of DNA vaccines against anthrax and other biothreats. PMID:26430894

  20. Plasmid DNA Vaccine Co-Immunisation Modulates Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Intranasal Inoculation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    King, Deborah F. L.; McKay, Paul F.; Mann, Jamie F. S.; Jones, C. Bryn; Shattock, Robin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background An effective HIV vaccine will likely require induction of both mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses. We investigated whether intramuscular (IM) delivery of electroporated plasmid DNA vaccine and simultaneous protein vaccinations by intranasal (IN) and IM routes could be combined to induce mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses to a model HIV-1 CN54 gp140 antigen in mice. Results Co-immunisation of DNA with intranasal protein successfully elicited both serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses, whereas DNA and IM protein co-delivery did not induce systemic or mucosal IgA responses. Cellular IFNγ responses were preserved in co-immunisation protocols compared to protein-only vaccination groups. The addition of DNA to IN protein vaccination reduced the strong Th2 bias observed with IN protein vaccination alone. Luminex analysis also revealed that co-immunisation with DNA and IN protein induced expression of cytokines that promote B-cell function, generation of TFH cells and CCR5 ligands that can reduce HIV infectivity. Significance These data suggest that while IN inoculation alone elicits both cellular and humoral responses, co-administration with homologous DNA vaccination can tailor these towards a more balanced Th1/Th2 phenotype modulating the cellular cytokine profile while eliciting high-levels of antigen-specific antibody. This work provides insights on how to generate differential immune responses within the same vaccination visit, and supports co-immunisation with DNA and protein by a mucosal route as a potential delivery strategy for HIV vaccines. PMID:26544970

  1. Evaluation of a chimeric multi-epitope-based DNA vaccine against subgroup J avian leukosis virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingqing; Cui, Ning; Ma, Xingjiang; Wang, Fangkun; Li, Hongmei; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2016-07-19

    The prokaryotic expressed recombinant chimeric multi-epitope protein X (rCMEPX) had been evaluated with good immunogenicity and protective efficacy against subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) in our previous study. In the present research, we cloned the chimeric multi-epitope gene X into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to evaluate its potency as a DNA vaccine. The purified recombinant gp85 protein and rCMEPX were used as positive controls and a DNA prime-protein boost strategy was also studied. Six experimental groups of 7-day-old chickens (20 per group) were immunized intramuscularly three times at 2weeks interval with PBS, gp85, rCMEPX, pVAX1, pVAX-X and pVAX-X+rCMEPX respectively. The antibody titers and cellular immune responses were assayed after immunization. The efficacy of immunoprotection against the challenge of ALV-J NX0101 strain was also examined. The results showed that the DNA vaccine could elicit both neutralizing antibodies and cellular responses. Immune-challenge experiments showed good protection efficacy against ALV-J infection. Particularly, the regimen involving one priming pVAX-X and twice recombinant rCMEPX boosting, induced the highest antibody titers in all immunized groups. Our results suggest that the constructed chimeric multi-epitope DNA has potential for a candidate vaccine against ALV-J when used in proper prime-boost combinations. The data presented here may provide an alternative strategy for vaccine design in chicken ALV-J prevention. PMID:27318415

  2. Enhanced Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Bacillus anthracis PA-D4 Protects Mice against Anthrax Spore Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Young; Chang, Dong Suk; Kim, Yeonsu; Kim, Chang Hwan; Hur, Gyeung Haeng; Yang, Jai Myung; Shin, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax has long been considered the most probable bioweapon-induced disease. The protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. In the current study, we evaluated the efficiency of a genetic vaccination with the fourth domain (D4) of PA, which is responsible for initial binding of the anthrax toxin to the cellular receptor. The eukaryotic expression vector was designed with the immunoglobulin M (IgM) signal sequence encoding for PA-D4, which contains codon-optimized genes. The expression and secretion of recombinant protein was confirmed in vitro in 293T cells transfected with plasmid and detected by western blotting, confocal microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results revealed that PA-D4 protein can be efficiently expressed and secreted at high levels into the culture medium. When plasmid DNA was given intramuscularly to mice, a significant PA-D4-specific antibody response was induced. Importantly, high titers of antibodies were maintained for nearly 1 year. Furthermore, incorporation of the SV40 enhancer in the plasmid DNA resulted in approximately a 15-fold increase in serum antibody levels in comparison with the plasmid without enhancer. The antibodies produced were predominantly the immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) type, indicating the predominance of the Th1 response. In addition, splenocytes collected from immunized mice produced PA-D4-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The biodistribution study showed that plasmid DNA was detected in most organs and it rapidly cleared from the injection site. Finally, DNA vaccination with electroporation induced a significant increase in immunogenicity and successfully protected the mice against anthrax spore challenge. Our approach to enhancing the immune response contributes to the development of DNA vaccines against anthrax and other biothreats. PMID:26430894

  3. Rhabdovirus-induced apoptosis in a fish cell line is inhibited by a human endogenous acid cysteine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, H V; Johansson, T R; Rinne, A

    1997-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms of cell death in rhabdovirus-infected cells, we studied the infection of the epithelial papilloma of carp cell line with spring viremia of carp virus. Studies using electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis revealed changes in cell morphology and DNA fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. The virus-induced apoptosis was inhibited in cells treated with a human endogenous acid cysteine proteinase inhibitor. PMID:9188644

  4. Isolation of a rhabdovirus during outbreaks of disease in cyprinid fish species at fishery sites in England.

    PubMed

    Way, K; Bark, S J; Longshaw, C B; Denham, K L; Dixon, P F; Feist, S W; Gardiner, R; Gubbins, M J; Le Deuff, R M; Martin, P D; Stone, D M; Taylor, G R

    2003-12-01

    A virus was isolated during disease outbreaks in bream Abramis brama, tench Tinca tinca, roach Rutilis rutilis and crucian carp Carassius carassius populations at 6 fishery sites in England in 1999. Mortalities at the sites were primarily among recently introduced fish and the predominant fish species affected was bream. The bream stocked at 5 of the 6 English fishery sites were found to have originated from the River Bann, Northern Ireland. Most fish presented few consistent external signs of disease but some exhibited clinical signs similar to those of spring viraemia of carp (SVC), with extensive skin haemorrhages, ulceration on the flanks and internal signs including ascites and petechial haemorrhages. The most prominent histopathological changes were hepatocellular necrosis, interstitial nephritis and splenitis. The virus induced a cytopathic effect in tissue cultures (Epithelioma papulosum cyprini [EPC] cells) at 20 degrees C and produced moderate signals in an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of SVC virus. The virus showed a close serological relationship to pike fry rhabdovirus in both EIA and serum neutralisation assays and to a rhabdovirus isolated during a disease outbreak in a bream population in the River Bann in 1998. A high degree of sequence similarity (> or = 99.5% nucleotide identity) was observed between the English isolates and those from the River Bann. Experimental infection of juvenile bream, tench and carp with EPC cell-grown rhabdovirus by bath and intraperitoneal injection resulted in a 40% mortality of bream in the injection group only. The virus was re-isolated from pooled kidney, liver and spleen tissue samples from moribund bream. The field observations together with the experimental results indicate that this rhabdovirus is of low virulence but may have the potential to cause significant mortality in fishes under stress. PMID:14735920

  5. Detection and genome analysis of a novel (dima)rhabdovirus (Riverside virus) from Ochlerotatus sp. mosquitoes in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Gábor; Boros, Ákos; Pál, József; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric; Pankovics, Péter

    2016-04-01

    During an investigation for potential arboviruses present in mosquitoes in Hungary (Central Europe) three highly similar virus strains of a novel rhabdovirus (family Rhabdoviridae) called Riverside virus (RISV, KU248085-KU248087) were detected and genetically characterized from Ochlerotatus sp. mosquito pools collected from 3 geographical locations using viral metagenomic and RT-PCR methods. The ssRNA(-) genome of RISVs follows the general genome layout of rhabdoviruses (3'-N-P-M-G-L-5') with two alternatives, small ORFs in the P and G genes (Px and Gx). The genome of RISVs contains some unusual features such as the large P proteins, the short M proteins with the absence of N-terminal region together with the undetectable "Late budding" motif and the overlap of P and M genes. The unusually long 3' UTRs of the M genes of RISVs probably contain a remnant transcription termination signal which is suggesting the presence of an ancestral gene. The phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons show that the closest known relative of RISVs is the recently identified partially sequenced mosquito-borne rhabdovirus, North Creek virus (NOCRV), from Australia. The RISVs and NOCRV form a distinct, basally rooted lineage in the dimarhabdovirus supergroup. The host species range of RISVs is currently unknown, although the presence of these viruses especially in Ochlerotatus sp. mosquitoes which are known to be fierce biting pests of humans and warm-blooded animals and abundant and widespread in Hungary could hold some potential medical and/or veterinary risks. PMID:26883377

  6. Protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine construct encoding the VP2 gene of infectious bursal disease and a truncated HSP70 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Maity, Hemanta Kumar; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan; Khulape, Sagar A; Pathak, Dinesh C; Vakharia, Vikram N

    2015-02-18

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, infectious, immunosuppressive disease affecting young chicken worldwide. The etiological agent IBD virus (IBDV) is a double stranded RNA virus with outer capsid protein VP2 of IBDV is the major antigenic determinant capable of inducing neutralizing antibody. DNA vaccines encoding VP2 has been extensively studied achieving only partial protection. However, the efficacy of DNA vaccines against IBDV can be augmented by choosing a potential molecular adjuvant. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding the C-terminal domain of the heat shock protein 70 (cHSP70) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene genetically fused with the full length VP2 gene of IBDV (pCIVP2-cHSP70) in comparison to a 'DNA prime-protein boost' approach and a DNA vaccine encoding the VP2 gene (pCIVP2) alone. The results indicate that both pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' elicited humoral as well as cellular immune responses. Chickens in the pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' groups developed significantly higher levels of ELISA titer to IBDV antigen compared to the group immunized with pCIVP2 alone (p<0.01). However, significantly higher levels of lymphocyte proliferative response, IL-12 and IFN-γ production were found in the pCIVP2-cHSP70 group compared to 'DNA prime-protein boost' group. Additionally, chickens immunized with pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' vaccines were completely protected against the vvIBDV whereas pCIVP2 DNA vaccine alone was able to protect only 70%. These findings suggest that the truncated C-terminal HSP70 mediated DNA vaccine genetically fused with the VP2 gene construct stimulated both humoral and cell mediated immune responses and conferred complete protection against IBDV. This novel strategy is perhaps a seminal concept in utilizing HSP70 as an adjuvant molecule to elicit an immune response against IBD affecting chickens. PMID

  7. Characterization of an Sf-rhabdovirus-negative Spodoptera frugiperda cell line as an alternative host for recombinant protein production in the baculovirus-insect cell system.

    PubMed

    Maghodia, Ajay B; Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-06-01

    Cell lines derived from the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf), are widely used as hosts for recombinant protein production in the baculovirus-insect cell system (BICS). However, it was recently discovered that these cell lines are contaminated with a virus, now known as Sf-rhabdovirus [1]. The detection of this adventitious agent raised a potential safety issue that could adversely impact the BICS as a commercial recombinant protein production platform. Thus, we examined the properties of Sf-RVN, an Sf-rhabdovirus-negative Sf cell line, as a potential alternative host. Nested RT-PCR assays showed Sf-RVN cells had no detectable Sf-rhabdovirus over the course of 60 passages in continuous culture. The general properties of Sf-RVN cells, including their average growth rates, diameters, morphologies, and viabilities after baculovirus infection, were virtually identical to those of Sf9 cells. Baculovirus-infected Sf-RVN and Sf9 cells produced equivalent levels of three recombinant proteins, including an intracellular prokaryotic protein and two secreted eukaryotic glycoproteins, and provided similar N-glycosylation patterns. In fact, except for the absence of Sf-rhabdovirus, the only difference between Sf-RVN and Sf9 cells was SF-RVN produced higher levels of infectious baculovirus progeny. These results show Sf-RVN cells can be used as improved, alternative hosts to circumvent the potential safety hazard associated with the use of Sf-rhabdovirus-contaminated Sf cells for recombinant protein manufacturing with the BICS. PMID:26923062

  8. Evaluation of the Impact of Codon Optimization and N-Linked Glycosylation on Functional Immunogenicity of Pfs25 DNA Vaccines Delivered by In Vivo Electroporation in Preclinical Studies in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Dibyadyuti; Bansal, Geetha P.; Kumar, Rajesh; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage surface antigen Pfs25 is a well-established candidate for malaria transmission-blocking vaccine development. Immunization with DNA vaccines encoding Pfs25 has been shown to elicit potent antibody responses in mice and nonhuman primates. Studies aimed at further optimization have revealed improved immunogenicity through the application of in vivo electroporation and by using a heterologous prime-boost approach. The goal of the studies reported here was to systematically evaluate the impact of codon optimization, in vivo electroporation, and N-linked glycosylation on the immunogenicity of Pfs25 encoded by DNA vaccines. The results from this study demonstrate that while codon optimization and in vivo electroporation greatly improved functional immunogenicity of Pfs25 DNA vaccines, the presence or absence of N-linked glycosylation did not significantly impact vaccine efficacy. These findings suggest that N-glycosylation of Pfs25 encoded by DNA vaccines is not detrimental to overall transmission-blocking efficacy. PMID:26135972

  9. Long-term functional duration of immune responses to HCV NS3/4A induced by DNA vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ahlén, G; Holmström, F; Gibbs, A; Alheim, M; Frelin, L

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the ability of hepatitis C virus non-structural (NS) 3/4A-DNA-based vaccines to activate long-term cell-mediated immune responses in mice. Wild-type and synthetic codon optimized (co) NS3/4A DNA vaccines have previously been shown to be immunogenic in mice, rabbits and humans, although we have very poor knowledge about the longevity of the immune responses primed. We therefore analyzed the functionality of primed NS3/4A-specific immune responses in BALB/c (H-2d) and/or C57BL/6J (H-2b) mice 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12 and 16 months after the last immunization. Mice were immunized one, two, three or four times using gene gun delivery to the skin or by intramuscular administration. Immunological responses after immunization were monitored by protection against in vivo challenge of NS3/4A-expressing syngeneic tumor cells. In addition, functionality of the NS3/4A-specific T cells was analyzed by a standard cytotoxicity assay. First, we identified a new unique murine H-2d-restricted NS3/4A cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope, which enabled us to study the epitope-specific immune responses. Our results show that the coNS3/4A vaccine was highly immunogenic by determination of interferon-γ/tumor necrosis factor-α production and lytic cytotoxic T cells, which could efficiently inhibit in vivo tumor growth. Importantly, we showed that one to four monthly immunizations protected mice from tumor development when challenged up to 16 months after the last immunization. When determining the functionality of NS3/4A-specific T cells in vitro, we showed detectable lytic activity up to 12 months after the last immunization. Thus, NS3/4A-based DNA vaccines activate potent cellular immune responses that are present and function in both BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice up to 12–16 months after the last immunization. The induction of long-term immunity after NS3/4A DNA immunization has not been shown previously and supports the use of NS3/4A in hepatitis C virus

  10. Xenogeneic human p53 DNA vaccination by electroporation breaks immune tolerance to control murine tumors expressing mouse p53.

    PubMed

    Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Trieu, Janson; Lee, Sung Yong; He, Liangmei; Tsai, Ya-Chea; Wu, T-C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2013-01-01

    The pivotal role of p53 as a tumor suppressor protein is illustrated by the fact that this protein is found mutated in more than 50% of human cancers. In most cases, mutations in p53 greatly increase the otherwise short half-life of this protein in normal tissue and cause it to accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumors. The overexpression of mutated p53 in tumor cells makes p53 a potentially desirable target for the development of cancer immunotherapy. However, p53 protein represents an endogenous tumor-associated antigen (TAA). Immunization against a self-antigen is challenging because an antigen-specific immune response likely generates only low affinity antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cells. This represents a bottleneck of tumor immunotherapy when targeting endogenous TAAs expressed by tumors. The objective of the current study is to develop a safe cancer immunotherapy using a naked DNA vaccine. The vaccine employs a xenogeneic p53 gene to break immune tolerance resulting in a potent therapeutic antitumor effect against tumors expressing mutated p53. Our study assessed the therapeutic antitumor effect after immunization with DNA encoding human p53 (hp53) or mouse p53 (mp53). Mice immunized with xenogeneic full length hp53 DNA plasmid intramuscularly followed by electroporation were protected against challenge with murine colon cancer MC38 while those immunized with mp53 DNA were not. In a therapeutic model, established MC38 tumors were also well controlled by treatment with hp53 DNA therapy in tumor bearing mice compared to mp53 DNA. Mice vaccinated with hp53 DNA plasmid also exhibited an increase in mp53-specific CD8(+) T-cell precursors compared to vaccination with mp53 DNA. Antibody depletion experiments also demonstrated that CD8(+) T-cells play crucial roles in the antitumor effects. This study showed intramuscular vaccination with xenogeneic p53 DNA vaccine followed by electroporation is capable of inducing potent antitumor effects against tumors expressing mutated

  11. Long-term functional duration of immune responses to HCV NS3/4A induced by DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ahlén, G; Holmström, F; Gibbs, A; Alheim, M; Frelin, L

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the ability of hepatitis C virus non-structural (NS) 3/4A-DNA-based vaccines to activate long-term cell-mediated immune responses in mice. Wild-type and synthetic codon optimized (co) NS3/4A DNA vaccines have previously been shown to be immunogenic in mice, rabbits and humans, although we have very poor knowledge about the longevity of the immune responses primed. We therefore analyzed the functionality of primed NS3/4A-specific immune responses in BALB/c (H-2(d)) and/or C57BL/6J (H-2(b)) mice 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12 and 16 months after the last immunization. Mice were immunized one, two, three or four times using gene gun delivery to the skin or by intramuscular administration. Immunological responses after immunization were monitored by protection against in vivo challenge of NS3/4A-expressing syngeneic tumor cells. In addition, functionality of the NS3/4A-specific T cells was analyzed by a standard cytotoxicity assay. First, we identified a new unique murine H-2(d)-restricted NS3/4A cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope, which enabled us to study the epitope-specific immune responses. Our results show that the coNS3/4A vaccine was highly immunogenic by determination of interferon-γ/tumor necrosis factor-α production and lytic cytotoxic T cells, which could efficiently inhibit in vivo tumor growth. Importantly, we showed that one to four monthly immunizations protected mice from tumor development when challenged up to 16 months after the last immunization. When determining the functionality of NS3/4A-specific T cells in vitro, we showed detectable lytic activity up to 12 months after the last immunization. Thus, NS3/4A-based DNA vaccines activate potent cellular immune responses that are present and function in both BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice up to 12-16 months after the last immunization. The induction of long-term immunity after NS3/4A DNA immunization has not been shown previously and supports the use of NS3/4A in hepatitis C virus vaccine

  12. Molecular characterization of the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis hsp60-hsp10 operon, and evaluation of the immune response and protective efficacy induced by hsp60 DNA vaccination in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are important candidates for the development of vaccines because they are usually able to promote both humoral and cellular immune responses in mammals. We identified and characterized the hsp60-hsp10 bicistronic operon of the animal pathogen Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, a Gram-positive bacterium of the class Actinobacteria, which causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) in small ruminants. Findings To construct the DNA vaccine, the hsp60 gene of C. pseudotuberculosis was cloned in a mammalian expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized by intramuscular injection with the recombinant plasmid (pVAX1/hsp60). Conclusion This vaccination induced significant anti-hsp60 IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a isotype production. However, immunization with this DNA vaccine did not confer protective immunity. PMID:21774825

  13. Increased Generation of HIV-1 gp120-Reactive CD8+ T Cells by a DNA Vaccine Construct Encoding the Chemokine CCL3

    PubMed Central

    Øynebråten, Inger; Hinkula, Jorma; Fredriksen, Agnete B.; Bogen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines based on subunits from pathogens have several advantages over other vaccine strategies. DNA vaccines can easily be modified, they show good safety profiles, are stable and inexpensive to produce, and the immune response can be focused to the antigen of interest. However, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines which is generally quite low needs to be improved. Electroporation and co-delivery of genetically encoded immune adjuvants are two strategies aiming at increasing the efficacy of DNA vaccines. Here, we have examined whether targeting to antigen-presenting cells (APC) could increase the immune response to surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1). To target APC, we utilized a homodimeric vaccine format denoted vaccibody, which enables covalent fusion of gp120 to molecules that can target APC. Two molecules were tested for their efficiency as targeting units: the antibody-derived single chain Fragment variable (scFv) specific for the major histocompatilibility complex (MHC) class II I-E molecules, and the CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3). The vaccines were delivered as DNA into muscle of mice with or without electroporation. Targeting of gp120 to MHC class II molecules induced antibodies that neutralized HIV-1 and that persisted for more than a year after one single immunization with electroporation. Targeting by CCL3 significantly increased the number of HIV-1 gp120-reactive CD8+ T cells compared to non-targeted vaccines and gp120 delivered alone in the absence of electroporation. The data suggest that chemokines are promising molecular adjuvants because small amounts can attract immune cells and promote immune responses without advanced equipment such as electroporation. PMID:25122197

  14. Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Shigella flexneri 2a strains mucosally deliver DNA vaccines encoding measles virus hemagglutinin, inducing specific immune responses and protection in cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Pasetti, Marcela F; Barry, Eileen M; Losonsky, Genevieve; Singh, Mahender; Medina-Moreno, Sandra M; Polo, John M; Ulmer, Jeffrey; Robinson, Harriet; Sztein, Marcelo B; Levine, Myron M

    2003-05-01

    Measles remains a leading cause of child mortality in developing countries. Residual maternal measles antibodies and immunologic immaturity dampen immunogenicity of the current vaccine in young infants. Because cotton rat respiratory tract is susceptible to measles virus (MV) replication after intranasal (i.n.) challenge, this model can be used to assess the efficacy of MV vaccines. Pursuing a new measles vaccine strategy that might be effective in young infants, we used attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CVD 908-htrA and Shigella flexneri 2a CVD 1208 vaccines to deliver mucosally to cotton rats eukaryotic expression plasmid pGA3-mH and Sindbis virus-based DNA replicon pMSIN-H encoding MV hemagglutinin (H). The initial i.n. dose-response with bacterial vectors alone identified a well-tolerated dosage (1 x 10(9) to 7 x 10(9) CFU) and a volume (20 micro l) that elicited strong antivector immune responses. Animals immunized i.n. on days 0, 28, and 76 with bacterial vectors carrying DNA plasmids encoding MV H or immunized parenterally with these naked DNA vaccine plasmids developed MV plaque reduction neutralizing antibodies and proliferative responses against MV antigens. In a subsequent experiment of identical design, cotton rats were challenged with wild-type MV 1 month after the third dose of vaccine or placebo. MV titers were significantly reduced in lung tissue of animals immunized with MV DNA vaccines delivered either via bacterial live vectors or parenterally. Since attenuated serovar Typhi and S. flexneri can deliver measles DNA vaccines mucosally in cotton rats, inducing measles immune responses (including neutralizing antibodies) and protection, boosting strategies can now be evaluated in animals primed with MV DNA vaccines. PMID:12692223

  15. Modulatory effect of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide on a DNA vaccine against nervous necrosis virus in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiang-Peng; Peng, Ran-Hong; Chiou, Pinwen P

    2015-08-01

    We report the development of a DNA vaccine pcMGNNV2 against nervous necrosis virus (NNV), a leading cause of mass mortality in grouper larvae. In addition, the modulatory effect of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), a Toll-like receptor 9 agonist, on the DNA vaccine was evaluated. The DNA vaccine alone elicited the production of NNV-specific antibodies, indicating that the vaccine was capable of triggering adaptive humoral response. Furthermore, significant induction of TLR9, Mx and IL-1β was observed in the spleen on day 7 post-vaccination, supporting that the vaccine could trigger TLR9 signaling. The incorporation of CpG ODN at high dose did not significantly affect the level of NNV-specific antibodies, but was able to moderately enhance the expression of Mx and IL-1β on day 7, indicating its ability in modulating innate response. After challenge with NNV, the vaccine alone enhanced the survival rate in infected larvae at both 1 and 2 weeks post-vaccination. The combination of CpG ODN further increased the survival rate at week 1 but not week 2. Interestingly, at week 2 the ODN appeared to induce a Th1-like response, as indicated by upregulation of T-bet (a Th1 marker) and downregulation of GATA-3 (a Th2 marker). Thus, the results suggest that the boosted Th1 response by CpG ODN does not augment the protection efficacy of pcMGNNV2 vaccine. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of a successful DNA vaccine against NNV in grouper. PMID:26093207

  16. Modulation of hepatitis C virus core DNA vaccine immune responses by co-immunization with CC-chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) gene as immunoadjuvant.

