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Sample records for rhamnogalacturonan acetyl esterase

  1. Novel Family of Carbohydrate Esterases, Based on Identification of the Hypocrea jecorina Acetyl Esterase Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cell walls have been shown to contain acetyl groups in hemicelluloses and pectin. The gene, ae1, encoding the acetyl esterase (Ae1) of Hypocrea jecorina was identified by amino terminal sequencing, peptide mass spectrometry, and genomic sequence analyses. The coded polypeptide had 348 amino ...

  2. Identification of a bacterial pectin acetyl esterase in Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937.

    PubMed

    Shevchik, V E; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, N

    1997-06-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi causes soft-rot diseases of various plants by enzymatic degradation of the pectin in plant cell walls. The structural complexity of pectin requires the combined action of several pectinases for its efficient breakdown. Three types of pectinases have so far been identified in E. chrysanthemi: two pectin methyl esterases (PemA, PemB), a polygalacturonase (PehX), and eight pectate lyases (PelA, PelB, PelC, PelD, PelE, PelL, PelZ, PelX). We report in this paper the analysis of a novel enzyme, the pectin acetyl esterase encoded by the paeY gene. No bacterial form of pectin acetyl esterases has been described previously, while plant tissues and some pectinolytic fungi were found to produce similar enzymes. The paeY gene is present in a cluster of five pectinase-encoding genes, pelA-pelE-pelD-paeY-pemA. The paeY open reading frame is 1650 bases long and encodes a 551-residue precursor protein of 60704Da, including a 25-amino-acid signal peptide. PaeY shares one region of homology with a rhamnogalacturonan acetyl esterase of Aspergillus aculeatus. To characterize the enzyme, the paeY gene was overexpressed and its protein product was purified. PaeY releases acetate from sugar-beet pectin and from various synthetic substrates. Moreover, the enzyme was shown to act in synergy with other pectinases. The de-esterification rate by PaeY increased after previous demethylation of the pectins by PemA and after depolymerization of the pectin by pectate lyases. In addition, the degradation of sugar-beet pectin by pectate lyases is favoured after the removal of methyl and acetyl groups by PemA and PaeY, respectively. The paeY gene was first identified on the basis of its regulation, which shares several characteristics with that of other pectinases. Analysis of the paeY transcription, using gene fusions, revealed that it is induced by pectic catabolic products and is affected by growth phase, oxygen limitation and catabolite repression. Regulation of pae

  3. Hydrolysis of wheat arabinoxylan by two acetyl xylan esterases from Chaetomium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiaoxue; Lange, Lene; Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Busk, Peter Kamp

    2015-01-01

    The thermophilic filamentous ascomycete Chaetomium thermophilum produces functionally diverse hemicellulases when grown on hemicellulose as carbon source. Acetyl xylan esterase (EC 3.1.1.72) is an important accessory enzyme in hemicellulose biodegradation. Although the genome of C. thermophilum has been sequenced, its carbohydrate esterases are not annotated yet. We applied peptide pattern recognition (PPR) tool for sequence analysis of the C. thermophilum genome, and 11 carbohydrate esterase genes were discovered. Furthermore, we cloned and heterologously expressed two putative acetyl xylan esterase genes, CtAxeA and CtAxeB, in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant proteins, rCtAxeA and rCtAxeB, released acetic acids from p-nitrophenyl acetate and water-insoluble wheat arabinoxylan. These results indicate that CtAxeA and CtAxeB are true acetyl xylan esterases. For both recombinant esterases, over 93 % of the initial activity was retained after 24 h of incubation at temperatures up to 60 °C, and over 90 % of the initial activity was retained after 24 h of incubation in different buffers from pH 4.0 to 9.0 at 4 and 50 °C. The overall xylose yield from wheat arabinoxylan hydrolysis was 8 % with xylanase treatment and increased to 34 % when xylanase was combined with rCtAxeA and rCtAxeB. In sum, the present study first report the biochemical characterization of two acetyl xylan esterases from C. thermophilum, which are efficient in hydrolyzing hemicellulose with potential application in biomass bioconversion to high value chemicals or biofuels. PMID:25369895

  4. Characterization of an acetyl xylan esterase from the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, D.L.; Li, X.L.; Chen, H.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1999-09-01

    A 1,067-bp cDNA, designated axeA, coding for an acetyl xylan esterase (AxeA) was cloned from the anaerobic rumen fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2. The gene had an open reading frame of 939 bp encoding a polypeptide of 313 amino acid residues with a calculated mass of 34,845 Da. An active esterase using the original start codon of the cDNA was synthesized in Escherichia coli. Two active forms of the esterase were purified from recombinant E. coli cultures. The size difference of 8 amino acids was a result of cleavages at two different sites within the signal peptide. The enzyme released acetate from several acetylated substrates, including acetylated xylan. The activity toward acetylated xylan was tripled in the presence of recombinant xylanase A from the same fungus. Using p-nitrophenyl acetate as a substrate, the enzyme had a K{sub m} of 0.9 mM and a V{sub max} of 785 {micro}mol min{sup {minus}} mg{sup {minus}1}. It had temperature and pH optima of 30 C and 9.0, respectively. AxeA had 56% amino acid identity with BnaA, an acetyl xylan esterase of Neocallimastix patriciarum, but the Orpinomyces AxeA was devoid of a noncatalytic repeated peptide domain (NCRPD) found at the carboxy terminus of the Neocallimastix BnaA. The NCRPD found in many glycosyl hydrolases and esterases of anaerobic fungi has been postulated to function as a docking domain for cellulase-hemicellulase complexes, similar to the dockerin of the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum.

  5. Expression of fungal acetyl xylan esterase in Arabidopsis thaliana improves saccharification of stem lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Derba-Maceluch, Marta; Chong, Sun-Li; Gómez, Leonardo D; Miedes, Eva; Banasiak, Alicja; Ratke, Christine; Gaertner, Cyril; Mouille, Grégory; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; Molina, Antonio; Sellstedt, Anita; Tenkanen, Maija; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall hemicelluloses and pectins are O-acetylated at specific positions, but the significance of these substitutions is poorly understood. Using a transgenic approach, we investigated how reducing the extent of O-acetylation in xylan affects cell wall chemistry, plant performance and the recalcitrance of lignocellulose to saccharification. The Aspergillus niger acetyl xylan esterase AnAXE1 was expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of either the constitutively expressed 35S CAMV promoter or a woody-tissue-specific GT43B aspen promoter, and the protein was targeted to the apoplast by its native signal peptide, resulting in elevated acetyl esterase activity in soluble and wall-bound protein extracts and reduced xylan acetylation. No significant alterations in cell wall composition were observed in the transgenic lines, but their xylans were more easily digested by a β-1,4-endoxylanase, and more readily extracted by hot water, acids or alkali. Enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulose after hot water and alkali pretreatments produced up to 20% more reducing sugars in several lines. Fermentation by Trametes versicolor of tissue hydrolysates from the line with a 30% reduction in acetyl content yielded ~70% more ethanol compared with wild type. Plants expressing 35S:AnAXE1 and pGT43B:AnAXE1 developed normally and showed increased resistance to the biotrophic pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, probably due to constitutive activation of defence pathways. However, unintended changes in xyloglucan and pectin acetylation were only observed in 35S:AnAXE1-expressing plants. This study demonstrates that postsynthetic xylan deacetylation in woody tissues is a promising strategy for optimizing lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production. PMID:25960248

  6. Crystal structure of an acetyl esterase complexed with acetate ion provides insights into the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uechi, Keiko; Kamachi, Saori; Akita, Hironaga; Mine, Shouhei; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2016-08-26

    We previously reported the crystal structure of an acetyl esterase (TcAE206) belonging to carbohydrate esterase family 3 from Talaromyces cellulolyticus. In this study, we solved the crystal structure of an S10A mutant of TcAE206 complexed with an acetate ion. The acetate ion was stabilized by three hydrogen bonds in the oxyanion hole instead of a water molecule as in the structure of wild-type TcAE206. Furthermore, the catalytic triad residue His182 moved 0.8 Å toward the acetate ion upon substrate entering the active site, suggesting that this movement is necessary for completion of the catalytic reaction. PMID:27329813

  7. Molecular characterization of a new acetyl xylan esterase (AXEII) from edible straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea with both de-O-acetylation and de-N-acetylation activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiufeng; Ding, Shaojun

    2009-06-01

    A new Volvariella volvacea gene encoding a carbohydrate esterase (CE) family 4 acetyl xylan esterase (AXE) (designated as VvaxeII) was cloned and characterized. The coded polypeptide had 253 amino acid residues, with the first 19 serving as a secretion signal peptide. The VvaxeII transcript levels were high when the fungus was grown on oat spelt xylan, cellobiose, microcrystalline cellulose, carboxymethyl-cellulose, lactose, galactose, and chitin from crab as carbon sources. The recombinant VvAXEII produced by expression of VvaxeII in Pichia pastoris exhibited activity toward acetylated oat spelt xylan and various chitinous substrates, but was totally inactive against artificial aromatic acetates such as beta-nitrophenyl, 4-methylumbelliferyl, and alpha-naphthyl acetates. Enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis was maximal at pH 7.0 and 60 degrees C, and reciprocal plots revealed an apparent K(m) value of 1.42 mg mL(-1) and a V(max) value of 833 IU micromol(-1) protein using glycol chitin as a substrate. The recombinant VvAXEII requires activation by bivalent cations such as Co2+ and Mg2+. Interestingly, the recombinant VvAXEII showed no deacetylation activity to fully acetylated monosaccharides such as xylose tetraacetate. PMID:19473250

  8. Molecular cloning, and characterization of a modular acetyl xylan esterase from the edible straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shaojun; Cao, Jie; Zhou, Rui; Zheng, Fei

    2007-09-01

    A new Volvariella volvacea gene encoding an acetyl xylan esterase (designated as Vvaxe1) was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris. The cDNA contained an ORF of 1047 bp encoding 349 amino acids with a calculated mass of 39 990 Da. VvAXE1 is a modular enzyme consisting of an N-terminal signal peptide, a catalytic domain, and a cellulose-binding domain. The amino acid sequence of the enzyme exhibited a high degree of similarity to cinnamoyl esterase B from Penicillium funiculosum, and acetyl xylan esterases from Aspergillus oryzae, Penicillium purpurogenum, and Aspergillus ficuum. Recombinant acetyl xylan esterase released acetate from several acetylated substrates including beta-d-xylose tetraacetate and acetylated xylan. No activity was detectable on p-nitrophenyl acetate. Enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate was maximal at pH 8.0 and 60 degrees C, and reciprocal plots revealed an apparent K(m) value of 307.7 microM and a V(max) value of 24 733 IU micromol(-1) protein. ReAXE1 also exhibited a capacity to bind to Avicel and H(3)PO(4) acid-swollen cellulose. PMID:17623028

  9. Acetylated Rhamnogalacturonans from Immature Fruits of Abelmoschus esculentus Inhibit the Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Human Gastric Cells by Interaction with Outer Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Thöle, Christian; Brandt, Simone; Ahmed, Niyaz; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Polysaccharide containing extracts from immature fruits of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) are known to exhibit antiadhesive effects against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to stomach tissue. The present study investigates structural and functional features of polymers responsible for this inhibition of bacterial attachment to host cells. Ammonium sulfate precipitation of an aqueous extract yielded two fractions at 60% and 90% saturation with significant antiadhesive effects against H. pylori, strain J99, (FE60% 68% ± 15%; FE90% 75% ± 11% inhibition rates) after preincubation of the bacteria at 1 mg/mL. Sequential extraction of okra fruits yielded hot buffer soluble solids (HBSS) with dose dependent antiadhesive effects against strain J99 and three clinical isolates. Preincubation of H. pylori with HBSS (1 mg/mL) led to reduced binding to 3'-sialyl lactose, sialylated Le(a) and Le(x). A reduction of bacterial binding to ligands complementary to BabA and SabA was observed when bacteria were pretreated with FE90%. Structural analysis of the antiadhesive polysaccharides (molecular weight, monomer composition, linkage analysis, stereochemistry, and acetylation) indicated the presence of acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-I polymers, decorated with short galactose side chains. Deacetylation of HBSS and FE90% resulted in loss of the antiadhesive activity, indicating esterification being a prerequisite for antiadhesive activity. PMID:26389872

  10. Acetyl xylan esterase of Aspergillus ficcum catalyzed the synthesis of peracetic acid from ethyl acetate and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Moon

    2011-11-01

    Recombinant acetyl xylan esterase (rAXE) of Aspergillus ficcum catalyzed the synthesis of peracetic acid (PAA) from ethyl acetate and hydrogen peroxide. Ten micrograms of rAXE catalyzed the synthesis of 1.34 mM of PAA, which can be used for the pretreatment of cellulosic biomass in situ. PMID:21824816

  11. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima acetyl esterase complex with a substrate analog: Insights into the distinctive substrate specificity in the CE7 carbohydrate esterase family.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mrityunjay K; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-07-22

    The carbohydrate esterase family 7 (CE7) members are acetyl esterases that possess unusual substrate specificity for cephalosporin C and 7-amino-cephalosporanic acid. This family containing the α/β hydrolase fold has a distinctive substrate profile that allows it to carry out hydrolysis of esters containing diverse alcohol moieties while maintaining narrow specificity for an acetate ester. Here we investigate the structural basis of this preference for small acyl groups using the crystal structure of the thermostable Thermotoga maritima CE7 acetyl esterase (TmAcE) complexed with a non-cognate substrate analog. The structure determined at 1.86 Å resolution provides direct evidence for the location of the largely hydrophobic and rigid substrate binding pocket in this family. Furthermore, a three-helix insertion domain near the catalytic machinery shapes the substrate binding site. The structure reveals two residues (Pro228 and Ile276) which constitute a hydrophobic rigid binding surface for the acyl group of the ester and thus restricts the size of the acyl group that be accommodated. In combination with previous literature on kinetic properties of the enzyme, our studies suggest that these residues determine the unique specificity of the TmAcE for short straight chain esters. The structure provides a template for focused attempts to engineer the CE7 enzymes for enhanced stability, selectivity or activity for biocatalytic applications. PMID:27181355

  12. MODE OF ACTION OF ACETYLXYLAN ESTERASE FROM STREPTOMYCES LIVIDANS: A STUDY WITH DEOXY AND DEOXY-FLUORO ANALOGUES OF ACETYLATED METHYL BETA-D-XYLOPYRANOSIDE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The action of Streptomyces lividans acetylxylan esterase on methyl 2,4-di-O-acetyl- and 3,4-di-O-acetyl beta-D-xylopyranoside was compared with its action on the 2- and 3-deoxy and 2- and 3-deoxy-fluoro-analogues of the two diacetates in order to elucidate the role of the free hydroxyl group in the ...

  13. Enhancement of acetyl xylan esterase activity on cellulose acetate through fusion to a family 3 cellulose binding module.

    PubMed

    Mai-Gisondi, Galina; Turunen, Ossi; Pastinen, Ossi; Pahimanolis, Nikolaos; Master, Emma R

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the potential to increase the activity of a family 1 carbohydrate esterase on cellulose acetate through fusion to a family 3 carbohydrate binding module (CBM). Specifically, CtCBM3 from Clostridium thermocellum was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the acetyl xylan esterase (AnAXE) from Aspergillus nidulans, and active forms of both AnAXE and AnAXE-CtCBM3 were produced in Pichia pastoris. CtCBM3 fusion had negligible impact on the thermostability or regioselectivity of AnAXE; activities towards acetylated corncob xylan, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, p-nitrophenyl acetate, and cellobiose octaacetate were also unchanged. By contrast, the activity of AnAXE-CtCBM3 on cellulose acetate increased by two to four times over 24 h, with greater differences observed at earlier time points. Binding studies using microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) and a commercial source of cellulose acetate confirmed functional production of the CtCBM3 domain; affinity gel electrophoresis using acetylated xylan also verified the selectivity of CtCBM3 binding to cellulose. Notably, gains in enzyme activity on cellulose acetate appeared to exceed gains in substrate binding, suggesting that fusion to CtCBM3 increases functional associations between the enzyme and insoluble, high molecular weight cellulosic substrates. PMID:26320711

  14. Biochemical and Domain Analyses of FSUAxe6B, a Modular Acetyl Xylan Esterase, Identify a Unique Carbohydrate Binding Module in Fibrobacter succinogenes S85▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac K. O.

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl xylan esterase (EC 3.1.1.72) is a member of a set of enzymes required to depolymerize hemicellulose, especially xylan that is composed of a main chain of β-1,4-linked xylopyranoside residues decorated with acetyl side groups. Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 Axe6B (FSUAxe6B) is an acetyl xylan esterase encoded in the genome of this rumen bacterium. The enzyme is a modular protein comprised of an esterase domain, a carbohydrate-binding module, and a region of unknown function. Sequences that are homologous to the region of unknown function are paralogously distributed, thus far, only in F. succinogenes. Therefore, the sequences were designated Fibrobacter succinogenes-specific paralogous module 1 (FPm-1). The FPm-1s are associated with at least 24 polypeptides in the genome of F. succinogenes S85. A bioinformatics search showed that most of the FPm-1-appended polypeptides are putative carbohydrate-active enzymes, suggesting a potential role in carbohydrate metabolism. Truncational analysis of FSUAxe6B, together with catalytic and substrate binding studies, has allowed us to delineate the functional modules in the polypeptide. The N-terminal half of FSUAxe6B harbors the activity that cleaves side chain acetyl groups from xylan-like substrates, and the binding of insoluble xylan was determined to originate from FPm-1. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of highly conserved active-site residues in the esterase domain suggested that the esterase activity is derived from a tetrad composed of Ser44, His273, Glu194, and Asp270, with both Glu194 and Asp270 functioning as helper acids, instead of a single carboxylate residue proposed to initiate catalysis. PMID:19897648

  15. A combined approach for improving alkaline acetyl xylan esterase production in Pichia pastoris, and effects of glycosylation on enzyme secretion, activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bin; Chen, Yan; Ding, Shaojun

    2012-09-01

    High level expression of axe1, a gene previously cloned from Volvariella volvacea that encodes an acetyl xylan esterase with two potential N-linked glycosylation sites, has been achieved in Pichia pastoris using a codon-optimized axe1 synthesized by the primer extension PCR procedure. The GC content of the codon-optimized axe1 was 48.62% compared with 55.49% in the native gene. Using the codon-optimized construct, AXE1 expression in P. pastoris was increased from an undetectable level to 136.45 U/ml six days after induction of yeast cultures grown in BMMY medium. A further increase (to 463 U/ml) was achieved when conditions for yeast culture were optimized as follows: 2.8% methanol, 0.63% casamino acids, and pH 8.0. This latter value represented a 3.4-fold and 246-fold increase in the enzyme levels recorded in non-optimized P. pastoris cultures and in rice straw-grown cultures of V. volvacea, respectively. N-linked glycosylation played an essential role in AXE1 secretion but had only a slight effect on the catalytic activity and stability of the recombinant enzyme. PMID:22750674

  16. A novel neutral xylanase with high SDS resistance from Volvariella volvacea: characterization and its synergistic hydrolysis of wheat bran with acetyl xylan esterase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Huang, Jingxuan; Yin, Yuhao; Ding, Shaojun

    2013-10-01

    A neutral xylanase (XynII) from Volvariella volvacea was identified and characterized. Unlike other modular xylanases, it consists of only a single GH10 catalytic domain with a unique C-terminal sequence (W-R-W-F) and a phenylalanine and proline-rich motif (T-P-F-P-P-F) at N-terminus, indicating that it is a novel GH10 xylanase. XynII exhibited optimal activity at pH 7 and 60 °C and stability over a broad range of pH 4.0-10.0. XynII displayed extreme highly SDS resistance retaining 101.98, 92.99, and 69.84 % activity at the presence of 300 mM SDS on birchwood, soluble oat spelt, and beechwood xylan, respectively. It remained largely intact after 24 h of incubation with proteinase K at a protease to protein ratio of 1:50 at 37 °C. The kinetic constants K(m) value towards beechwood xylan was 0.548 mg ml⁻¹, and the k(cat)/K(m) ratio, reflecting the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme, was 126.42 ml mg⁻¹ s⁻¹ at 60 °C. XynII was a true endo-acting xylanase lacking cellulase activity. It has weak activity towards xylotriose but efficiently hydrolyzed xylans and xylooligosaccharides larger than xylotriose mainly to xylobiose. Synergistic action with acetyl xylan esterase (AXEI) from V. volvacea was observed for de-starched wheat bran. The highest degree of synergy (DS 1.42) was obtained in sequential reactions with AXEI digestion preceding XynII. The high SDS resistance and intrinsic stability suggested XynII may have potential applications in various industrial processes especially for the detergent and textile industries and animal feed industries. PMID:23903903

  17. Molecular Docking and Pharmacological Investigations of Rivastigmine-Fluoxetine and Coumarin–Tacrine hybrids against Acetyl Choline Esterase

    PubMed Central

    Babitha, Pallikkara Pulikkal; Sahila, Mohammed Marunnan; Bandaru, Srinivas; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Sureshkumar, Sivanpillai

    2015-01-01

    The present AChE inhibitors have been successful in the treatment of Alzheimer׳s Diseases however suffers serious side effects. Therefore in this view, the present study was sought to identify compounds with appreciable pharmacological profile targeting AChE. Analogue of Rivastigmine and Fluoxetine hybrid synthesized by Toda et al, 2003 (dataset1), and Coumarin−Tacrine hybrids synthesized by Qi Sun et al (dataset2) formed the test compounds for the present pharmacological evaluation. p-cholorophenyl substituted Rivastigmine and Fluoxetine hybrid compound (26d) from dataset 1 and −OCH3 substitute Coumarin−Tacrine hybrids (1h) from dataset 2 demonstrated superior pharmacological profile. 26 d showed superior pharmacological profile comparison to the entire compounds in either dataset owing to its better electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding patterns. In order to identify still better compound with pharmacological profile than 26 d and 1h, virtual screening was performed. The best docked compound (PubCId: PubCid: 68874404) showed better affinity than its parent 26 d, however showed poor ADME profile and AMES toxicity. CHEMBL2391475 (PubCid: 71699632) similar to 1h had reduced affinity in comparison to its parent compound 1h. From, our extensive analysis involving binding affinity analysis, ADMET properties predictions and pharmacophoric mappings, we report p-cholorophenyl substituted rivastigmine and fluoxetine hybrid (26d) to be a potential candidate for AcHE inhibition which in addition can overcome narrow therapeutic window of present AChE inhibitors in clinical treatment of Alzheimer׳s disease. Abbreviations AD - Alzheimer׳s Disease, AChE - Acetyl Choline Estarase, OPLS - Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations, PDB - Protein Data Bank. PMID:26420918

  18. Structural and Enzymatic Characterization of NanS (YjhS) a 9-O-Acetyl N-acetylneuraminic Acid Esterase from Escherichia coli O157:H7

    SciTech Connect

    E Rangarajan; K Ruane; A Proteau; J Schrag; R Valladares; C Gonzalez; M Gilbert; A Yakunin; M Cygler

    2011-12-31

    There is a high prevalence of sialic acid in a number of different organisms, resulting in there being a myriad of different enzymes that can exploit it as a fermentable carbon source. One such enzyme is NanS, a carbohydrate esterase that we show here deacetylates the 9 position of 9-O-sialic acid so that it can be readily transported into the cell for catabolism. Through structural studies, we show that NanS adopts a SGNH hydrolase fold. Although the backbone of the structure is similar to previously characterized family members, sequence comparisons indicate that this family can be further subdivided into two subfamilies with somewhat different fingerprints. NanS is the founding member of group II. Its catalytic center contains Ser19 and His301 but no Asp/Glu is present to form the classical catalytic triad. The contribution of Ser19 and His301 to catalysis was confirmed by mutagenesis. In addition to structural characterization, we have mapped the specificity of NanS using a battery of substrates.

  19. Investigation of the nature of semisynthetic esterases. Annual progress report, September 15, 1982-September 14, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, M.H.

    1983-12-01

    Two semisynthetic esterases, an acid-esterase with a pH optimum of 6.0 and a neutral-esterase with a pH optimum of 7.5, were generated from bovine pancreatic ribonuclease. The method involved perturbation of ribonuclease at pH 3.0, subsequent conformational modification with indole propionic acid, and crosslinking the modified protein with glutaraldehyde. The two esterases generated by this procedure were separated and partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation. The neutral-esterase activity was predominantly precipitated at 40% ammonium sulfate saturation, and the acid-esterase at 70 to 90% ammonium sulfate saturation. Nearly 4 fold purification of the esterases was achieved by this step. The two esterases were further purified by gel filtration of the above ammonium sulfate fractions on Biogel P0-30. Nearly 100 fold purification of the esterases over the starting modified RNase has been achieved by the above two purification steps. Kinetic studies with the purified acid-esterase indicated that this semisynthetic esterase hydrolyzed several aminoacid ethyl esters, but preferred ester containing an aromatic residue. The acid-esterase was competitively inhibited by L-tryptophan and also had low amidase activity towards benzoylarginine p-nitroanilide. Neutral-esterase showed a high degree of specificity toward L-TrEE and acetyl tryptophan ethyl ester. Moreover, this esterase had significant amidase activity toward N-acetyltryptophanamide (NATA). Neutral esterase was not inhibited by tryptophan.

  20. Rhamnogalacturonan α-d-Galactopyranosyluronohydrolase1

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, Margien; Beldman, Gerrit; Pitson, Stuart M.; Schols, Henk A.; Voragen, Alphons G.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new enzyme, rhamnogalacturonan (RG) α-d-galactopyranosyluronohydrolase (RG-galacturonohydrolase), able to release a galacturonic acid residue from the nonreducing end of RG chains but not from homogalacturonan, was purified from an Aspergillus aculeatus enzyme preparation. RG-galacturonohydrolase acted with inversion of anomeric configuration, initially releasing β-d-galactopyranosyluronic acid. The enzyme cleaved smaller RG substrates with the highest catalytic efficiency. A Michaelis constant of 85 μm and a maximum reaction rate of 160 units mg−1 was found toward a linear RG fragment with a degree of polymerization of 6. RG-galacturonohydrolase had a molecular mass of 66 kD, an isoelectric point of 5.12, a pH optimum of 4.0, and a temperature optimum of 50°C. The enzyme was most stable between pH 3.0 and 6.0 (for 24 h at 40°C) and up to 60°C (for 3 h). PMID:9576784

  1. Cloning, overexpression in Escherichia coli, and characterization of a thermostable fungal acetylxylan esterase from Talaromyces emersonii.

    PubMed

    Waters, Deborah M; Murray, Patrick G; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, Angel T; Tuohy, Maria G; Faulds, Craig B

    2012-05-01

    The gene encoding an acetylxylan esterase (AXE1) from the thermophilic ascomycete Talaromyces emersonii was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and characterized. This form of AXE1, rTeAXE1, exhibits increased thermostability and activity at a higher temperature than other known fungal acetyl esterases, thus having huge potential application in biomass bioconversion to high value chemicals or biofuels. PMID:22407679

  2. Cloning, Overexpression in Escherichia coli, and Characterization of a Thermostable Fungal Acetylxylan Esterase from Talaromyces emersonii

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patrick G.; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, Angel T.; Tuohy, Maria G.; Faulds, Craig B.

    2012-01-01

    The gene encoding an acetylxylan esterase (AXE1) from the thermophilic ascomycete Talaromyces emersonii was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, and characterized. This form of AXE1, rTeAXE1, exhibits increased thermostability and activity at a higher temperature than other known fungal acetyl esterases, thus having huge potential application in biomass bioconversion to high value chemicals or biofuels. PMID:22407679

  3. Leukocyte esterase urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the urine. This may mean you have a urinary tract infection . If this test is positive, the urine should ... Results Mean An abnormal result indicates a possible urinary tract infection. Alternative Names WBC esterase Images Male urinary system ...

