Sample records for rhinovirus genome evolution

  1. Rhinovirus Genome Evolution during Experimental Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Daniel; Gobbini, Francesca; Farinelli, Laurent; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Winther, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) evolve rapidly due in part to their error-prone RNA polymerase. Knowledge of the diversity of HRV populations emerging during the course of a natural infection is essential and represents a basis for the design of future potential vaccines and antiviral drugs. To evaluate HRV evolution in humans, nasal wash samples were collected daily for five days from 15 immunocompetent volunteers experimentally infected with a reference stock of HRV-39. In parallel, HeLa-OH cells were inoculated to compare HRV evolution in vitro. Nasal wash in vivo assessed by real-time PCR showed a viral load that peaked at 48–72 h. Ultra-deep sequencing was used to compare the low-frequency mutation populations present in the HRV-39 inoculum in two human subjects and one HeLa-OH supernatant collected 5 days post-infection. The analysis revealed hypervariable mutation locations in VP2, VP3, VP1, 2C and 3C genes and conserved regions in VP4, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B and 3D genes. These results were confirmed by classical sequencing of additional samples, both from inoculated volunteers and independent cell infections, and suggest that HRV inter-host transmission is not associated with a strong bottleneck effect. A specific analysis of the VP1 capsid gene of 15 human cases confirmed the high mutation incidence in this capsid region, but not in the antiviral drug-binding pocket. We could also estimate a mutation frequency in vivo of 3.4×10?4 mutations/nucleotides and 3.1×10?4 over the entire ORF and VP1 gene, respectively. In vivo, HRV generate new variants rapidly during the course of an acute infection due to mutations that accumulate in hot spot regions located at the capsid level, as well as in 2C and 3C genes. PMID:20485673

  2. Population Structure and Evolution of Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Waman, Vaishali P.; Kolekar, Pandurang S.; Kale, Mohan M.; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila

    2014-01-01

    Rhinoviruses, formerly known as Human rhinoviruses, are the most common cause of air-borne upper respiratory tract infections in humans. Rhinoviruses belong to the family Picornaviridae and are divided into three species namely, Rhinovirus A, -B and -C, which are antigenically diverse. Genetic recombination is found to be one of the important causes for diversification of Rhinovirus species. Although emerging lineages within Rhinoviruses have been reported, their population structure has not been studied yet. The availability of complete genome sequences facilitates study of population structure, genetic diversity and underlying evolutionary forces, such as mutation, recombination and selection pressure. Analysis of complete genomes of Rhinoviruses using a model-based population genetics approach provided a strong evidence for existence of seven genetically distinct subpopulations. As a result of diversification, Rhinovirus A and -C populations are divided into four and two subpopulations, respectively. Genetically, the Rhinovirus B population was found to be homogeneous. Intra-species recombination was observed to be prominent in Rhinovirus A and -C species. Significant evidence of episodic positive selection was obtained for several sites within coding sequences of structural and non-structural proteins. This corroborates well with known phenotypic properties such as antigenicity of structural proteins. Episodic positive selection appears to be responsible for emergence of new lineages especially in Rhinovirus A. In summary, the Rhinovirus population is an ensemble of seven distinct lineages. In case of Rhinovirus A, intra-species recombination and episodic positive selection contribute to its further diversification. In case of Rhinovirus C, intra- and inter-species recombinations are responsible for observed diversity. Population genetics approach was further useful to analyze phylogenetic tree topologies pertaining to recombinant strains, especially when trees are derived using complete genomes. Understanding of population structure serves as a foundation for designing new vaccines and drugs as well as to explain emergence of drug resistance amongst subpopulations. PMID:24586469

  3. Analysis of Complete Genome Sequences of Human Rhinovirus

    PubMed Central

    Palmenberg, Ann C.; Rathe, Jennifer A.; Liggett, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Human Rhinovirus (HRV) infection is the cause of about one-half of asthma and COPD exacerbations. With >100 serotypes in the HRV reference set an effort was undertaken to sequence their complete genomes so as to understand diversity, structural variation, and evolution of the virus. Analysis revealed conserved motifs, hypervariable regions, a potential fourth HRV species, within-serotype variation in field isolates, a non-scanning internal ribosome entry site, and evidence for HRV recombination. Techniques have now been developed using next generation sequencing to generate complete genomes from patient isolates with high throughput, deep coverage, and low costs. Thus relationships can now be sought between obstructive lung phenotypes and variation in HRV genomes in infected patients, and, potential novel therapeutic strategies developed based on HRV sequence. PMID:20471068

  4. Molecular cloning and complete sequence determination of RNA genome of human rhinovirus type 14.

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, P L; Mizutani, S; Colonno, R J

    1985-01-01

    The genomic RNA of human rhinovirus type 14 was cloned in Escherichia coli and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The RNA genome is 7212 nucleotides long. A single large open reading frame of 6536 nucleotides was identified, which starts at nucleotide 678 and ends 47 nucleotides from the 3' end of the RNA genome. Comparisons of the specified proteins with those of other picornaviruses showed a striking homology (44-65%) between rhinovirus and poliovirus. The rhinovirus genomic RNA is rich in adenosine (32.1%) and strongly favors an adenosine or uridine in the third position of codons. The predicted map locations of all the rhinovirus structural and non-structural proteins and their proposed proteolytic cleavage sites are described. PMID:2983312

  5. New complete genome sequences of human rhinoviruses shed light on their phylogeny and genomic features

    PubMed Central

    Tapparel, Caroline; Junier, Thomas; Gerlach, Daniel; Cordey, Samuel; Van Belle, Sandra; Perrin, Luc; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Kaiser, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background Human rhinoviruses (HRV), the most frequent cause of respiratory infections, include 99 different serotypes segregating into two species, A and B. Rhinoviruses share extensive genomic sequence similarity with enteroviruses and both are part of the picornavirus family. Nevertheless they differ significantly at the phenotypic level. The lack of HRV full-length genome sequences and the absence of analysis comparing picornaviruses at the whole genome level limit our knowledge of the genomic features supporting these differences. Results Here we report complete genome sequences of 12 HRV-A and HRV-B serotypes, more than doubling the current number of available HRV sequences. The whole-genome maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis suggests that HRV-B and human enteroviruses (HEV) diverged from the last common ancestor after their separation from HRV-A. On the other hand, compared to HEV, HRV-B are more related to HRV-A in the capsid and 3B-C regions. We also identified the presence of a 2C cis-acting replication element (cre) in HRV-B that is not present in HRV-A, and that had been previously characterized only in HEV. In contrast to HEV viruses, HRV-A and HRV-B share also markedly lower GC content along the whole genome length. Conclusion Our findings provide basis to speculate about both the biological similarities and the differences (e.g. tissue tropism, temperature adaptation or acid lability) of these three groups of viruses. PMID:17623054

  6. Genome Sequences of Rhinovirus A Isolates from Wisconsin Pediatric Respiratory Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liggett, Stephen B.; Bochkov, Yury A.; Pappas, Tressa; Lemanske, Robert F.; Gern, James E.; Sengamalay, Naomi; Zhao, Xuechu; Su, Qi; Fraser, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Full-length or nearly full-length RNA genome sequences for 98 rhinovirus (RV) A isolates (from the Enterovirus genus of the Picornaviridae family), representing 43 different genotypes, were resolved as part of ongoing studies to define RV genetic diversity and its potential link to respiratory disease. PMID:24675855

  7. Genome-wide diversity and selective pressure in the human rhinovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, Amy L; Webster, Dale R; Rouskin, Silvi; Magrini, Vince; Credle, Joel J; Schnurr, David P; Boushey, Homer A; Mardis, Elaine R; Li, Hao; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2007-01-01

    Background The human rhinoviruses (HRV) are one of the most common and diverse respiratory pathogens of humans. Over 100 distinct HRV serotypes are known, yet only 6 genomes are available. Due to the paucity of HRV genome sequence, little is known about the genetic diversity within HRV or the forces driving this diversity. Previous comparative genome sequence analyses indicate that recombination drives diversification in multiple genera of the picornavirus family, yet it remains unclear if this holds for HRV. Results To resolve this and gain insight into the forces driving diversification in HRV, we generated a representative set of 34 fully sequenced HRVs. Analysis of these genomes shows consistent phylogenies across the genome, conserved non-coding elements, and only limited recombination. However, spikes of genetic diversity at both the nucleotide and amino acid level are detectable within every locus of the genome. Despite this, the HRV genome as a whole is under purifying selective pressure, with islands of diversifying pressure in the VP1, VP2, and VP3 structural genes and two non-structural genes, the 3C protease and 3D polymerase. Mapping diversifying residues in these factors onto available 3-dimensional structures revealed the diversifying capsid residues partition to the external surface of the viral particle in statistically significant proximity to antigenic sites. Diversifying pressure in the pleconaril binding site is confined to a single residue known to confer drug resistance (VP1 191). In contrast, diversifying pressure in the non-structural genes is less clear, mapping both nearby and beyond characterized functional domains of these factors. Conclusion This work provides a foundation for understanding HRV genetic diversity and insight into the underlying biology driving evolution in HRV. It expands our knowledge of the genome sequence space that HRV reference serotypes occupy and how the pattern of genetic diversity across HRV genomes differs from other picornaviruses. It also reveals evidence of diversifying selective pressure in both structural genes known to interact with the host immune system and in domains of unassigned function in the non-structural 3C and 3D genes, raising the possibility that diversification of undiscovered functions in these essential factors may influence HRV fitness and evolution. PMID:17477878

  8. Complete sequence of the RNA genome of human rhinovirus 16, a clinically useful common cold virus belonging to the ICAM-1 receptor group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wai-Ming Lee; Wensheng Wang; Roland R. Rueckert

    1995-01-01

    We report here the complete nucleotide sequence and predicted polyprotein sequence of HeLa cell-adapted human rhinovirus 16 (HRV16). This virus is more suitable than human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14) for clinical studies, and its growth and physical properties are favorable for biochemical and crystallographic analysis. The complete message-sense RNA genome of HRV16 is composed of 7124 bases, not including the poly(A)

  9. The Rhinovirus Subviral A-Particle Exposes 3?-Terminal Sequences of Its Genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Harutyunyan, Shushan; Kowalski, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enteroviruses, which represent a large genus within the family Picornaviridae, undergo important conformational modifications during infection of the host cell. Once internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor binding and/or the acidic endosomal environment triggers the native virion to expand and convert into the subviral (altered) A-particle. The A-particle is lacking the internal capsid protein VP4 and exposes N-terminal amphipathic sequences of VP1, allowing for its direct interaction with a lipid bilayer. The genomic single-stranded (+)RNA then exits through a hole close to a 2-fold axis of icosahedral symmetry and passes through a pore in the endosomal membrane into the cytosol, leaving behind the empty shell. We demonstrate that in vitro acidification of a prototype of the minor receptor group of common cold viruses, human rhinovirus A2 (HRV-A2), also results in egress of the poly(A) tail of the RNA from the A-particle, along with adjacent nucleotides totaling ?700 bases. However, even after hours of incubation at pH 5.2, 5?-proximal sequences remain inside the capsid. In contrast, the entire RNA genome is released within minutes of exposure to the acidic endosomal environment in vivo. This finding suggests that the exposed 3?-poly(A) tail facilitates the positioning of the RNA exit site onto the putative channel in the lipid bilayer, thereby preventing the egress of viral RNA into the endosomal lumen, where it may be degraded. IMPORTANCE For host cell infection, a virus transfers its genome from within the protective capsid into the cytosol; this requires modifications of the viral shell. In common cold viruses, exit of the RNA genome is prepared by the acidic environment in endosomes converting the native virion into the subviral A-particle. We demonstrate that acidification in vitro results in RNA exit starting from the 3?-terminal poly(A). However, the process halts as soon as about 700 bases have left the viral shell. Conversely, inside the cell, RNA egress completes in about 2 min. This suggests the existence of cellular uncoating facilitators. PMID:24672023