    PubMed

    Hartoonian, Christine; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Arashkia, Arash; Jang, Yon Suk; Ebtekar, Maasoumeh; Yazdi, Mojtaba Tabatabai; Negahdari, Babak; Nikoo, Azita; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2014-09-01

    Plasmid DNA vaccination is a promising vaccine platform for prevention and treatment of infectious disease. Enhancement of the DNA vaccine potency by co-inoculation of immunoadjuvant has been shown to be an effective strategy. Modulation of dendritic cells and T-cells locomotion and trafficking to prime an immune response is mediated by distinct chemokines. The recent study was designed to elucidate the adjuvant activity of plasmid expressing CC-chemokine ligand 20 (pCCL20) in co-inoculation with hepatitis C virus (HCV) core DNA vaccine immunization. pCCL20 was constructed and evaluated for its functional expression. Sub-cutaneous inoculation of pCCL20 with HCV core DNA vaccine was performed via electroporation in BALB/c mice on day 0 and 14 and a HCV core protein booster was applied on day 28. On week after final immunization, both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were assessed by indirect ELISA for core specific antibodies, lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine ELISA/ELISpot and cytotoxic Grenzyme B (GrzB) release assays. Mice were co-immunized with pCCL20 developed higher levels of core specific IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio and IL-2 release, IFN-γ producing cells, lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic Grenzyme B release in both draining lymph nodes and spleen cells of immunized mice. The core-specific serum total IgG and IgG2a/IgG1 ratio were significantly higher when the pCCL20 was co-inoculated. These results suggest the potential of CCL20 chemokine as vaccine adjuvant to enhance Th1 mediated cellular and humoral immune responses in HCV core DNA immunization. PMID:24972567

  17. Priming with two DNA vaccines expressing hepatitis C virus NS3 protein targeting dendritic cells elicits superior heterologous protective potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jie; Deng, Yao; Chen, Hong; Yin, Xiao; Yang, Yang; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-10-01

    Development an effective vaccine may offer an alternative preventive and therapeutic strategy against HCV infection. DNA vaccination has been shown to induce robust humoral and cellular immunity and overcome many problems associated with conventional vaccines. In this study, mice were primed with either conventional pVRC-based or suicidal pSC-based DNA vaccines carrying DEC-205-targeted NS3 antigen (DEC-NS3) and boosted with type 5 adenoviral vectors encoding the partial NS3 and core antigens (C44P). The prime boost regimen induced a marked increase in antigen-specific humoral and T-cell responses in comparison with either rAd5-based vaccines or DEC-205-targeted DNA immunization in isolation. The protective effect against heterogeneous challenge was correlated with high levels of anti-NS3 IgG and T-cell-mediated immunity against NS3 peptides. Moreover, priming with a suicidal DNA vaccine (pSC-DEC-NS3), which elicited increased TNF-α-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells against NS3-2 peptides (aa 1245-1461), after boosting, showed increased heterogeneous protective potential compared with priming with a conventional DNA vaccine (pVRC-DEC-NS3). In conclusion, a suicidal DNA vector (pSC-DEC-NS3) expressing DEC-205-targeted NS3 combined with boosting using an rAd5-based HCV vaccine (rAd5-C44P) is a good candidate for a safe and effective vaccine against HCV infection. PMID:26215441

  18. Dose-dependent inhibition of Gag cellular immunity by Env in SIV/HIV DNA vaccinated macaques

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Antonio; Li, Jinyao; Rosati, Margherita; Kulkarni, Viraj; Patel, Vainav; Jalah, Rashmi; Alicea, Candido; Reed, Steven; Sardesai, Niranjan; Berkower, Ira; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2015-01-01

    The induction of a balanced immune response targeting the major structural proteins, Gag and Env of HIV, is important for the development of an efficacious vaccine. The use of DNA plasmids expressing different antigens offers the opportunity to test in a controlled manner the influence of different vaccine components on the magnitude and distribution of the vaccine-induced cellular and humoral immune responses. Here, we show that increasing amounts of env DNA results in greatly enhanced Env antibody titers without significantly affecting the levels of anti-Env cellular immune responses. Co-immunization with Env protein further increased antibody levels, indicating that vaccination with DNA only is not sufficient for eliciting maximal humoral responses against Env. In contrast, under high env:gag DNA plasmid ratio, the development of Gag cellular responses was significantly reduced by either SIV or HIV Env, whereas Gag humoral responses were not affected. Our data indicate that a balanced ratio of the 2 key HIV/SIV vaccine components, Gag and Env, is important to avoid immunological interference and to achieve both maximal humoral responses against Env to prevent virus acquisition and maximal cytotoxic T cell responses against Gag to prevent virus spread. PMID:26125521

  19. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen. PMID:27239860

  20. A theoretical analysis of codon adaptation index of the Boophilus microplus bm86 gene directed to the optimization of a DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Lina María; Armengol, Gemma; Habeych, Edwin; Orduz, Sergio

    2006-04-21

    DNA vaccines utilize host cell molecules for gene transcription and translation to proteins, and the interspecific difference of codon usage is one of the major obstacles for effective induction of specific and strong immune response. In an attempt to improve codon usage effects of DNA vaccine on protein expression, a quantitative study was conducted to clarify the relationship of codon usage in the tick gene bm86 and its potential expression in bovine cells. The calculated relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) and codon adaptation index (CAI) values of bm86 from Boophilus microplus and a set of 14 highly expressed genes from Bos taurus indicated that some codons utilized frequently in bm86 are rarely used in B. taurus genes and vice versa. The different translational efficiencies obtained suggested that after DNA vaccination using the wild bm86 gene, the protein Bm86 would be expressed in bovines, but it would not be the optimum sequence. However, using the codon-optimized bm86 gene to bovines, whose sequence was theoretically designed, would probably improve the level of the immune response generated against ticks. PMID:16171828

  1. Novel linear DNA vaccines induce protective immune responses against lethal infection with influenza virus type A/H5N1

    PubMed Central

    Kendirgi, Frédéric; Yun, Nadezda E.; Linde, Nathaniel S.; Zacks, Michele A.; Smith, Jeanon N.; Smith, Jennifer K.; McMicken, Harilyn; Chen, Yin; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Vaccine development for possible influenza pandemics has been challenging. Conventional vaccines such as inactivated and live attenuated virus preparations are limited in terms of production speed and capacity. DNA vaccination has emerged as a potential alternative to conventional vaccines against influenza pandemics. In this study, we use a novel, cell-free DNA manufacturing process (synDNA™) to produce prototype linear DNA vaccines against the influenza virus type A/H5N1. This synDNA™ process does not require bacterial fermentation, so it avoids the use of antibiotic resistance genes and other nucleic acid sequences unrelated to the antigen gene expression in the actual therapeutic DNA construct. The efficacy of various vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins (H5N1 synDNA™), hemagglutinin alone (H5 synDNA™) or neuraminidase alone (N1 synDNA™) was evaluated in mice. Two of the constructs (H5 synDNA™ and H5N1 synDNA™) induced a robust protective immune response with up to 93% of treated mice surviving a lethal challenge of a virulent influenza A/Vietnam/1203/04 H5N1 isolate. In combination with a potent biological activity and simplified production footprint, these characteristics make DNA vaccines prepared with our synDNA™ process highly suitable as alternatives to other vaccine preparations. PMID:18443425

  2. A synthetic consensus anti-spike protein DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Karuppiah; Falzarano, Darryl; Reuschel, Emma L; Tingey, Colleen; Flingai, Seleeke; Villarreal, Daniel O; Wise, Megan; Patel, Ami; Izmirly, Abdullah; Aljuaid, Abdulelah; Seliga, Alecia M; Soule, Geoff; Morrow, Matthew; Kraynyak, Kimberly A; Khan, Amir S; Scott, Dana P; Feldmann, Friederike; LaCasse, Rachel; Meade-White, Kimberly; Okumura, Atsushi; Ugen, Kenneth E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary; Feldmann, Heinz; Weiner, David B

    2015-08-19

    First identified in 2012, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is caused by an emerging human coronavirus, which is distinct from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and represents a novel member of the lineage C betacoronoviruses. Since its identification, MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been linked to more than 1372 infections manifesting with severe morbidity and, often, mortality (about 495 deaths) in the Arabian Peninsula, Europe, and, most recently, the United States. Human-to-human transmission has been documented, with nosocomial transmission appearing to be an important route of infection. The recent increase in cases of MERS in the Middle East coupled with the lack of approved antiviral therapies or vaccines to treat or prevent this infection are causes for concern. We report on the development of a synthetic DNA vaccine against MERS-CoV. An optimized DNA vaccine encoding the MERS spike protein induced potent cellular immunity and antigen-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice, macaques, and camels. Vaccinated rhesus macaques seroconverted rapidly and exhibited high levels of virus-neutralizing activity. Upon MERS viral challenge, all of the monkeys in the control-vaccinated group developed characteristic disease, including pneumonia. Vaccinated macaques were protected and failed to demonstrate any clinical or radiographic signs of pneumonia. These studies demonstrate that a consensus MERS spike protein synthetic DNA vaccine can induce protective responses against viral challenge, indicating that this strategy may have value as a possible vaccine modality against this emerging pathogen. PMID:26290414

  3. A synthetic consensus anti–spike protein DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Muthumani, Karuppiah; Falzarano, Darryl; Reuschel, Emma L.; Tingey, Colleen; Flingai, Seleeke; Villarreal, Daniel O.; Wise, Megan; Patel, Ami; Izmirly, Abdullah; Aljuaid, Abdulelah; Seliga, Alecia M.; Soule, Geoff; Morrow, Matthew; Kraynyak, Kimberly A.; Khan, Amir S.; Scott, Dana P.; Feldmann, Friederike; LaCasse, Rachel; Meade-White, Kimberly; Okumura, Atsushi; Ugen, Kenneth E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Kobinger, Gary; Feldmann, Heinz; Weiner, David B.

    2015-01-01

    First identified in 2012, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is caused by an emerging human coronavirus, which is distinct from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and represents a novel member of the lineage C betacoronoviruses. Since its identification, MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been linked to more than 1372 infections manifesting with severe morbidity and, often, mortality (about 495 deaths) in the Arabian Peninsula, Europe, and, most recently, the United States. Human-to-human transmission has been documented, with nosocomial transmission appearing to be an important route of infection. The recent increase in cases of MERS in the Middle East coupled with the lack of approved antiviral therapies or vaccines to treat or prevent this infection are causes for concern. We report on the development of a synthetic DNA vaccine against MERS-CoV. An optimized DNA vaccine encoding the MERS spike protein induced potent cellular immunity and antigen-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice, macaques, and camels. Vaccinated rhesus macaques seroconverted rapidly and exhibited high levels of virus-neutralizing activity. Upon MERS viral challenge, all of the monkeys in the control-vaccinated group developed characteristic disease, including pneumonia. Vaccinated macaques were protected and failed to demonstrate any clinical or radiographic signs of pneumonia. These studies demonstrate that a consensus MERS spike protein synthetic DNA vaccine can induce protective responses against viral challenge, indicating that this strategy may have value as a possible vaccine modality against this emerging pathogen. PMID:26290414

  4. Novel linear DNA vaccines induce protective immune responses against lethal infection with influenza virus type A/H5N1.

    PubMed

    Kendirgi, Frédéric; Yun, Nadezda E; Linde, Nathaniel S; Zacks, Michele A; Smith, Jeanon N; Smith, Jennifer K; McMicken, Harilyn; Chen, Yin; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Vaccine development for possible influenza pandemics has been challenging. Conventional vaccines such as inactivated and live attenuated virus preparations are limited in terms of production speed and capacity. DNA vaccination has emerged as a potential alternative to conventional vaccines against influenza pandemics. In this study, we use a novel, cell-free DNA manufacturing process (synDNA) to produce prototype linear DNA vaccines against the influenza virus type A/H5N1. This synDNA process does not require bacterial fermentation, so it avoids the use of antibiotic resistance genes and other nucleic acid sequences unrelated to the antigen gene expression in the actual therapeutic DNA construct. The efficacy of various vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins (H5N1 synDNA), hemagglutinin alone (H5 synDNA) or neuraminidase alone (N1 synDNA) was evaluated in mice. Two of the constructs (H5 synDNA and H5N1 synDNA) induced a robust protective immune response with up to 93% of treated mice surviving a lethal challenge of a virulent influenza A/Vietnam/1203/04 H5N1 isolate. In combination with a potent biological activity and simplified production footprint, these characteristics make DNA vaccines prepared with our synDNA process highly suitable as alternatives to other vaccine preparations. PMID:18443425

  5. Experimental Rhodococcus equi and equine infectious anemia virus DNA vaccination in adult and neonatal horses: effect of IL-12, dose, and route.

    PubMed

    Mealey, R H; Stone, D M; Hines, M T; Alperin, D C; Littke, M H; Leib, S R; Leach, S E; Hines, S A

    2007-10-23

    Improving the ability of DNA-based vaccines to induce potent Type1/Th1 responses against intracellular pathogens in large outbred species is essential. Rhodoccocus equi and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) are two naturally occurring equine pathogens that also serve as important large animal models of neonatal immunity and lentiviral immune control. Neonates present a unique challenge for immunization due to their diminished immunologic capabilities and apparent Th2 bias. In an effort to augment R. equi- and EIAV-specific Th1 responses induced by DNA vaccination, we hypothesized that a dual promoter plasmid encoding recombinant equine IL-12 (rEqIL-12) would function as a molecular adjuvant. In adult horses, DNA vaccines induced R. equi- and EIAV-specific antibody and lymphoproliferative responses, and EIAV-specific CTL and tetramer-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes. These responses were not enhanced by the rEqIL-12 plasmid. In neonatal foals, DNA immunization induced EIAV-specific antibody and lymphoproliferative responses, but not CTL. The R. equi vapA vaccine was poorly immunogenic in foals even when co-administered with the IL-12 plasmid. It was concluded that DNA immunization was capable of inducing Th1 responses in horses; dose and route were significant variables, but rEqIL-12 was not an effective molecular adjuvant. Additional work is needed to optimize DNA vaccine-induced Th1 responses in horses, especially in neonates. PMID:17889970

  6. Adjuvanting a DNA vaccine with a TLR9 ligand plus Flt3 ligand results in enhanced cellular immunity against the simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Kwissa, Marcin; Amara, Rama R; Robinson, Harriet L; Moss, Bernard; Alkan, Sefik; Jabbar, Abdul; Villinger, Francois; Pulendran, Bali

    2007-10-29

    DNA vaccines offer promising strategies for immunization against infections. However, their clinical use requires improvements in immunogenicity. We explored the efficacy of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands (TLR-Ls) on augmenting the immunogenicity of a DNA prime-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine against SIV. Rhesus macaques were injected with Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3)-ligand (FL) to expand dendritic cells (DCs) and were primed with a DNA vaccine encoding immunodeficiency virus antigens mixed with ligands for TLR9 or TLR7/8. Subsequently, the animals were boosted with DNA and twice with recombinant MVA expressing the same antigens. TLR9-L (CpG DNA) mediated activation of DCs in vivo and enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific CD8(+) interferon (IFN) gamma(+) T cells and polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells producing IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 2. Although this trial was designed primarily as an immunogenicity study, we challenged the animals with pathogenic SIVmac(251) and observed a reduction in peak viremia and cumulative viral loads in the TLR9-L plus FL-adjuvanted group relative to the unvaccinated group; however, the study design precluded comparisons between the adjuvanted groups and the group vaccinated with DNA/MVA alone. Viral loads were inversely correlated with the magnitude and quality of the immune response. Thus, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines can be augmented with TLR9-L plus FL. PMID:17954572

  7. Passive protection of shrimp against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using specific antibody from egg yolk of chickens immunized with inactivated virus or a WSSV-DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanan; Liu, Junjun; Jin, Liji; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhen, Yuhong; Xue, Hongyu; You, Jiansong; Xu, Yongping

    2008-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) causes high mortality and large economic losses in cultured shrimp. The VP28, VP19 and VP15 genes encode viral structural proteins of WSSV. In this study, hens were immunized with recombinant plasmid (pCI-VP28/VP19/VP15) with linkers or with inactivated WSSV, which used CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) and Freund's adjuvant as adjuvant, respectively. Egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) from hens immunized with inactivated vaccine and DNA vaccine was obtained, purified and used for protection of Metapenaeus ensis shrimp against WSSV. The data showed that the antibody response of the hens immunized with the DNA vaccine was improved by CpG ODNs as adjuvant, but was still inferior to inactivated WSSV in both sera and egg yolks. Using specific IgY from hens immunized with inactivated WSSV and DNA vaccine to neutralize WSSV, the challenged shrimp showed 73.3% and 33.3% survival, respectively. Thus, the results suggest that passive immunization strategy with IgY will be a valuable method against WSSV infection in shrimp. PMID:18805492

  8. DNA vaccination of mice with a plasmid encoding Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid protein mimics the B-cell response induced by virus infection.

    PubMed

    Koletzki, D; Schirmbeck, R; Lundkvist, A; Meisel, H; Krüger, D H; Ulrich, R

    2001-11-17

    Inoculation of naked DNA has been applied for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against different viral infections. To study the humoral immune response induced by DNA vaccination we cloned the entire nucleocapsid protein-encoding sequence of the Puumala hantavirus strain Vranica/Hällnäs into the CMV promoter-driven expression unit of the plasmid pcDNA3, generating pcDNA3-VR1. A single dose injection of 50 microg of plasmid DNA into each M. tibialis anterior of BALB/c mice induced a high-titered antibody response against the nucleocapsid protein as documented 6 and 11 weeks after immunisation. PEPSCAN analysis of a serum pool of the pcDNA3-VR1-vaccinated animals revealed antibodies reacting with epitopes covering the whole nucleocapsid protein. The epitope-specificity of the immune response induced by DNA vaccination seems to reflect the antibody response in experimentally virus-infected bank voles (the natural host of the Puumala virus) and humans. The data suggest that DNA vaccination could be used for the identification of highly immunogenic epitopes in viral proteins. PMID:11035190

  9. Wide range of susceptibility to rhabdoviruses in homozygous clones of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Quillet, Edwige; Dorson, Michel; Le Guillou, Sandrine; Benmansour, Abdenour; Boudinot, Pierre

    2007-05-01

    Inbred lines differentially susceptible to diseases are a powerful tool to get insights into the mechanisms of genetic resistance to pathogens. In fish, chromosome manipulation techniques allow a quick production of such homozygous lines. Using gynogenesis, we produced nine homozygous clones of rainbow trout from a domestic population (INRA Sy strain). We examined the variability between clones for resistance to two rhabdoviruses, the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and the infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Intraperitoneal injections and waterborne infections were performed in parallel for both viruses. No survival was recorded after intraperitoneal injection of VHSV or IHNV, indicating that fish from all clones were fully susceptible to both viruses by this route of infection. In contrast, the different clones showed a wide range of survival frequency after waterborne infection. The resistance levels to VHSV ranged from 0 to 99% and resistance was not abrogated when resistant and sensitive animals were mixed and subjected to waterborne infection. VHSV was recovered from 10% of resistant fish after waterborne infection, confirming that virus replication was possible in this context but effective only in a low proportion of the population. The different clones also exhibited a wide range of survival (0-68%) after a waterborne infection with IHNV. Although VHSV-resistant clones were not fully resistant to IHNV, the susceptibility to IHNV and VHSV tended to be correlated, suggesting that non-specific mechanisms common to both viruses were involved. PMID:17085058

  10. Characterization of Viral Communities of Biting Midges and Identification of Novel Thogotovirus Species and Rhabdovirus Genus.