  4. Tissue-specific rhamnogalacturonan I forms the gel with hyperelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Mikshina, P V; Petrova, A A; Faizullin, D A; Zuev, Yu F; Gorshkova, T A

    2015-07-01

    Rhamnogalacturonans I are complex pectin polysaccharides extremely variable in structure and properties and widely represented in various sources. The complexity and diversity of the structure of rhamnogalacturonans I are the reasons for the limited information about the properties and supramolecular organization of these polysaccharides, including the relationship between these parameters and the functions of rhamnogalacturonans I in plant cells. In the present work, on the example of rhamnogalacturonan I from flax gelatinous fibers, the ability of this type of pectic polysaccharides to form at physiological concentrations hydrogels with hyperelastic properties was revealed for the first time. According to IR spectroscopy, water molecules are more tightly retained in the gelling rhamnogalacturonan I from flax fiber cell wall in comparison with the non-gelling rhamnogalacturonan I from primary cell wall of potato. With increase in strength of water binding by rhamnogalacturonan I, there is an increase in elastic modulus and decrease in Poisson's ratio of gel formed by this polysaccharide. The model of hyperelastic rhamnogalacturonan I capture by laterally interacting cellulose microfibrils, constructed using the finite element method, confirmed the suitability of rhamnogalacturonan I gel with the established properties for the function in the gelatinous cell wall, allowing consideration of this tissue- and stage-specific pectic polysaccharide as an important factor in creation of gelatinous fiber contractility. PMID:26542004

  5. Mechanism of Action of Neisseria gonorrhoeae O-Acetylpeptidoglycan Esterase, an SGNH Serine Esterase*

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, John M.; Weadge, Joel T.; Clarke, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    O-Acetylpeptidoglycan esterase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae functions to release O-acetyl groups from the C-6 position of muramoyl residues in O-acetylated peptidoglycan, thereby permitting the continued metabolism of this essential cell wall heteropolymer. It has been demonstrated to be a serine esterase with sequence similarity to the family CE-3 carbohydrate esterases of the CAZy classification system. In the absence of a three-dimensional structure for any Ape, further knowledge of its structure and function relationship is dependent on modeling and kinetic studies. In this study, we predicted Neisseria gonorrhoeae Ape1a to be an SGNH hydrolase with an adopted α/β-hydrolase fold containing a central twisted four-stranded parallel β-sheet flanked by six α-helices with the putative catalytic triad, Asp-366, His-369, and Ser-80 appropriately aligned within a pocket. The role of eight invariant and highly conserved residues localized to the active site was investigated by site-directed replacements coupled with kinetic characterization and binding studies of the resultant engineered enzymes. Based on these data and theoretical considerations, Gly-236 and Asn-268 were identified as participating at the oxyanion hole to stabilize the tetrahedral species in the reaction mechanism, whereas Gly-78, Asp-79, His-81, Asn-235, Thr-267, and Val-368 are proposed to position appropriately the catalytic residues and participate in substrate binding. PMID:23209280

  6. Mechanism of action of Neisseria gonorrhoeae O-acetylpeptidoglycan esterase, an SGNH serine esterase.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, John M; Weadge, Joel T; Clarke, Anthony J

    2013-01-25

    O-Acetylpeptidoglycan esterase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae functions to release O-acetyl groups from the C-6 position of muramoyl residues in O-acetylated peptidoglycan, thereby permitting the continued metabolism of this essential cell wall heteropolymer. It has been demonstrated to be a serine esterase with sequence similarity to the family CE-3 carbohydrate esterases of the CAZy classification system. In the absence of a three-dimensional structure for any Ape, further knowledge of its structure and function relationship is dependent on modeling and kinetic studies. In this study, we predicted Neisseria gonorrhoeae Ape1a to be an SGNH hydrolase with an adopted α/β-hydrolase fold containing a central twisted four-stranded parallel β-sheet flanked by six α-helices with the putative catalytic triad, Asp-366, His-369, and Ser-80 appropriately aligned within a pocket. The role of eight invariant and highly conserved residues localized to the active site was investigated by site-directed replacements coupled with kinetic characterization and binding studies of the resultant engineered enzymes. Based on these data and theoretical considerations, Gly-236 and Asn-268 were identified as participating at the oxyanion hole to stabilize the tetrahedral species in the reaction mechanism, whereas Gly-78, Asp-79, His-81, Asn-235, Thr-267, and Val-368 are proposed to position appropriately the catalytic residues and participate in substrate binding. PMID:23209280

  7. A new family of carbohydrate esterases is represented by a GDSL hydrolase/acetylxylan esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Alalouf, Onit; Balazs, Yael; Volkinshtein, Margarita; Grimpel, Yael; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2011-12-01

    Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyze the ester linkages of acetyl groups at positions 2 and/or 3 of the xylose moieties in xylan and play an important role in enhancing the accessibility of xylanases to the xylan backbone. The hemicellulolytic system of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 comprises a putative acetylxylan esterase gene, axe2. The gene product belongs to the GDSL hydrolase family and does not share sequence homology with any of the carbohydrate esterases in the CAZy Database. The axe2 gene is induced by xylose, and the purified gene product completely deacetylates xylobiose peracetate (fully acetylated) and hydrolyzes the synthetic substrates 2-naphthyl acetate, 4-nitrophenyl acetate, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, and phenyl acetate. The pH profiles for k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) suggest the existence of two ionizable groups affecting the binding of the substrate to the enzyme. Using NMR spectroscopy, the regioselectivity of Axe2 was directly determined with the aid of one-dimensional selective total correlation spectroscopy. Methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-β-d-xylopyranoside was rapidly deacetylated at position 2 or at positions 3 and 4 to give either diacetyl or monoacetyl intermediates, respectively; methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-d-glucopyranoside was initially deacetylated at position 6. In both cases, the complete hydrolysis of the intermediates occurred at a much slower rate, suggesting that the preferred substrate is the peracetate sugar form. Site-directed mutagenesis of Ser-15, His-194, and Asp-191 resulted in complete inactivation of the enzyme, consistent with their role as the catalytic triad. Overall, our results show that Axe2 is a serine acetylxylan esterase representing a new carbohydrate esterase family. PMID:21994937

  8. Characterization of rhamnogalacturonan I from cotton suspension culture cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Progress has been made on the project of determining the structure of pectins. From recent progress, a covalent crosslink between rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) and xyloglucan was hypothesized and a structure for RGI was proposed. The development of a method to determine the distribution of methyl esterification with pectins also progressed. The degree of methyl esterification of cotton cotyledon cell walls was compared to that of cotton suspension cultures. Cotyledon wall were found to have {approximately}55% of the galacturonic acid esterified whereas suspension culture wall were only about 14% methyl esterified. 10 refs. (SM)

  9. Cloning and characterization of two rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase genes from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed Central

    Suykerbuyk, M E; Kester, H C; Schaap, P J; Stam, H; Musters, W; Visser, J

    1997-01-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase gene of Aspergillus aculeatus was used as a probe for the cloning of two rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase genes of Aspergillus niger. The corresponding proteins, rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases A and B, are 78 and 72% identical, respectively, with the A. aculeatus enzyme. In A. niger cultures which were shifted from growth on sucrose to growth on apple pectin as a carbon source, the expression of the rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase A gene (rhgA) was transiently induced after 3 h of growth on apple pectin. The rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase B gene was not induced by apple pectin, but the rhgB gene was derepressed after 18 h of growth on either apple pectin or sucrose. Gene fusions of the A. niger rhgA and rhgB coding regions with the strong and inducible Aspergillus awamori exlA promoter were used to obtain high-producing A. awamori transformants which were then used for the purification of the two A. niger rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography of oligomeric degradation products showed that optimal degradation of an isolated highly branched pectin fraction by A. niger rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases A and B occurred at pH 3.6 and 4.1, respectively. The specific activities of rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases A and B were then 0.9 and 0.4 U/mg, respectively, which is significantly lower than the specific activity of A. aculeatus rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase (2.5 U/mg at an optimal pH of 4.5). Compared to the A enzymes, the A. niger B enzyme appears to have a different substrate specificity, since additional oligomers are formed. PMID:9212401

  10. O-acetylated oligosaccharides from pectins of potato tuber cell walls.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, T

    1997-01-01

    Acetylated trigalacturonides and rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I)-derived oligosaccharides were isolated from a Driselase digest of potato tuber cell walls by ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The oligosaccharides were structurally characterized by fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and glycosyl-linkage composition analysis. One trigalacturonide contained a single acetyl group at O-3 of the reducing galacturonic acid residue. A second trigalacturonide contained two acetyl substituents, which were located on O-3 or O-4 of the nonreducing galacturonic acid residue and O-3 of the reducing galacturonic acid residue. RG-I backbone-derived oligomers had acetyl groups at O-2 of the galacturonic acid residues. Some of these galacturonic acid residues were O-acetylated at both O-2 and O-3 positions. Rhamnosyl residues of RG-I oligomers were not acetylated. PMID:9112775

  11. Comparison of fungal carbohydrate esterases of family CE16 on artificial and natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Puchart, Vladimír; Agger, Jane W; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Várnai, Anikó; Westereng, Bjørge; Biely, Peter

    2016-09-10

    The enzymatic conversion of acetylated hardwood glucuronoxylan to functional food oligomers, biochemicals or fermentable monomers requires besides glycoside hydrolases enzymes liberating acetic acid esterifying position 2 and/or 3 in xylopyranosyl (Xylp) residues. The 3-O-acetyl group at internal Xylp residues substituted by MeGlcA is the only acetyl group of hardwood acetylglucuronoxylan and its fragments not attacked by acetylxylan esterases of carbohydrate esterase (CE) families 1, 4, 5 and 6 and by hemicellulolytic acetyl esterases classified in CE family 16. Monoacetylated aldotetraouronic acid 3″-Ac(3)MeGlcA(3)Xyl3, generated from the polysaccharide by GH10 endoxylanases, appears to be one of the most resistant fragments. The presence of the two substituents on the non-reducing-end Xylp residue prevents liberation of MeGlcA by α-glucuronidase of family GH67 and blocks the action of acetylxylan esterases. The Ac(3)MeGlcA(3)Xyl3 was isolated from an enzymatic hydrolysate of birchwood acetylglucuronoxylan and characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy as a mixture of two positional isomers, 3″-Ac(3)MeGlcA(3)Xyl3 and 4″-Ac(3)MeGlcA(3)Xyl3, the latter being the result of acetyl group migration. The mixture was used as a substrate for three members of CE16 family of fungal origin. Trichoderma reesei CE16 esterase, inactive on polymeric substrate, deacetylated both isomers. Podospora anserina and Aspergillus niger esterases, active on acetylglucuronoxylan, deesterified effectively only the 4″-isomer. The results indicate catalytic diversity among CE16 enzymes, but also their common and unifying catalytic ability to exo-deacetylate positions 3 and 4 on non-reducing-end Xylp residues, which is an important step in plant hemicellulose saccharification. PMID:27439201

  12. Structure of a Rhamnogalacturonan Fragment from Apple Pectin: Implications for Pectin Architecture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Xiangmei; Mort, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A comore » mmercial apple pectin was sequentially digested with the cloned enzymes endopolygalacturonase, galactanase, arabinofuranosidase, xylogalacturonase, and rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase. The rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase-generated oligosaccharides were separated by ultrafiltration, anion exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. Fractions from the ion exchange chromatography were pooled, lyophilized, and screened by MALDI-TOF MS. An oligosaccharide (RGP14P3) was identified and its structure, α -D-Gal p A- ( 1 → 2 ) - α -L-Rha p - ( 1 → 4 ) - α -D-Gal p A- ( 1 → 2 ) - α -L-Rha p - ( 1 → 4 ) - α -D-Gal p A, determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectrometry. This oligosaccharide probably represents a direct connection between homogalacturonan and rhamnogalacturonan in pectin. Alternatively, it could indicate that the nonreducing end of rhamnogalacturonan starts with a galacturonic acid residue.« less

  13. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  14. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  15. Modification of potato cell wall pectin by the introduction of rhamnogalacturonan lyase and β-galactosidase transgenes and their side effects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie-Hong; Kortstee, Anne; Dees, Dianka C T; Trindade, Luisa M; Schols, Henk A; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-06-25

    Genes encoding pectic enzymes were introduced to wild-type potato Karnico. Cell wall materials were extracted from Karnico and transgenic lines expressing β-galactosidase (β-Gal-14 mutant) or rhamnogalacturonan lyase (RGL-18 mutant). After sequential extraction, β-Gal-14 hot buffer-soluble solids (HBSS) of pectin contained 54% less galactose than Karnico HBSS, representing shorter galactan side chains. The individual pectin populations of β-Gal-14 HBSS showed different modifications extended to the two sub-populations as obtained by ion-exchange chromatography. Compared to wild-type, RGL-18 HBSS contained 27% more galacturonic acid and 55% less Gal on fresh potato weight basis, which was due to the removal of galactan-rich rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) segments. All pectin populations of RGL-18 showed consistently low levels of RG-I segments. Transgenic modification showed side effects on the methyl-esterification and acetyl substitution of RGL-18 HBSS (DM=53, DA=21), but not of the β-Gal-14 HBSS in comparison to wild-type (DM=29, DA=54). PMID:27083787

  16. Polypeptide having acetyl xylan esterase activity and uses thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Heijne, Wilbert Herman Marie; Los, Alrik Pieter

    2015-10-20

    The invention relates to a polypeptide comprising the amino acid sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2 or an amino acid sequence encoded by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 1, or a variant polypeptide or variant polynucleotide thereof, wherein the variant polypeptide has at least 82% sequence identity with the sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2 or the variant polynucleotide encodes a polypeptide that has at least 82% sequence identity with the sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2. The invention features the full length coding sequence of the novel gene as well as the amino acid sequence of the full-length functional polypeptide and functional equivalents of the gene or the amino acid sequence. The invention also relates to methods for using the polypeptide in industrial processes. Also included in the invention are cells transformed with a polynucleotide according to the invention suitable for producing these proteins.

  17. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  18. Improved procedures for the selective chemical fragmentation of rhamnogalacturonans.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chenghua; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Hahn, Michael G; York, William S

    2009-09-28

    The structural characterization of branched rhamnogalacturonans (RGs) requires the availability of methods that selectively cleave the Rhap-(1-->4)-alpha-GalAp linkage and thereby generate oligosaccharide fragments that are suitable for mass spectrometric and NMR spectroscopic analyses. Enzymic cleavage of this linkage is often ineffective, especially in highly branched RGs. Therefore, we have developed an improved chemical fragmentation method based on beta-elimination of esterified 4-linked GalpA residues. At least 85% of the carboxyl groups of the GalA residues in Arabidopsis thaliana seed mucilage RG is esterified using methyl iodide or 3-iodopropanol in Me(2)SO containing 8% water and 1% tetrabutylammonium fluoride. However, beta-elimination fragmentation at pH 7.3 and 120 degrees C is far more extensive with hydroxypropyl-esterified RG than with methyl-esterified RG. The non-reducing 4-deoxy-beta-l-threo-hex-4-enepyranosyluronic acid residue formed by the beta-elimination reaction is completely removed by treatment with aqueous N-bromosuccinimide, thereby simplifying the structural characterization of the chemically generated oligoglycosyl fragments. This newly developed procedure was used to selectively fragment the branched RG from peppergrass seed mucilage. The products were characterized using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, glycosyl residue composition analysis, and 1 and 2D NMR spectroscopy. Our data show that the most abundant low-molecular weight fragments contained a backbone rhamnose residue substituted at O-4 with a single sidechain, and suggest that peppergrass seed mucilage RG is composed mainly of the repeating unit 4-O-methyl-alpha-d-GlcpA-(1-->4)-beta-d-Galp-(1-->4)-[-->4)-alpha-d-GalpA-(1-->2)-]-alpha-l-Rhap-(1-->. PMID:19162261

  19. Synthesis of borate cross-linked rhamnogalacturonan II

    PubMed Central

    Funakawa, Hiroya; Miwa, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, we describe current knowledge about synthesis of borate crosslinked rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) and it physiological roles. RG-II is a portion of pectic polysaccharide with high complexity, present in primary cell wall. It is composed of homogalacturonan backbone and four distinct side chains (A–D). Borate forms ester bonds with the apiosyl residues of side chain A of two RG-II monomers to generate borate dimerized RG-II, contributing for the formation of networks of pectic polysaccharides. In plant cell walls, more than 90% of RG-II are dimerized by borate under boron (B) sufficient conditions. Borate crosslinking of RG-II in primary cell walls, to our knowledge, is the only experimentally proven molecular function of B, an essential trace-element. Although abundance of RG-II and B is quite small in cell wall polysaccharides, increasing evidence supports that RG-II and its borate crosslinking are critical for plant growth and development. Significant advancement was made recently on the location and the mechanisms of RG-II synthesis and borate cross-linking. Molecular genetic studies have successfully identified key enzymes for RG-II synthesis and regulators including B transporters required for efficient formation of RG-II crosslinking and consequent normal plant growth. The present article focuses recent advances on (i) RG-II polysaccharide synthesis, (ii) occurrence of borate crosslinking and (iii) B transport for borate supply to RG-II. Molecular mechanisms underlying formation of borate RG-II crosslinking and the physiological impacts are discussed. PMID:25954281

  20. Rhamnogalacturonan alpha-L-rhamnopyranohydrolase. A novel enzyme specific for the terminal nonreducing rhamnosyl unit in rhamnogalacturonan regions of pectin.

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, M; Beldman, G; Schols, H A; Voragen, A G

    1994-01-01

    Two alpha-L-rhamnohydrolases with different substrate specificities were isolated from a commercial preparation produced by Aspergillus aculeatus. The first rhamnohydrolase was active toward p-nitrophenyl-alpha-L- rhamnopyranoside, naringin, and hesperidin and was termed p-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranohydrolase (pnp-rhamnohydrolase). From the data collected, the enzyme seemed specific for the alpha-1,2- or alpha-1,6-linkage to beta-D-glucose. The pnp-rhamnohydrolase had a molecular mass of 87 kD (sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis), a pH optimum of 5.5 to 6, a temperature optimum of 60 degrees C, and a specific activity toward pnp-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (pnp-Rha) of 13 units mg-1 protein. The second rhamnohydrolase, on the contrary, was active toward rhamnogalacturonan (RG) fragments, releasing Rha, and was therefore termed RG-rhamnohydrolase. The RG-rhamnohydrolase had a molecular mass of 84 kD, a pH optimum of 4, a temperature optimum of 60 degrees C, and a specific activity toward RG oligomers of 60 units mg-1 protein. The RG-rhamnohydrolase liberated Rha from the nonreducing end of the RG chain and appeared specific for the alpha-1,4-linkage to alpha-D-galacturonic acid. The enzyme was hindered when this terminal Rha residue was substituted at the 4-position by a beta-D-galactose. The results so far obtained did not indicate particular preference of the enzyme for low or high molecular mass RG fragments. From the results it can be concluded that a new enzyme, an RG alpha-L-rhamnopyranohydrolase, has been isolated with high specificity toward RG regions of pectin. PMID:7972516

  1. Esterase zymograms of Proteus and Providencia.

    PubMed

    Goullet, P

    1975-03-01

    The intracellular esterases of 80 strains of Proteus and Providencia were analysed by the acrylamide-agarose zymogram technique using several synthetic substrates. The esterase bands were classified in five main groups. The alphaA-esterase bands hydrolysed alpha-naphthyl acetate and were resistant or relatively insensitive to di-isofluoropropyl phosphate (DFP). The alphaB-esterase band hydrolysed both alpha-naphthyl acetate and alpha-naphthyl butyrate and were very sensitive to DFP. Both groups of esterase bands were inactivated by heat. The betaA- and betaB-esterase bands hydrolysed beta-naphthyl acetate and were sensitive to DFP; these were distinguishable by the difference in their relative activity towards beta-naphthyl butyrate and in their relative stability to heat. The alpha-beta-esterase bands hydrolysed alpha- and beta-naphthyl acetates and alpha- and beta-naphthyl butyrates; they were inactivated by heat and were sensitive to DFP. The distribution of these esterase bands among the strains of Proteus and Providencia and their electrophoretic patterns established esterase profile types which correlate with the classification based on traditional bacteriological tests. The degree of inter-strain similarity in esterase pattern varied highly among species. The homogeneity of Proteus mirabilis and especially of Providencia stuartii contrasted with the heterogeneity of other species. This disparity suggests that the bacteria of the tribe Proteae have not the same degree of intra-specific differentiation in physico-chemical properties of esterases. PMID:48538

  2. Impact of Cell Wall Acetylation on Corn Stover Hydrolysis by Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, M. J.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of variously pretreated corn stover samples showed neutral to mildly acidic pretreatments were more effective at removing xylan from corn stover and more likely to maintain the acetyl to xylopyranosyl ratios present in untreated material than were alkaline treatments. Retention of acetyl groups in the residual solids resulted in greater resistance to hydrolysis by endoxylanase alone, although the synergistic combination of endoxylanase and acetyl xylan esterase enzymes permitted higher xylan conversions to be observed. Acetyl xylan esterase alone did little to improve hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes, although a direct relationship was observed between the enzymatic removal of acetyl groups and improvements in the enzymatic conversion of xylan present in substrates. In all cases, effective xylan conversions were found to significantly improve glucan conversions achievable by cellulolytic enzymes. Additionally, acetyl and xylan removal not only enhanced the respective initial rates of xylan and glucan conversion, but also the overall extents of conversion. This work emphasizes the necessity for xylanolytic enzymes during saccharification processes and specifically for the optimization of acetyl esterase and xylanase synergies when biomass processes include milder pretreatments, such as hot water or sulfite steam explosion.

  3. Characterization of four esterase genes and esterase activity from the gut of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four esterase genes and general esterase activity were investigated in the gut of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes. Two genes (RfEst1 and RfEst2) share significant translated identity with a number of insect JH esterases. The two remaining genes (RfEst3 and RfEst4) apparently code for much shorte...

  4. A new family of rhamnogalacturonan lyases contains an enzyme that binds to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    McKie, V A; Vincken, J P; Voragen, A G; van den Broek, L A; Stimson, E; Gilbert, H J

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas cellulosa is an aerobic bacterium that synthesizes an extensive array of modular cellulases and hemicellulases, which have a modular architecture consisting of catalytic domains and distinct non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). To investigate whether the main-chain-cleaving pectinases from this bacterium also have a modular structure, a library of P. cellulosa genomic DNA, constructed in lambdaZAPII, was screened for pectinase-encoding sequences. A recombinant phage that attacked arabinan, galactan and rhamnogalacturonan was isolated. The encoded enzyme, designated Rgl11A, had a modular structure comprising an N-terminal domain that exhibited homology to Bacillus and Streptomyces proteins of unknown function, a middle domain that exhibited sequence identity to fibronectin-3 domains, and a C-terminal domain that was homologous to family 2a CBMs. Expression of the three modules of the Pseudomonas protein in Escherichia coli showed that its C-terminal module was a functional cellulose-binding domain, and the N-terminal module consisted of a catalytic domain that hydrolysed rhamnogalacturonan-containing substrates. The activity of Rgl11A against apple- and potato-derived rhamnogalacturonan substrates indicated that the enzyme had a strong preference for rhamnogalacturonans that contained galactose side chains, and which were not esterified. The enzyme had an absolute requirement for calcium, a high optimum pH, and catalysis was associated with an increase in absorbance at 235 nm, indicating that glycosidic bond cleavage was mediated via a beta-elimination mechanism. These data indicate that Rgl11A is a rhamnogalacturonan lyase and, together with the homologous Bacillus and Streptomyces proteins, comprise a new family of polysaccharide lyases. The presence of a family 2a CBM in Rgl11A, and in a P. cellulosa pectate lyase described in the accompanying paper [Brown, Mallen, Charnock, Davies and Black (2001) Biochem. J. 355, 155-165] suggests that

  5. [Variability in esterases of Metarhizium anisopliae].

    PubMed

    Estrada-Martínez, M E; Piñón, D R; Capote, M C

    1997-03-01

    The variability in esterases of the entomogenous fungus Metarhizium anisopliae was determined electrophoretically on 8.5% polyacrylamide gel. Ten isolates from diverse taxonomic groups of insects were analyzed. The electrophoretic analysis showed differences and similarities between these isolates and it was possible to distinguish six different patterns. The results obtained show a great polymorphism for the esterase system of M. anisopliae. PMID:15482022

  6. Structural basis for ligand and substrate recognition by torovirus hemagglutinin esterases

    PubMed Central

    Langereis, Martijn A.; Zeng, Qinghong; Gerwig, Gerrit J.; Frey, Barbara; von Itzstein, Mark; Kamerling, Johannis P.; de Groot, Raoul J.; Huizinga, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    Hemagglutinin esterases (HEs), closely related envelope glycoproteins in influenza C and corona- and toroviruses, mediate reversible attachment to O-acetylated sialic acids (Sias). They do so by acting both as lectins and as receptor-destroying enzymes, functions exerted by separate protein domains. HE divergence was accompanied by changes in quaternary structure and in receptor and substrate specificity. The selective forces underlying HE diversity and the molecular basis for Sia specificity are poorly understood. Here we present crystal structures of porcine and bovine torovirus HEs in complex with receptor analogs. Torovirus HEs form homodimers with sialate-O-acetylesterase domains almost identical to corresponding domains in orthomyxo- and coronavirus HEs, but with unique lectin sites. Structure-guided biochemical analysis of the esterase domains revealed that a functionally, but not structurally conserved arginine–Sia carboxylate interaction is critical for the binding and positioning of glycosidically bound Sias in the catalytic pocket. Although essential for efficient de-O-acetylation of Sias, this interaction is not required for catalysis nor does it affect substrate specificity. In fact, the distinct preference of the porcine torovirus enzyme for 9-mono- over 7,9-di-O-acetylated Sias can be explained from a single-residue difference with HEs of more promiscuous specificity. Apparently, esterase and lectin pockets coevolved; also the porcine torovirus HE receptor-binding site seems to have been designed to use 9-mono- and exclude di-O-acetylated Sias, possibly as an adaptation to replication in swine. Our findings shed light on HE evolution and provide fundamental insight into mechanisms of substrate binding, substrate recognition, and receptor selection in this important class of virion proteins. PMID:19721004

  7. Characterization of two metagenome-derived esterases that reactivate chloramphenicol by counteracting chloramphenicol acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weixin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Yoon, Mi-Young; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Malhotra, Shweta; Wu, Jing; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2011-12-01

    Function-driven metagenomic analysis is a powerful approach to screening for novel biocatalysts. In this study, we investigated lipolytic enzymes selected from an alluvial soil metagenomic library, and identified two novel esterases, EstDL26 and EstDL136. EstDL26 and EstDL136 reactivated chloramphenicol from its acetyl derivates by counteracting the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in Escherichia coli. These two enzymes showed only 27% identity in amino acid sequence to each other; however both preferentially hydrolyzed short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (< or =C5) and showed mesophilic properties. In vitro, EstDL136 catalyzed the deacetylation of 1- and 3- acetyl and 1,3-diacetyl derivates; in contrast, EstDL26 was not capable of the deacetylation at C1, indicating a potential regioselectivity. EstDL26 and EstDL136 were similar to microbial hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), and since chloramphenicol acetate esterase (CAE) activity was detected from two other soil esterases in the HSL family, this suggests a distribution of CAE among the soil microorganisms. The isolation and characterization of EstDL26 and EstDL136 in this study may be helpful in understanding the diversity of CAE enzymes and their potential role in releasing active chloramphenicol in the producing bacteria. PMID:22210605

  8. Esterase profile of human masseter muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeby, S; Moe, D; Vilmann, H

    1988-01-01

    The esterase profile of fresh human masseter muscle was investigated by use of histochemistry and electrophoresis. The histochemical methods included reactions for alpha-naphthyl esterase, myofibrillar ATPase, reverse myofibrillar ATPase and succinic dehydrogenase. In frozen sections of the muscle the coloured reaction product for esterases was present both as a diffuse sarcoplasmic coloration and as distinct granules. The intensity of diffuse reaction was used to classify the muscle fibres as strongly, moderately and weakly reacting. The fibres with strong esterase activity belonged to Type I and iiC. iM and Type II A fibres showed a moderate esterase reaction and Type II B fibres had a low activity. The electrophoretic gels stained for esterase activity showed that the human masseter muscle possesses a slow migrating double band with high enzyme activity and a cascade of faster migrating isoenzymes. In isoelectric focused gels the major esterases showed isoelectric points around pH 5. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Figs. 3-5 Figs. 6-8 Figs. 9-11 Figs. 12-14 Figs. 15-16 Fig. 17 PMID:3198486

  9. BLT-esterase in infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, L; Wiesholzer, M; Worman, C P; Lang, G; Base, W

    1995-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes of three patients suffering from infectious mononucleosis due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection were analysed for BLT-esterase expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes by a well established cytochemical staining method. During the acute phase of disease with presence of clinical symptoms a very high level of up to 90% BLT-esterase-expressing lymphocytes were detected. The increased percentage of lymphocytes expressing BLT-esterase coincided with the time of greatest symptoms and the peak elevation of hepatocellular enzymes. The still moderately elevated level only gradually decreased to normal during the further recovery period of 2 months during which the patients described episodes of weakness. Peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotype analysis revealed a marked CD8 lymphocytosis, a CD4/CD8 ratio of about 0.2, low number of CD19+ B cells, and a high level of DR+ CD3+ lymphocytes. Reduction of BLT esterase expression during the recovery period coincided with reduction of CD8+ DR+ lymphocytes. By a combination of BLT-esterase staining with immunocytochemical phenotype analysis, 95% of CD8+ lymphocytes were found to be BLT-esterase-positive. BLT-esterase might be involved in the immunodefence against EBV in infectious mononucleosis by inducing apoptosis in EBV-transformed B cells. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7743659

  10. The psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas halosplanktis TAC125 possesses a gene coding for a cold-adapted feruloyl esterase activity that shares homology with esterase enzymes from gamma-proteobacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Aurilia, Vincenzo; Parracino, Antonietta; Saviano, Michele; Rossi, Mose'; D'Auria, Sabato

    2007-08-01

    The complete genome of the psychrophilic bacteria Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125, recently published, owns a gene coding for a putative esterase activity corresponding to the ORF PSHAa1385, also classified in the Carbohydrate Active Enzymes database (CAZY) belonging to family 1 of carbohydrate esterase proteins. This ORF is 843 bp in length and codes for a protein of 280 amino acid residues. In this study we characterized and cloned the PSHAa1385 gene in Escherichia coli. We also characterized the recombinant protein by biochemical and biophysical methodologies. The PSHAa1385 gene sequence showed a significant homology with several carboxyl-esterase and acetyl-esterase genes from gamma-proteobacteria genera and yeast. The recombinant protein exhibited a significant activity towards pNP-acetate, alpha-and beta-naphthyl acetate as generic substrates, and 4-methylumbelliferyl p-trimethylammonio cinnamate chloride (MUTMAC) as a specific substrate, indicating that the protein exhibits a feruloyl esterase activity that it is displayed by similar enzymes present in other organisms. Finally, a three-dimensional model of the protein was built and the amino acid residues involved in the catalytic function of the protein were identified. PMID:17543477

  11. Clinical significance of esterases in man.

    PubMed

    Williams, F M

    1985-01-01

    Esterases, hydrolases which split ester bonds, hydrolyse a number of compounds used as drugs in humans. The enzymes involved are classified broadly as cholinesterases (including acetylcholinesterase), carboxylesterases, and arylesterases, but apart from acetylcholinesterase, their biological function is unknown. The acetylcholinesterase present in nerve endings involved in neurotransmission is inhibited by anticholinesterase drugs, e.g. neostigmine, and by organophosphorous compounds (mainly insecticides). Cholinesterases are primarily involved in drug hydrolysis in the plasma, arylesterases in the plasma and red blood cells, and carboxylesterases in the liver, gut and other tissues. The esterases exhibit specificities for certain substrates and inhibitors but a drug is often hydrolysed by more than one esterase at different sites. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), for example, is hydrolysed to salicylate by carboxylesterases in the liver during the first-pass. Only 60% of an oral dose reaches the systemic circulation where it is hydrolysed by plasma cholinesterases and albumin and red blood cell arylesterases. Thus, the concentration of aspirin relative to salicylate in the circulation may be affected by individual variation in esterase levels and the relative roles of the different esterases, and this may influence the overall pharmacological effect. Other drugs have been less extensively investigated than aspirin and these include heroin (diacetylmorphine), suxamethonium (succinylcholine), clofibrate, carbimazole, procaine and other local anaesthetics. Ester prodrugs are widely used to improve absorption of drugs and in depot preparations. The active drug is released by hydrolysis by tissue carboxylesterases. Individual differences in esterase activity may be genetically determined, as is the case with atypical cholinesterases and the polymorphic distribution of serum paraoxonase and red blood cell esterase D. Disease states may also alter esterase activity. PMID

  12. Esterase isozyme polymorphism, specific and nonspecific esterase, syngenic lines development and natural occurrence of a thermostable esterase in the tropical silkworm Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, G K; Sengupta, A K; Verma, A K; Sen, S K; Saratchandra, B

    2001-11-01

    Esterase isozyme polymorphism was documented for digestive juice and haemolymph of the tropical multivoltine silkworm, Bombyx mori L., breed CB5 (GP) and its syngenic lines (CB5Lm(e)-1, CB5Lm-2 and CB5Lm-5) using alpha- and beta-naphthylacetate separately as nonspecific substrates (Ogita, Z., Kasai, T., 1965. Genetico-biochemical analysis of specific esterases in Musca domestica. Jpn. J. Genet. 40, 173-184). Polymorphism existed in the isozyme pattern of alpha-esterase with two or three bands in digestive juice and three to five bands in haemolymph. No polymorphism was observed in beta-esterase isozyme pattern having four bands in digestive juice and two bands in haemolymph. During the course of esterase isozyme studies, the presence of some specific alpha-esterase bands (Est-1, 4 and 5) in haemolymph and beta-esterase bands (Est-1, 2 and 3) in digestive juice were observed. But both alpha- and beta-esterase bands Est-3 and 4 in digestive juice and Est-2 and 3 in haemolymph were found to be nonspecific. Nonspecific beta-esterase band (Est-3) in haemolymph of CB5 (GP) and its syngenic lines withstood a temperature up to 80+/-1 degrees C for 10 min. No thermostable band was observed in the isozyme zymogram of alpha-esterase in digestive juice and haemolymph or beta-esterase in digestive juice. Overall, this study discusses the presence of esterase heterogeneity in the CB5 (GP) genepool, syngenic lines development, occurrence of specific alpha- and beta-esterase bands in digestive juice and haemolymph and thermostable beta-esterase band Est-3 in haemolymph in tropical silkworm Bombyx mori L. PMID:11583932

  13. Rhamnogalacturonan I containing homogalacturonan inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation by decreasing ICAM1 expression.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Ellen G; Colquhoun, Ian J; Chau, Hoa K; Hotchkiss, Arland T; Waldron, Keith W; Morris, Victor J; Belshaw, Nigel J

    2015-11-01

    Pectin modified with pH, heat or enzymes, has previously been shown to exhibit anti-cancer activity. However, the structural requirements for modified pectin bioactivity have rarely been addressed. In this study several pectin extracts representing different structural components of pectin were assessed for effects against colon cancer cells. Rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) extracts reduced proliferation of DLD1 and HCT116 colon cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. RGI reduced ICAM1 gene expression and siRNA-mediated knockdown of ICAM1 expression decreased cell proliferation providing a potential novel mechanism for the anti-cancer activity of pectin. Structural analysis of bioactive and non-bioactive RGIs suggested that a homogalacturonan component is maybe essential for the anti-proliferative activity, furthering the understanding of the structural requirements for pectin bioactivity. PMID:26256381

  14. Genetics of a tissue esterase polymorphism (Est-6) in the rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    van Zutphen, L F; den Bieman, M G; von Deimling, O; Fox, R R

    1987-06-01

    Genetic analysis of a polymorphic tissue esterase revealed a new locus (Est-6) with two alleles (Est-6a and Est-6b) on linkage group VI of the rabbit. Est-6 is closely linked to the Est-1,2,4 cluster. Esterase of Est-6 is found in many organs, particularly in liver and small intestine, but not in erythrocytes and serum. Est-6 esterase hydrolyzes alpha-naphthyl acetate and butyrate, naphthol AS-D acetate, indoxyl acetate, and butyrate as well as 5-bromoindoxyl acetate, N-acetyl-L-alanine-alpha-naphthyl ester but not 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate and fluorescein diacetate. The enzyme is inhibited by bis-p-nitrophenyl phosphate and eserine but not by p-chloromercuribenzoate. It was classified as a carboxylesterase (EC 3.1.1.1). Based on chromosomal localization, tissue distribution, substrate specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and range of pI's, rabbit Est-6 is assumed to be homologous with mouse Es-7. PMID:3619880

  15. [3H]Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol hydrolysis by extracts of Zea mays L. vegetative tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, P. J.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    [3H]Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was hydrolyzed by buffered extracts of acetone powders prepared from 4 day shoots of dark grown Zea mays L. seedlings. The hydrolytic activity was proportional to the amount of extract added and was linear for up to 6 hours at 37 degrees C. Boiled or alcohol denatured extracts were inactive. Analysis of reaction mixtures by high performance liquid chromatography demonstrated that not all isomers of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol were hydrolyzed at the same rate. Buffered extracts of acetone powders were prepared from coleoptiles and mesocotyls. The rates of hydrolysis observed with coleoptile extracts were greater than those observed with mesocotyl extracts. Active extracts also catalyzed the hydrolysis of esterase substrates such as alpha-naphthyl acetate and the methyl esters of indoleacetic acid and naphthyleneacetic acid. Attempts to purify the indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol hydrolyzing activity by chromatographic procedures resulted in only slight purification with large losses of activity. Chromatography over hydroxylapatite allowed separation of two enzymically active fractions, one of which catalyzed the hydrolysis of both indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and esterase substrates. With the other enzymic hydrolysis of esterase substrates was readily demonstrated, but no hydrolysis of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was ever detected.