  10. Genome evolution in yeasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard Dujon; David Sherman; Gilles Fischer; Pascal Durrens; Serge Casaregola; Ingrid Lafontaine; Jacky de Montigny; Christian Marck; Cécile Neuvéglise; Emmanuel Talla; Nicolas Goffard; Lionel Frangeul; Michel Aigle; Véronique Anthouard; Anna Babour; Valérie Barbe; Stéphanie Barnay; Sylvie Blanchin; Jean-Marie Beckerich; Emmanuelle Beyne; Claudine Bleykasten; Anita Boisramé; Jeanne Boyer; Laurence Cattolico; Fabrice Confanioleri; Antoine de Daruvar; Laurence Despons; Emmanuelle Fabre; Cécile Fairhead; Hélène Ferry-Dumazet; Alexis Groppi; Florence Hantraye; Christophe Hennequin; Nicolas Jauniaux; Philippe Joyet; Rym Kachouri; Alix Kerrest; Romain Koszul; Marc Lemaire; Isabelle Lesur; Laurence Ma; Héloïse Muller; Jean-Marc Nicaud; Macha Nikolski; Sophie Oztas; Odile Ozier-Kalogeropoulos; Stefan Pellenz; Serge Potier; Guy-Franck Richard; Marie-Laure Straub; Audrey Suleau; Dominique Swennen; Fredj Tekaia; Micheline Wésolowski-Louvel; Eric Westhof; Bénédicte Wirth; Maria Zeniou-Meyer; Ivan Zivanovic; Monique Bolotin-Fukuhara; Agnès Thierry; Christiane Bouchier; Bernard Caudron; Claude Scarpelli; Claude Gaillardin; Jean Weissenbach; Patrick Wincker; Jean-Luc Souciet

    2004-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms of eukaryotic genome evolution by comparative genomics is often complicated by the multiplicity of events that have taken place throughout the history of individual lineages, leaving only distorted and superimposed traces in the genome of each living organism. The hemiascomycete yeasts, with their compact genomes, similar lifestyle and distinct sexual and physiological properties, provide a unique opportunity

  11. The rhinovirus type 14 genome contains an internally located RNA structure that is required for viral replication.

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, K L; Lemon, S M

    1998-01-01

    Cis-acting RNA signals are required for replication of positive-strand viruses such as the picornaviruses. Although these generally have been mapped to the 5' and/or 3' termini of the viral genome, RNAs derived from human rhinovirus type 14 are unable to replicate unless they contain an internal cis-acting replication element (cre) located within the genome segment encoding the capsid proteins. Here, we show that the essential cre sequence is 83-96 nt in length and located between nt 2318-2413 of the genome. Using dicistronic RNAs in which translation of the P1 and P2-P3 segments of the polyprotein were functionally dissociated, we further demonstrate that translation of the cre sequence is not required for RNA replication. Thus, although it is located within a protein-coding segment of the genome, the cre functions as an RNA entity. Computer folds suggested that cre sequences could form a stable structure in either positive- or minus-strand RNA. However, an analysis of mutant RNAs containing multiple covariant and non-covariant nucleotide substitutions within these putative structures demonstrated that only the predicted positive-strand structure is essential for efficient RNA replication. The absence of detectable minus-strand synthesis from RNAs that lack the cre suggests that the cre is required for initiation of minus-strand RNA synthesis. Since a lethal 3' noncoding region mutation could be partially rescued by a compensating mutation within the cre, the cre appears to participate in a long-range RNA-RNA interaction required for this process. These data provide novel insight into the mechanisms of replication of a positive-strand RNA virus, as they define the involvement of an internally located RNA structure in the recognition of viral RNA by the viral replicase complex. Since internally located RNA replication signals have been shown to exist in several other positive-strand RNA virus families, these observations are potentially relevant to a wide array of related viruses. PMID:9848654

  12. Evolution of genome architecture.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-02-01

    Charles Darwin believed that all traits of organisms have been honed to near perfection by natural selection. The empirical basis underlying Darwin's conclusions consisted of numerous observations made by him and other naturalists on the exquisite adaptations of animals and plants to their natural habitats and on the impressive results of artificial selection. Darwin fully appreciated the importance of heredity but was unaware of the nature and, in fact, the very existence of genomes. A century and a half after the publication of the "Origin", we have the opportunity to draw conclusions from the comparisons of hundreds of genome sequences from all walks of life. These comparisons suggest that the dominant mode of genome evolution is quite different from that of the phenotypic evolution. The genomes of vertebrates, those purported paragons of biological perfection, turned out to be veritable junkyards of selfish genetic elements where only a small fraction of the genetic material is dedicated to encoding biologically relevant information. In sharp contrast, genomes of microbes and viruses are incomparably more compact, with most of the genetic material assigned to distinct biological functions. However, even in these genomes, the specific genome organization (gene order) is poorly conserved. The results of comparative genomics lead to the conclusion that the genome architecture is not a straightforward result of continuous adaptation but rather is determined by the balance between the selection pressure, that is itself dependent on the effective population size and mutation rate, the level of recombination, and the activity of selfish elements. Although genes and, in many cases, multigene regions of genomes possess elaborate architectures that ensure regulation of expression, these arrangements are evolutionarily volatile and typically change substantially even on short evolutionary scales when gene sequences diverge minimally. Thus, the observed genome architectures are, mostly, products of neutral processes or epiphenomena of more general selective processes, such as selection for genome streamlining in successful lineages with large populations. Selection for specific gene arrangements (elements of genome architecture) seems only to modulate the results of these processes. PMID:18929678

  13. Integrating sequence, evolution and functional genomics in regulatory genomics

    PubMed Central

    Vingron, Martin; Brazma, Alvis; Coulson, Richard; van Helden, Jacques; Manke, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Sand, Olivier; Ukkonen, Esko

    2009-01-01

    With genome analysis expanding from the study of genes to the study of gene regulation, 'regulatory genomics' utilizes sequence information, evolution and functional genomics measurements to unravel how regulatory information is encoded in the genome. PMID:19226437

  14. VIRAL EVOLUTION Genomic surveillance elucidates

    E-print Network

    Napp, Nils

    VIRAL EVOLUTION Genomic surveillance elucidates Ebola virus origin and transmission during the 2014,12,13 § Robert F. Garry,8 § S. Humarr Khan,3 § Pardis C. Sabeti1,2 § In its largest outbreak, Ebola virus disease is spreading through Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria. We sequenced 99 Ebola virus genomes from 78

  15. Nucleomorph genomes: structure, function, origin and evolution

    E-print Network

    Archibald, John

    Nucleomorph genomes: structure, function, origin and evolution John M. Archibald Summary and four genomes--two nuclear genomes, an endosymbiont- derived plastid genome and a mitochondrial genome derived from the host cell. Like mitochondrial and plastid genomes, the genome of the endosymbiont nucleus

  16. The medaka draft genome and insights into vertebrate genome evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masahiro Kasahara; Kiyoshi Naruse; Shin Sasaki; Yoichiro Nakatani; Wei Qu; Budrul Ahsan; Tomoyuki Yamada; Yukinobu Nagayasu; Koichiro Doi; Yasuhiro Kasai; Tomoko Jindo; Daisuke Kobayashi; Atsuko Shimada; Atsushi Toyoda; Yoko Kuroki; Asao Fujiyama; Takashi Sasaki; Atsushi Shimizu; Shuichi Asakawa; Nobuyoshi Shimizu; Shin-Ichi Hashimoto; Jun Yang; Yongjun Lee; Kouji Matsushima; Sumio Sugano; Mitsuru Sakaizumi; Takanori Narita; Kazuko Ohishi; Shinobu Haga; Fumiko Ohta; Hisayo Nomoto; Keiko Nogata; Tomomi Morishita; Tomoko Endo; Tadasu Shin-I; Hiroyuki Takeda; Shinichi Morishita; Yuji Kohara

    2007-01-01

    Teleosts comprise more than half of all vertebrate species and have adapted to a variety of marine and freshwater habitats. Their genome evolution and diversification are important subjects for the understanding of vertebrate evolution. Although draft genome sequences of two pufferfishes have been published, analysis of more fish genomes is desirable. Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence of

  17. Rhinovirus and the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Cox, D W; Le Souëf, P N

    2014-09-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections are now widely accepted as the commonest cause of acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) in children. Advanced PCR techniques have enabled HRV infections to be identified as causative agents in most common ARIs in childhood including bronchiolitis, acute asthma, pneumonia and croup. However, the long-term implications of rhinovirus infections are less clear. The aim of this review is to examine the relationship between rhinovirus infections and disorders of the lower airways in childhood. PMID:24767866

  18. Reverse genetic engineering of the human rhinovirus serotype 16 genome to introduce an antibody-detectable tag.

    PubMed

    Walker, Erin J; Jensen, Lora M; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately detect viral proteins during infection is essential for virology research, and the lack of specific antibodies can make this detection difficult. Reverse genetic engineering of virus genomes to alter the wild-type genome is a powerful technique to introduce a detectable tag onto a viral protein. Here we outline a method to incorporate an influenza hemagglutinin epitope tag onto the 2A protease of HRV16. The method uses site-directed mutagenesis PCR to introduce the sequence for the HA antigen onto either the C or N termini of 2A protease while keeping the relevant internal cleavage sites intact. The new viral product is then cloned into a wild-type HRV16 plasmid and transfected into Ohio Hela cells to produce recombinant virus. PMID:25261314

  19. Genomes and evolution From sequence to organism

    E-print Network

    Patel, Nipam H.

    Genomes and evolution From sequence to organism Editorial overview Evan E Eichler and Nipam H Patel, Center for Computational Genomics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University research is to understand the evolution, pathology and mechanisms of recent genome duplication in human

  20. Leading Edge Bacterial Genomics and Pathogen Evolution

    E-print Network

    Mekalanos, John

    Leading Edge Review Bacterial Genomics and Pathogen Evolution David M. Raskin,1 Rekha Seshadri,2 Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA 2 The Institute for Genomic Research, 9712 Medical Center Drive.02.002 The availability of hundreds of bacterial genome sequences has altered the study of bacte- rial pathogenesis

  1. Genomics and Evolution of Cellular Organelles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Odintsova; N. P. Yurina

    2005-01-01

    The structure, functions, and evolution of cellular organelles are reviewed. The mitochondrial genomes of eukaryotes differ considerably in size and structural organization mainly due to the length variation in noncoding regions and the presence of introns. The mitochondrial genomes of angiosperms are the largest and most complicated. Gene content in eukaryotic mitochondrial genomes is similar. They usually encode all types

  2. Genome duplication, extinction and vertebrate evolution

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    Genome duplication, extinction and vertebrate evolution Philip C.J. Donoghue1 and Mark A. Purnell2 7RH Vertebrate evolution has been punctuated by three episodes of widespread gene or genome duplication, which have been linked with the origin of vertebrates, gnathostomes and teleosts, respectively

  3. The Genomic Palimpsest: Genomics in Evolution and Ecology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    CHARLES F. DELWICHE (; )

    2004-11-01

    This peer-reviewed resource from Bioscience journal is about the role of genomics in evolution and ecology. Genomics is the discipline that has grown up around the sequencing and analysis of complete genomes. It has typically emphasized questions that involve the biological function of individual organisms, and has been somewhat isolated from the fields of evolutionary biology and ecology. However, genomic approaches also provide powerful tools for studying populations, interactions among organisms, and evolutionary history. Because of the large number of microbial genomes available, the first widespread use of genomic methods in evolution and ecology was in the study of bacteria and archaea, but similar approaches are being applied to eukaryotes. Genomic approaches have revolutionized the study of in situ microbial populations and facilitated the reconstruction of early events in the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. Fields that have been largely unaffected by genomics will feel its influence in the near future, and greater interaction will benefit all of these historically distinct fields of study.