    PubMed

    Temmam, Sarah; Monteil-Bouchard, Sonia; Robert, Catherine; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    More than two thirds of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, and among them RNA viruses represent the majority. Ceratopogonidae (genus Culicoides) are well-known vectors of several viruses responsible for epizooties (bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, etc.). They are also vectors of the only known virus infecting humans: the Oropouche virus. Female midges usually feed on a variety of hosts, leading to possible transmission of emerging viruses from animals to humans. In this context, we report here the analysis of RNA viral communities of Senegalese biting midges using next-generation sequencing techniques as a preliminary step toward the identification of potential viral biohazards. Sequencing of the RNA virome of three pools of Culicoides revealed the presence of a significant diversity of viruses infecting plants, insects and mammals. Several novel viruses were detected, including a novel Thogotovirus species, related but genetically distant from previously described tick-borne thogotoviruses. Novel rhabdoviruses were also detected, possibly constituting a novel Rhabdoviridae genus, and putatively restricted to insects. Sequences related to the major viruses transmitted by Culicoides, i.e., African horse sickness, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses were also detected. This study highlights the interest in monitoring the emergence and circulation of zoonoses and epizooties using their arthropod vectors. PMID:26978389

  11. Subcellular trafficking in rhabdovirus infection and immune evasion: a novel target for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Oksayan, Sibil; Ito, Naoto; Moseley, Greg; Blondel, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Rabies Virus (RABV) are the prototypic members of the rhabdovirus family. These viruses have a particularly broad host range, and despite the availability of vaccines, RABV still causes more than 50,000 human deaths a year. Trafficking of the virion or viral particles is important at several stages of the replicative life cycle, including cellular entry, localization into the cytoplasmic inclusion bodies which primarily house the transcription and replication of the viral genome, and migration to the plasma membrane from whence the virus is released by budding. Intriguingly, specific viral proteins, VSV M and RABV P have also been shown to undergo intracellular trafficking independent of the other viral apparatus. These proteins are multifunctional, and play roles in antagonism of host processes, namely the IFN system, and as such enable viral evasion of the innate cellular antiviral response. A body of recent research has been aimed at characterizing the mechanisms by which these proteins are able to shuttle between and localize to various subcellular sites, including the nucleus, which is not required during the cytoplasmic replicative life cycle of the virus. This work has indicated that trafficking of these proteins plays a significant role in determining the ability of the viruses to replicate and cause infection, and as such, represents a viable target for development of a new generation of vaccines and prophylactic therapeutics which are required to battle these pathogens of human and agricultural significance. PMID:22034934

  12. Characterization of Viral Communities of Biting Midges and Identification of Novel Thogotovirus Species and Rhabdovirus Genus

    PubMed Central

    Temmam, Sarah; Monteil-Bouchard, Sonia; Robert, Catherine; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    More than two thirds of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, and among them RNA viruses represent the majority. Ceratopogonidae (genus Culicoides) are well-known vectors of several viruses responsible for epizooties (bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, etc.). They are also vectors of the only known virus infecting humans: the Oropouche virus. Female midges usually feed on a variety of hosts, leading to possible transmission of emerging viruses from animals to humans. In this context, we report here the analysis of RNA viral communities of Senegalese biting midges using next-generation sequencing techniques as a preliminary step toward the identification of potential viral biohazards. Sequencing of the RNA virome of three pools of Culicoides revealed the presence of a significant diversity of viruses infecting plants, insects and mammals. Several novel viruses were detected, including a novel Thogotovirus species, related but genetically distant from previously described tick-borne thogotoviruses. Novel rhabdoviruses were also detected, possibly constituting a novel Rhabdoviridae genus, and putatively restricted to insects. Sequences related to the major viruses transmitted by Culicoides, i.e., African horse sickness, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses were also detected. This study highlights the interest in monitoring the emergence and circulation of zoonoses and epizooties using their arthropod vectors. PMID:26978389

  13. Immune response in mice and cattle after immunization with a Boophilus microplus DNA vaccine containing bm86 gene.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Lina María; Orduz, Sergio; López, Elkin D; Guzmán, Fanny; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Armengol, Gemma

    2007-03-15

    Plasmid pBMC2 encoding antigen Bm86 from a Colombian strain of cattle tick Boophilus microplus, was used for DNA-mediated immunization of BALB/c mice, employing doses of 10 and 50microg, delivered by intradermic and intramuscular routes. Anti-Bm86 antibody levels were significantly higher compared to control mice treated with PBS. In the evaluation of immunoglobulin isotypes, significant levels of IgG2a and IgG2b were observed in mice immunized with 50microg of pBMC2. Measurement of interleukine (IL) levels (IL-4, IL-5, IL-12(p40)) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the sera of mice immunized with pBMC2 indicated high levels of IL-4 and IL-5, although there were also significant levels of IFN-gamma. Mice immunized with pBMC2 showed antigen-specific stimulation of splenocytes according to the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine and IFN-gamma secretion. In all trials, mice injected intramuscularly with 50microg of pBMC2 presented the highest immune response. Moreover, cattle immunized with this DNA vaccine showed antibody production significantly different to the negative control. In conclusion, these results suggest the potential of DNA immunization with pBMC2 to induce humoral and cellular immune responses against B. microplus. PMID:17055651

  14. Immunogenicity and safety of xenogeneic vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 DNA vaccination in mice and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Denies, Sofie; Cicchelero, Laetitia; Polis, Ingeborgh; Sanders, Niek N.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is an attractive target in oncology due to its crucial role in angiogenesis. In this study a DNA vaccine coding for human VEGFR-2 was evaluated in healthy mice and dogs, administered by intradermal injection and electroporation. In mice, three doses and vaccination schedules were evaluated. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular IFN-gamma staining and a cytotoxicity assay and antibodies by ELISA. Safety was assessed by measuring regulatory T cells and myeloid derived suppressor cells and a wound healing assay. The vaccine was subsequently evaluated in dogs, which were vaccinated three times with 100μg. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular IFN-gamma staining and antibodies by a flow cytometric assay. In mice, maximal cellular responses were observed after two vaccinations with 5μg. Humoral responses continued to increase with higher dose and number of vaccinations. No abnormalities in the measured safety parameters were observed. The vaccine was also capable of eliciting a cellular and humoral immune response in dogs. No adverse effects were observed, but tolerability of the electroporation was poor. This study will facilitate the evaluation of the vaccine in tumor bearing animals, ranging from rodent models to dogs with spontaneous tumors. PMID:26871296

  15. DNA vaccination strategy targets epidermal dendritic cells, initiating their migration and induction of a host immune response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Trevor Rf; Schultheis, Katherine; Kiosses, William B; Amante, Dinah H; Mendoza, Janess M; Stone, John C; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    The immunocompetence and clinical accessibility of dermal tissue offers an appropriate and attractive target for vaccination. We previously demonstrated that pDNA injection into the skin in combination with surface electroporation (SEP), results in rapid and robust expression of the encoded antigen in the epidermis. Here, we demonstrate that intradermally EP-enhanced pDNA vaccination results in the rapid induction of a host humoral immune response. In the dermally relevant guinea pig model, we used high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy to observe direct dendritic cell (DC) transfections in the epidermis, to determine the migration kinetics of these cells from the epidermal layer into the dermis, and to follow them sequentially to the immediate draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, we delineate the relationship between the migration of directly transfected epidermal DCs and the generation of the host immune response. In summary, these data indicate that direct presentation of antigen to the immune system by DCs through SEP-based in vivo transfection in the epidermis, is related to the generation of a humoral immune response. PMID:26052522

  16. Codon-optimized filovirus DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular electroporation protect cynomolgus macaques from lethal Ebola and Marburg virus challenges

    PubMed Central

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Badger, Catherine V; Bounds, Callie E; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Kwilas, Steven A; Vu, Hong A; Warfield, Kelly L; Hooper, Jay W; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation with DNA plasmids expressing codon-optimized glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) or Marburg virus (MARV) or a combination of codon-optimized GP DNA vaccines for EBOV, MARV, Sudan virus and Ravn virus. When measured by ELISA, the individual vaccines elicited slightly higher IgG responses to EBOV or MARV than did the combination vaccines. No significant differences in immune responses of macaques given the individual or combination vaccines were measured by pseudovirion neutralization or IFN-γ ELISpot assays. Both the MARV and mixed vaccines were able to protect macaques from lethal MARV challenge (5/6 vs. 6/6). In contrast, a greater proportion of macaques vaccinated with the EBOV vaccine survived lethal EBOV challenge in comparison to those that received the mixed vaccine (5/6 vs. 1/6). EBOV challenge survivors had significantly higher pre-challenge neutralizing antibody titers than those that succumbed. PMID:25996997

  17. Clustered epitopes within a new poly-epitopic HIV-1 DNA vaccine shows immunogenicity in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Jafarpour, Nazli; Memarnejadian, Arash; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Kohram, Fatemeh; Aghababa, Haniyeh; Khoramabadi, Nima; Mahdavi, Mehdi

    2014-08-01

    Despite a huge number of studies towards vaccine development against human immunodeficiency virus-1, no effective vaccine has been approved yet. Thus, new vaccines should be provided with new formulations. Herein, a new DNA vaccine candidate encoding conserved and immunogenic epitopes from HIV-1 antigens of tat, pol, gag and env is designed and constructed. After bioinformatics analyses to find the best epitopes and their tandem, nucleotide sequence corresponding to the designed multiepitope was synthesized and cloned into pcDNA3.1+ vector. Expression of pcDNA3.1-tat/pol/gag/env plasmid was evaluated in HEK293T cells by RT-PCR and western-blotting. Seven groups of BALB/c mice were intramuscularly immunized three times either with 50, 100, 200 µg of plasmid in 2-week intervals or with similar doses of insert-free plasmid. Two weeks after the last injection, proliferation of T cells and secretion of IL4 and IFN-γ cytokines were evaluated using Brdu and ELISA methods, respectively. Results showed the proper expression of the plasmid in protein and mRNA levels. Moreover, the designed multiepitope plasmid was capable of induction of both proliferation responses as well as IFN-γ and IL-4 cytokine production in a considerable level compared to the control groups. Overall, our primary data warranted further detailed studies on the potency of this vaccine. PMID:24842263

  18. Protective efficiency of dendrosomes as novel nano-sized adjuvants for DNA vaccination against birch pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Balenga, Nariman Aghaei Bandbon; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Weiss, Richard; Sarbolouki, Mohammad Nabi; Thalhamer, Joseph; Rafati, Sima

    2006-07-25

    We evaluated the use of a novel gene porter (Den123--a nontoxic self-assembled dendritic spheroidal nanoparticle made of biodegradable monomers), aiming to enhance and improve the desired immune response in protection from allergy. Footpad DNA immunization in Balb/c mice was done three times using the Bet v 1a gene with or without Den123 with 2-week intervals followed by sensitization with rBetv1 (5 microg) in alum twice in a weekly interval. Different doses of pCMV-Betv1 were used (10 microg and 100 microg). The protective role of different formulations was evaluated by measuring the IgG1, IgG2a and IgE antibody production, cytokine release of isolated splenocytes and beta-hexosaminidase release from the RBL cells. Higher and increasing ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 were seen in mice which received plasmids in combination with Den123. Den123 and DNA vaccine synergistically enhanced the Interferon gamma released from splenocytes. In the presence of Den123, IgE inhibition was independent of the dose and type of the injected DNA. All DNA-pre-immunized mice demonstrated low basophil degranulation. It is therefore concluded that administration of the DNA entrapped in Den123 nanoparticles results in sustained release of plasmids, Th1/Th2 balanced immune response with promising IgE inhibition. Also higher amounts of DNA contributed to stronger Th1 response. PMID:16515817

  19. DNA vaccination strategy targets epidermal dendritic cells, initiating their migration and induction of a host immune response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Trevor RF; Schultheis, Katherine; Kiosses, William B; Amante, Dinah H; Mendoza, Janess M; Stone, John C; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    The immunocompetence and clinical accessibility of dermal tissue offers an appropriate and attractive target for vaccination. We previously demonstrated that pDNA injection into the skin in combination with surface electroporation (SEP), results in rapid and robust expression of the encoded antigen in the epidermis. Here, we demonstrate that intradermally EP-enhanced pDNA vaccination results in the rapid induction of a host humoral immune response. In the dermally relevant guinea pig model, we used high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy to observe direct dendritic cell (DC) transfections in the epidermis, to determine the migration kinetics of these cells from the epidermal layer into the dermis, and to follow them sequentially to the immediate draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, we delineate the relationship between the migration of directly transfected epidermal DCs and the generation of the host immune response. In summary, these data indicate that direct presentation of antigen to the immune system by DCs through SEP-based in vivo transfection in the epidermis, is related to the generation of a humoral immune response. PMID:26052522

  20. Immunogenicity and safety of xenogeneic vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 DNA vaccination in mice and dogs.

    PubMed

    Denies, Sofie; Cicchelero, Laetitia; Polis, Ingeborgh; Sanders, Niek N

    2016-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is an attractive target in oncology due to its crucial role in angiogenesis. In this study a DNA vaccine coding for human VEGFR-2 was evaluated in healthy mice and dogs, administered by intradermal injection and electroporation. In mice, three doses and vaccination schedules were evaluated. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular IFN-gamma staining and a cytotoxicity assay and antibodies by ELISA. Safety was assessed by measuring regulatory T cells and myeloid derived suppressor cells and a wound healing assay. The vaccine was subsequently evaluated in dogs, which were vaccinated three times with 100µg. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular IFN-gamma staining and antibodies by a flow cytometric assay. In mice, maximal cellular responses were observed after two vaccinations with 5µg. Humoral responses continued to increase with higher dose and number of vaccinations. No abnormalities in the measured safety parameters were observed. The vaccine was also capable of eliciting a cellular and humoral immune response in dogs. No adverse effects were observed, but tolerability of the electroporation was poor. This study will facilitate the evaluation of the vaccine in tumor bearing animals, ranging from rodent models to dogs with spontaneous tumors. PMID:26871296

  1. Immunization of Pigs with a Particle-Mediated DNA Vaccine to Influenza A Virus Protects against Challenge with Homologous Virus

    PubMed Central

    Macklin, Michael D.; McCabe, Dennis; McGregor, Martha W.; Neumann, Veronica; Meyer, Todd; Callan, Robert; Hinshaw, Virginia S.; Swain, William F.

    1998-01-01

    Particle-mediated delivery of a DNA expression vector encoding the hemagglutinin (HA) of an H1N1 influenza virus (A/Swine/Indiana/1726/88) to porcine epidermis elicits a humoral immune response and accelerates the clearance of virus in pigs following a homotypic challenge. Mucosal administration of the HA expression plasmid elicits an immune response that is qualitatively different than that elicited by the epidermal vaccination in terms of inhibition of the initial virus infection. In contrast, delivery of a plasmid encoding an influenza virus nucleoprotein from A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) to the epidermis elicits a strong humoral response but no detectable protection in terms of nasal virus shed. The efficacy of the HA DNA vaccine was compared with that of a commercially available inactivated whole-virus vaccine as well as with the level of immunity afforded by previous infection. The HA DNA and inactivated viral vaccines elicited similar protection in that initial infection was not prevented, but subsequent amplification of the infection is limited, resulting in early clearance of the virus. Convalescent animals which recovered from exposure to virulent swine influenza virus were completely resistant to infection when challenged. The porcine influenza A virus system is a relevant preclinical model for humans in terms of both disease and gene transfer to the epidermis and thus provides a basis for advancing the development of DNA-based vaccines. PMID:9445052

  2. Immunogenicity of Eight Dormancy Regulon-Encoded Proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in DNA-Vaccinated and Tuberculosis-Infected Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Roupie, Virginie; Romano, Marta; Zhang, Lei; Korf, Hannelie; Lin, May Young; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Klein, Michèl R.; Huygen, Kris

    2007-01-01

    Hypoxia and low concentrations of nitric oxide have been reported to upregulate in vitro gene expression of 48 proteins of the dormancy (DosR) regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These proteins are thought to be essential for the survival of bacteria during persistence in vivo and are targeted by the immune system during latent infection in humans. Here we have analyzed the immunogenicity of eight DosR regulon-encoded antigens by plasmid DNA vaccination of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, i.e., Rv1733c, Rv1738, Rv2029c (pfkB), Rv2031c/hspX (acr), Rv2032 (acg), Rv2626c, Rv2627c, and Rv2628. Strong humoral and/or cellular Th1-type (interleukin-2 and gamma interferon) immune responses could be induced against all but one (Rv1738) of these antigens. The strongest Th1 responses were measured following vaccination with DNA encoding Rv2031c and Rv2626c. Using synthetic 20-mer overlapping peptides, 11 immunodominant, predicted major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted epitopes and one Kd-restricted T-cell epitope could be identified. BALB/c and (B6D2)F1 mice persistently infected with M. tuberculosis developed immune responses against Rv1733c, Rv2031c, and Rv2626c. These findings have implications for proof-of-concept studies in mice mimicking tuberculosis (TB) latency models and their extrapolation to humans for potential new vaccination strategies against TB. PMID:17145953

  3. Analysis of anamnestic immune responses in adult horses and priming in neonates induced by a DNA vaccine expressing the vapA gene of Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A Marianela; Hines, Melissa T; Palmer, Guy H; Knowles, Donald P; Alperin, Debra C; Hines, Stephen A

    2003-09-01

    Rhodococcus equi remains one of the most important pathogens of early life in horses, yet conventional vaccines to prevent rhodococcal pneumonia have not been successful. DNA vaccination offers an alternative to conventional vaccines with specific advantages for immunization of neonates. We developed a DNA vaccine expressing the vapA gene (pVR1055vapA) that induced an anamnestic response characterized by virulence associated protein A (VapA)-specific IgG antibodies in sera and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as VapA-specific proliferation of pulmonary lymphocytes when tested in adult ponies. In contrast, none of the adults receiving the control plasmid responded. To determine if pVR1055vapA induced VapA-specific responses in the foal, the targeted age group for vaccination against R. equi, 10 naïve foals were randomly assigned at birth to two groups of five. At 8-15 days of age (day 1), foals were vaccinated by intranasal and intradermal (i.d.) routes with either pVR1055vapA or the negative control pVR1055vapA_rev. All foals were DNA boosted at day 14 and protein boosted at day 30 with either recombinant VapA or recombinant CAT (control group). Prior to the protein boost, neither group developed VapA-specific immune responses. However, at day 45, two of the VR1055vapA-vaccinated foals had increased titers of VapA-specific IgGb, IgM and IgGa in the sera, and IgG in the BALF. The induction of the opsonizing isotypes IgGa and IgGb has been previously shown to be associated with protection against R. equi. No VapA-specific immune responses were detected in the control group. This study indicates that the DNA vaccine effectively stimulates anamnestic systemic and pulmonary immune responses in adult horses. The results in foals suggest that the DNA vaccine also primed a subset of immunized neonates. These data support further development and modification to produce a DNA vaccine to more effectively prime neonatal foals. PMID:12922115

  4. Human Polyclonal Antibodies Produced through DNA Vaccination of Transchromosomal Cattle Provide Mice with Post-Exposure Protection against Lethal Zaire and Sudan Ebolaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bounds, Callie E.; Kwilas, Steven A.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Brannan, Jennifer M.; Bakken, Russell R.; Dye, John M.; Hooper, Jay W.; Dupuy, Lesley C.; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-an; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination of transchromosomal bovines (TcBs) with DNA vaccines expressing the codon-optimized (co) glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Sudan virus (SUDV) produce fully human polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) that recognize both viruses and demonstrate robust neutralizing activity. Each TcB was vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation (IM-EP) a total of four times and at each administration received 10 mg of the EBOV-GPco DNA vaccine and 10 mg of the SUDV-GPco DNA vaccine at two sites on the left and right sides, respectively. After two vaccinations, robust antibody responses (titers > 1000) were detected by ELISA against whole irradiated EBOV or SUDV and recombinant EBOV-GP or SUDV-GP (rGP) antigens, with higher titers observed for the rGP antigens. Strong, virus neutralizing antibody responses (titers >1000) were detected after three vaccinations when measured by vesicular stomatitis virus-based pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA). Maximal neutralizing antibody responses were identified by traditional plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) after four vaccinations. Neutralizing activity of human immunoglobulins (IgG) purified from TcB plasma collected after three vaccinations and injected intraperitoneally (IP) into mice at a 100 mg/kg dose was detected in the serum by PsVNA up to 14 days after administration. Passive transfer by IP injection of the purified IgG (100 mg/kg) to groups of BALB/c mice one day after IP challenge with mouse adapted (ma) EBOV resulted in 80% protection while all mice treated with non-specific pAbs succumbed. Similarly, interferon receptor 1 knockout (IFNAR -/-) mice receiving the purified IgG (100 mg/kg) by IP injection one day after IP challenge with wild type SUDV resulted in 89% survival. These results are the first to demonstrate that filovirus GP DNA vaccines administered to TcBs by IM-EP can elicit neutralizing antibodies that provide post-exposure protection. Additionally, these data describe

  5. Treatment with MOG-DNA vaccines induces CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and up-regulates genes with neuroprotective functions in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA vaccines represent promising therapeutic strategies in autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the precise mechanisms by which DNA vaccines induce immune regulation remain largely unknown. Here, we aimed to expand previous knowledge existing on the mechanisms of action of DNA vaccines in the animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), by treating EAE mice with a DNA vaccine encoding the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and exploring the therapeutic effects on the disease-induced inflammatory and neurodegenerative changes. Methods EAE was induced in C57BL6/J mice by immunization with MOG35-55 peptide. Mice were intramuscularly treated with a MOG-DNA vaccine or vehicle in prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. Histological studies were performed in central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Cytokine production and regulatory T cell (Treg) quantification were achieved by flow cytometry. Gene expression patterns were determined using microarrays, and the main findings were validated by real-time PCR. Results MOG-DNA treatment reduced the clinical and histopathological signs of EAE when administered in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Suppression of clinical EAE was associated with dampening of antigen (Ag)-specific proinflammatory Th1 and Th17 immune responses and, interestingly, expansion of Treg in the periphery and upregulation in the CNS of genes encoding neurotrophic factors and proteins involved in remyelination. Conclusions These results suggest for the first time that the beneficial effects of DNA vaccines in EAE are not limited to anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and DNA vaccines may also exert positive effects through hitherto unknown neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:22727044

  6. Genotyping of the fish rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus, by restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Winton, James R.; Lorenzen, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a standardized molecular assay that used limited resources and equipment for routine genotyping of isolates of the fish rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Computer generated restriction maps, based on 62 unique full-length (1524 nt) sequences of the VHSV glycoprotein (G) gene, were used to predict restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns that were subsequently grouped and compared with a phylogenetic analysis of the G-gene sequences of the same set of isolates. Digestion of PCR amplicons from the full-lengthG-gene by a set of three restriction enzymes was predicted to accurately enable the assignment of the VHSV isolates into the four major genotypes discovered to date. Further sub-typing of the isolates into the recently described sub-lineages of genotype I was possible by applying three additional enzymes. Experimental evaluation of the method consisted of three steps: (i) RT-PCR amplification of the G-gene of VHSV isolates using purified viral RNA as template, (ii) digestion of the PCR products with a panel of restriction endonucleases and (iii) interpretation of the resulting RFLP profiles. The RFLP analysis was shown to approximate the level of genetic discrimination obtained by other, more labour-intensive, molecular techniques such as the ribonuclease protection assay or sequence analysis. In addition, 37 previously uncharacterised isolates from diverse sources were assigned to specific genotypes. While the assay was able to distinguish between marine and continental isolates of VHSV, the differences did not correlate with the pathogenicity of the isolates.

  7. Increasing virulence, but not infectivity, associated with serially emergent virus strains of a fish rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breyta, Rachel; McKenney, Douglas; Tesfaye, Tarin; Ono, Kotaro; Kurath, Gael

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance and genetic typing of field isolates of a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), has identified four dominant viral genotypes that were involved in serial viral emergence and displacement events in steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in western North America. To investigate drivers of these landscape-scale events, IHNV isolates designated 007, 111, 110, and 139, representing the four relevant genotypes, were compared for virulence and infectivity in controlled laboratory challenge studies in five relevant steelhead trout populations. Viral virulence was assessed as mortality using lethal dose estimates (LD50), survival kinetics, and proportional hazards analysis. A pattern of increasing virulence for isolates 007, 111, and 110 was consistent in all five host populations tested, and correlated with serial emergence and displacements in the virus-endemic lower Columbia River source region during 1980–2013. The fourth isolate, 139, did not have higher virulence than the previous isolate 110. However, the mG139M genotype displayed a conditional displacement phenotype in that it displaced type mG110M in coastal Washington, but not in the lower Columbia River region, indicating that factors other than evolution of higher viral virulence were involved in some displacement events. Viral infectivity, measured as infectious dose (ID50), did not correlate consistently with virulence or with viral emergence, and showed a narrow range of variation relative to the variation observed in virulence. Comparison among the five steelhead trout populations confirmed variation in resistance to IHNV, but correlations with previous history of virus exposure or with sites of viral emergence varied between IHNV source and sink regions. Overall, this study indicated increasing viral virulence over time as a potential driver for emergence and displacement events in the endemic Lower Columbia River source region where these IHNV genotypes originated

  8. Characterization of Snakehead Rhabdovirus Infection in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)†

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Peter E.; Pressley, Meagan E.; Witten, P. Eckhard; Mellon, Mark T.; Blake, Sharon; Kim, Carol H.