  16. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  17. Modelling substrate specificity and enantioselectivity for lipases and esterases by substrate-imprinted docking

    PubMed Central

    Juhl, P Benjamin; Trodler, Peter; Tyagi, Sadhna; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Background Previously, ways to adapt docking programs that were developed for modelling inhibitor-receptor interaction have been explored. Two main issues were discussed. First, when trying to model catalysis a reaction intermediate of the substrate is expected to provide more valid information than the ground state of the substrate. Second, the incorporation of protein flexibility is essential for reliable predictions. Results Here we present a predictive and robust method to model substrate specificity and enantioselectivity of lipases and esterases that uses reaction intermediates and incorporates protein flexibility. Substrate-imprinted docking starts with covalent docking of reaction intermediates, followed by geometry optimisation of the resulting enzyme-substrate complex. After a second round of docking the same substrate into the geometry-optimised structures, productive poses are identified by geometric filter criteria and ranked by their docking scores. Substrate-imprinted docking was applied in order to model (i) enantioselectivity of Candida antarctica lipase B and a W104A mutant, (ii) enantioselectivity and substrate specificity of Candida rugosa lipase and Burkholderia cepacia lipase, and (iii) substrate specificity of an acetyl- and a butyrylcholine esterase toward the substrates acetyl- and butyrylcholine. Conclusion The experimentally observed differences in selectivity and specificity of the enzymes were reproduced with an accuracy of 81%. The method was robust toward small differences in initial structures (different crystallisation conditions or a co-crystallised ligand), although large displacements of catalytic residues often resulted in substrate poses that did not pass the geometric filter criteria. PMID:19493341

  18. Identification of Genes Encoding Microbial Glucuronoyl Esterases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One type of covalent linkages connecting lignin and hemicellulose in plant cell walls is the ester linkage between 4-0-methyl-D-glucuronic acid of glucuronoxylan and lignin alcohols. An enzyme that could hydrolyze such linkages, named glucuronoyl esterase, occurs in the cellulolytic system of the w...

  19. Phenol esterase activity of porcine skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkyl esters of plant-derived phenols may serve as slow-release sources for cutaneous delivery of antioxidants. The ability of skin esterases to hydrolyze phenolic esters was examined. Esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol were prepared from decanoic and lipoic acids. Ferulic acid was esterified ...

  20. Production of cutinolytic esterase by filamentous bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fett, W F; Wijey, C; Moreau, R A; Osman, S F

    2000-07-01

    Thirty-eight strains of filamentous bacteria, many of which are thermophilic or thermotolerant and commonly found in composts and mouldy fodders, were examined for their ability to produce cutinolytic esterase (cutinase) in culture media supplemented with cutin, suberin or cutin-containing agricultural by-products. Initially, the ability of culture supernatants to hydrolyse the artificial substrate p-nitrophenyl butyrate was determined by spectrophotometric assays. Only one bacterium, Thermoactinomyces vulgaris NRRL B-16117, exhibited cutinolytic esterase production. The enzyme was highly inducible, was repressed by the presence of glucose in the medium and hydrolysed both apple and tomato cutins. Inducers included apple cutin, apple pomace, tomato peel, potato suberin and commercial cork. Unlike similar fungal enzymes, the T. vulgaris cutinolytic esterase was not inducible by cutin hydrolysate. The cutinolytic esterase exhibited a half-life of over 60 min at 70 degrees C and a pH optimum of >/= 11.0. This study indicates that thermophylic filamentous bacteria may be excellent commercial sources of heat-stable cutin-degrading enzymes that can be produced by fermentation of low cost feedstocks. PMID:10886609

  1. New Extremophilic Lipases and Esterases from Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, Maria E; González Siso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the presence of water. In media with low water content or in organic solvents, they can catalyze synthetic reactions such as esterification and transesterification. Lipases and esterases, in particular those from extremophilic origin, are robust enzymes, functional under the harsh conditions of industrial processes owing to their inherent thermostability and resistance towards organic solvents, which combined with their high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity make them very attractive biocatalysts for a variety of industrial applications. Likewise, enzymes from extremophile sources can provide additional features such as activity at extreme temperatures, extreme pH values or high salinity levels, which could be interesting for certain purposes. New lipases and esterases have traditionally been discovered by the isolation of microbial strains producing lipolytic activity. The Genome Projects Era allowed genome mining, exploiting homology with known lipases and esterases, to be used in the search for new enzymes. The Metagenomic Era meant a step forward in this field with the study of the metagenome, the pool of genomes in an environmental microbial community. Current molecular biology techniques make it possible to construct total environmental DNA libraries, including the genomes of unculturable organisms, opening a new window to a vast field of unknown enzymes with new and unique properties. Here, we review the latest advances and findings from research into new extremophilic lipases and esterases, using metagenomic approaches, and their potential industrial and biotechnological applications. PMID:24588890

  2. Structural and immunological feature of rhamnogalacturonan I-rich polysaccharide from Korean persimmon vinegar.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon; Hong, Hee-Do; Suh, Hyung-Joo; Shin, Kwang-Soon

    2016-08-01

    The crude polysaccharide (KPV-0) isolated from Korean persimmon vinegar was fractionated using gel filtration chromatography to enhance the immunostimulatory activity and to identify the structural features of active fraction. Among three fractions, KPV-I obtained in a void volume, demonstrated the potent production of macrophage-stimulating mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, and nitric oxide. KPV-I showed a combined single peak with high molecular weight of 55,000Da by high performance size exclusion chromatography. Component sugar analysis revealed that KPV-I contained mainly of arabinose, mannose, galactose, rhamnose and galacturonic acid. Single radial gel diffusion assay using β-glucosyl Yariv reagent showed that KPV-I contained arabinogalactan protein with 13.7%. Methylation analysis indicated that KPV-I contained 21 kinds of neutral glycosidic linkages, which seemed to be composed three kinds of polysaccharide; that is a rhamnogalacturonan-I (65-70%) derived from persimmon as a raw material, a mannan (20-25%) derived from fermentation-associated microorganisms, and a linear glucans (less than 10%). In conclusion, polysaccharide isolated from persimmon vinegar could augment the macrophage stimulation, and a large amounts of RG-I polysaccharide derived from persimmon is likely a crucial role in expression of the activity in persimmon vinegar. PMID:27131731

  3. Enzymatic generation of galactose-rich oligosaccharides/oligomers from potato rhamnogalacturonan I pectic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Khodaei, Nastaran; Karboune, Salwa

    2016-04-15

    Potato pulp by-product rich in galactan-rich rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I) was investigated as a new source of oligosaccharides with potential prebiotic properties. The efficiency of selected monocomponent enzymes and multi-enzymatic preparations to generate oligosaccharides/oligomers from potato RG I was evaluated. These overall results of yield were dependent on the activity profile of the multi-enzymatic preparations. Highest oligo-RG I yield of 93.9% was achieved using multi-enzymatic preparation (Depol 670L) with higher hydrolytic activity toward side chains of RG I as compared to its backbone. Main oligo-RG I products were oligosaccharides with DP of 2-12 (79.8-100%), while the oligomers with DP of 13-70 comprised smaller proportion (0.0-20.2%). Galactose (58.9-91.2%, w/w) was the main monosaccharide of oligo-RG I, while arabinose represented 0.0-12.1%. An understanding of the relationship between the activity profile of multi-enzymatic preparations and the yield/DP of oligo-RG I was achieved. This is expected to provide the capability to generate galacto- and galacto(arabino) oligosaccharides and their corresponding oligomers from an abundant by-product. PMID:26616968

  4. Physicochemical properties of complex rhamnogalacturonan I from gelatinous cell walls of flax fibers.

    PubMed

    Mikshina, Polina V; Idiyatullin, Bulat Z; Petrova, Anna A; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zuev, Yuriy F; Gorshkova, Tatyana A

    2015-03-01

    The physicochemical properties of flax fiber cell wall rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) and its fragments, obtained after galactanase treatment (fraction G1), were characterized. RG-I retains its hydrodynamic volume after its molecular weight decreases by approximately half, as revealed by SEC. Two techniques, DLS and NMR, with different principles of diffusion experiment were used to establish the reasons for this property of RG-I. Three possible types of particles were revealed by DLS depending on the concentration of the RG-I and G1 solutions (2-2.5, 15-20, and 150-200 nm). It was determined by BPP-LED experiments that the backbone of the RG-I was 1.3-1.9-fold more mobile than the side chains. The obtained data suggest a novel type of pectin spatial organization-the formation of RG-I associates with the backbone at the periphery and the interaction between the side chains to form a core zone. PMID:25498709

  5. Effect of nanocoating with rhamnogalacturonan-I on surface properties and osteoblasts response.

    PubMed

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Svava, Rikke; Syberg, Susanne; Yihua, Yu; Haugshøj, Kenneth Brian; Damager, Iben; Ulvskov, Peter; Christensen, Leif Højslet; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2012-03-01

    Long-term stability of titanium implants are dependent on a variety of factors. Nanocoating with organic molecules is one of the methods used to improve osseointegration. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro effect of nanocoating with pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) on surface properties and osteoblasts response. Three different RG-Is from apple and lupin pectins were modified and coated on amino-functionalized tissue culture polystyrene plates (aminated TCPS). Surface properties were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurement, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of nanocoating on proliferation, matrix formation and mineralization, and expression of genes (real-time PCR) related to osteoblast differentiation and activity were tested using human osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells. It was shown that RG-I coatings affected the surface properties. All three RG-I induced bone matrix formation and mineralization, which was also supported by the finding that gene expression levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and collagen type-1 were increased in cells cultured on the RG-I coated surface, indicating a more differentiated osteoblastic phenotype. This makes RG-I coating a promising and novel candidate for nanocoatings of implants. PMID:22213456

  6. Xylella fastidiosa esterase rather than hydroxynitrile lyase.

    PubMed

    Torrelo, Guzman; Ribeiro de Souza, Fayene Zeferino; Carrilho, Emanuel; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-03-01

    In 2009, we reported that the product of the gene SCJ21.16 (XFa0032) from Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-restricted plant pathogen that causes a range of diseases in several important crops, encodes a protein (XfHNL) with putative hydroxynitrile lyase activity. Sequence analysis and activity tests indicated that XfHNL exhibits an α/β-hydrolase fold and could be classified as a member of the family of FAD-independent HNLs. Here we provide a more detailed sequence analysis and new experimental data. Using pure heterologously expressed XfHNL we show that this enzyme cannot catalyse the cleavage/synthesis of mandelonitrile and that this protein is in fact a non-enantioselective esterase. Homology modelling and ligand docking simulations were used to study the active site and support these results. This finding could help elucidate the common ancestor of esterases and hydroxynitrile lyases with an α/β -hydrolase fold. PMID:25684099

  7. Novel choline esterase based sensor for monitoring of organophosphorus pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, E.S.; Ghindilis, A.L.; Atanasov, P.

    1996-12-31

    Organophosphorus compounds are significant major environmental pollutants due to their intensive use as pesticides. The modern techniques based on inhibition of choline esterase enzyme activity are discussed. Potentiometric electrodes based on detection of choline esterase inhibition by analytes has been developed. The detection of choline esterase activity is based on the novel principle of molecular transduction. Immobilized peroxidase acting as the molecular transducer, catalyzes the electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide by direct (mediatorless) electron transfer. The sensing element consists of a carbon based electrode containing an assembly of co-immobilized enzymes: choline esterase, choline oxidase and peroxidase.

  8. Identification of putative rhamnogalacturonan-II specific glycosyltransferases in Arabidopsis using a combination of bioinformatics approaches.

    PubMed

    Voxeur, Aline; André, Aurélie; Breton, Christelle; Lerouge, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is a complex plant cell wall polysaccharide that is composed of an α(1,4)-linked homogalacturonan backbone substituted with four side chains. It exists in the cell wall in the form of a dimer that is cross-linked by a borate di-ester. Despite its highly complex structure, RG-II is evolutionarily conserved in the plant kingdom suggesting that this polymer has fundamental functions in the primary wall organisation. In this study, we have set up a bioinformatics strategy aimed at identifying putative glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in RG-II biosynthesis. This strategy is based on the selection of candidate genes encoding type II membrane proteins that are tightly coexpressed in both rice and Arabidopsis with previously characterised genes encoding enzymes involved in the synthesis of RG-II and exhibiting an up-regulation upon isoxaben treatment. This study results in the final selection of 26 putative Arabidopsis GTs, including 10 sequences already classified in the CAZy database. Among these CAZy sequences, the screening protocol allowed the selection of α-galacturonosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of α4-GalA oligogalacturonides present in both homogalacturonans and RG-II, and two sialyltransferase-like sequences previously proposed to be involved in the transfer of Kdo and/or Dha on the pectic backbone of RG-II. In addition, 16 non-CAZy GT sequences were retrieved in the present study. Four of them exhibited a GT-A fold. The remaining sequences harbored a GT-B like fold and a fucosyltransferase signature. Based on homologies with glycosyltransferases of known functions, putative roles in the RG-II biosynthesis are proposed for some GT candidates. PMID:23272088

  9. O-acetylated N-acetylneuraminic acid as a novel target for therapy in human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Lim, Min; Arutyunyan, Anna; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Hurtz, Christian; Lau, Kam; Müschen, Markus; Yu, Robert K.; von Itzstein, Mark; Groffen, John

    2013-01-01

    The development of resistance to chemotherapy is a major cause of relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Though several mechanisms associated with drug resistance have been studied in detail, the role of carbohydrate modification remains unexplored. Here, we investigated the contribution of 9-O-acetylated N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to survival and drug resistance development in ALL cells. A strong induction of 9-O-acetylated Neu5Ac including 9-O-acetyl GD3 was detected in ALL cells that developed resistance against vincristine or nilotinib, drugs with distinct cytotoxic mechanisms. Removal of 9-O-acetyl residues from Neu5Ac on the cell surface by an O-acetylesterase made ALL cells more vulnerable to such drugs. Moreover, removal of intracellular and cell surface–resident 9-O-acetyl Neu5Ac by lentiviral transduction of the esterase was lethal to ALL cells in vitro even in the presence of stromal protection. Interestingly, expression of the esterase in normal fibroblasts or endothelial cells had no effect on their survival. Transplanted mice induced for expression of the O-acetylesterase in the ALL cells exhibited a reduction of leukemia to minimal cell numbers and significantly increased survival. This demonstrates that Neu5Ac 9-O-acetylation is essential for survival of these cells and suggests that Neu5Ac de-O-acetylation could be used as therapy to eradicate drug-resistant ALL cells. PMID:23478187

  10. Non-specific esterases and esterproteases in masticatory muscles from the muscular dystrophic mouse.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, S; Moe, D; Vilmann, H

    1989-03-01

    With the aid of histochemical and electrophoretic techniques activities for esterase and esterprotease were investigated in the digastric and masseter muscles from normal and dystrophic mice. The substrates used were alpha-naphthyl acetate and N-acetyl-L-alanine alpha-naphthyl ester. According to the microscopic observations of the dystrophic muscles the histopathological changes in the masseter muscle were much more pronounced than in the digastric muscle. The connective tissue surrounding the myofibers of the dystrophic masseter contained a large number of cells with pronounced enzyme activity. Among them were mast cells that were strongly stained for esterprotease. The connective tissue of the dystrophic digastricus was much less infiltrated with cellular elements reacting for esterprotease. In zymograms the normal digastricus, the dystrophic masseter and the dystrophic digastricus showed a strong activity for certain isoenzymes that were absent or weakly expressed in the normal masseter. PMID:2657470

  11. IN VITRO COMPARISON OF RAT AND CHICKEN BRAIN NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterased showed that rat esterases we...

  12. Enlarging the substrate portfolio of the thermophilic esterase EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, Angela; Mandrich, Luigi; Manco, Giuseppe; Trincone, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    The enzymatic regioselective hydrolysis of (a) acetylated mono- to tetrasaccharides of different nature, (b) of acetylated aryl glycosides and (c) of different acetylated nucleosides was studied enlarging the portfolio of substrates that can be employed by the thermophilic esterase EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius. The reactions were optimised to the extent that the amount of enzyme needed was lowered of two orders of magnitude with respect to the previously reported reactions, namely from 4000 to 40 U of enzyme per reaction. New additional solvents were screened and dramatic changes in regioselectivity were observed depending on the amount and type of solvent used. For example, in the presence of 10 % DMF, only two α-D-glucose products 6-OH and 4,6-OH (in a 76:24 ratio) were detected, whereas with 25 % DMF, at least four products of similar amount were observed. This versatility adds specific value to the biocatalyst making possible the design of biocatalytic reactions with different hydrophobic ester substrates. As an additional remarkable example, EST2 catalysed with a good yield and high regioselectivity the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl β-D-xylopyranoside triacetate producing only the monoacetylated derivative with acetyl group in 3-O-position, in 2 min. The results with nucleosides as substrates are particularly interesting. The peracetates of 3',5'-di-O-acetylthymidine are converted almost quantitatively (95 %) to the monoacetylated derivative possessing free secondary OH; this regioselectivity is complementary to hydrolysis/alcoholysis reactions catalysed by CAL-B lipase or to other microbial hydrolytic biocatalysts, generally giving products with free primary OH groups. A docking analysis was undertaken with all analysed substrates suggesting a structural interpretation of the results. In most of cases, the best pose of the selected substrate was in line with the observed regioselectivity. PMID:26216109

  13. Structural features determining thermal adaptation of esterases.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Filip; Mandrysch, Agathe; Poojari, Chetan; Strodel, Birgit; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2016-02-01

    The adaptation of microorganisms to extreme living temperatures requires the evolution of enzymes with a high catalytic efficiency under these conditions. Such extremophilic enzymes represent valuable tools to study the relationship between protein stability, dynamics and function. Nevertheless, the multiple effects of temperature on the structure and function of enzymes are still poorly understood at the molecular level. Our analysis of four homologous esterases isolated from bacteria living at temperatures ranging from 10°C to 70°C suggested an adaptation route for the modulation of protein thermal properties through the optimization of local flexibility at the protein surface. While the biochemical properties of the recombinant esterases are conserved, their thermal properties have evolved to resemble those of the respective bacterial habitats. Molecular dynamics simulations at temperatures around the optimal temperatures for enzyme catalysis revealed temperature-dependent flexibility of four surface-exposed loops. While the flexibility of some loops increased with raising the temperature and decreased with lowering the temperature, as expected for those loops contributing to the protein stability, other loops showed an increment of flexibility upon lowering and raising the temperature. Preserved flexibility in these regions seems to be important for proper enzyme function. The structural differences of these four loops, distant from the active site, are substantially larger than for the overall protein structure, indicating that amino acid exchanges within these loops occurred more frequently thereby allowing the bacteria to tune atomic interactions for different temperature requirements without interfering with the overall enzyme function. PMID:26647400

  14. Structure of plant cell walls. X. Rhamnogalacturonan I, a structurally complex pectic polysaccharide in the walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, M.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1980-12-01

    The purification and characterization of a pectic polymer, rhamnogalacturonan I, present in the primary cell walls of dicots is described. Rhamnogalacturonan I accounts for approximately 7% of the mass of the walls isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. As purified, rhamnogalacturonan I has a molecular weight of approximately 200,000 and is composed primarily of L-rhamnosyl, D-galacturonosyl, L-arabinosyl, and D-galactosyl residues. The backbone of rhamnogalacturonan I is thought to be composed predominantly of D-galacturonosyl and L-rhamnosyl residues in a ratio of approximately 2:1. About half of the L-rhamnosyl residues are 2-linked and are glycosidically attached to C/sub 4/ of a D-galacturonosyl residue. The other half of the L-rhamnosyl residues are 2,4-linked and have a D-galacturonosyl residue glycosidically attached at C/sub 2/. Sidechains averaging 6 residues in length are attached to C/sub 4/ of the L-rhamnosyl residues. There are many different sidechains, containing variously linked L-arabinosyl, and/or D-galactosyl residues.

  15. Short strong hydrogen bonds in proteins: a case study of rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase

    PubMed Central

    Langkilde, Annette; Kristensen, Søren M.; Lo Leggio, Leila; Mølgaard, Anne; Jensen, Jan H.; Houk, Andrew R.; Navarro Poulsen, Jens-Christian; Kauppinen, Sakari; Larsen, Sine

    2008-01-01

    An extremely low-field signal (at approximately 18 p.p.m.) in the 1H NMR spectrum of rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase (RGAE) shows the presence of a short strong hydrogen bond in the structure. This signal was also present in the mutant RGAE D192N, in which Asp192, which is part of the catalytic triad, has been replaced with Asn. A careful analysis of wild-type RGAE and RGAE D192N was conducted with the purpose of identifying possible candidates for the short hydrogen bond with the 18 p.p.m. deshielded proton. Theor­etical calculations of chemical shift values were used in the interpretation of the experimental 1H NMR spectra. The crystal structure of RGAE D192N was determined to 1.33 Å resolution and refined to an R value of 11.6% for all data. The structure is virtually identical to the high-resolution (1.12 Å) structure of the wild-type enzyme except for the interactions involving the mutation and a disordered loop. Searches of the Cambridge Structural Database were conducted to obtain information on the donor–acceptor distances of different types of hydrogen bonds. The short hydrogen-bond inter­actions found in RGAE have equivalents in small-molecule structures. An examination of the short hydrogen bonds in RGAE, the calculated pK a values and solvent-accessibilities identified a buried carboxylic acid carboxylate hydrogen bond between Asp75 and Asp87 as the likely origin of the 18 p.p.m. signal. Similar hydrogen-bond interactions between two Asp or Glu carboxy groups were found in 16% of a homology-reduced set of high-quality structures extracted from the PDB. The shortest hydrogen bonds in RGAE are all located close to the active site and short interactions between Ser and Thr side-chain OH groups and backbone carbonyl O atoms seem to play an important role in the stability of the protein structure. These results illustrate the significance of short strong hydrogen bonds in proteins. PMID:18645234

  16. [Role of Human Orphan Esterases in Drug-induced Toxicity].

    PubMed

    Fukami, Tatsuki

    2015-01-01

    Esterases hydrolyze compounds containing ester, amide, and thioester bonds, causing prodrug activation or detoxification. Among esterases, carboxylesterases have been studied in depth due to their ability to hydrolyze a variety of drugs. However, there are several drugs for which the involved esterase(s) is unknown. We found that flutamide, phenacetin, rifamycins (rifampicin, rifabutin, and rifapentine), and indiplon are hydrolyzed by arylacetamide deacetylase (AADAC), which is highly expressed in human liver and gastrointestinal tissues. Flutamide hydrolysis is considered associated with hepatotoxicity. Phenacetin, a prodrug of acetaminophen, was withdrawn due to side effects such as methemoglobinemia and renal failure. It was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo using mice that AADAC is responsible for phenacetin hydrolysis, which leads to methemoglobinemia. In addition, it was shown that AADAC-mediated hydrolysis attenuates the cytotoxicity of rifamycins. Thus AADAC plays critical roles in drug-induced toxicity. Another orphan esterase, α/β hydrolase domain containing 10 (ABHD10), was found responsible for deglucuronidation of acyl-glucuronides including mycophenolic acid acyl-glucuronide and probenecid acyl-glucuronide. Because acyl-glucuronides appear associated with toxicity, ABHD10 would function as a detoxification enzyme. The roles of orphan esterases are becoming increasingly understood. Further studies will facilitate our knowledge of the pharmacologic and toxicological significance of orphan esterases in drug therapy. PMID:26521872

  17. Protein Acetylation and Acetyl Coenzyme A Metabolism in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galdieri, Luciano; Zhang, Tiantian; Rogerson, Daniella; Lleshi, Rron

    2014-01-01

    Cells sense and appropriately respond to the physical conditions and availability of nutrients in their environment. This sensing of the environment and consequent cellular responses are orchestrated by a multitude of signaling pathways and typically involve changes in transcription and metabolism. Recent discoveries suggest that the signaling and transcription machineries are regulated by signals which are derived from metabolism and reflect the metabolic state of the cell. Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a key metabolite that links metabolism with signaling, chromatin structure, and transcription. Acetyl-CoA is produced by glycolysis as well as other catabolic pathways and used as a substrate for the citric acid cycle and as a precursor in synthesis of fatty acids and steroids and in other anabolic pathways. This central position in metabolism endows acetyl-CoA with an important regulatory role. Acetyl-CoA serves as a substrate for lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), which catalyze the transfer of acetyl groups to the epsilon-amino groups of lysines in histones and many other proteins. Fluctuations in the concentration of acetyl-CoA, reflecting the metabolic state of the cell, are translated into dynamic protein acetylations that regulate a variety of cell functions, including transcription, replication, DNA repair, cell cycle progression, and aging. This review highlights the synthesis and homeostasis of acetyl-CoA and the regulation of transcriptional and signaling machineries in yeast by acetylation. PMID:25326522

  18. Genetics of esterase isoenzymes in Malus.

    PubMed

    Manganaris, A G; Alston, F H

    1992-02-01

    Three main zones of esterase activity (EST-I, EST-III, EST-IV) identified in leaf extracts of cultivated apple and Malus species were determined by the genes EST-1, EST-3 and EST-4, respectively. In addition to earlier reported alleles of EST-1 (a, b) three further bands c, d and f were identified in the EST-I zone of which c was found to be determined by an allele, c. Two alleles, a, b, and a null allele were found for both the genes EST-3 and EST-4. Differences in allelic frequency were observed between cultivars, rootstocks and Malus species. Allele EST-1a was rare amongst the rootstocks. The examination of Malus species and derivatives showed a geographical relationship. Allele EST-1c was confined to species of Asian origin, and EST-1d was confined to American species. PMID:24202593

  19. Characterization of a Feruloyl Esterase from Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Torres, María; Reverón, Inés; Mancheño, José Miguel; de las Rivas, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is frequently found in the fermentation of plant-derived food products, where hydroxycinnamoyl esters are abundant. L. plantarum WCFS1 cultures were unable to hydrolyze hydroxycinnamoyl esters; however, cell extracts from the strain partially hydrolyze methyl ferulate and methyl p-coumarate. In order to discover whether the protein Lp_0796 is the enzyme responsible for this hydrolytic activity, it was recombinantly overproduced and enzymatically characterized. Lp_0796 is an esterase that, among other substrates, is able to efficiently hydrolyze the four model substrates for feruloyl esterases (methyl ferulate, methyl caffeate, methyl p-coumarate, and methyl sinapinate). A screening test for the detection of the gene encoding feruloyl esterase Lp_0796 revealed that it is generally present among L. plantarum strains. The present study constitutes the description of feruloyl esterase activity in L. plantarum and provides new insights into the metabolism of hydroxycinnamic compounds in this bacterial species. PMID:23793626

  20. A DIRECT METHOD TO ASSAY NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct photometric method for assaying neurotoxic esterase (NTE) activity of chicken brain microsomal preparation has been developed using 4-nitrophenyl esters as substrates. Paired samples of the microsomal preparation were preincubated for 20 min. with paraoxon plus either (a...

  1. Rhamnogalacturonan-II cross-linking of plant pectins via boron bridges occurs during polysaccharide synthesis and/or secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Messenger, David J; Fry, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), a domain of plant cell wall pectins, is able to cross-link with other RG-II domains through borate diester bridges. Although it is known to affect mechanical properties of the cell wall, the biochemical requirements and lifecycle of this cross-linking remain unclear. We developed a PAGE methodology to allow separation of monomeric and dimeric RG-II and used this to study the dynamics of cross-linking in vitro and in vivo. Rosa cells grown in medium with no added boron contained no RG-II dimers, although these re-appeared after addition of boron to the medium. However, other Rosa cultures which were unable to synthesize new polysaccharides did not show dimer formation. We conclude that RG-II normally becomes cross-linked intraprotoplasmically or during secretion, but not post-secretion. PMID:24603547

  2. The world of protein acetylation.

    PubMed

    Drazic, Adrian; Myklebust, Line M; Ree, Rasmus; Arnesen, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Acetylation is one of the major post-translational protein modifications in the cell, with manifold effects on the protein level as well as on the metabolome level. The acetyl group, donated by the metabolite acetyl-coenzyme A, can be co- or post-translationally attached to either the α-amino group of the N-terminus of proteins or to the ε-amino group of lysine residues. These reactions are catalyzed by various N-terminal and lysine acetyltransferases. In case of lysine acetylation, the reaction is enzymatically reversible via tightly regulated and metabolism-dependent mechanisms. The interplay between acetylation and deacetylation is crucial for many important cellular processes. In recent years, our understanding of protein acetylation has increased significantly by global proteomics analyses and in depth functional studies. This review gives a general overview of protein acetylation and the respective acetyltransferases, and focuses on the regulation of metabolic processes and physiological consequences that come along with protein acetylation. PMID:27296530

  3. The catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF esterase: characterization by site-directed mutagenesis and functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Pleschka, S; Klenk, H D; Herrler, G

    1995-10-01

    Influenza C virus is able to inactivate its own cellular receptors by virtue of a sialate 9-O-acetylesterase that releases the acetyl residue at position C-9 of N-acetyl-9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2). The receptor-destroying enzyme activity is a function of the surface glycoprotein HEF and this esterase belongs to the class of serine hydrolases. In their active site, these enzymes contain a catalytic triad made up of a serine, a histidine and an aspartic acid residue. Sequence comparison with other serine esterases has indicated that, in addition to serine-71 (S71), the amino acids histidine-368 or -369 (H368/369) and aspartic acid 261 (D261) are the most likely candidates to form the catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein. By site-directed mutagenesis, mutants were generated in which alanine substituted for either of these amino acids. Using a phagemid expression vector, pSP1D-HEF the HEF gene was expressed in both COS 7 and MDCK I cells. The glycoprotein was obtained in a functional form only in the latter cells, as indicated by its transport to the cell surface and measurable enzyme activity. The low level of expression could be increased by stimulating the NF-KB-binding activity of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter/enhancer element of the vector. The esterase activity of the mutant proteins was compared with that of the wild-type glycoprotein. With Neu5,9Ac2 as the substrate, the esterase specific activities of the S71/A mutant and the H368,369/A mutant were reduced by more than 90%. In the case of the D261/A mutant the specific activity was reduced by 64%. From this data we conclude that S71, H368/369 and D261 are likely to represent the catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF. In addition, N280 is proposed to stabilize the oxyanion of the presumptive transition state intermediate formed by the enzyme-substrate complex. PMID:7595356

  4. Characterization of Esterases Produced by a Ruminal Bacterium Identified as Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens1

    PubMed Central

    Lanz, Wayne W.; Williams, Phletus P.

