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Sample records for rheumatoid arthritis a role

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? An Inflammatory, Autoimmune Disease Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease that causes ... sometimes feverish. Rheumatoid arthritis is classified as an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system ...

  3. Role of immunity to mycobacterial stress proteins in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, L.; Winrow, V.; Blake, D.

    1990-01-01

    'Stress Proteins in Inflammation' provided a forum for the discussion of topical issues in this rapidly moving field. The mycobacterial 65 kDa stress proteins play a key role in certain animal models of inflammatory arthritis. However, the impression emerging is that the mechanism probably involves more than a simple cross-reaction between mycobacterial SP65 and either the host SP65 or a cartilage antigen, and that evidence for a primary role in human rheumatoid arthritis is lacking. A realistic role for immune responses against stress proteins might be the amplification or perpetuation of inflammation. If so, this is unlikely to be limited to arthritis. PMID:2184873

  4. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Cervical Spine: A Review on the Role of Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gillick, John L.; Wainwright, John; Das, Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease affecting a significant percentage of the population. The cervical spine is often affected in this disease and can present in the form of atlantoaxial instability (AAI), cranial settling (CS), or subaxial subluxation (SAS). Patients may present with symptoms and disability secondary to these entities but may also be neurologically intact. Cervical spine involvement in RA can pose a challenge to the clinician and the appropriate role of surgical intervention is controversial. The aim of this paper is to describe the pathology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis in the cervical spine in order to provide a better understanding of the indications and options for surgery. Both the medical and surgical treatment options for RA have improved, so has the prognosis of the cervical spine disease. With the advent of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), fewer patients are presenting with cervical spine manifestations of RA; however, those that do, now have improved surgical techniques available to them. We hope that, by reading this paper, the clinician is able to better evaluate patients with RA in the cervical spine and determine in which patients surgery is indicated. PMID:26351458

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  7. Role of Leukotriene B4 Receptors in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Steven; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the role that murine models of arthritis are playing in the understanding of human rheumatoid arthritis and how leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is emerging as an important target in this field. Both the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model and the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model have contributed to outline the potential mechanisms involved in inflammatory arthritis. Indeed, the CIA model has contributed to the development of effective anti-TNF and anti-IL-1β based treatments for RA that are currently in the clinic. Many recent studies in mouse models have suggested a critical role for LTB4 and its receptors in the development of inflammatory arthritis. Inhibitors of LTB4 biosynthesis as well as LTB4 receptors are protective in mouse models of RA and mice deficient in the LTB4 biosynthetic enzymes or LTB4 receptors are resistant to disease development suggesting several promising targets for RA in this pathway. PMID:17967719

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rheumatoid arthritis drugs. However, because they are very expensive, insurance approval is generally required. Most of them ... rich in fish oils (omega-3 fatty acids). Smoking cigarettes should be stopped. Excessive alcohol should also ...

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis in a military aviator.

    PubMed

    Moszyk, Danielle J; Sulit, Daryl J

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition whose pathogenesis is determined partially by genetic and environmental factors. Without treatment, 20 to 30% of individuals with this condition will become permanently disabled in a few years. Rheumatoid arthritis and its potential complications can cause significant disability and could seriously affect the performance of an aviator. Traditionally, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and biologics have not been used until disease progression occurs, but they recently have been added earlier in the course of disease for a more aggressive approach to treatment. It has been shown to significantly reduce the number of affected joints, pain, and disability. This newer treatment regimen has helped a military pilot continue his aviation career. We present the case of an experienced designated military pilot who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. He was initially treated early with a DMARD and biologic medication. He has remained in remission and currently only uses etanercept (biologic medication) and a non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drug to control his disease. He has responded favorably to therapy and has few limitations. Due to his positive response to treatment, the aviator was granted military aeromedical waivers for rheumatoid arthritis and chronic medication use. PMID:17225486

  10. MRI appearance of retrocalcaneal bursitis and rheumatoid nodule in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Hakan; Sildiroglu, Huseyin; Pekkafali, Zekai; Kizilkaya, Esref; Cermik, Hakan

    2006-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology characterized by symmetric, erosive synovitis and sometimes multisystem involvement. Rheumatoid nodules have been reported in as many as 20-30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis; however, they are not commonly seen in the feet. We present magnetic resonance (MR) findings of a rarely seen case of rheumatoid bursitis in the retrocalcaneal bursa associated with a subcutaneous rheumatoid nodule inferior to the calcaneus which histologically confirmed the rheumatoid arthritis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case that rheumatoid bursitis in the retrocalcaneal bursa associated with the rheumatoid nodule in the foot was revealed by MR imaging. PMID:16222409

  11. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonism and its role in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Trung; Nakahama, Taisuke; Nguyen, Chi Hung; Tran, Trang Thu; Le, Van Son; Chu, Hoang Ha; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Although rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease, affecting approximately 1% of the population worldwide, its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Tobacco smoke, an environmental risk factor for RA, contains several ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), also known as dioxin receptor. Ahr plays critical roles in the immune system. We previously demonstrated that Ahr in helper T-cells contributes to development of collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Other studies have shown that cigarette smoke condensate and pure Ahr ligands exacerbate RA by altering bone metabolism and inducing proinflammatory responses in fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Consistent with these findings, several Ahr antagonists such as α-naphthoflavone, resveratrol, and GNF351 reverse the effect of Ahr ligands in RA pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of Ahr function in the immune system and the potential clinical benefits of Ahr antagonism in treating RA. PMID:27186143

  12. Is yoga a suitable treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: current opinion.

    PubMed

    Telles, Shirley; Singh, Nilkamal

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed published literature regarding the use of yoga for managing rheumatoid arthritis to determine whether adequate evidence exists to suggest its usefulness as a therapy. A search for previous studies involving yoga and rheumatoid arthritis in PubMed yielded eight reports. These studies reported the benefits of yoga in the physical and mental health of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggesting that yoga is a useful add-on therapy for RA patients. However, all studies showed limitations with respect to sample size, study design, description and duration of yoga intervention, and assessment tools and statistical methods used. Additionally, the studies did not attempt to understand the mechanisms underlying observed benefits. Hence, evidence suggests a definite role of yoga in RA improvement, reducing pain, improving function, and creating a positive mental state. However, detailed analysis and additional studies are necessary to verify these observations. PMID:24198591

  13. The role of exercise in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Metsios, George S; Stavropoulos-Kalinoglou, Antonis; Kitas, George D

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with significant functional impairment and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Along with pharmacological therapy, exercise seems to be a very promising intervention to improve disease-related outcomes, including functional ability and systemic manifestations, such as the increased cardiovascular risk. In this review, we discuss the physiological mechanisms by which exercise improves inflammation, cardiovascular risk and psychological health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and describe in detail how exercise can be incorporated in the management of this disease using real examples from our clinical practice. PMID:26178249

  14. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-10-01

    The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

  15. Towards a stratified targeted approach with biologic treatments in rheumatoid arthritis: role of synovial pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Astorri, Elisa; Nerviani, Alessandra; Bombardieri, Michele; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease affecting diarthrodial joints and extra-articular tissues; in the absence of an effective treatment, it is characterized by persistent symmetrical and erosive synovitis which leads to structural joint damage and lifelong disability. Several autoantibodies have been associated with RA such as rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). B cells have been shown to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of RA by producing autoantibodies and promoting synovial inflammation through antigen presentation, T cells activation and cytokines production [1]. Although biologic agents have notably improved disease outcome and patients' quality of life, currently around 30-40% of subjects do not respond to treatment and the mechanisms leading to resistance are still not known [2]. For this reason, new prognostic biomarkers and predictors of response are needed. We and others have postulated that the development of biomarkers for patients' stratification prior therapeutic intervention may be possible through a better understanding of the different histopathological patterns present both in early and established individual RA patient and the related underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. To date, Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α has been shown to be one of the master elements of inflammation in RA; however, even though therapies aimed at blocking this key cytokine have emerged as a major tool in the treatment of RA, a large proportion of patients (approximately 30-40%) do not achieve a meaningful clinical response assessed by either the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. The same limitation can be applied to the use of rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against CD20, which is uniquely expressed by all B-lymphocytes during the maturation process from late stage pro-B cells to memory cells. The

  16. Pathogenic role of platelets in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Harifi, Ghita; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Well-recognized for their role in vascular homoeostasis, platelets may play a major role in inflammation and immunomodulation. Substantial data are emerging on the pathogenic involvement of platelets in inflammatory arthritis and autoimmune diseases, indicating the existence of crosstalk between the coagulation and inflammation system. Upon activation, platelets release pro-inflammatory platelets microparticles, which interact with leucocytes leading to joint and systemic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. Platelets activation by immune complexes activate dendritic cells promoting the secretion of interferon alpha, which has a key role in the development of systemic lupus erythematous. In this review, we discuss the current data on the role of platelets in the pathophysiology of inflammatory arthritis and various autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. PMID:27052277

  17. Pathogenic role of platelets in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic autoimmune diseases. Perspectives and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Harifi, Ghita; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Well-recognized for their role in vascular homoeostasis, platelets may play a major role in inflammation and immunomodulation. Substantial data are emerging on the pathogenic involvement of platelets in inflammatory arthritis and autoimmune diseases, indicating the existence of crosstalk between the coagulation and inflammation system. Upon activation, platelets release pro-inflammatory platelets microparticles, which interact with leucocytes leading to joint and systemic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. Platelets activation by immune complexes activate dendritic cells promoting the secretion of interferon alpha, which has a key role in the development of systemic lupus erythematous. In this review, we discuss the current data on the role of platelets in the pathophysiology of inflammatory arthritis and various autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. PMID:27052277

  18. Rheumatoid Cachexia Revisited: A Metabolic Co-Morbidity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Masuko, Kayo

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease in which pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, play a crucial role. The chronic inflammation, combined with reduced physical activity, leads to muscle wasting whereas fat mass would be maintained; the resulting abnormal metabolic state is described as rheumatoid cachexia. Since the loss of muscle volume would be compensated by the increased fat mass, body mass index (BMI) is reported not to reflect the nutritional status in RA patients. The implication of rheumatoid cachexia for cardiovascular risk and clinical prognosis is not clearly understood, however, adequate control of disease activity in combination with appropriate physical exercise could be the most important strategy to control rheumatoid cachexia and related metabolic problems. PMID:25988122

  19. Bilateral Cricoarytenoid Arthritis: A Cause of Recurrent Upper Airway Obstruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Pradeep; Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Venkatachalam, VP

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral cricoarytenoid joint arthritis with history of rheumatoid arthritis, presented with stridor to the outpatient department. Endolaryngoscopy revealed adducted vocal cords and a nodule over left arytenoid which later confirmed to be rheumatoid nodule on histopathologic examination. Initially, although patient responded well to medical treatment, recurrence was noticed after 6 months follow-up.

  20. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pommepuy, I; Farny, M; Billey, T; Olivier, P; Lassoued, S

    1998-01-01

    A 75-year old man with rheumatoid arthritis developed bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), which responded to treatment with prednisolone (1 mg/kg/d) and cyclophosphamide (100 mg/d). PMID:9523389

  1. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  2. Role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF) beta in the physiopathology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Gil, Elena; Galindo-Izquierdo, María

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a cytokine with pleiotropic functions in hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Although its role in rheumatoid arthritis is not well defined, TGF-β activation leads to functional immunomodulatory effects according to environmental conditions. The function of TGF-β in the development of arthritis in murine models has been extensively studied with controversial results. Recent findings point to a non-relevant role for TGF-β in a mice model of collagen-induced arthritis. The study of TGF-β on T-cell responses has shown controversial results as an inhibitor or promoter of the inflammatory response. This paper presents a review of the role of TGF-β in animal models of arthritis. PMID:24685296

  3. Ultrasound Detection of Salmonella Septic Arthritis in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient on Anti-TNF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Salmonella septic arthritis detected by ultrasound in a 40-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis while he was on anti–tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody certolizumab. An aspirate of his left elbow joint showed Salmonella enteritidis infection that was sensitive to ceftraixone. This was preceded by a brief episode of loose stools following a visit to the Far East. He was treated with antibiotics and made a good recovery. There have only been a few case reports of Salmonella septic arthritis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient on anti–tumor necrosis factor treatment but none previously in association with certolizumab. PMID:26425605

  4. Towards an understanding of the role of DNA methylation in rheumatoid arthritis: therapeutic and diagnostic implications

    PubMed Central

    Cribbs, Adam; Feldmann, Marc; Oppermann, Udo

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘epigenetics’ loosely describes DNA-templated processes leading to heritable changes in gene activity and expression, which are independent of the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms comprise of post-translational modifications of chromatin, methylation of DNA, nucleosome positioning as well as expression of noncoding RNAs. Major advances in understanding the role of DNA methylation in regulating chromatin functions have been made over the past decade, and point to a role of this epigenetic mechanism in human disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder where altered DNA methylation patterns have been identified in a number of different disease-relevant cell types. However, the contribution of DNA methylation changes to RA disease pathogenesis is at present poorly understood and in need of further investigation. Here we review the current knowledge regarding the role of DNA methylation in rheumatoid arthritis and indicate its potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26425149

  5. Anti-inflammatory functions of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. and its compounds: A perspective on its potential role in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; ZHAO, FUTAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to take a look at the anti-inflammatory functions of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HCT) that have been illustrated in the literature and to explore new fields in which HCT could be used in the future. The use of HCT has been described in broad inflammatory domains, where it has exhibited a variety of activities, including antiviral, antibacterial, antiparasitic and immunostimulant activity, with high efficiency, mild features and definite therapeutic effects. The numerous anti-inflammatory functions of HCT have demonstrated that HCT has wide application prospects. New uses of HCT and the full extent of its utilization await further investigation. The basic pathological change of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is synovial proliferation which leads to joint destruction in the long-term. There are types of drugs that have been used clinically for patients with RA, however, due to their side-effects or high prices their broad usage is limited. A safe and low-cost drug is urgently required to be developed for the clinical usage of patients with RA. Thus, HCT has the potential to be a good candidate in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26170903

  6. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding. PMID:413361

  7. Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158076.html Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise Baricitinib helped patients who failed other ... HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis showed promise in a new six-month trial. ...

  8. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  9. Interleukin-34 in rheumatoid arthritis: potential role in clinical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fangze; Ding, Rui; Li, Ping; Ma, Cuili; Song, Ding; Wang, Xuetong; Ma, Tianjiao; Bi, Liqi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate, whether interleukin (IL)-34 can be used as marker for treatment effectiveness in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Serum samples were collected from 35 healthy participants and 83 patients with RA before as well as 4 weeks and 12 weeks after treatment initiation with the tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) inhibitor Etanercept. Related clinical data and hand radiograms of the patients were evaluated and serum IL-34, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) in addition to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody concentrations were measured by ELISA. Results: Serum concentrations of IL-34, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MMP-3 and anti-CCP antibodies were markedly elevated in RA patients compared with controls (P<0.001), significantly decreased during treatment and correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) and RA disease activity (P<0.05). IL-34 correlated withIL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MMP-3 and anti-CCP antibodies in RA patients at baseline (P<0.01) and also with IL-8, MMP-3, IL-6, and DAS28 changes during therapy. Patients in stage III of hand X-ray RA scores had higher IL-34 serum concentrations than in stage II (P<0.05). IL-34 level decreased significantly (P<0.01) starting from 4 weeks after therapy initiation. Conclusions: IL-34 serum concentrations correlated with inflammatory cytokines before and during therapy and were significantly higher in stage III of hand X-ray score patients than in stage II participants. IL-34 might be used both as a biomarker for RA diagnosis and therapy efficiency. PMID:26221333

  10. [Imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: role of MR imaging and CT].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2013-07-01

    An increasing aggressive therapeutic strategy has attracted growing attention to the potentials of MR imaging in the diagnosis, prognostication, and outcome measure of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the diagnosis of RA, skeletal destructions are the key to the diagnosis and assessment of long-term prognosis in RA. Marginal bone erosion is still recognized as an important finding in the 2010 RA criteria, and erosions typical of RA are deemed to have prima facie evidence of RA. MR imaging can detect erosions better than radiolography. In this regard, erosions detected by CT are considered to be reference standard to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of erosion in MR imaging and other imaging modalities. Further, to assess therapeutic effect of therapeutic agents involving the control of bone remodeling, CT may be used to evaluate bone formation and improvement of osteoporosis. PMID:23961666

  11. A population-based study on the association between rheumatoid arthritis and voice problems.

    PubMed

    Hah, J Hun; An, Soo-Youn; Sim, Songyong; Kim, So Young; Oh, Dong Jun; Park, Bumjung; Kim, Sung-Gyun; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether rheumatoid arthritis increases the frequency of organic laryngeal lesions and the subjective voice complaint rate in those with no organic laryngeal lesion. We performed a cross-sectional study using the data from 19,368 participants (418 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 18,950 controls) of the 2008-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The associations between rheumatoid arthritis and organic laryngeal lesions/subjective voice complaints were analyzed using simple/multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sample adjusting for confounding factors, including age, sex, smoking status, stress level, and body mass index, which could provoke voice problems. Vocal nodules, vocal polyp, and vocal palsy were not associated with rheumatoid arthritis in a multiple regression analysis, and only laryngitis showed a positive association (adjusted odds ratio, 1.59; 95 % confidence interval, 1.01-2.52; P = 0.047). Rheumatoid arthritis was associated with subjective voice discomfort in a simple regression analysis, but not in a multiple regression analysis. Participants with rheumatoid arthritis were older, more often female, and had higher stress levels than those without rheumatoid arthritis. These factors were associated with subjective voice complaints in both simple and multiple regression analyses. Rheumatoid arthritis was not associated with organic laryngeal diseases except laryngitis. Rheumatoid arthritis did not increase the odds ratio for subjective voice complaints. Voice problems in participants with rheumatoid arthritis originated from the characteristics of the rheumatoid arthritis group (higher mean age, female sex, and stress level) rather than rheumatoid arthritis itself. PMID:26758436

  12. [Pyoderma gangrenosum associated with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Beber, André Avelino Costa; Knob, Cristiane Faccin; Shons, Karen Regina Rosso; Neumaier, Walter; da Silva, João Carlos Nunes; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis, which is associated with non-infectious systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. It is more common in adults and may present with four distinct clinical forms, all leading to ulceration of the skin affected. Its diagnosis is clinical and demands exclusion of other causes. Treatment should be performed with local care and systemic therapy. PMID:25627229

  13. [Recent progress of radiology in rheumatoid arthritis: a role of magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideharu; Takeda, Akira

    2002-12-01

    Since MR imaging directly visualizes all articular components with excellent contrast resolution, it allows the joint to be viewed as a whole organ. An increasing aggressive therapeutic strategy has attracted growing attention to the potentials of MR imaging in the diagnosis, prognostication, and outcome measure of RA. The introduction of MR imaging into the diagnostic criteria for early RA contributes to more accurate diagnosis in patients suspected of having RA and thus allow an earlier decision to start proper medication. Quantification of inflammatory synovitis by MR imaging can assess treatment outcome in fewer subjects than with traditional measures. We believe MR imaging can be cost-effectively incorporated in the treatment trial. PMID:12510356

  14. Examination of Hearing in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Population: Role of Extended-High-Frequency Audiometry in the Diagnosis of Subclinical Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Lasso de la Vega, Mar; Villarreal, Ithzel Maria; Lopez-Moya, Julio; Garcia-Berrocal, Jose Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to analyze the high-frequency hearing levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to determine the relationship between hearing loss, disease duration, and immunological parameters. Materials and Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study including fifty-three patients with rheumatoid arthritis was performed. The control group consisted of 71 age- and sex-matched patients from the study population (consecutively recruited in Madrid “Area 9,” from January 2010 to February 2011). Both a pure tone audiometry and an extended-high-frequency audiometry were performed. Results. Extended-high-frequency audiometry diagnosed sensorineural hearing loss in 69.8% of the patients which exceeded the results obtained with pure tone audiometry (43% of the patients). This study found significant correlations in patients with sensorineural hearing loss related to age, sex, and serum anti-cardiolipin (aCL) antibody levels. Conclusion. Sensorineural hearing loss must be considered within the clinical context of rheumatoid arthritis. Our results demonstrated that an extended-high-frequency audiometry is a useful audiological test that must be performed within the diagnostic and follow-up testing of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, providing further insight into a disease-modifying treatment or a hearing loss preventive treatment. PMID:27239375

  15. Management of the early and late presentations of rheumatoid arthritis: a survey of Ontario primary care physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Glazier, R H; Dalby, D M; Badley, E M; Hawker, G A; Bell, M J; Buchbinder, R; Lineker, S C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine primary care physicians' management of rheumatoid arthritis, ascertain the determinants of management and compare management with that recommended by a current practice panel. DESIGN: Mail survey (self-administered questionnaire). SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A stratified computer-generated random sample of 798 members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportions of respondents who chose various items in the management of two hypothetical patients, one with early rheumatoid arthritis and one with late rheumatoid arthritis. Scores for investigations, interventions and referrals for each scenario were generated by summing the recommended items chosen by respondents and then dividing by the total number of items recommended in that category. The scores were examined for their association with physician and practice characteristics and physician attitudes. RESULTS: The response rate was 68.3% (529/775 eligible physicians). Recommended investigations were chosen by more than two thirds of the respondents for both scenarios. Referrals to physiotherapy, occupational therapy and rheumatology, all recommended by the panel, were chosen by 206 (38.9%), 72 (13.6%) and 309 (58.4%) physicians respectively for early rheumatoid arthritis. These proportions were significantly higher for late rheumatoid arthritis (p < 0.01). In multiple regression analysis, for early rheumatoid arthritis, internship or residency training in rheumatology was associated with higher investigation and intervention scores, for late rheumatoid arthritis, older physicians had higher intervention scores and female physicians had higher referral scores. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care physicians' investigation of rheumatoid arthritis was in accord with panel recommendations. However, rates of referral to rheumatologists and other health care professionals were very low, especially for the early presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. More exposure to

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cold treatment. However, you should not use these methods if you have poor circulation. What can I do? Exercise regularly. Lose weight if you are overweight. Eat a healthy diet. Use heat to reduce pain and stiffness (such as a hot shower or a heating ...

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is often combined with methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine (triple therapy). These drugs may have serious side effects, ... treatment with a three-drug combination known as "triple therapy", or with the biologic drugs, can decrease ...

  18. Genetics of Rheumatoid ArthritisA Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T.; Mikecz, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    The “Bermuda triangle” of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11–37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci — Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively — have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

  19. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  20. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, H A; Kvasnicka, J

    1978-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl with seronegative systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis developed acute cardiac tamponade. Pericardiocentesis and systemic corticosteroids resulted in complete recovery of the pericardial involvement. This was followed by complete remission of rheumatoid disease. Images PMID:686861

  1. Lipoprotein (a), lipids, and lipoproteins in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S; Wållberg-Jonsson, S; Dahlén, G

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a), (Lp(a)), an independent atherogenic factor, was significantly increased in 93 patients with classical, seropositive rheumatoid arthritis of median disease activity. In the patients with Lp(a) concentrations above the upper reference value of 480 mg/l there was a significant correlation between Lp(a) and the concentration of orosomucoid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the platelet count. The plasma concentrations of cholesterol and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol in both male and female patients were significantly lower than in controls. Apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein AI in the patients correlated significantly with total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol respectively. PMID:1829348

  2. Atherosclerosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: More Than a Simple Association

    PubMed Central

    Cavagna, Lorenzo; Boffini, Nicola; Cagnotto, Giovanni; Inverardi, Flora; Grosso, Vittorio; Caporali, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades a large amount of evidence linked rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to atherosclerosis. In fact, RA patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular events that is not fully explained by other classic cardiovascular risk factors. RA and atherosclerosis may share several common pathomechanisms and inflammation undoubtedly plays a primary role. The proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6, involved in the pathogenesis of RA, are also independently predictive of subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD). In RA, inflammation alters HDL constituents and the concentration of LDL and HDL, thus facilitating atherosclerosis and CVD events. On the other hand, also the increase of oxidative processes, frequently observed in RA, induces atherosclerosis. Interestingly, some genetic polymorphisms associated with RA occurrence enhance atherosclerosis, however, other polymorphisms associated with RA susceptibility do not increase CVD risk. Several other mechanisms may influence atherosclerotic processes in RA. Moreover, atherosclerosis may be directly mediated also by underlying autoimmune processes, and indirectly by the occurrence of metabolic syndrome and impaired physical activity. Finally, the effects of RA therapies on cardiovascular system in general and on atherosclerosis in particular are really wide and different. However, the starting point of every RA treatment is that disease control, or better remission, is the best way we have for the reduction of CVD occurrence. PMID:23024462

  3. Platelet and red blood cell interactions and their role in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Olumuyiwa-Akeredolu, Oore-Ofe O; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-12-01

    Cytokines, lymphocytes, platelets and several biomolecules have long been implicated in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the influences of antibody production and tagging, and cytokine, chemokine and enzyme production at specific rheumatoid joints were thought to be exclusive to the advancement of disease parameters. Another role player in RA is red blood cells (RBCs) which, of late, have been found to be involved in RA pathobiology, as there is a positive correlation between RBC counts and joint pathology, as well as with inflammatory biomarkers in the disease. There is also an association between RBC distribution width and the incidence of myocardial infarction amongst RA patients, and there is a change in the lipid distribution within RBC membranes. Of late, certain RBC-associated factors with previously obscure roles and cell-derived particles thought to be inconsequential to the other constituents of plasma were found to be active biomolecular players. Several of these have been discovered to be present in or originating from RBCs. Their influences have been shown to involve in membrane dynamics that cause structural and functional changes in both platelets and RBCs. RBC-derived microparticles are emerging entities found to play direct roles in immunomodulation via interactions with other plasma cells. These correlations highlight the direct influences of RBCs on exacerbating RA pathology. This review will attempt to shed more light on how RBCs, in the true inflammatory milieu of RA, are playing an even greater role than previously assumed. PMID:26059943

  4. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis? A Review

    PubMed Central

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Hansen, Inger M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the population. The auditory system may be involved during the course of disease; however the association of RA and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. Objective: The objective of this review is to evaluate published clinical reports related to hearing impairment in patients with RA. Furthermore, we discuss possible pathologies and associated factors as well as new treatment modalities. Method: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases including Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane and ComDisDome to cover all relative reports. The following keywords were used: hearing loss, hearing difficulties, hearing disorders, hearing impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss, autoimmune hearing loss, drug ototoxicity, drug-induced hearing loss, hearing test, audiometry, auditory dysfunction and rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusion: Based on our review it can be postulated that patients with RA are at higher risk of hearing impairment compared to healthy subjects in their course of the disease. The hearing impairment in RA seems to be a multifactorial condition; however the mechanisms of injury, as well as the relative risk factors, are not completely clear. This review can aid to clarify this condition and is a guide for further evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review of hearing impairment in RA. PMID:27053970

  5. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, I. F.; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective episodes were fatal. Pyogenic, especially staphylococcal, infection should be considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with unexplained illness with or without sudden deterioration in joint symptoms. It is important to recognize and treat infection rapidly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3671222

  6. Leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    2000-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are given to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to prevent synovitis, slow destruction of articular cartilage and bone, preserve function and control systemic manifestations of the disease. Recognition that irreversible joint damage often occurs early in RA has led to much prompter use of DMARDs, with sulfasalazine or methotrexate commonly considered the treatment of first choice. Leflunomide (Arava-Aventis) is a new DMARD, licensed for the treatment of adults with active RA. The manufacturer claims that leflunomide has "comparable efficacy to methotrexate and sulphasalazine", with a "faster onset of action", and an "acceptable tolerability profile". Here, we consider the place of leflunomide in the management of patients with RA. PMID:11027115

  7. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  8. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  9. [Rheumatoid arthritis and malignancy].