    2005-01-01

    The zebrafish, Danio rerio, has become recognized as a valuable model for the study of development, genetics, and toxicology. Recently, the zebrafish has been recognized as a useful model for infectious disease and immunity. In this study, the pathogenesis and antiviral immune response of zebrafish to experimental snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV) infection was characterized. Zebrafish 24 h postfertilization to 30 days postfertilization were susceptible to infection by immersion in 106 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of SHRV/ml, and adult zebrafish were susceptible to infection by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 105 TCID50 of SHRV/ml. Mortalities exceeded 40% in infected fish, and clinical presentation of infection included petechial hemorrhaging, redness of the abdomen, and erratic swim behavior. Virus reisolation and reverse transcription-PCR analysis of the viral nucleocapsid gene confirmed the presence of SHRV. Histological sections of moribund embryonic and juvenile fish revealed necrosis of the pharyngeal epithelium and liver, in addition to congestion of the swim bladder by cell debris. Histopathology in adult fish injected i.p. was confined to the site of injection. The antiviral response in zebrafish was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of zebrafish interferon (IFN) and Mx expression. IFN and Mx levels were elevated in zebrafish exposed to SHRV, although expression and intensity differed with age and route of infection. This study is the first to examine the pathogenesis of SHRV infection in zebrafish. Furthermore, this study is the first to describe experimental infection of zebrafish embryos with a viral pathogen, which will be important for future experiments involving targeted gene disruption and forward genetic screens. PMID:15650208

  9. Rhabdoviruses in Two Species of Drosophila: Vertical Transmission and a Recent Sweep

    PubMed Central

    Longdon, Ben; Wilfert, Lena; Obbard, Darren J.; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2011-01-01

    Insects are host to a diverse range of vertically transmitted micro-organisms, but while their bacterial symbionts are well-studied, little is known about their vertically transmitted viruses. We have found that two sigma viruses (Rhabdoviridae) recently discovered in Drosophila affinis and Drosophila obscura are both vertically transmitted. As is the case for the sigma virus of Drosophila melanogaster, we find that both males and females can transmit these viruses to their offspring. Males transmit lower viral titers through sperm than females transmit through eggs, and a lower proportion of their offspring become infected. In natural populations of D. obscura in the United Kingdom, we found that 39% of flies were infected and that the viral population shows clear evidence of a recent expansion, with extremely low genetic diversity and a large excess of rare polymorphisms. Using sequence data we estimate that the virus has swept across the United Kingdom within the past ∼11 years, during which time the viral population size doubled approximately every 9 months. Using simulations based on our lab estimates of transmission rates, we show that the biparental mode of transmission allows the virus to invade and rapidly spread through populations at rates consistent with those measured in the field. Therefore, as predicted by our simulations, the virus has undergone an extremely rapid and recent increase in population size. In light of this and earlier studies of a related virus in D. melanogaster, we conclude that vertically transmitted rhabdoviruses may be common in insects and that these host–parasite interactions can be highly dynamic. PMID:21339477

  10. HIV-1 p24(gag) derived conserved element DNA vaccine increases the breadth of immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Rosati, Margherita; Valentin, Antonio; Ganneru, Brunda; Singh, Ashish K; Yan, Jian; Rolland, Morgane; Alicea, Candido; Beach, Rachel Kelly; Zhang, Gen-Mu; Le Gall, Sylvie; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Heckerman, David; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; Weiner, David B; Mullins, James I; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2013-01-01

    Viral diversity is considered a major impediment to the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Despite this diversity, certain protein segments are nearly invariant across the known HIV-1 Group M sequences. We developed immunogens based on the highly conserved elements from the p24(gag) region according to two principles: the immunogen must (i) include strictly conserved elements of the virus that cannot mutate readily, and (ii) exclude both HIV regions capable of mutating without limiting virus viability, and also immunodominant epitopes located in variable regions. We engineered two HIV-1 p24(gag) DNA immunogens that express 7 highly Conserved Elements (CE) of 12-24 amino acids in length and differ by only 1 amino acid in each CE ('toggle site'), together covering >99% of the HIV-1 Group M sequences. Altering intracellular trafficking of the immunogens changed protein localization, stability, and also the nature of elicited immune responses. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with p55(gag) DNA induced poor, CD4(+) mediated cellular responses, to only 2 of the 7 CE; in contrast, vaccination with p24CE DNA induced cross-clade reactive, robust T cell responses to 4 of the 7 CE. The responses were multifunctional and composed of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells with mature cytotoxic phenotype. These findings provide a method to increase immune response to universally conserved Gag epitopes, using the p24CE immunogen. p24CE DNA vaccination induced humoral immune responses similar in magnitude to those induced by p55(gag), which recognize the virus encoded p24(gag) protein. The inclusion of DNA immunogens composed of conserved elements is a promising vaccine strategy to induce broader immunity by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to additional regions of Gag compared to vaccination with p55(gag) DNA, achieving maximal cross-clade reactive cellular and humoral responses. PMID:23555935

  11. Novel synthetic plasmid and Doggybone™ DNA vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies and provide protection from lethal influenza challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Patel, Ami; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hensley, Scott E; Ragwan, Edwin; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Rothwell, Paul J; Extance, Jonathan P; Caproni, Lisa J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based vaccines (NAVs) are a promising alternative to conventional influenza vaccines with the potential to increase influenza vaccine availability due to their simplicity in design and rapid speed of production. NAVs can also target multiple influenza antigens and control flu variants. Traditionally NAVs have been DNA plasmids however, we are continuing to explore new methods that may enhance vaccine efficacy. Recently new focus has been on RNA cassettes as NAVs. RNA vaccines combine conceptual advantages in that they focus on delivery of only the coding cassette. However, RNA vaccines have a short half-life and cause interferon-induced fevers. Here we describe a new NAV approach where we study delivery of a linear DNA cassette [Doggybone™ linear closed DNA [(dbDNA™)] produced by an enzymatic process that yields an antigen expression cassette comprising a promoter, DNA antigen, poly A tail, and telomeric ends. This focused approach has many of the advantages of plasmid DNA as well as a minimal cassette size similar to RNA strategies. For this study, we characterized the specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and determined the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers induced by dbDNA™ and compared the responses with those of an optimized plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine encoding the same H1N1 influenza A/PR/8/34 HA gene. Immunizations with the constructs resulted in similar humoral and cellular immune responses. Both constructs induced high-titer HI antibodies and fully protected animals from lethal viral challenge. The data obtained from this study provides important validation for further development of novel vector approaches. PMID:26091432

  12. The Adjuvant Effects of High-Molecule-Weight Polysaccharides Purified from Antrodia cinnamomea on Dendritic Cell Function and DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Chen; Pan, I-Hong; Li, Yi-Rong; Pan, Yi-Gen; Lin, Ming-Kuem; Lu, Yi-Huang; Wu, Hsin-Chieh; Chu, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The biological activity of the edible basidiomycete Antrodia cinnamomea (AC) has been studied extensively. Many effects, such as anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activities, have been reported from either crude extracts or compounds isolated from AC. However, research addressing the function of AC in enhancing immunity is rare. The aim of the present study is to investigate the active components and the mechanism involved in the immunostimulatory effect of AC. We found that polysaccharides (PS) in the water extract of AC played a major role in dendritic cell (DC) activation, which is a critical leukocyte in initiating immune responses. We further size purified and identified that the high-molecular weight PS fraction (greater than 100 kDa) exhibited the activating effect. The AC high-molecular weight PSs (AC hmwPSs) promoted pro-inflammatory cytokine production by DCs and the maturation of DCs. In addition, DC-induced antigen-specific T cell activation and Th1 differentiation were increased by AC hmwPSs. In studying the molecular mechanism, we confirmed the activation of the MAPK and NF-κB pathways in DCs after AC hmwPSs treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TLR2 and TLR4 are required for the stimulatory activity of AC hmwPSs on DCs. In a mouse tumor model, we demonstrated that AC hmwPSs enhanced the anti-tumor efficacy of the HER-2/neu DNA vaccine by facilitating specific Th1 responses. Thus, we conclude that hmwPSs are the major components of AC that stimulate DCs via the TLR2/TLR4 and NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathways. The AC hmwPSs have potential to be applied as adjuvants. PMID:25723174

  13. IFN-adjuvanted DNA vaccine against infectious salmon anemia virus: Antibody kinetics and longevity of IFN expression.

    PubMed

    Robertsen, Børre; Chang, Chia-Jung; Bratland, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Plasmids expressing interferon (IFN) have recently been shown to function as adjuvants in Atlantic salmon when co-injected with a DNA vaccine encoding hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) from infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). In this work we have compared the antibody kinetics and the systemic Mx/ISG15 response of fish vaccinated with HE-plasmid using either IFNa plasmid (pIFNa) or pIFNc as adjuvants over a longer time period, i.e. 22 weeks post vaccination (pv). The results showed that the antibody response against ISAV with pIFNa as adjuvant arose earlier (7 weeks pv) than with pIFNc as adjuvant (10 weeks pv), peaked at week 10 and declined at week 22. The antibody response with pIFNc as adjuvant peaked at 16 weeks and kept at this level 22 weeks pv. Fish injected with pIFNc alone expressed high levels of Mx and ISG15 in liver throughout the 22 week period. In contrast, fish injected with pIFNc together with HE-plasmid expressed high levels of Mx and ISG15 in liver for the first 10 weeks, but at week 16 this response was absent in two of three fish at week 16 and was absent in all tested fish at week 22 pv. This suggests that cells expressing HE and IFNc are intact at week 10 pv, but are eliminated by adaptive immune responses after week 10 due to recognition of HE. The longevity of the Mx/ISG15 response in pIFNc treated fish is likely due to the fact that IFNc is a self-antigen of salmon and is not attacked by the adaptive immune system. PMID:27108379

  14. Interleukin-18-mediated enhancement of the protective effect of an infectious laryngotracheitis virus glycoprotein B plasmid DNA vaccine in chickens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Ying; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Li, Xin-Sheng; Cui, Bao-An; Wang, Shu-Juan; Geng, Jing-Wei; Li, Kun

    2011-01-01

    The immunogenicity of an infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) glycoprotein B (gB) plasmid DNA vaccine and the immunoregulatory activity of chicken interleukin-18 (IL-18) were investigated in a challenge model. Two recombinant plasmids, pcDNA3.1/gB (pgB) and pcDNA3.1/IL-18 (pIL-18), containing gB and IL-18 were constructed. Chickens were intramuscularly administered two immunizations 2 weeks apart, and challenged with the virulent CG strain of ILTV 2 weeks later. All animals vaccinated with pgB alone or with a combination of pgB plus pIL-18 developed a specific anti-ILTV ELISA antibody and splenocyte proliferation response. The ratios of CD4(+) to CD8(+) T lymphocytes in chickens immunized with pgB plus pIL-18 were significantly higher than in those immunized with pgB alone. Co-injection of pIL-18 significantly increased the production of gamma interferon and IL-2, indicating that IL-18 enhances the T helper 1-dominant immune response. Challenge experiments showed that the morbidity rate in the pgB group (25  %) was significantly higher than that in the pgB plus pIL-18 group (10  %). The mortality rates in the pgB and pgB plus pIL-18 groups were 10 and 0 %, respectively, and the corresponding protection rates were 60 and 80  %. These results indicate that IL-18 may be an effective adjuvant for an ILTV vaccine. PMID:20829398

  15. CpG adjuvant enhances the mucosal immunogenicity and efficacy of a Treponema pallidum DNA vaccine in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feijun; Liu, Shuangquan; Zhang, Xiaohong; Yu, Jian; Zeng, Tiebing; Gu, Weiming; Cao, Xunyu; Chen, Xi; Wu, Yimou

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The protective response against Treponema pallidum (Tp) infection of a DNA vaccine enhanced by an adjuvant CpG ODN was investigated. Results: The mucosal adjuvant CpG ODN enhanced the production of higher levels of anti-TpGpd antibodies induced by pcD/Gpd-IL-2 in rabbits. It also resulted in higher levels of secretion of IL-2 and IFN-γ, and facilitated T cell proliferation and differentiation (p < 0.05). No significant difference about testing index above-mentioned was found in the intranasal immunization group of pcD/Gpd-IL-2 vaccine adjuvanted by CpG ODN when compared with the immunization by pcD/Gpd-IL-2 vaccine intramuscular injection alone (p > 0.05). Furthermore, CpG ODN stimulated the production of mucosa-specific anti-sIgA antibodies and resulted in the lowest Tp-positive rate (6.7%) for Tp-infection of skin lesions and the lowest rates (8.3%) of ulceration lesions, thus achieving better protective effects. Methods: New Zealand rabbits were immunized with the eukaryotic vector encoding recombinant pcD/Gpd-IL-2 using intramuscular multi-injection or together with mucosal enhancement via a nasal route. The effect of the mucosal adjuvant CpG ODN was examined. Conclusions:The CpG ODN adjuvant significantly enhances the humoral and cellular immune effects of the immunization by pcD/Gpd-IL-2 with mucosal enhancement via nasal route. It also stimulates strong mucosal immune effects, thus initiating more efficient immune-protective effects. PMID:23563515

  16. Isolation and characterization of a rhabdovirus from starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) collected from the northern portion of Puget Sound, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mork, Christina; Hershberger, Paul K.; Kocan, Richard; Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    The initial characterization of a rhabdovirus isolated from a single, asymptomatic starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) collected during a viral survey of marine fishes from the northern portion of Puget Sound, Washington, USA, is reported. Virions were bullet-shaped and approximately 100 nm long and 50 nm wide, contained a lipid envelope, remained stable for at least 14 days at temperatures ranging from -80 to 5 degrees C and grew optimally at 15 degrees C in cultures of epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells. The cytopathic effect on EPC cell monolayers was characterized by raised foci containing rounded masses of cells. Pyknotic and dark-staining nuclei that also showed signs of karyorrhexis were observed following haematoxylin and eosin, May-Grunwald Giemsa and acridine orange staining. PAGE of the structural proteins and PCR assays using primers specific for other known fish rhabdoviruses, including Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, Spring viremia of carp virus, and Hirame rhabdovirus, indicated that the new virus, tentatively termed starry flounder rhabdovirus (SFRV), was previously undescribed in marine fishes from this region. In addition, sequence analysis of 2678 nt of the amino portion of the viral polymerase gene indicated that SFRV was genetically distinct from other members of the family Rhabdoviridae for which sequence data are available. Detection of this virus during a limited viral survey of wild fishes emphasizes the void of knowledge regarding the diversity of viruses that naturally infect marine fish species in the North Pacific Ocean.

  17. Complete genome sequence and integrated protein localization and interaction map for alfalfa dwarf virus, which combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Bejerman, Nicolás; Giolitti, Fabián; Breuil, Soledad de; Trucco, Verónica; Nome, Claudia; Lenardon, Sergio; Dietzgen, Ralf G.

    2015-09-15

    Summary: We have determined the full-length 14,491-nucleotide genome sequence of a new plant rhabdovirus, alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV). Seven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the antigenomic orientation of the negative-sense, single-stranded viral RNA, in the order 3′-N-P-P3-M-G-P6-L-5′. The ORFs are separated by conserved intergenic regions and the genome coding region is flanked by complementary 3′ leader and 5′ trailer sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleoprotein amino acid sequence indicated that this alfalfa-infecting rhabdovirus is related to viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus. When transiently expressed as GFP fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, most ADV proteins accumulated in the cell periphery, but unexpectedly P protein was localized exclusively in the nucleus. ADV P protein was shown to have a homotypic, and heterotypic nuclear interactions with N, P3 and M proteins by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. ADV appears unique in that it combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses. - Highlights: • The complete genome of alfalfa dwarf virus is obtained. • An integrated localization and interaction map for ADV is determined. • ADV has a genome sequence similarity and evolutionary links with cytorhabdoviruses. • ADV protein localization and interaction data show an association with the nucleus. • ADV combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses.

  18. Characterization of Intramolecular Disulfide Bonds and Secondary Modifications of the Glycoprotein from Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus, a Fish Rhabdovirus

    PubMed Central

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Krogh, Thomas N.; Roepstorff, Peter; Lorenzen, Niels

    1998-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infections cause high losses in cultured rainbow trout in Europe. Attempts to produce a recombinant vaccine based on the transmembrane glycoprotein (G protein) have indicated that proper folding is important for the antigenicity and immunogenicity of the protein. The present study was initiated to identify the disulfide bonds and other structural aspects relevant to vaccine design. The N-terminal amino acid residue was identified as being a pyroglutamic acid, corresponding to Gln21 of the primary transcript. Peptides from endoproteinase-degraded G protein were analyzed by mass spectrometry before and after chemical reduction, and six disulfide bonds were identified: Cys29-Cys339, Cys44-Cys295, Cys90-Cys132, Cys172-Cys177, Cys195-Cys265, and Cys231-Cys236. Mass spectrometric analysis in combination with glycosidases allowed characterization of the glycan structure of the G protein. Three of four predicted N-linked oligosaccharides were found to be predominantly biantennary complex-type structures. Furthermore, an O-linked glycan near the N terminus was identified. Alignment of the VHSV G protein with five other rhabdovirus G proteins indicates that eight cysteine residues are situated at conserved positions. This finding suggests that there might be some common disulfide bonding pattern among the six rhabdoviruses. PMID:9811760

  19. Thermal inactivation of rabies and other rhabdoviruses: stabilization by the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid at physiological temperatures.

    PubMed

    Michalski, F; Parks, N F; Sokol, F; Clark, H F

    1976-07-01

    Thermal inactivation of rabies and several other rhabdoviruses was studied using virus suspended in several different diluents. Rabies serogroup viruses were more stable than Kern Canyon or vesicular stomatitis viruses. Limited studies of two fish rhabdoviruses requiring low temperatures (less than 33 C) for replication indicated that they were not markedly more thermolabile than rabies virus. Bovine serum protein components in complex cell culture media stabilized virus at 56 C, but at temperatures of less than or equal to 37 C, sodium tris (hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane (NT) buffer containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (NTE) was a much more efficient stabilizer of virus infectivity. Chelating agents EDTA and ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)tetraacetic acid were equally efficient in protection of rabies virus infectivity; the effect of each was lost when excess Ca2+ was added. Bovine serum in NT or NTE buffers produced a thermostabilizing effect at 37 C not provided by the same serum concentration in complex cell culture media. Bovine serum was more efficient than EDTA in stabilizing virus infectivity during repeated cycles of freezing and thawing. PMID:181323

  20. Thermal inactivation of rabies and other rhabdoviruses: stabilization by the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid at physiological temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, F; Parks, N F; Sokol, F; Clark, H F

    1976-01-01

    Thermal inactivation of rabies and several other rhabdoviruses was studied using virus suspended in several different diluents. Rabies serogroup viruses were more stable than Kern Canyon or vesicular stomatitis viruses. Limited studies of two fish rhabdoviruses requiring low temperatures (less than 33 C) for replication indicated that they were not markedly more thermolabile than rabies virus. Bovine serum protein components in complex cell culture media stabilized virus at 56 C, but at temperatures of less than or equal to 37 C, sodium tris (hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane (NT) buffer containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (NTE) was a much more efficient stabilizer of virus infectivity. Chelating agents EDTA and ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)tetraacetic acid were equally efficient in protection of rabies virus infectivity; the effect of each was lost when excess Ca2+ was added. Bovine serum in NT or NTE buffers produced a thermostabilizing effect at 37 C not provided by the same serum concentration in complex cell culture media. Bovine serum was more efficient than EDTA in stabilizing virus infectivity during repeated cycles of freezing and thawing. PMID:181323

  1. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding the fusion protein of mycobacterium heat shock protein 65 (Hsp65) with human interleukin-2 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Mei; Bai, Yin-Lan; Shi, Chang-Hong; Gao, Hui; Xue, Ying; Jiang, Hong; Xu, Zhi-Kai

    2008-12-01

    Developing a new generation of vaccines is important for preventing tuberculosis (TB). DNA vaccine is one promising candidate. In this study we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the DNA vaccine encoding the fusion protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock protein 65 (Hsp65) with human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) in BALB/c mice. We showed that the DNA vaccine pcDNA-Hsp65-hIL-2 could induce high levels of antigen-specific antibody, IFN-gamma, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell production. When the immunized mice were infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv, the organ bacterial loads in the DNA immunized group were significantly reduced compared to those of the saline control group, but the ability to reduce bacteria was not better than for BCG. The histopathology in lungs of the DNA vaccine immunized mice was similar to that of BCG immunized mice, which was obviously ameliorated compared to that of the saline control group. Overall, the DNA vaccine could afford protection against M. tuberculosis infection, though the protection efficacy was not as great as that of conventional BCG. PMID:19133010

  2. Tumor endothelial marker 1–specific DNA vaccination targets tumor vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Facciponte, John G.; Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Li, Chunsheng; Wang, Liping; Nair, Gautham; Sehgal, Sandy; Raj, Arjun; Matthaiou, Efthymia; Coukos, George; Facciabene, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1; also known as endosialin or CD248) is a protein found on tumor vasculature and in tumor stroma. Here, we tested whether TEM1 has potential as a therapeutic target for cancer immunotherapy by immunizing immunocompetent mice with Tem1 cDNA fused to the minimal domain of the C fragment of tetanus toxoid (referred to herein as Tem1-TT vaccine). Tem1-TT vaccination elicited CD8+ and/or CD4+ T cell responses against immunodominant TEM1 protein sequences. Prophylactic immunization of animals with Tem1-TT prevented or delayed tumor formation in several murine tumor models. Therapeutic vaccination of tumor-bearing mice reduced tumor vascularity, increased infiltration of CD3+ T cells into the tumor, and controlled progression of established tumors. Tem1-TT vaccination also elicited CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses against murine tumor-specific antigens. Effective Tem1-TT vaccination did not affect angiogenesis-dependent physiological processes, including wound healing and reproduction. Based on these data and the widespread expression of TEM1 on the vasculature of different tumor types, we conclude that targeting TEM1 has therapeutic potential in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24642465