    1973-01-01

    An obligately anaerobic ruminal bacterial isolate was selected from 18 tributyrin-degrading isolates and identified as Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens strain 53. The culture in late exponential phase contained enzymes which could be released by sonic disruption. These enzymes degraded substrates at a rate in the order 1-naphthyl acetate (NA) > 1-naphthyl butyrate > 1-naphthyl propionate but did not degrade 1-naphthyl palmitate or 1-naphthyl phosphate. The enzymes on NA were neither stimulated nor inhibited by CoCl2, MgCl2, and MnCl (each varied from 10−6 to 10−4 M). CaCl at 10−3 M stimulated esterase activity by 16%. Aliphatic substrates were hydrolyzed at a rate in the order triacetin > tributyrin > tripropionin, and ethyl acetate > ethyl formate. Similarly, aromatic fluorescein diesters were degraded at a rate in the order acetyl > propionyl > caproyl > butyryl > capryl > lauryl. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic zymograms indicated that the enzyme composite contained cathodally migrating bands. By column chromatography, these enzymes were separated into six NA-degrading fractions. Fraction V contained an esterase which had an optimal temperature of 39 C, a Km of 7.6 × 10−4 on NA, and a molecular weight of about 66,000. This enzyme was inhibited by paraoxon (41%, 10−4 M), eserine (17%, 10−2 M), NaF (17%, 10−2 M), and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (62%, 10−4 M) but not by 1-naphthyl N-methyl carbamate at 8.4 × 10−4 M. PMID:4734862

  5. An esterase gene from Lactobacillus casei cotranscribed with genes encoding a phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system and regulated by a LevR-like activator and sigma54 factor.

    PubMed

    Yebra, María J; Viana, Rosa; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2004-01-01

    A new esterase-encoding gene was found in the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei BL23 (CECT5275). It is located in an operon together with genes encoding the EIIA, EIIB, EIIC, and EIID proteins of a mannose class phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. After overproduction in Escherichia coli and purification, the esterase could hydrolyze acetyl sugars, hence the operon was named esu for esterase-sugar uptake genes. Upstream of the genes encoding the EII components (esuABCD) and the esterase (esuE), two genes transcribed in the opposite sense were found which encode a Bacillus subtilis LevR-like transcriptional activator (esuR) and a sigma54-like transcriptional factor (rpoN). As compared with the wild-type strain, elevated fructose phosphorylation was detected in L. casei mutants constitutively expressing the esu operon. However, none of the many sugars tested could induce the esu operon. The fact that EsuE exhibits esterase activity on acetyl sugars suggests that this operon could be involved in the uptake and metabolism of esterified sugars. Expression of the esu operon is similar to that of the B. subtilis lev operon: it contains a -12,-24 consensus promoter typical of sigma54-regulated genes, and EsuR and RpoN are essential for its transcription which is negatively regulated by EIIB(Esu). The esuABCDE transcription unit represents the first sigma54-regulated operon in lactobacilli. Furthermore, replacement of His852 in the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system regulation domain II of EsuR with Ala indicated that the transcription activator function of EsuR is inhibited by EIIB(Esu)-mediated phosphorylation at His852. PMID:15925903

  6. An esterase from the basidiomycete Pleurotus sapidus hydrolyzes feruloylated saccharides.

    PubMed

    Linke, Diana; Matthes, Rene; Nimtz, Manfred; Zorn, Holger; Bunzel, Mirko; Berger, Ralf G

    2013-08-01

    Investigating the secretion of esterases by the basidiomycetous fungus Pleurotus sapidus in a Tween 80-rich nutrient medium, an enzyme was discovered that hydrolyzed the ester bond of feruloylated saccharides. The enzyme was purified by ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed a monomeric protein of about 55 kDa. The complete coding sequence with an open reading frame of 1,665 bp encoded a protein (Est1) consisting of 554 amino acids. The enzyme showed no significant homology to any published feruloyl esterase sequences, but possessed putative conserved domains of the lipase/esterase superfamily. Substrate specificity studies classified the new enzyme as type-A feruloyl esterase, hydrolyzing methyl ferulate, methyl sinapate, and methyl p-coumarate but no methyl caffeate. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 6 and a temperature optimum at 50 °C. Ferulic acid was efficiently released from ferulated saccharides, and the feruloyl esterase exhibited moderate stability in biphasic systems (50 % toluene or tert-butylmethyl ether). PMID:23203636

  7. NEUROPATHY TARGET ESTERASE INHIBITION BY ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ESTERS IN HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Certain organophosphorus compounds (OPs) produce a delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) in man and some animal species. apability to cause OPIDN is generally predicted in animal models by early and irreversible inhibition of neuropathy target esterase (NTE, neurotoxic esterase) . In this s...

  8. Three-dimensional structure of homodimeric cholesterol esterase-ligand complex at 1.4 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, V.; Addlagatta, A.; Wawrzak, Z.; Duax, W.

    2010-03-08

    The three-dimensional structure of a Candida cylindracea cholesterol esterase (ChE) homodimer (534 x 2 amino acids) in complex with a ligand of proposed formula C{sub 23}H{sub 48}O{sub 2} has been determined at 1.4 {angstrom} resolution in space group P1 using synchrotron low-temperature data. The structure refined to R = 0.136 and R{sub free} = 0.169 and has revealed new stereochemical details in addition to those detected for the apo- and holo-forms at 1.9 and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively [Ghosh et al. (1995), Structure, 3, 279-288]. The cholesterol esterase structure is a dimer with four spatially separated interfacial contact areas and two symmetry-related pairs of openings to an internal intradimer cavity. Hydrophobic active-site gorges in each subunit face each other across a central interfacial cavity. The ChE subunits have carbohydrate chains attached to their Asn314 and Asn351 residues, with two ordered N-acetyl-D-glucosoamine moieties visible at each site. The side chains of 14 residues have two alternative conformations with occupancy values of 0.5 {+-} 0.2. For each subunit the electron density in the enzyme active-site gorge is well modeled by a C{sub 23}-chain fatty acid.

  9. Differential effect of the serine protease inhibitor phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride on cytochemically detectable esterases in human leucocytes and platelets.

    PubMed

    Dufer, J; Trentesaux, C; Desplaces, A

    1984-01-01

    Esterases of human leucocytes and platelets were studied by cytochemical methods. The aim of the study was to clarify the cellular distribution and possible nature of esterases types differing in their substrate specificity and/or their inhibitor sensitivity. 3 substrates (alpha-naphthyl acetate: ANA; naphthol AS-D chloroacetate: NASDCA; and N-acetyl DL-alanine alpha-naphthyl ester: NACALA) were used and the effects of 2 inhibitors (sodium fluoride and the serine protease inhibitor phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride: PMSF) were evaluated. 4 enzyme types were described: Type I, present in granulocytes, was detected using NASDCA and NACALA and was resistant to fluoride but sensitive to PMSF. Other types were detected using ANA as substrate. Type II, present in monocytes, was inhibited by both fluoride and PMSF. Type III, present in platelets and plasma cells, was inhibited by fluoride but resistant to PMSF. Type IV, present in lymphocytes, was resistant to both fluoride and PMSF. The specific aims and possible areas for application of these results are discussed. PMID:6364322

  10. 2,2-Disubstituted 4-acylthio-3-oxobutyl groups as esterase- and thermolabile protecting groups of phosphodiesters.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Emilia; Ahmed, Zafar; Lönnberg, Harri; Beigelman, Leonid; Ora, Mikko

    2013-02-01

    Five different 2,2-disubstituted 4-acylthio-3-oxobutyl groups have been introduced as esterase-labile phosphodiester protecting groups that additionally are thermolabile. The phosphotriesters 1-3 were prepared to determine the rate of the enzymatic and nonenzymatic removal of such groups at 37 °C and pH 7.5 by HPLC-ESI-MS. Additionally, (1)H NMR spectroscopic monitoring was used for structural characterization of the intermediates and products. When treated with hog liver esterase, these groups were removed by enzymatic deacylation followed by rapid chemical cyclization to 4,4-disubstituted dihydrothiophen-3(2H)-one. The rate of the enzymatic deprotection could be tuned by the nature of the 4-acylthio substituent, the benzoyl group and acetyl groups being removed 50 and 5 times as fast as the pivaloyl group. No alkylation of glutathione could be observed upon the enzymatic deprotection. The half-life for the nonenzymatic deprotection varied from 0.57 to 35 h depending on the electronegativity of the 2-substituents and the size of the acylthio group. The acyl group evidently migrates from the sulfur atom to C3-gem-diol obtained by hydration of the keto group and the exposed mercapto group attacks on C1 resulting in departure of the protecting group as 4,4-disubstituted 3-acyloxy-4,5-dihydrothiophene with concomitant release of the desired phosphodiester. PMID:23272806

  11. Pregastric esterase in milk sham fed to adult jersey steers.

    PubMed

    Leidy, R B; Russell, R W; Wise, G H

    1975-04-01

    Pregastric esterase activity was detected in reconstituted nonfat milk sham fed from a nipple pail to two 4-yr-old rumen-fistualted steers. Lipolytic activity, determined in a medium containing 5% tri-n-butyrin, averaged 8.6 plus or minus .4 lipase units. Further assays, in which activitiy was measured by free fatty acids released from a condensed milk substrate, averaged 166.9 plus or minus 9.2 mumol. These values are higher than those noted for young calves, indicating that secretion of pregastric esterase may persist in cattle beyond calfhood. Esterase activity in one of the steers fed whole milk until he was 2 yr of age showed no marked residual effect of earlier intake of milk fat. PMID:1127162

  12. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly. PMID:26301520

  13. Microwave-assisted alkaline extraction of galactan-rich rhamnogalacturonan I from potato cell wall by-product.

    PubMed

    Khodaei, Nastaran; Karboune, Salwa; Orsat, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Galactan-rich rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I), exhibiting promising health benefits, is the most abundant polysaccharide in potato pulp by-product. In the present study, the microwave-assisted alkaline extraction of galactan-rich RG I was investigated. Solid/liquid ratio was identified as the most significant parameter affecting linearly yield and galactose/rhamnose contents. Microwave power and solid/liquid ratio exhibited a significant adverse interactive effect on the yield. Galactose content of extracted polysaccharides can be modulated by compromising between KOH concentration and extraction time, which exhibited adverse interaction. Optimum conditions were identified using the established predicted models and consisted of treatment of potato cell wall at solid/liquid ratio of 2.9% (w/v) with 1.5M KOH under microwave power of 36.0 W for 2.0 min. Yield of intact galactan-rich RG I of 21.6% and productivity of 192.0 g/Lh were achieved. The functional properties of RG I-rich polysaccharides were comparable or superior to potato galactan and oranges homogalacturonan. PMID:26213002

  14. Immunogold Localization of Xyloglucan and Rhamnogalacturonan I in the Cell Walls of Suspension-Cultured Sycamore Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Patricia J.; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter; Staehelin, L. Andrew

    1986-01-01

    Plant cell walls serve several functions: they impart rigidity to the plant, provide a physical and chemical barrier between the cell and its environment, and regulate the size and shape of each cell. Chemical studies have provided information on the biochemical composition of the plant cell walls as well as detailed knowledge of individual cell wall molecules. In contrast, very little is known about the distribution of specific cell wall components around individual cells and throughout tissues. To address this problem, we have produced polyclonal antibodies against two cell wall matrix components; rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), a pectic polysaccharide, and xyloglucan (XG), a hemicellulose. By using the antibiodies as specific markers we have been able to localize these polymers on thin sections of suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). Our results reveal that each molecule has a unique distribution. XG is localized throughout the entire wall and middle lamella. RG-I is restricted to the middle lamella and is especially evident in the junctions between cells. These observations indicate that plant cell walls may have more distinct chemical (and functional?) domains than previously envisaged. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16665111

  15. Acetyl transfer in arylamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Booth, J.

    1966-01-01

    1. N-Hydroxyacetamidoaryl compounds (hydroxamic acids) are metabolites of arylamides, and an enzyme that transfers the acetyl group from these derivatives to arylamines has been found in rat tissues. The reaction products were identified by thin-layer chromatography and a spectrophotometric method, with 4-amino-azobenzene as acetyl acceptor, was used to measure enzyme activity. 2. The acetyltransferase was in the soluble fraction of rat liver, required a thiol for maximum activity and had a pH optimum between 6·0 and 7·5. 3. The soluble fractions of various rat tissues showed decreasing activity in the following order: liver, adrenal, kidney, lung, spleen, testis, heart; brain was inactive. 4. With the exception of aniline and aniline derivatives all the arylamines tested were effective as acetyl acceptors but aromatic compounds with side-chain amino groups were inactive. 5. The N-hydroxyacetamido derivatives of 2-naphthylamine, 4-amino-biphenyl and 2-aminofluorene were active acetyl donors but N-hydroxyacetanilide showed only slight activity. Acetyl-CoA was not a donor. 6. Some properties of the enzyme are compared with those of other acetyltransferases. PMID:5969287

  16. Fatal Intoxication with Acetyl Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Susan M; Haikal, Nabila A; Kraner, James C

    2016-01-01

    Among the new psychoactive substances encountered in forensic investigations is the opioid, acetyl fentanyl. The death of a 28-year-old man from recreational use of this compound is reported. The decedent was found in the bathroom of his residence with a tourniquet secured around his arm and a syringe nearby. Postmortem examination findings included marked pulmonary and cerebral edema and needle track marks. Toxicological analysis revealed acetyl fentanyl in subclavian blood, liver, vitreous fluid, and urine at concentrations of 235 ng/mL, 2400 ng/g, 131 ng/mL, and 234 ng/mL, respectively. Acetyl fentanyl was also detected in the accompanying syringe. Death was attributed to recreational acetyl fentanyl abuse, likely through intravenous administration. The blood acetyl fentanyl concentration is considerably higher than typically found in fatal fentanyl intoxications. Analysis of this case underscores the need for consideration of a wide range of compounds with potential opioid-agonist activity when investigating apparent recreational drug-related deaths. PMID:26389815

  17. 9-O-Acetylation of sialomucins: a novel marker of murine CD4 T cells that is regulated during maturation and activation.

    PubMed

    Krishna, M; Varki, A

    1997-06-01

    Terminal sialic acids on cell surface glycoconjugates can carry 9-O-acetyl esters. For technical reasons, it has previously been difficult to determine their precise distribution on different cell types. Using a recombinant soluble form of the Influenza C virus hemagglutinin-esterase as a probe for 9-O-acetylated sialic acids, we demonstrate here their preferential expression on the CD4 T cell lineage in normal B10.A mouse lymphoid organs. Of total thymocytes, 8-10% carry 9-O-acetylation; the great majority of these are the more mature PNA-, HSA-, and TCRhi medullary cells. While low levels of 9-O-acetylation are seen on some CD4/CD8 double positive (DP) and CD8 single positive (SP) cells, high levels are present primarily on 80- 85% of CD4 SP cells. Correlation with CD4 and CD8 levels suggests that 9-O-acetylation appears as an early differentiation marker as cells mature from the DP to the CD4 SP phenotype. This high degree of 9-O-acetylation is also present on 90-95% of peripheral spleen and lymph node CD4 T cells. In contrast, only a small minority of CD8 T cells and B cells show such levels of 9-O-acetylation. Among mature peripheral CD4 T lymphocytes, the highly O-acetylated cells are Mel 14(hi), CD44(lo), and CD45R(exon B)hi, features typical of naive cells. Digestions with trypsin and O-sialoglycoprotease (OSGPase) and ELISA studies of lipid extracts indicate that the 9-O-acetylated sialic acids on peripheral CD4 T cells are predominantly on O-linked mucintype glycoproteins and to a lesser degree, on sialylated glycolipids (gangliosides). In contrast, sialic acids on mucin type molecules of CD8 T cells are not O-acetylated; instead these molecules mask the recognition of O-acetylated gangliosides that seem to be present at similar levels as on CD4 cells. The 9-O-acetylated gangliosides on mouse T cells are not bound by CD60 antibodies, which recognize O-acetylated gangliosides in human T cells. Tethering 9-O-acetylated mucins with the Influenza C probe with

  18. Regiospecific Ester Hydrolysis by Orange Peel Esterase - An Undergraduate Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Lewin, Andrew M.; Catlin, Eric R.

    1997-01-01

    A simple but effective experiment has been developed to demonstrate the regiospecificity of enzyme catalysis using an esterase activity easily isolated from orange peel. The experiment involves the preparation of diester derivatives of para-, meta- and ortho-hydroxybenzoic acid (e.g. methyl 4-acetoxy-benzoic acid). The derivatives are incubated with orange peel esterase, as a crude extract, and with commercially available pig liver esterase and porcine pancreatic lipase. The enzymatic hydrolysis reactions are monitored by thin layer chromatography, revealing which of the two ester groups is hydrolysed, and the rate of the enzyme-catalysed reaction. The results of a group experiment revealed that in all cases hydrolysis was observed with at least one enzyme, and in most cases the enzymatic hydrolysis was specific for production of either the hydroxy-ester or acyl-acid product. Specificity towards the ortho-substituted series was markedly different to that of the para-substituted series, which could be rationalised in the case of pig liver esterase by a published active site model.

  19. Characterization of a feruloyl esterase B from Talaromyces cellulolyticus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Yoshida, Erika; Fukada, Hiroaki; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Tokura, Mitsunori; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A feruloyl esterase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamoyl (feruloyl) group from esterified sugars in plant cell walls. Talaromyces cellulolyticus is a high cellulolytic-enzyme producing fungus. However, there is no report for feruloyl esterase activity of T. cellulolyticus. Analysis of the genome database of T. cellulolyticus identified a gene encoding a putative feruloyl esterase B. The recombinant enzyme was prepared using a T. cellulolyticus homologous expression system and characterized. The purified enzyme exhibited hydrolytic activity toward p-nitrophenyl acetate, p-nitrophenyl trans-ferulate, methyl ferulate, rice husk, and bagasse. HPLC assays showed that the enzyme released ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid from hydrothermal-treated rice husk and bagasse. Trichoderma sp. is well-known high cellulolytic-enzyme producing fungus useful for the lignocellulosic biomass saccharification. Interestingly, no feruloyl esterase has been reported from Trichoderma sp. The results show that this enzyme is expected to be industrially useful for biomass saccharification. PMID:26110915

  20. In vitro comparison of rat and chicken brain neurotoxic esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, R.; Padilla, S.

    1986-04-01

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases showed that rat esterases were more sensitive than chicken to paraoxon inhibition at concentrations less than or equal to microM and superimposable with chicken esterases at concentrations of 2.5-1000 microM. Mipafox titration of the paraoxon-resistant esterases at a fixed paraoxon concentration of 100 microM (mipafox concentration: 0-1000 microM) resulted in a mipafox I50 of 7.3 microM for chicken brain NTE and 11.6 microM for rat brain NTE. NTE (i.e., paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive esterase activity) comprised 80% of chicken and 60% of rat brain paraoxon-resistant activity with the specific activity of chicken brain NTE approximately twice that of rat brain NTE. The pH maxima for NTE from both species was similar showing broad, slightly alkaline optima from pH 7.9 to 8.6. (/sup 3/H)Diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP)-labeled NTE from the brains of both species had an apparent mol wt of 160,000 measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In conclusion, NTE from both species was very similar, with the mipafox I50 for rat NTE within the range of reported values for chicken and human NTE, and the inhibitor parameters of the chicken NTE assay were applicable for the rat NTE assay.

  1. The Synthesis and Origin of the Pectic Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan II – Insights from Nucleotide Sugar Formation and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Peled, Maor; Urbanowicz, Breeanna R.; O’Neill, Malcolm A.

    2012-01-01

    There is compelling evidence showing that the structurally complex pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) exists in the primary cell wall as a borate cross-linked dimer and that this dimer is required for the assembly of a functional wall and for normal plant growth and development. The results of several studies have also established that RG-II structure and cross-linking is conserved in vascular plants and that RG-II likely appeared early in the evolution of land plants. Two features that distinguish RG-II from other plant polysaccharides are that RG-II is composed of 13 different glycoses linked to each other by up to 22 different glycosidic linkages and that RG-II is the only polysaccharide known to contain both apiose and aceric acid. Thus, one key event in land plant evolution was the emergence of genes encoding nucleotide sugar biosynthetic enzymes that generate the activated forms of apiose and aceric acid required for RG-II synthesis. Many of the genes involved in the generation of the nucleotide sugars used for RG-II synthesis have been functionally characterized. By contrast, only one glycosyltransferase involved in the assembly of RG-II has been identified. Here we provide an overview of the formation of the activated sugars required for RG-II synthesis and point to the possible cellular and metabolic processes that could be involved in assembling and controlling the formation of a borate cross-linked RG-II molecule. We discuss how nucleotide sugar synthesis is compartmentalized and how this may control the flux of precursors to facilitate and regulate the formation of RG-II. PMID:22639675

  2. Glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides from Rosa cell cultures are boron-bridged in the plasma membrane and form complexes with rhamnogalacturonan II

    PubMed Central

    Voxeur, Aline; Fry, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Boron (B) is essential for plant cell-wall structure and membrane functions. Compared with its role in cross-linking the pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), little information is known about the biological role of B in membranes. Here, we investigated the involvement of glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides (GIPCs), major components of lipid rafts, in the membrane requirement for B. Using thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, we first characterized GIPCs from Rosa cell culture. The major GIPC has one hexose residue, one hexuronic acid residue, inositol phosphate, and a ceramide moiety with a C18 trihydroxylated mono-unsaturated long-chain base and a C24 monohydroxylated saturated fatty acid. Disrupting B bridging (by B starvation in vivo or by treatment with cold dilute HCl or with excess borate in vitro) enhanced the GIPCs’ extractability. As RG-II is the main B-binding site in plants, we investigated whether it could form a B-centred complex with GIPCs. Using high-voltage paper electrophoresis, we showed that addition of GIPCs decreased the electrophoretic mobility of radiolabelled RG-II, suggesting formation of a GIPC–B–RG-II complex. Last, using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we showed that added GIPCs facilitate RG-II dimerization in vitro. We conclude that B plays a structural role in the plasma membrane. The disruption of membrane components by high borate may account for the phytotoxicity of excess B. Moreover, the in-vitro formation of a GIPC–B–RG-II complex gives the first molecular explanation of the wall–membrane attachment sites observed in vivo. Finally, our results suggest a role for GIPCs in the RG-II dimerization process. PMID:24804932

  3. Molecular characterization of a Penicillium chrysogenum exo-rhamnogalacturonan lyase that is structurally distinct from other polysaccharide lyase family proteins.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Marin; Kawakami, Takuya; Ikemoto, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Takenaka, Shigeo; Nakazawa, Masami; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    2015-10-01

    We previously described an endo-acting rhamnogalacturonan (RG) lyase, termed PcRGL4A, of Penicillium chrysogenum 31B. Here, we describe a second RG lyase, called PcRGLX. We determined the cDNA sequence of the Pcrglx gene, which encodes PcRGLX. Based on analyses using a BLAST search and a conserved domain search, PcRGLX was found to be structurally distinct from known RG lyases and might belong to a new polysaccharide lyase family together with uncharacterized fungal proteins of Nectria haematococca, Aspergillus oryzae, and Fusarium oxysporum. The Pcrglx cDNA gene product (rPcRGLX) expressed in Escherichia coli demonstrated specific activity against RG but not against homogalacturonan. Divalent cations were not essential for the enzymatic activity of rPcRGLX. rPcRGLX mainly released unsaturated galacturonosyl rhamnose (ΔGR) from RG backbones used as the substrate from the initial stage of the reaction, indicating that the enzyme can be classified as an exo-acting RG lyase (EC 4.2.2.24). This is the first report of an RG lyase with this mode of action in Eukaryota. rPcRGLX acted synergistically with PcRGL4A to degrade soybean RG and released ΔGR. This ΔGR was partially decorated with galactose (Gal) residues, indicating that rPcRGLX preferred oligomeric RGs to polymeric RGs, that the enzyme did not require Gal decoration of RG backbones for degradation, and that the enzyme bypassed the Gal side chains of RG backbones. These characteristics of rPcRGLX might be useful in the determination of complex structures of pectins. PMID:25921806

  4. Bacterial protein acetylation: new discoveries unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Alan J

    2016-05-01

    Nε-acetylation is emerging as an abundant post-translational modification of bacterial proteins. Two mechanisms have been identified: one is enzymatic, dependent on an acetyltransferase and acetyl-coenzyme A; the other is non-enzymatic and depends on the reactivity of acetyl phosphate. Some, but not most, of those acetylations are reversed by deacetylases. This review will briefly describe the current status of the field and raise questions that need answering. PMID:26660885

  5. Electrophoretic and densitometric analysis of esterase activity as an indicator of mercury toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, M.J.; Guttman, S.I.

    1995-12-31

    In an earlier experiment, esterase activity as determined by starch gel electrophoresis was absent in larval caddisflies (Nectopsyche albida) that succumbed to mercury exposure, but was present in control larvae. To test the effects of mercury exposure duration on esterase activity, additional larval N. albida were exposed under conditions identical to those in the earlier experiment, and esterase activity was determined by electrophoresis of several live individuals every 12 hours. To test the effects of mercury concentration on esterase activity, homogenates of unexposed N. albida were electrophoresed, and esterase activity was determined using esterase-specific stains spiked with various concentrations of mercury. Following both experiments, esterase activity was quantified by laser densitometry of stained electrophoresis gels, Results indicate that: (1) inorganic mercury inhibited esterase activity, (2) inhibition increased with exposure time, and (3) inhibition increased with mercury concentration. Esterase inhibition may be a causal factor in mortality related to mercury exposure. Quantification of esterase activity by densitometry of electrophoretic gels may be an alternative method of rapid toxicity assessment.

  6. Structural Basis for the De-N-acetylation of Poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine in Gram-positive Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Bamford, Natalie C.; Pokrovskaya, Varvara; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P. Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides are required for the development and integrity of biofilms produced by a wide variety of bacteria. In staphylococci, partial de-N-acetylation of the exopolysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) by the extracellular protein IcaB is required for biofilm formation. To understand the molecular basis for PNAG de-N-acetylation, the structure of IcaB from Ammonifex degensii (IcaBAd) has been determined to 1.7 Å resolution. The structure of IcaBAd reveals a (β/α)7 barrel common to the family four carbohydrate esterases (CE4s) with the canonical motifs circularly permuted. The metal dependence of IcaBAd is similar to most CE4s showing the maximum rates of de-N-acetylation with Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+. From docking studies with β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers and structural comparison to PgaB from Escherichia coli, the Gram-negative homologue of IcaB, we identify Arg-45, Tyr-67, and Trp-180 as key residues for PNAG binding during catalysis. The absence of these residues in PgaB provides a rationale for the requirement of a C-terminal domain for efficient deacetylation of PNAG in Gram-negative species. Mutational analysis of conserved active site residues suggests that IcaB uses an altered catalytic mechanism in comparison to other characterized CE4 members. Furthermore, we identified a conserved surface-exposed hydrophobic loop found only in Gram-positive homologues of IcaB. Our data suggest that this loop is required for membrane association and likely anchors IcaB to the membrane during polysaccharide biosynthesis. The work presented herein will help guide the design of IcaB inhibitors to combat biofilm formation by staphylococci. PMID:25359777

  7. Mode of action of Bacillus licheniformis pectin methylesterase on highly methylesterified and acetylated pectins.

    PubMed

    Remoroza, Connie; Wagenknecht, Martin; Buchholt, Hans Christian; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Gruppen, Harry; Schols, Henk A

    2015-01-22

    A gene encoding a putative pectinesterase from Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The resulting recombinant enzyme (BliPME) was purified and characterized as a pectin methylesterase. The enzyme showed maximum activity at pH 8.0 and 50°C. BliPME is able to release up to 100% of the methylesters from lime pectin (DM 34-76→DM 0) and up to 73% of all methylesters from SBPs (DM 30-73→DM 14). BliPME efficiently de-methylesterifies lemon pectins and SBPs in a blockwise manner and is quite tolerant towards the acetyl groups present within the SBPs. Detailed analysis of the BliPME-modified pectins using HILIC-MSn and the classical calcium reactivity measurement showed that the enzyme generates pectins with low methylesterification (lime and SBP) and high acetyl content (SBP) while creating blocks of nonmethylesterified galacturonic acid residues. The high activity of BliPME towards highly methylesterified and acetylated pectins makes this novel esterase more efficient in removing methylesters from highly esterified beet pectin compared to other PMEs, e.g. Aspergillus niger PME. PMID:25439930

  8. Overexpression of esterase D in kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses

    SciTech Connect

    Loughna, S.; Moore, G. ); Gau, G.; Blunt, S. ); Nicolaides, K. )

    1993-10-01

    Human trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. It is compatible with life, but prolonged survival is rare. Anomalies often involve the urogenital, cardiac, craniofacial, and central nervous systems. It is possible that these abnormalities may be due to the overexpression of developmentally important genes on chromosome 13. The expression of esterase D (localized to chromosome 13q14.11) has been investigated in both muscle and kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses and has been compared with normal age- and sex-matched fetal tissues, by using northern analysis. More than a twofold increase in expression of esterase D was found in the kidney of two trisomy 13 fetuses, with normal levels in a third. Overexpression was not seen in the muscle tissues from these fetuses. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Plant cell wall imaging by metabolic click-mediated labelling of rhamnogalacturonan II using azido 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Marie; Lehner, Arnaud; Vauzeilles, Boris; Malassis, Julien; Marchant, Alan; Smyth, Kevin; Linclau, Bruno; Baron, Aurélie; Mas Pons, Jordi; Anderson, Charles T; Schapman, Damien; Galas, Ludovic; Mollet, Jean-Claude; Lerouge, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    In plants, 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) is a monosaccharide that is only found in the cell wall pectin, rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II). Incubation of 4-day-old light-grown Arabidopsis seedlings or tobacco BY-2 cells with 8-azido 8-deoxy Kdo (Kdo-N3 ) followed by coupling to an alkyne-containing fluorescent probe resulted in the specific in muro labelling of RG-II through a copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. CMP-Kdo synthetase inhibition and competition assays showing that Kdo and D-Ara, a precursor of Kdo, but not L-Ara, inhibit incorporation of Kdo-N3 demonstrated that incorporation of Kdo-N3 occurs in RG-II through the endogenous biosynthetic machinery of the cell. Co-localisation of Kdo-N3 labelling with the cellulose-binding dye calcofluor white demonstrated that RG-II exists throughout the primary cell wall. Additionally, after incubating plants with Kdo-N3 and an alkynated derivative of L-fucose that incorporates into rhamnogalacturonan I, co-localised fluorescence was observed in the cell wall in the elongation zone of the root. Finally, pulse labelling experiments demonstrated that metabolic click-mediated labelling with Kdo-N3 provides an efficient method to study the synthesis and redistribution of RG-II during root growth. PMID:26676799

  10. A Naturally Occurring Mutation in an Arabidopsis Accession Affects a β-d-Galactosidase That Increases the Hydrophilic Potential of Rhamnogalacturonan I in Seed Mucilage[W

    PubMed Central

    Macquet, Audrey; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Loudet, Olivier; Kronenberger, Jocelyne; Mouille, Gregory; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M.

    2007-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana accession Shahdara was identified as a rare naturally occurring mutant that does not liberate seed mucilage on imbibition. The defective locus was found to be allelic to the mum2-1 and mum2-2 mutants. Map-based cloning showed that MUCILAGE-MODIFIED2 (MUM2) encodes the putative β-d-galactosidase BGAL6. Activity assays demonstrated that one of four major β-d-galactosidase activities present in developing siliques is absent in mum2 mutants. No difference was observed in seed coat epidermal cell structure between wild-type and mutant seed; however, weakening of the outer tangential cell wall by chemical treatment resulted in the release of mucilage from mum2 seed coat epidermal cells, and the mum2 mucilage only increased slightly in volume, relative to the wild type. Consistent with the absence of β-d-galactosidase activity in the mutant, the inner layer of mucilage contained more Gal. The allocation of polysaccharides between the inner and outer mucilage layers was also modified in mum2. Mass spectrometry showed that rhamnogalacturonan I in mutant mucilage had more branching between rhamnose and hexose residues relative to the wild type. We conclude that the MUM2/BGAL6 β-d-galactosidase is required for maturation of rhamnogalacturonan I in seed mucilage by the removal of galactose/galactan branches, resulting in increased swelling and extrusion of the mucilage on seed hydration. PMID:18165330

  11. Toxicological implications of esterases-From molecular structures to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tetsuo . E-mail: satohbri@peach.ifnet.or.jp

    2005-09-01

    This article reports on a keynote lecture at the 10th International Congress of Toxicology sponsored by the International Union of Toxicology and held on July 2004. Current developments in molecular-based studies into the structure and function of cholinesterases, carboxylesterases, and paraoxonases are described. This article covers mechanisms of regulation of gene expression of the various esterases by developmental factors and xenobiotics, as well as the interplay between physiological and chemical regulation of the enzyme activity.