  4. Gene Family Evolution across 12 Drosophila Genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew W Hahn; Mira V Han; Sang-Gook Han

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of whole genomes has revealed large and frequent changes in the size of gene families. These changes occur because of high rates of both gene gain (via duplication) and loss (via deletion or pseudogenization), as well as the evolution of entirely new genes. Here we use the genomes of 12 fully sequenced Drosophila species to study the gain and

  5. Evolution of small prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cano, David J.; Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Partida-Martínez, Laila P.; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Delaye, Luis

    2015-01-01

    As revealed by genome sequencing, the biology of prokaryotes with reduced genomes is strikingly diverse. These include free-living prokaryotes with ?800 genes as well as endosymbiotic bacteria with as few as ?140 genes. Comparative genomics is revealing the evolutionary mechanisms that led to these small genomes. In the case of free-living prokaryotes, natural selection directly favored genome reduction, while in the case of endosymbiotic prokaryotes neutral processes played a more prominent role. However, new experimental data suggest that selective processes may be at operation as well for endosymbiotic prokaryotes at least during the first stages of genome reduction. Endosymbiotic prokaryotes have evolved diverse strategies for living with reduced gene sets inside a host-defined medium. These include utilization of host-encoded functions (some of them coded by genes acquired by gene transfer from the endosymbiont and/or other bacteria); metabolic complementation between co-symbionts; and forming consortiums with other bacteria within the host. Recent genome sequencing projects of intracellular mutualistic bacteria showed that previously believed universal evolutionary trends like reduced G+C content and conservation of genome synteny are not always present in highly reduced genomes. Finally, the simplified molecular machinery of some of these organisms with small genomes may be used to aid in the design of artificial minimal cells. Here we review recent genomic discoveries of the biology of prokaryotes endowed with small gene sets and discuss the evolutionary mechanisms that have been proposed to explain their peculiar nature. PMID:25610432

  6. BIOL 430 Genome Evolution 2014 -draft syllabus Instructor: Keith Adams

    E-print Network

    Wood, Spencer

    browsers, genome project sites, gene expression sites and databases, the human and discoveries in genomics and genome evolution to human disease and other applied. Genomics computer projects and write-ups: After the computer labs on web resources

  7. Biophysical Studies on Rhinovirus and Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Sandy; Mayor, Heather D.

    1968-01-01

    An explanation has been sought for the high buoyant density of rhinoviruses, which are classified as acid-sensitive picornaviruses. Heat degradation of purified preparations of rhinovirus type 1B and poliovirus type LSc leads to the extrusion of ribonucleoprotein strands. Contour lengths of these strands were measured by electron microscopy, and the molecular weights of rhinovirus and poliovirus ribonucleic acid (RNA) were determined. Values of 2 × 106 and 4 × 106 daltons were obtained for the molecular weight of poliovirus and rhinovirus RNA, respectively. This additional nucleic acid in the rhinovirion probably accounts for the increased density and may be related to the acid sensitivity of the rhinovirus. Images PMID:4316016

  8. Solvable Sequence Evolution Models and Genomic Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, Philipp W.; Arndt, Peter F.; Lässig, Michael

    2005-04-01

    We study a minimal model for genome evolution whose elementary processes are single site mutation, duplication and deletion of sequence regions, and insertion of random segments. These processes are found to generate long-range correlations in the composition of letters as long as the sequence length is growing; i.e., the combined rates of duplications and insertions are higher than the deletion rate. For constant sequence length, on the other hand, all initial correlations decay exponentially. These results are obtained analytically and by simulations. They are compared with the long-range correlations observed in genomic DNA, and the implications for genome evolution are discussed.

  9. The Genomic Landscape of Compensatory Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kalapis, Dorottya; Kovács, Károly; Fekete, Gergely; Farkas, Zoltán; Lázár, Viktória; Hrtyan, Mónika; Kemmeren, Patrick; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J. A.; Rutkai, Edit; Holstege, Frank C. P.; Papp, Balázs; Pál, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive evolution is generally assumed to progress through the accumulation of beneficial mutations. However, as deleterious mutations are common in natural populations, they generate a strong selection pressure to mitigate their detrimental effects through compensatory genetic changes. This process can potentially influence directions of adaptive evolution by enabling evolutionary routes that are otherwise inaccessible. Therefore, the extent to which compensatory mutations shape genomic evolution is of central importance. Here, we studied the capacity of the baker's yeast genome to compensate the complete loss of genes during evolution, and explored the long-term consequences of this process. We initiated laboratory evolutionary experiments with over 180 haploid baker's yeast genotypes, all of which initially displayed slow growth owing to the deletion of a single gene. Compensatory evolution following gene loss was rapid and pervasive: 68% of the genotypes reached near wild-type fitness through accumulation of adaptive mutations elsewhere in the genome. As compensatory mutations have associated fitness costs, genotypes with especially low fitnesses were more likely to be subjects of compensatory evolution. Genomic analysis revealed that as compensatory mutations were generally specific to the functional defect incurred, convergent evolution at the molecular level was extremely rare. Moreover, the majority of the gene expression changes due to gene deletion remained unrestored. Accordingly, compensatory evolution promoted genomic divergence of parallel evolving populations. However, these different evolutionary outcomes are not phenotypically equivalent, as they generated diverse growth phenotypes across environments. Taken together, these results indicate that gene loss initiates adaptive genomic changes that rapidly restores fitness, but this process has substantial pleiotropic effects on cellular physiology and evolvability upon environmental change. Our work also implies that gene content variation across species could be partly due to the action of compensatory evolution rather than the passive loss of genes. PMID:25157590

  10. Pathogenesis of Rhinovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Joshua L; Turner, Ronald B.; Braciale, Thomas; Heymann, Peter W.; Borish, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Summary Since its discovery in 1956, rhinovirus (RV) has been recognized as the most important virus producing the common cold syndrome. Despite its ubiquity, little is known concerning the pathogenesis of RV infections, and some of the research in this area has led to contradictions regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of RV-induced illness. In this article, we discuss the pathogenesis of this virus as it relates to RV-induced illness in the upper and lower airway, an issue of considerable interest in view of the minimal cytopathology associated with RV infection. We endeavor to explain why many infected individuals exhibit minimal symptoms or remain asymptomatic, while others, especially those with asthma, may have severe, even life-threatening, complications (sequelae). Finally, we discuss the immune responses to RV in the normal and asthmatic host focusing on RV infection and epithelial barrier integrity and maintenance as well as the impact of the innate and adaptive immune responses to RV on epithelial function. PMID:22542099

  11. Molecular and Phylogenetic Analyses of Bovine Rhinovirus Type 2 Shows it is Closely Related to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine rhinovirus 2 (BRV2), a causative agent of respiratory disease in cattle, is currently an unclassified species tentatively assigned to the genus rhinovirus in the family Picornaviridae. A nearly full-length cDNA of the BRV2 genome was cloned and the nucleotide sequence from the poly(C) to the ...

  12. Polyploidy and genome evolution in plants Keith L Adams1

    E-print Network

    Wendel, Jonathan F.

    force in plant evolution. Analyses of whole-genome sequences, exten- sive expressed sequence tag (ESTPolyploidy and genome evolution in plants Keith L Adams1 and Jonathan F Wendel2 Genome doubling (polyploidy) has been and continues to be a pervasive force in plant evolution. Modern plant genomes harbor

  13. Genome plasticity and systems evolution in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Streptomycetes are filamentous soil-dwelling bacteria. They are best known as the producers of a great variety of natural products such as antibiotics, antifungals, antiparasitics, and anticancer agents and the decomposers of organic substances for carbon recycling. They are also model organisms for the studies of gene regulatory networks, morphological differentiation, and stress response. The availability of sets of genomes from closely related Streptomyces strains makes it possible to assess the mechanisms underlying genome plasticity and systems adaptation. Results We present the results of a comprehensive analysis of the genomes of five Streptomyces species with distinct phenotypes. These streptomycetes have a pan-genome comprised of 17,362 orthologous families which includes 3,096 components in the core genome, 5,066 components in the dispensable genome, and 9,200 components that are uniquely present in only one species. The core genome makes up about 33%-45% of each genome repertoire. It contains important genes for Streptomyces biology including those involved in gene regulation, secretion, secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation. Abundant duplicate genes have been identified, with 4%-11% of the whole genomes composed of lineage-specific expansions (LSEs), suggesting that frequent gene duplication or lateral gene transfer events play a role in shaping the genome diversification within this genus. Two patterns of expansion, single gene expansion and chromosome block expansion are observed, representing different scales of duplication. Conclusions Our results provide a catalog of genome components and their potential functional roles in gene regulatory networks and metabolic networks. The core genome components reveal the minimum requirement for streptomycetes to sustain a successful lifecycle in the soil environment, reflecting the effects of both genome evolution and environmental stress acting upon the expressed phenotypes. A better understanding of the LSE gene families will, on the other hand, bring a wealth of new insights into the mechanisms underlying strain-specific phenotypes, such as the production of novel antibiotics, pathogenesis, and adaptive response to environmental challenges. PMID:22759432

  14. Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guojie; Li, Cai; Li, Qiye; Li, Bo; Larkin, Denis M.; Lee, Chul; Storz, Jay F.; Antunes, Agostinho; Greenwold, Matthew J.; Meredith, Robert W.; Ödeen, Anders; Cui, Jie; Zhou, Qi; Xu, Luohao; Pan, Hailin; Wang, Zongji; Jin, Lijun; Zhang, Pei; Hu, Haofu; Yang, Wei; Hu, Jiang; Xiao, Jin; Yang, Zhikai; Liu, Yang; Xie, Qiaolin; Yu, Hao; Lian, Jinmin; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Fang; Li, Hui; Zeng, Yongli; Xiong, Zijun; Liu, Shiping; Zhou, Long; Huang, Zhiyong; An, Na; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Qiumei; Xiong, Yingqi; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Bo; Wang, Jingjing; Fan, Yu; da Fonseca, Rute R.; Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Schubert, Mikkel; Orlando, Ludovic; Mourier, Tobias; Howard, Jason T.; Ganapathy, Ganeshkumar; Pfenning, Andreas; Whitney, Osceola; Rivas, Miriam V.; Hara, Erina; Smith, Julia; Farré, Marta; Narayan, Jitendra; Slavov, Gancho; Romanov, Michael N; Borges, Rui; Machado, João Paulo; Khan, Imran; Springer, Mark S.; Gatesy, John; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C.; Håstad, Olle; Sawyer, Roger H.; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Kyu-Won; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Cho, Seoae; Li, Ning; Huang, Yinhua; Bruford, Michael W.; Zhan, Xiangjiang; Dixon, Andrew; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Derryberry, Elizabeth; Warren, Wesley; Wilson, Richard K; Li, Shengbin; Ray, David A.; Green, Richard E.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Griffin, Darren; Johnson, Warren E.; Haussler, David; Ryder, Oliver A.; Willerslev, Eske; Graves, Gary R.; Alström, Per; Fjeldså, Jon; Mindell, David P.; Edwards, Scott V.; Braun, Edward L.; Rahbek, Carsten; Burt, David W.; Houde, Peter; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Jarvis, Erich D.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, which predominantly arose because of lineage-specific erosion of repetitive elements, large segmental deletions, and gene loss. Avian genomes furthermore show a remarkably high degree of evolutionary stasis at the levels of nucleotide sequence, gene synteny, and chromosomal structure. Despite this pattern of conservation, we detected many non-neutral evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes and noncoding regions. These analyses reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits. PMID:25504712