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with excess mortality. Especially, malignancy is a major cause of mortality. According to previous reports, the overall incidence of malignancies in RA patients has been reported to be comparable or slightly higher than that in general population. The increased incidence of malignant lymphoma and lung cancer has been reported to be consistent in most studies. The use of some csDMARD was also reported as risk factors for malignancy. Recently, MTX associated lymphoproliferative disorder(MTX-LPD) is one of the important complications in RA treatment. We revealed the mean MTX dose was demonstrated to be an independent risk factor regarding MTX-LPD onset in RA patients. This data suggest that the treatment with higher MTX dose promotes LPD onset in Japanese RA patients. PMID:27311195

  10. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  11. Spontaneous talar and calcaneal fracture in rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Antonio; Clemente, Alberto; Vancini, Chiara; Fejzo, Majlinda; Campioni, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leads to a progressive weakening of the skeleton which may result in bone fractures. However, spontaneous fractures (exclusive of stress fractures, vertebral collapse, and superficial articular fragmentation) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been only occasionally reported in the medical literature. A case of spontaneous talar and calcaneal fracture in rheumatoid arthritis is described. Bone lesions were identified on radiographs, MR images and scintigraphy in a patient with right ankle pain. The absence of episodes of acute trauma, and the presence of acute clinical manifestations should guide the clinical suspicion. PMID:22470803

  12. A study of the effects of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy with respect to serological grouping in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, K S; Sarkar, A K; Datta, A K; Rakshit, A

    1998-09-01

    The positive role of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is known. The differential role of serological status of patients in RA is also well known. This paper presents a study of the differential effects of PEMF therapy on the two serological groups of patients. The responses of the seropositive patients are found to be more subdued. Varying effects of the therapy in alleviating the different symptomatologies indicate that the rheumatoid factor (RF) is more resistant to PEMF. PMID:10063282

  13. Effects of rehabilitation for pain relief in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngju; Chang, Moonyoung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to find evidence for the effectiveness of rehabilitation for pain relief in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] A systematic review was conducted of MEDLINE, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and OVID, for studies published from July 2005 to July 2015. We extracted data regarding patients, intervention, comparison, and outcomes, and assessed the methodological quality of the data. [Results] Nine randomized controlled trials comparing the effects of pain relief in patients with rheumatoid arthritis were found. [Conclusion] Physical therapy and occupational therapy can reduce pain in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26957779

  14. Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-6 in Arthritis Animal Models: Roles in the Early Phase of Transition from Acute to Chronic Inflammation and Relevance for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is the major target of the therapeutic approach in rheumatoid arthritis. A key issue in the approach to chronic arthritis is the understanding of the crucial molecules driving the transition from the acute phase to the chronic irreversible phase of the disease. In this review we analyzed five experimental arthritis animal models (antigen-induced arthritis, adjuvant-induced arthritis, streptococcal cell wall arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis and SKG) considered as possible scenarios to facilitate interpretation of the biology of human rheumatoid arthritis. The SKG model is strictly dependent on interleukin (IL)-6. In the other models, IL-1β and IL-6, more than TNF-α, appear to be relevant in driving the transition, which suggests that these should be the targets of an early intervention to stop the course toward the chronic form of the disease. PMID:20683549

  15. [Rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmune hemolysis: B-cell depletion for remission induction in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and cold agglutinin disease].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, P; Hartung, W; Ehrenstein, B; Schölmerich, J; Fleck, M

    2010-08-01

    Autoimmune hemolysis is a rare complication of systemic rheumatic diseases. We report on a 68-year-old female patient with established, long-standing rheumatoid arthritis, who complained of progressive weakness and worsening of her arthralgia under therapy with leflunomide. Physical and laboratory examination revealed autoimmune hemolysis due to cold agglutinin disease. As hemolysis and arthritis were refractory to steroid treatment, B-cell depletion with rituximab was performed leading to a marked reduction of hemolytic parameters as well as remission of her rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:20213090

  16. The Role of Different Subsets of Regulatory T Cells in Immunopathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gol-Ara, Maryam; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Sadria, Reza; Azizi, Gholamreza; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease and a systemic inflammatory disease which is characterized by chronic joint inflammation and variable degrees of bone and cartilage erosion and hyperplasia of synovial tissues. Considering the role of autoreactive T cells (particularly Th1 and Th17 cells) in pathophysiology of RA, it might be assumed that the regulatory T cells (Tregs) will be able to control the initiation and progression of disease. The frequency, function, and properties of various subsets of Tregs including natural Tregs (nTregs), IL-10-producing type 1 Tregs (Tr1 cells), TGF-β-producing Th3 cells, CD8+ Tregs, and NKT regulatory cells have been investigated in various studies associated with RA and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) as experimental model of this disease. In this paper, we intend to submit the comprehensive information about the immunobiology of various subsets of Tregs and their roles and function in immunopathophysiology of RA and its animal model, CIA. PMID:23133752

  17. [Early rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Babić-Naglić, Durdica

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is chronic joint disease which if untreated leads to permanent structural damage and disability. Early diagnosis and therapy are the main requests for good clinical practice. Early diagnosis tools include specific clinical assesment, serological, immunogenetic and radiological evaluation. Disease activity score is cornerstone in clinical assesment, rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) are very specific serological parameters. The shared epitope containing HLA-DRB1* alleles represent the most significant genetic risk for RA. Magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging are very sensitive methods in early phase of disease. PMID:19024271

  18. Medicines to Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 55, but it can happen at any age. Rheumatoid arthritis affects women more than men. Visit your doctor to talk about your health and the medicines you may need. This factsheet will give you information about a type of medicine. You will learn ...

  19. Balneotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis-a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Santos, Isabel; Cantista, Pedro; Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation of synovial joints with pain, often leading to joint destruction and disability, and despite intensive research, the cause of RA remains unknown. Balneotherapy-also called mineral baths or spa therapy-uses different types of mineral water compositions like sulphur, radon, carbon dioxin, etc. The role of balneotherapy is on debate; Sukenik wrote that the sulphur mineral water has special proprieties to rheumatologic diseases, including in the course of active inflammatory phases in RA. The aim of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effects of balneotherapy on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We have made a systematic search of the articles published from 1980 to 2014 on this topic in PubMed, Scopus, CRD, PEDro, Web of Science and Embase databases. We have followed the method set by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA). These that have compared balneotherapy with other therapeutic modalities or with no intervention were considered. The inclusion criteria of these papers were randomized control trial (RCT); languages: English, French, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese; evaluation of efficacy (analysis of outcomes); use of natural mineral water baths; and participants with RA. A total of eight articles documenting RCTs were found and included for full review and critical appraisal involving a total of 496 patients. The studies selected highlighted an important improvement and statistically significant in several clinical parameters, in spite of their heterogeneity between the various studies. One study emphasized an important improvement on functional capacity up to 6 months of follow-up (FU). Some of the studies (std.) reveal an improvement on morning stiffness (5 std.), number of active joints (3 std.), Ritchie index (2 std.) and activities of daily living (2 std.) up to 3 months of FU. Three

  20. Restless legs syndrome as a comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gjevre, John A; Taylor Gjevre, Regina M

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multisystem disease with a complex immunologic pathophysiology. Likewise, sleep disorders can involve a complicated interplay between the neurologic pathways, immune system, and respiratory system. Recent studies have shown an elevated prevalence of sleep abnormalities in connective tissue disorders compared to the general population. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) may be present in up to 30% of RA patients. These findings may be related to cytokine release and other immunomodulatory responses. TNF- α levels relate to sleep physiology and anti-TNF- α therapy may improve sleep patterns. Most of the patients with this disorder can distinguish their RLS sensations from their arthritic symptoms. RLS is a common comorbidity seen with RA, and prompt recognition and treatment can improve patient quality of life. PMID:23840943

  1. A rheumatoid arthritis study by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Carolina S.; Silva, Ana Carla A.; Santos, Tatiano J. P. S.; Martin, Airton A.; dos Santos Fernandes, Ana Célia; Andrade, Luís E.; Raniero, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory disease of unknown causes and a new methods to identify it in early stages are needed. The main purpose of this work is the biochemical differentiation of sera between normal and RA patients, through the establishment of a statistical method that can be appropriately used for serological analysis. The human sera from 39 healthy donors and 39 rheumatics donors were collected and analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The results show significant spectral variations with p<0.05 in regions corresponding to protein, lipids and immunoglobulins. The technique of latex particles, coated with human IgG and monoclonal anti-CRP by indirect agglutination known as FR and CRP, was performed to confirm possible false-negative results within the groups, facilitating the statistical interpretation and validation of the technique.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  3. Simultaneous thrombosis of multiple coronary arteries in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kalayci, Arzu; Arslan, Erol; Bakar, Salih Murat; Guneri, Mahmut; Dizman, Rafet; Kivanc, Eylem; Karabay, Can Yucel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of simultaneous coronary thrombosis of the left main, the left anterior descending artery and the right coronary artery in a patient, recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27489603

  4. Simultaneous thrombosis of multiple coronary arteries in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kalayci, Arzu; Arslan, Erol; Bakar, Salih Murat; Guneri, Mahmut; Dizman, Rafet; Kivanc, Eylem; Karabay, Can Yucel

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of simultaneous coronary thrombosis of the left main, the left anterior descending artery and the right coronary artery in a patient, recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27489603

  5. [Legionella pneumonia after infliximab in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Giassi, Karina de Souza; Furlanetto, Vilson; Fialho, Sonia; Gomes Ribeiro, Giovana; Pereira, Ivânio Alves

    2014-01-01

    The antagonists of tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) have been successfully used in several chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), but some studies have observed the development of infections by intracellular pathogens in patients using anti-TNF. We report a case of a female patient with previous diagnosis of RA for 16 years that used several disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) that resulted in treatment failure, and then was treated with infliximab. After fifteen days of the second dose, the patient developed ventilatory-dependent chest pain, dry cough and dyspnea. She was hospitalized, and the diagnosis of pneumonia by Legionella pneumophila was confirmed by the presence of Legionella antigen in an urine test. TNF is an inflammatory cytokine that also acts inhibiting the bacterial growth of intracellular pathogens, and its inhibition seems to increase susceptibility to these infections in some patients. PMID:25627305

  6. Zingiber officinale: A Potential Plant against Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nahain, Abdullah; Jahan, Rownak

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease particularly affecting elderly people which leads to massive bone destruction with consequent inflammation, pain, and debility. Allopathic medicine can provide only symptomatic relief. However, Zingiber officinale is a plant belonging to the Zingiberaceae family, which has traditionally been used for treatment of RA in alternative medicines of many countries. Many of the phytochemical constituents of the rhizomes of this plant have therapeutic benefits including amelioration of RA. This review attempts to list those phytochemical constituents with their reported mechanisms of action. It is concluded that these phytochemicals can form the basis of discovery of new drugs, which not only can provide symptomatic relief but also may provide total relief from RA by stopping RA-induced bone destruction. As the development of RA is a complex process, further research should be continued towards elucidating the molecular details leading to RA and drugs that can stop or reverse these processes by phytoconstituents of ginger. PMID:24982806

  7. Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research 2013 April 2013 (historical) Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death Taking methotrexate—a commonly ... reduce the risk of death among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to recently-published research in the ...

  8. [Genetics and genomics in rheumatoid arthritis (RA): An update].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Elías, Ana Karen; Maldonado-Murillo, Karina; López-Mendoza, Luis Fernando; Ramírez-Bello, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects approximately 0.5-1% of the general population and leads to chronic synovial inflammation, destruction of cartilage and bone, and disability. The heritability of rheumatoid arthritis has been estimated to be about 60%, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37%. Other genes, such as PTPN22, STAT4, CTLA4, TRAF1, PADI4, IRF5, FCRL3, TNFIP3, TNF-α, miRNAs, CD28, CD40, TYK2, etc., have been associated with susceptibility, severity, activity, and treatment response of rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this review is to describe the role of gene variants located in immune system genes associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27160622

  9. PTPome profile of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes: a novel role for SHP-2 as a modulator of invasion and survival

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Stephanie M.; Maestre, Michael F.; Campbell, Amanda M.; Bartok, Beatrix; Kiosses, William B.; Boyle, David L.; Arnett, Heather A.; Mustelin, Tomas; Firestein, Gary S.; Bottini, Nunzio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in the synovial intimal lining of the joint are key mediators of inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In RA, these cells aggressively invade the extracellular matrix, producing cartilage-degrading proteases and inflammatory cytokines. The behavior of FLS is controlled by multiple interconnected signal transduction pathways involving reversible phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues. However, little is known about the role of the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in FLS function. The objective of this study was to explore the expression of all the PTP genes (PTPome) in FLS. METHODS A comparative screening was conducted of the expression of the PTPome in FLS from patients with RA or osteoarthritis (OA). The functional effect of a PTP up-regulated in RA, SHP-2, was then analyzed by knock-down using cell-permeable antisense oligonucleotides in RA FLS. RESULTS PTPN11 was over-expressed in RA compared to OA FLS. Knock-down of PTPN11, which encodes SHP-2, using a cell-permeable antisense oligonucleotide, decreased the invasion, migration, adhesion, spreading and survival of RA FLS. Additionally, signaling in response to growth factors and inflammatory cytokines was impaired by the knock-down of SHP-2. RA FLS deficient in SHP-2 displayed decreased activation of focal adhesion kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases. CONCLUSION These findings indicate a novel role for SHP-2 in mediating human FLS function, and suggest that SHP-2 promotes the invasiveness and survival of RA FLS. Further investigation may reveal SHP-2 to be a candidate therapeutic target for RA. PMID:23335101

  10. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Tanja; Beyer, Nina; Aadahl, Mette; Hetland, Merete L.; Løppenthin, Katrine; Midtgaard, Julie; Esbensen, Bente A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB) in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA describe their daily SB. Methods Fifteen patients with RA (10 women and 5 men) from 23 to 73 years of age and with a disease duration ranging from 4 to 27 years were interviewed following a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analysed using the content analysis method described by Graneheim. Results SB appeared in three categories covering: 1) A constant battle between good and bad days; SB could be a consequence of RA in terms of days with pronounced pain and fatigue resulting in many hours of SB. 2) Adaptation to everyday life; living with the unpredictability of RA included constant modification of physical activity level causing increase in SB, especially during periods of disease flare. Prioritizing and planning of SB also functioned as part of self-management strategies. 3) It has nothing to do with my arthritis; for some patients, SB was not related to RA, but simply reflected a way of living independent of the disease. Conclusions SB is perceived, motivated, and performed differently in patients with RA. An individually tailored approach may be essential in understanding and encouraging patients’ motivation towards sustainable change in SB and activity patterns. PMID:26462971

  11. Rapidly progressive aortic valve incompetence in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, J P; Douglas-Jones, A G; Pritchard, M H

    1991-10-01

    A 27-year-old female with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis of onset at age 18 years developed progressive aortic valve incompetence requiring urgent aortic valve replacement. Rheumatoid aortic valve disease may be more rapidly progressive than aortic valve disease from other causes and awareness of this by the monitoring physicians may help to avoid the possible complications. PMID:1913010

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Amandeep; Naik, Shobha; Pai, Anuradha; Anuradha, Ardra

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT) in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease. PMID:25684928

  13. TRAF1-C5 as a Risk Locus for Rheumatoid ArthritisA Genomewide Study

    PubMed Central

    Plenge, Robert M.; Seielstad, Mark; Padyukov, Leonid; Lee, Annette T.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Ding, Bo; Liew, Anthony; Khalili, Houman; Chandrasekaran, Alamelu; Davies, Leela R.L.; Li, Wentian; Tan, Adrian K.S.; Bonnard, Carine; Ong, Rick T.H.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Pettersson, Sven; Liu, Chunyu; Tian, Chao; Chen, Wei V.; Carulli, John P.; Beckman, Evan M.; Altshuler, David; Alfredsson, Lars; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Amos, Christopher I.; Seldin, Michael F.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Rheumatoid arthritis has a complex mode of inheritance. Although HLA-DRB1 and PTPN22 are well-established susceptibility loci, other genes that confer a modest level of risk have been identified recently. We carried out a genomewide association analysis to identify additional genetic loci associated with an increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS We genotyped 317,503 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a combined case-control study of 1522 case subjects with rheumatoid arthritis and 1850 matched control subjects. The patients were seropositive for autoantibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP). We obtained samples from two data sets, the North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium (NARAC) and the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA). Results from NARAC and EIRA for 297,086 SNPs that passed quality-control filters were combined with the use of Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel stratified analysis. SNPs showing a significant association with disease (P<1×10-8) were genotyped in an independent set of case subjects with anti-CCP-positive rheumatoid arthritis (485 from NARAC and 512 from EIRA) and in control subjects (1282 from NARAC and 495 from EIRA). RESULTS We observed associations between disease and variants in the major-histocompatibility-complex locus, in PTPN22, and in a SNP (rs3761847) on chromosome 9 for all samples tested, the latter with an odds ratio of 1.32 (95% confidence interval, 1.23 to 1.42; P = 4×10-14). The SNP is in linkage disequilibrium with two genes relevant to chronic inflammation: TRAF1 (encoding tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 1) and C5 (encoding complement component 5). CONCLUSIONS A common genetic variant at the TRAF1-C5 locus on chromosome 9 is associated with an increased risk of anti-CCP-positive rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17804836

  14. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  15. Acral vesicles and bullae in a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Soza, Gabriela M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 56-year-old black woman with rheumatoid arthritis who developed worsening fatigue, fever, weight loss, and a vesiculobullous skin eruption while being treated with certolizumab pegol for her arthritis. Microscopic findings confirmed the diagnosis of a neutrophilic dermatosis. PMID:26424941

  16. Brief Report: Chikungunya viral arthritis in the United States: A mimic of seronegative rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Julie M.; Taffner, Samantha; Malkova, Olga N.; Oh, Stephen T.; Kim, Alfred H.J.; Diamond, Michael S.; Lenschow, Deborah J.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that spread to the Caribbean in 2013 and the United States in 2014. CHIKV-infected patients develop inflammatory arthritis that can persist for months to years, but little is known about the rheumatologic and immunologic features of CHIKV arthritis in humans, particularly as compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we describe these features in a group of 10 American travelers who were nearly simultaneously infected while visiting Haiti in June 2014. METHODS Patients were assessed by history, physical examination, and laboratory studies. All patients with CHIKV arthritis had detectable anti-CHIKV IgG. Using cytometry by time of flight (CyTOF), we analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells in CHIKV-infected patients, healthy controls, and patients with untreated, active RA. RESULTS Among ten CHIKV-infected individuals, eight developed persistent symmetric polyarthritis, who otherwise met the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria for (seronegative) RA. CyTOF analysis revealed that RA and CHIKV-infected patients had greater percentages of activated and effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than healthy controls. CONCLUSION In addition to similar clinical features, patients with CHIKV infection and RA develop highly similar peripheral T cell phenotypes. These overlapping clinical and immunologic features highlight a need for rheumatologists to consider CHIKV infection when evaluating patients with new, symmetric polyarthritis. PMID:25605621

  17. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established. PMID:27317820

  18. [Osteoporosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis: role of the vitamin D/parathyroid hormone system].

    PubMed

    Bellan, Mattia; Pirisi, Mario; Sainaghi, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a well-established extra-articular feature of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Systemic inflammation seems to play a crucial role in causing an alteration of multiple homeostatic systems implied in bone health, such as the RANK/RANKL/Osteoprotegerin and Wnt/β catenin pathways; several other causal factors have been called into question, including the chronic use of corticosteroids. Since vitamin D exerts important immune-regulatory roles, it has been claimed that derangement of the vitamin D/parathyroid hormone (PTH) system, a well-known determinant of bone health, may play a pathogenic role in autoimmunity; animal models and clinical data support this hypothesis. Furthermore, RA patients seem to be relatively refractory to vitamin D-induced PTH suppression. Therefore, the link between RA and osteoporosis might in part be due to alterations in the vitamin D/PTH system. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of this system may be crucial to prevent and cure osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. A major clinical correlate of the strict cooperation and interdependence between vitamin D and PTH is that correction of the vitamin D deficiency, at least in autoimmune diseases, should be targeted to PTH suppression. PMID:25582993

  19. Vaccinations for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Lisa M.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer an increased burden of infectious disease-related morbidity and mortality and have twice the risk of acquiring a severe infection compared to the general population. This increased risk is not only a result of the autoimmune disease but is also attributed to the immunosuppressive therapies that are commonly used in this patient population. Given the increase in infection-related risks in RA, there is great interest in mitigating such risk. A number of vaccines are available to the rheumatologist, with a handful that are of importance for RA patients in the United States. The goal of this paper is to highlight the most recent literature on the key vaccines and the specific considerations for the rheumatologist and their RA patients, with a particular focus on influenza, pneumococcal, and herpes zoster vaccines. It is important for rheumatologist to understand and be aware of which vaccines are live and what potential contraindications exist for giving vaccines to RA patients. PMID:24925587

  20. Limited T-cell receptor beta-chain heterogeneity among interleukin 2 receptor-positive synovial T cells suggests a role for superantigen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, M D; Diveley, J P; Lundeen, K A; Esty, A; Winters, S T; Carlo, D J; Brostoff, S W

    1991-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease affecting the synovial membranes of articulating joints that is thought to result from T-cell-mediated autoimmune phenomena. T cells responsible for the pathogenesis of RA are likely present in that fraction of synovial T cells that expresses the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), one marker of T-cell activation. We report herein an analysis of T-cell receptor (TCR) beta-chain gene expression by IL-2R-positive synovial T cells. These T cells were isolated from uncultured synovial tissue specimens by using IL-2R-specific monoclonal antibodies and magnetic beads, and TCR beta-chain transcription was analyzed by PCR-catalyzed amplification using a panel of primers specific for the human TCR beta-chain variable region (V beta). Multiple V beta gene families were found to be transcribed in these patients samples; however, three gene families, V beta 3, V beta 14, and V beta 17, were found in a majority of the five synovial samples analyzed, suggesting that T cells bearing these V beta s had been selectively retained in the synovial microenvironment. In many instances, the V beta 3, V beta 14, or V beta 17 repertoires amplified from an individual patient were dominated by a single rearrangement, indicative of clonal expansion in the synovium and supportive of a role for these T cells in RA. Of note is a high sequence similarity between V beta 3, V beta 14, and V beta 17 polypeptides, particularly in the fourth complementarity-determining region (CDR). Given that binding sites for superantigens have been mapped to the CDR4s of TCR beta chains, the synovial localization of T cells bearing V beta s with significant CDR4 homology indicates that V beta-specific T-cell activation by superantigen may play a role in RA. PMID:1660155

  1. Natural killer cells and their role in rheumatoid arthritis: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Shegarfi, Hamid; Naddafi, Fatemeh; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a long-term disease that leads to inflammation of the joints and surrounding tissues. Natural killer (NK) cells are an important part of the innate immune system and are responsible for the first line of defense against pathogens during the initial immune challenge before the adaptive immune system eventually eliminates the infectious burden. NK cells have the capacity to damage normal cells or through interaction with other cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages, and T cells cause autoimmune diseases, such as RA. NK cells isolated from the joints of patients with RA suggest that they may play a role in this disease. However, the involvement of NK cells in RA pathology is not fully elucidated. Both protective and detrimental roles of NK cells in RA have recently been reported. A better understanding of NK cells' role in RA might help to develop new therapeutic strategies for treatment of the RA or other autoimmune diseases. We have decided in this paper to focus on the NK cell biology, and attempt to bring the interested readership of this Journal up to date on the NK cell, specifically its possible relation to RA. PMID:22547986

  2. Parasympathetic dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis patients with ocular dryness.

    PubMed Central

    Barendregt, P J; van der Heijde, G L; Breedveld, F C; Markusse, H M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether abnormalities in the function of the autonomic nervous system are associated with oral and ocular dryness in rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: Pupillography was done using an infrared light reflection method (IRIS) to measure both parasympathetic function (constriction latency and the latency of maximum constriction velocity (MCV)) and sympathetic function (dilatation latency) in rheumatoid arthritis patients with and without ocular dryness. The Schirmer and Saxon tests were used to measure the tear and saliva production respectively. RESULTS: The Schirmer and Saxon test results in rheumatoid arthritis patients with ocular dryness were reduced (P < 0.05) compared with rheumatoid arthritis patients without ocular dryness and healthy controls. Constriction latency and MCV latency were prolonged in rheumatoid arthritis patients with ocular dryness compared to the other two groups (P < 0.05). A negative correlation was found between the degree of ocular dryness and both constriction latency and MCV latency. No correlation was found between the results of pupillography and saliva production. CONCLUSIONS: Parasympathetic dysfunction may play a role in ocular dryness in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8882130

  3. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Michaud, Kaleb

    2016-05-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and their measures have a long and important history for determining the status and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This article describes the history and evolution of PROs for RA and the current state of the field, with key examples of accepted and widely used measures, and offers some reflection on the roles of PROs for the study and management of RA. PMID:27133486