  12. Preparation and Properties of Novel Dentin Adhesives with Esterase Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Gu; Ye, Qiang; Topp, Elizabeth M.; Kostoryz, Elisabet L.; Wang, Yong; Kieweg, Sarah L.; Spencer, Paulette

    2012-01-01

    A new methacrylate monomer, trimethylolpropane mono allyl ether dimethacrylate (TMPEDMA), was synthesized and evaluated. This branched methacrylate was designed to increase esterase-resistance when incorporated into conventional HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)/BisGMA (2,2-bis[4(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy-propyloxy)-phenyl] propane) dental adhesives. The new adhesives, HEMA/BisGMA/TMPEDMA in a 45/30/25 (w/w) ratio were formulated with H2O at 0 (A0T) and 8 wt % water (A8T) and compared with control adhesives (HEMA/BisGMA, 45/55 (w/w), at 0 (A0) and 8 wt % (A8) water). Camphoroquinone (CQ), 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate and diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate were used as photoinitiators. The new adhesives showed a degree of conversion comparable with the control and improved modulus and glass transition temperature (Tg). Exposure of photopolymerized discs to porcine liver esterase for up to eight days showed that the net cumulative methacrylic acid (MAA) release in adhesives formulated with the new monomer and 8% water (A8T: 182 μg/mL) was dramatically (P < 0.05) decreased in comparison to the control (A8: 361.6 μg/mL). The results demonstrate that adhesives made with the new monomer and cured in water to simulate wet bonding are more resistant to esterase than conventional HEMA/BisGMA adhesive. PMID:22919119

  13. 3 Benzyl-6-chloropyrone: a suicide inhibitor of cholesterol esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Saint, C.; Gallo, I.; Kantorow, M.; Bailey, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Cholesterol, absorbed from the intestine, appears in lymph as the ester. Cholesterol esterase is essential for this process, since depletion of the enzyme blocks and repletion restores, absorption. Selective inhibitors of cholesterol esterase may thus prove useful in reducing cholesterol uptake. A series of potential suicide substrates were synthesized which, following cleavage by the enzyme, would attack the putative nucleophile in the active site. One of these, 3-benzyl-6-chloropyrone (3BCP), inhibited both synthesis and hydrolysis of /sup 14/C-cholesteryl oleate with an I/sub 50/ of approximately 150 ..mu..M. The inactivation was time-dependent and characteristic of a suicide mechanism. The ..cap alpha.. pyrone structure (lactone analog) is cleaved by a serine-hydroxyl in the active site. This generates an enoyl chloride which inactivates the imidazole believed to play a part in the catalytic function of the enzyme. Inhibition by 3BCP is selective for cholesterol esterase. The activity of pancreatic lipase as not affected by concentrations up to 1 mM.

  14. The effect of age and frailty upon blood esterase activities and their response to dietary supplementation.

    PubMed Central

    Summerbell, J; Wynne, H; Hankey, C R; Williams, F M

    1993-01-01

    1. The aims of this study were two-fold. First, to define ranges of blood esterase activities in three groups, namely young subjects, fit community dwelling elderly and frail, chronically hospitalised elderly subjects, and second, to determine whether low blood esterase activities in the frail patients could be altered by increasing their nutritional intake. 2. Plasma cholinesterase, aspirin esterase, paraoxonase and phenylacetate esterase activities were all significantly lower in the frail elderly compared with the young and fit elderly volunteers. The activity of red blood cell esterase was not different in the frail elderly. 3. Fourteen frail elderly patients were randomly assigned to receive either hospital meal provision plus supplemental feeding with Build-up (Nestle) and Maxijul (SHS Ltd) or hospital provision alone for 8 weeks. Dietary intake was measured for all patients at the start of the study and at week 8. Measurements of blood esterase (cholinesterase, phenylacetate esterase, paraoxonase, aspirin esterase and red blood cell esterase), albumin and anthropometric indices (weight, triceps skinfold thickness and mid arm circumference) were made before the study and repeated at week 4 and 8. 4. There was a significant increase in plasma cholinesterase at week 4 (P < 0.05) but this was not statistically significant at week 8. There were no significant changes in any of the other esterase activities or anthropometric measurements. 5. We conclude that the lower esterase activities of the frail chronically hospitalised elderly do not respond to dietary supplementation for a period of 8 weeks with routinely available products. The hypothesis that lower esterase activities are the direct result of undernutrition which would be corrected by dietary supplementation has not been supported by this study. PMID:12959286

  15. Esterase activity able to hydrolyze dietary antioxidant hydroxycinnamates is distributed along the intestine of mammals.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, M F; Kroon, P A; Williamson, G; Garcia-Conesa, M T

    2001-11-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids are effective antioxidants and are abundant components of plant cell walls, especially in cereal bran. For example, wheat and rye brans are rich sources of the hydroxycinnamates ferulic acid, sinapic acid, and p-coumaric acid. These phenolics are part of human and animal diets and may contribute to the beneficial effects derived from consumption of cereal bran. However, these compounds are ester linked to the main polymers in the plant cell wall and cannot be absorbed in this complex form. The present work shows that esterases with activity toward esters of the major dietary hydroxycinnamates are distributed throughout the intestinal tract of mammals. In rats, the cinnamoyl esterase activity in the small intestine is derived mainly from the mucosa, whereas in the large intestine the esterase activity was found predominantly in the luminal microflora. Mucosa cell-free extracts obtained from human duodenum, jejunum, and ileum efficiently hydrolyzed various hydroxycinnamoyl esters, providing the first evidence of human cinnamoyl esterase(s). This study first demonstrates the release by human colonic esterase(s) (mostly of microbial origin) of sinapic acid and p-coumaric acid from rye and wheat brans. Hydrolysis by intestinal esterase(s) is very likely the major route for release of antioxidant hydroxycinnamic acids in vivo. PMID:11714377

  16. The effect of liver esterases and temperature on remifentanil degradation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Ornella; Cascone, Sara; Sessa, Linda; De Robertis, Edoardo; Lamberti, Gaetano

    2016-08-20

    Remifentanil is a potent opioid metabolized by serum and tissue esterases; it is routinely administered to patients with liver failure as anaesthetic and analgo-sedative without variation in doses, even if prolonged clinical effects and respiratory depression have been observed in these patients. The aim of this study was to determine remifentanil enzymatic degradation kinetics bearing in mind the effect of liver esterases in order to trace a more accurate pharmacokinetic profile of the drug. Solution samples were taken over time and analysed to measure remifentanil concentration by HPLC. We reproduced the physiological settings, varying temperature and pH in vitro and evaluated the kinetics of degradation of remifentanil in the presence of Rhizopus Oryzae esterases, equine liver esterases and porcine liver esterases. Remifentanil kinetics of degradation was accelerated by porcine liver esterases. Remifentanil in vitro half-life decreases with increasing temperatures in the presence of porcine liver esterases. A drug model simulation considering the effect of temperature in the presence of liver esterases was developed. Remifentanil in vitro half-life decreases with increasing temperatures when porcine liver esterases are present. In this paper we propose a model for describing remifentanil degradation kinetics at various temperatures. PMID:27370912

  17. Isozymic variations in specific and nonspecific esterase and its thermostability in silkworm, Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Biswas, Tapati Datta; Nayak, Sandeepta Kumar; Saha, A K; Majumdar, M K

    2012-09-01

    Esterase isozymic variations were documented in the haemolymph of developed multivoltine and bivoltine silkworm breeds during unfavorable seed crop seasons of May - September using á- and â- napthylacetate separately to identify specific and nonspecific esterase having thermotolerant potentiality. Variations existed in the isozyme pattern with three bands (Est-2, 3 and 4) in pure Nistari race and other developed multivoltine and bivoltine breeds. Est-2 and Est-3 were non-specific esterases as they were observed when both á- and â-napthylacetate was used as substrates separately. Est-4 band was observed only with á-napthylacetate as substrate and was therefore confirmed to be specific á-esterase band in the haemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. Zymograms showed that the non-specific esterase band (Est-3) with R1 of 0.43 and specific á-esterase band (Est-4) with R(f) of 0.32 predominately withstood a temperature of 70 +/- 2 degrees C for a duration of 10 min and were confirmed as thermostable esterases in haemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. This also categorized the presence of thermostable esterases in developed multivoltine and bivoltine breeds of silkworm, even though the qualitative activity was more in the former than the latter. The qualitative presence of thermostable esterases and their activity could be adopted as an indicative biochemical marker in relation to thermotolerance in silkworm. PMID:23734447

  18. An extended loop in CE7 carbohydrate esterase family is dispensable for oligomerization but required for activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mrityunjay K; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-06-01

    The carbohydrate esterase family 7 (CE7) belonging to the α/β hydrolase superfamily contains a structurally conserved loop extension element relative to the canonical α/β hydrolase fold. This element called the β-interface loop contributes 20-30% of the total buried surface area at intersubunit interfaces of the functional hexameric state. To test whether this loop is an enabling region for the structure and function of the oligomeric assembly, we designed a truncation variant of the thermostable CE7 acetyl esterase from Thermotoga maritima (TmAcE). Although deletion of 26 out of 40 residues in the loop had little impact on the hexamer formation, the variant exhibited altered dynamics of the oligomeric assembly and a loss of thermal stability. Furthermore, the mutant lacked catalytic activity. Crystal structures of the variant and a new crystal form of the wild type protein determined at 2.75Å and 1.76Å, respectively, provide a rationale for the properties of the variant. The hexameric assembly in the variant is identical to that of the wild type and differed only in the lack of buried surface area interactions at the original intersubunit interfaces. This is accompanied by disorder in an extended region of the truncated loop that consequently induces disorder in the neighboring oxyanion hole loop. Overall, the results suggest that the β-interface loop in CE7 enzymes is dispensable for the oligomeric assembly. Rather, the loop extension event was evolutionarily selected to regulate activity, conformational flexibility and thermal stability. PMID:27085421

  19. Biosensor analysis of blood esterases for organophosphorus compounds exposure assessment: approaches to simultaneous determination of several esterases.

    PubMed

    Sigolaeva, Larisa; Makhaeva, Galina; Rudakova, Elena; Boltneva, Natalia; Porus, Marya; Dubacheva, Galina; Eremenko, Arkadi; Kurochkin, Ilya; Richardson, Rudy J

    2010-09-01

    This paper reviews our previously published data and presents new results on biosensor assay of blood esterases. Tyrosinase and choline oxidase biosensors based on nanostructured polyelectrolyte films were developed for these purposes. Experiments were performed on the quantitative determination of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), carboxylesterase (CaE), and neuropathy target esterase (NTE) in samples of whole blood of rats, mice, and humans. Good agreement was found between biosensor and spectrophotometric assays for AChE, BChE, and CaE. No direct comparison could be made for NTE because its activity cannot be measured spectrophotometrically in whole blood. A new method of simultaneous quantitative determination of AChE and BChE in test mixtures is also described. This method represents a bifunctional biosensor for the simultaneous analysis of choline and phenol based on integration of individual sensors. Algorithms for calculation of separate concentrations of AChE and BChE in the mixture were developed. The mean error of calculated component concentrations was approximately 6% for binary test mixtures. The present work provides a foundation for building multiplexed systems for the simultaneous determination of multiple esterases with applications to biomonitoring for exposures to organophosphorus compounds. PMID:20097186

  20. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated. PMID:27423860

  1. Towards the industrialization of new biosurfactants: Biotechnological opportunities for the lactone esterase gene from Starmerella bombicola.

    PubMed

    Roelants, Sophie L K W; Ciesielska, Katarzyna; De Maeseneire, Sofie L; Moens, Helena; Everaert, Bernd; Verweire, Stijn; Denon, Quenten; Vanlerberghe, Brecht; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Van der Meeren, Paul; Devreese, Bart; Soetaert, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Although sophorolipids (SLs) produced by S. bombicola are a real showcase for the industrialization of microbial biosurfactants, some important drawbacks are associated with this efficient biological process, e.g., the simultaneous production of acidic and lactonic SLs. Depending on the application, there is a requirement for the naturally produced mixture to be manipulated to give defined ratios of the components. Recently, the enzyme responsible for the lactonization of SLs was discovered. The discovery of the gene encoding this lactone esterase (sble) enabled the development of promising S. bombicola strains producing either solely lactonic (using a sble overexpression strain described in this paper: oe sble) or solely acidic SLs (using a sble deletion strain, which was recently described, but not characterized yet: Δsble). The new S. bombicola strains were used to investigate the production processes (fermentation and purification) of either lactonic or acidic SLs. The strains maintain the high inherent productivities of the wild-type or even perform slightly better and thus represent a realistic industrial opportunity. 100% acidic SLs with a mixed acetylation pattern were obtained for the Δsble strain, while the inherent capacity to selectively produce lactonic SLs was significantly increased (+42%) for the oe sble strain (99% lactonic SLs). Moreover, the regulatory effect of citrate on lactone SL formation for the wild-type was absent in this new strain, which indicates that it is more robust and better suited for the industrial production of lactonic SLs. Basic parameters were determined for the purified SLs, which confirm that the two new strains produce molecules with distinctive properties of which the application potential can now easily be investigated independently. PMID:26301720

  2. Structure of coronavirus hemagglutinin-esterase offers insight into corona and influenza virus evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qinghong; Langereis, Martijn A.; van Vliet, Arno L. W.; Huizinga, Eric G.; de Groot, Raoul J.

    2008-01-01

    The hemagglutinin-esterases (HEs) are a family of viral envelope glycoproteins that mediate reversible attachment to O-acetylated sialic acids by acting both as lectins and as receptor-destroying enzymes (RDEs). Related HEs occur in influenza C, toro-, and coronaviruses, apparently as a result of relatively recent lateral gene transfer events. Here, we report the crystal structure of a coronavirus (CoV) HE in complex with its receptor. We show that CoV HE arose from an influenza C-like HE fusion protein (HEF). In the process, HE was transformed from a trimer into a dimer, whereas remnants of the fusion domain were adapted to establish novel monomer–monomer contacts. Whereas the structural design of the RDE-acetylesterase domain remained unaltered, the HE receptor-binding domain underwent remodeling to such extent that the ligand is now bound in opposite orientation. This is surprising, because the architecture of the HEF site was preserved in influenza A HA over a much larger evolutionary distance, a switch in receptor specificity and extensive antigenic variation notwithstanding. Apparently, HA and HEF are under more stringent selective constraints than HE, limiting their exploration of alternative binding-site topologies. We attribute the plasticity of the CoV HE receptor-binding site to evolutionary flexibility conferred by functional redundancy between HE and its companion spike protein S. Our findings offer unique insights into the structural and functional consequences of independent protein evolution after interviral gene exchange and open potential avenues to broad-spectrum antiviral drug design. PMID:18550812

  3. Variations in elastaselike esterase activities in human leucocytes during cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, G; Janoff, A

    1976-05-01

    Granules of human peripheral blood leucocytes contain four well-characterized elastase isozymes and one or two slow-moving elastaselike esterases (SE) which have not been as well characterized. SE are capable of hydrolyzing typical elastase synthetic sybstrates such as N-acetyl-dl-alanine-alpha-naphthyl ester (Ac-DL-Ala-1-ONap) and N-t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-alanine-p-nitrophenyl ester (Boc-Ala-ONp), but unlike the highly basic elastase isozymes, SE barely migrate into 13% acrylamide gels during cationic electrophoresis at pH 4.3. Hydrolysis of Ac-DL-Ala-1-ONap by SE requires the presence of Triton in the gel, and hydrolysis of Boc-Ala-ONp by the same enzyme(s) is also enhanced in the presence of the detergent. Triton is not required for these activities, in the case of the elastase isozymes. Diisopropylfluorophosphate (Dip-F) inactivates both SE and the elastase isozymes, whereas Ac-(Ala)2-Pro-AlaCH2Cl (a powerful inactivator of the leucocyte elastase isozymes at 10-4 M concentration) does not inactivate SE at the same concentration. Immunochemical studies revealed antigenic cross-reaction between the rapidly migrating leucocyte elastase isozymes and SE. Two preparations of leucocyte granules from nonleukemic bone marrow cells showed no activity of the rapidly migrating elastase isozymes, but did contain SE activity. SE may be a precursor or zymogen form of the elastase isozymes, present in immature cells and partly retained through later stages of development. PMID:1265076

  4. Mitochondrial Acetylation and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gregory R.; Payne, R. Mark

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, protein lysine acetylation has emerged as a prominent and conserved regulatory posttranslational modification that is abundant on numerous enzymes involved in the processes of intermediary metabolism. Well-characterized mitochondrial processes of carbon utilization are enriched in acetyl-lysine modifications. Although seminal discoveries have been made in the basic biology of mitochondrial acetylation, an understanding of how acetylation states influence enzyme function and metabolic reprogramming during pathological states remains largely unknown. This paper will examine our current understanding of eukaryotic acetate metabolism and present recent findings in the field of mitochondrial acetylation biology. The implications of mitochondrial acetylation for the aging process will be discussed, as well as its potential implications for the unique and localized metabolic states that occur during the aging-associated conditions of heart failure and cancer growth. PMID:21437190

  5. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  6. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Khedri, Zahra; Diaz, Sandra; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV) was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF) of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV) HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health. PMID:26816272

  7. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Khedri, Zahra; Diaz, Sandra; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV) was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF) of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV) HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health. PMID:26816272

  8. ASSAY OF CHICKEN BRAIN NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE ACTIVITY USING LEPTOPHOSOXON AS THE SELECTIVE NEUROTOXIC INHIBITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hen brain microsomal preparation has phenyl valeratehydrolyzing activity associated with neurotoxic esterase activity. Part of that activity is due to paraoxon-insensitive esterases and a sub-part of this is sensitive to neurotoxic organophosphates, i.e., mipafox and leptophosoxo...

  9. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a...

  10. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a...

  11. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme... animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a process which completely removes the organism Mucor miehei...

  12. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a...

  13. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a...

  14. Esterase phenotyping in human liver in vitro: specificity of carboxylesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Ken-Ichi; Zollinger, Markus; Kigondu, Elizabeth; Witschi, Marc; Juif, Claire; Huth, Felix; Schiller, Hilmar; Chibale, Kelly; Camenisch, Gian

    2016-10-01

    1. Esterases may play a major role in the clearance of drugs with functional groups amenable to hydrolysis, particularly in the case of ester prodrugs. To understand the processes involved in the elimination of such drugs, it is necessary to determine the esterases involved. However, the tools currently available for this enzyme phenotyping are relatively scarce. 2. The work was aimed at summarizing the selectivity of esterase inhibitors for carboxylesterases 1 and 2 (CES1 and CES2) in the human liver to clarify their suitability for esterase phenotyping. Eserine, at around 10 μM, was found to be a highly specific CES2 inhibitor, whereas other esterase inhibitors turned out less selective. When used together with tacrine, which inhibits cholinesterases but not CES, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (inhibitor of paraoxonases), the involvement of the hydrolyzing esterases in the hepatic clearance of a drug can be elucidated. 3. The second approach to esterase phenotyping is based on data from recombinant or isolated esterases, together with relative activity factors, which relate their activities to those of the same enzymes in subcellular fractions. 4. These two approaches will help to characterize the hydrolytic metabolism of drug candidates in a similar manner as practiced routinely for the oxidative metabolism by cytochrome P450 enzymes. PMID:26887925

  15. Structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from Hypocrea jecorina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from the fungus Hypocrea jecorina was determined at a resolution of 1.9 Angstroms. This is the first structure of the newly established carbohydrate esterase family 15. The structure has revealed the residues Ser278–His411–Glu301 pre...

  16. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, F.H.; Moore, J.C.

    1999-05-25

    A method is disclosed for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase. 43 figs.

  17. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Moore, Jeffrey C.

    1999-01-01

    A method for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase.

  18. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Moore, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase.

  19. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, F.H.; Moore, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A method is disclosed for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases. These enzymes exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase. 43 figs.

  20. Esterase activity of BSA-ZnO nanoparticle complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhogale, A.; Nair, A.; Patel, N.; Miotello, A.; Kothari, D. C.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on functional properties of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein was studied. ZnO NPs were synthesized with average size of ˜7.5 nm as obtained from TEM analysis. The catalytic conversion of p-nitrophenylacetate (PNPA) to p-nitrophenol in the presence of BSA attached with ZnO NPs was examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy at room temperature. The result suggests that esterase activity of BSA is significantly enhanced (6 times) due to the ground state BSA-ZnO complex formation.

  1. A comparison of multiple esterases as biomarkers of organophosphate exposure and effect in two earthworm species.

    PubMed

    Henson-Ramsey, Heather; Schneider, Ashley; Stoskopf, Michael K

    2011-04-01

    Two different earthworm species, Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris, were exposed to 5 μg/cm(2) of malathion to evaluate their usefulness as sentinels of organophosphate exposure and to assess three different esterases, as biomarkers of malathion exposure and effect. Tissue xenobiotic burdens and esterase activity were determined for each species and each esterase in order to assess variability. E. fetida exhibited 4-fold less variability in tissue burdens than did L. terrestris and had less variable basal esterase activities. An attempt was made to correlate malathion and malaoxon tissue burdens with esterase activity post-exposure. There was no malaoxon present in the earthworm tissues. No significant correlations were determined by comparing acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, nor carboxylesterase activities with malathion burdens. PMID:21404045

  2. Assays for the classification of two types of esterases: carboxylic ester hydrolases and phosphoric triester hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Anspaugh, Douglas D; Roe, R Michael

    2002-11-01

    Assays for the Classification of Two Types of Esterases: Carboxylic Ester Hydrolase and Phosphoric Triester Hydrolase (Douglas D. Anspaugh and Michael Roe, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina). This unit describes assays that quantitate two types of esterase the carboxylic ester hydrolases and the phosphoric triester hydrolases. Carboxylic ester hydrolases include the B-esterases, which are inhibited by organophosphorus compounds. Among the phosphoric triester hydrolases is aryldialkylphosphatase, which has been called A-esterase or paraoxonase due to its ability to oxidize paraoxon and other organophosphates. These assays are colorimetric and miniaturized for rapid simultaneous testing of multiple, small-volume samples in a microtiter plate format. There is also a discussion of the history of esterase nomenclature and the reasons why this large group of enzymes is so difficult to classify. PMID:20945297

  3. Esterase Activity and Intracellular Localization in Reconstructed Human Epidermal Cultured Skin Models

    PubMed Central

    Katayanagi, Mishina; Hashimoto, Fumie

    2015-01-01

    Background Reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models have been developed for cosmetic and pharmaceutical research. Objective This study evaluated the total and carboxyl esterase activities (i.e., Km and Vmax, respectively) and localization in two reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models (LabCyte EPI-MODEL [Japan Tissue Engineering] and EpiDerm [MatTek/Kurabo]). The usefulness of the reconstruction cultured epidermis was also verified by comparison with human and rat epidermis. Methods Homogenized epidermal samples were fractioned by centrifugation. p-nitrophenyl acetate and 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate were used as substrates of total esterase and carboxyl esterase, respectively. Results Total and carboxyl esterase activities were present in the reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models and were localized in the cytosol. Moreover, the activities and localization were the same as those in human and rat epidermis. Conclusion LabCyte EPI-MODEL and EpiDerm are potentially useful for esterase activity prediction in human epidermis. PMID:26082583

  4. Profiling and functional classification of esterases in olive (Olea europaea) pollen during germination

    PubMed Central

    Rejón, Juan D.; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Rodríguez-García, María Isabel; Castro, Antonio J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims A pollen grain contains a number of esterases, many of which are released upon contact with the stigma surface. However, the identity and function of most of these esterases remain unknown. In this work, esterases from olive pollen during its germination were identifided and functionally characterized. Methods The esterolytic capacity of olive (Olea europaea) pollen was examined using in vitro and in-gel enzymatic assays with different enzyme substrates. The functional analysis of pollen esterases was achieved by inhibition assays by using specific inhibitors. The cellular localization of esterase activities was performed using histochemical methods. Key Results Olive pollen showed high levels of non-specific esterase activity, which remained steady after hydration and germination. Up to 20 esterolytic bands were identified on polyacrylamide gels. All the inhibitors decreased pollen germinability, but only diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DIFP) hampered pollen tube growth. Non-specific esterase activity is localized on the surface of oil bodies (OBs) and small vesicles, in the pollen intine and in the callose layer of the pollen tube wall. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was mostly observed in the apertures, exine and pollen coat, and attached to the pollen tube wall surface and to small cytoplasmic vesicles. Conclusions In this work, for the first time a systematic functional characterization of esterase enzymes in pollen from a plant species with wet stigma has been carried out. Olive pollen esterases belong to four different functional groups: carboxylesterases, acetylesterases, AChEs and lipases. The cellular localization of esterase activity indicates that the intine is a putative storage site for esterolytic enzymes in olive pollen. Based on inhibition assays and cellular localization of enzymatic activities, it can be concluded that these enzymes are likely to be involved in pollen germination, and pollen tube growth and penetration of

  5. Proteomic profiling of lysine acetylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals the diversity of acetylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Hardouin, Julie

    2015-07-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and highly regulated post-translational modification with the well demonstrated physiological relevance in eukaryotes. Recently, its important role in the regulation of metabolic processes in bacteria was highlighted. Here, we reported the lysine acetylproteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a proteomic approach. We identified 430 unique peptides corresponding to 320 acetylated proteins. In addition to the proteins involved in various metabolic pathways, several enzymes contributing to the lipopolysaccharides biosynthesis were characterized as acetylated. This data set illustrated the abundance and the diversity of acetylated lysine proteins in P. aeruginosa and opens opportunities to explore the role of the acetylation in the bacterial physiology. PMID:25900529

  6. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong-Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  7. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  8. Histone Acetylation in Fungal Pathogens of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Junhyun; Kwon, Seomun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of histone lysine residues occurs in different organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals for the regulation of diverse cellular processes. With the identification of enzymes that create or reverse this modification, our understanding on histone acetylation has expanded at an amazing pace during the last two decades. In fungal pathogens of plants, however, the importance of such modification has only just begun to be appreciated in the recent years and there is a dearth of information on how histone acetylation is implicated in fungal pathogenesis. This review covers the current status of research related to histone acetylation in plant pathogenic fungi and considers relevant findings in the interaction between fungal pathogens and host plants. We first describe the families of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Then we provide the cases where histone acetylation was investigated in the context of fungal pathogenesis. Finally, future directions and perspectives in epigenetics of fungal pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:25288980

  9. Branched nanotrees with immobilized acetylcholine esterase for nanobiosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risveden, Klas; Dick, Kimberly A.; Bhand, Sunil; Rydberg, Patrik; Samuelson, Lars; Danielsson, Bengt

    2010-02-01

    A novel lab-on-a-chip nanotree enzyme reactor is demonstrated for the detection of acetylcholine. The reactors are intended for use in the RISFET (regional ion sensitive field effect transistor) nanosensor, and are constructed from gold-tipped branched nanorod structures grown on SiNx-covered wafers. Two different reactors are shown: one with simple, one-dimensional nanorods and one with branched nanorod structures (nanotrees). Significantly higher enzymatic activity is found for the nanotree reactors than for the nanorod reactors, most likely due to the increased gold surface area and thereby higher enzyme binding capacity. A theoretical calculation is included to show how the enzyme kinetics and hence the sensitivity can be influenced and increased by the control of electrical fields in relation to the active sites of enzymes in an electronic biosensor. The possible effects of electrical fields employed in the RISFET on the function of acetylcholine esterase is investigated using quantum chemical methods, which show that the small electric field strengths used are unlikely to affect enzyme kinetics. Acetylcholine esterase activity is determined using choline oxidase and peroxidase by measuring the amount of choline formed using the chemiluminescent luminol reaction.

  10. A halotolerant type A feruloyl esterase from Pleurotus eryngii.

    PubMed

    Nieter, Annabel; Haase-Aschoff, Paul; Linke, Diana; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf G

    2014-03-01

    An extracellular feruloyl esterase (PeFaeA) from the culture supernatant of Pleurotus eryngii was purified to homogeneity using cation exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and size exclusion chromatography. The length of the complete coding sequence of PeFaeA was determined to 1668 bp corresponding to a protein of 555 amino acids. The catalytic triad of Ser-Glu-His demonstrated the uniqueness of the enzyme compared to previously published FAEs. The purified PeFaeA was a monomer with an estimated molecular mass of 67 kDa. Maximum feruloyl esterase (FAE) activity was observed at pH 5.0 and 50 °C, respectively. Metal ions (5 mM), except Hg(2+), had no significant influence on the enzyme activity. Substrate specificity profiling characterized the enzyme as a type A FAE preferring bulky natural substrates, such as feruloylated saccharides, rather than small synthetic ones. Km and kcat of the purified enzyme for methyl ferulate were 0.15 mM and 0.85 s(-1). In the presence of 3 M NaCl activity of the enzyme increased by 28 %. PeFaeA alone released only little ferulic acid from destarched wheat bran (DSWB), whereas after addition of Trichoderma viride xylanase the concentration increased more than 20 fold. PMID:24607359

  11. Improved thermostability of a Bacillus subtilis esterase by domain exchange.

    PubMed

    Gall, Markus G; Nobili, Alberto; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2014-02-01

    A moderately thermostable esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (BsteE) and its homolog from Bacillus subtilis (BsubE) show a high structural similarity with more than 95% homology and 74% amino acid identity. Interestingly, their thermal stability differs significantly by 30 °C in their melting temperature. In order to identify the positions that are responsible for this difference, most of the flexible amino acids assumed to confer instability were found to be in the cap region. For this reason, a 30 amino acid long cap domain fragment containing ten differing positions derived from BsteE was incorporated into the homologous gene encoding for the more labile BsubE by spliced overlap-extension PCR. The melting temperature of the two wild-type esterases and the mutant was evaluated by circular dichroism spectroscopy, while the kinetic parameters and the stability were determined with a photometric assay. The cap domain mutant maintained its activity, with a catalytic efficiency more similar to BsteE, while it exhibited an increase of the melting temperature by 4 °C compared to BsubE. Additional point mutations based on the differences of the parent enzymes gave a further increase of the thermostability up to 11 °C compared to BsubE; however, a significant reduction in activity was observed. PMID:23812333

  12. The Structure- and Metal-dependent Activity of Escherichia coli PgaB Provides Insight into the Partial De-N-acetylation of Poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine*

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Poloczek, Joanna; Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P. Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides are required for the development and integrity of biofilms produced by a wide variety of bacteria. In Escherichia coli, partial de-N-acetylation of the exopolysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) by the periplasmic protein PgaB is required for polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent biofilm formation. To understand the molecular basis for PNAG de-N-acetylation, the structure of PgaB in complex with Ni2+ and Fe3+ have been determined to 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively, and its activity on β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers has been characterized. The structure of PgaB reveals two (β/α)x barrel domains: a metal-binding de-N-acetylase that is a member of the family 4 carbohydrate esterases (CE4s) and a domain structurally similar to glycoside hydrolases. PgaB displays de-N-acetylase activity on β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers but not on the β-1,4-(GlcNAc)4 oligomer chitotetraose and is the first CE4 member to exhibit this substrate specificity. De-N-acetylation occurs in a length-dependent manor, and specificity is observed for the position of de-N-acetylation. A key aspartic acid involved in de-N-acetylation, normally seen in other CE4s, is missing in PgaB, suggesting that the activity of PgaB is attenuated to maintain the low levels of de-N-acetylation of PNAG observed in vivo. The metal dependence of PgaB is different from most CE4s, because PgaB shows increased rates of de-N-acetylation with Co2+ and Ni2+ under aerobic conditions, and Co2+, Ni2+ and Fe2+ under anaerobic conditions, but decreased activity with Zn2+. The work presented herein will guide inhibitor design to combat biofilm formation by E. coli and potentially a wide range of medically relevant bacteria producing polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent biofilms. PMID:22810235

  13. An organic-solvent-tolerant esterase from thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis S-86.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sebastián; Martínez, M Alejandra; Pandey, Ashok; Castro, Guillermo R

    2009-01-01

    A thermophile, halotolerant and organic-solvent-tolerant esterase producer Bacillus sp. S-86 strain previously isolated was found to belong to Bacillus licheniformis species through morphological, biochemical, 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and rDNA intergenic spacers amplification (ITS-PCR). The strain can grow at 55 degrees C in presence of C2-C7 alkanols (log P=-0.86 to 2.39), and NaCl concentrations up to 15% (w/v). This bacterium showed optimal growth and esterase production at 50 degrees C. Two different molecular weight esterase activities were detected in zymographic assays. PMSF inhibited type I esterase activity, showing no inhibitory effect on type II esterase activity. B. licheniformis S-86 was able to grow in presence of hydroxylic organic-solvents like propan-2-ol, butan-1-ol and 3-methylbutan-1-ol. At a sub-lethal concentration of these solvents (392 mmoll(-1) propan-2-ol; 99 mmol l(-1) butan-1-ol, 37 mmol l(-1) 3-methylbutan-1-ol), adequate to produce 50% cell growth inhibition at 50 degrees C, an increment between 1.9 and 2.3 times was observed in type I esterase production, and between 2.2 and 3.1 times in type II esterase production. PMID:18723341

  14. Detection of ferulic acid esterase production by Bacillus spp. and lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Donaghy, J; Kelly, P F; McKay, A M

    1998-08-01

    The production of feruloyl esterase activity by Bacillus spp. and lactobacilli can be detected in an agarplate assay. The assay involves the substitution of the main carbon source in specific agar with ethyl ferulate. A number of Bacillus spp., predominantly B. subtilis strains, were found to exhibit feruloyl esterase activity by this method. Of the examined lactobacilli, Lb. fermentum (NCFB 1751) showed the highest level of ferulic acid esterase activity. The enzyme was released from harvested cells by sonication and showed pH and temperature optima of 6.5 and 30 degrees C respectively. PMID:9763694

  15. Angiooedema due to acquired deficiency of C1-esterase inhibitor associated with leucocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Farkas, H; Szongoth, M; Bély, M; Varga, L; Fekete, B; Karádi, I; Füst, G

    2001-01-01

    A hereditary and an acquired type of C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency have been described. Manifestations characteristic of both forms include recurrent subcutaneous and submucosal angiooedema. Acquired C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency has been observed in association with lymphoproliferative disorders, malignancy, autoimmune diseases and infections. We report on a case with the acquired form of the disease accompanied by leucocytoclastic vasculitis. Treatment with antimalarial agents resulted in complete resolution of symptoms and signs. Furthermore, C1-esterase inhibitor concentration and activity, as well as C1 levels, all returned to normal. PMID:11720182

  16. Acetylation phenotypes in patients with bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bicho, M P; Breitenfeld, L; Carvalho, A A; Manso, C F

    1988-01-01

    The present study was done to evaluate the possible association of bladder carcinoma with the slow acetylator phenotype in a portuguese population. 49 patients with bladder carcinoma were compared to a normal control group of 84 individuals. No statistically significant association was detected. But when subdividing the group of slow acetylators it is found that in the subgroup with 12-36% acetylation there is a higher percentage of patients, which is statistically significant. These results are in agreement with two other studies, using populations of similar ethnic origin. PMID:3265609

  17. Heterologous Expression of Two Ferulic Acid Esterases from Penicillium Funiculosum

    SciTech Connect

    Knoshaug, E. P.; Selig, M. J.; Baker, J. O.; Decker, S. R.; Himmel, M. E.; Adney, W. S.