  15. Punctuated Evolution of Prostate Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Sylvan C.; Prandi, Davide; Lawrence, Michael S.; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Romanel, Alessandro; Drier, Yotam; Park, Kyung; Kitabayashi, Naoki; MacDonald, Theresa Y.; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Van Allen, Eliezer; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Sboner, Andrea; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Soong, T. David; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Auclair, Daniel; Tewari, Ashutosh; Beltran, Himisha; Onofrio, Robert C.; Boysen, Gunther; Guiducci, Candace; Barbieri, Christopher E.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Carter, Scott L.; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Douglas; Ramos, Alex H; Winckler, Wendy; Cipicchio, Michelle; Ardlie, Kristin; Kantoff, Philip W.; Berger, Michael F.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Golub, Todd R.; Meyerson, Matthew; Lander, Eric S.; Elemento, Olivier; Getz, Gad; Demichelis, Francesca; Rubin, Mark A.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The analysis of exonic DNA from prostate cancers has identified recurrently mutated genes, but the spectrum of genome-wide alterations has not been profiled extensively in this disease. We sequenced the genomes of 57 prostate tumors and matched normal tissues to characterize somatic alterations and to study how they accumulate during oncogenesis and progression. By modeling the genesis of genomic rearrangements, we identified abundant DNA translocations and deletions that arise in a highly interdependent manner. This phenomenon, which we term “chromoplexy”, frequently accounts for the dysregulation of prostate cancer genes and appears to disrupt multiple cancer genes coordinately. Our modeling suggests that chromoplexy may induce considerable genomic derangement over relatively few events in prostate cancer and other neoplasms, supporting a model of punctuated cancer evolution. By characterizing the clonal hierarchy of genomic lesions in prostate tumors, we charted a path of oncogenic events along which chromoplexy may drive prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:23622249

  16. NEWS AND COMMENTARY Genome evolution...............................................................

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    population genomics of the mustard Arabidopsis thaliana and its close relative A. lyrata, Moore-B, and GD3-B, at B0.50, 1.20, and 0.24 MY ago, respectively. Since A. thaliana and A. lyrata diverged B5 MY ago, it is expected that the duplicated copies do not exist in A. lyrata, as was confirmed

  17. New genomes clarify mimicry evolution.

    PubMed

    Mallet, James

    2015-04-01

    For over 100 years, it has been known that polymorphic mimicry is often switched by simple mendelian factors, yet the physical nature of these loci had escaped characterization. Now, the genome sequences of two swallowtail butterfly (Papilio) species have enabled the precise identification of a locus underlying mimicry, adding to unprecedented recent discoveries in mimicry genetics. PMID:25814305

  18. Genome evolution due to allopolyploidization in wheat.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Moshe; Levy, Avraham A

    2012-11-01

    The wheat group has evolved through allopolyploidization, namely, through hybridization among species from the plant genera Aegilops and Triticum followed by genome doubling. This speciation process has been associated with ecogeographical expansion and with domestication. In the past few decades, we have searched for explanations for this impressive success. Our studies attempted to probe the bases for the wide genetic variation characterizing these species, which accounts for their great adaptability and colonizing ability. Central to our work was the investigation of how allopolyploidization alters genome structure and expression. We found in wheat that allopolyploidy accelerated genome evolution in two ways: (1) it triggered rapid genome alterations through the instantaneous generation of a variety of cardinal genetic and epigenetic changes (which we termed "revolutionary" changes), and (2) it facilitated sporadic genomic changes throughout the species' evolution (i.e., evolutionary changes), which are not attainable at the diploid level. Our major findings in natural and synthetic allopolyploid wheat indicate that these alterations have led to the cytological and genetic diploidization of the allopolyploids. These genetic and epigenetic changes reflect the dynamic structural and functional plasticity of the allopolyploid wheat genome. The significance of this plasticity for the successful establishment of wheat allopolyploids, in nature and under domestication, is discussed. PMID:23135324

  19. Insights into Cyanobacterial Evolution from Comparative Genomics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wesley D. Swingley; Robert E. Blankenship

    Recent high-throughput sequencing has provided DNA sequences at an unprecedented rate, posing considerable analytical challenges, but also offering insight into the genetic mechanisms of adaptation. Here we present a comparative genomics-based approach towards understanding the evolution of these mechanisms in cyanobacteria. Historically, systematic methods of defining morphological traits in cyanobacteria have posed a major barrier in reconstructing their true evolutionary

  20. Constraints and plasticity in genome and molecular-phenome evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuri I. Wolf; Eugene V. Koonin

    2010-01-01

    Multiple constraints variously affect different parts of the genomes of diverse life forms. The selective pressures that shape the evolution of viral, archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic genomes differ markedly, even among relatively closely related animal and bacterial lineages; by contrast, constraints affecting protein evolution seem to be more universal. The constraints that shape the evolution of genomes and phenomes are

  1. A model for genome size evolution.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Stephan; Bernard, Samuel; Beslon, Guillaume; Knibbe, Carole

    2014-09-01

    We present a model for genome size evolution that takes into account both local mutations such as small insertions and small deletions, and large chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and large deletions. We introduce the possibility of undergoing several mutations within one generation. The model, albeit minimalist, reveals a non-trivial spontaneous dynamics of genome size: in the absence of selection, an arbitrary large part of genomes remains beneath a finite size, even for a duplication rate 2.6-fold higher than the rate of large deletions, and even if there is also a systematic bias toward small insertions compared to small deletions. Specifically, we show that the condition of existence of an asymptotic stationary distribution for genome size non-trivially depends on the rates and mean sizes of the different mutation types. We also give upper bounds for the median and other quantiles of the genome size distribution, and argue that these bounds cannot be overcome by selection. Taken together, our results show that the spontaneous dynamics of genome size naturally prevents it from growing infinitely, even in cases where intuition would suggest an infinite growth. Using quantitative numerical examples, we show that, in practice, a shrinkage bias appears very quickly in genomes undergoing mutation accumulation, even though DNA gains and losses appear to be perfectly symmetrical at first sight. We discuss this spontaneous dynamics in the light of the other evolutionary forces proposed in the literature and argue that it provides them a stability-related size limit below which they can act. PMID:25142746

  2. Microbial genome analysis: insights into virulence, host adaptation and evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brendan W. Wren

    2000-01-01

    Genome analysis of microbial pathogens has provided unique insights into their virulence, host adaptation and evolution. Common themes have emerged, including lateral gene transfer among enteric pathogens, genome decay among obligate intracellular pathogens and antigenic variation among mucosal pathogens. The advent of post-genomic approaches and the sequencing of the human genome will enable scientists to investigate the complex and dynamic

  3. Genome Size Evolution in Pufferfish: A Comparative Analysis of Diodontid

    E-print Network

    Palumbi, Stephen

    Genome Size Evolution in Pufferfish: A Comparative Analysis of Diodontid and Tetraodontid Pufferfish Genomes Daniel E. Neafsey1,3 and Stephen R. Palumbi2 1 Department of Organismic and Evolutionary the smallest vertebrate genomes yet measured. They have a haploid genome size of 400 million bp (Mb), which

  4. Clinical Features and Complete Genome Characterization of a Distinct Human Rhinovirus (HRV) Genetic Cluster, Probably Representing a Previously Undetected HRV Species, HRV-C, Associated with Acute Respiratory Illness in Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanna K. P. Lau; Cyril C. Y. Yip; Hoi-wah Tsoi; Rodney A. Lee; Lok-yee So; Yu-lung Lau; Kwok-hung Chan; Patrick C. Y. Woo; Kwok-yung Yuen

    2007-01-01

    Although human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are common causes of respiratory illness, their molecular epidemi- ology has been poorly investigated. Despite the recent findings of new HRV genotypes, their clinical disease spectrum and phylogenetic positions were not fully understood. In this study, 203 prospectively collected nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs), negative for common respiratory viruses (83 were human bocavirus (HBoV) positive and 120 HBoV

  5. Mitochondrial genome evolution in fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Complete mitochondrial genome sequences have become important tools for the study of genome architecture, phylogeny, and molecular evolution. Despite the rapid increase in available mitogenomes, the taxonomic sampling often poorly reflects phylogenetic diversity and is often also biased ...

  6. Comparative genomics and evolution of eukaryotic phospholipidbiosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lykidis, Athanasios

    2006-12-01

    Phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes produce diverse molecular structures and are often present in multiple forms encoded by different genes. This work utilizes comparative genomics and phylogenetics for exploring the distribution, structure and evolution of phospholipid biosynthetic genes and pathways in 26 eukaryotic genomes. Although the basic structure of the pathways was formed early in eukaryotic evolution, the emerging picture indicates that individual enzyme families followed unique evolutionary courses. For example, choline and ethanolamine kinases and cytidylyltransferases emerged in ancestral eukaryotes, whereas, multiple forms of the corresponding phosphatidyltransferases evolved mainly in a lineage specific manner. Furthermore, several unicellular eukaryotes maintain bacterial-type enzymes and reactions for the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. Also, base-exchange phosphatidylserine synthases are widespread and ancestral enzymes. The multiplicity of phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes has been largely generated by gene expansion in a lineage specific manner. Thus, these observations suggest that phospholipid biosynthesis has been an actively evolving system. Finally, comparative genomic analysis indicates the existence of novel phosphatidyltransferases and provides a candidate for the uncharacterized eukaryotic phosphatidylglycerol phosphate phosphatase.

  7. The genomic evolution of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, T; Neal, D E

    2015-07-14

    Prostate cancers are highly prevalent in the developed world, with inheritable risk contributing appreciably to tumour development. Genomic heterogeneity within individual prostate glands and between patients derives predominantly from structural variants and copy-number aberrations. Subtypes of prostate cancers are being delineated through the increasing use of next-generation sequencing, but these subtypes are yet to be used to guide the prognosis or therapeutic strategy. Herein, we review our current knowledge of the mutational landscape of human prostate cancer, describing what is known of the common mutations underpinning its development. We evaluate recurrent prostate-specific mutations prior to discussing the mutational events that are shared both in prostate cancer and across multiple cancer types. From these data, we construct a putative overview of the genomic evolution of human prostate cancer. PMID:26125442

  8. Towards identification of cis-acting elements involved in the replication of enterovirus and rhinovirus RNAs: a proposal for the existence of tRNA-like terminal structures.

    PubMed Central

    Pilipenko, E V; Maslova, S V; Sinyakov, A N; Agol, V I

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of a comparative analysis of published sequences, models for the secondary structure of the 3'-terminal [poly(A)-preceding] untranslated region of the entero- and rhinovirus RNAs were worked out. The models for all these viruses share a common core element, but there are an extra enterovirus-specific element and still an additional element characteristic of a subset of enterovirus RNAs. The two latter models were verified for poliovirus and coxsackievirus B genomes by testing with single-strand and double-strand specific enzymatic and chemical probes. A tRNA-like tertiary structure model for the 3'-terminal folding of enterovirus RNAs was proposed. A similar folding was proposed for the 3' termini of the negative RNA strands as well as for the 5' termini of the positive strand of all entero- and rhinovirus RNAs. Implications of these data for template recognition during negative and positive RNA strands synthesis and for the evolution of the picornavirus genomes are discussed. PMID:1315956

  9. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...rhinovirus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Rhinoviruses cause common colds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...rhinovirus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Rhinoviruses cause common colds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...rhinovirus infections and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these viruses. Rhinoviruses cause common colds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification...