  3. Evolution of MS lesions to black holes under DNA vaccine treatment.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Athina; von Felten, Stefanie; Traud, Stefan; Rahman, Amena; Quan, Joanne; King, Robert; Garren, Hideki; Steinman, Lawrence; Cutter, Gary; Kappos, Ludwig; Radue, Ernst Wilhelm

    2012-07-01

    Persistent black holes (PBH) are associated with axonal loss and disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this work was to determine if BHT-3009, a DNA plasmid-encoding myelin basic protein (MBP), reduces the risk of new lesions becoming PBH, compared to placebo, and to test if pre-treatment serum anti-MBP antibody levels impact on the effect of BHT-3009 treatment. In this retrospective, blinded MRI study, we reviewed MRI scans of 155 MS patients from a double-blind, randomized, phase II trial with three treatment arms (placebo, 0.5 and 1.5 mg BHT-3009). New lesions at weeks 8 and 16 were tracked at week 48 and those appearing as T1-hypointense were classified as PBH. A subset of 46 patients with available pre-treatment serum anti-MBP IgM levels were analyzed separately. Overall, there was no impact of treatment on the risk for PBH. However, there was a significant interaction between anti-MBP antibodies and treatment effect: patients receiving 0.5 mg BHT-3009 showed a reduced risk of PBH with higher antibody levels compared to placebo (p < 0.01). Although we found no overall reduction of the risk for PBH in treated patients, there may be an effect of low-dose BHT-3009, depending on the patients' pre-treatment immune responses. PMID:22222856

  4. Cellular immunity survey against urinary tract infection using pVAX/fimH cassette with mammalian and wild type codon usage as a DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bagherpour, Ghasem; Khoramabadi, Nima; Fallah Mehrabadi, Jalil; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Halabian, Raheleh; Amin, Mohsen; Izadi Mobarakeh, Jalal; Einollahi, Behzad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose FimH (the adhesion fragment of type 1 fimbriae) is implicated in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) attachment to epithelial cells through interaction with mannose. Recently, some studies have found that UPEC can thrive intracellularly causing recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Almost all vaccines have been designed to induce antibodies against UPEC. Yet, the humoral immune response is not potent enough to overcome neither the primary UTI nor recurrent infections. However, DNA vaccines offer the possibility of inducing cell mediated immune responses and may be a promising preventive tool. Materials and Methods In this study, we employed two different open reading frames within mammalian (mam) and wild type (wt) codons of fimH gene. Optimized fragments were cloned in pVAX-1. Expression of the protein in COS-7 was confirmed by western blot analysis after assessing pVAX/fimH(mam) and pVAX/fimH(wt). The constructs were injected to BALB/c mice at plantar surface of feet followed by electroporation. Results The mice immunized with both constructs following booster injection with recombinant FimH showed increased interferon-γ and interleukin-12 responses significantly higher than non-immunized ones (p<0.05). The immunized mice were challenged with UPEC and then the number of bacteria recovered from the immunized mice was compared with the non-immunized ones. Decreased colony count in immunized mice along with cytokine responses confirmed the promising immune response by the DNA vaccines developed in this study. Conclusion In conclusion, DNA vaccines of UPEC proteins may confer some levels of protection which can be improved by multiple constructs or boosters. PMID:25003092

  5. Inclusion of the Bovine Neutrophil Beta-Defensin 3 with Glycoprotein D of Bovine Herpesvirus 1 in a DNA Vaccine Modulates Immune Responses of Mice and Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie-Dyck, Sarah; Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Snider, Marlene; Babiuk, Lorne A.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) causes recurrent respiratory and genital infections in cattle and predisposes them to lethal secondary infections. While modified live and killed BoHV-1 vaccines exist, these are not without problems. Development of an effective DNA vaccine for BoHV-1 has the potential to address these issues. As a strategy to enhance DNA vaccine immunity, a plasmid encoding the bovine neutrophil beta-defensin 3 (BNBD3) as a fusion with truncated glycoprotein D (tgD) and a mix of two plasmids encoding BNBD3 and tgD were tested in mice and cattle. In mice, coadministration of BNBD3 on the separate plasmid enhanced the tgD-induced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response but not the antibody response. BNBD3 fused to tgD did not affect the antibody levels or the number of IFN-γ-secreting cells but increased the induction of tgD-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). In cattle, the addition of BNBD3 as a fusion construct also modified the immune response. While the IgG and virus-neutralizing antibody levels were not affected, the number of IFN-γ-secreting cells was increased after BoHV-1 challenge, specifically the CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells, including CD8+ IFN-γ+ CD25+ CTLs. While reduced virus shedding, rectal temperature, and weight loss were observed, the level of protection was comparable to that observed in pMASIA-tgD-vaccinated animals. These data show that coadministration of BNBD3 with a protective antigen as a fusion in a DNA vaccine strengthened the Th1 bias and increased cell-mediated immune responses but did not enhance protection from BoHV-1 infection. PMID:24451331

  6. Chimeric vapA/groEL2 DNA vaccines enhance clearance of Rhodococcus equi in aerosol challenged C3H/He mice.

    PubMed

    Phumoonna, Tongted; Barton, Mary D; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Heuzenroeder, Michael W

    2008-05-12

    Rhodococcus equi remains a significant bacterial pathogen, causing severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals aged 1-3 months. There is no effective vaccine currently available for the prevention of R. equi pneumonia. DNA vaccines are known to offer specific advantages over conventional vaccines. The aim of this study was to demonstrate efficacy of our recombinant DNA vaccine candidates, namely pcDNA3-Re1, pcDNA3-Re3 and pcDNA3-Re5 by combining a heat shock protein GroEL2 to a virulence-associated protein A (VapA) from R. equi to protect C3H/He mice against the R. equi infection. VapA was shown to be strongly recognised by sera from pneumonic foals. All vaccines elicited at least a doubling of the IgG2a/IgG1 ratio in comparison to the controls, indicating a bias to the Th1 response, which is postulated to be crucial for bacterial clearance and protective immunity against intracellular pathogens including R. equi. In addition, the immunised mice showed a significant reduction in R. equi in their lungs at 7 days after the aerosol challenge in comparison to PBS treated mice. However, examination of lung pathology 14 days after the challenge showed no gross differences in pathological changes between the unvaccinated and vaccinated animals. The lack of significant pathological changes suggests that the precise level of protection against R. equi pneumonia in the murine model of infection may not represent a true effectiveness of the potential vaccine candidates, indicating the mouse may not be the ideal non-equine model for vaccine studies and (or) the incomplete immunogenic antigen of vapA-based DNA vaccine constructs that mount an inadequate cell-mediated immune response against the R. equi infection. PMID:18423949

  7. Safety and Comparative Immunogenicity of an HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Combination with Plasmid Interleukin 12 and Impact of Intramuscular Electroporation for Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kalams, Spyros A.; Parker, Scott D.; Elizaga, Marnie; Metch, Barbara; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Hural, John; De Rosa, Stephen; Carter, Donald K.; Rybczyk, Kyle; Frank, Ian; Fuchs, Jonathan; Koblin, Beryl; Kim, Denny H.; Joseph, Patrice; Keefer, Michael C.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Eldridge, John; Boyer, Jean; Sherwat, Adam; Cardinali, Massimo; Allen, Mary; Pensiero, Michael; Butler, Chris; Khan, Amir S.; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kublin, James G.; Weiner, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Background. DNA vaccines have been very poorly immunogenic in humans but have been an effective priming modality in prime-boost regimens. Methods to increase the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are needed. Methods. HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) studies 070 and 080 were multicenter, randomized, clinical trials. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PENNVAX®-B DNA vaccine (PV) is a mixture of 3 expression plasmids encoding HIV-1 Clade B Env, Gag, and Pol. The interleukin 12 (IL-12) DNA plasmid expresses human IL-12 proteins p35 and p40. Study subjects were healthy HIV-1–uninfected adults 18–50 years old. Four intramuscular vaccinations were given in HVTN 070, and 3 intramuscular vaccinations were followed by electroporation in HVTN 080. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular cytokine staining after stimulation with HIV-1 peptide pools. Results. Vaccination was safe and well tolerated. Administration of PV plus IL-12 with electroporation had a significant dose-sparing effect and provided immunogenicity superior to that observed in the trial without electroporation, despite fewer vaccinations. A total of 71.4% of individuals vaccinated with PV plus IL-12 plasmid with electroporation developed either a CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell response after the second vaccination, and 88.9% developed a CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell response after the third vaccination. Conclusions. Use of electroporation after PV administration provided superior immunogenicity than delivery without electroporation. This study illustrates the power of combined DNA approaches to generate impressive immune responses in humans. PMID:23840043

  8. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Priming plus Papillomavirus E6 DNA Vaccination: Effects on Papilloma Formation and Regression in the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus-Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Leachman, Sancy A.; Tigelaar, Robert E.; Shlyankevich, Mark; Slade, Martin D.; Irwin, Michele; Chang, Ed; Wu, T. C.; Xiao, Wei; Pazhani, Sundaram; Zelterman, Daniel; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2000-01-01

    A cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) E6 DNA vaccine that induces significant protection against CRPV challenge was used in a superior vaccination regimen in which the cutaneous sites of vaccination were primed with an expression vector encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a cytokine that induces differentiation and local recruitment of professional antigen-presenting cells. This treatment induced a massive influx of major histocompatibility complex class II-positive cells. In a vaccination-challenge experiment, rabbit groups were treated by E6 DNA vaccination, GM-CSF DNA inoculation, or a combination of both treatments. After two immunizations, rabbits were challenged with CRPV at low, moderate, and high stringencies and monitored for papilloma formation. As expected, all clinical outcomes were monotonically related to the stringency of the viral challenge. The results demonstrate that GM-CSF priming greatly augmented the effects of CRPV E6 vaccination. First, challenge sites in control rabbits (at the moderate challenge stringency) had a 0% probability of remaining disease free, versus a 50% probability in E6-vaccinated rabbits, and whereas GM-CSF alone had no effect, the interaction between GM-CSF priming and E6 vaccination increased disease-free survival to 67%. Second, the incubation period before papilloma onset was lengthened by E6 DNA vaccination alone or to some extent by GM-CSF DNA inoculation alone, and the combination of treatments induced additive effects. Third, the rate of papilloma growth was reduced by E6 vaccination and, to a lesser extent, by GM-CSF treatment. In addition, the interaction between the E6 and GM-CSF treatments was synergistic and yielded more than a 99% reduction in papilloma volume. Finally, regression occurred among the papillomas that formed in rabbits treated with the E6 vaccine and/or with GM-CSF, with the highest regression frequency occurring in rabbits that received the combination

  9. Protective immunity with an E1 multivalent epitope DNA vaccine against cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) infection in an HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy; Peng, Xuwen; Balogh, Karla; Christensen, Neil D

    2008-02-01

    Cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)/rabbit model is widely used to study pathogenesis of papillomavirus infections and malignant tumor progression. Recently, we established HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit lines and demonstrated efficacy for the testing of immunogenicity of a well-known A2-resticted epitope (HPV16E7/82-90) [Hu J, Peng X, Schell TD, Budgeon LR, Cladel NM, Christensen ND. An HLA-A2.1-transgenic rabbit model to study immunity to papillomavirus infection. J Immunol 2006;177(11):8037-45]. In the present study, we screened five HLA-A2.1 restricted epitopes from CRPVE1 (selected using online MHCI epitope prediction software) and constructed a multivalent epitope DNA vaccine (CRPVE1ep1-5). CRPVE1ep1-5 and a control DNA vaccine (Ub3) were then delivered intracutaneously onto normal and HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits, respectively, by a helium-driven gene-gun delivery system. One, two or three immunizations were given to different groups of animals from both New Zealand White outbred and EIII/JC inbred genetic background. Two and three immunizations with CRPVE1ep1-5 DNA vaccine provided complete protection against viral DNA infection of HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits from both genetic backgrounds but not in the control-vaccinated groups. One immunization, however, failed to protect HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits against viral DNA infection. This study further demonstrated that the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits can be used to test the immunogenicity of HLA-A2.1 restricted epitopes identified by MHCI epitope predication software. PMID:18187239

  10. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M. . E-mail: tmr15@pitt.edu

    2004-10-25

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d{sub 3}) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}. In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d{sub 3} or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}-DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d.

  11. Preparation, characterization, and in ovo vaccination of dextran-spermine nanoparticle DNA vaccine coexpressing the fusion and hemagglutinin genes against Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Seyed Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Webster, Thomas J; Ideris, Aini

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines have emerged as effective subunit vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. In this study, a DNA vaccine, namely plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F, was applied in ovo against Newcastle disease (ND). Vaccination was carried out using the DNA vaccine alone or as a mixture of the pDNA and dextran-spermine (D-SPM), a nanoparticle used for pDNA delivery. The results showed that in ovo vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone induced high levels of antibody titer (P<0.05) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens at 3 and 4 weeks postvaccination compared to 2 weeks postvaccination. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer was not significantly different between groups injected with 40 μg pDNA + 64 μg D-SPM and 40 μg pDNA at 4 weeks postvaccination (P>0.05). Higher antibody titer was observed in the group immunized with 40 μg pDNA/egg at 4 weeks postvaccination. The findings also showed that vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone was able to confer protection against Newcastle disease virus strain NDIBS002 in two out of seven SPF chickens. Although the chickens produced antibody titers 3 weeks after in ovo vaccination, it was not sufficient to provide complete protection to the chickens from lethal viral challenge. In addition, vaccination with pDNA/D-SPM complex did not induce high antibody titer when compared with naked pDNA. Therefore, it was concluded that DNA vaccination with plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F can be suitable for in ovo application against ND, whereas D-SPM is not recommended for in ovo gene delivery. PMID:26834470

  12. Induction of human immunodeficiency virus type-1-specific immunity with a novel gene transport unit (GTU)-MultiHIV DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, Vesna; Männik, Andres; Malm, Maria; Sikut, Rein; Valtavaara, Minna; Toots, Urve; Ustav, Mart; Krohn, Kai

    2006-07-01

    A multiHIV fusion gene expressing an antigenic fusion protein composed of regulatory HIV-1 proteins Rev, Nef, and Tat, as well as Gag p17/p24 and a stretch of 11 cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope clusters from Pol and Env, was cloned into a novel DNA vector named the Gene Transport Unit (GTU). A mouse H-2(d)-restricted HIV-1 gp120 epitope (RGPGRAFVTI) was cloned into the fusion gene as well. In addition to the HIV- 1 genes the GTU codes for a nuclear anchoring protein (bovine papilloma virus E2), ensuring the long maintenance of the vector and a high expression level of the selected immunogens. BALB/c mice were immunized with the GTU-MultiHIV DNA construct by different routes and regimens of immunization to assess the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine in vivo. Mice developed strong CD8(+) CTL responses to HIV-1 Env and Gag measured by an ELISPOT-IFN-gamma assay and chromium release assay. In addition, T cell responses to regulatory proteins Rev, Nef, and Tat were induced. Antibody responses were detected to each of the HIV antigens encoded by the DNA construct. Minimal doses of the GTU-MultiHIV DNA delivered by gene gun were potent in inducing significant HIV-specific CTL responses. The equivalent doses of the conventional plasmid expressing MultiHIV DNA delivered by gene gun failed to do so. An ideal DNA vaccine should yield high expression of the viral antigens for a prolonged period of time, and expression of the multiple viral antigens is probably required for the induction of a broad and protective immune response. The GTU-MultiHIV DNA vaccine described is a good vaccine candidate that meets the above criteria. PMID:16831091

  13. Preparation, characterization, and in ovo vaccination of dextran-spermine nanoparticle DNA vaccine coexpressing the fusion and hemagglutinin genes against Newcastle disease

    PubMed Central

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Seyed Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Webster, Thomas J; Ideris, Aini

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines have emerged as effective subunit vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. In this study, a DNA vaccine, namely plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F, was applied in ovo against Newcastle disease (ND). Vaccination was carried out using the DNA vaccine alone or as a mixture of the pDNA and dextran-spermine (D-SPM), a nanoparticle used for pDNA delivery. The results showed that in ovo vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone induced high levels of antibody titer (P<0.05) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens at 3 and 4 weeks postvaccination compared to 2 weeks postvaccination. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer was not significantly different between groups injected with 40 μg pDNA + 64 μg D-SPM and 40 μg pDNA at 4 weeks postvaccination (P>0.05). Higher antibody titer was observed in the group immunized with 40 μg pDNA/egg at 4 weeks postvaccination. The findings also showed that vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone was able to confer protection against Newcastle disease virus strain NDIBS002 in two out of seven SPF chickens. Although the chickens produced antibody titers 3 weeks after in ovo vaccination, it was not sufficient to provide complete protection to the chickens from lethal viral challenge. In addition, vaccination with pDNA/D-SPM complex did not induce high antibody titer when compared with naked pDNA. Therefore, it was concluded that DNA vaccination with plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F can be suitable for in ovo application against ND, whereas D-SPM is not recommended for in ovo gene delivery. PMID:26834470

  14. Efficacy of chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria tenella 5401 and chicken IFN-γ or IL-2 against coccidiosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Huang, Xinmei; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-09-01

    Chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria tenella (E. tenella) surface antigen 5401 were constructed and their efficacies against E. tenella challenge were studied. The open reading frame (ORF) of 5401 was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T2 to express the recombinant protein and the expressed recombinant protein was identified by Western blot. The ORF of 5401 and chicken cytokine gene IFN-γ or IL-2 were cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 consecutively to construct DNA vaccines pVAX-5401-IFN-γ, pVAX-5401-IL-2 and pVAX-5401. The expression of aim genes in vivo was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Fourteen-day-old chickens were inoculated twice at an interval of 7 days with 100 µg of plasmids pVAX-5401, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ and pVAX-5401-IL-2 or 200 µg of recombinant 5401 protein by leg intramuscular injection, respectively. Seven days after the second inoculation, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 5 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. Seven days after challenge, all chickens were weighted and slaughtered to determine the effects of immunization. The results showed the recombinant protein was about 90 kDa and reacted with antiserum against soluble sporozoites. The animal experiment showed that all the DNA vaccines pVAX-5401, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ or pVAX-5401-IL-2 and the recombinant 5401 protein could obviously alleviate body weight loss and cecal lesions as compared with non-vaccinated challenged control and empty vector pVAX1control. Furthermore, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ or pVAX-5401-IL-2 induced anti-coccidial index (ACI) of 180.01 or 177.24 which were significantly higher than that of pVAX-5401. The results suggested that 5401 was an effective candidate antigen for vaccine. This finding also suggested that chicken IFN-γ or IL-2 could effectively improve the efficacies of DNA vaccines against avian coccidiosis. PMID:26008611

  15. Enhancement by ampicillin of antibody responses induced by a protein antigen and a DNA vaccine carried by live-attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Woo, P C; Tsoi, H W; Leung, H C; Wong, L P; Wong, S S; Chan, E; Yuen, K Y

    2000-07-01

    Live-attenuated Salmonella species are effective carriers of microbial antigens and DNA vaccines. In a mouse model, the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and total antibody levels directed toward the lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were significantly enhanced at day 21 after oral immunization with live-attenuated serovar Typhi (strain Ty21a) when ampicillin was concomitantly administered (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The heat-killed Ty21a-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation indices for the ampicillin group at day 21 were significantly higher than those for the normal saline (NS) group (P < 0.005, P < 0.001, and P < 0.01) for all three doses of antigen (10(4), 10(5), and 10(6) heat-killed Ty21a per well, respectively). The 50% lethal doses for mice from the ampicillin and NS groups immunized with Ty21a with pBR322 after wild-type serovar Typhi challenge on day 24 were 3.4 x 10(7) and 5.0 x 10(6) CFU, respectively. The fecal bacterial counts for the ampicillin group at days 1, 3, and 5 were significantly lower than those for the NS group (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, and P < 0.05, respectively), and there was a trend toward recovery of Ty21a in a larger number of mice from the ampicillin group than from the NS group. Furthermore, the IgG2a levels directed toward tetanus toxoid were significantly enhanced at days 7 and 21 after oral immunization with Ty21a that carried the fragment c of tetanus toxoid when ampicillin was concomitantly administered (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively), and the IgM and total hepatitis B surface antibody levels were significantly enhanced at days 7 (P < 0.005 and P < 0.05, respectively) and 21 (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively) after oral immunization with Ty21a that carried the DNA vaccine that encodes hepatitis B surface antigen when ampicillin was concomitantly administered. The present observation may improve the efficacy of the protein antigens and DNA vaccines carried in live-attenuated bacteria, and further

  16. A Phase 1 clinical trial of a DNA vaccine for Venezuelan equine encephalitis delivered by intramuscular or intradermal electroporation.