    2008-01-01

    Two recombinant ferulic acid esterases from Penicillium funiculosum produced in Aspergillus awamori were evaluated for their ability to improve the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The genes, faeA and faeB, were cloned from P. funiculosum and expressed in A. awamori using their native signal sequences. Both enzymes contain a catalytic domain connected to a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module by a threonine-rich linker peptide. Interestingly, the carbohydrate binding-module is N-terminal in FaeA and C-terminal in FaeB. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity using column chromatography, and their thermal stability was characterized by differential scanning microcalorimetry. We evaluated both enzymes for their potential to enhance the cellulolytic activity of purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A on pretreated corn stover.

  18. β-Glucuronidase-coupled assays of glucuronoyl esterases.

    PubMed

    Fraňová, Lucia; Puchart, Vladimír; Biely, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Glucuronoyl esterases (GEs) are microbial enzymes with potential to cleave the ester bonds between lignin alcohols and xylan-bound 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid in plant cell walls. This activity renders GEs attractive research targets for biotechnological applications. One of the factors impeding the progress in GE research is the lack of suitable substrates. In this work, we report a facile preparation of methyl esters of chromogenic 4-nitrophenyl and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl β-D-glucuronides for qualitative and quantitative GE assay coupled with β-glucuronidase as the auxiliary enzyme. The indolyl derivative affording a blue indigo-type product is suitable for rapid and sensitive assay of GE in commercial preparations as well as for high throughput screening of microorganisms and genomic and metagenomic libraries. PMID:27452816

  19. Heterologous Expression of Two Ferulic Acid Esterases from Penicillium funiculosum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoshaug, Eric P.; Selig, Michael J.; Baker, John O.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Adney, William S.

    Two recombinant ferulic acid esterases from Penicillium funiculosum produced in Aspergillus awamori were evaluated for their ability to improve the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The genes, faeA and faeB, were cloned from P. funiculosum and expressed in A. awamori using their native signal sequences. Both enzymes contain a catalytic domain connected to a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module by a threonine-rich linker peptide. Interestingly, the carbohydrate binding-module is N-terminal in FaeA and C-terminal in FaeB. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity using column chromatography, and their thermal stability was characterized by differential scanning microcalorimetry. We evaluated both enzymes for their potential to enhance the cellulolytic activity of purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A on pretreated corn stover.

  20. A new approach for determination of neuropathy target esterase activity.

    PubMed

    Sigolaeva, L V; Eremenko, A V; Makower, A; Makhaeva, G F; Malygin, V V; Kurochkin, I N

    1999-05-14

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) was shown to be an excellent biochemical marker for screening of organophosphates (OPs) with respect to their ability to result in organophosphate induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN). This paper describes a new biosensor approach to the analysis of NTE and its inhibitors. The method is based on the combination of NTE enzymatic hydrolysis of phenyl valerate (PV) with phenol detection by the Clark-type oxygen electrode modified by immobilized tyrosinase. The validity of this biosensor method is confirmed by the facts that the calibration curves for NTE obtained by colorimetric and flow-through electrochemical methods were nearly identical and the titration of NTE by test inhibitor mipafox was shown to yield the same pI50 values. The developed electrochemical methods can be considered as a promising approach both for serial express NTE analysis and for kinetic characteristics of NTE. PMID:10421495

  1. Impact of acetylation on tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Li, Fu-Long; Cheng, Zhou-Li; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of protein lysine residues is a reversible and dynamic process that is controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs and SIRTs). Recent studies have revealed that acetylation modulates not only nuclear proteins but also cytoplasmic or mitochondrial proteins, including many metabolic enzymes. In tumors, cellular metabolism is reprogrammed to provide intermediates for biosynthesis such as nucleotides, fatty acids, and amino acids, and thereby favor the rapid proliferation of cancer cells and tumor development. An increasing number of investigations have indicated that acetylation plays an important role in tumor metabolism. Here, we summarize the substrates that are modified by acetylation, especially oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and enzymes that are implicated in tumor metabolism. PMID:27308346

  2. Acetylator phenotypes in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Penketh, R J A; Gibney, S F A; Nurse, G T; Hopkinson, D A

    1983-01-01

    Acetylator phenotypes have been determined in 139 unrelated subjects from the hitherto untested populations of Papua New Guinea, and their relevance to current antituberculous isoniazid chemotherapy is discussed. PMID:6842533

  3. Acetyl-L-carnitine increases mitochondrial protein acetylation in the aged rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Janos; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Lee, Kwangwon; Virmani, Ashraf; Koverech, Aleardo; Cavazza, Claudio; Chance, Mark R; Hoppel, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that in vivo treatment of elderly Fisher 344 rats with acetylcarnitine abolished the age-associated defect in respiratory chain complex III in interfibrillar mitochondria and improved the functional recovery of the ischemic/reperfused heart. Herein, we explored mitochondrial protein acetylation as a possible mechanism for acetylcarnitine's effect. In vivo treatment of elderly rats with acetylcarnitine restored cardiac acetylcarnitine content and increased mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and increased the number of lysine-acetylated proteins in cardiac subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria. Enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial β-oxidation, and ATP synthase of the respiratory chain showed the greatest acetylation. Acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, complex V, and aspartate aminotransferase was accompanied by decreased catalytic activity. Several proteins were found to be acetylated only after treatment with acetylcarnitine, suggesting that exogenous acetylcarnitine served as the acetyl-donor. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that acetylcarnitine treatment also induced changes in mitochondrial protein amount; a two-fold or greater increase/decrease in abundance was observed for thirty one proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the first time that in the aged rat heart in vivo administration of acetylcarnitine provides acetyl groups for protein acetylation and affects the amount of mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25660059

  4. Levels of histone acetylation in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Puppin, Cinzia; Passon, Nadia; Lavarone, Elisa; Di Loreto, Carla; Frasca, Francesco; Vella, Veronica; Vigneri, Riccardo; Damante, Giuseppe

    2011-08-12

    Histone acetylation is a major mechanism to regulate gene transcription. This post-translational modification is modified in cancer cells. In various tumor types the levels of acetylation at several histone residues are associated to clinical aggressiveness. By using immunohistochemistry we show that acetylated levels of lysines at positions 9-14 of H3 histone (H3K9-K14ac) are significantly higher in follicular adenomas (FA), papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC) and undifferentiated carcinomas (UC) than in normal tissues (NT). Similar data have been obtained when acetylated levels of lysine 18 of H3 histone (H3K18ac) were evaluated. In this case, however, no difference was observed between NT and UC. When acetylated levels of lysine 12 of H4 histone (H4K12ac) were evaluated, only FA showed significantly higher levels in comparison with NT. These data indicate that modification histone acetylation is an early event along thyroid tumor progression and that H3K18 acetylation is switched off in the transition between differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumors. By using rat thyroid cell lines that are stably transfected with doxycyclin-inducible oncogenes, we show that the oncoproteins RET-PTC, RAS and BRAF increase levels of H3K9-K14ac and H3K18ac. In the non-tumorigenic rat thyroid cell line FRTL-5, TSH increases levels of H3K18ac. However, this hormone decreases levels of H3K9-K14ac and H4K12ac. In conclusion, our data indicate that neoplastic transformation and hormonal stimulation can modify levels of histone acetylation in thyroid cells. PMID:21763277

  5. Fungal genomes mining to discover novel sterol esterases and lipases as catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sterol esterases and lipases are enzymes able to efficiently catalyze synthesis and hydrolysis reactions of both sterol esters and triglycerides and due to their versatility could be widely used in different industrial applications. Lipases with this ability have been reported in the yeast Candida rugosa that secretes several extracellular enzymes with a high level of sequence identity, although different substrate specificity. This versatility has also been found in the sterol esterases from the ascomycetes Ophiostoma piceae and Melanocarpus albomyces. Results In this work we present an in silico search of new sterol esterase and lipase sequences from the genomes of environmental fungi. The strategy followed included identification and search of conserved domains from these versatile enzymes, phylogenetic studies, sequence analysis and 3D modeling of the selected candidates. Conclusions Six potential putative enzymes were selected and their kinetic properties and substrate selectivity are discussed on the basis of their similarity with previously characterized sterol esterases/lipases with known structures. PMID:24138290

  6. Diagnostic assays based on esterase-mediated resistance mechanisms in western corn rootworms (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuguo; Scharf, Michael E; Parimi, Srinivas; Meinke, Lance J; Wright, Robert J; Chandler, Laurence D; Siegfried, Blair D

    2002-12-01

    Resistance to methyl-parathion among Nebraska western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, populations is associated with increased hydrolytic metabolism of an organophosphate insecticide substrate. An electrophoretic method to identify resistant individuals based on the staining intensity of esterase isozymes on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels was developed. Three groups of esterases (I, II, and III) were visible on the gels, but only group II esterase isozymes were intensified in resistant populations. A total of 26 and 31 field populations of western corn rootworms from Nebraska (in 1998 and 1999, respectively) were assessed with nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) assays and diagnostic concentration bioassays. Significant correlations were observed between the two diagnostic assays. Group II esterase isozymes provide a reliable biochemical marker for detection of methyl-parathion resistance in individual western corn rootworms and a tool for monitoring the frequency of resistant individuals in field populations. PMID:12539840

  7. TRIPHENYL PHOSPHITE: IN VIVO AND IN VITRO INHIBITION OF RAT NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphorus compounds which, after acute administration, inhibit neurotoxic esterase (NTE) by > or = 65% and undergo a subsequent 'aging' reaction, produce a delayed neuropathy characterized by degeneration of large and long nerve fibers. The present studies examine in detai...

  8. CORRELATION BETWEEN NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE INHIBITION AND MIPAFOX-INDUCED NEUROPATHIC DAMAGE IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The correlation between neuropathic damage and inhibition of neurotoxic esterase or neuropathy target enzyme (NTE) was examined in rats acutely exposed to Mipafox (N, N'-diisopropylphosphorodiamidofluoridate), a neurotoxic organophospate. Brain and spinal cord NTE activities were...

  9. RELATIONSHIP OF NEUROPATHY TARGET ESTERASE INHIBITION TO NEUROPATHOLOGY AND ATAXIA IN HENS GIVEN ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ESTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adult WhiteLeghorn hens were acutely exposed to 3 dosages of the following organophosphorus esters: mipafox, tri-ortho-tolyl phosphate (TOTP), penyl saligenin phosphate, diisppropylophosphoro-fluoridate (DFP), malathion and dichlorvos. europathy target esterase (NTE) activity was...

  10. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis. PMID:26503676

  11. Esterase inhibition by grapefruit juice flavonoids leading to a new drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Callery, Patrick S; Gan, Liang-Shang; Balani, Suresh K

    2007-07-01

    Our previous studies described a newly identified potential of grapefruit juice (GFJ) in mediating pharmacokinetic drug interactions due to its capability of esterase inhibition. The current study identifies the active components in GFJ responsible for its esterase-inhibitory effect. The esterase-inhibitory potential of 10 constitutive flavonoids and furanocoumarins toward p-nitrophenylacetate (PNPA) hydrolysis was investigated. The furanocoumarins bergamottin, 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin, and bergapten, and the glycoside flavonoids naringin and hesperidin, at concentrations found in GFJ or higher, did not inhibit the hydrolysis of PNPA by purified porcine esterase and human liver microsomes. However, the flavonoid aglycones morin, galangin, kaempferol, quercetin, and naringenin showed appreciable inhibition of PNPA hydrolysis in purified porcine esterase, and human and rat liver systems. In Caco-2 cells, demonstrated to contain minimal CYP3A activity, the permeability coefficient of the prodrugs lovastatin and enalapril was increased in the presence of the active flavonoids kaempferol and naringenin, consistent with inhibition of esterase activity. In rats, oral coadministration of kaempferol and naringenin with these prodrugs led to significant increases in plasma exposure to the active acids. In addition, in portal vein-cannulated rats, coadministration of lovastatin with kaempferol (10 mg/kg) led to a 154% and a 113% increase in the portal plasma exposure to the prodrug and active acid, respectively, compared with coadministration with water. The contribution of CYP3A inhibition was demonstrated to be minimal. Overall, a series of flavonoids present in GFJ are identified as esterase inhibitors, of which kaempferol and naringenin are shown to mediate pharmacokinetic drug interaction with the prodrugs lovastatin and enalapril due to their capability of esterase inhibition. PMID:17452418

  12. The search of the target of promotion: Phenylbenzoate esterase activities in hen peripheral nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, A. . E-mail: angelo.moretto@icps.it; Nicolli, A.; Lotti, M.

    2007-03-15

    Certain esterase inhibitors, such as carbamates, phosphinates and sulfonyl halides, do not cause neuropathy as some organophosphates, but they may exacerbate chemical or traumatic insults to axons. This phenomenon is called promotion of axonopathies. Given the biochemical and toxicological characteristics of these compounds, the hypothesis was made that the target of promotion is a phenyl valerate (PV) esterase similar to neuropathy target esterase (NTE), the target of organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy. However, attempts to identify a PV esterase in hen peripheral nerve have been, so far, unsuccessful. We tested several esters, other than PV, as substrates of esterases from crude homogenate of the hen peripheral nerve. The ideal substrate should be poorly hydrolysed by NTE but extensively by enzyme(s) that are insensitive to non-promoters, such as mipafox, and sensitive to promoters, such as phenyl methane sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). When phenyl benzoate (PB) was used as substrate, about 65% of total activity was resistant to the non-promoter mipafox (up to 0.5 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0), that inhibits NTE and other esterases. More than 90% of this resistant activity was sensitive to the classical promoter PMSF (1 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0) with an IC{sub 50} of about 0.08 mM (20 min, pH 8.0). On the contrary, the non-promoter p-toluene sulfonyl fluoride caused only about 10% inhibition at 0.5 mM. Several esterase inhibitors including, paraoxon, phenyl benzyl carbamate, di-n-butyl dichlorovinyl phosphate and di-isopropyl fluorophosphate, were tested both in vitro and in vivo for inhibition of this PB activity. Mipafox-resistant PMSF-sensitive PB esterase activity(ies) was inhibited by promoters but not by non promoters and neuropathic compounds.

  13. Production and purification of a solvent-resistant esterase from Bacillus licheniformis S-86.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sebastián; Baigorí, Mario D; Pandey, Ashok; Castro, Guillermo R

    2008-12-01

    New thermophilic and organic-solvent-tolerant Bacillus licheniformis S-86 strain is able to produce two active and solvent-stable esterases. Production of type I and II esterases was substantially enhanced when oils and surfactants were supplied as carbon sources. Grape oil (0.1% v/v) and Tween 20 to 60 (0.1% v/v) had enhanced enzyme production between 1.6- and 2.2-folds. Type II esterase was purified to homogeneity in a five-step procedure. This esterase was purified 76.7-fold with a specific activity of 135 U mg(-1). Molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 38.4 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Type II esterase was active mostly on esters with short acyl chains, which allowed to classify the enzyme as a carboxylesterase with a K (m) of 80.2 mmol l(-1) and a V (max) of 256.4 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) for p-nitrophenyl acetate. Also, B. licheniformis S-86 type II esterase displayed activity in presence of water-miscible organic solvents at 50% concentration and stability after 1-h incubation. PMID:18543118

  14. Identification of a cocaine esterase in a strain of Pseudomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed Central

    Britt, A J; Bruce, N C; Lowe, C R

    1992-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas maltophilia (termed MB11L) which was capable of using cocaine as its sole carbon and energy source was isolated by selective enrichment. An inducible esterase catalyzing the hydrolysis of cocaine to ecgonine methyl ester and benzoic acid was identified and purified 22-fold. In the presence of the solubilizing agent cholate, cocaine esterase had a native Mr of 110,000 and was shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to be a monomer. In the absence of cholate, cocaine esterase had a native Mr of 410,000 and probably existed as a tetramer. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 8.0, and the Km values for cocaine, ethyl benzoate, and ethyl 2-hydroxybenzoate were 0.36, 1.89, and 1.75 mM, respectively. Inhibition studies indicated that the enzyme was a serine esterase, possibly possessing a cation-binding site similar to those of mammalian acetylcholinesterase and the atropine esterase of Pseudomonas putida PMBL-1. The cocaine esterase of P. maltophilia MB11L showed no activity with atropine, despite the structural similarity of cocaine and atropine. PMID:1551831

  15. Characterization and structural modeling of a new type of thermostable esterase from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Levisson, Mark; van der Oost, John; Kengen, Servé W M

    2007-06-01

    A bioinformatic screening of the genome of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima for ester-hydrolyzing enzymes revealed a protein with typical esterase motifs, though annotated as a hypothetical protein. To confirm its putative esterase function the gene (estD) was cloned, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Recombinant EstD was found to exhibit significant esterase activity with a preference for short acyl chain esters (C4-C8). The monomeric enzyme has a molecular mass of 44.5 kDa and optimal activity around 95 degrees C and at pH 7. Its thermostability is relatively high with a half-life of 1 h at 100 degrees C, but less stable compared to some other hyperthermophilic esterases. A structural model was constructed with the carboxylesterase Est30 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus as a template. The model covered most of the C-terminal part of EstD. The structure showed an alpha/beta-hydrolase fold and indicated the presence of a typical catalytic triad consisting of a serine, aspartate and histidine, which was verified by site-directed mutagenesis and inhibition studies. Phylogenetic analysis showed that EstD is only distantly related to other esterases. A comparison of the active site pentapeptide motifs revealed that EstD should be grouped into a new family of esterases (Family 10). EstD is the first characterized member of this family. PMID:17466017

  16. Esterase in imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta and S. richteri (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): activity, kinetics and variation.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Rashid, T; Feng, G

    2014-01-01

    Solenopsis invicta and Solenopsis richteri are two closely related invasive ants native to South America. Despite their similarity in biology and behavior, S. invicta is a more successful invasive species. Toxic tolerance has been found to be important to the success of some invasive species. Esterases play a crucial role in toxic tolerance of insects. Hence, we hypothesized that the more invasive S. invicta would have a higher esterase activity than S. richteri. Esterase activities were measured for workers and male and female alates of both ant species using α-naphthyl acetate and β-naphthyl acetate as substrates. Esterase activities in S. invicta were always significantly higher than those in S. richteri supporting our hypothesis. In S. invicta, male alates had the highest esterase activities followed by workers then female alates for both substrates. In S. richetri, for α-naphthyl acetate, male alates had the highest activity followed by female alates then workers, while for β-naphthyl acetate, female alates had the highest activity followed by male alates then workers. For workers, S. richteri showed significantly higher levels of variation about the mean esterase activity than S. invicta. However, S. invicta showed significantly higher levels of variation in both female and male alates. PMID:25408118

  17. Differences in Esterase Activity to Aspirin and p-Nitrophenyl Acetate among Human Serum Albumin Preparations.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Akitoshi; Okada, Masaya; Inagaki, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Sachiyo; Hamaguchi, Tsuneo; Iwakawa, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) has two major ligand-binding sites, sites I and II, and also hydrolyzes some compounds at both sites. In the present study, we investigated differences in esterase activity among HSA preparations, and also the effects of warfarin, indomethacin, and naproxen on the hydrolytic activities of HSA to aspirin and p-nitrophenyl acetate. The esterase activities of HSA to aspirin or p-nitrophenyl acetate were measured from the pseudo-first-order formation rate constant (kobs) of salicylic acid or p-nitrophenol by HSA. Inter-lot variations were observed in the esterase activities of HSA to aspirin and p-nitrophenyl acetate; however, the esterase activity of HSA to aspirin did not correlate with that to p-nitrophenyl acetate. The inhibitory effects of warfarin and indomethacin on the esterase activity of HSA to aspirin were stronger than that of naproxen. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of naproxen on the esterase activity of HSA to p-nitrophenyl acetate was stronger than those of warfarin and indomethacin. These results suggest that the administration of different commercial HSA preparations and the co-administration with site I or II high-affinity binding drugs may change the pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs that are hydrolyzed by HSA. PMID:27476944

  18. In situ prebiotics: enzymatic release of galacto-rhamnogalacturonan from potato pulp in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract of the weaning piglet.

    PubMed

    Strube, Mikael Lenz; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Meyer, Anne Strunge; Boye, Mette

    2015-12-01

    Prebiotics may be efficient for prevention of intestinal infections in humans and animals by increasing the levels of beneficial bacteria and thereby improving gut health. Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry. Instead, prebiotic fibres may be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ. Using low doses, 0.03 % enzyme-to-substrate ratio, of the enzymes pectin lyase and polygalacturonase in combination with potato pulp, a low-value industrial by-product, we show that high molecular weight galacto-rhamnogalacturonan can be solubilized in the stomach of weaning piglets. The release of this fiber is in the order of 22-38 % of the theoretical amount, achieved within 20 min. The catalysis takes place mainly in the stomach of the animal and is then followed by distribution through the small intestines. To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing targeted production of prebiotics in an animal model. PMID:26475351

  19. Switching Catalysis from Hydrolysis to Perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens Esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, D.; Bernhardt, P; Morley, K; Jiang, Y; Cheeseman, J; Purpero, V; Schrag, J; Kazlauskas, R

    2010-01-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k{sub cat}, but K{sub m} also increased so the specificity constant, k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the

  20. Switching catalysis from hydrolysis to perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase.

    PubMed

    Yin, De Lu Tyler; Bernhardt, Peter; Morley, Krista L; Jiang, Yun; Cheeseman, Jeremy D; Purpero, Vincent; Schrag, Joseph D; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2010-03-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of epsilon-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k(cat), but K(m) also increased so the specificity constant, k(cat)/K(m), remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of epsilon-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the active site blocks access

  1. Histone Acetylation Regulates Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    McBrian, Matthew A.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S.; Christofk, Heather R.; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pHi). As pHi decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pHi. Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pHi rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pHi, particularly compromising pHi maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pHi with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

  2. Proteomic analysis of acetylation in thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Dooil; Lee, Yong-Jik; Kim, Jung-Ae; Choi, Ji Young; Kang, Sunghyun; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2013-08-01

    Recent analysis of prokaryotic N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteins highlights the posttranslational regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular proteins. However, the exact role of acetylation remains unclear due to a lack of acetylated proteome data in prokaryotes. Here, we present the N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteome of gram-positive thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus. Affinity enrichment using acetyl-lysine-specific antibodies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis revealed 253 acetylated peptides representing 114 proteins. These acetylated proteins include not only common orthologs from mesophilic Bacillus counterparts, but also unique G. kaustophilus proteins, indicating that lysine acetylation is pronounced in thermophilic bacteria. These data complement current knowledge of the bacterial acetylproteome and provide an expanded platform for better understanding of the function of acetylation in cellular metabolism. PMID:23696451

  3. Esterase inhibition attribute of grapefruit juice leading to a new drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Callery, Patrick S; Gan, Liang-Shang; Balani, Suresh K

    2007-07-01

    This report describes a newly identified potential of grapefruit juice (GFJ) in mediating pharmacokinetic drug interactions due to its capability to inhibit esterase. The study demonstrates that GFJ inhibits purified porcine esterase activity toward p-nitrophenyl acetate and the prodrugs lovastatin and enalapril. In rat and human hepatic or gut S9 fractions and rat gut lumen, GFJ inhibited the hydrolysis of enalapril and lovastatin, which are known to be metabolized principally by esterases, lovastatin being metabolized also by CYP3A. In Caco-2 cells, with minimal CYP3A activity, permeability of these prodrugs was increased in the presence of GFJ. In rats, oral coadministration of GFJ or an esterase inhibitor, bis-(p-nitrophenylphosphate), with the prodrugs led to respective increases in plasma area under the curve by 70% or 57% for enalaprilat and 279% or 141% for lovastatin acid. In addition, portal vein-cannulated rats pretreated with GFJ at -15 and -2 h before lovastatin administration (10 mg/kg p.o.) as a solution, 1) in water and 2) in GFJ, showed, respectively, a 49% increase (CYP3A-inhibited) and a 116% increase (both CYP3A and gut esterase-inhibited) in the portal plasma exposure to the active acid, compared with a non-GFJ pretreatment group. Overall, along with the CYP3A inactivation by GFJ, the decreased esterase activity also played a significant role in increasing the metabolic stability and permeability of esters leading to enhancement of exposure to the active drugs in rats. These new esterase inhibition findings indicate that the potential of drug interaction between ester prodrugs and GFJ should also be considered in the clinic. PMID:17392396

  4. The Secreted Esterase of Propionibacterium freudenreichii Has a Major Role in Cheese Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abeijón Mukdsi, María Claudia; Falentin, Hélène; Maillard, Marie-Bernadette; Chuat, Victoria; Medina, Roxana Beatriz; Parayre, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Free fatty acids are important flavor compounds in cheese. Propionibacterium freudenreichii is the main agent of their release through lipolysis in Swiss cheese. Our aim was to identify the esterase(s) involved in lipolysis by P. freudenreichii. We targeted two previously identified esterases: one secreted esterase, PF#279, and one putative cell wall-anchored esterase, PF#774. To evaluate their role in lipolysis, we constructed overexpression and knockout mutants of P. freudenreichii CIRM-BIA1T for each corresponding gene. The sequences of both genes were also compared in 21 wild-type strains. All strains were assessed for their lipolytic activity on milk fat. The lipolytic activity observed matched data previously reported in cheese, thus validating the relevance of the method used. The mutants overexpressing PF#279 or PF#774 released four times more fatty acids than the wild-type strain, demonstrating that both enzymes are lipolytic esterases. However, inactivation of the pf279 gene induced a 75% reduction in the lipolytic activity compared to that of the wild-type strain, whereas inactivation of the pf774 gene did not modify the phenotype. Two of the 21 wild-type strains tested did not display any detectable lipolytic activity. Interestingly, these two strains exhibited the same single-nucleotide deletion at the beginning of the pf279 gene sequence, leading to a premature stop codon, whereas they harbored a pf774 gene highly similar to that of the other strains. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate that PF#279 is the main lipolytic esterase in P. freudenreichii and a key agent of Swiss cheese lipolysis. PMID:24242250

  5. Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Nance, Mark R.; Gao, Daquan; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Macdonald, Joanne; Tamburi, Patricia; Yoon, Dan; Landry, Donald M.; Woods, James H.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2010-09-03

    Cocaine is considered to be the most addictive of all substances of abuse and mediates its effects by inhibiting monoamine transporters, primarily the dopamine transporters. There are currently no small molecules that can be used to combat its toxic and addictive properties, in part because of the difficulty of developing compounds that inhibit cocaine binding without having intrinsic effects on dopamine transport. Most of the effective cocaine inhibitors also display addictive properties. We have recently reported the use of cocaine esterase (CocE) to accelerate the removal of systemic cocaine and to prevent cocaine-induced lethality. However, wild-type CocE is relatively unstable at physiological temperatures ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 13 min at 37 C), presenting challenges for its development as a viable therapeutic agent. We applied computational approaches to predict mutations to stabilize CocE and showed that several of these have increased stability both in vitro and in vivo, with the most efficacious mutant (T172R/G173Q) extending half-life up to 370 min. Here we present novel X-ray crystallographic data on these mutants that provide a plausible model for the observed enhanced stability. We also more extensively characterize the previously reported variants and report on a new stabilizing mutant, L169K. The improved stability of these engineered CocE enzymes will have a profound influence on the use of this protein to combat cocaine-induced toxicity and addiction in humans.