  12. Law of genome evolution direction: Coding information quantity grows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liao-Fu

    2009-06-01

    The problem of the directionality of genome evolution is studied. Based on the analysis of C-value paradox and the evolution of genome size, we propose that the function-coding information quantity of a genome always grows in the course of evolution through sequence duplication, expansion of code, and gene transfer from outside. The function-coding information quantity of a genome consists of two parts, p-coding information quantity that encodes functional protein and n-coding information quantity that encodes other functional elements. The evidences on the law of the evolutionary directionality are indicated. The needs of function are the motive force for the expansion of coding information quantity, and the information quantity expansion is the way to make functional innovation and extension for a species. Therefore, the increase of coding information quantity of a genome is a measure of the acquired new function, and it determines the directionality of genome evolution.

  13. An algebraic view of bacterial genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Francis, Andrew R

    2014-12-01

    Rearrangements of bacterial chromosomes can be studied mathematically at several levels, most prominently at a local, or sequence level, as well as at a topological level. The biological changes involved locally are inversions, deletions, and transpositions, while topologically they are knotting and catenation. These two modelling approaches share some surprising algebraic features related to braid groups and Coxeter groups. The structural approach that is at the core of algebra has long found applications in sciences such as physics and analytical chemistry, but only in a small number of ways so far in biology. And yet there are examples where an algebraic viewpoint may capture a deeper structure behind biological phenomena. This article discusses a family of biological problems in bacterial genome evolution for which this may be the case, and raises the prospect that the tools developed by algebraists over the last century might provide insight to this area of evolutionary biology. PMID:24375264

  14. Genome size diversity in orchids: consequences and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, I. J.; Kahandawala, I.; Suda, J.; Hanson, L.; Ingrouille, M. J.; Chase, M. W.; Fay, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    Background The amount of DNA comprising the genome of an organism (its genome size) varies a remarkable 40 000-fold across eukaryotes, yet most groups are characterized by much narrower ranges (e.g. 14-fold in gymnosperms, 3- to 4-fold in mammals). Angiosperms stand out as one of the most variable groups with genome sizes varying nearly 2000-fold. Nevertheless within angiosperms the majority of families are characterized by genomes which are small and vary little. Species with large genomes are mostly restricted to a few monocots families including Orchidaceae. Scope A survey of the literature revealed that genome size data for Orchidaceae are comparatively rare representing just 327 species. Nevertheless they reveal that Orchidaceae are currently the most variable angiosperm family with genome sizes ranging 168-fold (1C = 0·33–55·4 pg). Analysing the data provided insights into the distribution, evolution and possible consequences to the plant of this genome size diversity. Conclusions Superimposing the data onto the increasingly robust phylogenetic tree of Orchidaceae revealed how different subfamilies were characterized by distinct genome size profiles. Epidendroideae possessed the greatest range of genome sizes, although the majority of species had small genomes. In contrast, the largest genomes were found in subfamilies Cypripedioideae and Vanilloideae. Genome size evolution within this subfamily was analysed as this is the only one with reasonable representation of data. This approach highlighted striking differences in genome size and karyotype evolution between the closely related Cypripedium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium. As to the consequences of genome size diversity, various studies revealed that this has both practical (e.g. application of genetic fingerprinting techniques) and biological consequences (e.g. affecting where and when an orchid may grow) and emphasizes the importance of obtaining further genome size data given the considerable phylogenetic gaps which have been highlighted by the current study. PMID:19168860

  15. Mechanisms of genome evolution of Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Andam, Cheryl P; Hanage, William P

    2015-07-01

    The genus Streptococcus contains 104 recognized species, many of which are associated with human or animal hosts. A globally prevalent human pathogen in this group is Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). While being a common resident of the upper respiratory tract, it is also a major cause of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, accounting for a high burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings demonstrate the importance of recombination and selection in driving the population dynamics and evolution of different pneumococcal lineages, allowing them to successfully evade the impacts of selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic treatment. We highlight the ability of pneumococci to respond to these pressures through processes including serotype replacement, capsular switching and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes. The challenge in controlling this pathogen also lies in the exceptional genetic and phenotypic variation among different pneumococcal lineages, particularly in terms of their pathogenicity and resistance to current therapeutic strategies. The widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, which target only a small subset of the more than 90 pneumococcal serotypes, provides us with a unique opportunity to elucidate how the processes of selection and recombination interact to generate a remarkable level of plasticity and heterogeneity in the pneumococcal genome. These processes also play an important role in the emergence and spread of multi-resistant strains, which continues to pose a challenge in disease control and/or eradication. The application of population of genomic approaches at different spatial and temporal scales will help improve strategies to control this global pathogen, and potentially other pathogenic streptococci. PMID:25461843

  16. Evolution of Genome Size and Complexity in the Rhabdoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Peter J.; Firth, Cadhla; Widen, Steven G.; Blasdell, Kim R.; Guzman, Hilda; Wood, Thomas G.; Paradkar, Prasad N.; Holmes, Edward C.; Tesh, Robert B.; Vasilakis, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses exhibit substantial structural, ecological and genomic diversity. However, genome size in RNA viruses is likely limited by a high mutation rate, resulting in the evolution of various mechanisms to increase complexity while minimising genome expansion. Here we conduct a large-scale analysis of the genome sequences of 99 animal rhabdoviruses, including 45 genomes which we determined de novo, to identify patterns of genome expansion and the evolution of genome complexity. All but seven of the rhabdoviruses clustered into 17 well-supported monophyletic groups, of which eight corresponded to established genera, seven were assigned as new genera, and two were taxonomically ambiguous. We show that the acquisition and loss of new genes appears to have been a central theme of rhabdovirus evolution, and has been associated with the appearance of alternative, overlapping and consecutive ORFs within the major structural protein genes, and the insertion and loss of additional ORFs in each gene junction in a clade-specific manner. Changes in the lengths of gene junctions accounted for as much as 48.5% of the variation in genome size from the smallest to the largest genome, and the frequency with which new ORFs were observed increased in the 3’ to 5’ direction along the genome. We also identify several new families of accessory genes encoded in these regions, and show that non-canonical expression strategies involving TURBS-like termination-reinitiation, ribosomal frame-shifts and leaky ribosomal scanning appear to be common. We conclude that rhabdoviruses have an unusual capacity for genomic plasticity that may be linked to their discontinuous transcription strategy from the negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome, and propose a model that accounts for the regular occurrence of genome expansion and contraction throughout the evolution of the Rhabdoviridae. PMID:25679389

  17. Rhinoviruses, Allergic Inflammation, and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gavala, Monica; Bertics, Paul J.; Gern, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Viral infections affect wheezing and asthma in children and adults of all ages. In infancy, wheezing illnesses are usually viral in origin, and children with more severe wheezing episodes are more likely to develop recurrent episodes of asthma and to develop asthma later in childhood. Children who develop allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (allergic sensitization), and those who wheeze with rhinoviruses (HRV) are at especially high risk for asthma. In older children and adults, HRV infections generally cause relatively mild respiratory illnesses and yet contribute to acute and potentially severe exacerbations in patients with asthma. These findings underline the importance of understanding the synergistic nature of allergic sensitization and infections with HRV in infants relative to the onset of asthma and in children and adults with respect to exacerbations of asthma. This review discusses clinical and experimental evidence of virus/allergen interactions and evaluates theories which relate immunologic responses to respiratory viruses and allergens to the pathogenesis and disease activity of asthma. Greater understanding of the relationship between viral respiratory infections, allergic inflammation, and asthma is likely to suggest new strategies for the prevention and treatment of asthma. PMID:21682739

  18. Evidence of Recombination and Genetic Diversity in Human Rhinoviruses in Children with Acute Respiratory Infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ting Huang; Wei Wang; Mael Bessaud; Peijun Ren; Jun Sheng; Huajie Yan; Jing Zhang; Xin Lin; Yongjin Wang; Francis Delpeyroux; Vincent Deubel; Linqi Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundHuman rhinoviruses (HRVs) are a highly prevalent cause of acute respiratory infection in children. They are classified into at least three species, HRV-A, HRV-B and HRV-C, which are characterized by sequencing the 5? untranslated region (UTR) or the VP4\\/VP2 region of the genome. Given the increased interest for novel HRV strain identification and their worldwide distribution, we have carried out

  19. Simple In Vitro Translation Assay To Analyze Inhibitors of Rhinovirus Proteases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BEVERLY A. HEINZ; JOSEPH TANG; JEAN M. LABUS; FREDERICK W. CHADWELL; STEPHEN W. KALDOR; ANDMARLYS HAMMOND

    1996-01-01

    ThevirusfamilyPicornaviridaecomprisesapproximately180 serotypes of human pathogens. These include the rhinoviruses (RV), which are the primary causes of the common cold (8), and the enteroviruses (whose prototype is poliovirus (PV)), which cause such diverse diseases as meningitis, encephalitis, conjunctivitis, and respiratory disease. These viruses have pos- itive-sense, single-stranded RNA genomes. Upon infection of susceptible cells, the viral RNA is translated into a

  20. The Brassica oleracea genome reveals the asymmetrical evolution of polyploid genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Yumei; Yang, Xinhua; Tong, Chaobo; Edwards, David; Parkin, Isobel A. P.; Zhao, Meixia; Ma, Jianxin; Yu, Jingyin; Huang, Shunmou; Wang, Xiyin; Wang, Junyi; Lu, Kun; Fang, Zhiyuan; Bancroft, Ian; Yang, Tae-Jin; Hu, Qiong; Wang, Xinfa; Yue, Zhen; Li, Haojie; Yang, Linfeng; Wu, Jian; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Wanxin; King, Graham J; Pires, J. Chris; Lu, Changxin; Wu, Zhangyan; Sampath, Perumal; Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Hui; Pan, Shengkai; Yang, Limei; Min, Jiumeng; Zhang, Dong; Jin, Dianchuan; Li, Wanshun; Belcram, Harry; Tu, Jinxing; Guan, Mei; Qi, Cunkou; Du, Dezhi; Li, Jiana; Jiang, Liangcai; Batley, Jacqueline; Sharpe, Andrew G; Park, Beom-Seok; Ruperao, Pradeep; Cheng, Feng; Waminal, Nomar Espinosa; Huang, Yin; Dong, Caihua; Wang, Li; Li, Jingping; Hu, Zhiyong; Zhuang, Mu; Huang, Yi; Huang, Junyan; Shi, Jiaqin; Mei, Desheng; Liu, Jing; Lee, Tae-Ho; Wang, Jinpeng; Jin, Huizhe; Li, Zaiyun; Li, Xun; Zhang, Jiefu; Xiao, Lu; Zhou, Yongming; Liu, Zhongsong; Liu, Xuequn; Qin, Rui; Tang, Xu; Liu, Wenbin; Wang, Yupeng; Zhang, Yangyong; Lee, Jonghoon; Kim, Hyun Hee; Denoeud, France; Xu, Xun; Liang, Xinming; Hua, Wei; Wang, Xiaowu; Wang, Jun; Chalhoub, Boulos; Paterson, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidization has provided much genetic variation for plant adaptive evolution, but the mechanisms by which the molecular evolution of polyploid genomes establishes genetic architecture underlying species differentiation are unclear. Brassica is an ideal model to increase knowledge of polyploid evolution. Here we describe a draft genome sequence of Brassica oleracea, comparing it with that of its sister species B. rapa to reveal numerous chromosome rearrangements and asymmetrical gene loss in duplicated genomic blocks, asymmetrical amplification of transposable elements, differential gene co-retention for specific pathways and variation in gene expression, including alternative splicing, among a large number of paralogous and orthologous genes. Genes related to the production of anticancer phytochemicals and morphological variations illustrate consequences of genome duplication and gene divergence, imparting biochemical and morphological variation to B. oleracea. This study provides insights into Brassica genome evolution and will underpin research into the many important crops in this genus. PMID:24852848

  1. The amphioxus genome and the evolution of the chordate karyotype.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Nicholas H; Butts, Thomas; Ferrier, David E K; Furlong, Rebecca F; Hellsten, Uffe; Kawashima, Takeshi; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Terry, Astrid; Yu, Jr-Kai; Benito-Gutiérrez, E Lia; Dubchak, Inna; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi; Gibson-Brown, Jeremy J; Grigoriev, Igor V; Horton, Amy C; de Jong, Pieter J; Jurka, Jerzy; Kapitonov, Vladimir V; Kohara, Yuji; Kuroki, Yoko; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Pennacchio, Len A; Salamov, Asaf A; Satou, Yutaka; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Schmutz, Jeremy; Shin-I, Tadasu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne; Fujiyama, Asao; Holland, Linda Z; Holland, Peter W H; Satoh, Nori; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2008-06-19

    Lancelets ('amphioxus') are the modern survivors of an ancient chordate lineage, with a fossil record dating back to the Cambrian period. Here we describe the structure and gene content of the highly polymorphic approximately 520-megabase genome of the Florida lancelet Branchiostoma floridae, and analyse it in the context of chordate evolution. Whole-genome comparisons illuminate the murky relationships among the three chordate groups (tunicates, lancelets and vertebrates), and allow not only reconstruction of the gene complement of the last common chordate ancestor but also partial reconstruction of its genomic organization, as well as a description of two genome-wide duplications and subsequent reorganizations in the vertebrate lineage. These genome-scale events shaped the vertebrate genome and provided additional genetic variation for exploitation during vertebrate evolution. PMID:18563158

  2. Minimal Model for Genome Evolution and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Li-Ching; Luo, Liaofu; Ji, Fengmin; Lee, H. C.