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klipple, G L; Cecere, F A

    1989-05-01

    The activity of RA is significantly altered by pregnancy with approximately 70 per cent of patients experiencing substantial improvement in symptoms, signs and sometimes extra-articular manifestations. This lessening of disease activity occurs in association with an almost complete cessation of medications. However, whether partial or complete this remission is short-lived with more than 90 per cent of women who improved relapsing by 6 to 8 months postpartum. Further, in approximately 30 per cent of RA patients the course remains unchanged or worsens during gestation and indeed the first symptoms of RA may develop during pregnancy or shortly thereafter. Conversely active rheumatoid arthritis seems to little influence the maternal course or fetal outcome of pregnancy. The multiple and complex immunologic alterations of the pregnant state are designed to ensure survival of the fetal allograft in a foreign host. A number of these alterations particularly involving modulation of cell-mediated immunity, immunoglobulin composition, immune complex generation, or the inflammatory response have the potential to interfere with the pathophysiology of RA. In short, although the specific mechanism remains an enigma, the reason for the amelioration of RA during pregnancy is probably an incidental and fortuitous reaction to one or more of these immunomodulatory factors. PMID:2657889

  5. Critical Role of Glucose Metabolism in Rheumatoid Arthritis Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Carbonell, Ricard; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Lodi, Alessia; Vicente-Suarez, Ildefonso; Saha, Arindam; Cheroutre, Hilde; Boss, Gerry R.; Tiziani, Stefano; Murphy, Anne N.; Guma, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Objective Up-regulation of glucose metabolism has been implicated not only in tumor cell growth but also in immune cells upon activation. However, little is known about the metabolite profile in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), particularly in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). This study was undertaken to evaluate whether changes in glucose metabolism in RA FLS could play a role in inflammation and joint damage. Methods Synovium and FLS were obtained from patients with RA and patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The rate of glycolysis after stimulation of FLS with lipopolysaccharide and platelet-derived growth factor BB was measured using glycolysis stress test technology. FLS function was evaluated using a glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). After stimulation of the FLS, a migration scratch assay, MTT assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed to measure the effect of 2-DG on FLS migration, viability of the FLS, and cytokine secretion, respectively. IRDye 800CW 2-DG was used to assess glucose uptake in the arthritic joints and stromal cells of mice after K/BxN mouse serum transfer. The mice were injected daily, intraperitoneally, with 3-bromopyruvate (BrPa; 5 mg/kg) to assess the effect of inhibition of glycolysis in vivo. Results Compared to human OA FLS, the balance between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was shifted toward glycolysis in RA FLS. Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression correlated with baseline functions of the RA FLS. Glucose deprivation or incubation of the FLS with glycolytic inhibitors impaired cytokine secretion and decreased the rate of proliferation and migration of the cells. In a mouse model of inflammatory arthritis, GLUT1 mRNA expression in the synovial lining cells was observed, and increased levels of glucose uptake and glycolytic gene expression were detected in the stromal compartment of the arthritic mouse joints. Inhibition of glycolysis by BrPa, administered in vivo

  6. Characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis in Algeria: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Slimani, Samy; Abbas, Abdelmalek; Ben Ammar, Amina; Kebaili, Djemaa; Ali, El Hadi; Rahal, Fadia; Khamari, Mohamed Choukri; Baltache, Ayada; Khider, Imene; Chiheub, Riad; Khelif, Khireddine; Akbi, Sabrina; Rahmani, Salima; Dahou-Makhloufi, Chafia; Brahimi-Mazouni, Nadjia; Abtroun-Benmadi, Sabira; Ladjouze-Rezig, Aicha

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in North Africa to that of Western countries. We have enrolled in a cross-sectional study all consecutive patients presenting with the diagnosis of RA according to the 1987 ACR criteria, and during a 5-month period, patients were included in 11 centers across northern Algeria. Demographics, clinical data, and health assessment questionnaires (HAQ) were collected for each patient. We have estimated means, standard deviations, and 95 % confidence intervals for all parameters. Of the 249 patients (213 females and 36 males) enrolled in the study, 10 (4 %) had juvenile onset of the disease. The mean age was 50.1 ± 14.5 years, and the mean duration of RA was 8.4 ± 7.8 years. In terms of comorbidities, 18.9 % of patients reported hypertension and 5.2 % had diabetes. The mean DAS28 at inclusion was 4.3 (95 % CI 4.1-4.5); 14.0 % were in remission (DAS28 ≤ 2.6). The mean HAQ score was 0.81 ± 0.82. Rheumatoid factor was positive in 78.5 % of cases, and anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies, when measured, was positive in 69.0 % of cases. Seronegative patients were older and had a relatively less severe disease. For treatment, 89.7 % of patients were taking disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and only 4 % were taking biologics (rituximab); 90.8 % of patients were taking glucocorticoids, and none of the patients satisfied the recommended calcium intake guidelines. RA in Algeria is more common in women. Compared to reports from Western countries, RA in Algeria appears to be less aggressive, with more dominant seronegative oligoarthritis forms. The remission rate is comparable to that of Western populations. PMID:24633899

  7. Immune modulation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Dimitrios A; Geraldino-Pardilla, Laura; Bathon, Joan M

    2011-12-01

    The approval - several years ago - of the first tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor for the management of rheumatoid arthritis launched a new era in the therapeutics of rheumatology. Since then an almost cataclysmic discovery of new treatment targets and corresponding biologic agents ensued. Nowadays, the rheumatologist and the rheumatologic patient have the luxury of several immune modulators available to successfully treat the majority of patients with RA or other inflammatory arthritides and conditions. In this review we focus on a discussion of the approved immune modulators/biologic agents available for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. We also present an overview of agents under development. For the immune modulators discussed, we describe their mechanism of action and summarise initial data and recent updates on efficacy and safety. PMID:22265267

  8. Chemokines and angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Zoltan; Pakozdi, Angela; Szentpetery, Agnes; Besenyei, Timea; Koch, Alisa E.

    2010-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, chemokines mediate the migration of inflammatory leukocytes into the synovium. Among the four known chemokine families, CXC, CC chemokines and fractalkine seem to be of outstanding importance in this process. Angiogenesis, the formation of new vessels, is also important during the perpetuation of inflammation underlying rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, authors discuss the role of the most important chemokines and chemokine repetors in arthritis-associated neovascularization. The process and regulation of angiogenesis are described in this context as well. Apart from discussing the pathogenic role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in arthritic vessel formation, authors also review the important relevance of chemokines and angiogenesis for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19482623

  9. Diagnosis and management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Amy M

    2011-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most commonly diagnosed systemic inflammatory arthritis. Women, smokers, and those with a family history of the disease are most often affected. Criteria for diagnosis include having at least one joint with definite swelling that is not explained by another disease. The likelihood of a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis increases with the number of small joints involved. In a patient with inflammatory arthritis, the presence of a rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibody, or elevated C-reactive protein level or erythrocyte sedimentation rate suggests a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Initial laboratory evaluation should also include complete blood count with differential and assessment of renal and hepatic function. Patients taking biologic agents should be tested for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and tuberculosis. Earlier diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis allows for earlier treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic agents. Combinations of medications are often used to control the disease. Methotrexate is typically the first-line drug for rheumatoid arthritis. Biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, are generally considered second-line agents or can be added for dual therapy. The goals of treatment include minimization of joint pain and swelling, prevention of radiographic damage and visible deformity, and continuation of work and personal activities. Joint replacement is indicated for patients with severe joint damage whose symptoms are poorly controlled by medical management. PMID:22150658

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis and sexuality: A patient survey in France

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on patients’ sexuality and identify disease and other factors such as fatigue that most influence sexual relationships. Methods A specific pretested questionnaire was sent to all members of a French patient association (ANDAR). Questions related to demographics, disease status, quality of life (utility, EQ-5D), pain, psychological status (mood), fatigue and emotional and sexual relationships. To isolate the impact of RA, an attempt was made to include a matched sample from the general population. Results The analysis included 1271 patients, but only 70 controls agreed to participate and comparisons should therefore be considered with caution. The two groups were similar in terms of age, gender distribution, living conditions and diseases other than RA. However, patients scored worse for global health, mood, fatigue, had a lower utility (0.55 versus 0.65). Controls were more active sexually (69% versus 63%), in particular women (71% versus 60%). Age, gender, living alone, physical function and mood were significant predictors for being sexually active for patients; for controls, age and overall quality of life (utility) were significant predictors. Conclusions While it is known that RA has a negative impact on patients’ sexuality, there have been few attempts to quantify the problem. Our study highlights the negative impact of RA on patients’ sexuality, and triggers the question how to include this aspect into care. PMID:22963081

  11. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas Roldán, Jorge; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Castellanos-de la Hoz, Juan; Giraldo-Villamil, Juliana; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladys; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and impact of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Eight-hundred patients were included. The association between AITD and RA was analyzed was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. In addition, a literature review was done focusing on geographical variations. Results. In our cohort the prevalence of AITD was 9.8% while the presence of antibodies was 37.8% for antithyroperoxidase enzyme (TPOAb) and 20.8% for antithyroglobulin protein (TgAb). The presence of type 2 diabetes, thrombosis, abnormal body mass index, and a high educational level was positively associated with AITD. The literature review disclosed a geographical variation of AITD in RA ranging from 0.5% to 27%. Autoantibody prevalence ranges from 6% to 31% for TgAb, 5% to 37% for TPOAb, and from 11.4% to 32% for the presence of either of the two. Conclusion. AITD is not uncommon in RA and should be systematically assessed since it is a risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These results may help to further study the common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases, to improve patients' outcome, and to define public health policies. An international consensus to accurately diagnose AITD is warranted. PMID:23209899

  12. [A case of rheumatoid arthritis involving disseminated torichosporonosis].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yo; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yuji; Takahashi, Yuko; Mimori, Akio

    2011-09-01

    A 75-year-old man who developed disseminated trichosporonosis had a long history of immunosuppressive therapy with weekly methotrexate and low-dose prednisolone for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). He had been administered 30 mg of prednisolone per day for organizing pneumonia, probably due to the RA, for about 3 months before admission for a lumbar compression fracture. He then developed bilateral aspiration pneumonia with pleural effusion, treated successfully with broad-spectrum antibiotics meropenem and ciprofloxacin, and fluid management. He then developed acute, progressive respiratory failure with changes in both lung lobes in chest computed tomography (CT). Meropenem, ciprofloxacin, micafungin, and pulsed steroid administration were ineffective. He died of respiratory failure, after which Trichosporon asahii was first detected in blood and urine culture. Disseminated trichosporonosis was determined based on positive blood culture, elevated serum glucuronoxylomannan antigen and beta-D glucan, and the man's lack of clinical progress. He had numerous risk factors for trichosporonosis, including neutrophilic dysfunction due to prolonged steroid therapy, administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and micafungin, and central venous catheterization. Disseminated trichosporonosis is a chiefly hematological infection and case reports without hematological disorders are rare, so we report this instructive case. PMID:22117385

  13. Current therapies in rheumatoid arthritis: a Latin American perspective.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Catoggio, Luis Jose; Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Ostojich, Kasmir; Cardiel, Mario H

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease affecting the synovium of joints, tendons, and some extra-articular sites. RA prevalence in Latin America ranges from 0.4 to 1.6%. Early treatment of RA translates into a substantial reduction in the cost to society. In light of this, early disease clinics are being established in some countries. Barriers to RA management, such as delay in referral to rheumatologists and limited access to therapy, have been identified. Evidence-based treatment guidelines have been adapted by countries according to their own situations. The need for keeping accurate records of biologics prescribed has been addressed by biologic registries, thereby contributing toward a better understanding of rheumatic diseases and their treatment. Current biologics include the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab), B-cell depletion agent (rituximab), interleukin-6 receptor blocker (tocilizumab), and T-cell co-stimulatory blocker (abatacept). Future therapies include kinase inhibitors (tofacitinib and fostamatinib), alternative TNF-α inhibitors (golimumab and certolizumab), and biosimilars. PMID:23337169

  14. Inflammatory Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Nevius, Erin; Gomes, Ana Cordeiro; Pereira, João P

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that primarily affects the joints. Self-reactive B and T lymphocytes cooperate to promote antibody responses against self proteins and are major drivers of disease. T lymphocytes also promote RA independently of B lymphocytes mainly through the production of key inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17, that promote pathology. While the innate signals that initiate self-reactive adaptive immune responses are poorly understood, the disease is predominantly caused by inflammatory cellular infiltration and accumulation in articular tissues, and by bone erosions driven by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are giant multinucleated cells formed by the fusion of multiple myeloid cells that require short-range signals, such as the cytokines MCSF and RANKL, for undergoing differentiation. The recruitment and positioning of osteoclast precursors to sites of osteoclast differentiation by chemoattractants is an important point of control for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Recently, the GPCR EBI2 and its oxysterol ligand 7a, 25 dihydroxycholesterol, were identified as important regulators of osteoclast precursor positioning in proximity to bone surfaces and of osteoclast differentiation under homeostasis. In chronic inflammatory diseases like RA, osteoclast differentiation is also driven by inflammatory cytokines such as TNFa and IL-1, and can occur independently of RANKL. Finally, there is growing evidence that the chemotactic signals guiding osteoclast precursors to inflamed articular sites contribute to disease and are of great interest. Furthering our understanding of the complex osteoimmune cell interactions should provide new avenues of therapeutic intervention for RA. PMID:26511861

  15. Sexual dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis: a hot but sensitive issue.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Deborah; El Miedany, Yasser

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has considerable personal impact for sufferers and their families. Those with RA suffer from pain, restricted joint movements, and fatigue, and can have problems with self-esteem and body image. It is also possible that medication causes sexual problems. Research on the subject is limited, and shows a divergent picture. Assessment for sexual dysfunction in clinical practice might be another hurdle, as patients and health professionals are reluctant to discuss this issue face to face. The aim of the work carried out and described in this article was to study the possibility of implementing sexual dysfunction assessment into standard rheumatology clinical practice. Results revealed that the multidimensional patient-reported outcome measures questionnaire offered the opportunity to assess the disease activity parameters, functional disability, quality of life, sexual dysfunction, and self-helplessness in one format. The patients appeared willing to complete questionnaires and this may be an acceptable tool for assessment. Improving patient education, as well as nurse-patient communication, through discussions about available options may minimize patients' feelings of isolation in addressing the problem and could help compensate for negative effects resulting from the disease. PMID:22067584

  16. Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in etiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bauerová, K; Bezek, A

    1999-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease affecting up to 3% of the population in most countries. The causes of RA have not been completely elucidated. This paper aims to review the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the etiopathogenesis of RA. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical and hypochlorous acid, as well as reactive nitrogen species (RNS), such as nitric oxide and peroxynitrite, contribute significantly to tissue injury in RA. Several mechanisms are involved in the generation and action of ROS and RNS. Superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide do not directly damage the majority of biological molecules. They are however converted into the highly reactive hydroxyl radical, which reacts with almost all molecules in living cells. The resulting chronic inflammation process can be reduced with antioxidant therapy. To date, scavenging, preventive, and enzyme antioxidants are available. The most important mode is scavenging of the hydroxyl radical and of hypochlorous acid. Another important way is to inhibit production of RNS and ROS by neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. The control of inflammation in arthritic patients by natural as well as synthetic antioxidants could become a relevant component of antirheumatic prevention and therapy. PMID:10703714

  17. Toxic epidermal necrolysis due to therapy with cyclophosphamide and mesna. A case report of a patient with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis and rheumatoid vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, A C; Misra, D P; Patro, P S; Agarwal, V

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid vasculitis usually occurs on the background of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, although in rare cases the patients can be seronegative. We report a woman with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis with rheumatoid vasculitis who developed toxic epidermal necrolysis involving most of her body surface area, while on therapy with intravenous cyclophosphamide and mesna. After withdrawal of suspected offending agents, administration of intravenous immunoglobulin, and supportive therapy, she had a favorable outcome. Such an occurrence is rare and serves to educate about a potentially life-threatening adverse event associated with a commonly used immunosuppressive agent. PMID:26555550

  18. A Case of REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, Narcolepsy-Cataplexy, Parkinsonism, and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Filomena I. I.; Distefano, Angela; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Schenck, Carlos H.

    2014-01-01

    A patient is reported in whom signs and symptoms of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and narcolepsy have been associated for almost two decades with a late development of parkinsonism and rheumatoid arthritis. A 78-year-old male patient in whom RBD was first diagnosed was followed-up by clinical examination, video-polysomnography, multiple sleep latency test, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, and dopamine transporter imaging by single-photon emission computerized tomography. The patient was found to present for almost two decades, in addition to RBD, also narcolepsy. Moreover, a late development of parkinsonism and the occurrence of rheumatoid arthritis were detected and clinically and instrumentally characterized. Patients predisposed to RBD and later parkinsonism might be susceptible to a variety of triggers that, in our patient, might have been represented by a possible latent autoimmune process leading to the development of narcolepsy with cataplexy and rheumatoid arthritis, later. PMID:24825961

  19. Aggressive treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van Jaarsveld, C H M; Jacobs, J; van der Veen, M J; Blaauw, A; Kruize, A; Hofman, D; Brus, H; van Albada-Kuiper..., G A; Heurkens, A; ter Borg, E J; Haanen, H; van Booma-Frankfo..., C; Schenk, Y; Bijlsma, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To compare three therapeutic strategies using slow acting antirheumatic drugs (SAARDs) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), for their disease modifying properties, toxicity, and lag time until treatment effect.
METHODS—Patients with recent onset RA from six hospitals were randomly assigned to immediate initiation of one of three treatment strategies: (I) a "mild SAARD with a long lag time" (hydroxychloroquine, if necessary replaced by auranofin); (II) a "potent SAARD with a long lag time" (intramuscular gold, if necessary replaced by D-penicillamine); (III) a "potent SAARD with a short lag time" (methotrexate, if necessary replaced by sulfasalazine). Comparisons included two years of follow up.
RESULTS—All SAARD strategies reduced mean disease activity. A greater percentage of patients improved clinically with strategies II and III than with strategy I: percentages of patients improved on joint score with strategies II and III (79% and 82%, respectively), which was statistically different from strategy I (66%). The same was true for remission percentages: 31% and 24% v 16%, respectively). Longitudinal analysis showed significantly less disability with strategy III, and a lower erythrocyte sedimentation rate with strategy II than with strategy I. In addition, radiological damage after one and two years, was significantly lower in strategies II and III (at two years median scores were 11 and 10 v 14 in strategy I, p<0.05). Toxicity was increased in strategy II compared with the other strategies.
CONCLUSION—Strategy III, comprising methotrexate or sulfasalazine, produced the best results weighing effectiveness and toxicity. Strategy I (hydroxychloroquine or auranofin) was slightly less effective, and strategy II (intramuscular gold or D-penicillamine) was associated with increased toxicity.

 PMID:10834865

  20. New onset psoriasis in a patient receiving abatacept for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Christina; Hermann, Josef; Caelen, Laila El-Shabrawi; Graninger, Winfried

    2009-01-01

    Administration of abatacept is a new treatment modality for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We describe a patient in whom psoriasiform skin lesions developed 4 months after the initiation of abatacept therapy for longstanding, rheumatoid factor positive RA. Histological findings were consistent with psoriasis. The skin lesions subsided after discontinuation of abatacept and reappeared after re-exposure to the drug, suggesting a causal connection between abatacept and the development of psoriasis. PMID:21686603

  1. A randomized controlled trial examining Iyengar yoga for young adults with rheumatoid arthritis: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, disabling disease that can compromise mobility, daily functioning, and health-related quality of life, especially in older adolescents and young adults. In this project, we will compare a standardized Iyengar yoga program for young people with rheumatoid arthritis to a standard care wait-list control condition. Methods/Design Seventy rheumatoid arthritis patients aged 16-35 years will be randomized into either the 6-week Iyengar yoga program (12 - 1.5 hour sessions twice weekly) or the 6-week wait-list control condition. A 20% attrition rate is anticipated. The wait-list group will receive the yoga program following completion of the first arm of the study. We will collect data quantitatively, using questionnaires and markers of disease activity, and qualitatively using semi-structured interviews. Assessments include standardized measures of general and arthritis-specific function, pain, mood, and health-related quality of life, as well as qualitative interviews, blood pressure/resting heart rate measurements, a medical exam and the assessment of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Data will be collected three times: before treatment, post-treatment, and two months following the treatment. Discussion Results from this study will provide critical data on non-pharmacologic methods for enhancing function in rheumatoid arthritis patients. In particular, results will shed light on the feasibility and potential efficacy of a novel intervention for rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, paving the way for a larger clinical trial. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01096823 PMID:21255431

  2. The occurrence of a geode in the olecranon of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Torikai, Eiji; Kageyama, Yasunori; Sugiyama, Eiji; Ogiwara, Yoshihiro; Irisawa, Satoshi; Nagano, Akira

    2006-03-01

    Geode, a subchondral cyst, is sometimes seen in the femur, knee, or wrist in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). But the onset of a giant geode at the olecranon is extremely rare in a patient with RA. We describe herein a rare case of a giant geode at the olecranon in a patient with RA. PMID:16402200

  3. The Role of Citrullinated Protein Antibodies in Predicting Erosive Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jilani, A. A.; Mackworth-Young, C. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Autoantibodies to citrullinated peptides have been shown to be valuable in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The expanding repertoire of antibodies to citrullinated peptide antigens (ACPA) has been a topic of great interest in recent reviews and research studies, as has the ability of these autoantibodies to predict disease outcome. Objectives. The aim of this review was to provide an update on the relevance of ACPA as prognostic markers in RA. The ability to identify patients predisposed to an aggressive outcome at the time of initial diagnosis greatly facilitates the selection of appropriate and cost-effective treatment. Methods. A systematic review of the literature was carried out. Studies from 1967 up to June 2014 with data on prognostic value of ACPA were included. Quality assessment was done by using the modified Hayden list for prognostic studies. Meta-analysis was performed using BioStat software. Results. The results of 25 studies were selected for the final review. A total of 6421 patients with RA were included, mainly in inception cohorts, with follow-up duration ranging from one year to ten years. All studies carried prognostic data on all available isotypes of anticyclic citrullinated protein (CCP), while four had data on antimutated citrullinated vimentin (MCV). There was a single relevant study each on anticitrullinated enolase peptide 1 (CEP1) and antichimaeric fibrin/filaggrin citrullinated peptide 1 (CFFCP1). All studies showed ACPA to be strong predictors of joint erosions in RA. Other factors, particularly baseline erosions, showed an additive effect. Anti-MCV appeared to be a marker of a more aggressive form of disease. Ten studies had data on which a meta-analysis could be performed. This gave an overall odds ratio of 4.85 for ACPA (anti-CCP/MCV) positivity being predictive for the development of joint erosions. Two studies with data on anti-CEP1 and anti-CFFCP1 also showed this positive predictive role of ACPA for joint

  4. Ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis: a rare association--case report.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Vitor Alves; Yamaguchi, Lúcio; Ribeiro, Carolina Nazeozeno; Magalhães, Vanessa de Oliveira; Rego, Jozelia; Silva, Nilzio Antonio da

    2012-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology. Although the large intestine is the major focus of autoimmunity, resulting in chronic diarrhea, that is actually a systemic disease, with numerous extraintestinal manifestations, such as articular involvement. The frequent association of a number of autoimmune diseases in the same patient has been described. However, the coexistence of ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis is rare. The authors report a case of ulcerative colitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in which colitis occurred 12 years before the onset of inflammatory arthropathy. PMID:22885429

  5. Antiperinuclear factor, a marker autoantibody for rheumatoid arthritis: colocalisation of the perinuclear factor and profilaggrin.

    PubMed Central

    Hoet, R M; Boerbooms, A M; Arends, M; Ruiter, D J; van Venrooij, W J

    1991-01-01

    The antiperinuclear factor, an autoantibody specific for rheumatoid arthritis, was found in 51/63 (81%) patients with rheumatoid arthritis by indirect immunofluorescence on human buccal mucosa cells. The sensitivity of the antiperinuclear factor test was increased by pretreating the buccal mucosa cells with 0.5% Triton-X100. The specificity of the test for rheumatoid arthritis as compared with control serum samples was maintained. The localisation of the perinuclear factor in the keratohyalin granules of the buccal mucosa cells was verified by immunoelectron microscopy. The perinuclear factor was found to be an insoluble protein whose antigenicity was sensitive to various fixation procedures. In serum samples from patients with rheumatoid arthritis there was a positive correlation between the presence of antiperinuclear factor and the presence of the so called antikeratin antibodies as detected by immunofluorescence on unfixed rat oesophagus cryostat sections. No relation was found between the presence of the perinuclear factor and either the rheumatoid factor, Epstein-Barr virus components, or any cytokeratin. By double immunofluorescence an exact colocalisation of the perinuclear factor and profilaggrin was found. Although the precise biochemical identity of the perinuclear factor remains unclear, our results suggest that it is a protein only present in the fully differentiated squamous epithelial cell layer. Images PMID:1718228

  6. Changes of lymphocyte membrane fluidity in rheumatoid arthritis: a fluorescence polarisation study.

    PubMed Central

    Beccerica, E; Piergiacomi, G; Curatola, G; Ferretti, G

    1988-01-01

    Fluorescence polarisation of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was used to study the lymphocyte membrane in rheumatoid arthritis. The increase of polarisation value in the patients (n = 27) compared with healthy controls (n = 32) suggests a decrease of membrane fluidity. Moreover, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and plasma fibrinogen concentrations were positively correlated with lymphocyte fluorescence polarisation values (r = 0.66 and r = 0.76 respectively). The results suggest that the changes in lymphocyte membrane fluidity could be involved in the pathogenetic mechanism of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:3382266

  7. Fluorescence imaging of experimental rheumatoid arthritis in vivo using a fast flying-spot scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, J.; Voigt, J.; Seifert, F.; Ebert, B.; Macdonald, R.; Gemeinhardt, I.; Gemeinhardt, O.; Schnorr, J.; Taupitz, M.; Vater, A.; Vollmer, S.; Licha, K.; Schirner, M.

    2007-07-01

    We have developed a flying-spot scanner for fluorescence imaging of rheumatoid arthritis in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range following intravenous administration of contrast agents. The new imaging system has been characterized with respect to linearity, dynamic range and spatial resolution with the help of fluorescent phantoms. In vivo experiments were performed on an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. Finally, NIR-fluorescence images of early stages of joint inflammation have been compared with findings from contrast enhanced MR imaging and histology.