    PubMed

    Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Ellefsen, Barry; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2016-06-30

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a mosquito-borne alphavirus, causes periodic epizootics in equines and is a recognized biological defense threat for humans. There are currently no FDA-licensed vaccines against VEEV. We developed a candidate DNA vaccine expressing the E3-E2-6K-E1 genes of VEEV (pWRG/VEE) and performed a Phase 1 clinical study to assess the vaccine's safety, reactogenicity, tolerability, and immunogenicity when administered by intramuscular (IM) or intradermal (ID) electroporation (EP) using the Ichor Medical Systems TriGrid™ Delivery System. Subjects in IM-EP groups received 0.5mg (N=8) or 2.0mg (N=9) of pWRG/VEE or a saline placebo (N=4) in a 1.0ml injection. Subjects in ID-EP groups received 0.08mg (N=8) or 0.3mg (N=8) of DNA or a saline placebo (N=4) in a 0.15ml injection. Subjects were monitored for a total period of 360 days. No vaccine- or device-related serious adverse events were reported. Based on the results of a subject questionnaire, the IM- and ID-EP procedures were both considered to be generally acceptable for prophylactic vaccine administration, with the acute tolerability of ID EP delivery judged to be greater than that of IM-EP delivery. All subjects (100%) in the high and low dose IM-EP groups developed detectable VEEV-neutralizing antibodies after two or three administrations of pWRG/VEE, respectively. VEEV-neutralizing antibody responses were detected in seven of eight subjects (87.5%) in the high dose and five of eight subjects (62.5%) in the low dose ID-EP groups after three vaccine administrations. There was a correlation between the DNA dose and the magnitude of the resulting VEEV-neutralizing antibody responses for both IM and ID EP delivery. These results indicate that pWRG/VEE delivered by either IM- or ID-EP is safe, tolerable, and immunogenic in humans at the evaluated dose levels. Clinicaltrials.gov registry number NCT01984983. PMID:27206386

  17. Evaluation of protective efficacy using a nonstructural protein NS1 in DNA vaccine-loaded microspheres against dengue 2 virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-shiung; Li, I-Hsun; Hong, Po-da; Yeh, Ming-kung

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus results in dengue fever or severe dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome in humans. The purpose of this work was to develop an effective antidengue virus delivery system, by designing poly (dl-lactic-co-glycolic) acid/polyethylene glycol (PLGA/PEG) microspheres using a double-emulsion solvent extraction method, for vaccination therapy based on locally and continuously sustained biological activity. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccine-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres exhibited a high loading capacity (4.5% w/w), yield (85.2%), and entrapment efficiency (39%), the mean particle size 4.8 μm, and a controlled in vitro release profile with a low initial burst (18.5%), lag time (4 days), and continued released protein over 70 days. The distribution of protein on the microspheres surface, outer layer, and core were 3.0%, 28.5%, and 60.7%, respectively. A release rate was noticed to be 1.07 μg protein/mg microspheres/day of protein release, maintained for 42 days. The cumulative release amount at Days 1, 28, and 42 was 18.5, 53.7, and 62.66 μg protein/mg microspheres, respectively. The dengue virus challenge in mice test, in which mice received one dose of 20 μg NS1 protein content of microspheres, in comparison with NS1 protein in Al(OH)3 or PBS solution, was evaluated after intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice. The study results show that the greatest survival was observed in the group of mice immunized with NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres (100%). In vivo vaccination studies also demonstrated that NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres had a protective ability; its steady-state immune protection in rat plasma changed from 4,443 ± 1,384 pg/mL to 10,697 ± 3,197 pg/mL, which was 2.5-fold higher than that observed for dengue virus in Al(OH)3 at 21 days. These findings strongly suggest that NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres offer a new therapeutic strategy in optimizing the vaccine incorporation

  18. Anti-tumor effects of DNA vaccine targeting human fibroblast activation protein α by producing specific immune responses and altering tumor microenvironment in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiu; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Geng, Fei; Liu, Chen-Lu; Xu, Ping; Lu, Zhen-Zhen; Yu, Bin; Wu, Hui; Wu, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xiang-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblast activation protein α (FAPα) is a tumor stromal antigen overexpressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). CAFs are genetically more stable compared with the tumor cells and immunosuppressive components of the tumor microenvironment, rendering them excellent targets for cancer immunotherapy. DNA vaccines are widely applied due to their safety. To specifically destroy CAFs, we constructed and examined the immunogenicity and anti-tumor immune mechanism of a DNA vaccine expressing human FAPα. This vaccine successfully reduced 4T1 tumor growth through producing FAPα-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses which could kill CAFs, and the decrease in FAPα-expressing CAFs resulted in markedly attenuated expression of collagen I and other stromal factors that benefit the tumor progression. Based on these results, a DNA vaccine targeting human FAPα may be an attractive and effective cancer immunotherapy strategy. PMID:27020681

  19. A retrospective review of outcome and survival following surgery and adjuvant xenogeneic DNA vaccination in 32 dogs with oral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    TREGGIARI, Elisabetta; GRANT, Jessica Pauline; NORTH, Susan Margaret

    2016-01-01

    A xenogeneic DNA vaccination has been licensed for use in dogs with locally controlled stage II and III oral malignant melanoma (OMM). At present, there are limited outcome data for dogs with OMM treated with surgery and immunotherapy. The aim of this study is to retrospectively review the outcome and survival of 32 dogs affected by OMM that were treated with a combination of surgery and the xenogeneic DNA vaccination (with the addition of radiotherapy in some cases) and to determine the influence of surgical margins and delay in receiving vaccination. The overall median survival time (MST) was 335 days (95% CI: 301–540 days), and the overall median progression-free survival (PFS) was 160 days (mean 182 days, 95% CI: 132–232 days). Stage, completeness of surgical margins and delay in administration of the vaccine did not appear to statistically influence survival or PFS, although these results may reflect the low statistical power of the study due to small numbers. Further studies are required to assess whether the addition of any adjuvant treatment to surgery, including immunotherapy, is able to significantly prolong survival in cases of canine oral melanoma. PMID:26781703

  20. Interleukin-22 as a molecular adjuvant facilitates IL-17-producing CD8+ T cell responses against a HBV DNA vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Zou, Qiang; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Bin

    2013-10-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is mainly produced by activated Th1 cells, Th17 cells and NK cells and promotes anti-microbial defense, pro-inflammatory and tissue remodeling responses. However, its potential use as a vaccine adjuvant has not been tested. In this study, we tested if a DNA construct expressing IL-22 (pVAX-IL-22) could be used as a molecular adjuvant to enhance host immune responses induced by HBV DNA vaccination (pcD-S2). After immunizing mice with pcD-S2 combined with pVAX-IL-22, we didn't find enhancement of HBsAg-specific antibody responses in comparison to mice immunized with pcD-S2 alone. However, there was an enhancement of the level of IL-17 expression in antigen specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (Tc17). By using CD8 T-cell knockout (KO) and IL-17 KO mice, Tc17 cells were found to be a dominant population driving cytotoxicity. Importantly, there was a correlation between pVAX-IL-22 enhancement of T lymphocytes and a reduction of HBsAg-positive hepatocytes in HBsAg transgenic mice. These results demonstrate that IL-22 might be used as an effective adjuvant to enhance cellular immune responses during HBsAg DNA vaccination since it can induce Tc17 cells to break tolerance in HBsAg transgenic mice. PMID:23941891

  1. Therapeutic DNA Vaccination Using In Vivo Electroporation Followed by Standard of Care Therapy in Patients With Genotype 1 Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, Ola; Ahlén, Gustaf; Diepolder, Helmut; Jung, Maria-Christina; Levander, Sepideh; Fons, Michael; Mathiesen, Iacob; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Vahlne, Anders; Frelin, Lars; Sällberg, Matti

    2013-01-01

    Clearance of infections caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) correlates with HCV-specific T cell function. We therefore evaluated therapeutic vaccination in 12 patients with chronic HCV infection. Eight patients also underwent a subsequent standard-of-care (SOC) therapy with pegylated interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. The phase I/IIa clinical trial was performed in treatment naive HCV genotype 1 patients, receiving four monthly vaccinations in the deltoid muscles with 167, 500, or 1,500 μg codon-optimized HCV nonstructural (NS) 3/4A-expressing DNA vaccine delivered by in vivo electroporation (EP). Enrollment was done with 2 weeks interval between patients for safety reasons. Treatment was safe and well tolerated. The vaccinations significantly improved IFN-γ–producing responses to HCV NS3 during the first 6 weeks of therapy. Five patients experienced 2–10 weeks 0.6–2.4 log10 reduction in serum HCV RNA. Six out of eight patients starting SOC therapy within 1–30 months after the last vaccine dose were cured. This first-in-man therapeutic HCV DNA vaccine study with the vaccine delivered by in vivo EP shows transient effects in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection. The interesting result noted after SOC therapy suggests that therapeutic vaccination can be explored in a combination with SOC treatment. PMID:23752314

  2. Combination of treatment with death receptor 5-specific antibody with therapeutic HPV DNA vaccination generates enhanced therapeutic anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chih Wen; Monie, Archana; Trimble, Cornelia; Alvarez, Ronald D; Huh, Warner K; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Straughn, J Michael; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Yagita, Hideo; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2008-08-12

    There is currently a vital need for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the control of advanced stage cancers. Antigen-specific immunotherapy and the employment of antibodies against the death receptor 5 (DR5) have emerged as two potentially promising strategies for cancer treatment. In the current study, we hypothesize that the combination of treatment with the anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody, MD5-1 with a DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 antigen (CRT/E7(detox)) administered via gene gun would lead to further enhancement of E7-specific immune responses as well as anti-tumor effects. Our results indicated that mice bearing the E7-expressing tumor, TC-1 treated with MD5-1 monoclonal antibody followed by CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccination generated the most potent therapeutic anti-tumor effects as well as highest levels of E7-specific CD8+ T cells among all the groups tested. In addition, treatment with MD5-1 monoclonal antibody was capable of rendering the TC-1 tumor cells more susceptible to lysis by E7-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Our findings serve as an important foundation for future clinical translation. PMID:18598733

  3. Polyvalent DNA vaccines expressing HA antigens of H5N1 influenza viruses with an optimized leader sequence elicit cross-protective antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixia; Hackett, Anthony; Jia, Na; Zhang, Chunhua; Zhang, Lu; Parker, Chris; Zhou, An; Li, Jun; Cao, Wu-Chun; Huang, Zuhu; Li, Yan; Lu, Shan

    2011-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI) H5N1 viruses are circulating among poultry populations in parts of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, and have caused human infections with a high mortality rate. H5 subtype hemagglutinin (HA) has evolved into phylogenetically distinct clades and subclades based on viruses isolated from various avian species. Since 1997, humans have been infected by HPAI H5N1 viruses from several clades. It is, therefore, important to develop strategies to produce protective antibody responses against H5N1 viruses from multiple clades or antigenic groups. In the current study, we optimized the signal peptide design of DNA vaccines expressing HA antigens from H5N1 viruses. Cross reactivity analysis using sera from immunized rabbits showed that antibody responses elicited by a polyvalent formulation, including HA antigens from different clades, was able to elicit broad protective antibody responses against multiple key representative H5N1 viruses across different clades. Data presented in this report support the development of a polyvalent DNA vaccine strategy against the threat of a potential H5N1 influenza pandemic. PMID:22205966

  4. Induction of CML28-specific cytotoxic T cell responses using co-transfected dendritic cells with CML28 DNA vaccine and SOCS1 small interfering RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hongsheng; Zhang Donghua . E-mail: hanson2008@gmail.com; Wang Yaya; Dai Ming; Zhang Lu; Liu Wenli; Liu Dan; Tan Huo; Huang Zhenqian

    2006-08-18

    CML28 is an attractive target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. SOCS1 represents an inhibitory control mechanism for DC antigen presentation and the magnitude of adaptive immunity. In this study, we evaluated the potential for inducing CML28-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses by dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. We constructed a CML28 DNA vaccine and a SOCS1 siRNA vector and then cotransfect monocyte-derived DCs. Flow cytometry analysis showed gene silencing of SOCS1 resulted in higher expressions of costimulative moleculars in DCs. Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) indicated downregulation of SOCS1 stronger capability to stimulate proliferation of responder cell in DCs. The CTL assay revealed transfected DCs effectively induced autologous CML28-specific CTL responses and the lytic activities induced by SOCS1-silenced DCs were significantly higher compared with those induced by SOCS1-expressing DCs. These results in our study indicates gene silencing of SOCS1 remarkably enhanced the cytotoxicity efficiency of CML28 DNA vaccine in DCs.

  5. Enhanced immunogenicity of microencapsulated multiepitope DNA vaccine encoding T and B cell epitopes of foot-and-mouth disease virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; He, Xiao-Wen; Jiang, Lei; Ren, Ding; He, Ying; Li, De-An; Sun, Shu-Han

    2006-03-15

    The role of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) microparticles on enhancing immune responses of multiepitope DNA vaccines was investigated in vitro and in vivo. pcDNA-SG encoding T and B cell epitopes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) was encapsulated into PLGA microparticles. PLGA microparticles could protect themselves from nuclease degradation in vitro. PLGA-pcDNA-SG microparticles could be uptaken by cells and expressed His-tagged SG immunogen in vitro and in vivo. A prolonged expression and presentation of SG immunogen were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy in the lymphocytes from the mice incubated with PLGA-pcDNA-SG microparticles, compared with the mice immunized with naked pcDNA-SG. PLGA-pcDNA-SG microparticles displayed a significant stronger immunogenicity than naked DNA vaccines with a higher titer of virus-specific antibody, elevated IFN-gamma production and enhanced lymphocyte proliferation. PLGA-DNA microparticle could elicit augmented humoral and cellular responses with reduced amounts and times of immunization. PMID:16414158

  6. Construction of a Novel DNA Vaccine Candidate Encoding an HspX-PPE44-EsxV Fusion Antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Bagher; Sankian, Mojtaba; Amini, Yousef; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, is not effective in adults, therefore, many efforts have been made to produce an effective adult TB vaccine. The aim of this study was to develop a new tuberculosis DNA vaccine candidate encoding a recombinant HspX-PPE44-EsxV fusion antigen of M. tuberculosis. Methods: A fusion DNA segment consisting of HspX, linker, PPE44, linker, and EsxV, after codon optimization, was designed. The fusion DNA was cloned and its sequence confirmed. Then, expression of a recombinant pcDNA3.1 (+)/HspX-PPE44-EsxV plasmid in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was verified by RT-PCR and Western-blot analysis. Results: A 1968 bp band in RT-PCR and a 68 kDa band on Western-blot analysis confirmed transcription and expression of recombinant hspX-ppe44-esxV in eukaryotic cells. Conclusion: A recombinant DNA segment encoding the HspX-PPE44-EsxV fusion antigen of M. tuberculosis was constructed and considered to be tested as a new TB DNA vaccine candidate. PMID:27536702

  7. Evaluation of protective efficacy and immune mechanisms of using a non-structural protein NS1 in DNA vaccine against dengue 2 virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Fen; Liao, Ching-Len; Lin, Yi-Ling; Yeh, Chia-Tsui; Chen, Li-Kuang; Huang, Yung-Feng; Chou, Hsin-Ying; Huang, Jau-Ling; Shaio, Men-Fang; Sytwu, Huey-Kang

    2003-09-01

    To evaluate the potential of DNA vaccine against dengue (DEN) infection, we characterize the protective efficacy and immune responses of mice intramuscularly injected with plasmid encoding DEN-2 non-structural protein 1 (NS1). Intravenously challenged by lethal DEN-2, mice vaccinated with NS1-DNA exhibited a delay onset of paralysis, a marked decrease of morbidity, and a significant enhancement of survival. In addition to a moderate increase of NS1-specific antibody titer from immunized mice measured by ELISA, a strong priming effect on anti-NS1 response was also noticed in plasmid NS1-vaccinated mice by radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) or immunoblot analysis. Interestingly, newborn mice from NS1-DNA-immunized dam showed stronger resistance to viral challenge, as compared to those from vector DNA or PBS-immunized dams, indicating the protective role of NS1-specific antibody. In contrast to humoral immune response, DNA immunization can elicit strong cellular immune responses, including NS1-specific T cell proliferation and cytolytic activity. The NS1-DNA-induced protection can be further augmented by co-injection of plasmid encoding interleukin 12 (IL-12), suggesting an effector role of Th1 immunity against DEN infection. In summary, our results suggest the potential of NS1-DNA vaccine against DEN infection, and indicate both NS1-specific humoral and cellular immune responses contribute to the protection. PMID:12922127

  8. Sequence analysis and expression of the M1 and M2 matrix protein genes of hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishizawa, T.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a 2318 nucleotide region of the genomic RNA of hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV), an important viral pathogen of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. This region comprises approximately two-thirds of the 3' end of the nucleocapsid protein (N) gene and the complete matrix protein (M1 and M2) genes with the associated intergenic regions. The partial N gene sequence was 812 nucleotides in length with an open reading frame (ORF) that encoded the carboxyl-terminal 250 amino acids of the N protein. The M1 and M2 genes were 771 and 700 nucleotides in length, respectively, with ORFs encoding proteins of 227 and 193 amino acids. The M1 gene sequence contained an additional small ORF that could encode a highly basic, arginine-rich protein of 25 amino acids. Comparisons of the N, M1, and M2 gene sequences of HIRRV with the corresponding sequences of the fish rhabdoviruses, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) indicated that HIRRV was more closely related to IHNV than to VHSV, but was clearly distinct from either. The putative consensus gene termination sequence for IHNV and VHSV, AGAYAG(A)(7), was present in the N-M1, M1-M2, and M2-G intergenic regions of HIRRV as were the putative transcription initiation sequences YGGCAC and AACA. An Escherichia coli expression system was used to produce recombinant proteins from the M1 and M2 genes of HIRRV. These were the same size as the authentic M1 and M2 proteins and reacted with anti-HIRRV rabbit serum in western blots. These reagents can be used for further study of the fish immune response and to test novel control methods.

  9. Route and method of delivery of DNA vaccine influence immune responses in mice and non-human primates.

    PubMed Central

    McCluskie, M. J.; Brazolot Millan, C. L.; Gramzinski, R. A.; Robinson, H. L.; Santoro, J. C.; Fuller, J. T.; Widera, G.; Haynes, J. R.; Purcell, R. H.; Davis, H. L.

    1999-01-01

    antibodies (Th2-like) at 4 weeks and only very low IgG2a levels at later times; ID-immunized mice had predominantly IgG1 at 4 weeks and this changed to mixed IgG1/IgG2a over time. Responses with IM injection (in the leg or tongue) were predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like) at all times. IV injection gave mixed IgG1/IgG2a responses. In monkeys, in the first experiment, 1 mg DNA IM or ID at 0, 4, and 8 weeks gave equivalent anti-HB titers and 0.4 microg at the same times by GG induced lower titers. In the second experiment, 1 mg DNA IM or ID, or 3.2 microg by GG, at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, gave anti-HB values in the hierarchy of GG > IM > ID. Furthermore, high titers were retained after a single immunization in mice but fell off over time in the monkeys, even after boost. CONCLUSIONS: Route of administration of plasmid DNA vaccines influences the strength and nature of immune responses in mice and non-human primates. However, the results in mice were not always predictive of those in monkeys and this is likely true for humans as well. Optimal dose and immunization schedule will most likely vary between species. It is not clear whether results in non-human primates will be predictive of results in humans, thus additional studies are required. http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00020/bibs /5n5p287. html Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:10390545

  10. Improved immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus inactivated vaccine following DNA vaccination using Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the development of DNA vaccines using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) genes from AF2240 Newcastle disease virus strain, namely pIRES/HN, pIRES/F and pIRES-F/HN. Transient expression analysis of the constructs in Vero cells revealed the successful expression of gene inserts in vitro. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that single vaccination with the constructed plasmid DNA (pDNA) followed by a boost with inactivated vaccine induced a significant difference in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody levels (p < 0.05) elicited by either pIRES/F, pIRES/F+ pIRES/HN or pIRES-F/HN at one week after the booster in specific pathogen free chickens when compared with the inactivated vaccine alone. Taken together, these results indicated that recombinant pDNA could be used to increase the efficacy of the inactivated vaccine immunization procedure. PMID:27051336

  11. Immunotherapy of tuberculosis with Mycobacterium leprae Hsp65 as a DNA vaccine triggers cross-reactive antibodies against mammalian Hsp60 but not pathological autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Doimo, Nayara T S; Zárate-Bladés, Carlos R; Rodrigues, Rodrigo F; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Trotte, Marcele N S; Souza, Patrícia R M; Soares, Luana S; Rios, Wendy M; Floriano, Elaine M; Brandão, Izaira T; Masson, Ana P; Coelho, Verônica; Ramos, Simone G; Silva, Celio L

    2014-01-01

    Despite substantial efforts in recent years toward the development of new vaccines and drugs against tuberculosis (TB), success has remained elusive. Immunotherapy of TB with mycobacterial Hsp65 as a DNA vaccine (DNA-hsp65) results in a reduction of systemic bacterial loads and lung tissue damage, but the high homology of Hsp65 with the mammalian protein raises concern that pathological autoimmune responses may also be triggered. We searched for autoimmune responses elicited by DNA-hsp65 immunotherapy in mice chronically infected with TB by evaluating the humoral immune response and comprehensive histopathology using stereology. Cross-reactive antibodies between mycobacterial and mammalian Hsp60/65 were detected; however, no signs of pathological autoimmunity were found up to 60 days after the end of the therapy. PMID:24607935

  12. A DNA vaccine encoding mutated HPV58 mE6E7-Fc-GPI fusion antigen and GM-CSF and B7.1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Yu, Jiyun; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a predominant cause of cervical cancer, and HPV58 is the third most common virus detected in the patients with cervical cancer in Asia. E6 and E7 are the viral oncogenes which are constitutively expressed in HPV-associated tumor cells and can be used as target antigens for related immunotherapy. In this study, we modified the HPV58 E6 and E7 oncogenes to eliminate their oncogenic potential and constructed a recombinant DNA vaccine that coexpresses the sig-HPV58 mE6E7-Fc-GPI fusion antigen in addition to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and B7.1 as molecular adjuvants (PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB) for the treatment of HPV58 (+) cancer. Methods PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB recombinant DNA vaccine was constructed to express a fusion protein containing a signal peptide, a modified HPV58 mE6E7 gene, and human IgG Fc and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchoring sequences using the modified DNA vaccine vector PVAX1-IRES-GM/B7.1 that coexpresses GM-CSF, and B7.1. C57BL/6 mice were challenged by HPV58 E6E7-expressing B16-HPV58 E6E7 cells, followed by immunization by PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB vaccine on days 7, 14, 21 after tumor challenge. The cellular immune responses in immunized mice were assessed by measuring IFN-γ production in splenocytes upon stimulation by HPV58 E6E7-GST protein and the lysis of B16-HPV58 E6E7 target cells by splenocytes after restimulation with HPV58 E6E7-GST protein. The antitumor efficacy was evaluated by monitoring the growth of the tumor. Results PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB elicited varying levels of IFN-lsgdB58onn T-cell immune responses and lysis of target cell in mice in response to the recombinant antigen HPV58 E6E7-GST. Furthermore, the vaccine also induced antitumor responses in the HPV58 (+) B16-HPV58 E6E7 tumor challenge model as evidenced by delayed tumor development. Conclusion The recombinant DNA vaccine PVAX1-HPV58 mE6E7FcGB efficiently generates

  13. Immunotherapy of tuberculosis with Mycobacterium leprae Hsp65 as a DNA vaccine triggers cross-reactive antibodies against mammalian Hsp60 but not pathological autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Doimo, Nayara TS; Zárate-Bladés, Carlos R; Rodrigues, Rodrigo F; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Trotte, Marcele NS; Souza, Patrícia RM; Soares, Luana S; Rios, Wendy M; Floriano, Elaine M; Brandão, Izaira T; Masson, Ana P; Coelho, Verônica; Ramos, Simone G; Silva, Celio L

    2014-01-01

    Despite substantial efforts in recent years toward the development of new vaccines and drugs against tuberculosis (TB), success has remained elusive. Immunotherapy of TB with mycobacterial Hsp65 as a DNA vaccine (DNA-hsp65) results in a reduction of systemic bacterial loads and lung tissue damage, but the high homology of Hsp65 with the mammalian protein raises concern that pathological autoimmune responses may also be triggered. We searched for autoimmune responses elicited by DNA-hsp65 immunotherapy in mice chronically infected with TB by evaluating the humoral immune response and comprehensive histopathology using stereology. Cross-reactive antibodies between mycobacterial and mammalian Hsp60/65 were detected; however, no signs of pathological autoimmunity were found up to 60 days after the end of the therapy. PMID:24607935

  14. Prime-boost BCG vaccination with DNA vaccines based in β-defensin-2 and mycobacterial antigens ESAT6 or Ag85B improve protection in a tuberculosis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Biragyn, Arya; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Bodogai, Monica; Martínez-Fierro, Margarita; Sada, Eduardo; Trujillo, Valentin; Enciso-Moreno, Antonio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2013-01-11