    2003-01-01

    Textual analysis of typical microbial genomes reveals that they have the statistical characteristics of a DNA sequence of a much shorter length. This peculiar property supports an evolutionary model in which a genome evolves by random mutation but primarily grows by random segmental duplication. That genomes grew mostly by duplication is consistent with the observation that repeat sequences in all genomes are widespread and intragenomic and intergenomic homologous genes are preponderant across all life forms.

  3. The evolution of genome size in ants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil D Tsutsui; Andrew V Suarez; Joseph C Spagna; J Spencer Johnston

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the economic and ecological importance of ants, genomic tools for this family (Formicidae) remain woefully scarce. Knowledge of genome size, for example, is a useful and necessary prerequisite for the development of many genomic resources, yet it has been reported for only one ant species (Solenopsis invicta), and the two published estimates for this species differ by 146.7

  4. Variation of the Mitochondral Genome in the Evolution of Drosophila

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. G. Mitrofanov; S. Yu. Sorokina; B. V. Andrianov

    2002-01-01

    The evidence on mitochondrial genome variation and its role in evolution of the genus Drosophila are reviewed. The mitochondrial genome is represented by a circular double-stranded DNA molecule 16 to 19 kb in length. Mitochondrial genes lack introns and recombination. The entire mitochondrial genome can be arbitrarily divided into three parts: (1) protein-coding genes; (2) genes encoding rRNA and tRNA;

  5. The amphioxus genome and the evolution of the chordate karyotype

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas H. Putnam; Thomas Butts; David E. K. Ferrier; Rebecca F. Furlong; Uffe Hellsten; Takeshi Kawashima; Marc Robinson-Rechavi; Eiichi Shoguchi; Astrid Terry; Yu-Kai Jr.; Èlia Benito-Gutiérrez; Inna Dubchak; Jordi Garcia-Fernàndez; Jeremy J. Gibson-Brown; Igor V. Grigoriev; Amy C. Horton; Pieter J. de Jong; Jerzy Jurka; Vladimir V. Kapitonov; Yuji Kohara; Yoko Kuroki; Erika Lindquist; Susan Lucas; Kazutoyo Osoegawa; Len A. Pennacchio; Asaf A. Salamov; Yutaka Satou; Tatjana Sauka-Spengler; Jeremy Schmutz; Tadasu Shin-I; Atsushi Toyoda; Marianne Bronner-Fraser; Asao Fujiyama; Linda Z. Holland; Peter W. H. Holland; Nori Satoh; Daniel S. Rokhsar

    2008-01-01

    Lancelets (`amphioxus') are the modern survivors of an ancient chordate lineage, with a fossil record dating back to the Cambrian period. Here we describe the structure and gene content of the highly polymorphic ~520-megabase genome of the Florida lancelet Branchiostoma floridae, and analyse it in the context of chordate evolution. Whole-genome comparisons illuminate the murky relationships among the three chordate

  6. Selfish genetic elements and plant genome size evolution.

    PubMed

    Ågren, J Arvid; Wright, Stephen I

    2015-04-01

    Plants have contributed extensively to our understanding of selfish genetic elements. Most recently, the sequencing of the Arabis alpina genome shows how the co-evolutionary arms race between transposable elements and the silencing machinery employed to control them may drive the evolution of genome size. PMID:25802093

  7. Evolution of linear chromosomes and multipartite genomes in yeast mitochondria

    E-print Network

    Brejova, Brona

    Evolution of linear chromosomes and multipartite genomes in yeast mitochondria Matus Valach1 mitochondria contain linear (cir- cularly permuted) concatemers that are heterogeneous in size (termed, mitochondria of numerous organisms contain multipartite genome; i.e. fragmented into multiple (from few

  8. Genome size shifts: karyotype evolution in Crepis section Neglectoides (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Enke, N; Kunze, R; Pustahija, F; Glöckner, G; Zimmermann, J; Oberländer, J; Kamari, G; Siljak-Yakovlev, S

    2015-07-01

    Plant genome size evolution is a very dynamic process: the ancestral genome of angiosperms was initially most likely small, which led to a tendency towards genome increase during evolution. However, findings in several angiosperm lineages demonstrate mechanisms that also led to genome size contraction. Recent molecular investigations on the Asteraceae genus Crepis suggest that several genomic reduction events have occurred during the evolution of the genus. This study focuses on the Mediterranean Crepis sect. Neglectoides, which includes three species with some of the smallest genomes within the whole genus. Crepis neglecta has the largest genome in sect. Neglectoides, approximately twice the size of the two species Crepis cretica and Crepis hellenica. Whereas C. cretica and C. hellencia are more closely related to each other than to C. neglecta the karyotypes of the latter species and C. cretica are similar, while that of C. hellenica differs considerably. Here, the karyotypic organisation of the three species is investigated with fluorescence in-situ hybridisation and studied in a molecular phylogenetic framework based on the nuclear markers Actin, CHR12, CPN60B, GPCR1 and XTH23. Our findings further corroborate the occurrence of genome size contraction in Crepis, and suggest that the difference in genome size between C. neglecta and C. cretica is mostly due to elimination of dispersed repetitive elements, whereas chromosomal reorganisation was involved in the karyotype formation of C. hellenica. PMID:25683604

  9. Evolution of linear chromosomes and multipartite genomes in yeast mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Valach, Matus; Farkas, Zoltan; Fricova, Dominika; Kovac, Jakub; Brejova, Brona; Vinar, Tomas; Pfeiffer, Ilona; Kucsera, Judit; Tomaska, Lubomir; Lang, B. Franz; Nosek, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome diversity in closely related species provides an excellent platform for investigation of chromosome architecture and its evolution by means of comparative genomics. In this study, we determined the complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of eight Candida species and analyzed their molecular architectures. Our survey revealed a puzzling variability of genome architecture, including circular- and linear-mapping and multipartite linear forms. We propose that the arrangement of large inverted repeats identified in these genomes plays a crucial role in alterations of their molecular architectures. In specific arrangements, the inverted repeats appear to function as resolution elements, allowing genome conversion among different topologies, eventually leading to genome fragmentation into multiple linear DNA molecules. We suggest that molecular transactions generating linear mitochondrial DNA molecules with defined telomeric structures may parallel the evolutionary emergence of linear chromosomes and multipartite genomes in general and may provide clues for the origin of telomeres and pathways implicated in their maintenance. PMID:21266473

  10. Insights into bilaterian evolution from three spiralian genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Oleg; Marletaz, Ferdinand; Cho, Sung-Jin; Edsinger-Gonzales, Eric; Havlak, Paul; Hellsten, Uffe; Kuo, Dian-Han; Larsson, Tomas; Lv, Jie; Arendt, Detlev; Savage, Robert; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; de Jong, Pieter; Grimwood, Jane; Chapman, Jarrod A.; Shapiro, Harris; Otillar, Robert P.; Terry, Astrid Y.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lindberg, David R.; Seaver, Elaine C.; Weisblat, David A.; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Aerts, Andrea

    2012-01-07

    Current genomic perspectives on animal diversity neglect two prominent phyla, the molluscs and annelids, that together account for nearly one-third of known marine species and are important both ecologically and as experimental systems in classical embryology1, 2, 3. Here we describe the draft genomes of the owl limpet (Lottia gigantea), a marine polychaete (Capitella teleta) and a freshwater leech (Helobdella robusta), and compare them with other animal genomes to investigate the origin and diversification of bilaterians from a genomic perspective. We find that the genome organization, gene structure and functional content of these species are more similar to those of some invertebrate deuterostome genomes (for example, amphioxus and sea urchin) than those of other protostomes that have been sequenced to date (flies, nematodes and flatworms). The conservation of these genomic features enables us to expand the inventory of genes present in the last common bilaterian ancestor, establish the tripartite diversification of bilaterians using multiple genomic characteristics and identify ancient conserved long- and short-range genetic linkages across metazoans. Superimposed on this broadly conserved pan-bilaterian background we find examples of lineage-specific genome evolution, including varying rates of rearrangement, intron gain and loss, expansions and contractions of gene families, and the evolution of clade-specific genes that produce the unique content of each genome.

  11. Reticulate Evolution of the Rye Genome[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Mihaela M.; Zhou, Ruonan; Haseneyer, Grit; Schmutzer, Thomas; Vrána, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; König, Susanne; Kugler, Karl G.; Scholz, Uwe; Hackauf, Bernd; Korzun, Viktor; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Doležel, Jaroslav; Bauer, Eva; Mayer, Klaus F.X.; Stein, Nils

    2013-01-01

    Rye (Secale cereale) is closely related to wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare). Due to its large genome (?8 Gb) and its regional importance, genome analysis of rye has lagged behind other cereals. Here, we established a virtual linear gene order model (genome zipper) comprising 22,426 or 72% of the detected set of 31,008 rye genes. This was achieved by high-throughput transcript mapping, chromosome survey sequencing, and integration of conserved synteny information of three sequenced model grass genomes (Brachypodium distachyon, rice [Oryza sativa], and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor]). This enabled a genome-wide high-density comparative analysis of rye/barley/model grass genome synteny. Seventeen conserved syntenic linkage blocks making up the rye and barley genomes were defined in comparison to model grass genomes. Six major translocations shaped the modern rye genome in comparison to a putative Triticeae ancestral genome. Strikingly dissimilar conserved syntenic gene content, gene sequence diversity signatures, and phylogenetic networks were found for individual rye syntenic blocks. This indicates that introgressive hybridizations (diploid or polyploidy hybrid speciation) and/or a series of whole-genome or chromosome duplications played a role in rye speciation and genome evolution. PMID:24104565

  12. Human rhinoviruses: The cold wars resume

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian M. Mackay

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundHuman rhinoviruses (HRVs) are the most common cause of viral illness worldwide but today, less than half the strains have been sequenced and only a handful examined structurally. This viral super-group, known for decades, has still to face the full force of a molecular biology onslaught. However, newly identified viruses (NIVs) including human metapneumovirus and bocavirus and emergent viruses including

  13. Programming cells by multiplex genome engineering and accelerated evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Harris H; Isaacs, Farren J; Carr, Peter A; Sun, Zachary Z; Xu, George; Forest, Craig R; Church, George M