  8. The role of free radicals in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hadjigogos, K

    2003-03-01

    Free radicals are reactive chemical species that differ from other compounds in that they have unpaired electrons in their outer orbitals. They are capable of damaging cellular components, and accumulating evidence suggests that they may contribute to various disease entities including inflammatory joint disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as reactive nitrogen species (RNS) can directly or indirectly damage basic articular constituents and lead to the clinical expression of the inflammatory arthritis. Hydroxyl radicals degrade isolated proteoglycans, and HOCl fragments collagen. Hydrogen peroxide, which is very diffusible, readily inhibits cartilage proteoglycan synthesis, e.g. by interfering with ATP synthesis, in part by inhibiting the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in chondrocytes, aggravating the effects of proteolytic and free-radical-mediated cartilage degradation. Peroxynitrite and HOCl may facilitate cartilage damages by inactivating TIMPs. TIMP-1 inhibits stromelysins, collagenases and gelatinases and this ability is lost after ONOO(-) or HOCl treatment. HOCl can also activate latent forms of neutrophil collagenases and gelatinase with obvious consequences. Hypochlorous acid, ONOO(-) and O(2)(*-) react with ascorbate, which is essential for cartilage function, leading to low levels of ascorbate in synovial fluid. Low concentrations of H2O(2), O(2)(*-) or both, accelerate bone resorption by osteoclasts, whereas NO. inhibits it. NO. promotes chondrocyte apoptosis, inhibits proteoglycan synthesis and activates latent metalloproteinases and cyclooxygenase. ROS, produced by activated phagocytes, could alter the antigenic behaviour of immunoglobulin G, producing fluorescent protein aggregates that can further activate phagocytic cells. Radical-exposed IgG is able to bind rheumatoid factor and results in the generation of C3alpha. This reaction may be self-perpetuating within the rheumatoid joint, suggesting that free

  9. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  10. Interleukin 6 and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuji; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a representative cytokine featuring pleiotropic activity and redundancy. A transient synthesis of IL-6 contributes to host defense against infectious agents and tissue injuries by inducing acute phase reactions and immunological and hematopoietic responses. However, uncontrolled persistent production of IL-6 may lead to the development of several immune-mediated diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease with joint and systemic inflammation resulting from immunological abnormalities and it has been found that IL-6 plays a key role in the development of this disease. Clinical trials in various parts of the world of tocilizumab, a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, have proved its efficacy and tolerable safety either as monotherapy or in combination with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. As a result, it is currently used as a first-line biologic for the treatment of moderate-to-severe RA in more than 100 countries. Clarification of the mechanism(s) through which tocilizumab exerts its effect on RA and of the reason(s) why IL-6 is continuously produced in RA can be expected to lead to the best use of this agent for RA patients and aid in investigations into the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24524085

  11. No rheumatoid arthritis in ancient Egypt: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Rothschild, Bruce M

    2016-06-01

    Antiquity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains controversial, and its origins in Americas or in the Old World are disputed. Proponents of the latter frequently refer to RA in ancient Egypt, but validity of those claims has never been examined. Review of all reported RA cases from ancient Egypt revealed that none of them represent real RA, instead being either examples of changing naming conventions or of imprecise diagnostic criteria. Most cases represented osteoarthritis or spondyloarthropathies. Also review of preserved ancient Egyptian medical writings revealed many descriptions of musculoskeletal disorders, but none of them resembled RA. This suggests that RA was absent in ancient Egypt and supports the hypothesis of the New World origin of RA and its subsequent global spread in the last several centuries. PMID:26650735

  12. The supplementary therapeutic DMARD role of low-dose glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is primarily based on the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), mainly comprising synthetic chemical compounds (that is, methotrexate or leflunomide) and biological agents (tumor necrosis factor inhibitors or abatacept). On the other hand, glucocorticoids (GCs), used for decades in the treatment of RA, are effective in relieving signs and symptoms of the disease, but also interfere with radiographic progression, either as monotherapy or in combination with conventional synthetic DMARDs. GCs exert most of their biological effects through a genomic action, using the cytosolic GC receptor and then interacting with the target genes within target cells that can result in increased expression of regulatory - including anti-inflammatory - proteins (transactivation) or decreased production of proinflammatory proteins (transrepression). An inadequate secretion of GCs from the adrenal gland, in relation to stress and inflammation, seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis and disease progression of RA. At present there is clear evidence that GC therapy, especially long-term low-dose treatment, slows radiographic progression by at least 50% when given to patients with early RA, hence satisfying the conventional definition of a DMARD. In addition, long-term follow-up studies suggest that RA treatment strategies which include GC therapy may favorably alter the disease course even after their discontinuation. Finally, a low-dose, modified night-release formulation of prednisone, although administered in the evening (replacement therapy), has been developed to counteract the circadian (night) rise in proinflammatory cytokine levels that contributes to disease activity, and might represent the way to further optimize the DMARD activity exerted by GCs in RA. PMID:25608624

  13. The microbiome and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Jose U.; Abramson, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the energy they require to survive, and in exchange they support the physiological, metabolic and immune capacities that have contributed to our evolutionary success. Although currently categorized as an autoimmune disorder and regarded as a complex genetic disease, the ultimate cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains elusive. It seems that interplay between predisposing genetic factors and environmental triggers is required for disease manifestation. New insights from DNA sequence-based analyses of gut microbial communities and a renewed interest in mucosal immunology suggest that the microbiome represents an important environmental factor that can influence autoimmune disease manifestation. This Review summarizes the historical clues that suggest a possible role for the microbiota in the pathogenesis of RA, and will focus on new technologies that might provide scientific evidence to support this hypothesis. PMID:21862983

  14. Oxidative Stress Relevance in the Pathogenesis of the Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Quiñonez-Flores, Celia María; González-Chávez, Susana Aideé; Del Río Nájera, Danyella; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease whose pathogenic mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The oxidative stress and antioxidants play an important role in the disease process of RA. The study of oxidants and antioxidants biomarkers in RA patients could improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis; likely determining the oxidative stress levels in these patients could prove helpful in assessing disease activity and might also have prognostic implications. To date, the usefulness of oxidative stress biomarkers in RA patients is unclear and the evidence supporting them is heterogeneous. In order to resume and update the information in the status of oxidants and antioxidants and their connection as biomarkers in RA, we performed a systematic literature search in the PubMed database, including clinical trials published in the last five years using the word combination “rheumatoid arthritis oxidative stress”. In conclusion, this review supports the fact that the oxidative stress is an active process in RA pathogenesis interrelated to other better known pathogenic elements. However, some controversial results preclude a definite conclusion. PMID:27340664

  15. Cells of the synovium in rheumatoid arthritis. Synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Ospelt, Caroline; Gay, Steffen; Distler, Oliver; Pap, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    For some time synovial fibroblasts have been regarded simply as innocent synovial cells, mainly responsible for synovial homeostasis. During the past decade, however, a body of evidence has accumulated illustrating that rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) are active drivers of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. Details regarding the intracellular signalling cascades that result in long-term activation and synthesis of proinflammatory molecules and matrix-degrading enzymes by RASFs have been analyzed. Molecular, cellular and animal studies have identified various interactions with other synovial and inflammatory cells. This expanded knowledge of the distinct role played by RASFs in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis has moved these fascinating cells to the fore, and work to identify targeted therapies to inhibit their joint destructive potential is underway. PMID:18177509

  16. A Crossover Trial Evaluating an Educational-Behavioral Joint Protection Programme for People with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, A.; Lincoln, N.; Sutcliffe, L.

    1999-01-01

    Joint protection, a self-management technique taught to people with rheumatoid arthritis, was used in a group education program. A crossover trial (N=35) was conducted. No significant changes in measures of pain, functional disability, grip strength, self-efficacy or helplessness occurred post-education, although this may have been due to the…

  17. [Vasculitis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bély, M; Apáthy, A

    1996-07-21

    The frequency and histopathological characteristics of systemic vasculitis were studied in the autopsy material of 161 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Systemic vasculitis was observed in 36 case (22.4%). In percentage of all cases with systemic vasculitis, the most frequently involved organs were the heart (66.7%), skeletal muscles (54.8%), and peripheral nerves (52%). The skin was involved only in about one third of 36 cases (36%). In most cases the arterioles and the small arteries were affected by vasculitis. Three types of vasculitis (non specific, fibrinoid necrotic, granulomatous) could be observed simultaneously in different vessels or combined in the same vessel. Different stages of inflammation could be found simultaneously, reflecting the relapsing nature of vasculitis. The frequency, the severity, and the recurrence of vasculitis are different aspects of the same phenomenon running usually parallel to each other in different organs and on different vessels. Vasculitis lead to local ischaemia and regressive changes depend on the number and size of the involved vessels. Systemic vasculitis led to death in 19 of 36 cases. Vasculitis was detected clinically in 7 of 36 cases. Exitus lethalis depend on the localization of the involved vessels. Vasculitis in the heart and brain are more life threatening, than that of localized to the skin. PMID:8757068

  18. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein on fibroblast-like synoviocytes in refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients: a potential mechanism for multidrug resistance in rheumatoid arthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y M; Chen, J W; Chen, L X; Xie, X; Mao, N

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression level in drug resistance to disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RRA). We evaluated and compared the expression levels of P-gp in fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), and investigated the potential mechanism of P-gp-induced multidrug resistance in RRA. Ten patients were enrolled and divided into two groups: six in the RA group and four in the OA group. The expression level of P-gp in FLS cells was detected by western blotting following cell culture. A linear correlation algorithm was used to assess the association between the level of P-gp and disease activity  (using DAS28 scoring), as well as the duration of methotrexate (MTX) treatment in the RRA patients. The level of P-gp in the RRA patients was markedly higher than that in the OA patients (P < 0.05, t = -4.179). There was a positive linear correlation between the P-gp level in FLS cells and the duration of MTX treatment in the RRA group (Г = 0.733, P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant correlation between the P-gp level and DAS28 scoring (Г = 0.206, P > 0.05). P-gp might be upregulated during the progression of RRA, which possibly correlates with the development of resistance to MTX. PMID:27323187

  19. Patient Preferences Regarding Rheumatoid Arthritis Therapies: A Conjoint Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Louder, Anthony M.; Singh, Amitabh; Saverno, Kim; Cappelleri, Joseph C.; Aten, Aaron J.; Koenig, Andrew S.; Pasquale, Margaret K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), provides patients with an alternative to subcutaneously or intravenously administered biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Little is known about patient preference for novel RA treatments. Objective To investigate patient preferences for attributes associated with RA treatments. Methods A choice-based conjoint survey was mailed to 1400 randomly selected commercially insured patients (aged 21–80 years) diagnosed with RA, who were continuously enrolled from May 1, 2012, through April 30, 2013, and had ≥2 medical claims for International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code 714.0 and no previous biologic DMARD use. Treatment attributes included route of administration; monthly out-of-pocket cost; frequency of administration; ability to reduce daily joint pain and swelling; likelihood of serious adverse events; improvement in the ability to perform daily tasks; and medication burden. Mean attribute importance scores were calculated after adjusting for patient demographics (eg, age, sex, years since diagnosis) using a hierarchical Bayes model. Patient preferences for each treatment attribute were ranked by the importance score. Part-worth utilities (ie, preference scores) were used to perform a conjoint market simulation. Results A total of 380 patients (response rate, 27.1%) returned the survey. Their mean age (± standard deviation) was 54.9 (± 9.3) years. Nonrespondents were 2 years younger (mean, 52.9 years; P = .002) but did not differ significantly from respondents in known clinical characteristics. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, mean patients' ranking of treatment attribute importance, in decreasing order, was route of administration, 34.1 (± 15.5); frequency of administration, 16.4 (± 6.8); serious adverse events, 12.0 (± 9.3); cost, 10.1 (± 6.2); medication

  20. The role of the prolactin/vasoinhibin axis in rheumatoid arthritis: an integrative overview.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Carmen; Adán, Norma; Ledesma-Colunga, María G; Solís-Gutiérrez, Mariana; Triebel, Jakob; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory disease destroying articular cartilage and bone. The female preponderance and the influence of reproductive states in RA have long linked this disease to sexually dimorphic, reproductive hormones such as prolactin (PRL). PRL has immune-enhancing properties and increases in the circulation of some patients with RA. However, PRL also suppresses the immune system, stimulates the formation and survival of joint tissues, acquires antiangiogenic properties upon its cleavage to vasoinhibins, and protects against joint destruction and inflammation in the adjuvant-induced model of RA. This review addresses risk factors for RA linked to PRL, the effects of PRL and vasoinhibins on joint tissues, blood vessels, and immune cells, and the clinical and experimental data associating PRL with RA. This information provides important insights into the pathophysiology of RA and highlights protective actions of the PRL/vasoinhibin axis that could lead to therapeutic benefits. PMID:27026299

  1. Fears and Beliefs in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Spondyloarthritis: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Berenbaum, Francis; Chauvin, Pierre; Hudry, Christophe; Mathoret-Philibert, Florence; Poussiere, Maud; De Chalus, Thibault; Dreuillet, Caroline; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Joubert, Jean-Michel; Saraux, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore beliefs and apprehensions about disease and its treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Methods 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 25 with spondyloarthritis participated in semi-structured interviews about their disease and its treatment. The interviews were performed by trained interviewers in participants' homes. The interviews were recorded and the main themes identified by content analysis. Results Patients differentiated between the underlying cause of the disease, which was most frequently identified as a hereditary or individual predisposition. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, the most frequently cited triggering factor for disease onset was a psychological factor or life-event, whereas patients with spondyloarthritis tended to focus more on an intrinsic vulnerability to disease. Stress and overexertion were considered important triggering factors for exacerbations, and relaxation techniques were frequently cited strategies to manage exacerbations. The unpredictability of the disease course was a common source of anxiety. Beliefs about the disease and apprehensions about the future tended to evolve over the course of the disease, as did treatment expectations. Conclusions Patients with rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis hold a core set of beliefs and apprehensions that reflect their level of information about their disease and are not necessarily appropriate. The physician can initiate discussion of these beliefs in order to dispel misconceptions, align treatment expectations, provide reassurance to the patient and readjust disease management. Such a dialogue would help improve standards of care in these chronic and incapacitating diseases. PMID:25474157

  2. Do You Have a Child with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis in Your Class?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Jean; Fujishige, Carole

    The booklet provides information to help teachers understand juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). JRA is a chronic disease involving one or more joint(s); its cause is unknown. The five types of JRA are monarticular, pauciarticular of young girls, pauciarticular of boys, polyarticular, and systemic. Aspirin is the main treatment medication and…

  3. Therapeutic implications of autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aletaha, Daniel; Blüml, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of autoantibodies. Their value for diagnostic/prognostic purposes has been well established. In contrast, their role in established disease and their associations with disease activity is less clear. Moreover, as evidence is accumulating that these autoantibodies are causally involved in certain key aspects of the disease, such as the initiation and perpetuation of joint inflammation or join destruction, autoantibodies in RA can no longer be regarded as mere epiphenomena, but are integral elements of the pathophysiology of RA. PMID:27252890

  4. Comparative Persistence of the TNF Antagonists in Rheumatoid ArthritisA Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Anat; Bassett, Ken; Wright, James M.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Freeman, Hugh; Dormuth, Colin R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare persistence with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) antagonists among rheumatoid arthritis patients in British Columbia. Treatment persistence has been suggested as a proxy for real-world therapeutic benefit and harm of treatments for chronic non-curable diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. We hypothesized that the different pharmacological characteristics of infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept cause statistically and clinically significant differences in persistence. Methods We conducted a population-based cohort study using administrative health data from the Canadian province of British Columbia. The study cohort included rheumatoid arthritis patients who initiated the first course of a TNF antagonist between 2001 and 2008. Persistence was measured as the time between first dispensing to discontinuation. Drug discontinuation was defined as a drug-free interval of 180 days or switching to another TNF antagonist, anakinra, rituximab or abatacept. Persistence was estimated and compared using survival analysis. Results The study cohort included 2,923 patients, 63% treated with etanercept. Median persistence in years (95% confidence interval) with infliximab was 3.7 (2.9–4.9), with adalimumab 3.3 (2.6–4.1) and with etanercept 3.8 (3.3–4.3). Similar risk of discontinuation was observed for the three drugs: the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) was 0.98 (0.85–1.13) comparing infliximab with etanercept, 0.95 (0.78–1.15) comparing infliximab with adalimumab and 1.04 (0.88–1.22) comparing adalimumab with etanercept. Conclusions Similar persistence was observed with infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept in rheumatoid arthritis patients during the first 9 years of use. If treatment persistence is a good proxy for the therapeutic benefit and harm of these drugs, then this finding suggests that the three drugs share an overall similar benefit-harm profile in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:25141123

  5. Autonomic Dysfunction Precedes Development of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, F.A.; Tang, M.W.; Vermeij, J.; de Hair, M.J.; Choi, I.Y.; Vervoordeldonk, M.J.; Gerlag, D.M.; Karemaker, J.M.; Tak, P.P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) is a validated method to establish autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is accompanied by ANS imbalance. We hypothesized that ANS dysfunction may precede the development of RA, which would suggest that it plays a role in its etiopathogenesis. Methods First, we assessed HRV parameters in supine (resting) and upright (active) position in healthy subjects (HS, n = 20), individuals at risk of developing arthritis (AR subjects, n = 50) and RA patients (RA, n = 20). Next, we measured resting heart rate (RHR), a parasympathetic HRV parameter, in an independent prospective cohort of AR subjects (n = 45). We also evaluated expression levels of the parasympathetic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor type 7 (α7nAChR) on circulating monocytes. Findings Both AR subjects (68 beats per minute (bpm), interquartile range (IQR) 68–73) and RA patients (68 bpm, IQR 62–76) had a significantly higher RHR compared to HS (60 bpm, IQR 56–63). RHR was significantly higher at baseline in individuals who subsequently developed arthritis. Expression levels of α7nAChR were lower in AR subjects with RHR ≥ 70 bpm compared to those with RHR < 70 bpm, consistent with reduced activity of the parasympathetic cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Interpretation These data support the notion that autonomic dysfunction precedes the development of RA. PMID:27211565

  6. A study on FoxP3 and Tregs in paired samples of peripheral blood and synovium in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shalini P., Usha; Debnath, Tanya; JVS, Vidyasagar; Kamaraju, Suguna R.; Kancherla, Ravindranath; Chelluri, Lakshmi K.

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing evidence suggesting the role of fork head boxP3 (FoxP3) in the development and the regulation of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells. T-cell regulatory mechanisms in rheumatoid arthritis patients were evaluated by the contributing factors such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, circulating immune complexes, HLA DR expression, ligand binding biomarkers, FoxP3 expression in paired samples of peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF). These cellular responses were further correlated with the humoral immune responses such as anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides IgG (CCP), circulating immune complex-c1q IgG (CIC), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) of the rheumatoid arthritis factor (RAF). The results suggest a definitive role of Tregs in the homeostatic control because there is an increase in FoxP3 (37%) and HLA-DR (45%) expression in the synovial fluid as compared to PB. Furthermore, humoral responses as a downstream effector mechanism are positively correlated with the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A positive relationship exists between quantitative anti-CCP production and the expression of HLA-DR. The study relates an increased and pivotal role of B cell activation in the synovial fluid thereby permitting the need to ablate the targeted B cell immune responses. PMID:26862306

  7. An Autopsy Case of Fulminant Amebic Colitis in a Patient with a History of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Naoko; Nagasawa, Miho; Nakanishi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Generally, amebic colitis is localized around the mucosal membrane and often accompanied by diarrhea and abdominal pain. We describe a patient with a history of rheumatoid arthritis who had received prolonged steroid therapy. The patient complained of breathing difficulties because of rheumatoid lung disease. Although the patient was given antibacterial agent, the symptoms did not improve until death. We did an autopsy and found that he had fulminant amebic colitis, although the patient was not previously examined. Histochemical analysis revealed severe inflammation and full-thickness necrosis of the colon by ameba, suggesting the involvement of ameba in the progression of the overall condition. PMID:27382497

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis, the contraceptive pill, and androgens.

    PubMed

    James, W H

    1993-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating that low androgen concentrations are a cause of rheumatoid arthritis. This would explain a number of established features of the epidemiology of the disease. These include: (a) the variation of disease activity with pregnancy; (b) the variation of age at onset by sex; (c) the variation by sex with HLA-B15; (d) the association with bone mineral density; and (e) the differing time trends in incidence rates by sex. It is argued, moreover, that if one makes a plausible assumption--namely, that women who choose oral contraceptives have high androgen concentrations at the time they first make this choice--then an explanation becomes available for the confusion about the relation between rheumatoid arthritis and oral contraception. Grounds are adduced for that assumption. If this line of reasoning is substantially correct it also has implications for the relations between rheumatoid arthritis and smoking and consumption of alcohol. PMID:8323402

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis in population samples in Iraq.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rawi, Z S; Alazzawi, A J; Alajili, F M; Alwakil, R

    1978-01-01

    A prevalence survey for rheumatoid arthritis was carried out during the summer of 1975 in persons aged 16 years and over in areas of Iraq representative of differences in geography and ethnicity. Definite rheumatoid arthritis was observed in 1% of the 6999 individuals studied, but differences in occurrence rates in relation to various associated characteristics were not detected. It is concluded that present rheumatological services in Iraq have not developed in response to the magnitude of the existing burden. Morning stiffness was reported fairly frequently by individuals without rheumatoid arthritis, but the significance of this observation is not easy to determine. Raynaud's phenomenon was also recorded, but comparative evaluation of the findings is not possible. PMID:629609

  10. Is patient education helpful in providing care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A qualitative study involving French nurses.

    PubMed

    Fall, Estelle; Chakroun, Nadia; Dalle, Nathalie; Izaute, Marie

    2013-09-01

    This French study explored nurses' involvement in patient education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study design was qualitative. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 16 hospital nurses. Data analysis was performed according to Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological method, and supported by specific qualitative analysis software (Sphinx). The results showed the important role of hospital nurses in rheumatoid arthritis care. Patient education is a core part of nurses' work, allowing them to give patients information and emotional support. The interviewees displayed skills in helping patients learn to care for themselves. However, patient education mostly concerned patients who are already committed to their health care. Non-adherent patients warrant special attention; their acceptance of their disease, perceptions about disease and treatment, motivation, and autonomy should be specifically addressed. French nurses could benefit from more training, and could be aided by psychologists. Ambulatory services could also be developed for patient education in France, based on examples from other countries. PMID:23480278

  11. Altered Immunoregulation in Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Role of Regulatory T Cells and Proinflammatory Th17 Cells and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Alunno, Alessia; Caterbi, Sara; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia; Bistoni, Onelia; Bartoloni, Elena; Valentini, Valentina; Terenzi, Riccardo; Gerli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In recent years several studies investigated the role of T lymphocyte subpopulations in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Pathogenic Th17 cells mediate pannus growth, osteoclastogenesis, and synovial neoangiogenesis; hence they are key players in the development of the disease. On the other hand, regulatory T (Treg) cells are a T cell subset whose peculiar function is to suppress autoreactive lymphocytes. The imbalance between Th17 and Treg cells has been identified as a crucial event in the pathogenesis of RA. In addition, the effects of currently employed RA therapeutic strategies on these lymphocyte subpopulations have been extensively investigated. This review article aims to discuss current knowledge on Treg and Th17 cells in RA and possible implications of their therapeutic targeting in this disorder. PMID:25918479

  12. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis are variations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes , especially the HLA-DRB1 gene. The proteins produced from HLA genes help the immune system distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins made by foreign invaders ( ...

  13. [Guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis, was announced from Japan College of Rheumatology. This guideline was made by the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) method with a concept of "treat to target" led for European and American recommendation of rheumatoid arthritis. It assesses not only evidences but also the balance of desirable and undesirable consequences, values and preferences of the patient, and resource use. It is constructed by evidence summary of 88 clinical questions and 37 recommendations about medication, orthopaedic surgery and rehabilitation. PMID:27311182

  14. Palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sangueza, Omar P; Caudell, Misty D; Mengesha, Yebabe M; Davis, Loretta S; Barnes, Cheryl J; Griffin, Julia E; Fleischer, Alan B; Jorizzo, Joseph L

    2002-08-01

    Palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (PNGD) is an entity that has not been clearly defined either clinically or histopathologically. It is seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases. In the past, many cases of PNGD have been described under several different names including palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis, linear subcutaneous bands, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with cutaneous cords and arthritis, rheumatoid papules, and Churg-Strauss granuloma. We report 7 additional cases of PNGD. Clinically, 6 patients presented with erythematous to violaceous plaques, papules, and nodules on multiple body sites; one presented with subcutaneous linear bands on the shoulder. Five had rheumatoid arthritis; one had adult-onset Still's disease; and one showed clinical signs of rheumatoid arthritis, although serologically the rheumatoid factor was negative. On histologic examination, a spectrum of changes was observed ranging from urticaria-like infiltrates to leukocytoclastic vasculitis and granuloma annulare with neutrophils. We report these cases to expand the histologic spectrum of this entity and to further delineate the different forms of clinical presentation. PMID:12140472

  15. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  16. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  17. A Woman with Rheumatoid Arthritis and a Bilateral Fracture of the Proximal Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Hooghof, J. Th. (Arjan); Mellema, Joris J.; Posthumus, Marcel D.; van Raaij, Jos J. A. M.