  6. Inhibition of monocyte esterase activity by organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J; Waters, H C

    1977-11-01

    Organophosphate insecticides, such as Vapona, Naled, and Rabon, are highly potent inhibitors of an enzyme found in human monocytes. The enzyme, a specific monocyte esterase, could be inhibited by Vapona in blood samples via airborne contamination at levels easily achieved from commercial slow-release insecticide strips. Fifty percent inhibition (I50)--as measured on the Hemalog D (Technicon Corp.)--occurred at solution concentrations of 0.22, 1.5, and 2.6 X 10(-6) g/liter for Vapona, Rabon, and Naled, respectively. Parathion (a thiophosphate) and Baygon (a carbamate) were less potent, with I50 values of 3.7 X 10(-5) and 1.5 X 10(-4) g/liter, respectively. Dursban (another thiophosphate) and Carbaryl (a carbamate) showed only marginal inhibition. Eserine, malathion, nicotine and pyrethrum had no inhibitory effect up to 0.5 g/liter. The occurrence of this effect in vivo has not yet been shown, nor is it clear what the implications of such an effect would be. The inhibition of this enzyme by airborne contaminants, however, may interfere with the proper functioning of the Hemalog D. PMID:907842

  7. Hydrolysis of synthetic polyesters by Clostridium botulinum esterases.

    PubMed

    Perz, Veronika; Baumschlager, Armin; Bleymaier, Klaus; Zitzenbacher, Sabine; Hromic, Altijana; Steinkellner, Georg; Pairitsch, Andris; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Gruber, Karl; Sinkel, Carsten; Küper, Ulf; Ribitsch, Doris; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-05-01

    Two novel esterases from the anaerobe Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 (Cbotu_EstA and Cbotu_EstB) were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21-Gold(DE3) and were found to hydrolyze the polyester poly(butylene adipate-co-butylene terephthalate) (PBAT). The active site residues (triad Ser, Asp, His) are present in both enzymes at the same location only with some amino acid variations near the active site at the surrounding of aspartate. Yet, Cbotu_EstA showed higher kcat values on para-nitrophenyl butyrate and para-nitrophenyl acetate and was considerably more active (sixfold) on PBAT. The entrance to the active site of the modeled Cbotu_EstB appears more narrowed compared to the crystal structure of Cbotu_EstA and the N-terminus is shorter which could explain its lower activity on PBAT. The Cbotu_EstA crystal structure consists of two regions that may act as movable cap domains and a zinc metal binding site. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1024-1034. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26524601

  8. Genetic variability for esterase enzyme in Onobrychis species.

    PubMed

    Kidambi, S P; Mahan, J R; Matches, A G; Burke, J J; Nunna, R R

    1990-10-01

    Understanding polymorphism at the enzyme level is basic to its use in population and genetic studies. However, no such information is available on the variability among different sainfoin (Onobrychis) species. Therefore, our objective was to study the existence of genetic polymorphism for esterase in 17 Onobrychis species and three cultivars of O. viciifolia Scop. Three regions of banding were observed in all the materials tested, with the number of bands varying from 0 to 3, 3 to 14, and 1 to 2 bands in each of these zones, which have been designated EST1, EST2, and EST3 respectively. All the materials studied had unique banding patterns, the only common feature being that all of them, except one species, had isozyme 1. Identification was possible only for four species (O. iberica, O. kachetica, O. transcaucasica, and O. bieberstenii) and one cultivar ('Nova') based on the banding patterns. Large diversity was evident from the wide range of percent similarity values (0%-79%). Subsequent studies should be directed in using these isozyme banding patterns as markers to the desirable agronomic and quality traits of different germplasm lines. PMID:24220999

  9. Identification of petrogenic produced water components as acetylcholine esterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Froment, Jean; Langford, Katherine; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Bråte, Inger Lise N; Brooks, Steven J; Thomas, Kevin V

    2016-08-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) was applied to identify acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitors in produced water. Common produced water components from oil production activities, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols, and naphthenic acids were tested for AChE inhibition using a simple mixture of PAHs and naphthenic acids. Produced water samples collected from two offshore platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea were extracted by solid phase extraction and fractionated by open-column liquid solid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) before being tested using a high-throughput and automated AChE assay. The HPLC fractions causing the strongest AChE inhibition were analysed by gas chromatography coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-HR-ToF-MS). Butylated hydroxytoluene and 4-phenyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene were identified as two produced water components capable of inhibiting AChE at low concentrations. In order to assess the potential presence of such compounds discharged into aquatic ecosystems, AChE activity in fish tissues was measured. Saithe (Pollachius virens) caught near two offshore platforms showed lower enzymatic activity than those collected from a reference location. Target analysis of saithe did not detected the presence of these two putative AChE inhibitors and suggest that additional compounds such as PAHs, naphthenic acids and yet un-identified compounds may also contribute to the purported AChE inhibition observed in saithe. PMID:27176761

  10. Acetylation of bleached Kraft pulp: effect of xylan content on properties of acetylated compounds.

    PubMed

    Peredo, Karol; Reyes, Herna; Escobar, Danilo; Vega-Lara, Johana; Berg, Alex; Pereira, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Bleached Kraft pulp (BKP) from Eucalyptus globulus and cotton xylan blends (CXB) was acetylated. The effects of xylan content on cellulose acetylation and the properties of the acetylated material were studied. An increase in xylan content caused a slight decrease in the degree of substitution (2.98 to 2.68 for CXB; 2.93 to 2.84 for BKP). Thermal analysis showed that the melting temperature also decreases from 268.0 to 188.8 °C for CXB and from 221.4 to 212.8 °C for BKP. Moreover, the solubility decreased due to the partial dissolution of acetylated xylans. The presence of xylans during Kraft pulp acetylation does not have a significant negative effect on the physical properties of the acetylated material, but the decrease in melting temperature was beneficial for the application of acetylated polymer as a natural internal plasticizer. This is considered to be an important argument for BKP utilization in the cellulose acetate manufacturing process. PMID:25498729

  11. Non-enzymatic protein acetylation detected by NAPPA protein arrays*

    PubMed Central

    Olia, Adam S.; Barker, Kristi; McCullough, Cheryl E.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W.; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation is a post-translational modification that occurs on thousands of proteins located in many cellular organelles. This process mediates many protein functions and modulates diverse biological processes. In mammalian cells, where acetyl-CoA is the primary acetyl donor, acetylation in the mitochondria is thought to occur by chemical means due to the relatively high concentration of acetyl-CoA located in this organelle. In contrast, acetylation outside of the mitochondria is thought to be mediated predominantly by acetyltransferase enzymes. Here we address the possibility that non-enzymatic chemical acetylation outside of the mitochondria may be more common than previously appreciated. We employed the Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array platform to perform an unbiased screen for human proteins that undergo chemical acetylation, which resulted in the identification of a multitude of proteins with diverse functions and cellular localization. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that basic residues typically precede the acetylated lysine in the −7 to −3 position, and we show by mutagenesis that these basic residues contribute to chemical acetylation capacity. We propose that these basic residues lower the pKa of the substrate lysine for efficient chemical acetylation. Many of the identified proteins reside outside of the mitochondria, and have been previously demonstrated to be acetylated in vivo. As such, our studies demonstrate that chemical acetylation occurs more broadly throughout the eukaryotic cell than previously appreciated, and suggests that this post-translational protein modification may have more diverse roles in protein function and pathway regulation. PMID:26083674

  12. Nucleosome structure incorporated histone acetylation site prediction in arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Acetylation is a crucial post-translational modification for histones, and plays a key role in gene expression regulation. Due to limited data and lack of a clear acetylation consensus sequence, a few researches have focused on prediction of lysine acetylation sites. Several systematic prediction studies have been conducted for human and yeast, but less for Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Concerning the insufficient observation on acetylation site, we analyzed contributions of the peptide-alignment-based distance definition and 3D structure factors in acetylation prediction. We found that traditional structure contributes little to acetylation site prediction. Identified acetylation sites of histones in Arabidopsis thaliana are conserved and cross predictable with that of human by peptide based methods. However, the predicted specificity is overestimated, because of the existence of non-observed acetylable site. Here, by performing a complete exploration on the factors that affect the acetylability of lysines in histones, we focused on the relative position of lysine at nucleosome level, and defined a new structure feature to promote the performance in predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. thaliana. Conclusion We found a new spacial correlated acetylation factor, and defined a ε-N spacial location based feature, which contains five core spacial ellipsoid wired areas. By incorporating the new feature, the performance of predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. Thaliana was promoted, in which the previous mispredicted acetylable lysines were corrected by comparing to the peptide-based prediction. PMID:21047388

  13. Esterase Active in Polar Organic Solvents from the Yeast Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165.

    PubMed

    Alex, Deepthy; Shainu, Anju; Pandey, Ashok; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    Esterases/lipases active in water miscible solvents are highly desired in biocatalysis where substrate solubility is limited and also when the solvent is desired as an acyl acceptor in transesterification reactions, as with the case of biodiesel production. We have isolated an esterase from the glycolipid producing yeast-Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 which in its crude form was alkali active, thermo stable, halo tolerant and also capable of acting in presence of high methanol concentration. The crude enzyme which maintained 90% of its original activity after being treated at 70°C was purified and the properties were characterized. The partially purified esterase preparation had temperature and pH optima of 60°C and 8.0 respectively. The enzyme retained almost complete activity in presence of 25% methanol and 80% activity in the same strength of ethanol. Conditions of enzyme production were optimized, which lead to 9 fold increase in the esterase yield. One of the isoforms of the enzyme LIP1 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Purified LIP1 had a K m and V max of 0.01 and 1.12, respectively. The purified esterase lost its thermo and halo tolerance but interestingly, retained 97% activity in methanol. PMID:24800063

  14. Isolation and characterization of novel lipases/esterases from a bovine rumen metagenome.

    PubMed

    Privé, Florence; Newbold, C Jamie; Kaderbhai, Naheed N; Girdwood, Susan G; Golyshina, Olga V; Golyshin, Peter N; Scollan, Nigel D; Huws, Sharon A

    2015-07-01

    Improving the health beneficial fatty acid content of meat and milk is a major challenge requiring an increased understanding of rumen lipid metabolism. In this study, we isolated and characterized rumen bacterial lipases/esterases using functional metagenomics. Metagenomic libraries were constructed from DNA extracted from strained rumen fluid (SRF), solid-attached bacteria (SAB) and liquid-associated rumen bacteria (LAB), ligated into a fosmid vector and subsequently transformed into an Escherichia coli host. Fosmid libraries consisted of 7,744; 8,448; and 7,680 clones with an average insert size of 30 to 35 kbp for SRF, SAB and LAB, respectively. Transformants were screened on spirit blue agar plates containing tributyrin for lipase/esterase activity. Five SAB and four LAB clones exhibited lipolytic activity, and no positive clones were found in the SRF library. Fosmids from positive clones were pyrosequenced and twelve putative lipase/esterase genes and two phospholipase genes retrieved. Although the derived proteins clustered into diverse esterase and lipase families, a degree of novelty was seen, with homology ranging from 40 to 78% following BlastP searches. Isolated lipases/esterases exhibited activity against mostly short- to medium-chain substrates across a range of temperatures and pH. The function of these novel enzymes recovered in ruminal metabolism needs further investigation, alongside their potential industrial uses. PMID:25575887

  15. Esterase Active in Polar Organic Solvents from the Yeast Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165

    PubMed Central

    Shainu, Anju; Pandey, Ashok; Sukumaran, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Esterases/lipases active in water miscible solvents are highly desired in biocatalysis where substrate solubility is limited and also when the solvent is desired as an acyl acceptor in transesterification reactions, as with the case of biodiesel production. We have isolated an esterase from the glycolipid producing yeast-Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 which in its crude form was alkali active, thermo stable, halo tolerant and also capable of acting in presence of high methanol concentration. The crude enzyme which maintained 90% of its original activity after being treated at 70°C was purified and the properties were characterized. The partially purified esterase preparation had temperature and pH optima of 60°C and 8.0 respectively. The enzyme retained almost complete activity in presence of 25% methanol and 80% activity in the same strength of ethanol. Conditions of enzyme production were optimized, which lead to 9 fold increase in the esterase yield. One of the isoforms of the enzyme LIP1 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Purified LIP1 had a Km and Vmax of 0.01 and 1.12, respectively. The purified esterase lost its thermo and halo tolerance but interestingly, retained 97% activity in methanol. PMID:24800063

  16. Profiling Esterases in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using Far-Red Fluorogenic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Tallman, Katie R; Levine, Samantha R; Beatty, Kimberly E

    2016-07-15

    Enzyme-activated, fluorogenic probes are powerful tools for studying bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In prior work, we reported two 7-hydroxy-9H-(1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one) (DDAO)-derived acetoxymethyl ether probes for esterase and lipase detection. Here, we report four-carbon (C4) and eight-carbon (C8) acyloxymethyl ether derivatives, which are longer-chain fluorogenic substrates. These new probes demonstrate greater stability and lipase reactivity than the two-carbon (C2) acetoxymethyl ether-masked substrates. We used these new C4 and C8 probes to profile esterases and lipases from Mtb. The C8-masked probes revealed a new esterase band in gel-resolved Mtb lysates that was not present in lysates from nonpathogenic M. bovis (bacillus Calmette-Guérin), a close genetic relative. We identified this Mtb-specific enzyme as the secreted esterase Culp1 (Rv1984c). Our C4- and C8-masked probes also produced distinct Mtb banding patterns in lysates from Mtb-infected macrophages, demonstrating the potential of these probes for detecting Mtb esterases that are active during infections. PMID:27177211

  17. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production. PMID:26369647

  18. Simultaneous determination of N(1)-acetyl sulfisoxazole and its metabolites, and relative bioavailability compare to sulfisoxazole in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunyoung; Kang, Wonku

    2016-09-10

    N(1)-acetyl sulfisoxazole (N1AS), a dihydropteroate synthase inhibitor is known to be biotransformed primarily to sulfisoxazole, partly to N(4)-acetyl sulfisoxazole (N4AS), and likely also to diacetyl sulfisoxazole (DAS) and other compounds. Although its clinical use has been limited due to urolithiasis, some countries still use the drug in combination with trimethoprim in cattle. A liquid chromatographic method using ultraviolet detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of four substances for the first time. Four analytes and sulfamethoxazole (IS) were separated on a reversed-phase column with gradient elution of a mobile phase. Because DAS and N1AS in plasma were changed very quickly into N4AS and sulfisoxazole, respectively, and esterase inhibitors (sodium fluoride and eserine) could not prevent the transformation, sulfisoxazole and N4AS were monitored in rat plasma following a single oral administration of N1AS and sulfisoxazole in five rats. The relative bioavailability of N1AS to sulfisoxazole was about two, indicating that a half-dose of N1AS would be equivalent to a dose of sulfisoxazole to achieve the same systemic exposure to sulfisoxazole. PMID:27423008

  19. Identification and characterization of glycosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of the side chains of the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, Malcolm

    2015-08-31

    Our goal was to gain insight into the genes and proteins involved in the biosynthesis of rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), a borate cross-linked and structurally conserved pectic polysaccharide present in the primary cell walls of all vascular plants. The research conducted during the funding period established that (i) Avascular plants have the ability to synthesize UDP-apiose but lack the glycosyltransferase machinery required to synthesize RG-II or other apiose-containing cell wall glycans. (ii) RG-II structure is highly conserved in the Lemnaceae (duckweeds and relatives). However, the structures of other wall pectins and hemicellulose have changed substantial during the diversification of the Lemnaceae. This supports the notion that a precise structure of RG-II must be maintained to allow borate cross-linking to occur in a controlled manner. (iii) Enzymes involved in the conversion of UDP-GlcA to UDP-Api, UDP-Xyl, and UDP-Ara may have an important role in controlling the composition of duckweed cell walls. (iv) RG-II exists as the borate ester cross-linked dimer in the cell walls of soybean root hairs and roots. Thus, RG-II is present in the walls of plants cells that grow by tip or by expansive growth. (v) A reduction in RG-II cross-linking in the maize tls1 mutant, which lacks a borate channel protein, suggests that the growth defects observed in the mutant are, at least in part, due to defects in the cell wall.

  20. The Pore Size of Non-Graminaceous Plant Cell Walls Is Rapidly Decreased by Borate Ester Cross-Linking of the Pectic Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan II1

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Axel; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Ehwald, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan II (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH ≤ 2.0 or by treatment with Ca2+-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca2+, but not by Na+ or Mg2+ ions at pH 1.5. The Ca2+-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Our results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed. PMID:10557231

  1. Roles of BOR2, a boron exporter, in cross linking of rhamnogalacturonan II and root elongation under boron limitation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Kyoko; Wakuta, Shinji; Takada, Shigeki; Ide, Koji; Takano, Junpei; Naito, Satoshi; Omori, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Toshiro; Fujiwara, Toru

    2013-12-01

    Boron (B) is required for cross linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) and is consequently essential for the maintenance of cell wall structure. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BOR1 is an efflux B transporter for xylem loading of B. Here, we describe the roles of BOR2, the most similar paralog of BOR1. BOR2 encodes an efflux B transporter localized in plasma membrane and is strongly expressed in lateral root caps and epidermis of elongation zones of roots. Transfer DNA insertion of BOR2 reduced root elongation by 68%, whereas the mutation in BOR1 reduced it by 32% under low B availability (0.1 µm), but the reduction in shoot growth was not as obvious as that in the BOR1 mutant. A double mutant of BOR1 and BOR2 exhibited much more severe growth defects in both roots and shoots under B-limited conditions than the corresponding single mutants. All single and double mutants grew normally under B-sufficient conditions. These results suggest that both BOR1 and BOR2 are required under B limitation and that their roles are, at least in part, different. The total B concentrations in roots of BOR2 mutants were not significantly different from those in wild-type plants, but the proportion of cross-linked RG-II was reduced under low B availability. Such a reduction in RG-II cross linking was not evident in roots of the BOR1 mutant. Thus, we propose that under B-limited conditions, transport of boric acid/borate by BOR2 from symplast to apoplast is required for effective cross linking of RG-II in cell wall and root cell elongation. PMID:24114060

  2. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II, monitored by gel electrophoresis, occurs during polysaccharide synthesis and secretion but not post-secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Messenger, David J; Fry, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    The cell-wall pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is cross-linked via borate diester bridges, which influence the expansion, thickness and porosity of the wall. Previously, little was known about the mechanism or subcellular site of this cross-linking. Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) to separate monomeric from dimeric (boron-bridged) RG-II, we confirmed that Pb2+ promotes H3BO3-dependent dimerisation in vitro. H3BO3 concentrations as high as 50 mm did not prevent cross-linking. For in-vivo experiments, we successfully cultured ‘Paul's Scarlet’ rose (Rosa sp.) cells in boron-free medium: their wall-bound pectin contained monomeric RG-II domains but no detectable dimers. Thus pectins containing RG-II domains can be held in the wall other than via boron bridges. Re-addition of H3BO3 to 3.3 μm triggered a gradual appearance of RG-II dimer over 24 h but without detectable loss of existing monomers, suggesting that only newly synthesised RG-II was amenable to boron bridging. In agreement with this, Rosa cultures whose polysaccharide biosynthetic machinery had been compromised (by carbon starvation, respiratory inhibitors, anaerobiosis, freezing or boiling) lost the ability to generate RG-II dimers. We conclude that RG-II normally becomes boron-bridged during synthesis or secretion but not post-secretion. Supporting this conclusion, exogenous [3H]RG-II was neither dimerised in the medium nor cross-linked to existing wall-associated RG-II domains when added to Rosa cultures. In conclusion, in cultured Rosa cells RG-II domains have a brief window of opportunity for boron-bridging intraprotoplasmically or during secretion, but secretion into the apoplast is a point of no return beyond which additional boron-bridging does not readily occur. PMID:24320597

  3. The pore size of non-graminaceous plant cell walls is rapidly decreased by borate ester cross-linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; O'Neill, M.A.; Ehwald, R.

    1999-11-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH {le} 2.0 or by treatment with Ca{sup 2+}-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca{sup 2+}, but not by Na{sup +} or Mg{sup 2+} ions at pH 1.5. The Ca{sup 2+}-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Their results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed.

  4. Occurrence of the Primary Cell Wall Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan II in Pteridophytes, Lycophytes, and Bryophytes. Implications for the Evolution of Vascular Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Toshiro; Ishii, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Higuchi, Masanobu; Darvill, Alan; Albersheim, Peter; O'Neill, Malcolm A.

    2004-01-01

    Borate ester cross-linking of the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) is required for the growth and development of angiosperms and gymnosperms. Here, we report that the amounts of borate cross-linked RG-II present in the sporophyte primary walls of members of the most primitive extant vascular plant groups (Lycopsida, Filicopsida, Equisetopsida, and Psilopsida) are comparable with the amounts of RG-II in the primary walls of angiosperms. By contrast, the gametophyte generation of members of the avascular bryophytes (Bryopsida, Hepaticopsida, and Anthocerotopsida) have primary walls that contain small amounts (approximately 1% of the amounts of RG-II present in angiosperm walls) of an RG-II-like polysaccharide. The glycosyl sequence of RG-II is conserved in vascular plants, but these RG-IIs are not identical because the non-reducing l-rhamnosyl residue present on the aceric acid-containing side chain of RG-II of all previously studied plants is replaced by a 3-O-methyl rhamnosyl residue in the RG-IIs isolated from Lycopodium tristachyum, Ceratopteris thalictroides, Platycerium bifurcatum, and Psilotum nudum. Our data indicate that the amount of RG-II incorporated into the walls of plants increased during the evolution of vascular plants from their bryophyte-like ancestors. Thus, the acquisition of a boron-dependent growth habit may be correlated with the ability of vascular plants to maintain upright growth and to form lignified secondary walls. The conserved structures of pteridophyte, lycophyte, and angiosperm RG-IIs suggests that the genes and proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of this polysaccharide appeared early in land plant evolution and that RG-II has a fundamental role in wall structure. PMID:14671014

  5. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II, monitored by gel electrophoresis, occurs during polysaccharide synthesis and secretion but not post-secretion.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Messenger, David J; Fry, Stephen C

    2014-02-01

    The cell-wall pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is cross-linked via borate diester bridges, which influence the expansion, thickness and porosity of the wall. Previously, little was known about the mechanism or subcellular site of this cross-linking. Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) to separate monomeric from dimeric (boron-bridged) RG-II, we confirmed that Pb(2+) promotes H3 BO3 -dependent dimerisation in vitro. H3 BO3 concentrations as high as 50 mm did not prevent cross-linking. For in-vivo experiments, we successfully cultured 'Paul's Scarlet' rose (Rosa sp.) cells in boron-free medium: their wall-bound pectin contained monomeric RG-II domains but no detectable dimers. Thus pectins containing RG-II domains can be held in the wall other than via boron bridges. Re-addition of H3 BO3 to 3.3 μm triggered a gradual appearance of RG-II dimer over 24 h but without detectable loss of existing monomers, suggesting that only newly synthesised RG-II was amenable to boron bridging. In agreement with this, Rosa cultures whose polysaccharide biosynthetic machinery had been compromised (by carbon starvation, respiratory inhibitors, anaerobiosis, freezing or boiling) lost the ability to generate RG-II dimers. We conclude that RG-II normally becomes boron-bridged during synthesis or secretion but not post-secretion. Supporting this conclusion, exogenous [(3) H]RG-II was neither dimerised in the medium nor cross-linked to existing wall-associated RG-II domains when added to Rosa cultures. In conclusion, in cultured Rosa cells RG-II domains have a brief window of opportunity for boron-bridging intraprotoplasmically or during secretion, but secretion into the apoplast is a point of no return beyond which additional boron-bridging does not readily occur. PMID:24320597

  6. Roles of BOR2, a Boron Exporter, in Cross Linking of Rhamnogalacturonan II and Root Elongation under Boron Limitation in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Kyoko; Wakuta, Shinji; Takada, Shigeki; Ide, Koji; Takano, Junpei; Naito, Satoshi; Omori, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Toshiro; Fujiwara, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Boron (B) is required for cross linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) and is consequently essential for the maintenance of cell wall structure. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BOR1 is an efflux B transporter for xylem loading of B. Here, we describe the roles of BOR2, the most similar paralog of BOR1. BOR2 encodes an efflux B transporter localized in plasma membrane and is strongly expressed in lateral root caps and epidermis of elongation zones of roots. Transfer DNA insertion of BOR2 reduced root elongation by 68%, whereas the mutation in BOR1 reduced it by 32% under low B availability (0.1 µm), but the reduction in shoot growth was not as obvious as that in the BOR1 mutant. A double mutant of BOR1 and BOR2 exhibited much more severe growth defects in both roots and shoots under B-limited conditions than the corresponding single mutants. All single and double mutants grew normally under B-sufficient conditions. These results suggest that both BOR1 and BOR2 are required under B limitation and that their roles are, at least in part, different. The total B concentrations in roots of BOR2 mutants were not significantly different from those in wild-type plants, but the proportion of cross-linked RG-II was reduced under low B availability. Such a reduction in RG-II cross linking was not evident in roots of the BOR1 mutant. Thus, we propose that under B-limited conditions, transport of boric acid/borate by BOR2 from symplast to apoplast is required for effective cross linking of RG-II in cell wall and root cell elongation. PMID:24114060

  7. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  8. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  9. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  10. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  11. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  12. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  13. Cellular function of neuropathy target esterase in lysophosphatidylcholine action

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, Sarah C.; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Gulevich, Alex G.; Lin, Amy Y.; Holland, Nina T.; Casida, John E.

    2008-11-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) plays critical roles in embryonic development and maintenance of peripheral axons. It is a secondary target of some organophosphorus toxicants including analogs of insecticides and chemical warfare agents. Although the mechanistic role of NTE in vivo is poorly defined, it is known to hydrolyze lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) in vitro and may protect cell membranes from cytotoxic accumulation of LPC. To determine the cellular function of NTE, Neuro-2a and COS-7 cells were transfected with a full-length human NTE-containing plasmid yielding recombinant NTE (rNTE). We find the same inhibitor sensitivity and specificity profiles for rNTE assayed with LPC or phenyl valerate (a standard NTE substrate) and that this correlation extends to the LPC hydrolases of human brain, lymphocytes and erythrocytes. All of these LPC hydrolases are therefore very similar to each other in respect to a conserved inhibitor binding site conformation. NTE is expressed in brain and lymphocytes and contributes to LPC hydrolase activities in these tissues. The enzyme or enzymes responsible for erythrocyte LPC hydrolase activity remain to be identified. We also show that rNTE protects Neuro-2a and COS-7 cells from exogenous LPC cytotoxicity. Expression of rNTE in Neuro-2a cells alters their phospholipid balance (analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with single ion monitoring) by lowering LPC-16:0 and LPC-18:0 and elevating glycerophosphocholine without a change in phosphatidylcholine-16:0/18:1 or 16:0/18:2. NTE therefore serves an important function in LPC homeostasis and action.

  14. Extraction and purification of wheat-esterase using aqueous two-phase systems of ionic liquid and salt.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Feng, Zhibiao; Liu, Chunhong; Xu, Yingcao; Li, Dongmei; Ji, Guo

    2015-05-01

    To explore a new and simple rapid extraction and purification technique for wheat-esterase, an ionic liquids (ILs)-based aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) was developed for the purification of wheat-esterase from wheat extracts. Effects of various process parameters such as the concentrations of [Bmim]BF4, the types and concentrations of phase-forming salt, the system pH and the temperature on partitioning of wheat-esterase were evaluated. The obtained data indicated that wheat-esterase was preferentially partitioned into the ILs-rich phase and the ATPS composed of 20 % [Bmim]BF4 (w/w) and 25 % (w/w) NaH2PO4(pH = 4.8) showed good selectivity on wheat-esterase. Under the optimum conditions, wheat-esterase was purified with an acceptable yield (88.93 %), but produced wheat-esterase was 4.23 times as pure. It was obvious that temperature shows little influence on the purification between 10 and 50 °C. Sephadex G-150FF revealed that the band intensity of contaminating proteins in ATPS fraction almost disappeared. Therefore, ILs-based ATPS was an effective method for partitioning and recovery of wheat-esterase from wheat crude extracts. PMID:25892786

  15. Cutinolytic esterase activity of bacteria isolated from mixed-plant compost and characterization of a cutinase gene from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes.

    PubMed

    Inglis, G D; Yanke, L J; Selinger, L B

    2011-11-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine cutinolytic esterase (i.e., cutinase) activity by pseudomonads and bacteria isolated from mixed-plant compost. Approximately 400 isolates representing 52 taxa recovered from mixed-plant compost using cuticle baits, along with 117 pseudomonad isolates obtained from a culture collection (i.e., non-compost habitats), were evaluated. The ability of isolates to degrade the synthetic cutin polycaprolactone (PCL) was initially measured. Isolates from 23 taxa recovered from the compost degraded PCL. As well, isolates from 13 taxa of pseudomonads cleared PCL. Secondary screening measured esterase activity induced by the presence of apple cuticle using the chromogenic substrate p-nitrophenyl butyrate. Eighteen isolates representing four taxa (Alcaligenes faecalis , Bacillus licheniformis , Bacillus pumilus , and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes) recovered from compost exhibited substantial esterase activity when grown with cuticle. In contrast, none of the pseudomonad isolates from the culture collection produced appreciable esterase activity. Although degradation of PCL was not correlated with esterase activity, isolates that were unable to degrade PCL failed to produce measureable esterase activities. Zymogram analysis indicated that the esterases produced by bacteria from compost ranged in size from 29 to 47 kDa. A gene from P. pseudoalcaligenes (cutA) was found to code for a cutin-induced esterase consisting of 302 amino acids and a theoretical protein size of 32 kDa. The enzyme was unique and was most closely related to other bacterial lipases (≤48% similarity). PMID:22029433

  16. Cloning of a novel feruloyl esterase gene from rumen microbial metagenome and enzyme characterization in synergism with endoxylanases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A feruloyl esterase (FAE) gene was isolated from a rumen microbial metagenome, cloned into E. coli, and expressed in active form. The enzyme (RuFae2) was identified as a Type C feruloyl esterase, which acted on methyl ferulate, methyl p-coumarate, methyl sinapinate, methyl caffeate, but not diferul...

  17. COMPARISON OF THE RELATIVE INHIBITION OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE AND NEUROPATHY TARGET ESTERASE IN RATS AND HENS GIVEN CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhibition of neuropathy target esterase (NTE, neurotoxic esterase) and acetylcholinesterase (AME) activities was compared in brain and spinal cords of adult. hile Leghorn hens and adult male Long Evans rats 4-48 hr after administration of tri-ortho-tolyl phosphate (TOTP po, 50-5...

  18. ROLE OF NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE (NTE) IN THE PREVENTION AND POTENTIATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS-INDUCED DELAYED NEUROTOXICITY (OPIDN)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first step in the initiation of organophosphorus-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) is proposed to be the phosphorylation of an enzyme found in the nervous system called neurotoxic esterase (neuropathy target esterase, NTE). t has been known for over twenty years that non-neu...

  19. Expression of feruloyl esterase A from Aspergillus terreus and its application in biomass degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai-Bing; Wang, Le; Liu, Yan; Zhai, Huan-Chen; Cai, Jing-Ping; Hu, Yuan-Sen

    2015-11-01

    Feruloyl esterases (FAEs) are key enzymes involved in the complete biodegradation of lignocelluloses, which could hydrolyze the ester bonds between hemicellulose and lignin. The coding sequence of a feruloyl esterase A (AtFaeA) was cloned from Aspergillus terreus and the recombinant AtFaeA was constitutively expressed in Pichia pastoris. The SDS-PAGE analysis of purified AtFaeA showed two protein bands owing to the different extent of glycosylation, and the recombinant AtFaeA had an optimum temperature of 50°C and an optimum pH of 5.0. The substrate utilization and primary sequence identity of AtFaeA demonstrated that it is a type-A feruloyl esterase. The hydrolysis of corn stalk and corncob by xylanase from Aspergillus niger could be significantly improved in concert with recombinant AfFaeA. PMID:26282562

  20. Eco-friendly surface modification on polyester fabrics by esterase treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jindan; Cai, Guoqiang; Liu, Jinqiang; Ge, Huayun; Wang, Jiping

    2014-03-01

    Currently, traditional alkali deweighting technology is widely used to improve the hydrophilicity of polyester fabrics. However, the wastewater and heavy chemicals in the effluent cause enormous damage to the environment. Esterase treatment, which is feasible in mild conditions with high selectivity, can provide a clean and efficient way for polyester modification. Under the optimum conditions, the polyester fabric hydrolysis process of esterase had a linear kinetics. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) results showed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups were produced only on the surface of modified fiber without changing the chemical composition of the bulk. These fibers exhibited much improved fabric wicking, as well as greatly improved oily stain removal performance. Compared to the harsh alkali hydrolysis, the enzyme treatment led to smaller weight loss and better fiber integrity. The esterase treatment technology is promising to produce higher-quality polyester textiles with an environmental friendly approach.