    2009-08-13

    The breadth of genomic diversity found among organisms in nature allows populations to adapt to diverse environments. However, genomic diversity is difficult to generate in the laboratory and new phenotypes do not easily arise on practical timescales. Although in vitro and directed evolution methods have created genetic variants with usefully altered phenotypes, these methods are limited to laborious and serial manipulation of single genes and are not used for parallel and continuous directed evolution of gene networks or genomes. Here, we describe multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) for large-scale programming and evolution of cells. MAGE simultaneously targets many locations on the chromosome for modification in a single cell or across a population of cells, thus producing combinatorial genomic diversity. Because the process is cyclical and scalable, we constructed prototype devices that automate the MAGE technology to facilitate rapid and continuous generation of a diverse set of genetic changes (mismatches, insertions, deletions). We applied MAGE to optimize the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) biosynthesis pathway in Escherichia coli to overproduce the industrially important isoprenoid lycopene. Twenty-four genetic components in the DXP pathway were modified simultaneously using a complex pool of synthetic DNA, creating over 4.3 billion combinatorial genomic variants per day. We isolated variants with more than fivefold increase in lycopene production within 3 days, a significant improvement over existing metabolic engineering techniques. Our multiplex approach embraces engineering in the context of evolution by expediting the design and evolution of organisms with new and improved properties. PMID:19633652

  14. CRISPR Immunity Drives Rapid Phage Genome Evolution in Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Espino, David; Sharon, Itai; Morovic, Wesley; Stahl, Buffy; Thomas, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many bacteria rely on CRISPR-Cas systems to provide adaptive immunity against phages, predation by which can shape the ecology and functioning of microbial communities. To characterize the impact of CRISPR immunization on phage genome evolution, we performed long-term bacterium-phage (Streptococcus thermophilus-phage 2972) coevolution experiments. We found that in this species, CRISPR immunity drives fixation of single nucleotide polymorphisms that accumulate exclusively in phage genome regions targeted by CRISPR. Mutation rates in phage genomes highly exceed those of the host. The presence of multiple phages increased phage persistence by enabling recombination-based formation of chimeric phage genomes in which sequences heavily targeted by CRISPR were replaced. Collectively, our results establish CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity as a key driver of phage genome evolution under the conditions studied and highlight the importance of multiple coexisting phages for persistence in natural systems. PMID:25900652

  15. The Norway spruce genome sequence and conifer genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Nystedt, Björn; Street, Nathaniel R; Wetterbom, Anna; Zuccolo, Andrea; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Scofield, Douglas G; Vezzi, Francesco; Delhomme, Nicolas; Giacomello, Stefania; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Vicedomini, Riccardo; Sahlin, Kristoffer; Sherwood, Ellen; Elfstrand, Malin; Gramzow, Lydia; Holmberg, Kristina; Hällman, Jimmie; Keech, Olivier; Klasson, Lisa; Koriabine, Maxim; Kucukoglu, Melis; Käller, Max; Luthman, Johannes; Lysholm, Fredrik; Niittylä, Totte; Olson, Ake; Rilakovic, Nemanja; Ritland, Carol; Rosselló, Josep A; Sena, Juliana; Svensson, Thomas; Talavera-López, Carlos; Theißen, Günter; Tuominen, Hannele; Vanneste, Kevin; Wu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Bo; Zerbe, Philipp; Arvestad, Lars; Bhalerao, Rishikesh; Bohlmann, Joerg; Bousquet, Jean; Garcia Gil, Rosario; Hvidsten, Torgeir R; de Jong, Pieter; MacKay, John; Morgante, Michele; Ritland, Kermit; Sundberg, Björn; Thompson, Stacey Lee; Van de Peer, Yves; Andersson, Björn; Nilsson, Ove; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Lundeberg, Joakim; Jansson, Stefan

    2013-05-30

    Conifers have dominated forests for more than 200?million years and are of huge ecological and economic importance. Here we present the draft assembly of the 20-gigabase genome of Norway spruce (Picea abies), the first available for any gymnosperm. The number of well-supported genes (28,354) is similar to the >100 times smaller genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, and there is no evidence of a recent whole-genome duplication in the gymnosperm lineage. Instead, the large genome size seems to result from the slow and steady accumulation of a diverse set of long-terminal repeat transposable elements, possibly owing to the lack of an efficient elimination mechanism. Comparative sequencing of Pinus sylvestris, Abies sibirica, Juniperus communis, Taxus baccata and Gnetum gnemon reveals that the transposable element diversity is shared among extant conifers. Expression of 24-nucleotide small RNAs, previously implicated in transposable element silencing, is tissue-specific and much lower than in other plants. We further identify numerous long (>10,000?base pairs) introns, gene-like fragments, uncharacterized long non-coding RNAs and short RNAs. This opens up new genomic avenues for conifer forestry and breeding. PMID:23698360

  16. Non-adaptive evolution of genome complexity

    E-print Network

    Yi, Soojin

    the tree of life. The difference between genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotesisparticularly striking.Prokaryotes of them in an increasing order from prokaryotes, to unicellular eukaryotes, and to multicellular eukaryotes.(1,4) The distinction between the genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes has been considered

  17. Comparative genomic paleontology across plant kingdom reveals the dynamics of TE-driven genome evolution.

    PubMed

    El Baidouri, Moaine; Panaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Long terminal repeat-retrotransposons (LTR-RTs) are the most abundant class of transposable elements (TEs) in plants. They strongly impact the structure, function, and evolution of their host genome, and, in particular, their role in genome size variation has been clearly established. However, the dynamics of the process through which LTR-RTs have differentially shaped plant genomes is still poorly understood because of a lack of comparative studies. Using a new robust and automated family classification procedure, we exhaustively characterized the LTR-RTs in eight plant genomes for which a high-quality sequence is available (i.e., Arabidopsis thaliana, A. lyrata, grapevine, soybean, rice, Brachypodium dystachion, sorghum, and maize). This allowed us to perform a comparative genome-wide study of the retrotranspositional landscape in these eight plant lineages from both monocots and dicots. We show that retrotransposition has recurrently occurred in all plant genomes investigated, regardless their size, and through bursts, rather than a continuous process. Moreover, in each genome, only one or few LTR-RT families have been active in the recent past, and the difference in genome size among the species studied could thus mostly be accounted for by the extent of the latest transpositional burst(s). Following these bursts, LTR-RTs are efficiently eliminated from their host genomes through recombination and deletion, but we show that the removal rate is not lineage specific. These new findings lead us to propose a new model of TE-driven genome evolution in plants. PMID:23426643

  18. Three crocodilian genomes reveal ancestral patterns of evolution among archosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Green, Richard E; Braun, Edward L; Armstrong, Joel; Earl, Dent; Nguyen, Ngan; Hickey, Glenn; Vandewege, Michael W; St John, John A; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Castoe, Todd A; Kern, Colin; Fujita, Matthew K; Opazo, Juan C; Jurka, Jerzy; Kojima, Kenji K; Caballero, Juan; Hubley, Robert M; Smit, Arian F; Platt, Roy N; Lavoie, Christine A; Ramakodi, Meganathan P; Finger, John W; Suh, Alexander; Isberg, Sally R; Miles, Lee; Chong, Amanda Y; Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Gongora, Jaime; Moran, Christopher; Iriarte, Andrés; McCormack, John; Burgess, Shane C; Edwards, Scott V; Lyons, Eric; Williams, Christina; Breen, Matthew; Howard, Jason T; Gresham, Cathy R; Peterson, Daniel G; Schmitz, Jürgen; Pollock, David D; Haussler, David; Triplett, Eric W; Zhang, Guojie; Irie, Naoki; Jarvis, Erich D; Brochu, Christopher A; Schmidt, Carl J; McCarthy, Fiona M; Faircloth, Brant C; Hoffmann, Federico G; Glenn, Travis C; Gabaldón, Toni; Paten, Benedict; Ray, David A

    2015-01-01

    To provide context for the diversifications of archosaurs, the group that includes crocodilians, dinosaurs and birds, we generated draft genomes of three crocodilians, Alligator mississippiensis (the American alligator), Crocodylus porosus (the saltwater crocodile), and Gavialis gangeticus (the Indian gharial). We observed an exceptionally slow rate of genome evolution within crocodilians at all levels, including nucleotide substitutions, indels, transposable element content and movement, gene family evolution, and chromosomal synteny. When placed within the context of related taxa including birds and turtles, this suggests that the common ancestor of all of these taxa also exhibited slow genome evolution and that the relatively rapid evolution of bird genomes represents an autapomorphy within that clade. The data also provided the opportunity to analyze heterozygosity in crocodilians, which indicates a likely reduction in population size for all three taxa through the Pleistocene. Finally, these new data combined with newly published bird genomes allowed us to reconstruct the partial genome of the common ancestor of archosaurs providing a tool to investigate the genetic starting material of crocodilians, birds, and dinosaurs. PMID:25504731

  19. Evolution of parasitism along convergent lines: from ecology to genomics.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Robert; Randhawa, Haseeb S

    2015-02-01

    SUMMARY From hundreds of independent transitions from a free-living existence to a parasitic mode of life, separate parasite lineages have converged over evolutionary time to share traits and exploit their hosts in similar ways. Here, we first summarize the evidence that, at a phenotypic level, eukaryotic parasite lineages have all converged toward only six general parasitic strategies: parasitoid, parasitic castrator, directly transmitted parasite, trophically transmitted parasite, vector-transmitted parasite or micropredator. We argue that these strategies represent adaptive peaks, with the similarities among unrelated taxa within any strategy extending to all basic aspects of host exploitation and transmission among hosts and transcending phylogenetic boundaries. Then, we extend our examination of convergent patterns by looking at the evolution of parasite genomes. Despite the limited taxonomic coverage of sequenced parasite genomes currently available, we find some evidence of parallel evolution among unrelated parasite taxa with respect to genome reduction or compaction, and gene losses or gains. Matching such changes in parasite genomes with the broad phenotypic traits that define the convergence of parasites toward only six strategies of host exploitation is not possible at present. Nevertheless, as more parasite genomes become available, we may be able to detect clear trends in the evolution of parasitic genome architectures representing true convergent adaptive peaks, the genomic equivalents of the phenotypic strategies used by all parasites. PMID:24229807

  20. Evolution of genome size in Carex (Cyperaceae) in relation to chromosome number and genomic base composition

    PubMed Central

    Lipnerová, Ivana; Bureš, Petr; Horová, Lucie; Šmarda, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Carex exhibits karyological peculiarities related to holocentrism, specifically extremely broad and almost continual variation in chromosome number. However, the effect of these peculiarities on the evolution of the genome (genome size, base composition) remains unknown. While in monocentrics, determining the arithmetic relationship between the chromosome numbers of related species is usually sufficient for the detection of particular modes of karyotype evolution (i.e. polyploidy and dysploidy), in holocentrics where chromosomal fission and fusion occur such detection requires knowledge of the DNA content. Methods The genome size and GC content were estimated in 157 taxa using flow cytometry. The exact chromosome numbers were known for 96 measured samples and were taken from the available literature for other taxa. All relationships were tested in a phylogenetic framework using the ITS tree of 105 species. Key Results The 1C genome size varied between 0·24 and 1·64 pg in Carex secalina and C. cuspidata, respectively. The genomic GC content varied from 34·8 % to 40·6 % from C. secalina to C. firma. Both genomic parameters were positively correlated. Seven polyploid and two potentially polyploid taxa were detected in the core Carex clade. A strong negative correlation between genome size and chromosome number was documented in non-polyploid taxa. Non-polyploid taxa of the core Carex clade exhibited a higher rate of genome-size evolution compared with the Vignea clade. Three dioecious taxa exhibited larger genomes, larger chromosomes, and a higher GC content than their hermaphrodite relatives. Conclusions Genomes of Carex are relatively small and very GC-poor compared with other angiosperms. We conclude that the evolution of genome and karyotype in Carex is promoted by frequent chromosomal fissions/fusions, rare polyploidy and common repetitive DNA proliferation/removal. PMID:23175591

  1. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490 Rhinovirus serological reagents. (a) Identification....