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented herself with pain on the medial sides of the proximal tibia after a minimal trauma. Conventional X-rays did not show any pathology. However, the MRI showed a bilateral fracture of the proximal tibia. Since the patient was treated with methotrexate due to rheumatoid arthritis, methotrexate osteopathy was considered. Long term treatment with low doses of methotrexate proved to inhibit osteoblast proliferation and may eventually lead to decreased bone formation and osteopenia. On the other hand, immobilization, joint deformities, and steroid treatment are associated with rheumatoid arthritis and are also known risk factors for fractures. The clinical relevance of methotrexate osteopathy still has to be established. However, if a patient treated with methotrexate localizes pain in the tibia, methotrexate osteopathy should be considered. Withdrawal of the drug may improve symptoms. PMID:26981298

  18. A Systematic Review of Serum Biomarkers Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide and Rheumatoid Factor as Tests for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter; Gartemann, Juliane; Hsieh, Jeanie; Creeden, James

    2011-01-01

    This systematic review assesses the current status of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) tests in the diagnosis and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We reviewed publications on tests and biomarkers for early diagnosis of RA from English-language MEDLINE-indexed journals and non-MEDLINE-indexed sources. 85 publications were identified and reviewed, including 68 studies from MEDLINE and 17 non-MEDLINE sources. Anti-CCP2 assays provide improved sensitivity over anti-CCP assays and RF, but anti-CCP2 and RF assays in combination demonstrate a positive predictive value (PPV) nearing 100%, greater than the PPV of either of the tests alone. The combination also appears to be able to distinguish between patients whose disease course is expected to be more severe and both tests are incorporated in the 2010 ACR Rheumatoid Arthritis Classification Criteria. While the clinical value of anti-CCP tests has been established, differences in cut-off values, sensitivities and specificities exist between first-, second- and third-generation tests and harmonization efforts are under way. Anti-CCP and RF are clinically valuable biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of RA patients. The combination of the two biomarkers in conjunction with other clinical measures is an important tool for the diagnosis and management of RA patients. PMID:21915375

  19. A Case of Diverticular Perforation in a Young Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis on Methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ian; Guggenheim, Carla; Laird-Fick, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as methotrexate (MTX), are associated with gastrointestinal toxicity. MTX inhibits dihydrofolate reductase, but it is unclear if polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene predict toxicity. Case. We describe a 33-year-old male with polyarticular rheumatoid arthritis who developed sigmoid diverticular perforation while receiving methotrexate, folic acid, prednisone, and naproxen. He tested heterozygous for the C677T allele MTHFR gene. Discussion. Rheumatoid arthritis and its treatments are associated with increased risk of gastrointestinal disease. In one study, perforation was highest among individuals with concomitant exposure to NSAIDs, nonbiologic DMARDs, and glucocorticoids. Multiple mutations of the MTHFR gene have been identified, but their association with MTX toxicity is unclear. This case adds to a growing body of literature that could help inform the treatment of others in the future. PMID:26064129

  20. Management of cardiovascular risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: evidence and expert opinion

    PubMed Central

    van den Oever, Inge A.M.; van Sijl, Alper M.

    2013-01-01

    The risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is increased in rheumatoid arthritis. The classical cardiovascular risk factors, including smoking, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, obesity and physical inactivity do not appear to explain the excess cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis, although they do contribute, albeit in a different way or to a lesser extent, to rheumatoid arthritis in comparison with the general population. A very important link between rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease is inflammation as it plays a key role in all stages of atherosclerosis: from endothelial dysfunction to plaque rupture and thrombosis. It also has an influence on and accentuates some traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such as dyslipidaemia, obesity and insulin resistance. To date, the exact pathophysiologic mechanism by which this relation between cardiovascular disease and rheumatoid arthritis can be explained is not completely clear. Cardiovascular risk management in rheumatoid arthritis is mandatory. Unfortunately, the way this should be done remains a point of discussion. In this review issues regarding cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis and its management will be addressed, according to evidence presented in the latest studies and our own experience-based opinion. PMID:23904862

  1. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  2. Pharmacotherapy Options in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Banik, Snehashish

    2013-01-01

    Drugs form the mainstay of therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five main classes of drugs are currently used: analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids, nonbiologic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend that clinicians start biologic agents if patients have suboptimal response or intolerant to one or two traditional disease modifying agents (DMARDs). Methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide and hydroxychloroquine are the commonly used DMARDs. Currently, anti-TNF is the commonly used first line biologic worldwide followed by abatacept and it is usually combined with MTX. There is some evidence that tocilizumab is the most effective biologic as a monotherapy agent. Rituximab is generally not used as a first line biologic therapy due to safety issues but still as effective as anti-TNF. The long term data for the newer oral small molecule biologics such as tofacitinib is not available and hence used only as a last resort. PMID:23997576

  3. Paleopathologic evidence for the evolution of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Klepinger, L L

    1978-01-01

    A human skeleton recovered from a Sicilian archaeological site and dating from the Hellenistic period (330-210 B.C.) presents a pathological pattern suggesting a transition between ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis, providing evidence in support of the hypothesis that rheumatoid arthritis may have recently evolved out of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:367177

  4. Chlamydial infection preceding the development of rheumatoid arthritis: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Meenakshi; Curran, J J

    2004-10-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis-triggered reactive arthritis is a well-documented entity that has been extensively described. We do not have a clear understanding about the inflammatory oligoarthritis associated with the presence of this organism. It is rarely cultured from the synovial fluid, but is usually detectable by molecular biological techniques. Typically, Chlamydia trachomatis causes a sterile but inflammatory oligoarthritis. We report an unusual case of inflammatory monoarthritis in a young woman in whom Chlamydia was isolated from the synovial fluid. This is the first case of documented isolation of Chlamydia from synovial fluid, which subsequently was diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:15459816

  5. Destruction of articular cartilage by alpha2 macroglobulin elastase complexes: role in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A.; Appelboam, A.; Kawabata, K.; Da Silva, J. A P; D'Cruz, D.; Gowland, G.; Willoughby, D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Neutrophil elastase accounts for the ability of some fresh rheumatoid synovial fluids to degrade cartilage matrix in vitro. The aim of this study was to determine if enzyme activity could result from depletion of synovial fluid inhibitors or protection of the enzyme from inhibition.
METHODS—The ability of synovial fluids to inhibit porcine pancreatic elastase was investigated together with chemical pretreatments capable of inactivating alpha1 protease inhibitor (α1PI) or preventing formation of alpha2 macroglobulin (α2M) elastase complexes. Subsequently, complexes of human neutrophil elastase with α2M were prepared and applied to frozen sections of cartilage. Proteoglycan loss was quantified by alcian blue staining and scanning and integrating microdensitometry. Parallel studies were carried out using a low molecular weight chromogenic elastase substrate. The effects of α1PI and SF on these systems were investigated. Finally, synovial fluids were subjected to gel filtration and the fractions assayed for elastase activity. High molecular weight fractions were pooled, concentrated, and tested for their ability to degrade cartilage sections.
RESULTS—All synovial fluids reduced the activity of porcine pancreatic elastase, the inhibition mainly being attributable to α1PI, whereas remaining activity resulted from complexes of elastase with α2M. Complexes of human neutrophil elastase with α2M were shown to cause proteoglycan degradation in frozen sections of human articular cartilage. Alpha1PI prevented α2M elastase complexes from degrading cartilage but not the chromogenic substrate. The data suggested that α1PI does not inhibit elastase bound to α2M but sterically hinders the complex. However, only one of five synovial fluids was able to completely block the actions of α2M elastase complexes against cartilage. Gel filtration of rheumatoid synovial fluids showed elastase and cartilage degrading activity to be associated with fractions that

  6. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrich, Christian; Diddens, Heyke C.; Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1995-03-01

    The only early therapy of rheumatoid arthritis in orthopedic surgery is a synovectomy, which is restricted to more or less big joints. A laser-synovectomy of small joints is ineffective yet. An alternative method may be photodynamic therapy. In our study we describe the photodynamic effect of Photosan 3 in a cell culture study.

  7. [Cystic Rheumatoid Arthritis--case report].

    PubMed

    Mourão, Ana Filipa; Santos, Fernando Pimentel; Falcão, Sandra; Pinto, Teresa Laura; Barros, Rita; de Matos, António Alves; Branco, Jaime Cunha

    2007-01-01

    Among the many radiological findings seen in Rheumatoid Arthritis RA small subchondral geodes and erosions are typical. Large geodes are far less common abnormalities and their presence may indicate diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. We present a case report of a 55-year old woman with seronegative RA that developed a large geode in the knee with extensive joint destruction. PMID:18159206

  8. Segmental vitiligo after infliximab use for rheumatoid arthritis - A case report*

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Luiza Dalla Bernardina; Ortigosa, Luciena Cegatto Martins

    2014-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor alpha is a cytokine related to immune and inflammatory processes by acting on different parts of the body. It is secreted by several cell types including macrophages, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, dendritic cells, among others. Infliximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to soluble and transmembrane tumor necrosis factor alpha form blocking its action. In rheumatoid arthritis it is used because the cytokines that cause inflammation in this disease are regulated by tumor necrosis factor alpha and IL-1. We report the case of a 46-year-old patient with rheumatoid arthritis who developed segmental vitiligo after two months using infliximab. The event aims to alert to the existence of this adverse effect that can be induced with the use of this medication. PMID:24626663

  9. Nanofacilitated synergistic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: A 'three-pronged' approach.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shweta; Rai, Nishant; Rawat, Purnima; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Talegaonkar, Sushama

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease of unidentified etiology that affects the joints and causes pain, swelling, stiffness and redness in the joints. The exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis has not yet been discovered and, consequently, treatment methods have not been optimally effective. It has long been treated with anti-inflammatory and immunosupressants including modern biologics either alone or in combination but all of the drugs have severe life threatening consequences with impaired immune function due to nonspecific targeting. Therefore, a three-pronged approach of local, active and synergistic targeting can be used to optimize delivery of therapeutic agents to reduce toxicity and patient outcome without compromising patient's immunity. PMID:27241253

  10. Adalimumab-induced acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Olívia Meira; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Costa, André Nathan; Athanazio, Rodrigo Abensur; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunobiological agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is increasing in medical practice. Anti-TNF therapies have been increasingly used in refractory autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis, with promising results. However, the use of such therapies has been associated with an increased risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents can cause pulmonary complications, such as reactivation of mycobacterial and fungal infections, as well as sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). There is evidence of an association between ILD and the use of anti-TNF agents, etanercept and infliximab in particular. Adalimumab is the newest drug in this class, and some authors have suggested that its use might induce or exacerbate preexisting ILDs. In this study, we report the first case of acute ILD secondary to the use of adalimumab in Brazil, in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and without a history of ILD. PMID:24626274

  11. Wrist arthrodesis in rheumatoid arthritis. A comparison of two methods of fusion.

    PubMed

    Howard, A C; Stanley, D; Getty, C J

    1993-06-01

    17 wrists were arthrodesed in 13 patients with severe wrist disease due to rheumatoid arthritis. Eight fusions in seven patients were carried out using a radial sliding bone graft technique whilst nine fusions in nine patients were undertaken using a third tubular AO plate. Subjective, objective and radiological assessments confirmed the efficacy of both methods but indicated a shorter period of post-operative immobilization for patients treated using the AO plate fixation technique. The importance of this is discussed. PMID:8345273

  12. Role of the netrin system of repellent factors on synovial fibroblasts in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Schubert, T; Denk, A; Mägdefrau, U; Kaufmann, S; Bastone, P; Lowin, T; Schedel, J; Bosserhoff, A K

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the expression of repellent factors, i.e., Netrins and their receptors, may be responsible for the invasive behavior of the synovial tissue cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). This study was carried out to analyze the expression of Netrins and their receptors in synovial cells of patients with RA, OA, and control subjects without synovial inflammation. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to measure the expression of Netrin-1, -3, -4, Neogenin, DCC, UNC5A-D. The influence of Netrin-1 on synovial fibroblasts (SF) was analyzed by determining proliferation, migration, and their ability to organize collagen. SF expressed all repellent factors of the Netrin family. When comparing SF of healthy donors to patients with RA and OA, a stronger expression of UNC5B (4 fold) and UNC5C (769 fold) in RA and OA was found, whereas expression of the other molecules revealed no significant differences. Treating the SF-cells with recombinant Netrin-1 resulted in inhibition of migration of RA- and OA-SFs whereas control cells were not affected. The stronger expression of UNC5B and UNC5C receptors might contribute to the disordered phenotype of RA- and OA-SFs. Addition of Netrin-1 reduces the migratory ability of SFs, potentially by repulsion, as seen in neuronal cells in embryonic development. Due to its function, Netrin-1 may constitute a novel target in the treatment of OA and RA. PMID:19822088

  13. Diet therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Panush, R S; Carter, R L; Katz, P; Kowsari, B; Longley, S; Finnie, S

    1983-04-01

    Although diet therapy for arthritis has received considerable publicity, there is little objective information about its efficacy. We undertook a 10-week, controlled, double-blind, randomized trial of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six patients completed the study; 11 were on an experimental diet (a specific popular diet free of additives, preservatives, fruit, red meat, herbs, and dairy products) and 15 were on a "placebo" diet. Of 183 variables analyzed, there were no clinically important differences among rheumatologic, laboratory, immunologic, radiologic, or nutritional findings between patients on experimental and placebo diets. Six RA patients on the placebo and 5 on the experimental diet improved by objective criteria. Improvement averaged 29% for patients on placebo and 32% for patients on experimental diets. Two patients on the experimental diet improved notably, elected to remain on the experimental diet following the study period, have continued to improve, and noted exacerbations of disease upon consuming nonexperimental diet foods. Our study failed to provide evidence of objective overall clinical benefit of this diet as followed by a group of patients with longstanding, progressive, active RA. However, our data are not inconsistent with the possibility that individualized dietary manipulations might be beneficial for selected patients with rheumatic disease. PMID:6838671

  14. Silicone Arthroplasty After Ankylosis of Proximal Interphalangeal Joints in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Awan, Hisham M; Imbriglia, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can cause severe disability of the hand and fingers. Ankylosis of the finger joints is a known yet underreported manifestation of RA of the hand. We report the case of a patient who had RA and developed autofusion of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints. At presentation, the PIP joints were fused in 15° of flexion. Silicone PIP arthroplasty was performed. Function improved with 60° of PIP joint motion and no pain. PMID:27327930

  15. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Bagan, Leticia; Bagan, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis has been regarded as a potential risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A systematic review is made to determine whether nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with RA offers benefits in terms of the clinical activity and inflammatory markers of the disease. Material and Methods A search was made of the Medline-PubMed, Cochrane, Embase and Scopus databases to identify studies on the relationship between the two disease processes, and especially on the effects of nonsurgical treatment in patients of this kind. The search was based on the following keywords: rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontitis (MeSH), rheumatoid arthritis AND periodontal treatment. Results Eight articles on the nonsurgical treatment of patients with periodontitis and RA were finally included in the study. All of them evaluated clinical (DAS28) and laboratory test activity (ESR, CRP, IL-6, TNFα) before and after treatment. A clear decrease in DAS28 score and ESR was recorded, while other parameters such as CRP, IL-6 and TNFα showed a non significant tendency to decrease as a result of treatment. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment improved the periodontal condition of patients with periodontitis and RA, with beneficial effects upon the clinical and laboratory test parameters (DAS28 and ESR), while other inflammatory markers showed a marked tendency to decrease. However, all the studies included in the review involved small samples sizes and follow-up periods of no more than 6 months. Larger and particularly longitudinal studies are therefore needed to more firmly establish possible significant relations between the two disease processes. Key words:Periodontitis, rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal treatment. PMID:26946202

  16. Persistence of babesiosis for >2 years in a patient on rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Raffalli, John; Wormser, Gary P

    2016-06-01

    We report a patient who was being treated with rituximab for rheumatoid arthritis who developed Babesia microti infection that persisted for 26 months despite prolonged anti-babesia drug therapy. The explanation for the persistence was likely to have been the long-term immunocompromising effects of rituximab, as evidenced by seronegativity for B. microti antibodies that lasted for more than 1 year after onset of infection. PMID:27036977

  17. Inflammatory infratentorial progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lach, Boleslaw; Connolly, Barbara; Wüthrich, Christian; Koralnik, Igor J

    2014-02-01

    An 84-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate, developed progressive confusion and cerebellar symptoms, and died approximately 2 months later. Neuropathological examination revealed progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) involving the cerebellum and brainstem. The affected tissues displayed intense infiltrations by CD8+ T-cells and microglia. JC virus was localized in oligodendroglia and cerebellar granule cells. This case illustrates unusual localization of inflammatory PML in a patient with RA treated with methotrexate. PMID:23683127

  18. THE IDENTIFICATION OF A FLUORESCENT REDUCING SUBSTANCE IN THE URINE OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Mary

    1960-01-01

    The report that 2,5-dihydroxyphenylpyruvic acid occurs in the urine of patients with collagen disease has not been confirmed, and no evidence was found for regarding collagen disease as being due to an inherent error in tyrosine metabolism as suggested by Japanese workers. A strongly reducing substance was conspicuous in the urine of patients with rheumatoid arthritis but not in that of normal persons. This substance was identified as 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA). A method is described for the measurement of 3-HAA in urine, employing ether extraction, paper chromatography in a formate solvent, and visual assessment by fluorescence in ultra-violet light and colour with Ehrlich's reagent. Normal persons excreted from less than 125 to 375 μg./day (average rather lower than 200 μg./day); those suffering from rheumatoid arthritis excreted from less than 125 to 2,250 μg./day (average 820 μg./day). The excessive excretion of 3-HAA in persons with rheumatoid arthritis was investigated in terms of other aspects of the activity of the disease. Some relationship was suggested between excretion levels, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the sensitized sheep cell test. Cases of osteoarthritis, other orthopaedic conditions, and miscellaneous diseases were examined. A few of the latter, including diseases of the haemopoietic system, were associated with increased excretion of 3-HAA. PMID:16810953

  19. Bilateral Terrien’s Marginal Degeneration and Posterior Polymorphous Dystrophy in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zarei-Ghanavati, Siamak; Javadi, Mohammad-Ali; Yazdani, Shahin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report an interesting case of concomitant bilateral Terrien’s marginal degeneration-like corneal ectasia and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy in a young man with quiescent rheumatoid arthritis. Case Report: A 24-year-old man with history of rheumatoid arthritis presented with bilateral decreased vision since four years ago. Slit lamp examination revealed bilateral circumferential peripheral corneal thinning and bulging with vascularization and lipid deposition in addition to band-like lesions in descemet’s membrane. Previous records revealed no gross corneal abnormalities up to 4 years ago. Corneal lesions were compatible with bilateral circumferential Terrien’s marginal degeneration concomitant with posterior polymorphous dystrophy. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report of concomitant bilateral Terrien’s marginal degeneration with peripheral corneal ectasia and posterior polymorphous dystrophy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Bilateral circumferential involvement, younger age at presentation and total peripheral corneal ectasia as observed in this case are not typical for classic Terrien’s marginal degeneration. PMID:22737388

  20. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  1. C5orf30 is a negative regulator of tissue damage in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Muthana, Munitta; Hawtree, Sarah; Wilshaw, Adam; Linehan, Eimear; Roberts, Hannah; Khetan, Sachin; Adeleke, Gbadebo; Wright, Fiona; Akil, Mohammed; Fearon, Ursula; Veale, Douglas; Ciani, Barbara; Wilson, Anthony G

    2015-09-15

    The variant rs26232, in the first intron of the chromosome 5 open reading frame 30 (C5orf30) locus, has recently been associated with both risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and severity of tissue damage. The biological activities of human C5orf30 are unknown, and neither the gene nor protein show significant homology to any other characterized human sequences. The C5orf30 gene is present only in vertebrate genomes with a high degree of conservation, implying a central function in these organisms. Here, we report that C5orf30 is highly expressed in the synovium of RA patients compared with control synovial tissue, and that it is predominately expressed by synovial fibroblast (RASF) and macrophages in the lining and sublining layer of the tissue. These cells play a central role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA and are implicated in cartilage destruction. RASFs lacking C5orf30 exhibit increased cell migration and invasion in vitro, and gene profiling following C5orf30 inhibition confirmed up-regulation of genes involved in cell migration, adhesion, angiogenesis, and immune and inflammatory pathways. Importantly, loss of C5orf30 contributes to the pathology of inflammatory arthritis in vivo, because inhibition of C5orf30 in the collagen-induced arthritis model markedly accentuated joint inflammation and tissue damage. Our study reveal C5orf30 to be a previously unidentified negative regulator of tissue damage in RA, and this protein may act by modulating the autoaggressive phenotype that is characteristic of RASFs. PMID:26316022

  2. Why do we need new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Chikanza, I C; Jawed, S; Naughton, D; Blake, D R

    1998-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by progressive joint damage. The classical treatments of the disease such as myocrisin and sulphasalazine, are not always effective at controlling the disease. This has necessitated the development of novel agents for treating rheumatoid arthritis. Most of these drugs are biological in nature and are targeted at specific sites of the inflammatory cascade of reactions. A number of clinical trials have been conducted. The clinical effects that have been observed are transient, necessitating repeated treatments and the risk of vaccination effects. Many of these agents have to be administered parenterally, production costs are very high. Consequently, chemical entities which can be taken orally need to be developed. Since the immune system is very complex with pleiotropic cytokines and redundancy in some of the regulatory networks, it may therefore be necessary to use multiple agents targeted at different specific sites of the inflammatory cascade or that different agents could be given at different stages of the disease, to induce disease remission and maintain the response to therapy. Cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) play important physiological roles in the host's defence systems against infections and malignancy. The chronic inhibition of these cytokines by targeted therapies may therefore lead to the development of side effects. Thus, carefully controlled long-term studies will be required to assess the safety of selective targeting of processes involved in inflammation. A more recent novel approach is to target hypoxic tissues with bioreductive agents. Thus, some of the established rheumatoid arthritis treatments could be linked to bioreductive agents and released in hypoxic tissues where inflammation is occurring. This review summarizes the important developments in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis. There is no doubt that despite

  3. Risk of Major Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis, Psoriasis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, YiDing; Haynes, Kevin; Love, Thorvardur Jon; Maliha, Samantha; Jiang, Yihui; Troxel, Andrea B.; Hennessy, Sean; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Margolis, David J.; Choi, Hyon; Mehta, Nehal N.; Gelfand, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to quantify the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and psoriasis without known PsA compared to the general population after adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Methods A population-based longitudinal cohort study from 1994–2010 was performed in The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a primary care medical record database in the United Kingdom. Patients aged 18–89 with PsA, RA, or psoriasis were included. Up to 10 unexposed controls matched on practice and index date were selected for each patient with PsA. Outcomes included cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accidents, and the composite outcome (MACE). Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the hazard ratios (HR) for each outcome adjusted for traditional risk factors. A priori we hypothesized an interaction between disease status and disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) use. Results Patients with PsA (N=8,706), RA (N=41,752), psoriasis (N=138,424) and unexposed controls (N=81,573) were identified. After adjustment for traditional risk factors, the risk of MACE was higher in PsA patients not prescribed a DMARD (HR 1.24, 95%CI: 1.03 to 1.49), patients with RA (No DMARD: HR 1.39, 95%CI: 1.28 to 1.50, DMARD: HR 1.58, 95%CI: 1.46 to 1.70), patients with psoriasis not prescribed a DMARD (HR 1.08, 95%CI: 1.02 to 1.15) and patients with severe psoriasis (DMARD users: HR 1.42, 95%CI: 1.17 to 1.73). Conclusions Cardiovascular risk should be addressed with all patients affected by psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25351522

  4. The Future of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hand Surgery - Combining Evolutionary Pharmacology and Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    M, Malahias; H, Gardner; S, Hindocha; A, Juma; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease of uncertain aetiology, which is characterized primarily by synovial inflammation with secondary skeletal destructions. Rheumatoid Arthritis is diagnosed by the presence of four of the seven diagnostic criteria, defined by The American College of Rheumatology. Approximately half a million adults in the United Kingdom suffer from rheumatoid arthritis with an age prevalence between the second and fourth decades of life; annually approximately 20,000 new cases are diagnosed. The management of Rheumatoid Arthritis is complex; in the initial phase of the disease it primarily depends on pharmacological management. With disease progression, surgical input to correct deformity comes to play an increasingly important role. The treatment of this condition is also intimately coupled with input from both the occupational therapists and physiotherapy. PMID:22423304

  5. Possible role of leptin in hypoandrogenicity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Harle, P; Pongratz, G; Weidler, C; Buttner, R; Scholmerich, J; Straub, R

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hypoandrogenicity is common in obesity and in chronic inflammatory diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adrenal androgens such as androstenedione (ASD) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulphate are low, which partly depends on the influence of TNF in chronic inflammatory diseases. Leptin is stimulated by TNF and is associated with hypoandrogenicity in non-inflammatory conditions. Objective: To study the interrelation between serum levels of leptin and adrenal steroids in SLE and RA. Methods: In a retrospective study, serum levels of leptin, ASD, DHEA, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) were measured by ELISA, and serum levels of cortisol by radioimmunoassay in 30 patients with RA, 32 with SLE, and 54 healthy control subjects (HS). Results: In SLE and RA but not HS, serum levels of ASD correlated negatively with serum levels of leptin (p<0.01) independently of prior prednisolone treatment in patients with SLE (p = 0.013) and tended to be independent of prednisolone in patients with RA (p = 0.067). In a partial correlation analysis, this interrelation remained significant after controlling for daily prednisolone dose in both patient groups. In both patient groups, serum leptin levels correlated negatively with the molar ratio of serum ASD/serum cortisol and serum ASD/serum 17OHP, and positively with the molar ratio of serum DHEA/serum ASD. Conclusions: The negative correlation of serum leptin and ASD or, particularly, ASD/17OHP, together with its known anti-androgenic effects indicate that leptin is also involved in hypoandrogenicity in patients with SLE and RA. Leptin may be an important link between chronic inflammation and the hypoandrogenic state. PMID:15194576

  6. A2A Adenosine Receptors Are Differentially Modulated by Pharmacological Treatments in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Their Stimulation Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Padovan, Melissa; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Giacuzzo, Sarah; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Govoni, Marcello; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A2A adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the inhibition of the inflammatory process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation of A2AARs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after different pharmacological treatments and to investigate the effect of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis. We investigated A2AAR density and functionality in RA progression by using a longitudinal study in RA patients before and after methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNFα agents or rituximab treatments. A2AARs were analyzed by saturation binding assays in lymphocytes from RA patients throughout the 24-month study timeframe. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats we showed the efficacy of the A2AAR agonist, CGS 21680 in comparison with standard therapies by means of paw volume assessment, radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging. Arthritic-associated pain was investigated in mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia tests. IL-10 release following A2AAR stimulation in lymphocytes from RA patients and in serum from arthritic rats was measured. In lymphocytes obtained from RA patients, the A2AAR up-regulation was gradually reduced in function of the treatment time and the stimulation of these receptors mediated a significant increase of IL-10 production. In the same cells, CGS 21680 did not affected cell viability and did not produced cytotoxic effects. The A2AAR agonist CGS 21680 was highly effective, as suggested by the marked reduction of clinical signs, in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis and associated pain. This study highlighted that A2AAR agonists represent a physiological-like therapeutic alternative for RA treatment as suggested by the anti-inflammatory role of A2AARs in lymphocytes from RA patients. The effectiveness of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis supported the role of A2AAR agonists as potential pharmacological treatment for RA. PMID:23326596