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that there are about 8 million new cases annually of active Tuberculosis (TB). Despite its irregular effectiveness (0-89%), the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) BCG is the only vaccine available worldwide for prevention of TB; thus, the design is important of novel and more efficient vaccination strategies. Considering that β-defensin-2 is an antimicrobial peptide that induces dendritic cell maturation through the TLR-4 receptor and that both ESAT-6 and Ag85B are immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and efficient activators of the protective immune response, we constructed two DNA vaccines by the fusion of the gene encoding β-defensin-2 and antigens ESAT6 (pDE) and 85B (pDA). After confirming efficient local antigen expression that induced high and stable Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in intramuscular (i.m.) vaccinated Balb/c mice, groups of mice were vaccinated with DNA vaccines in a prime-boost regimen with BCG and with BCG alone, and 2 months later were challenged with the mild virulence reference strain H37Rv and the highly virulent clinical isolate LAM 5186. The level of protection was evaluated by survival, lung bacilli burdens, and extension of tissue damage (pneumonia). Vaccination with both DNA vaccines showed similar protection to that of BCG. After the challenge with the highly virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, animals that were prime-boosted with BCG and then boosted with both DNA vaccines showed significant higher survival and less tissue damage than mice vaccinated only with BCG. These results suggest that improvement of BCG vaccination, such as the prime-boost DNA vaccine, represents a more efficient vaccination scheme against TB. PMID:23196205

  15. Protection against H1N1 influenza challenge by a DNA vaccine expressing H3/H1 subtype hemagglutinin combined with MHC class II-restricted epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple subtypes of avian influenza viruses have crossed the species barrier to infect humans and have the potential to cause a pandemic. Therefore, new influenza vaccines to prevent the co-existence of multiple subtypes within a host and cross-species transmission of influenza are urgently needed. Methods Here we report a multi-epitope DNA vaccine targeted towards multiple subtypes of the influenza virus. The protective hemagglutinin (HA) antigens from H5/H7/H9 subtypes were screened for MHC II class-restricted epitopes overlapping with predicted B cell epitopes. We then constructed a DNA plasmid vaccine, pV-H3-EHA-H1, based on HA antigens from human influenza H3/H1 subtypes combined with the H5/H7/H9 subtype Th/B epitope box. Results Epitope-specific IFN-γ ELISpot responses were significantly higher in the multi-epitope DNA group than in other vaccine and control groups (P < 0.05). The multi-epitope group significantly enhanced Th2 cell responses as determined by cytokine assays. The survival rate of mice given the multi-epitope vaccine was the highest among the vaccine groups, but it was not significantly different compared to those given single antigen expressing pV-H1HA1 vaccine and dual antigen expressing pV-H3-H1 vaccine (P > 0.05). No measurable virus titers were detected in the lungs of the multi-epitope immunized group. The unique multi-epitope DNA vaccine enhanced virus-specific antibody and cellular immunity as well as conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) influenza strain in mice. Conclusions This approach may be a promising strategy for developing a universal influenza vaccine to prevent multiple subtypes of influenza virus and to induce long-term protective immune against cross-species transmission. PMID:21134292

  16. An optimized, synthetic DNA vaccine encoding the toxin A and toxin B receptor binding domains of Clostridium difficile induces protective antibody responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baliban, Scott M; Michael, Amanda; Shammassian, Berje; Mudakha, Shikata; Khan, Amir S; Cocklin, Simon; Zentner, Isaac; Latimer, Brian P; Bouillaut, Laurent; Hunter, Meredith; Marx, Preston; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Welles, Seth L; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Weiner, David B; Kutzler, Michele A

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) constitutes a large majority of nosocomial diarrhea cases in industrialized nations and is mediated by the effects of two secreted toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). Patients who develop strong antitoxin antibody responses can clear C. difficile infection and remain disease free. Key toxin-neutralizing epitopes have been found within the carboxy-terminal receptor binding domains (RBDs) of TcdA and TcdB, which has generated interest in developing the RBD as a viable vaccine target. While numerous platforms have been studied, very little data describes the potential of DNA vaccination against CDAD. Therefore, we created highly optimized plasmids encoding the RBDs from TcdA and TcdB in which any putative N-linked glycosylation sites were altered. Mice and nonhuman primates were immunized intramuscularly, followed by in vivo electroporation, and in these animal models, vaccination induced significant levels of both anti-RBD antibodies (blood and stool) and RBD-specific antibody-secreting cells. Further characterization revealed that sera from immunized mice and nonhuman primates could detect RBD protein from transfected cells, as well as neutralize purified toxins in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mice that were immunized with plasmids or given nonhuman-primate sera were protected from a lethal challenge with purified TcdA and/or TcdB. Moreover, immunized mice were significantly protected when challenged with C. difficile spores from homologous (VPI 10463) and heterologous, epidemic (UK1) strains. These data demonstrate the robust immunogenicity and efficacy of a TcdA/B RBD-based DNA vaccine in preclinical models of acute toxin-associated and intragastric, spore-induced colonic disease. PMID:25024365

  17. DNA vaccine encoding the moonlighting protein Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) leads to partial protection in a mouse model of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Steisslinger, Vera; Korten, Simone; Brattig, Norbert W; Erttmann, Klaus D

    2015-10-26

    River blindness, caused by the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus, is a major socio-economic and public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2015, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa (TOVA) Initiative has been launched with the aim of providing new tools to complement mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin, thereby promoting elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa. In this context we here present Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) as a possible DNA vaccine candidate. We report that in a laboratory model for filariasis, immunization with Ov-GAPDH led to a significant reduction of adult worm load and microfilaraemia in BALB/c mice after challenge infection with the filarial parasite Litomosoides sigmodontis. Mice were either vaccinated with Ov-GAPDH.DNA plasmid (Ov-pGAPDH.DNA) alone or in combination with recombinantly expressed Ov-GAPDH protein (Ov-rGAPDH). During the following challenge infection of immunized and control mice with L. sigmodontis, those formulations which included the DNA plasmid, led to a significant reduction of adult worm loads (up to 57% median reduction) and microfilaraemia (up to 94% reduction) in immunized animals. In a further experiment, immunization with a mixture of four overlapping, synthetic Ov-GAPDH peptides (Ov-GAPDHpept), with alum as adjuvant, did not significantly reduce worm loads. Our results indicate that DNA vaccination with Ov-GAPDH has protective potential against filarial challenge infection in the mouse model. This suggests a transfer of the approach into the cattle Onchocerca ochengi model, where it is possible to investigate the effects of this vaccination in the context of a natural host-parasite relationship. PMID:26320419

  18. A phase I trial of DNA vaccination with a plasmid expressing prostate-specific antigen in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pavlenko, M; Roos, A-K; Lundqvist, A; Palmborg, A; Miller, A M; Ozenci, V; Bergman, B; Egevad, L; Hellström, M; Kiessling, R; Masucci, G; Wersäll, P; Nilsson, S; Pisa, P

    2004-08-16

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a serine protease secreted at low levels by normal luminal epithelial cells of the prostate and in significantly higher levels by prostate cancer cells. Therefore, PSA is a potential target for various immunotherapeutical approaches against prostate cancer. DNA vaccination has been investigated as immunotherapy for infectious diseases in patients and for specific treatment of cancer in certain animal models. In animal studies, we have demonstrated that vaccination with plasmid vector pVAX/PSA results in PSA-specific cellular response and protection against tumour challenge. The purpose of the trial was to evaluate the safety, feasibility and biological efficacy of pVAX/PSA vaccine in the clinic. A phase I trial of pVAX/PSA, together with cytokine granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (Molgramostim) and IL-2 (Aldesleukin) as vaccine adjuvants, was carried out in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer. To evaluate the biologically active dose, the vaccine was administered during five cycles in doses of 100, 300 and 900 microg, with three patients in each cohort. Eight patients were evaluable. A PSA-specific cellular immune response, measured by IFN-gamma production against recombinant PSA protein, and a rise in anti-PSA IgG were detected in two of three patients after vaccination in the highest dose cohort. A decrease in the slope of PSA was observed in the two patients exhibiting IFN-gamma production to PSA. No adverse effects (WHO grade >2) were observed in any dose cohort. We demonstrate that DNA vaccination with a PSA-coding plasmid vector, given with GM-CSF and IL-2 to patients with prostate cancer, is safe and in doses of 900 microg the vaccine can induce cellular and humoral immune responses against PSA protein. PMID:15280930

  19. Toxoplasma gondii: Protective immunity induced by a DNA vaccine expressing GRA1 and MIC3 against toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Pengtao; Cao, Lili; Guo, Yanbing; Dong, Hang; Yuan, Shuxian; Yao, Xinhua; Ren, Wenzhi; Yao, Lin; Xu, Zhilin; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Xichen

    2016-07-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is a major cause of abortion and neonatal loss in livestock, and can cause severe illness to human with weakened immune system. The heavy incidence and severe consequence indicate the development of vaccines against T. gondii is required. In this study, DNA vaccines encoding GRA1 and MIC3 antigens were developed. The parasite-specific immune responses and protection efficiency against toxoplasmosis by these DNA vaccines were evaluated in BALB/c mice. The results demonstrated that the IgG antibody production was significantly increased in multi-antigenic vaccine encoding GRA1 and MIC3 immunized group, as well as the IFN-γ level, when compared with single-gene vaccines and controls groups (p < 0.05). Two weeks after the final vaccination, the mice were challenged with either 1 × 10(4) or 1 × 10(2) RH strain tachyzoites, and the mortality and parasite reduction were observed. The multi-antigenic vaccine encoding GRA1 and MIC3 lead to the longest survival time as well as the less parasite-loads in brain and liver of immunized mice (p < 0.01). The present study indicates that the GRA1 and MIC3 showed the potential as target for vaccine investigation against toxoplasmosis. And the immune efficacy induced by multi-antigenic vaccine encoding GRA1 and MIC3 was better than that induced by single-antigenic vaccines alone. PMID:27059254

  20. Immune Responses Induced by Gene Gun or Intramuscular Injection of DNA Vaccines That Express Immunogenic Regions of the Serine Repeat Antigen from Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Belperron, Alexia A.; Feltquate, David; Fox, Barbara A.; Horii, Toshihiro; Bzik, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The liver- and blood-stage-expressed serine repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum is a candidate protein for a human malaria vaccine. We compared the immune responses induced in mice immunized with SERA-expressing plasmid DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular (i.m.) injection or delivered intradermally by Gene Gun immunization. Mice were immunized with a pcdna3 plasmid encoding the entire 47-kDa domain of SERA (amino acids 17 to 382) or the N-terminal domain (amino acids 17 to 110) of SERA. Minimal antibody responses were detected following DNA vaccination with the N-terminal domain of SERA, suggesting that the N-terminal domain alone is not highly immunogenic by this route of vaccine delivery. Immunization of mice by Gene Gun delivery of the 47-kDa domain of SERA elicited a significantly higher serum antibody titer to the antigen than immunization of mice by i.m. injection with the same plasmid did. The predominant isotype subclass of the antibodies elicited to the SERA protein following i.m. and Gene Gun immunizations with SERA plasmid DNA was immunoglobulin G1. Coimmunization of mice with SERA plasmid DNA and a plasmid expressing the hepatitis B surface antigen (pCMV-s) by the i.m. route resulted in higher anti-SERA titers than those generated in mice immunized with the SERA DNA plasmid alone. Vaccination with DNA may provide a viable alternative or may be used in conjunction with protein-based subunit vaccines to maximize the efficacy of a human malaria vaccine that includes immunogenic regions of the SERA protein. PMID:10496891

  1. Immune responses induced by gene gun or intramuscular injection of DNA vaccines that express immunogenic regions of the serine repeat antigen from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Belperron, A A; Feltquate, D; Fox, B A; Horii, T; Bzik, D J

    1999-10-01

    The liver- and blood-stage-expressed serine repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum is a candidate protein for a human malaria vaccine. We compared the immune responses induced in mice immunized with SERA-expressing plasmid DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular (i.m.) injection or delivered intradermally by Gene Gun immunization. Mice were immunized with a pcdna3 plasmid encoding the entire 47-kDa domain of SERA (amino acids 17 to 382) or the N-terminal domain (amino acids 17 to 110) of SERA. Minimal antibody responses were detected following DNA vaccination with the N-terminal domain of SERA, suggesting that the N-terminal domain alone is not highly immunogenic by this route of vaccine delivery. Immunization of mice by Gene Gun delivery of the 47-kDa domain of SERA elicited a significantly higher serum antibody titer to the antigen than immunization of mice by i.m. injection with the same plasmid did. The predominant isotype subclass of the antibodies elicited to the SERA protein following i.m. and Gene Gun immunizations with SERA plasmid DNA was immunoglobulin G1. Coimmunization of mice with SERA plasmid DNA and a plasmid expressing the hepatitis B surface antigen (pCMV-s) by the i.m. route resulted in higher anti-SERA titers than those generated in mice immunized with the SERA DNA plasmid alone. Vaccination with DNA may provide a viable alternative or may be used in conjunction with protein-based subunit vaccines to maximize the efficacy of a human malaria vaccine that includes immunogenic regions of the SERA protein. PMID:10496891

  2. An Optimized, Synthetic DNA Vaccine Encoding the Toxin A and Toxin B Receptor Binding Domains of Clostridium difficile Induces Protective Antibody Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baliban, Scott M.; Michael, Amanda; Shammassian, Berje; Mudakha, Shikata; Khan, Amir S.; Cocklin, Simon; Zentner, Isaac; Latimer, Brian P.; Bouillaut, Laurent; Hunter, Meredith; Marx, Preston; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Welles, Seth L.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) constitutes a large majority of nosocomial diarrhea cases in industrialized nations and is mediated by the effects of two secreted toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). Patients who develop strong antitoxin antibody responses can clear C. difficile infection and remain disease free. Key toxin-neutralizing epitopes have been found within the carboxy-terminal receptor binding domains (RBDs) of TcdA and TcdB, which has generated interest in developing the RBD as a viable vaccine target. While numerous platforms have been studied, very little data describes the potential of DNA vaccination against CDAD. Therefore, we created highly optimized plasmids encoding the RBDs from TcdA and TcdB in which any putative N-linked glycosylation sites were altered. Mice and nonhuman primates were immunized intramuscularly, followed by in vivo electroporation, and in these animal models, vaccination induced significant levels of both anti-RBD antibodies (blood and stool) and RBD-specific antibody-secreting cells. Further characterization revealed that sera from immunized mice and nonhuman primates could detect RBD protein from transfected cells, as well as neutralize purified toxins in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mice that were immunized with plasmids or given nonhuman-primate sera were protected from a lethal challenge with purified TcdA and/or TcdB. Moreover, immunized mice were significantly protected when challenged with C. difficile spores from homologous (VPI 10463) and heterologous, epidemic (UK1) strains. These data demonstrate the robust immunogenicity and efficacy of a TcdA/B RBD-based DNA vaccine in preclinical models of acute toxin-associated and intragastric, spore-induced colonic disease. PMID:25024365

  3. CryJ-LAMP DNA Vaccines for Japanese Red Cedar Allergy Induce Robust Th1-Type Immune Responses in Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Michael; Marketon, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Allergies caused by Japanese Red Cedar (JRC) pollen affect up to a third of Japanese people, necessitating development of an effective therapeutic. We utilized the lysosomal targeting property of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) to make DNA vaccines that encode LAMP-1 and the sequences of immunodominant allergen CryJ1 or CryJ2 from the JRC pollen. This novel strategy is designed to skew the CD4 T cell responses to the target allergens towards a nonallergenic Th1 response. CryJ1-LAMP and CryJ2-LAMP were administrated to BALB/c mice and antigen-specific Th1-type IgG2a and Th2-type IgG1 antibodies, as well as IgE antibodies, were assayed longitudinally. We also isolated different T cell populations from immunized mice and adoptively transferred them into naïve mice followed by CryJ1/CryJ2 protein boosts. We demonstrated that CryJ-LAMP immunized mice produce high levels of IFN-γ and anti-CryJ1 or anti-CryJ2 IgG2a antibodies and low levels of IgE antibodies, suggesting that a Th1 response was induced. In addition, we found that CD4+ T cells are the immunological effectors of DNA vaccination in this allergy model. Together, our results suggest the CryJ-LAMP Vaccine has a potential as an effective therapeutic for JRC induced allergy by skewing Th1/Th2 responses. PMID:27239481

  4. CryJ-LAMP DNA Vaccines for Japanese Red Cedar Allergy Induce Robust Th1-Type Immune Responses in Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Connolly, Michael; Marketon, Anthony; Heiland, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Allergies caused by Japanese Red Cedar (JRC) pollen affect up to a third of Japanese people, necessitating development of an effective therapeutic. We utilized the lysosomal targeting property of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) to make DNA vaccines that encode LAMP-1 and the sequences of immunodominant allergen CryJ1 or CryJ2 from the JRC pollen. This novel strategy is designed to skew the CD4 T cell responses to the target allergens towards a nonallergenic Th1 response. CryJ1-LAMP and CryJ2-LAMP were administrated to BALB/c mice and antigen-specific Th1-type IgG2a and Th2-type IgG1 antibodies, as well as IgE antibodies, were assayed longitudinally. We also isolated different T cell populations from immunized mice and adoptively transferred them into naïve mice followed by CryJ1/CryJ2 protein boosts. We demonstrated that CryJ-LAMP immunized mice produce high levels of IFN-γ and anti-CryJ1 or anti-CryJ2 IgG2a antibodies and low levels of IgE antibodies, suggesting that a Th1 response was induced. In addition, we found that CD4(+) T cells are the immunological effectors of DNA vaccination in this allergy model. Together, our results suggest the CryJ-LAMP Vaccine has a potential as an effective therapeutic for JRC induced allergy by skewing Th1/Th2 responses. PMID:27239481

  5. Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross‐reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades

    PubMed Central

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril J.; Thomsen, Joakim S.; Jensen, Kim L.; Nielsen, Lars P.; Aasted, Bent; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Bragstad et al. (2010) Pandemic influenza 1918 H1N1 and 1968 H3N2 DNA vaccines induce cross‐reactive immunity in ferrets against infection with viruses drifted for decades. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 13–23. Background  Alternative influenza vaccines and vaccine production forms are needed as the conventional protein vaccines do not induce broad cross‐reactivity against drifted strains. Furthermore, fast vaccine production is especially important in a pandemic situation, and broader vaccine reactivity would diminish the need for frequent change in the vaccine formulations. Objective  In this study, we compared the ability of pandemic influenza DNA vaccines to induce immunity against distantly related strains within a subtype with the immunity induced by conventional trivalent protein vaccines against homologous virus challenge. Methods  Ferrets were immunised by particle‐mediated epidermal delivery (gene gun) with DNA vaccines based on the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) and/or the matrix (M) and nucleoprotein genes of the 1918 H1N1 Spanish influenza pandemic virus or the 1968 H3N2 Hong Kong influenza pandemic virus. The animals were challenged with contemporary H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. Results  We demonstrated that DNA vaccines encoding proteins of the original 1918 H1N1 pandemic virus induced protective cross‐reactive immune responses in ferrets against infection with a 1947 H1N1 virus and a recent 1999 H1N1 virus. Similarly, a DNA vaccine, based on the HA and NA of the 1968 H3N2 pandemic virus, induced cross‐reactive immune responses against a recent 2005 H3N2 virus challenge. Conclusions  DNA vaccines based on pandemic or recent seasonal influenza genes induced cross‐reactive immunity against contemporary virus challenge as good as or superior to contemporary conventional trivalent protein vaccines. This suggests a unique ability of influenza DNA to induce cross‐protective immunity

  6. In vivo virus growth competition assays demonstrate equal fitness of fish rhabdovirus strains that co-circulate in aquaculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troyer, R.M.; Garver, K.A.; Ranson, J.C.; Wargo, A.R.; Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    A novel virus growth competition assay for determining relative fitness of RNA virus variants in vivo has been developed using the fish rhabdovirus, Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). We have conducted assays with IHNV isolates designated B, C, and D, representing the three most common genetic subtypes that co-circulate in Idaho trout farm aquaculture. In each assay, groups of 30 fish were immersed in a 1:1 mixture of two genotypes of IHNV, and then held in individual beakers for a 72 h period of in vivo competitive virus replication. Progeny virus populations in each fish were analyzed for the presence and proportion of each viral genotype. In two independent assays of the B:C isolate pair, and two assays of the B:D pair, all fish were co-infected and there was a high level of fish-to-fish variation in the ratio of the two competing genotypes. However, in each assay the average ratio in the 30-fish group was not significantly different from the input ratio of 1:1, indicating equal or nearly equal viral fitness on a host population basis, under the conditions tested. ?? 2008.

  7. [Construction and transfection of eucaryotic expression recombinant vector containing truncated region of UL83 gene of human cytomegalovirus and it's sheltered effect as DNA vaccine].