  1. Transition-State Analysis of 2-O-Acetyl-ADP-Ribose Hydrolysis by Human Macrodomain 1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Macrodomains, including the human macrodomain 1 (MacroD1), are erasers of the post-translational modification of monoadenosinediphospho-ribosylation and hydrolytically deacetylate the sirtuin product O-acetyl-ADP-ribose (OAADPr). OAADPr has been reported to play a role in cell signaling based on oocyte microinjection studies, and macrodomains affect an array of cell processes including transcription and response to DNA damage. Here, we investigate human MacroD1 by transition-state (TS) analysis based on kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) from isotopically labeled OAADPr substrates. Competitive radiolabeled-isotope effects and mass spectrometry were used to obtain KIE data to yield intrinsic KIE values. Intrinsic KIEs were matched to a quantum chemical structure of the TS that includes the active site residues Asp184 and Asn174 and a structural water molecule. Transition-state analysis supports a concerted mechanism with an early TS involving simultaneous nucleophilic water attack and leaving group bond cleavage where the breaking C–O ester bond = 1.60 Å and the C–O bond to the attacking water nucleophile = 2.30 Å. The MacroD1 TS provides mechanistic understanding of the OAADPr esterase chemistry. PMID:25051211

  2. Contribution of soil esterase to biodegradation of aliphatic polyester agricultural mulch film in cultivated soils.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Tamura, Kimiko; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Watanabe, Takashi; Koitabashi, Motoo; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Yarimizu, Tohru; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between degradation speed of soil-buried biodegradable polyester film in a farmland and the characteristics of the predominant polyester-degrading soil microorganisms and enzymes were investigated to determine the BP-degrading ability of cultivated soils through characterization of the basal microbial activities and their transition in soils during BP film degradation. Degradation of poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) film was evaluated in soil samples from different cultivated fields in Japan for 4 weeks. Both the degradation speed of the PBSA film and the esterase activity were found to be correlated with the ratio of colonies that produced clear zone on fungal minimum medium-agarose plate with emulsified PBSA to the total number colonies counted. Time-dependent change in viable counts of the PBSA-degrading fungi and esterase activities were monitored in soils where buried films showed the most and the least degree of degradation. During the degradation of PBSA film, the viable counts of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activities in soils, which adhered to the PBSA film, increased with time. The soil, where the film was degraded the fastest, recorded large PBSA-degrading fungal population and showed high esterase activity compared with the other soil samples throughout the incubation period. Meanwhile, esterase activity and viable counts of PBSA-degrading fungi were found to be stable in soils without PBSA film. These results suggest that the higher the distribution ratio of native PBSA-degrading fungi in the soil, the faster the film degradation is. This could be due to the rapid accumulation of secreted esterases in these soils. PMID:25852987

  3. Characterization of a novel cold active and salt tolerant esterase from Zunongwangia profunda.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Asadur; Culsum, Umma; Tang, Wenhao; Zhang, Shao Wei; Wu, Gaobing; Liu, Ziduo

    2016-04-01

    A novel cold active esterase, EstLiu was cloned from the marine bacterium Zunongwangia profunda, overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by glutathione-S transferase (GST) affinity chromatography. The mature esterase EstLiu sequence encodes a protein of 273 amino acids residues, with a predicted molecular weight of 30KDa and containing the classical pentapeptidase motif from position 156 to 160 with the catalytic triad Ser158-Asp211-His243. Although, EstLiu showed 64% similarity with the hypothetical esterase from Chryseobacterium sp. StRB126 (WP_045498424), phylogenetic analysis showed it had no similarity with any of the established family of lipases/esterases, suggesting that it could be considered as a new family. The purified enzyme showed broad substrate specificity with the highest hydrolytic activity against p-nitrophenyl butyrate (C4). EstLiu showed remarkable activity (75%) at 0°Cand the optimal activity at pH 8.0 and 30°C with good thermostability and quickened inactivation above 60°C. EstLiu retained 81, 103, 67 and 78% of its original activity at 50% (v/v) in ethanol, isopropanol, DMSO and ethylene glycol, respectively. In the presence of Tween 20, Tween 80 and Triton X-100, EstLiu showed 88, 100 and 117% of relative activity. It is also co-factor independent. The high activity at low temperature and desirable stability in organic solvents and salts of this novel family esterase represents a good evidence of novel biocatalyst. Overall, this novel enzyme showed better activity than previously reported esterases in extreme reaction conditions and could promote the reaction in both aqueous and non-aqueous conditions, indicating its great potential for industrial applications. PMID:26920474

  4. Purified human C1-esterase inhibitor is safe in acute relapses of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To minimize complement-mediated damage in acute relapses of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) by adding treatment with a complement inhibitor, purified C1-esterase inhibitor, to the current standard of care (high-dose glucocorticoids). Method: We conducted an open-label phase 1b safety and proof-of-concept trial in 10 patients with NMO–immunoglobulin G seropositive NMO or NMO spectrum disease (NMOSD) who presented with acute transverse myelitis and/or optic neuritis. In addition to treating with 1 g of daily IV methylprednisolone, we infused 2,000 units of C1-esterase inhibitor daily for 3 days, beginning on day 1 of hospitalization. The primary outcome measure was safety, and the secondary efficacy measure was change in Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores. Results: Ten patients with NMO/NMOSD were enrolled, 7 of whom presented with acute transverse myelitis and 3 with acute optic neuritis. C1-esterase inhibitor proved to be safe in all 10 patients, with no serious adverse events recorded. There were no thromboembolic events or related lab abnormalities in any of the subjects. EDSS scores dropped from a median of 4.5 on admission to 4.0 on discharge and then down to 2.5 on 30-day follow-up. All but 1 patient returned to preattack EDSS or better and only 2 patients required escalation to plasmapheresis. Conclusions: C1-esterase inhibitor is a safe add-on therapy for patients with NMO/NMOSD presenting with acute transverse myelitis and optic neuritis. Preliminary evidence suggests a promising benefit with C1-esterase inhibitor in reducing neurologic damage and improving outcomes. A placebo-controlled trial is necessary to confirm these findings. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with NMO with acute transverse myelitis or optic neuritis, C1-esterase inhibitor is safe and improves disability. PMID:25340061

  5. Esterases immobilized on aminosilane modified magnetic nanoparticles as a catalyst for biotransformation reactions.

    PubMed

    Alex, Deepthy; Mathew, Abraham; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by reacting ferrous and ferric salts in presence of aqueous ammonia. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were amino functionalized by treating with 3-aminopropyl triethoxy silane (APTES) and was coupled with glutaraldehyde. A novel solvent tolerant esterase from Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 was immobilized on the MNPs through covalent bonding to the glutaraldehyde. The magnetite nanoparticles had a size range of 10-100 nm, confirmed by DLS. Lipases immobilized on MNPs were evaluated for biotransformation reactions including synthesis of ethyl acetate and transesterification of vegetable oil for producing biodiesel. The MNP immobilized esterase had prolonged shelf life and there was no loss in enzyme activity. PMID:24968816

  6. Regulation of JH epoxide hydrolase versus JH esterase activity in the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, by juvenile hormone and xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Anspaugh, Douglas D; Roe, R Michael

    2005-05-01

    JH III esterase and JH III epoxide hydrolase (EH) in vitro activity was compared in whole body Trichoplusia ni homogenates at each stage of development (egg, larva, pupa and adult). While activity of both enzymes was detected at all ages tested, JH esterase was significantly higher than EH activity except for day three of the fifth (last) stadium (L5D3). For both enzymes, activity was highest in eggs. Adult virgin females had 4.6- and 4.0-fold higher JH esterase and EH activities, respectively, than adult virgin males. JH III metabolic activity also was measured in whole body homogenates of fifth stadium T. ni that were fed a nutritive diet (control) or starved on a non-nutritive diet of alphacel, agar and water. With larvae that were starved for 6, 28 and 52 h, EH activity per insect equivalent was 48%, 5% and 1%, respectively, of the control insects. At the same time points, JH esterase activity levels in starved T. ni were 29%, 4% and 3% of that of insects fed the nutritive diet. Selected insect hormones and xenobiotics were administered topically or orally to fifth stadium larvae for up to 52 h, and the effects on whole body EH and JH esterase activity analyzed. JH III increased the JH III esterase activity as high as 2.2-fold, but not the JH III EH activity. The JH analog, methoprene, increased both JH esterase and EH activity as high as 2.5-fold. The JH esterase inhibitor, 3-octylthio-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-one (OTFP), had no impact on EH activity. The epoxides trans- and cis-stilbene oxide (TSO and CSO) in separate experiments increased the EH activity approximately 2.0-fold. TSO did not alter JH esterase levels when topically applied, but oral administration reduced activity to 70% of the control at 28 h, and then increased the activity 1.8-fold at 52 h after the beginning of treatment. CSO had no effect on JH esterase activity. Phenobarbital increased EH activity by 1.9-fold, but did not change JH esterase levels. Clofibrate and cholesterol 5alpha,6alpha

  7. Dynamic Protein Acetylation in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gaoyuan; Walley, Justin W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen infection triggers complex molecular perturbations within host cells that results in either resistance or susceptibility. Protein acetylation is an emerging biochemical modification that appears to play central roles during host–pathogen interactions. To date, research in this area has focused on two main themes linking protein acetylation to plant immune signaling. Firstly, it has been established that proper gene expression during defense responses requires modulation of histone acetylation within target gene promoter regions. Second, some pathogens can deliver effector molecules that encode acetyltransferases directly within the host cell to modify acetylation of specific host proteins. Collectively these findings suggest that the acetylation level for a range of host proteins may be modulated to alter the outcome of pathogen infection. This review will focus on summarizing our current understanding of the roles of protein acetylation in plant defense and highlight the utility of proteomics approaches to uncover the complete repertoire of acetylation changes triggered by pathogen infection. PMID:27066055

  8. The neurobiology of acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    A large body of evidence points to the positive effects of dietary supplementation of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Its use has shown health benefits in neuroinflammation, which is a common denominator in a host of neurodegenerative diseases. ALC is the principal acetyl ester of L-Carnitine (LC), and it plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism, acting as a donor of acetyl groups and facilitating the transfer of fatty acids from cytosol to mitochondria during beta-oxidation. Dietary supplementation of ALC exerts neuroprotective, neurotrophic, antidepressive and analgesic effects in painful neuropathies. ALC also has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activity. Moreover, ALC exhibits positive effects on mitochondrial metabolism, and shows promise in the treatment of aging and neurodegenerative pathologies by slowing the progression of mental deterioration. In addition, ALC plays neuromodulatory effects on both synaptic morphology and synaptic transmission. These effects are likely due to affects of ALC through modulation of gene expression on several targets in the central nervous system. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on effects of ALC in the nervous system. PMID:27100509

  9. Fragrance material review on acetyl cedrene.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Politano, V T; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of acetyl cedrene when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Acetyl cedrene is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. The generic formula for this group can be represented as (R1)(R2)CO. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for acetyl cedrene were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, elicitation, phototoxicity, photoallergy, toxicokinetics, repeated dose, reproductive toxicity, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2013) (Belsito, D., Bickers, D., Bruze, M., Calow, P., Dagli, M., Fryer, A.D., Greim, H., Miyachi, Y., Saurat, J.H., Sipes, I.G., 2013. A Toxicologic and Dermatologic Assessment of Alkyl Cyclic Ketones When Used as Fragrance Ingredients. Submitted with this manuscript.) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances. PMID:23907023

  10. Enhancement of lysine acetylation accelerates wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Spallotta, Francesco; Cencioni, Chiara; Straino, Stefania; Sbardella, Gianluca; Castellano, Sabrina; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio; Gaetano, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    In physiopathological conditions, such as diabetes, wound healing is significantly compromised and chronic complications, including ulcers, may occur. In a mouse model of skin repair, we recently reported that wound treatment with Sirtuin activators and class I HDAC inhibitors induced keratinocyte proliferation and enhanced healing via a nitric oxide (NO) dependent mechanism. We observed an increase in total protein acetylation in the wound area, as determined by acetylation of α-tubulin and histone H3 Lysine 9. We reasoned that this process activated cell function as well as regulated gene expression to foster tissue repair. We report here that the direct activation of P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) by the histone acetylase activator pentadecylidenemalonate 1b (SPV-106) induced Lysine acetylation in the wound area. This intervention was sufficient to enhance repair process by a NO-independent mechanism. Hence, an impairment of PCAF and/or other GCN5 family acetylases may delay skin repair in physiopathological conditions. PMID:24265859

  11. Tissue-specific inhibition and recovery of esterase activities in Lumbricus terrestris experimentally exposed to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Vejares, Sandra González; Sabat, Pablo; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C

    2010-04-01

    Exposure and effect assessment of organophosphate (OP) pesticides generally involves the use of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition. In earthworm, this enzyme activity is often measured in homogenates from the whole organism. Here we examine the tissue-specific response of ChE and carboxylesterase (CE) activities in Lumbricus terrestris experimentally exposed to chlorpyrifos-spiked field soils. Esterases were measured in different gut segments and in the seminal vesicles of earthworms following acute exposure (2 d) to the OP and during 35d of a recovery period. We found that inhibition of both esterase activities was dependent on the tissue. Cholinesterase activity decreased in the pharynx, crop, foregut and seminal vesicles in a concentration-dependent way, whereas CE activity (4-nitrophenyl valerate) was strongly inhibited in these tissues. Gizzard CE activity was not inhibited by the OP, even an increase of enzyme activity was evident during the recovery period. These results suggest that both esterases should be determined jointly in selected tissues of earthworms. Moreover, the high levels of gut CE activity and its inhibition and recovery dynamic following OP exposure suggest that this esterase could play an important role as an enzymatic barrier against OP uptake from the ingested contaminated soil. PMID:20045489

  12. Phylogenetic classification of Aureobasidium pullulans strains for production of feruloyl esterase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to phylogenetically classify diverse strains of A. pullulans and determine their production of feruloyl esterase. Seventeen strains from the A. pullulans literature were phylogenetically classified. Phenotypic traits of color variation and endo-ß-1,4-xylanase overproduction were as...

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the pneumococcal teichoic acid phosphorylcholine esterase Pce

    SciTech Connect

    Lagartera, Laura; González, Ana; Stelter, Meike; García, Pedro; Kahn, Richard; Menéndez, Margarita; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2005-02-01

    The modular choline-binding protein Pce, the phosphorylcholine esterase from S. pneumoniae, has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A SAD data set from a derivative with a gadolinium complex has been collected to 2.7 Å resolution.

  14. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce feruloyl esterase for the release of ferulic acid from switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Aspergillus niger ferulic acid esterase gene (faeA) was cloned into Saccharomyces cerevisiae via a yeast expression vector, resulting in efficient expression and secretion of the enzyme in the medium. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange and hydrophobic interactio...

  15. Cholesterol esterase inhibitory activity of bioactives from leaves of Mangifera indica L

    PubMed Central

    Gururaja, G. M.; Mundkinajeddu, Deepak; Dethe, Shekhar M.; Sangli, Gopala K.; Abhilash, K.; Agarwal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the earlier studies, methanolic extract of Mangifera indica L leaf was exhibited hypocholesterol activity. However, the bioactive compounds responsible for the same are not reported so far. Objective: To isolate the bioactive compounds with hypocholesterol activity from the leaf extract using cholesterol esterase inhibition assay which can be used for the standardization of extract. Materials and Methods: The leaf methanolic extract of M. indica (Sindoora variety) was partitioned with ethyl acetate and chromatographed on silica gel to yield twelve fractions and the activity was monitored by using cholesterol esterase inhibition assay. Active fractions were re-chromatographed to yield individual compounds. Results and Discussion: A major compound mangiferin present in the extract was screened along with other varieties of mango leaves for cholesterol esterase inhibition assay. However, the result indicates that compounds other than mangiferin may be active in the extract. Invitro pancreatic cholesterol esterase inhibition assay was used for bioactivity guided fractionation (BAGF) to yield bioactive compound for standardization of extract. Bioactivity guided fractionation afford the active fraction containing 3b-taraxerol with an IC50 value of 0.86μg/ml. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that M. indica methanol extract of leaf have significant hypocholesterol activity which is standardized with 3b-taraxerol, a standardized extract for hypocholesterol activity resulted in development of dietary supplement from leaves of Mangifera indica. PMID:26692750

  16. Usefulness of Leukocyte Esterase Test Versus Rapid Strep Test for Diagnosis of Acute Strep Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A study to compare the usage of throat swab testing for leukocyte esterase on a test strip(urine dip stick-multi stick) to rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of Group A Beta hemolytic streptococci in cases of acute pharyngitis in children. Hypothesis: The testing of throat swab for leukocyte esterase on test strip currently used for urine testing may be used to detect throat infection and might be as useful as rapid strep. Methods: All patients who come with a complaint of sore throat and fever were examined clinically for erythema of pharynx, tonsils and also for any exudates. Informed consent was obtained from the parents and assent from the subjects. 3 swabs were taken from pharyngo-tonsillar region, testing for culture, rapid strep & Leukocyte Esterase. Results: Total number is 100. Cultures 9(+); for rapid strep== 84(-) and16 (+); For LE== 80(-) and 20(+) Statistics: From data configuration Rapid Strep versus LE test don’t seem to be a random (independent) assignment but extremely aligned. The Statistical results show rapid and LE show very agreeable results. Calculated Value of Chi Squared Exceeds Tabulated under 1 Degree Of Freedom (P<.0.0001) reject Null Hypothesis and Conclude Alternative Conclusions: Leukocyte esterase on throat swab is as useful as rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of strep pharyngitis on test strip currently used for urine dip stick causing acute pharyngitis in children. PMID:27335975

  17. Evolution and homologous recombination of the hemagglutinin-esterase gene sequences from porcine torovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the present study was to gain new insights into the evolution, homologous recombination and selection pressures imposed on the porcine torovirus (PToV), by examining changes in the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene. The most recent common ancestor of PToV was estimated to have emerge...

  18. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors using human liver samples in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON1) are consider...

  19. Cloning and sequence analysis of the ces10 gene encoding a Sphingomonas paucimobilis esterase.

    PubMed

    Videira, P A; Fialho, A M; Marques, A R; Coutinho, P M; Sá-Correia, I

    2003-06-01

    The ces10 gene of the gellan gum-producing strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461 was cloned and sequenced. Multi-sequence alignment of the deduced protein indicated that Ces10 belongs to the serine hydrolase family with a potential catalytic triad comprising Ser(153) (within the G-X-S-X-G consensus sequence), His(75) and Asp(125). The mixed block results obtained following pattern search and the low identities detected in a BLAST analysis indicate that Ces10 is significantly different from other characterised bacterial esterases/lipases. Nevertheless, the Ces10 amino acid sequence showed 45% similarity with Rhodococcus sp. heroin esterase and 48% with Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase. Ces10, with a predicted molecular mass of 30,641 Da, was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity in a histidine-tagged form. Enzyme assays using p-nitrophenyl-esters (p-NP-esters) with different acyl chain-lengths as the substrate confirmed the anticipated esterase activity. Ces10 exhibited a marked preference for short-chain fatty acids, yielding the highest activity with p-NP-propionate (optimal pH 7.4, optimal temperature 37 degrees C). PMID:12764567

  20. Gene cloning and characterization of a novel esterase from activated sludge metagenome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A metagenomic library was prepared using pCC2FOS vector containing about 3.0 Gbp of community DNA from the microbial assemblage of activated sludge. Screening of a part of the un-amplified library resulted in the finding of 1 unique lipolytic clone capable of hydrolyzing tributyrin, in which an esterase gene was identified. This esterase/lipase gene consists of 834 bp and encodes a polypeptide (designated EstAS) of 277 amino acid residuals with a molecular mass of 31 kDa. Sequence analysis indicated that it showed 33% and 31% amino acid identity to esterase/lipase from Gemmata obscuriglobus UQM 2246 (ZP_02733109) and Yarrowia lipolytica CLIB122 (XP_504639), respectively; and several conserved regions were identified, including the putative active site, HSMGG, a catalytic triad (Ser92, His125 and Asp216) and a LHYFRG conserved motif. The EstAS was overexpressed, purified and shown to hydrolyse p-nitrophenyl (NP) esters of fatty acids with short chain lengths (≤ C8). This EstAS had optimal temperature and pH at 35°C and 9.0, respectively, by hydrolysis of p-NP hexanoate. It also exhibited the same level of stability over wide temperature and pH ranges and in the presence of metal ions or detergents. The high level of stability of esterase EstAS with its unique substrate specificities make itself highly useful for biotechnological applications. PMID:20028524

  1. The cell wall pectic polymer rhamnogalacturonan-II is required for proper pollen tube elongation: implications of a putative sialyltransferase-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Marie; Lehner, Arnaud; Bouton, Sophie; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie Christine; Voxeur, Aline; Pelloux, Jérôme; Lerouge, Patrice; Mollet, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is one of the pectin motifs found in the cell wall of all land plants. It contains sugars such as 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-lyxo-heptulosaric acid (Dha) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo), and within the wall RG-II is mostly found as a dimer via a borate diester cross-link. To date, little is known regarding the biosynthesis of this motif. Here, after a brief review of our current knowledge on RG-II structure, biosynthesis and function in plants, this study explores the implications of the presence of a Golgi-localized sialyltransferase-like 2 (SIA2) protein that is possibly involved in the transfer of Dha or Kdo in the RG-II of Arabidopsis thaliana pollen tubes, a fast-growing cell type used as a model for the study of cell elongation. Methods Two heterozygous mutant lines of arabidopsis (sia2-1+/– and qrt1 × sia2-2+/–) were investigated. sia2-2+/– was in a quartet1 background and the inserted T-DNA contained the reporter gene β-glucuronidase (GUS) under the pollen-specific promoter LAT52. Pollen germination and pollen tube phenotype and growth were analysed both in vitro and in vivo by microscopy. Key Results Self-pollination of heterozygous lines produced no homozygous plants in the progeny, which may suggest that the mutation could be lethal. Heterozygous mutants displayed a much lower germination rate overall and exhibited a substantial delay in germination (20 h of delay to reach 30 % of pollen grain germination compared with the wild type). In both lines, mutant pollen grains that were able to produce a tube had tubes that were either bursting, abnormal (swollen or dichotomous branching tip) or much shorter compared with wild-type pollen tubes. In vivo, mutant pollen tubes were restricted to the style, whereas the wild-type pollen tubes were detected at the base of the ovary. Conclusions This study highlights that the mutation in arabidopsis SIA2 encoding a sialyltransferase-like protein that

  2. Consumption of dairy yogurt with the polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan from the peel of the Korean citrus hallabong enhances immune function and attenuates the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Minkyung; Kwak, Jung Hyun; Chang, Dong Hoon; Yu, Won Kyu; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of consuming dairy yogurt supplemented with rhamnogalacturonan (RG), a polysaccharide from the peel of the Korean citrus hallabong, on natural killer (NK) cell activity and circulating cytokine levels. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 120 nondiabetic and nonobese subjects. Over an eight-week period, the test group consumed one pack (150 mL) of dairy yogurt containing 50 mg of probiotics and 100 mg of hallabong peel polysaccharide (60% RG) each day, whereas the placebo group consumed the same product without the hallabong peel supplement. NK cell activity (%) was measured based on the ratios of the effector cells (E; peripheral blood mononuclear cells, PBMCs) from each participant relative to the target cells (T; K562 cells) at E : T ratios of 10 : 1, 5 : 1, 2.5 : 1, or 1.25 : 1. NK cell activities under all assay conditions and interleukin (IL)-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly increased in the test group at eight weeks compared to the baseline values, whereas the placebo group showed a significant increase only in NK cell activity at E : T = 1.25 : 1. The test group had significantly greater increases in the changes in serum NK cell activity at the E : T ratios of 10 : 1, 5 : 1, and 2.5 : 1 and in the increases in IL-12 and IFN-γ levels than were observed in the placebo group, after adjusting for baseline values. After eight weeks of treatment, significant reductions were found in IL-6 and IL-1β levels in both the placebo and test groups. The daily consumption of dairy yogurt supplemented with RG, a polysaccharide from the peel of the Korean citrus hallabong, enhanced NK cell function and attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02535663). PMID:27225729

  3. Total esterase activity in human saliva: Validation of an automated assay, characterization and behaviour after physical stress.

    PubMed

    Tecles, Fernando; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; De Torre, Carlos; Carrillo, José M; Rubio, Mónica; García, Montserrat; Cugat, Ramón; Cerón, José J

    2016-07-01

    Although saliva has esterase activity, this activity has not been characterized or studied in individuals subjected to physical stress. The aim of this report was to develop and validate an automated spectrophotometric assay for total esterase activity measurement in human saliva, as well as to study the contribution of different enzymes on this activity and its behaviour under physical stress in healthy subjects. The assay used 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate and was precise, accurate and provided low limits of detection and quantification. Inhibition with diisopropylfluorophosphate showed that cholinesterase, carboxylesterase and cholesterol esterase contributions not represented more than 20% of total esterase. Addition of standards of lipase and albumin to saliva samples showed that both proteins significantly contributed to esterase activity only when equal or higher than 11.6 IU/L and 250 μg/mL, respectively. Western blot analyses showed absence of paraoxonase-1 and high amount of carbonic anhydrase-VI. The high affinity of purified carbonic anhydrase-VI for the substrate supported a major contribution of this enzyme. Total esterase activity and alpha-amylase was measured in saliva samples from 12 healthy male students before and after participation in an indoor football match. The activity significantly increased after match and positively correlated with salivary alpha-amylase. This method could be used as a biomarker of physical stress in humans, with carbonic anhydrase-VI being the esterase that contributed more to the activity of the assay. PMID:27045801

  4. Isolation and characterization of p-coumaroyl esterase from the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix strain MC-2.

    PubMed Central

    Borneman, W S; Ljungdahl, L G; Hartley, R D; Akin, D E

    1991-01-01

    An extracellular p-coumaroyl esterase produced by the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix strain MC-2 released p-coumaroyl groups from 0-[5-0-((E)-p-coumaroyl)-alpha-L-arabinofuranosyl]-(1----3)-0-beta -D-xylopyranosyl-(1----4)-D-xylopyranose (PAXX). The esterase was purified 121-fold from culture medium in successive steps involving ultrafiltration column chromatography on S-sepharose and hydroxylapatite, isoelectric focusing, and gel filtration. The native enzyme had an apparent mass of 11 kDa under nondenaturing conditions and a mass of 5.8 kDa under denaturing conditions, suggesting that the enzyme may exist as a dimer. The isoelectric point was 4.7, and the pH optimum was 7.2. The purified esterase had 100 times more activity towards PAXX than towards the analogous feruloyl ester (FAXX). The apparent Km and Vmax of the purified p-coumaroyl esterase for PAXX at pH 7.2 and 40 degrees C were 19.4 microM and 5.1 microM min(-1), respectively. p-Coumaroyl tetrasaccharides isolated from plant cell walls were hydrolyzed at rates similar to that for PAXX, whereas a dimer of PAXX was hydrolyzed at a rate 20-fold lower, yielding 4,4'-dihydroxy-alpha-truxillic acid as an end product. Ethyl and methyl p-coumarates were hydrolyzed at very slow rates, if at all. The purified esterase released p-coumaroyl groups from finely, but not coarsely, ground plant cell walls, and this activity was enhanced by the addition of xylanase and other cell wall-degrading enzymes. Images PMID:1768103

  5. Gel-electrophoretic identification of hen brain neurotoxic esterase, labelled with tritiated di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D G; Johnson, M K

    1981-01-01

    The particulate fraction from hen brain was labelled with [3H]di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DiPF) and separated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Four radioactive protein bands (1--4) of molecular weights 155000, 92000, 60000, and 30000 were resolved. Most of the labelling of bands 2, 3 and 4 was inhibited by preincubation with Paraoxon. The residue in band 4 was sensitive to pH 5.2. Successive treatments with Paraoxon and pH 5.2 resulted in the abolition of bands 3 and 4. Bands 1 and 2 contained one and two polypeptides respectively, whose labelling was sensitive to Mipafox, but one, in band 2, was sensitive to higher concentrations of Paraoxon. The concentrations of the other two polypeptides were 6.7 and 1.95 pmol of DiPF bound/g of brain in bands 1 and 2 respectively. Both were as sensitive to Mipafox as neurotoxic esterase and were also sensitive to phenyl benzylcarbamate. 4-Nitrophenyl di-n-pentylphosphinate given in vivo inhibited neurotoxic esterase and the labelling of the band-1 polypeptide by 82% and 84% respectively, but inhibited the labelling of the band 2 polypeptide by 51%. The phosphinate in vitro produced 98% inhibition of the labelling of the band-1 polypeptide, with only 26% inhibition of the band-2 polypeptide, under conditions sufficient to inhibit neurotoxic esterase totally. Both neurotoxic esterase and the band-1 polypeptide were found in the forebrain at 1.74-fold their concentration in the rest of the brain, whereas the band-2 polypeptide was uniformly distributed. The evidence indicates that the Mipafox-sensitive polypeptide in band 1 is the [3H]DiPF-labelled active-site subunit of neurotoxic esterase. The catalytic-centre activity of the enzyme for phenyl valerate hydrolysis was found to be 2.6 x 10(5) min-1. PMID:7340807

  6. Association of esterases with insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jennifer R; Ottea, James

    2012-06-01

    The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, is a competent vector of human disease and an important target of mosquito abatement programs. However, these management programs have been compromised by development of insecticide resistance. In the current study, susceptibilities to naled and resmethrin, two adulticides used in mosquito abatement, were monitored using a topical and contact bioassay, respectively, in five field- collected populations of C. quinquefasciatus (MARC, HOOD1, HOOD2, MINLOVE, and THIB). Frequencies of resistance, measured as survival after treatment with discriminating concentrations (i.e., sufficient to kill > 90% of a reference susceptible strain) were high (88.0-96.8%) in all field collections treated with naled, but were variable (3.3-94.2%) with resmethrin. In addition, esterase activities in mosquitoes from these collections were quantified using alpha-naphthyl acetate and ranged from 1.08 to 3.39 micromol alpha-naphthol produced min(-1) mg prot(-1). Heightened activities were associated with decreased insecticide susceptibility in HOOD1, THIB, and MINLOVE but not HOOD2. Esterases were visualized using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and intra- and interstrain differences in banding patterns were detected. In addition, esterases from MINLOVE mosquitoes were more numerous and intensely staining when compared with those from a laboratory-susceptible strain. Finally, naled synergized the toxicity of resmethrin in populations with decreased insecticide susceptibility and increased esterase activity by 2.5-(MINLOVE) to three-fold (THIB). Results from this study will allow management strategies for populations of C. quinquefasciatus to be optimized, and provide a foundation for further studies exploring use of esterase inhibitors as synergists of pyrethroid toxicity. PMID:22812138

  7. Acetylation and characterization of spruce (Picea abies) galactoglucomannans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunlin; Leppänen, Ann-Sofie; Eklund, Patrik; Holmlund, Peter; Sjöholm, Rainer; Sundberg, Kenneth; Willför, Stefan

    2010-04-19

    Acetylated galactoglucomannans (GGMs) are the main hemicellulose type in most softwood species and can be utilized as, for example, bioactive polymers, hydrocolloids, papermaking chemicals, or coating polymers. Acetylation of spruce GGM using acetic anhydride with pyridine as catalyst under different conditions was conducted to obtain different degrees of acetylation on a laboratory scale, whereas, as a classic method, it can be potentially transferred to the industrial scale. The effects of the amount of catalyst and acetic anhydride, reaction time, temperature and pretreatment by acetic acid were investigated. A fully acetylated product was obtained by refluxing GGM for two hours. The structures of the acetylated GGMs were determined by SEC-MALLS/RI, (1)H and (13)C NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. NMR studies also indicated migration of acetyl groups from O-2 or O-3 to O-6 after a heating treatment in a water bath. The thermal stability of the products was investigated by DSC-TGA. PMID:20144827

  8. Determination of amphetamine by HPLC after acetylation.

    PubMed

    Veress, T

    2000-01-01

    An analytical procedure has been developed for the HPLC determination of amphetamine by off-line pre-column derivatization. The proposed procedure consists of sample preparation by acetylation of amphetamine with acetic anhydride and a subsequent reversed-phase HPLC separation on an octadecyl silica stationary phase with salt-free mobile phase (tetrahydrofuran, acetonitrile, 0.1% triethylamine in water, 15:15:70 v/v) applying UV-detection. The applicability of the elaborated procedure is demonstrated with results obtained by analysis of real samples seized in the Hungarian black market. PMID:10641931

  9. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  10. Comparative study of human intestinal and hepatic esterases as related to enzymatic properties and hydrolizing activity for ester-type drugs.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Morikawa, M; Tsuboi, M; Ito, Y; Sugiura, M

    1980-08-01

    In attempts to determine the exact role of intestinal esterase in the body, we purified esterases from human intestinal mucosa and liver, and compared the enzymatic properties and substrate specificities with those of purified esterases. Esterase from human liver was purified 58-fold, by treatment with butanol, DE-52 and DEAE Sephadex A-50 column chromatographies, Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, and isoelectric focusing. The purified preparation showed a single band by polyacylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular weights of intestinal and hepatic esterases were determined to be 53,000-55,000 and 180,000, respectively, by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. The activity of the purified intestinal and hepatic esterases was strongly inhibited by diethyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate and diisopropyl fluorophosphate, and was not inhibited by eserine sulfate and p-chloromercuribenzoate. Moreover, the purified esterases hydrolyzed ester-type drugs such as aspirin, clofibrate, indanyl carbenicillin and procaine. Hepatic esterase had properties similar to those of intestinal esterase with respect to the sensitivity to organophosphate and the substrate specificity. However, the two purified esterases differed in properties such as molecular weight, isoelectric point, thermostability and optimal pH. PMID:7206363