  7. T Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Mario; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Pablos, José L.; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins, and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies. PMID:26284069

  8. T Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Mario; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Pablos, José L; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins, and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies. PMID:26284069

  9. Interleukin-17 as a novel predictor of vascular function in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Wendy; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh; Myles, James D.; Hench, Rita; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Lustig, Susan; Brook, Robert; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with enhanced cardiovascular (CV) risk and subclinical vascular disease. The proinflammatory milieu has been linked to premature atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction in RA. While IL-17 is considered pathogenic in RA, its role in determining vascular dysfunction in this disease has not been systematically assessed. We analyzed candidate variables that could determine endothelial function in various vascular territories in a cohort of RA patients on biologic therapy, with minimal traditional CV risk factors and low disease activity score. Methods RA patients (n=51) on stable biologic therapy underwent measurement of conduit artery endothelial function by brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD); arterial compliance by pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessment; and endothelium-dependent microvascular testing with Endo-PAT2000 device to assess reactive hyperemia index (RHI). IL-17 was quantified by ELISA and disease activity was assessed by DAS-28. Results IL-17 and high sensitivity CRP were the main determinants of lower RHI in univariate (p=0.004, <0.001) and multivariate (p=0.004, <0.0001) analysis, respectively. Traditional and non-traditional CV risk variables determined PWV, with a significant positive association with IL-17 in univariate and multivariate analysis (p=0.02, 0.01, respectively). In contrast, conduit endothelial function was mainly determined by rheumatoid factor titers (p=0.003). Anti-CCP titers and disease activity did not determine vascular function. Conclusion In RA patients treated with biologics, IL-17 is a main predictor of microvascular function and arterial compliance. This study suggests IL-17 may play a significant role in development of endothelial dysfunction and CVD in RA. PMID:21727237

  10. Can Rheumatoid Arthritis Be Prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of elevations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related biomarkers prior to the onset of clinically apparent RA raises hopes that individuals who are at risk for future RA can be identified in a preclinical phase of disease that is defined as abnormalities of RA-related immune activity prior to the clinically apparent onset of joint disease. Additionally, there is a growing understanding of the immunologic processes that are occurring in preclinical RA, as well as a growing understanding of risk factors that may be mechanistically related to RA development. Furthermore, there are data supporting that treatment of early RA can lead to drug free remission. Taken as a whole, these findings suggest that it may be possible to use biomarkers and other factors to accurately identify the likelihood and timing of onset of future RA, and intervene with immunomodulatory therapies and/or risk factor modification to prevent the future onset of RA in at-risk individuals. Importantly, several clinical prevention trials for RA have already been tried, and one is underway. However, while our understanding of the growing understanding of the mechanisms and natural history of RA development may be leading us to the implementation of prevention strategies for RA, there are still several challenges to be met. These include developing sufficiently accurate methods of predicting those at high risk for future RA so that clinical trials can be developed based on accurate rates of development of arthritis and subjects can be adequately informed of their risk for disease, identifying the appropriate interventions and biologic targets for optimal prevention, and addressing the psychosocial and economic aspects that are crucial to developing broadly applicable prevention measures for RA. These issues notwithstanding, prevention of RA may be within reach in the near future. PMID:24315049

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Incidence of Twelve Initial Presentations of Cardiovascular Disease: A Population Record-Linkage Cohort Study in England

    PubMed Central

    Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar; Duyx, Bram; Thomas, Sara L.; Stogiannis, Dimitris; Rahman, Anisur; Smeeth, Liam; Hemingway, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Introduction While rheumatoid arthritis is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), our knowledge of how the pattern of risk varies for different cardiovascular phenotypes is incomplete. The association between rheumatoid arthritis and the initial presentation of 12 types of CVDs were examined in a contemporary population of men and women of a wide age range. Methods CALIBER data, which links primary care, hospital and mortality data in England, was analysed. A cohort of people aged ≥18 years and without history of CVD was assembled and included all patients with prospectively recorded rheumatoid arthritis from January 1997, until March 2010, matched with up to ten people without rheumatoid arthritis by age, sex and general practice. The associations between rheumatoid arthritis and the initial presentation of 12 types of CVDs were estimated using multivariable random effects Poisson regression models. Results The analysis included 12,120 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and 121,191 comparators. Of these, 2,525 patients with and 18,146 without rheumatoid arthritis developed CVDs during a median of 4.2 years of follow-up. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had higher rates of myocardial infarction (adjusted incidence ratio [IRR] = 1.43, 95%CI 1.21–1.70), unheralded coronary death (IRR = 1.60, 95%CI 1.18–2.18), heart failure (IRR = 1.61, 95%CI 1.43–1.83), cardiac arrest (HR = 2.26, 95%CI 1.69–3.02) and peripheral arterial disease (HR = 1.36, 95%CI 1.14–1.62); and lower rates of stable angina (HR = 0.83, 95%CI 0.73–0.95). There was no evidence of association with cerebrovascular diseases, abdominal aortic aneurysm or unstable angina, or of interactions with sex or age. Conclusions The observed associations with some but not all types of CVDs inform both clinical practice and the selection of cardiovascular endpoints for trials and for the development of prognostic models for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26978266

  12. Recurrent Pneumothorax after Etanercept Therapy in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Seo, Young Ho; Kim, Ji Hyoung; Jeong, Il Woo; Sohn, Sung Birm

    2014-01-01

    The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who are refractory to disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs is gradually increasing. Etanercept is the first anti-TNF agent to be approved for RA treatment and is also the most widely used. However, aggravation of interstitial lung disease after etanercept treatment in RA patients has been reported recently. We report the first case of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax with progression of interstitial lung disease after initiating etanercept therapy. The withdrawal of etanercept and a change to adalimumab, a different class of TNF inhibitor, achieved clinical stabilization. PMID:25568848

  13. Morbidity impact of rheumatoid arthritis on society.

    PubMed

    McDuffie, F C

    1985-01-21

    Classic and definite rheumatoid arthritis affects from 0.5 to 1 percent of the United States' population between the ages of 20 and 80. In the age group of 55 to 75 years, this figure increases to 4.5 percent. In addition to the pain and suffering produced by this disease, family structure is dramatically affected--the divorce rate for patients with rheumatoid arthritis is 70 percent above that for the general population. Rheumatoid arthritis also results in serious economic loss to society. In 1983, the direct cost (out-of-pocket expense for medical care) was $777 million, and the indirect cost (loss of productivity) was $215 million, with a total of approximately $1 billion. The average person with stage III rheumatoid arthritis suffers a 60 percent decline in earnings during the first six years after onset of the disease. Recent studies have indicated that the ability to remain employed depends at least as much on job-related factors as on the extent of disease or success of medical treatment. Job autonomy or the ability to control one's working conditions is the most important factor. Other important variables are education, seniority, and work that is not excessively physically demanding. Good transportation between home and job is also an essential requirement for remaining employed. There are few data available on the cost/benefit ratio of the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. An 18-month study showed a trend toward greater improvement in patients given optimal care by a team of experts in a medical center as compared with average treatment provided in the community. A study in Scotland on cost of hospitalization of 366 patients (about one half underwent surgery) showed cost benefits of xi 14,000 to xi 131,000 over a five- to 10-year period for those who returned to work. Patients who did not return to work incurred medical costs of xi 100,000. There is little question that more effective medical treatment and better rehabilitation strategies for people

  14. Diagnosis and classification of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kourilovitch, Maria; Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Ortiz-Prado, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease of unclear etiology that is manifested in by a progressive and destructive polyarthritis in association with serological evidence of autoreactivity. Its diagnosis is based on the classification criteria that involve four parameters: joint involvement, serology (rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide--anti-CCP), levels of acute phase reactants and the duration of the symptoms Aletaha, et al. [1]. This classification simplifies the categorization of the patients with early RA; however, the diagnosis requires highly trained specialists who are able to differentiate early symptoms of RA from other pathologies. PMID:24568777

  15. [The pulmonological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bernscherer, György; Karabélyos, Csaba; Tarján, Zsolt

    2008-07-20

    In their review article the authors overview the primary and secondary pulmonary complications of rheumatoid arthritis with the help of bibliographic data. They emphasize the pulmonological complications of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs used for the pharmaceutical therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, of which they discuss the methotrexate induced pulmonary diseases. Methotrexate participates nearly in all of additive double and triple--O'Dell-scheme--combined disease modifying antirheumatic drugs therapy. Because of that, the early detection of drug-induced pulmonological complications is important. For rheumatologists the treatment of methotrexate resistant rheumatoid arthritis is always getting a higher and higher challenge. Biological therapeutical drugs act as cytokine antagonists, by blocking TNF-alpha and, compared to disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, they can more effectively inhibit the progression of the disease. These are the biological response modifiers. Their main representatives are infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept. At the end, the authors discuss secondary pulmonary complications caused by biological response modifiers, e.g. the biological response modifiers associated pulmonary tuberculosis, bacterial tracheobronchitis, bacterial pneumonia, bronchiectasia, pulmonary oedema, rapid fibrosing alveolitis, and coccidioidomycosis. At 3% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, treated with biological response modifiers, who live in Arizona, California, Nevada, pulmonary and systemic mycosis--coccidioidomycosis can appear with a 15% of mortality. As a consequence of frequent earthquakes, the spores getting into the air from the ground infect immunosuppressed patients treated with biological response modifiers. The authors draw attention to the fact that patients who receive biological therapy and travel to the above-mentioned endemic or earthquake-active regions, have a potential high risk, so it is indispensable that they are informed by the

  16. Risks and benefits of low-dosage cyclosporin in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pasero, G; Ferraccioli, G F; Portioli, I

    1997-05-01

    The effects of cyclosporin on the activity of rheumatoid arthritis have mainly been investigated in patients with active, refractory, long-standing disease. The data obtained in these trials suggest that cyclosporin is not only a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis but can also be considered a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), since it seems to be capable of slowing the progression of cartilage and bone damage due to rheumatoid arthritis. The trials conducted so far have led to a better understanding of cyclosporin toxicity and, therefore, to better monitoring of patients in order to avoid it. The reasons for studying the role of cyclosporin in patients with early, active and potentially severe rheumatoid arthritis are the poor prognosis of the disease despite the use of the presently available DMARDs, and the hypothesis that the drug is more efficacious and better tolerated in early rheumatoid arthritis. A new classification of antirheumatic drugs proposes that disease-controlling antirheumatic therapies decrease inflammatory synovitis and prevent structural joint damage or significantly reduce its rate of progression. However, few existing drugs meet these criteria. The 12-month results of a disease-controlling antirheumatic therapy clinical trial with a blinded radiological end-point, named GRISAR (Gruppo Reumatologi Italiani Studio Artrite Reumatoide) comparing cyclosporin with conventional DMARDs in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis provide strong evidence that cyclosporin offers better control of ongoing joint damage than do conventional DMARDs. PMID:18031101

  17. Cervical spine involvement as initial manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Filipe; Silva, Inês; Sepriano, Alexandre; Reizinho, Carla; Marques, Luís; Nero, Patrícia; Branco, Jaime C

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis' synovitis affects mostly small hand and feet joints, although it may compromise any joint with a synovial lining. Cervical involvement occurs usually in longstanding disease in over half of these patients. We report the case of a 35-year old male patient who was referred to our outpatient clinic for a 2-year severe and disabling inflammatory neck pain, with incomplete response to intramuscular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and unremarkable cervical imaging studies. He also mentioned self-limited episodes of symmetric polyarthralgia involving hands, wrists, elbows, knees and feet, which started after his cervical complaints. On laboratorial workup, positive rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated peptide antibody and negative HLA-B27 were found. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed atlantoaxial subluxation and odontoid process inflammatory pannus and erosions. Rheumatoid arthritis with cervical spine involvement as initial manifestation of disease was the definite diagnosis. The patient was started on methotrexate and prednisone and he was referred to neurosurgery outpatient clinic for cervical spine fixation. PMID:24861079

  18. Differentially expressed epigenome modifiers, including Aurora kinase A and B, in immune cells of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Glant, Tibor T.; Besenyei, Timea; Kádár, András; Kurkó, Júlia; Tryniszewska, Beata; Gál, János; Soós, Györgyi; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Hoffmann, Gyula; Block, Joel A.; Katz, Robert S.; Mikecz, Katalin; Rauch, Tibor A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify epigenetic factors that are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to explore the therapeutic potential of the targeted inhibition of these factors. Methods PCR arrays were utilized to investigate the expression profile of genes that encod key epigenetic regulator enzymes. Mononuclear cells from RA patients and mice were monitored for gene expression changes, in association with arthritis development in murine models of RA. Selected genes were further characterized by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot and flow cytometry methods. The targeted inhibition of the upregulated enzymes was studied in arthritic mice. Results A set of genes with arthritis-specific expression was identified by the PCR arrays. Aurora kinase A and B, both of which were highly expressed in arthritic mice and treatment naïve RA patients, were selected for detailed analysis. Elevated Aurora kinase expression was accompanied with an increased phosphorylation of histone H3, which promotes proliferation of T lymphocytes. Treatment with VX-680, a pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor, promoted B cell apoptosis, provided significant protection against the onset, and attenuated the inflammatory reactions in arthritic mice. Conclusions Arthritis development is accompanied the changes in the expression of a number of epigenome-modifying enzymes. Drug-induced downregulation of the Aurora kinases, among other targets, seems to be sufficient to treat experimental arthritis. Development of new therapeutics that target the Aurora kinases can potentially improve RA management. PMID:23653330

  19. Genetic epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, A H; Kwoh, C K; Venglish, C M; Aston, C E; Chakravarti, A

    1995-01-01

    We conducted family studies and segregation analyses of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that were based on consecutive patients with RA ascertained without regard to family history or known risk factors. First-degree relatives from 135 simplex and 30 multiplex families were included in the analyses. A highly penetrant recessive major gene, with a mutant allele frequency of .005, was identified as the most parsimonious genetic risk factor. Significant evidence for heterogeneity in risk for RA was observed for proband gender but not for proband age at onset. Kaplan-Meier risk analysis demonstrated significant evidence for differences in the distribution of risk among first-degree relatives. These analyses demonstrated that both proband gender and age at onset are important risk factors but that proband gender appears to be the more important determinant of risk, with relatives of male probands having the greatest cumulative risk for RA. In addition, log-linear modeling identified proband gender, familiality (multiplex or simplex), and an interaction term between these two variables as being adequate to define the distribution of risk in families. The pattern of risk for RA among susceptible individuals and its inheritance is thus heterogeneous. For future genetic analyses, families with an excess of affected males having a young age at onset may be the most informative in identifying the putative recessive gene and its modifiers. PMID:7611283

  20. Structural requirements for recognition of the HLA-Dw14 class II epitope: A key HLA determinant associated with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, Akikazu; Yamanaka, Katsuo; Kwok, W.W.; Nepom, G.T. ); Mickelson, E.M.; Masewicz, S.; Hansen, J.A. ); Radka, S.F. )

    1990-10-01

    Although HLA genes have been shown to be associated with certain diseases, the basis for this association is unknown. Recent studies, however, have documented patterns of nucleotide sequence variation among some HLA genes associated with a particular disease. For rheumatoid arthritis, HLA genes in most patients have a shared nucleotide sequence encoding a key structural element of an HLA class II polypeptide; this sequence element is critical for the interaction of the HLA molecule with antigenic peptides and with responding T cells, suggestive of a direct role for this sequence element in disease susceptibility. The authors describe the serological and cellular immunologic characteristics encoded by this rheumatoid arthritis-associated sequence element. Site-directed mutagenesis of the DRB1 gene was used to define amino acids critical for antibody and T-cell recognition of this structural element, focusing on residues that distinguish the rheumatoid arthritis-associated alleles Dw4 and Dw14 from a closely related allele, Dw10, not associated with disease. Both the gain and loss of rheumatoid arthritis-associated epitopes were highly dependent on three residues within a discrete domain of the HLA-DR molecule. Recognition was most strongly influenced by the following amino acids (in order): 70 > 71 > 67. Some alloreactive T-cell clones were also influenced by amino acid variation in portions of the DR molecule lying outside the shared sequence element.

  1. Unmet needs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bykerk, Vivian

    2009-06-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), including the introduction of biologic therapies and employment of combination disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) strategies, remission rates remain suboptimal and patients with RA are still missing a significant number of work days. Early diagnostic criteria are needed to ensure that appropriate treatment is initiated early so as to prevent joint damage. Better prognostic markers are also needed to identify patients with the potential for poor outcomes, in whom more aggressive strategies can be applied at the outset. Because of stringent inclusion criteria and heterogeneous definitions of remission, results seen in clinical trials of RA are not necessarily generalizable to results seen in clinical practice. As a result, existing guidelines may not adequately reflect current practice. In the absence of biomarkers to predict the course of disease, methotrexate remains the standard of care initially for most patients with RA. The ability to predict the course of disease could allow more appropriately targeted therapy and higher rates of remission. PMID:19509330

  2. A double blind randomised trial of low power laser treatment in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Heussler, J K; Hinchey, G; Margiotta, E; Quinn, R; Butler, P; Martin, J; Sturgess, A D

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To define the value of low power laser treatment in small joint rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS--Twenty five women with active disease were recruited. The metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints of one hand were treated with 12 J/cm2 for 30 s with a gallium-aluminium-arsenate laser. The other hand received a sham laser treatment designed so that neither therapist nor patient could distinguish the active laser from the sham laser. Each patient received 12 treatments over four weeks. The following parameters were measured: pain as assessed by visual analogue scale; range of joint movements; grip strength; duration of early morning stiffness, joint circumference, Jebsen's hand assessment; drug usage; total swollen joint counts; Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales; three phase bone scans; haematological and serological tests. RESULTS--A total of 72% of patients reported pain relief but this reduction was reported equally in both hands. No significant changes were seen in other clinical, functional, scintigraphic, or laboratory features. Neither patients nor staff were able to detect which hand was treated with the active laser. CONCLUSION--When this specific laser and dose regimen was used, low power laser treatment had no objective effect on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It did appear to produce analgesia through a powerful placebo effect. PMID:8257205

  3. HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasstedt, S.J.; Clegg, D.O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. 79 refs., 9 tabs.

  4. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  5. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  6. Preclinical Rheumatoid Arthritis (Autoantibodies): An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that there is a period of development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during which there are elevations of disease-related biomarkers, including autoantibodies, in the absence of and prior to the development of RA; this period can be termed ‘preclinical RA’. These ‘preclinical’ autoantibodies including rheumatoid factor and antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens, and more recent studies have also identified a wider variety of autoantibodies and a wide range of inflammatory biomarkers. These findings in conjunction with established and emerging data about genetic and environmental risk factors for RA support a model of disease development where certain factors lead to an initial triggering of RA-related autoimmunity that expands over time to the point where symptomatic arthritis classifiable as RA develops. Herein will be reviewed updates in the field, as well as a discussion of current limitations of our understanding of preclinical RA, and potential future directions for study. PMID:24643396

  7. The role of autoreactive T cell in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and implications for T cell targeted vaccine therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Li, Y; Liu, Y; Shi, G

    2015-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterised by chronic inflammation of joint synovial tissue and subsequent destruction of associated bone, cartilage and soft tissues. RA is commonly treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids and biologic inhibitors of TNF, IL-1, IL-6, T cells and B cells. The use of these drugs especially biological agents has greatly improved the treatment of RA. Although the pathogenesis of RA remains unclear, T-cell mediated immune response is considered as a critical contributor in RA initiation and progression. It has been hypothesized that arthritogenic T cells (autoreactive T cells) escaping negative selection can recognize arthritogenic antigens and lead to autoimmunity and tissue destruction. Due to the important role of autoreactive T cells in the mechanisms of RA, they might be a novel therapeutic target. Many vaccines targeting autoreactive T cells which can establish immunological self tolerance have been developed. The efficacy of these vaccines has been justified in experimental models of RA and clinical trials. Inhibition of autoreactive T cell response by vaccination might provide a new treatment opinion in RA. PMID:26057192

  8. The occurrence of malignancies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with cyclophosphamide: a controlled retrospective follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Baltus, J A; Boersma, J W; Hartman, A P; Vandenbroucke, J P

    1983-01-01

    In a retrospective follow-up we compared the incidence of malignancies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with cyclophosphamide with that in another group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and also with the incidence of malignancies in the general population. Among 81 patients treated with cyclophosphamide in the past decade 15 malignancies occurred. This was 4.1 times the expected number obtained from a closely matched control group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis not treated with cytotoxic drugs (95% confidence interval 1.5 to 19.0), and 3.7 times the expected number calculated from general population rates (95% confidence interval 2.1 to 5.9). The increase in haematological and lymphoreticular malignancies was specially notable. The data also indicate that the development of malignancies after the start of cyclophosphamide therapy necessitates a certain induction time and that it is to some extent dose-dependent. PMID:6882031

  9. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Żuchowski, Paweł; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures. PMID:27407274

  10. MICL controls inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Redelinghuys, Pierre; Whitehead, Lauren; Augello, Andrea; Drummond, Rebecca A; Levesque, Jean-Michel; Vautier, Simon; Reid, Delyth M; Kerscher, Bernhard; Taylor, Julie A; Nigrovic, Peter A; Wright, John; Murray, Graeme I; Willment, Janet A; Hocking, Lynne J; Fernandes, Maria J G; De Bari, Cosimo; Mcinnes, Iain B; Brown, Gordon D

    2016-01-01

    Background Myeloid inhibitory C-type lectin-like receptor (MICL, Clec12A) is a C-type lectin receptor (CLR) expressed predominantly by myeloid cells. Previous studies have suggested that MICL is involved in controlling inflammation. Objective To determine the role of this CLR in inflammatory pathology using Clec12A−/− mice. Methods Clec12A−/− mice were generated commercially and primarily characterised using the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. Mechanisms and progress of disease were characterised by clinical scoring, histology, flow cytometry, irradiation bone-marrow chimera generation, administration of blocking antibodies and in vivo imaging. Characterisation of MICL in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was determined by immunohistochemistry and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Anti-MICL antibodies were detected in patient serum by ELISA and dot-blot analysis. Results MICL-deficient animals did not present with pan-immune dysfunction, but exhibited markedly exacerbated inflammation during CAIA, owing to the inappropriate activation of myeloid cells. Polymorphisms of MICL were not associated with disease in patients with RA, but this CLR was the target of autoantibodies in a subset of patients with RA. In wild-type mice the administration of such antibodies recapitulated the Clec12A−/− phenotype. Conclusions MICL plays an essential role in regulating inflammation during arthritis and is an autoantigen in a subset of patients with RA. These data suggest an entirely new mechanism underlying RA pathogenesis, whereby the threshold of myeloid cell activation can be modulated by autoantibodies that bind to cell membrane-expressed inhibitory receptors. PMID:26275430

  11. Serum selenium concentrations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, J R; Lemley-Gillespie, S; Palmer, W R; Weaver, A L; Moore, G F; Klassen, L W

    1991-01-01

    Selenium is a trace element and an essential part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase, which protects cells from oxidative damage. Selenium has been shown to have antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and immune altering effects. Serum selenium concentrations in 101 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis were found to be significantly lower than those in 29 normal, healthy controls (mean (SD) 148 (42) v 160 (25) micrograms/l) and also lower than those in eight patients with fibrositis (148 (42) v 166 (25) micrograms/l). It is speculated that serum selenium concentrations may modulate the effect of viral or other infections in subjects with the appropriate genetic background and in this way enhance the development or progression of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2059080

  12. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O’Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease. PMID:26084368

  13. Parasitic rheumatism presenting as rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Burnstein, S L; Liakos, S

    1983-06-01

    A symmetrical polyarthritis with low titer positive rheumatoid factor occurred in a young man who also complained of chronic diarrhea after returning from Vietnam. Endolimax nana grew on stool culture. Both the patient's diarrhea and arthritis responded effectively to therapy with metronidazole. The diagnosis of parasitic rheumatism was made in retrospect. Diagnostic consideration should be given to this entity in patients with unusual arthropathies, particularly if they have stayed in an endemic parasitic country and have gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:6604161

  14. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  15. Acquired hemophilia possibly induced by etanercept in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Banse, Christopher; Benhamou, Ygal; Lequerré, Thierry; Le Cam-Duchez, Véronique; Lévesque, Hervé; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    A 47-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated successively with infliximab, abatacept, and etanercept spontaneously developed subcutaneous bruises and a noncompressive hematoma 11 months after starting etanercept therapy (50mg/week). Her prothrombin time was normal but her activated partial thromboplastin time was increased to 2.48 (normal range, 0.85-1.17). She had a circulating anticoagulant (Rosner index, 45; normal,<13) due to an anti-factor VIII antibody in a titer of 45 Bethesda units. Her factor VIII level was less than 1% (normal range, 55-150). The etanercept and leflunomide were stopped and prednisone was given in a daily dosage of 1mg/kg, in combination with rituximab, two 1-g doses at an interval of 2 weeks. After 5 months, persistence of the anti-factor VIII antibody prompted the initiation of azathioprine therapy, 2mg/kg/d. A remission was achieved 9 months after the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia and was sustained at last follow-up after 3 years. This new case of acquired hemophilia in a patient with RA may reflect a simple association or an inducing role of etanercept. PMID:25617259

  16. Lymphomatoid papulosis in a patient treated with adalimumab for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jun; Lee, Jae Hyung; Lee, Dong-Youn; Koh, Eun-Mi

    2012-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are now well regarded as highly effective treatment modalities for multiple immunologically mediated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease and psoriasis. The mechanism of action for this particular class of medications involves the blockade of multiple intracellular signaling pathways originating from TNF-α, ultimately inducing a generalized immunosuppressed state. In fact, several cases of lymphomas have been reported in patients treated with anti-TNF-α agents, though it has been difficult to prove any degree of causality. Herein, we described a patient who developed lymphomatoid papulosis after being treated with adalimumab, whereby a clear causality could be established. PMID:23257839

  17. A tumour necrosis factor alpha polymorphism is not associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A G; de Vries, N; van de Putte, L B; Duff, G W

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether a polymorphism within the tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) gene is associated with susceptibility to, or severity of, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS--Consecutive patients with recent onset RA were enrolled in a prospective trial. DNA was collected, disease activity was measured at presentation, and radiographic progression at three years was assessed. Typing of TNF alpha was by polymerase chain reaction and single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. RESULTS--No association of TNF alpha alleles and susceptibility to, or severity of, RA was demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS--These results indicate that this TNF alpha polymorphism does not play a part in the genetic background of RA. PMID:7668906

  18. Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation Following Salazosulfapyridine Monotherapy in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kengo; Saegusa, Jun; Nakamachi, Yuji; Nakazawa, Takashi; Kumagai, Shunichi; Morinobu, Akio

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old man was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and prior hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. He began treatment with salazosulfapyridine (SASP). Several months later, his blood tests reflected a slightly elevated liver function. Serum tests were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen and HBV-DNA, and the diagnosis of de novo HBV hepatitis was made. A genetic analysis showed that he had polymorphisms of ABCG2 and NAT2, which could lead to high plasma concentrations of SASP and sulfapyridine. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of de novo hepatitis developing during SASP monotherapy for RA. PMID:27181550

  19. Delayed diagnosis of Q fever endocarditis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shailee Y.; Kovacs, Christopher; Tan, Carmela D.; Pettersson, Gosta; Shrestha, Nabin K.; Lutwick, Larry; Gordon, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Q fever caused by Coxiella burnetii is uncommon in the United States and is most often associated with infective endocarditis. We present a 52-year-old woman with a history of aortic valve replacement and rheumatoid arthritis treated with Etanercept with chronic Q fever manifesting as prosthetic valve infective endocarditis. Explanted valve tissue showed organisms confirmed to be C. burnetii by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) sequencing. She subsequently reported consumption of unpasteurized cow milk which was the likely source of C. burnetii. She continues to do well 6 months after valve replacement on oral doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine. PMID:26793469

  20. Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated with Abatacept

    PubMed Central

    Ospina, Fabio E.; Agualimpia, Andrés; Cañas, Carlos A.; Tobón, Gabriel J.