    PubMed

    Gao, Rong-Bao; Li, Yan-Qiu; Wang, Ming-Li

    2006-06-01

    To construct eucaryotic expression recombinant vector containing vivo truncated region of UL83 gene of human cytomegalovirus, realize its steady expression in Hep-2 cell, and study sheltered effect of the eucaryotic expression recombinant vector as DNA vaccine. A vivo truncated UL83 gene fragment encoding for truncated HCMV pp65 was obtained by PCR from human cytomegalovirus AD169 stock genome. By gene recombinant ways, the truncated UL83 gene fragment was cloned into eucaryotic expression vector pEGFP-C1 with reported gene coding GFP to construct recombinant vector pEGFP-C1-UL83. The recombinant vector pEGFP-C1-UL83 was tested by different methods including PCR, restriction digestion and gene sequencing. Test results showed the recombinant vector was constructed successfully. After pEGFP-C1-UL83 was transfected into Hep-2 cell by lipofectin mediation, expression of GFP and truncated pp65 fusion protein in Hep-2 cell was observed at different time points by fluorescence microscope. Results showed that quantity of fusion protein expression was the highest at 36h point. Then, Hep-2 cell was cultured selectively by RPMI-1640 containing G418 (200 microg/mL) to obtain a new cell stock of expressing truncated UL83 Gene fragment steadily. RT-PCR and Western blot results showed the truncated fragment of UL83 gene could be expressed steadily in Hep-2 cell. The result showed a new cell stock of expressing Tpp65 was established. This cell stock could be useful in some HCMV research fields, for example, it could be a tool in study of pp65 and HCMV infection, and it could provide a platform for the research into the therapy of HCMV infection. Immune sheltered effect of pEGFP-C1-UL83 as DNA vaccine was studied in vivo of HCMV congenital infection mouse model. The mouse model was immunized solely by pEGFP-C1-UL83, and was immunized jointly by pEGFP-C1-UL83 and its expression product. When the mouse was pregnant and brought to bed, differential antibody of anti-HCMV pp65 was

  8. Induction of robust cellular immunity against HPV6 and HPV11 in mice by DNA vaccine encoding for E6/E7 antigen

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Thomas; Pankhong, Panyupa; Yan, Jian; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Weiner, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the strong relationship between the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) “high-risk” subtypes and cervical cancers, most HPV-related studies have been focusing on the “high-risk” HPV subtypes 16 and 18. However, it has been suggested that the “low-risk” subtypes of HPV, HPV6 and HPV11, are the major cause of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and genital warts. In addition, HPV 6 and 11 are also associated with otolaryngologic malignancies, carcinoma of the lung, tonsil, larynx and low-grade cervical lesions. Therefore, development of HPV therapeutic vaccines targeting on subtypes 6 and 11 E6 or E7 are in great need. In this report, we describe two novel engineered DNA vaccines that encode HPV 6 and 11 consensus E6/E7 fusion proteins (p6E6E7 and p11E6E7) by utilizing a multi-phase strategy. Briefly, after generating consensus sequences, several modifications were performed to increase the expression of both constructs, including codon/RNA optimization, addition of a Kozak sequence and a highly efficient leader sequence. An endoproteolytic cleavage site was also introduced between E6 and E7 protein for proper protein folding and for better CTL processing. The expressions of both constructs were confirmed by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay. Vaccination with these DNA vaccines could elicit robust cellular immune responses. The epitope mapping assay was performed to further characterize the cellular immune responses induced by p6E6E7 and p11E6E7. The HPV 6 and 11 E6 or E7-specific immunodominant and subdominant epitopes were verified, respectively. The intracellular cytokine staining revealed that the magnitude of IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion in antigen-specific CD8+ cells was significantly enhanced, indicating that the immune responses elicited by p6E6E7 and p11E6E7 was heavily skewed toward driving CD8+ T cells. Such DNA immunogens are interesting candidates for further studies on HPV 6 and 11-associated diseases. PMID:22336879

  9. Safety and Immunogenicity Study of Multiclade HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Alone or as Boost following a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Susan; Than, Soe; Adams, Elizabeth M.; Graham, Barney S.; Koup, Richard A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Smith, Carol; Dally, Len; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Bergin, Philip J.; Hayes, Peter; Ho, Martin; Loughran, Kelley; Komaroff, Wendy; Stevens, Gwynneth; Thomson, Helen; Boaz, Mark J.; Cox, Josephine H.; Schmidt, Claudia; Gilmour, Jill; Nabel, Gary J.; Fast, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I study of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vector expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol from subtype B and Env from subtypes A, B and C, given alone or as boost following a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing the same HIV-1 proteins plus Nef, in 114 healthy HIV-uninfected African adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were randomized to 4 groups receiving the rAd5 vaccine intramuscularly at dosage levels of 1×1010 or 1×1011 particle units (PU) either alone or as boost following 3 injections of the DNA vaccine given at 4 mg/dose intramuscularly by needle-free injection using Biojector® 2000. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for 12 months. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Overall, 62% and 86% of vaccine recipients in the rAd5 alone and DNA prime - rAd5 boost groups, respectively, responded to the HIV-1 proteins by an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISPOT. The frequency of immune responses was independent of rAd5 dosage levels. The highest frequency of responses after rAd5 alone was detected at 6 weeks; after DNA prime - rAd5 boost, at 6 months (end of study). At baseline, neutralizing antibodies against Ad5 were present in 81% of volunteers; the distribution was similar across the 4 groups. Pre-existing immunity to Ad5 did not appear to have a significant impact on reactogenicity or immune response rates to HIV antigens by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Binding antibodies against Env were detected in up to 100% recipients of DNA prime - rAd5 boost. One volunteer acquired HIV infection after the study ended, two years after receipt of rAd5 alone. Conclusions/Significance The HIV-1 rAd5 vaccine, either alone or as a boost following HIV-1 DNA vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic in African adults. DNA priming increased the frequency and magnitude of cellular and humoral immune responses, but there was no effect of rAd5 dosage on immunogenicity endpoints. Trial

  10. A novel Sin Nombre virus DNA vaccine and its inclusion in a candidate pan-hantavirus vaccine against hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS)☆

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Jay W.; Josleyn, Matthew; Ballantyne, John; Brocato, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) causes a hemorrhagic fever known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North America. There have been approximately 200 fatal cases of HPS in the United States since 1993, predominantly in healthy working-age males (case fatality rate 35%). There are no FDA-approved vaccines or drugs to prevent or treat HPS. Previously, we reported that hantavirus vaccines based on the full-length M gene segment of Andes virus (ANDV) for HPS in South America, and Hantaan virus (HTNV) and Puumala virus (PUUV) for hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia, all elicited high-titer neutralizing antibodies in animal models. HFRS is more prevalent than HPS (>20,000 cases per year) but less pathogenic (case fatality rate 1–15%). Here, we report the construction and testing of a SNV full-length M gene-based DNA vaccine to prevent HPS. Rabbits vaccinated with the SNV DNA vaccine by muscle electroporation (mEP) developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, hamsters vaccinated three times with the SNV DNA vaccine using a gene gun were completely protected against SNV infection. This is the first vaccine of any kind that specifically elicits high-titer neutralizing antibodies against SNV. To test the possibility of producing a pan-hantavirus vaccine, rabbits were vaccinated by mEP with an HPS mix (ANDV and SNV plasmids), or HFRS mix (HTNV and PUUV plasmids), or HPS/HFRS mix (all four plasmids). The HPS mix and HFRS mix elicited neutralizing antibodies predominantly against ANDV/SNV and HTNV/PUUV, respectively. Furthermore, the HPS/HFRS mix elicited neutralizing antibodies against all four viruses. These findings demonstrate a pan-hantavirus vaccine using a mixed-plasmid DNA vaccine approach is feasible and warrants further development. PMID:23892100

  11. A novel Sin Nombre virus DNA vaccine and its inclusion in a candidate pan-hantavirus vaccine against hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS).

    PubMed

    Hooper, Jay W; Josleyn, Matthew; Ballantyne, John; Brocato, Rebecca

    2013-09-13

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) causes a hemorrhagic fever known as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North America. There have been approximately 200 fatal cases of HPS in the United States since 1993, predominantly in healthy working-age males (case fatality rate 35%). There are no FDA-approved vaccines or drugs to prevent or treat HPS. Previously, we reported that hantavirus vaccines based on the full-length M gene segment of Andes virus (ANDV) for HPS in South America, and Hantaan virus (HTNV) and Puumala virus (PUUV) for hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia, all elicited high-titer neutralizing antibodies in animal models. HFRS is more prevalent than HPS (>20,000 cases per year) but less pathogenic (case fatality rate 1-15%). Here, we report the construction and testing of a SNV full-length M gene-based DNA vaccine to prevent HPS. Rabbits vaccinated with the SNV DNA vaccine by muscle electroporation (mEP) developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, hamsters vaccinated three times with the SNV DNA vaccine using a gene gun were completely protected against SNV infection. This is the first vaccine of any kind that specifically elicits high-titer neutralizing antibodies against SNV. To test the possibility of producing a pan-hantavirus vaccine, rabbits were vaccinated by mEP with an HPS mix (ANDV and SNV plasmids), or HFRS mix (HTNV and PUUV plasmids), or HPS/HFRS mix (all four plasmids). The HPS mix and HFRS mix elicited neutralizing antibodies predominantly against ANDV/SNV and HTNV/PUUV, respectively. Furthermore, the HPS/HFRS mix elicited neutralizing antibodies against all four viruses. These findings demonstrate a pan-hantavirus vaccine using a mixed-plasmid DNA vaccine approach is feasible and warrants further development. PMID:23892100

  12. Co-Administration of Molecular Adjuvants Expressing NF-Kappa B Subunit p65/RelA or Type-1 Transactivator T-bet Enhance Antigen Specific DNA Vaccine-Induced Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Tingey, Colleen; Mahadevan, Lavanya; Hutnick, Natalie; Reuschel, Emma L.; Kudchodkar, Sagar; Flingai, Seleeke; Yan, Jenny; Kim, Joseph J.; Ugen, Kenneth E.; Weiner, David B.; Muthumani, Kar

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccine-induced immunity can be enhanced by the co-delivery of synthetic gene-encoding molecular adjuvants. Many of these adjuvants have included cytokines, chemokines or co-stimulatory molecules that have been demonstrated to enhance vaccine-induced immunity by increasing the magnitude or type of immune responses and/or protective efficacy. In this way, through the use of adjuvants, immune responses can be highly customizable and functionally tailored for optimal efficacy against pathogen specific (i.e., infectious agent) or non-pathogen (i.e., cancer) antigens. In the novel study presented here, we examined the use of cellular transcription factors as molecular adjuvants. Specifically the co-delivery of (a) RelA, a subunit of the NF-κB transcription complex or (b) T-bet, a Th1-specific T box transcription factor, along with a prototypical DNA vaccine expressing HIV-1 proteins was evaluated. As well, all of the vaccines and adjuvants were administered to mice using in vivo electroporation (EP), a technology demonstrated to dramatically increase plasmid DNA transfection and subsequent transgene expression with concomitant enhancement of vaccine induced immune responses. As such, this study demonstrated that co-delivery of either adjuvant resulted in enhanced T and B cell responses, specifically characterized by increased T cell numbers, IFN-γ production, as well as enhanced antibody responses. This study demonstrates the use of cellular transcription factors as adjuvants for enhancing DNA vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26344618

  13. Co-Administration of Molecular Adjuvants Expressing NF-Kappa B Subunit p65/RelA or Type-1 Transactivator T-bet Enhance Antigen Specific DNA Vaccine-Induced Immunity.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, Devon J; Tingey, Colleen; Mahadevan, Lavanya; Hutnick, Natalie; Reuschel, Emma L; Kudchodkar, Sagar; Flingai, Seleeke; Yan, Jenny; Kim, Joseph J; Ugen, Kenneth E; Weiner, David B; Muthumani, Kar

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccine-induced immunity can be enhanced by the co-delivery of synthetic gene-encoding molecular adjuvants. Many of these adjuvants have included cytokines, chemokines or co-stimulatory molecules that have been demonstrated to enhance vaccine-induced immunity by increasing the magnitude or type of immune responses and/or protective efficacy. In this way, through the use of adjuvants, immune responses can be highly customizable and functionally tailored for optimal efficacy against pathogen specific (i.e., infectious agent) or non-pathogen (i.e., cancer) antigens. In the novel study presented here, we examined the use of cellular transcription factors as molecular adjuvants. Specifically the co-delivery of (a) RelA, a subunit of the NF-κB transcription complex or (b) T-bet, a Th1-specific T box transcription factor, along with a prototypical DNA vaccine expressing HIV-1 proteins was evaluated. As well, all of the vaccines and adjuvants were administered to mice using in vivo electroporation (EP), a technology demonstrated to dramatically increase plasmid DNA transfection and subsequent transgene expression with concomitant enhancement of vaccine induced immune responses. As such, this study demonstrated that co-delivery of either adjuvant resulted in enhanced T and B cell responses, specifically characterized by increased T cell numbers, IFN-γ production, as well as enhanced antibody responses. This study demonstrates the use of cellular transcription factors as adjuvants for enhancing DNA vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26344618

  14. DNA vaccine (P1-2A-3C-pCDNA) co-administered with Bovine IL-18 gives protective immune response against Foot and Mouth Disease in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kotla, Sivareddy; Sanghratna Vishanath, Bahire; H J, Dechamma; K, Ganesh; V V S, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G R

    2016-09-25

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals causing considerable economic loss in the affected countries. Presently used tissue culture inactivated vaccine protects the vaccinated animals for a short duration. DNA vaccines along with appropriate adjutants is one of the approach for the development of alternative vaccine. In the present study, we constructed P1-2A-3CpCDNA (containing P1-2A-3C coding sequences of FMDV Asia-1 Ind 63/72) and bovine IL-18 pCDNA plasmids and evaluated in cattle. Four groups of calves each group containing six calves were vaccinated with 200μg of plasmid DNA vaccine P1-2A-3CpCDNA, P1-2A-3CpCDNA+ bIL-18pCDNA and inactivated vaccine respectively where as fourth group was unvaccinated. P1-2A-3CpCDNA+bIL-18pCDNA vaccinated animals have shown higher levels of neutralizing antibodies and specific T-cell proliferation responses. Higher levels of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were observed in these animals. Similarly, IL-18 adjuvanted group has shown increased Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses. All the vaccinated animals were challenged with cattle adapted FMD homologous Asia1 virus two weeks after the booster dose. IL18 co administered DNA vaccine construct has protected four out of six animals challenged with homologous virus. PMID:27599937

  15. DNA vaccines targeting heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E induce potent humoral and cellular immunity and provide protection from lethal toxin challenge

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hutnick, Natalie A; Walters, Jewell N; Ragwan, Edwin; Bdeir, Khalil; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Finnefrock, Adam C; Casimiro, Danilo R; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are deadly, toxic proteins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum that can cause significant diseases in humans. The use of the toxic substances as potential bioweapons has raised concerns by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Military. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent botulinum intoxication. Here we present an immunogenicity study to evaluate the efficacy of novel monovalent vaccines and a trivalent cocktail DNA vaccine targeting the heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E. These synthetic DNA vaccines induced robust humoral and polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses which fully protected animals against lethal challenge after just 2 immunizations. In addition, naïve animals administered immunized sera mixed with the lethal neurotoxin were 100% protected against intoxication. The data demonstrate the protective efficacy induced by a combinative synthetic DNA vaccine approach. This study has importance for the development of vaccines that provide protective immunity against C. botulinum neurotoxins and other toxins. PMID:26158319

  16. A Novel Rhabdovirus Isolated from the Straw-Colored Fruit Bat Eidolon helvum, with Signs of Antibodies in Swine and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Binger, Tabea; Annan, Augustina; Drexler, Jan Felix; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Kallies, René; Adankwah, Ernest; Wollny, Robert; Kopp, Anne; Heidemann, Hanna; Dei, Dickson; Agya-Yao, Festus Courage; Junglen, Sandra; Feldt, Torsten; Kurth, Andreas; Oppong, Samuel; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bats have been implicated as reservoirs of emerging viruses. Bat species forming large social groups and roosting in proximity to human communities are of particular interest. In this study, we sampled a colony of ca. 350,000 individuals of the straw-colored fruit bat Eidolon helvum in Kumasi, the second largest city of Ghana. A novel rhabdovirus (Kumasi rhabdovirus [KRV]) was isolated in E. helvum cell cultures and passaged to Vero cells as well as interferon-competent human and primate cells (A549 and MA104). Genome composition was typical for a rhabdovirus. KRV was detected in 5.1% of 487 animals, showing association with the spleen but not the brain. Antibody prevalence was 11.5% by immunofluorescence and 6.4% by plaque reduction virus neutralization test (PRNT). Detection throughout 3 sampling years was pronounced in both annual wet seasons, of which only one overlaps the postparturition season. Juvenile bats showed increased viral prevalence. No evidence of infection was obtained in 1,240 female mosquitos (6 different genera) trapped in proximity to the colony to investigate potential vector association. Antibodies were found in 28.9% (5.4% by PRNT) of 107 swine sera but not in similarly large collections of sheep, goat, or cattle sera. The antibody detection rate in human subjects with occupational exposure to the bat colony was 11% (5/45 persons), which was significantly higher than in unexposed adults (0.8% [1/118]; chi square, P < 0.001). KRV is a novel bat-associated rhabdovirus potentially transmitted to humans and swine. Disease associations should be investigated. IMPORTANCE Bats are thought to carry a huge number of as-yet-undiscovered viruses that may pose epidemic threats to humans and livestock. Here we describe a novel dimarhabdovirus which we isolated from a large colony of the straw-colored fruit bat Eidolon helvum in Ghana. As these animals are exposed to humans and several livestock species, we looked for antibodies indicating

  17. Enhanced Efficacy of a Codon-Optimized DNA Vaccine Encoding the Glycoprotein Precursor Gene of Lassa Virus in a Guinea Pig Disease Model When Delivered by Dermal Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kathleen A; Broderick, Kate E; Wilkinson, Eric R; Shaia, Carl I; Bell, Todd M; Shurtleff, Amy C; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine V; Guttieri, Mary C; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa. Presently, there are no FDA-licensed medical countermeasures for this disease. In a pilot study, we constructed a DNA vaccine (pLASV-GPC) that expressed the LASV glycoprotein precursor gene (GPC). This plasmid was used to vaccinate guinea pigs (GPs) using intramuscular electroporation as the delivery platform. Vaccinated GPs were protected from lethal infection (5/6) with LASV compared to the controls. However, vaccinated GPs experienced transient viremia after challenge, although lower than the mock-vaccinated controls. In a follow-on study, we developed a new device that allowed for both the vaccine and electroporation pulse to be delivered to the dermis. We also codon-optimized the GPC sequence of the vaccine to enhance expression in GPs. Together, these innovations resulted in enhanced efficacy of the vaccine. Unlike the pilot study where neutralizing titers were not detected until after virus challenge, modest neutralizing titers were detected in guinea pigs before challenge, with escalating titers detected after challenge. The vaccinated GPs were never ill and were not viremic at any timepoint. The combination of the codon-optimized vaccine and dermal electroporation delivery is a worthy candidate for further development. PMID:26344112

  18. Effect of the Plasmid-DNA Vaccination on Macroscopic and Microscopic Damage Caused by the Experimental Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in the Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C.; García-Mendoza, Humberto; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A.; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2013-01-01

    The dog is considered the main domestic reservoir for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and a suitable experimental animal model to study the pathological changes during the course of Chagas disease (CD). Vaccine development is one of CD prevention methods to protect people at risk. Two plasmids containing genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (TcSP) and an amastigote-specific glycoprotein (TcSSP4) were used as DNA vaccines in a canine model. Splenomegaly was not found in either of the recombinant plasmid-immunized groups; however, cardiomegaly was absent in animals immunized only with the plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene. The inflammation of subendocardial and myocardial tissues was prevented only with the immunization with TcSSP4 gene. In conclusion, the vaccination with these genes has a partial protective effect on the enlargement of splenic and cardiac tissues during the chronic CD and on microscopic hearth damage, since both plasmids prevented splenomegaly but only one avoided cardiomegaly, and the lesions in heart tissue of dog immunized with plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene covered only subepicardial tissue. PMID:24163822

  19. Polysaccharides from Dioscorea (山藥 Shān Yào) and Other Phytochemicals Enhance Antitumor Effects Induced by DNA Vaccine Against Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Chi; Wang, Jeng-Hwan; Aravindaram, Kandan; Wang, Shu-Jane; Hsu, Chih-Chien; Li, Chin-Jin; Wen, Chih-Chun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants can be used to enhance the immunogenicity of antigens and improve the efficacy of vaccines. Potent adjuvant action is known to often correlate with the activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Specific plant polysaccharides and a variety of phytochemicals from foods and traditional medicinal herbs have been shown to modulate NF-κB activation. In the present study, selected plant polysaccharides and phytochemicals were evaluated for use as a DNA vaccine adjuvant in a murine melanoma model. We observed that a specific ethanol extract fraction (DsCE-I) from the tuber of a key Traditional Chinese Medicine plant, Dioscorea (山藥 Shān Yào), enhanced the protection against melanoma after immunization with a gene-based vaccine. A number of anti-inflammatory phytochemicals tested were able to partially diminish the inflammation-associated tumorigenesis elicited by LPS. Among the several phytochemical combinations investigated, the use of an adjuvant containing LPS in combination with emodin resulted in smaller tumors and higher survival rate in test mice than the use of other adjuvant treatments and the control sets in this DNA cancer vaccine model. A Dioscorea polysaccharide fraction (DsCE-I) and several specific phytochemicals warrant further exploration as useful adjuvants for anticancer vaccines. PMID:24872932

  20. [Elaboration and evaluation of a candidate to the DNA vaccine using synthetic genes derived from the peptídeo SBm7462 against the carrapato Rhiphicephalus (Boophilus) microplus].

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Carla L; Mendonça, Bianca G; Tavares, Larissa C; Girão, Flávia A; Sossai, Sidimar; Peconick, Ana P; Carvalho, Gabriel D; Patarroyo, Joaquín H

    2008-09-01

    Rhiphicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is one of the most important arthropods in veterinary medicine due economic losses and health problems caused in cattle production. The vaccination represents optimum method evaluated with effective cost to prevent economic losses and to increase the duration and quality of life of the production animals. A synthetic peptide, SBm 7462, derived from Bm86, has been shown great results in control of ticks. The construction and synthesis of one nucleotide sequence based on this peptide might be useful for design a DNA vaccine that has many advances than peptide vaccine. A gene, called seq1, was constructed with a three repetition of nucleotide sequence of SBm 7462. It was cloned into a pCIneo vector expression in mammals and injected in BALB/c mouse. When mice were inoculated with the expression cassette they did not response in ELISA. They elevated antibody titles only when vaccinated with the synthetic peptide SBm7462®. And, the best titles of immunoglobulins were seen when the SBm7462® was administered subcutaneously. PMID:20059811

  1. Immune responses in rats and sheep induced by a DNA vaccine containing the phosphoglycerate kinase gene of Fasciola hepatica and liver fluke infection.

    PubMed

    Wesołowska, Agnieszka; Zawistowska-Deniziak, Anna; Norbury, Luke J; Wilkowski, Przemysław; Januszkiewicz, Kamil; Pyziel, Anna M; Zygner, Wojciech; Wędrychowicz, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Immune responses of rats and sheep following vaccination with cDNA encoding phosphoglycerate kinase of Fasciola hepatica (cDNA-FhPGK/pCMV) and F. hepatica infection were investigated in the present study. cDNA-FhPGK/pCMV vaccinated female Sprague-Dawley rats were better protected by vaccination than their male counterparts - 48% reduction in fluke burden for females and no protection for males when compared with appropriate infection control groups. Moreover, male rats developed marked leukocytosis during the study with higher neutrophil, eosinophil and monocyte responses than females. Additionally, dynamics of eosinophil and monocyte responses varied between sexes. Increased titres of anti-FhPGK IgG1 and IgG2a correlated with the protective effect of vaccination that was observed among female rats. In the case of male sheep, no differences in worm burdens and in the course of the immune response were observed following vaccination. Titres of specific antibodies detected were low, and cellular responses were not significant. Apparently, sheep immune responses induced by cDNA-FhPGK/pCMV vaccination are not effective at controlling F. hepatica infection. Poor immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in large animals is still a major obstacle of this technology that has to be overcome. PMID:27078643

  2. A multigene HIV type 1 subtype C modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccine efficiently boosts immune responses to a DNA vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Enid; Burgers, Wendy A; Van Harmelen, Joanne H; Monroe, James E; Greenhalgh, Trish; Williamson, Carolyn; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2008-02-01

    Heterologous prime-boost vaccine strategies have generated high frequencies of antigen-specific T cells in preclinical and clinical trials of candidate HIV vaccines. We have developed a DNA (SAAVI DNA-C) and MVA (SAAVI MVA-C) vaccine based on HIV-1 subtype C for testing in clinical trials. Both vaccines contain five subtype C genes: gag, reverse transcriptase, tat, and nef, expressed as a polyprotein, and a truncated env (gp150). The individual vaccines induced CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells specific for the vaccine-expressed antigens in BALB/c mice. Combining the vaccines in a DNA prime and MVA boost regimen increased the cumulative peptide response compared to the DNA vaccine alone 10-fold, to over 6000 SFU/10(6) splenocytes in the IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. Th1 cytokine IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha levels