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial membrane inflammation and joint cartilage destruction. Abatacept is a biologic agent that blocks the costimulation signals, preventing antigen presentation and proliferation of T lymphocytes. It is approved for the treatment of patients with RA. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) is an infectious disease complicating several immunosuppressive drugs. PJP associated with abatacept has not been reported yet in the medical literature. Various factors, such as the mechanism of action of abatacept, may contribute to predisposing to  Pneumocystis jirovecii infection. In this paper, we report a patient with RA who developed PJP under abatacept treatment. PMID:25313341

  1. Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated with Abatacept.

    PubMed

    Ospina, Fabio E; Agualimpia, Andrés; Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Cañas, Carlos A; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial membrane inflammation and joint cartilage destruction. Abatacept is a biologic agent that blocks the costimulation signals, preventing antigen presentation and proliferation of T lymphocytes. It is approved for the treatment of patients with RA. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) is an infectious disease complicating several immunosuppressive drugs. PJP associated with abatacept has not been reported yet in the medical literature. Various factors, such as the mechanism of action of abatacept, may contribute to predisposing to  Pneumocystis jirovecii infection. In this paper, we report a patient with RA who developed PJP under abatacept treatment. PMID:25313341

  2. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: a global perspective on the use of antirheumatic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Envalds, Minja; Pincus, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    Modern therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is based on knowledge of the severity of the natural history of the disease. RA patients are approached with early and aggressive treatment strategies, methotrexate as an anchor drug, biological targeted therapies in those with inadequate response to methotrexate, and “tight control,” aiming for remission and low disease activity according to quantitative monitoring. This chapter presents a rationale for current treatment strategies for RA with antirheumatic drugs, a review of published reports concerning treatments in clinical cohorts outside of clinical trials, and current treatments at 61 sites in 21 countries in the QUEST-RA database. PMID:18437286

  3. Growth-related gene product {alpha}: A chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.E.; Pope, R.M. |; Shah, M.R.; Hosaka, S.

    1995-10-01

    Leukocyte recruitment is critical in the inflammation seen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To determine whether the chemokine growth-related gene product {alpha} (gro{alpha}) plays a role in this process, we examined synovial tissue (ST), synovial fluid (SF), and plasma samples from 102 patients with arthritis. RA SF contained more antigenic gro{alpha} (mean 5.3 {+-} 1.9 ng/ml) than did SFs from either osteoarthritis (OA) or other forms of arthritis (mean 0.1 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). RA plasma contained more gro{alpha} (mean 4.3 {+-} 1.8 ng/ml) than normal plasma (mean 0.1 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). RA ST fibroblasts (1.2 x 10{sup 5}/cells/ml RPMI 1640/24 h) produced antigenic gro{alpha} (mean 0.2 {+-} 0.1 ng/ml), and this production was increased significantly upon incubation with TNF-{alpha} (mean 1.3 {+-} 0.3 ng/ml) or IL-1{beta} (mean 2.3 {+-} 0.6 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). Cells from RA SF also produced gro{alpha}: neutrophils (PMNs) (10{sup 7} cells/ml/24 h) produced 3.7 {+-} 0.7 ng/ml. RA SF mononuclear cells produced gro{alpha}, particularly upon incubation with LPS or PHA. Immunoreactive ST gro{alpha} was found in greater numbers of RA compared with either OA or normal lining cells, as well as in RA compared with OA subsynovial macrophages (p < 0.05). IL-8 accounted for a mean of 36% of the RA SF chemotactic activity for PMNs, while epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide-78 accounted for 34%, and gro{alpha} for 28%, of this activity. Combined neutralization of all three chemokines in RA SFs resulted in a mean decrease of 50% of the chemotactic activity for PMNs present in the RA SFs. These results indicate that gro{alpha} plays an important role in the ingress of PMNs into the RA joint. 54 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Diffuse alveolar damage in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis under prolonged leflunomide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Keng, Li-Ta; Lin, Mong-Wei; Huang, Hsien-Neng; Chung, Kuei-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often have pulmonary involvement, and interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the primary manifestation, in which diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) is a rare histopathologic pattern. Leflunomide (LEF) is a frequently prescribed disease-modifying antirheumatic drug for treating RA. LEF-related ILD in the form of DAD has been reported in patients with RA, with the duration of LEF treatment before symptom onset ranging from 6 to 1204 days. We present a case of elderly woman with RA under prolonged LEF treatment for >9 years (3291 days), who had acute respiratory failure with the initial presentation of exertional dyspnea, fever, chills, and productive cough for 2 days. The histopathologic result of surgical lung biopsy was compatible with DAD. She was diagnosed as having LEF-related ILD, based on correlated clinical history, compatible histopathologic examination and excluding possible infection after extensive survey. Although the causative role of LEF cannot be confirmed, this case still hints that LEF-related DAD may occur even if LEF has been prescribed for a prolonged period. PMID:27368035

  5. Establishment of a cell model for screening antibody drugs against rheumatoid arthritis with ADCC and CDC.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Hu, Rui; Tu, Song; Cheng, Wen-Jun; Zheng, Qiong; Wang, Jun-Wen; Kan, Wu-Sheng; Ren, Yi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    TNFα played a dominant role in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Clinical trials proved the efficacies of anti-TNFα agents for curing RA. However, most researchers were concentrating on their abilities of neutralizing TNFα, the potencies of different anti-TNFα agents varied a lot due to the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). For better understanding and differentiating the potentiality of various candidate anti-TNF reagents at the stage of new drug research and development, present study established a cell model expressing the transmembrane TNFα for usage in in vitro ADCC or CDC assay, meanwhile, the assay protocol described here could provide guidelines for screening macromolecular antibody drugs. A stable cell subline bearing transmembrane TNFα was first established by conventional transfection method, the expression of transmembrane TNFα was approved by flow cytometer, and the performance of the stable subline in ADCC and CDC assay was evaluated, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as effector cells, and Adalimumab as the anti-TNFα reagent. The stable cell subline demonstrated high level of surface expression of transmembrane TNFα, and Adalimumab exerted both ADCC and CDC effects on this cell model. In conclusion, the stable cell line we established in present research could be used in ADCC or CDC assay for screening antibody drugs, which would provide in-depth understanding of the potencies of candidate antibody drugs in addition to the traditional TNFα neutralizing assay. PMID:26884918

  6. Development of a framework for reporting health service models for managing rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Siobhan; Li, Linda C; King, Judy; Lauzon, Chantal; Finn, Heather; Vliet Vlieland, Theodora P M

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a framework for reporting health service models for managing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We conducted a search of the health sciences literature for primary studies that described interventions which aimed to improve the implementation of health services in adults with RA. Thereafter, a nominal group consensus process was used to synthesize the evidence for the development of the reporting framework. Of the 2,033 citations screened, 68 primary studies were included which described 93 health service models for RA. The origin and meaning of the labels given to these health service delivery models varied widely and, in general, the reporting of their components lacked detail or was absent. The six dimensions underlying the framework for reporting RA health service delivery models are: (1) Why was it founded? (2) Who was involved? (3) What were the roles of those participating? (4) When were the services provided? (5) Where were the services provided/received? (6) How were the services/interventions accessed and implemented, how long was the intervention, how did individuals involved communicate, and how was the model supported/sustained? The proposed framework has the potential to facilitate knowledge exchange among clinicians, researchers, and decision makers in the area of health service delivery. Future work includes the validation of the framework with national and international stakeholders such as clinicians, health care administrators, and health services researchers. PMID:19865842

  7. Successful leukocytapheresis therapy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Keisuke; Torigoe, Masataka; Iwakura, Mikako; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Ishii, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old female undergoing maintenance hemodialysis in whom early-phase rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was successfully treated by leukocytapheresis (LCAP). The effects of prednisone, tacrolimus, and etanercept were limited, but LCAP was highly effective and its efficacy continued even after cessation of LCAP. Moreover, remission was maintained for 2 years after discontinuation of medication. LCAP may be an important treatment option for RA patients with end-stage renal failure who are on hemodialysis. PMID:24517518

  8. A double blind multicentre study of OM-8980 and auranofin in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, T L

    1988-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of the immunomodulator OM-8980 in rheumatoid arthritis was compared with that of auranofin, an oral gold salt, in a double blind, randomised multicentre study lasting six months. Seventy patients were treated with auranofin and 75 with OM-8980. The patients of both groups improved significantly at three and six months for all the clinical parameters observed: Ritchie index, number of swollen joints, morning stiffness, pain, grip strength, intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. No serious side effects were observed in either group. The patients receiving auranofin had more adverse reactions, mainly affecting the gastrointestinal system. PMID:3041924

  9. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Laria, A; Lurati, A; Scarpellini, M

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  10. Sensitivity to non-acetylated salicylates in a patient with asthma, nasal polyps, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chudwin, D S; Strub, M; Golden, H E; Frey, C; Richmond, G W; Luskin, A T

    1986-08-01

    A woman experienced exacerbations of bronchial asthma after taking aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for rheumatoid arthritis. On oral challenges, she developed an urticarial reaction after tartrazine; urticarial and bronchospastic reactions after salicylsalicylic acid; and urticarial and bronchospastic reactions after choline magnesium trisalicylate. Non-acetylated salicylates have been recommended for use in aspirin- and/or tartrazine-sensitive patients. The results of sensitivity studies of our patient indicates that such patients may also be sensitive to non-acetylated salicylates. PMID:3740556

  11. Pain Sensitisation in Women with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Vladimirova, Nora; Jespersen, Anders; Bartels, Else Marie; Christensen, Anton W.; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, joint pain persists without signs of inflammation. This indicates that central pain sensitisation may play a role in the generation of chronic pain in a subgroup of RA. Our aim was to assess the degree of peripheral and central pain sensitisation in women with active RA compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods. 38 women with active RA (DAS28 > 2.6) and 38 female HC were included in, and completed, the study. Exclusion criteria were polyneuropathy, pregnancy, and no Danish language. Cuff Pressure Algometry measurements were carried out on the dominant lower leg. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain sensitivity during tonic painful stimulation were recorded. Results. Women with active RA had significantly lower pain threshold (p < 0.01) and pain tolerance (p < 0.01) than HC. The mean temporal summation- (TS-) index in RA patients was 0.98 (SEM: 0.09) and 0.71 (SEM: 0.04) in HC (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Patients with active RA showed decreased pressure-pain threshold compared to HC. In addition, temporal summation of pressure-pain was increased, indicating central pain sensitization, at least in some patients. Defining this subgroup of patients may be of importance when considering treatment strategies. PMID:26266046

  12. Pain Sensitisation in Women with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Vladimirova, Nora; Jespersen, Anders; Bartels, Else Marie; Christensen, Anton W; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, joint pain persists without signs of inflammation. This indicates that central pain sensitisation may play a role in the generation of chronic pain in a subgroup of RA. Our aim was to assess the degree of peripheral and central pain sensitisation in women with active RA compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods. 38 women with active RA (DAS28 > 2.6) and 38 female HC were included in, and completed, the study. Exclusion criteria were polyneuropathy, pregnancy, and no Danish language. Cuff Pressure Algometry measurements were carried out on the dominant lower leg. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain sensitivity during tonic painful stimulation were recorded. Results. Women with active RA had significantly lower pain threshold (p < 0.01) and pain tolerance (p < 0.01) than HC. The mean temporal summation- (TS-) index in RA patients was 0.98 (SEM: 0.09) and 0.71 (SEM: 0.04) in HC (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Patients with active RA showed decreased pressure-pain threshold compared to HC. In addition, temporal summation of pressure-pain was increased, indicating central pain sensitization, at least in some patients. Defining this subgroup of patients may be of importance when considering treatment strategies. PMID:26266046

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis as a hyper-endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation disease.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Satoshi; Yagishita, Naoko; Tsuchimochi, Kaneyuki; Nishioka, Kusuki; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2005-01-01

    We introduce Synoviolin as a novel pathogenic factor in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Experimental studies indicate that this endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident E3 ubiquitin ligase has important functions in the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) system, an essential system for ER homeostasis. Overexpression of Synoviolin in mice causes arthropathy with synovial hyperplasia, whereas heterozygous knockdown results in increased apoptosis of synovial cells and resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in mice. On the basis of these experimental data, we propose that excess elimination of unfolded proteins (that is, 'hyper-ERAD') by overexpression of Synoviolin triggers synovial cell overgrowth and hence a worsening of RA. Further analysis of the hyper-ERAD system may permit the complex pathomechanisms of RA to be uncovered. PMID:16207344

  14. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raciborski, Filip; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment. PMID:27407258

  15. Quercetin: a potential natural drug for adjuvant treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian-Jun; Lin, Yuan; Huang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Hou-Li; Diao, Yun-Peng; Li, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the rheumatism mainly manifested as disabling joint disease and mainly involves hands, wrists, feet and other small joints. Recurrent arthritis attacks, synovial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia and bone and cartilage damages eventually lead to joint dysfunction and other complications, and there is no cure. Quercetin (QU) is a kind of natural flavonoids, with lipid-lowering, anti-inflammatory and other pharmacological activities, and minor toxic side effects. Thus, we assume that QU may be an adjuvant natural drug for treatment of RA. The possible mechanism is through regulation of NF-κB, to inhibit the transcription of joint synovitis factors, hinder the generation of inflammatory factors, and inhibit the inflammatory reaction; through inhibiting the activities of VEGF, bFGF, MMP-2 and other cytokines, to inhibit angiogenesis in multiple links and inhibit synovial pannus formation. QU may be an adjuvant natural drug for treatment of RA. PMID:24146468

  16. Efficacy and safety of a non-acetylated salicylate, choline magnesium trisalicylate, in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, K G

    1983-01-01

    The results of three double-blind, multicentre trials are reviewed to compare the efficacy of acetysalicylic acid (ASA) and a non-acetylated salicylate, choline magnesium trisalicylate (CMT), in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In each trial, patients were randomly assigned to receive comparable doses of salicylate as either ASA or CMT. Mean values for clinical indicators of rheumatoid arthritis (number of painful joints, articular index, number of swollen joints, swelling index, duration of morning stiffness) showed similar or greater improvement among groups of patients receiving CMT, compared to those receiving ASA. In addition, the incidence of gastro-intestinal side-effects was lower among patients receiving CMT. PMID:6360749

  17. Preclinical characterisation of the GM-CSF receptor as a therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Greven, D E A; Cohen, E S; Gerlag, D M; Campbell, J; Woods, J; Davis, N; van Nieuwenhuijze, A; Lewis, A; Heasmen, S; McCourt, M; Corkill, D; Dodd, A; Elvin, J; Statache, G; Wicks, I P; Anderson, I K; Nash, A; Sleeman, M A; Tak, P P

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous work has suggested that the granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)–GM-CSF receptor α axis (GM-CSFRα) may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, we investigated the cellular expression of GM-CSFRα in RA synovial tissue and investigated the effects of anti-GM-CSFRα antibody treatment in vitro and in vivo in a preclinical model of RA. Methods We compared GM-CSFRα expression on macrophages positive for CD68 or CD163 on synovial biopsy samples from patients with RA or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) to disease controls. In addition, we studied the effects of CAM-3003, an anti-GM-CSFR antibody in a collagen induced arthritis model of RA in DBA/1 mice. The pharmacokinetic profile of CAM-3003 was studied in naïve CD1(ICR) mice (see online supplement) and used to interpret the results of the pharmacodynamic studies in BALB/c mice. Results GM-CSFRα was expressed by CD68 positive and CD163 positive macrophages in the synovium, and there was a significant increase in GM-CSFRα positive cells in patients in patients with RA as well as patients with PsA compared with patients with osteoarthritis and healthy controls. In the collagen induced arthritis model there was a dose dependent reduction of clinical arthritis scores and the number of F4/80 positive macrophages in the inflamed synovium after CAM-3003 treatment. In BALB/c mice CAM-3003 inhibited recombinant GM-CSF mediated margination of peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils. Conclusions The findings support the ongoing development of therapies aimed at interfering with GM-CSF or its receptor in various forms of arthritis, such as RA and PsA. PMID:24936585

  18. Role of self-esteem and autonomy in determining medication compliance among adolescents with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Litt, I F; Cuskey, W R; Rosenberg, A

    1982-01-01

    This study was designed to improve understanding of adolescents' compliance with medical regimens. Compliance with salicylate therapy among adolescents with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis was examined in relationship to two of the most important issues of adolescent psychosocial development--self-image and autonomy. Standardized instruments that assessed these variables were administered to 38 adolescents with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis during the year in which compliance was determined, utilizing serum salicylate measurements. Patients and disease-related characteristics were also recorded, and interactions with personality variables were examined. The data show that adolescents with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who comply with their medical regimen are those who have high self-esteem and are allowed more autonomy than the noncompliers. The longer the duration of the illness and the more symptoms present at onset, the poorer was self-concept, and hence compliance, at adolescence. PMID:7054755

  19. Future therapies for rheumatoid arthritis: remedies from the horns of a dilemma?

    PubMed

    Staite, N D

    1997-07-01

    Drugs used to treat arthritis can be broadly classified into either anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory agents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used for both osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), while drugs with an immunological mechanism of action are only applicable to RA. The total market value for anti-arthritic drugs is estimated to be 8.4 bn dollars, with the OA segment worth 6.9 bn dollars. In contrast, the major RA markets are valued at approximately 1.5 bn dollars. Drugs currently in late phase development reflect the accepted approaches towards treating the symptoms of arthritis, or suppressing immunological mechanisms considered to be the driving force for the underlying disease process in RA. The size of both the RA and OA markets, however, creates an incentive to develop new therapeutics which do not conform to these two approaches, but target new molecular mechanisms. Compounds currently in preclinical development demonstrate that it may be possible to combine anti-inflammatory and slow-acting antirheumatic activity into a single therapeutic. This new generation of anti-arthritic compounds has the potential to redefine the way in which common forms of arthritis, mixed connective tissue diseases and musculoskeletal diseases are treated in the future. PMID:15989642

  20. Cervical myelopathy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meijers, K A; Cats, A; Kremer, H P; Luyendijk, W; Onvlee, G J; Thomeer, R T

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained in 43 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with cervical myelopathy are described; all patients showed several alarm signs together with neurological disturbances. Thirty-four cases were operable; nine patients were not operated upon for various reasons (refusal, and general condition). In the surgically treated patients, the changes were localized in the C1-C2 area (n = 20), in the area below C2 (n = 5), or in both (n = 9). The patients were put on skull traction pre- and post-operatively and nursed on a circo-electric bed. Pre-operatively, the duration of traction varied from a few days to weeks (mean 3 weeks). Post-operatively, the patients were given continuous skull traction for 2 1/2-3 months. This procedure yielded neurological improvement and a stable graft in all but two patients. On follow-up, recurrence of neurological complaints was seen in nine patients, in four due to a new slip at a lower level. Three of these cases were reoperated with good results. Twenty-three patients have died: four 'early' (one pre-operatively and three within 6 weeks post-operatively) and 19 'late'. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.5 years. In those who died 'late', the cause of death was due to the effects of an unstable graft in two cases and in the others the causes were not related to changes in the cervical spine. In the 10 patients who are still alive the mean duration of follow-up is 5 years. The nine patients who were not operated upon all died within a year, 4 of them due to consequences of cord compression. If cervical spondylodesis is feasible in an RA patient with myelopathy, the procedure is advocated. PMID:6529877

  1. A historical perspective concerning population-based and clinical studies of early arthritis and early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sokka, T; Pincus, T

    2003-01-01

    Research concerning early arthritis and early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be considered to have begun with population-based studies in the United Kingdom, the United States and Scandinavia, from the late 1950s to the late 1960s. These studies indicated that the majority of people with clinical findings of RA had no evidence of disease 3-5 years later, and that only about 25% to 30% of people in a population who met the criteria for RA had rheumatoid factor. These findings may have contributed to an underestimation of RA until the severity of long-term outcomes of clinical RA were recognized in the 1980s on the basis of clinical cohorts. The first major early RA clinical cohort was established in 1957-1963 in Bath, England. Although results at 3 and even 11 years were not overly unfavorable, by 15 and 20 years most patients had severe outcomes of functional declines and premature mortality. The Middle-sex (UK) early RA cohort established in 1966-1971 indicated that radiographic abnormalities were observed in about 70% of patients by 2 years of disease, and were seen in most patients initially in the feet. The Memphis (Tennessee, USA) early RA cohort established in 1967-1971 suggested that a progressive course of RA is predicted by a higher number of involved joints at baseline. The Lund (Sweden) early RA cohort established in 1985-1989 indicated rather severe long-term outcomes in patients treated according to traditional conservative approaches to use of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The early RA study (ERAS) involving nine National Health Service trusts in the UK was established in 1987-93, and showed associations of education level and socioeconomic status with clinical status. The movement towards early arthritis clinics was given great impetus following the work by Emery in the early 1990s. These studies and others described elsewhere in this supplement have contributed to the foundations for the clinical approach to early arthritis in the

  2. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Fiona M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone extraordinary change in recent years and new techniques are now available to help the clinician diagnose and manage patients much more effectively than previously. While established modalities such as plain radiography (X-Ray) remain important, especially for detection of erosions and determining the progression of joint damage, there are many instances where ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning provide added information. MRI and US are now used regularly by clinicians to help diagnose RA in the pre-radiographic stage as they offer improved visualisation of joint erosions. They also have the potential to provide prognostic information as MRI bone oedema/osteitis is linked to the later development of erosions and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) joint positivity is also a predictor of joint damage. Nuclear imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are also highly sensitive for detecting joint change in early RA and pre-RA but not yet used clinically mainly because of accessibility and radiation exposure. MRI, US, scintigraphy, SPECT and PET have all been shown to detect sub-clinical joint inflammation in patients in clinical remission, a state that is now the goal of most treat-to-target management strategies. Thus, imaging may be used to direct therapeutic decision making and MRI is also now being used in clinical trials to determine the impact of disease-suppressing therapy on the course of synovitis and osteitis. As is the case for all tests, it would be unwise to rely completely on any one imaging result, as false positives and negatives can occur for all modalities. Thus, the clinician needs to choose the most relevant and reliable imaging test, while also striving to minimise patient discomfort, radiation burden and economic impact. PMID:24315051

  3. The roles of the classical and alternative nuclear factor-kappaB pathways: potential implications for autoimmunity and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Keith D; Claudio, Estefania; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is an inducible transcription factor controlled by two principal signaling cascades, each activated by a set of signal ligands: the classical/canonical NF-κB activation pathway and the alternative/noncanonical pathway. The former pathway proceeds via phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) and leads most commonly to activation of the heterodimer RelA/NF-κB1(p50). The latter pathway proceeds via phosphorylation and proteolytic processing of NF-κB2 (p100) and leads to activation, most commonly, of the heterodimer RelB/NF-κB2 (p52). Both pathways play critical roles at multiple levels of the immune system in both health and disease, including the autoimmune inflammatory response. These roles include cell cycle progression, cell survival, adhesion, and inhibition of apoptosis. NF-κB is constitutively activated in many autoimmune diseases, including diabetes type 1, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this review we survey recent developments in the involvement of the classical and alternative pathways of NF-κB activation in autoimmunity, focusing particularly on RA. We discuss the involvement of NF-κB in self-reactive T and B lymphocyte development, survival and proliferation, and the maintenance of chronic inflammation due to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-8. We discuss the roles played by IL-17 and T-helper-17 cells in the inflammatory process; in the activation, maturation, and proliferation of RA fibroblast-like synovial cells; and differentiation and activation of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. The prospects of therapeutic intervention to block activation of the NF-κB signaling pathways in RA are also discussed. PMID:18771589

  4. Randomized clinical trials as reflexive-interpretative process in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    de Jorge, Mercedes; Parra, Sonia; de la Torre-Aboki, Jenny; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel

    2015-08-01

    Patients in randomized clinical trials have to adapt themselves to a restricted language to capture the necessary information to determine the safety and efficacy of a new treatment. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of patients with rheumatoid arthritis after completing their participation in a biologic therapy randomized clinical trial for a period of 3 years. A qualitative approach was used. The information was collected using 15 semi-structured interviews of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Data collection was guided by the emergent analysis until no more relevant variations in the categories were found. The data were analysed using the grounded theory method. The objective of the patients when entering the study was to improve their quality of life by initiating the treatment. However, the experience changed the significance of the illness as they acquired skills and practical knowledge related to the management of their disease. The category "Interactional Empowerment" emerged as core category, as it represented the participative experience in a clinical trial. The process integrates the follow categories: "weight of systematisation", "working together", and the significance of the experience: "the duties". Simultaneously these categories evolved. The clinical trial monitoring activities enabled patients to engage in a reflexive-interpretative mechanism that transformed the emotional and symbolic significance of their disease and improved the empowerment of the patient. A better communicative strategy with the health professionals, the relatives of the patients, and the community was also achieved. PMID:25636236

  5. Pain mystery score beliefs: a comparison of fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Robert; Russell, Anthony Science

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the mysteriousness scores of the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory in fibromyalgia. Methods. Two cohorts of patients, one with fibromyalgia (FM) and one with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), completed the Mystery Scale component of the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory to determine whether subjects in the two diagnostic groups had significantly different scores on the Mystery Scale. Results. A total of 126 subjects (64 FM, 62 RA) completed all questionnaires. The FM group had a greater percentage of female subjects, more severe pain, more severe anxiety, more severe depression, and a higher perceived injustice score. When the RA and FM group scores for the Mystery Scale were adjusted for age, sex, pain severity, HADS scores, and perceived injustice scores, the FM group still had a higher Mystery Scale score. Discussion. Fibromyalgia is associated with a higher level of perception of mysteriousness in the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory than is seen with rheumatoid arthritis. This difference appears to be independent of levels of pain, depression, anxiety, and perceived injustice. This sense of mysteriousness may reflect a lack of understanding of pain in fibromyalgia as previously reported and may be an area to be addressed in therapy. PMID:25548570

  6. A controlled trial of nandrolone decanoate in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed Central

    Bird, H A; Burkinshaw, L; Pearson, D; Atkinson, P J; Leatham, P A; Hill, J; Raven, A; Wright, V

    1987-01-01

    To determine whether an anabolic steroid had any benefit in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis 47 patients entered a parallel group study. Twenty four received nandrolone decanoate 50 mg intramuscularly every third week for two years and 23 patients received no anabolic steroids. Other therapy was unaltered. Patients attended for clinical and biochemical assessments as well as the objective assessments of elementary body composition by in vivo neutron activation analysis and measurement of the mineral content of the distal femur by single photon absorptiometry on five occasions. A modest clinical deterioration (except for grip strength) was seen in both groups. No significant changes in calcium or alkaline phosphatase were seen. There was no significant change in total body calcium, total body phosphorus, body weight, or bone index/bone width measurements in either group. Significant increases occurred in total body nitrogen, total body potassium, haemoglobin, and packed cell volume (by six months) in the group treated with nandrolone decanoate. Comparison of 10 patients in the group treated with nandrolone decanoate also receiving oral steroid therapy with 14 patients in this group not receiving oral steroid therapy showed no significant differences. The main side effect of nandrolone decanoate was hoarseness. No radiological changes were seen. Nandrolone decanoate, in a dose that produces a significant anabolic effect, has no demonstrable action on bone metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis but may improve the chronic anaemia by six months. PMID:3555359

  7. A radiographic evaluation of temporomandibular and hand (Metacarpophalangeal) / wrist joints of patients with adult rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Seema; Gharote, Harshkant; Jose, Renju

    2012-01-01

    Background: A review of literature revealed that, although the involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients is not uncommon, variation in presentation persist. Comparative studies of bony changes in the right and left TMJ with the right and left peripheral hand (Metacarpophalangeal-MCP)/wrist joints have not been done, to the best of our knowledge. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the temporomandibular and hand (MCP) and wrist joints of fifteen rheumatoid arthritis patients were evaluated with questionnaires, clinical and lab assessment and radiographically using conventional radiographs and computed tomography. Students t-test was applied for the statistical analysis of the data obtained and a P value of 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Comparisons between the right TMJ with right MCP/wrist joint and left TMJ with left MCP/wrist joint did not reveal statistically significant results. Radiographically, flattening and erosions were the common manifestations. MCP joints were more affected than the wrist, but whenever the wrist was involved, it was more likely to be bilaterally affected. Conclusions: Although the TMJ showed osseous changes of a higher grade than the hand (MCP) and wrist joints radiographically, it was observed that patients were more aware of the peripheral joint discomfort. There were no significant differences between TMJ and peripheral joints on both right and left sides. PMID:23814559

  8. The Role of Power Doppler Ultrasonography as Disease Activity Marker in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Shaloo; Cheung, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) occurs early if inflammation is not treated promptly. Treatment targeted to reduce inflammation, in particular, that of synovial inflammation in the joints (synovitis), has been recommended as standard treat-to-target recommendations by rheumatologists. The goal is to achieve disease remission (i.e., no disease activity). Several accepted remission criteria have not always equated to the complete absence of true inflammation. Over the last decade, musculoskeletal ultrasonography has been demonstrated to detect subclinical synovitis not appreciated by routine clinical or laboratory assessments, with the Power Doppler modality allowing clinicians to more readily appreciate true inflammation. Thus, targeting therapy to Power Doppler activity may provide superior outcomes compared with treating to clinical targets alone, making it an attractive marker of disease activity in RA. However, more validation on its true benefits such as its benefits to patients in regard to patient related outcomes and issues with standardized training in acquisition and interpretation of power Doppler findings are required. PMID:26063952

  9. Vocational Rehabilitation for Persons with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Saralynn H.

    1998-01-01

    Useful vocational rehabilitation strategies for persons with rheumatoid arthritis include (1) management of symptoms and reduction of energy demand; (2) reasonable job accommodations; (3) identification of suitable jobs and necessary training; and (4) enhancement of self-advocacy skills. (SK)

  10. Termination of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis and in psoriatic arthritis. A comparative study of 270 cases.

    PubMed

    Ujfalussy, I; Koó, E; Seszták, M; Gergely, P

    2003-04-01

    102 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 104 psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients' records were analysed according to a standardised protocol. Using Cox regression, life-table analysis and log rank test, the effectiveness and toxicity of, and duration of disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment were compared in RA and PsA. RA patients were treated with gold sodium thiomalate (GST), methotrexate (MTX) and sulphasalazine (SSZ) for a median duration of 35, 72 and 12 months respectively, whereas PsA patients were treated for 12, 12 and 17 months. The differences for GST and MTX were statistically significant (p=0.0043 and 0.0447). Drug toxicity was more frequently seen among patients with PsA (p=0.0023). No difference in efficacy could be proved. Results suggest that there is a significant difference between RA and PsA patients in terms of toxicity of these agents. Therefore, separate treatment strategies are needed, and earlier results with RA may not be directly applicable to PsA. PMID:12721703

  11. NETs are a source of citrullinated autoantigens and stimulate inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Khandpur, Ritika; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Gizinski, Alison; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Knight, Jason S.; Friday, Sean; Li, Sam; Patel, Rajiv M.; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul; Chen, Pojen; Fox, David A.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2013-01-01

    The early events leading to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain unclear but formation of autoantibodies to citrullinated antigens (ACPA) is considered a key pathogenic phenomenon. Neutrophils isolated from patients with various autoimmune diseases display enhanced extracellular trap formation (NETs), a phenomenon that externalizes autoantigens and immunostimulatory molecules. We investigated whether aberrant NETosis occurs in RA, determined its triggers and examined its deleterious inflammatory consequences. Enhanced NETosis was observed in circulating and synovial fluid RA neutrophils, compared to neutrophils from healthy controls and from patients with osteoarthritis. Further, netting neutrophils infiltrated RA synovial tissue, rheumatoid nodules and skin. NETosis correlated with ACPA presence and levels and with systemic inflammatory markers. RA sera and immunoglobulin fractions from RA patients with high levels of ACPA and/or rheumatoid factor significantly enhanced NETosis, and the NETs induced by these autoantibodies displayed distinct protein content. During NETosis, neutrophils externalized citrullinated autoantigens implicated in RA pathogenesis, whereas anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies potently induced NET formation. The inflammatory cytokines IL-17A and TNF-α induced NETosis in RA neutrophils. In turn, NETs significantly augmented inflammatory responses in RA and OA synovial fibroblasts, including induction of IL-6, IL-8, chemokines and adhesion molecules. These observations implicate accelerated NETosis in RA pathogenesis, through externalization of citrullinated autoantigens and immunostimulatory molecules that may promote aberrant adaptive and innate immune responses in the joint and in the periphery, and perpetuate pathogenic mechanisms in this disease. PMID:23536012

  12. Renal findings in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical aspects of 132 necropsies.

    PubMed

    Boers, M; Croonen, A M; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C; Eulderink, F; Cats, A; Weening, J J

    1987-09-01

    Renal abnormalities in 132 necropsied patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. Clinical findings before death included extra-articular manifestations of the disease (86% of patients), systemic vasculitis (6%), and uraemia (23%). Necropsy findings included nephrosclerosis (90%), systemic vasculitis (14%) with kidney involvement in 8%, amyloidosis (11%), membranous glomerulopathy (8%), and focal glomerular disease (8%). Association with clinical data suggests that both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid disease may play a part in the cause of these abnormalities. PMID:3675007

  13. A 21-year-old man with systemic-onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, cough and progressive dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Leber, A; Carette, S; Chapman, K R; Hwang, D M; Singer, L G; Marras, T K

    2010-01-01

    Primary or nonobstructive, endogenous lipoid pneumonia is a rare clinical entity usually associated with an underlying systemic disease. The present report describes a case involving a 21-year-old man with systemic-onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who developed primary endogenous lipoid pneumonia. Multiple treatment regimens were attempted; however, definitive management was only achieved through double-lung transplantation. PMID:20617213

  14. MicroRNAs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Eisa; Eftekhari, Rahil; Oraei, Mona; Gharib, Alvand; Bidad, Katayoon

    2015-04-01

    The role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the development of rheumatic diseases has been an interesting field of research over the past decades all around the world. Research on the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been active and ongoing, and investigations have attempted to use miRNAs as biomarkers in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. This review focuses on experimental researches in the field of miRNAs and RA to present the data available up to this date and includes researches searched by keywords "microRNA" and "rheumatoid arthritis" in PubMed from 2008 to January 2015. All references were also searched for related papers. miRNAs are shown to act as proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory agents in diverse cell types, and their role seems to be regulatory in most instances. Researchers have evaluated miRNAs in patients compared to controls or have investigated their role by overexpressing or silencing them. Multiple targets have been identified in vivo, in vitro, or in silico, and the researches still continue to show their efficacy in clinical settings. PMID:25736037

  15. Surgical Management of the Forefoot in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis - A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Nash, W.J.; Al-Nammari, S.; Khan, W.S.; Pengas, I.P.

    2015-01-01

    Foot and ankle pathologies cause a significant disease burden on rheumatoid patients. Forefoot pathologies causes pain, callosities and possibly ulceration, and can cause problems with footwear. Forefoot correction in rheumatoid patients has historically comprised of excision of diseased joints. While satisfaction was high with this procedure, complications, changing expectations and improvement in medical therapy have raised expectation of patients, physicians and surgeons alike. This review assesses the role of joint preserving osteotomies and arthrodesis, as well as associated complications. It also describes the role of the multidisciplinary team in the management of these patients. PMID:25861409

  16. Investigating the Value of Abatacept in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review of Cost-Effectiveness Studies

    PubMed Central

    Petrakis, Ioannis; Kyriopoulos, John

    2013-01-01

    Background. Rheumatoid arthritis is a progressive inflammatory disease that affects greatly patients' quality of life and demands for aggressive management early on during the course of the disease. The discovery of biologics has equipped rheumatologists with evolutionary treatment tools but has also impacted greatly management costs. Objectives. To conduct a systematic review in order to evaluate the cost effectiveness of abatacept in the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. Methods. Pubmed, the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Outcomes Research Digest, the National Health System Economic Evaluation Database, and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects were searched. Results. In total 301 studies were identified and 42 met the inclusion criteria. Half of the selected studies evaluated abatacept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, after failure of or intolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. Of those, 82% were in favor of abatacept as a cost-effective or dominant strategy versus varying alternatives, whereas 18% favored other treatments. Conclusion. The majority of evidence from the published literature supports that abatacept can be a cost-effective alternative in the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, especially in patients that have demonstrated inadequate response or intolerance to anti-TNF agents or conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs. PMID:23819062

  17. Home Care Guide on Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (For Parents).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesecke, Linda L.; And Others

    The booklet, written by the medical staff of a children's hospital, provides information for parents of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Arthritis is a swelling of the joint(s) in children and lasts for over 6 weeks (sometimes many years). Aspirin is the main medicine given for JRA, and it works not only to control pain but also,…

  18. Biological Basis for the Use of Botanicals in Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and hip is a debilitating disease affecting more women than men and the risk of developing OA increases precipitously with aging. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common form of inflammatory joint diseases, is a disease of unknown etiology and affects ∼1% of the population worldwide, and unlike OA, generally involves many joints because of the systemic nature of the disease. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the first drugs of choice for the symptomatic treatment of both OA and RA. Because of the risks associated with the use of NSAIDs and other limitations, the use of alternative therapies, such as acupuncture and medicinal herbs, is on the rise and according to reports ∼60–90% of dissatisfied arthritis patients are likely to seek the option of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This paper reviews the efficacy of some of the common herbs that have a history of human use and their anti-inflammatory or antiarthritic properties have been evaluated in animal models of inflammatory arthritis, in studies employing well defined and widely accepted in vitro models that use human chondrocytes/cartilage explants or in clinical trials. Available data suggests that the extracts of most of these herbs or compounds derived from them may provide a safe and effective adjunctive therapeutic approach for the treatment of OA and RA. This, in turn, argues for trials to establish efficacy and optimum dosage of these compounds for treating human inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases. PMID:16136208

  19. Anglo-French contributions to the recognition of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Kevin J.

    1982-01-01

    Early descriptions of rheumatoid arthritis in the English and French literature are reviewed. Charcot pointed out that the disease was recognised as distinct from gout in eighteenth century England, and pictorial evidence for this is presented. His own work on arthritis led to a series of noteworthy interactions with Alfred Baring Garrod, which are discussed. Images PMID:7051988

  20. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR): therapeutic target and predictive biological marker in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Pnina; Cohen, Shira

    2016-09-01

    The Gi protein-associated A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is over-expressed in inflammatory cells, and this high expression is also reflected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease. CF101, a selective agonist with high affinity to the A3AR, is known to induce robust anti-inflammatory effect in experimental animal models of adjuvant-, collagen-, and tropomyosin-induced arthritis. The effect is mediated via a definitive molecular mechanism entailing deregulation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the Wnt signal transduction pathways resulting in apoptosis of inflammatory cells. CF101 was found to be safe and well tolerated in all preclinical, phase I, and phase II human clinical studies. In two phase II clinical studies where CF101 was administered to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as a stand-alone drug, a significant anti-rheumatic effect and a direct significant correlation were found between receptor expression at baseline and patients' response to the drug, suggesting that A3AR may be utilized as a predictive biomarker. The A3AR is a promising therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis and can be used also as a biological marker to predict patients' response to CF101. This is a unique type of a personalized medicine approach which may pave the way for a safe and efficacious treatment for this patient population. PMID:26886128

  1. IL-17 in synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis is a potent stimulator of osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Shigeru; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro; Itoh, Kanami; Ishiyama, Shigeru; Saito, Seiji; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Suda, Tatsuo

    1999-01-01

    IL-17 is a newly discovered T cell–derived cytokine whose role in osteoclast development has not been fully elucidated. Treatment of cocultures of mouse hemopoietic cells and primary osteoblasts with recombinant human IL-17 induced the formation of multinucleated cells, which satisfied major criteria of osteoclasts, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity, calcitonin receptors, and pit formation on dentine slices. Direct interaction between osteoclast progenitors and osteoblasts was required for IL-17–induced osteoclastogenesis, which was completely inhibited by adding indomethacin or NS398, a selective inhibitor of cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2). Adding IL-17 increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis in cocultures of bone marrow cells and osteoblasts and in single cultures of osteoblasts, but not in single cultures of bone marrow cells. In addition, IL-17 dose-dependently induced expression of osteoclast differentiation factor (ODF) mRNA in osteoblasts. ODF is a membrane-associated protein that transduces an essential signal(s) to osteoclast progenitors for differentiation into osteoclasts. Osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor (OCIF), a decoy receptor of ODF, completely inhibited IL-17–induced osteoclast differentiation in the cocultures. Levels of IL-17 in synovial fluids were significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients than osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Anti–IL-17 antibody significantly inhibited osteoclast formation induced by culture media of RA synovial tissues. These findings suggest that IL-17 first acts on osteoblasts, which stimulates both COX-2–dependent PGE2 synthesis and ODF gene expression, which in turn induce differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into mature osteoclasts, and that IL-17 is a crucial cytokine for osteoclastic bone resorption in RA patients. PMID:10225978

  2. Sarilumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Simon

    2016-03-01

    Simon Cooper is interviewed by Ellen Clarke, Commissioning Editor Simon Cooper has >18 years of global experience in the pharmaceutical industry. He joined Sanofi in July 2014 as the Vice President, Global Project Head. In his current position at Sanofi, Dr Cooper is responsible for the clinical development of sarilumab and the worldwide submission in rheumatoid arthritis. He joined Sanofi after serving as the Global Program Medical Director at Novartis since 2012. In this role, Dr Cooper acted as the clinical lead for secukinumab psoriasis submission. Prior to Novartis, Dr Cooper held various posts at Human Genome Sciences, USA, including Executive Director of Clinical Research, Senior Director of Clinical Research and Director of Clinical Research. During his tenure at Human Genome Sciences, USA, Dr Cooper was involved in the submission of belimumab leading to its approval for SLE, and was responsible for its subsequent clinical development program. Dr Cooper has also previously held positions at MedImmune Ltd, UK, Roche, Napp Pharmaceutical Research Ltd, Wyeth Research and Medeval Ltd. In these roles, his responsibilities ranged from medical oversight of clinical trials to medical support for commercial, medical affairs and business development. He received a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery from University of Newcastle upon Tyne Medical School. PMID:26860742

  3. The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage and Reflexology on Pain and Fatigue in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Gok Metin, Zehra; Ozdemir, Leyla

    2016-04-01

    Nonpharmacologic interventions for symptom management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are underinvestigated. Limited data suggest that aromatherapy massage and reflexology may help to reduce pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the effects of aromatherapy massage and reflexology on pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study sample was randomly assigned to either an aromatherapy massage (n = 17), reflexology (n = 17) or the control group (n = 17). Aromatherapy massage was applied to both knees of subjects in the first intervention group for 30 minutes. Reflexology was administered to both feet of subjects in the second intervention group for 40 minutes during weekly home visits. Control group subjects received no intervention. Fifty-one subjects with rheumatoid arthritis were recruited from a university hospital rheumatology clinic in Turkey between July 2014 and January 2015 for this randomized controlled trial. Data were collected by personal information form, DAS28 index, Visual Analog Scale and Fatigue Severity Scale. Pain and fatigue scores were measured at baseline and within an hour after each intervention for 6 weeks. Pain and fatigue scores significantly decreased in the aromatherapy massage and reflexology groups compared with the control group (p < .05). The reflexology intervention started to decrease mean pain and fatigue scores earlier than aromatherapy massage (week 1 vs week 2 for pain, week 1 vs week 4 for fatigue) (p < .05). Aromatherapy massage and reflexology are simple and effective nonpharmacologic nursing interventions that can be used to help manage pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27091583

  4. Dendritic cells provide a potential link between smoking and inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Smoking increases the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and affects the severity of established RA. Smoking can impact on Th17 lymphocyte differentiation and function through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a process with implications for the pathogenic mechanisms in RA that involve the cytokine, interleukin (IL)-17A. The objective of this study was to establish any effect of smoking on the inflammatory tissue lesions of rheumatoid arthritis via the AHR and IL-17A. Methods Twenty synovial and eighteen subcutaneous nodule tissue samples from 31 patients with RA were studied. Patient smoking status at the time of tissue collection was established. Expression of AHR, CYP1A1, AHRR, IL6, IL17A, IL17F, IL22, IL23, IL23R, IFNG, TBX21, IDO1 and FOXP3 genes were assessed in tissues and cultured cells using real-time PCR. Two-colour immunofluorescence was used to co-localise AHR and CYP1A1 protein in synovial tissues. The response of monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mo-DCs) to the AHR agonist, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) was compared in vitro. Results AHR gene expression was demonstrated in rheumatoid synovial tissues and nodules with significantly greater expression in synovia. Expression was not influenced by smoking in either tissue. Evidence of AHR activation, indicated by CYP1A1 and AHRR gene expression, was found only in synovia from patients who smoked. However, IL17A gene expression was lower in synovia from smokers. TBX21 and FOXP3 expression was not affected by smoking. Within the synovial tissues of smokers the principal cell type with evidence of AHR activation was a subset of synovial DCs. This observation was consistent with the sensitivity of human mo-DCs to BaP stimulation demonstrated in vitro. Exposure to BaP affected mo-DC function as demonstrated by decreased IL6 expression induced by PolyI:C, without affecting indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO)1 expression. Conclusion Our findings show that one effect of

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Contents Members of the America 2 Anywhere 4 Arthritis (A2A4A) running group after finishing a marathon. Through ...

  6. Polyarticular psoriatic arthritis is more like oligoarticular psoriatic arthritis, than rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, P S; Porter, G; Taylor, W J

    2007-01-01

    Background and objective Since the original description of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) subgroups by Moll and Wright, there has been some discrepancy in the precise prevalence of the different subgroups and in particular the proportion of patients with polyarthritis. The higher prevalence of the polyarthritis subgroup may be due to the inclusion of patients with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis with coincidental psoriasis. The classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR) study database provided an opportunity to examine this question. Methods The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician‐diagnosed PsA and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of whom had rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with PsA were divided into two groups: polyarthritis and non‐polyarthritis (which included the Moll and Wright subgroups of spinal disease, distal interphalangeal predominant and arthritis mutilans) and were compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Comparisons were made between all three groups and, if a significant difference occurred, between the two groups with PsA. Results The three groups differed significantly with regard to all clinical and laboratory variables except duration of disease. Significant differences were also found between the two groups of PsA in terms of age, sex, total number of involved joints, disability score and symmetry. However, no differences were found between the groups of patients with PsA in terms of seropositivity for rheumatoid factor and antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide, enthesitis, and spinal pain and stiffness. Further, dactylitis was commonly seen in patients with PsA (57% in the polyarticular group and 45% in non‐polyarticular group), and uncommonly found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (5%). With the exception of entheseal changes, syndesmophytes and osteolysis, typical radiological features of PsA could not be used to distinguish between the PsA

  7. Nerve Zap Eased Rheumatoid Arthritis in Small Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159838.html Nerve Zap Eased Rheumatoid Arthritis in Small Study Treatment worked some for patients ... the gut may help ease stubborn symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, preliminary research suggests. The study, of 17 adults ...

  8. Bilirubin as a Protective Factor for Rheumatoid Arthritis: An NHANES Study of 2003 - 2006 Data

    PubMed Central

    Fischman, Daniel; Valluri, Ashok; Gorrepati, Venkata Subhash; Murphy, Megan E.; Peters, Ian; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2010-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis(RA) is a chronic inflammatory, autoimmune polyarthritis, with a prevalence estimated at one percent of the United States(US) population. Serum bilirubin, because of its antioxidant nature, has been conjectured to exert an anti-inflammatory biologic effect. The objective of this study is to discern whether higher serum Total Bilirubin(TBili) levels are protective against RA. Methods This is a secondary analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data collected between 2003-2006. Study participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire regarding their health history, underwent a physical examination, and had body fluids collected for laboratory studies. In NHANES, to assess for the presence of RA, the following questions were asked: "Doctor ever said you had arthritis?" If so, "Which type of arthritis". Statistical analysis was performed, using SAS version 9.1, proc survey methods. Participant data were adjusted for demographic characteristics as well as risk factors for RA. Results NHANES 2003-2006 included 20,470 individuals, chosen as a representative sampling of the entire US population. Exclusion criteria included age less than twenty years or liver dysfunction, defined as history of abnormal liver function tests or liver disease. 8,147 subjects did not have any exclusion criteria and were included in the data analysis. RA is inversely related to the serum level of TBili with an odds ratio of 0.679 (95% CI 0.533-0.865) and remained significant even after adjusting for age, gender, race, education, and tobacco history, with an odds ratio 0.749 (95% CI 0.575 - 0.976). Conclusions Our study supports the hypothesis that higher TBili levels are protective against RA. A plausible mechanism for this association would be that the anti-oxidant effects of TBili exert a physiologic anti-inflammatory effect, which provides protection against RA. This explanation is supported by prior studies which show that higher

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis association at 6q23.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Donn, Rachelle; Symmons, Deborah; Hider, Samantha; Bruce, Ian N; Wilson, Anthony G; Marinou, Ioanna; Morgan, Ann; Emery, Paul; Carter, Angela; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Strachan, David; Worthington, Jane

    2007-12-01

    The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) identified nine single SNPs putatively associated with rheumatoid arthritis at P = 1 x 10(-5) - 5 x 10(-7) in a genome-wide association screen. One, rs6920220, was unequivocally replicated (trend P = 1.1 x 10(-8)) in a validation study, as described here. This SNP maps to 6q23, between the genes oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 3 (OLIG3) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3). PMID:17982455

  10. Sarcoidosis during etanercept treatment for rheumatoid arthritis in women with a history of bilateral oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    Sawahata, Michiru; Sigiyama, Yukihiko; Yamasawa, Hideaki; Miki, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Muto, Shigeaki; Yamamoto, Hironori; Bando, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    nd in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxically, this treatment induces sarcoidosis in a small population of RA patients as a class effect. A safer anti-TNF therapeutic strategy requires understanding of the risk factors for sarcoidosis. In Japan, TNF inhibitor was introduced in 2003. We reviewed 226 consecutive patients (65 men and 161 women) who were newly diagnosed with sarcoidosis between 2003 and 2012 at Jichi Medical University Hospital, Japan. We detected 3 cases in which sarcoidosis developed during etanercept treatment for RA. All 3 cases were women who had undergone bilateral oophorectomy more than 20 years earlier. Taken together with our previous epidemiologic findings of a consistently maintained second peak after menopause in the age-specific distribution of sarcoidosis in women over four decades, long-term insidious ovarian dysfunction was a possible risk factor for sarcoidosis under certain conditions, especially during etanercept treatment. PMID:27537723