  2. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490 Rhinovirus serological reagents. (a) Identification....

  3. Evolution of paralogous genes: Reconstruction of genome rearrangements through comparison of multiple genomes within Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tsuru, Takeshi; Kawai, Mikihiko; Mizutani-Ui, Yoko; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2006-06-01

    Analysis of evolution of paralogous genes in a genome is central to our understanding of genome evolution. Comparison of closely related bacterial genomes, which has provided clues as to how genome sequences evolve under natural conditions, would help in such an analysis. With species Staphylococcus aureus, whole-genome sequences have been decoded for seven strains. We compared their DNA sequences to detect large genome polymorphisms and to deduce mechanisms of genome rearrangements that have formed each of them. We first compared strains N315 and Mu50, which make one of the most closely related strain pairs, at the single-nucleotide resolution to catalogue all the middle-sized (more than 10 bp) to large genome polymorphisms such as indels and substitutions. These polymorphisms include two paralogous gene sets, one in a tandem paralogue gene cluster for toxins in a genomic island and the other in a ribosomal RNA operon. We also focused on two other tandem paralogue gene clusters and type I restriction-modification (RM) genes on the genomic islands. Then we reconstructed rearrangement events responsible for these polymorphisms, in the paralogous genes and the others, with reference to the other five genomes. For the tandem paralogue gene clusters, we were able to infer sequences for homologous recombination generating the change in the repeat number. These sequences were conserved among the repeated paralogous units likely because of their functional importance. The sequence specificity (S) subunit of type I RM systems showed recombination, likely at the homology of a conserved region, between the two variable regions for sequence specificity. We also noticed novel alleles in the ribosomal RNA operons and suggested a role for illegitimate recombination in their formation. These results revealed importance of recombination involving long conserved sequence in the evolution of paralogous genes in the genome. PMID:16601000

  4. lincRNAs: Genomics, Evolution, and Mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Ulitsky, Igor

    Long intervening noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are transcribed from thousands of loci in mammalian genomes and might play widespread roles in gene regulation and other cellular processes. This Review outlines the emerging ...

  5. Computational comparative genomics : genes, regulation, evolution

    E-print Network

    Kamvysselis, Manolis, 1977-

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the biological signals encoded in a genome is a key challenge of computational biology. These signals are encoded in the four-nucleotide alphabet of DNA and are responsible for all molecular processes in the ...

  6. Genome evolution, metabolism and Course Computational Biology 2013/2014; Paulien Hogeweg;

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    of macro evolution and model metabolic regulation in E.coli evolution as tool #12;#12;Some "surprising12 Genome evolution, metabolism and parameters Course Computational Biology 2013/2014; Paulien functional differentiation in one quasispecies Genome evolution: 'mutational priming' by genome structuring

  7. Polyploidy-associated genome modifications during land plant evolution.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuannian; Paterson, Andrew H

    2014-08-01

    The occurrence of polyploidy in land plant evolution has led to an acceleration of genome modifications relative to other crown eukaryotes and is correlated with key innovations in plant evolution. Extensive genome resources provide for relating genomic changes to the origins of novel morphological and physiological features of plants. Ancestral gene contents for key nodes of the plant family tree are inferred. Pervasive polyploidy in angiosperms appears likely to be the major factor generating novel angiosperm genes and expanding some gene families. However, most gene families lose most duplicated copies in a quasi-neutral process, and a few families are actively selected for single-copy status. One of the great challenges of evolutionary genomics is to link genome modifications to speciation, diversification and the morphological and/or physiological innovations that collectively compose biodiversity. Rapid accumulation of genomic data and its ongoing investigation may greatly improve the resolution at which evolutionary approaches can contribute to the identification of specific genes responsible for particular innovations. The resulting, more 'particulate' understanding of plant evolution, may elevate to a new level fundamental knowledge of botanical diversity, including economically important traits in the crop plants that sustain humanity. PMID:24958928

  8. Three crocodilian genomes reveal ancestral patterns of evolution among archosaurs.

    PubMed

    Green, Richard E; Braun, Edward L; Armstrong, Joel; Earl, Dent; Nguyen, Ngan; Hickey, Glenn; Vandewege, Michael W; St John, John A; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Castoe, Todd A; Kern, Colin; Fujita, Matthew K; Opazo, Juan C; Jurka, Jerzy; Kojima, Kenji K; Caballero, Juan; Hubley, Robert M; Smit, Arian F; Platt, Roy N; Lavoie, Christine A; Ramakodi, Meganathan P; Finger, John W; Suh, Alexander; Isberg, Sally R; Miles, Lee; Chong, Amanda Y; Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Gongora, Jaime; Moran, Christopher; Iriarte, Andrés; McCormack, John; Burgess, Shane C; Edwards, Scott V; Lyons, Eric; Williams, Christina; Breen, Matthew; Howard, Jason T; Gresham, Cathy R; Peterson, Daniel G; Schmitz, Jürgen; Pollock, David D; Haussler, David; Triplett, Eric W; Zhang, Guojie; Irie, Naoki; Jarvis, Erich D; Brochu, Christopher A; Schmidt, Carl J; McCarthy, Fiona M; Faircloth, Brant C; Hoffmann, Federico G; Glenn, Travis C; Gabaldón, Toni; Paten, Benedict; Ray, David A

    2014-12-12

    To provide context for the diversification of archosaurs--the group that includes crocodilians, dinosaurs, and birds--we generated draft genomes of three crocodilians: Alligator mississippiensis (the American alligator), Crocodylus porosus (the saltwater crocodile), and Gavialis gangeticus (the Indian gharial). We observed an exceptionally slow rate of genome evolution within crocodilians at all levels, including nucleotide substitutions, indels, transposable element content and movement, gene family evolution, and chromosomal synteny. When placed within the context of related taxa including birds and turtles, this suggests that the common ancestor of all of these taxa also exhibited slow genome evolution and that the comparatively rapid evolution is derived in birds. The data also provided the opportunity to analyze heterozygosity in crocodilians, which indicates a likely reduction in population size for all three taxa through the Pleistocene. Finally, these data combined with newly published bird genomes allowed us to reconstruct the partial genome of the common ancestor of archosaurs, thereby providing a tool to investigate the genetic starting material of crocodilians, birds, and dinosaurs. PMID:25504731

  9. Chromothripsis and beyond: rapid genome evolution from complex chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Leibowitz, Mitchell L.; Pellman, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome sequencing studies have identified several classes of complex genomic rearrangements that appear to be derived from a single catastrophic event. These discoveries identify ways that genomes can be altered in single large jumps rather than by many incremental steps. Here we compare and contrast these phenomena and examine the evidence that they arise “all at once.” We consider the impact of massive chromosomal change for the development of diseases such as cancer and for evolution more generally. Finally, we summarize current models for underlying mechanisms and discuss strategies for testing these models. PMID:24298051

  10. Retrotransposon evolution in diverse plant genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, T; Seago, C; Mende, M; Leggett, M; Thomas, H; Forster, J W; Jones, R N; Jenkins, G

    2000-01-01

    Retrotransposon or retrotransposon-like sequences have been reported to be conserved components of cereal centromeres. Here we show that the published sequences are derived from a single conventional Ty3-gypsy family or a nonautonomous derivative. Both autonomous and nonautonomous elements are likely to have colonized Poaceae centromeres at the time of a common ancestor but have been maintained since by active retrotransposition. The retrotransposon family is also present at a lower copy number in the Arabidopsis genome, where it shows less pronounced localization. The history of the family in the two types of genome provides an interesting contrast between "boom and bust" and persistent evolutionary patterns. PMID:10978295

  11. Implications of the plastid genome sequence of typha (typhaceae, poales) for understanding genome evolution in poaceae.

    PubMed

    Guisinger, Mary M; Chumley, Timothy W; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Boore, Jeffrey L; Jansen, Robert K

    2010-02-01

    Plastid genomes of the grasses (Poaceae) are unusual in their organization and rates of sequence evolution. There has been a recent surge in the availability of grass plastid genome sequences, but a comprehensive comparative analysis of genome evolution has not been performed that includes any related families in the Poales. We report on the plastid genome of Typha latifolia, the first non-grass Poales sequenced to date, and we present comparisons of genome organization and sequence evolution within Poales. Our results confirm that grass plastid genomes exhibit acceleration in both genomic rearrangements and nucleotide substitutions. Poaceae have multiple structural rearrangements, including three inversions, three genes losses (accD, ycf1, ycf2), intron losses in two genes (clpP, rpoC1), and expansion of the inverted repeat (IR) into both large and small single-copy regions. These rearrangements are restricted to the Poaceae, and IR expansion into the small single-copy region correlates with the phylogeny of the family. Comparisons of 73 protein-coding genes for 47 angiosperms including nine Poaceae genera confirm that the branch leading to Poaceae has significantly accelerated rates of change relative to other monocots and angiosperms. Furthermore, rates of sequence evolution within grasses are lower, indicating a deceleration during diversification of the family. Overall there is a strong correlation between accelerated rates of genomic rearrangements and nucleotide substitutions in Poaceae, a phenomenon that has been noted recently throughout angiosperms. The cause of the correlation is unknown, but faulty DNA repair has been suggested in other systems including bacterial and animal mitochondrial genomes. PMID:20091301

  12. Evolution of Genome Size in Brassicaceae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. SPENCER JOHNSTON; ALAN E. PEPPER; ANNE E. HALL; Z. JEFFREY CHEN; GEORGE HODNETT; JANICE DRABEK; REBECCA LOPEZ; H. JAMES PRICE

    2005-01-01

    ? Background and Aims Brassicaceae, with nearly 340 genera and more than 3350 species, anchors the low range of angiosperm genome sizes. The relatively narrow range of DNA content (0? 16 pg < 1C < 1? 95 pg) was maintained in spite of extensive chromosomal change. The aim of this study was to erect a cytological and molecular phylogenetic framework

  13. Evolution and comparative genomics of subcellular specializations: EST sequencing of Torpedo electric organ

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Evolution and comparative genomics of subcellular specializations: EST sequencing of Torpedo discovery Open reading frame (ORF) Uncharacterized open reading frames (ORFs) in human genomic sequence Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The availability of complete genomic sequences

  14. Origin and evolution of photosynthesis: clues from genome comparison Armen Y. Mulkidjanian1,2

    E-print Network

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    Origin and evolution of photosynthesis: clues from genome comparison Armen Y. Mulkidjanian1 Keywords: origin of photosynthesis, comparative genomics, evolution, cyanobacteria, phototrophic organisms with the recent geological data on the properties of the ancient phototrophs, suggest that photosynthesis has

  15. The compact Selaginella genome identifies changes in gene content associated with the evolution of vascular plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Igor V. Grigoriev; Jo Ann Banks; Tomoaki Nishiyama; Mitsuyasu Hasebe; John L. Bowman; Michael Gribskov; Claude dePamphilis; Victor A. Albert; Naoki Aono; Tsuyoshi Aoyama; Barbara A. Ambrose; Neil W. Ashton; Michael J. Axtell; Elizabeth Barker; Michael S. Barker; Jeffrey L. Bennetzen; Nicholas D. Bonawitz; Clint Chapple; Chaoyang Cheng; Luiz Gustavo Guedes Correa; Michael Dacre; Jeremy DeBarry; Ingo Dreyer; Marek Elias; Eric M. Engstrom; Mark Estelle; Liang Feng; Cedric Finet; Sandra K. Floyd; Wolf B. Frommer; Tomomichi Fujita; Lydia Gramzow; Michael Gutensohn; Jesper Harholt; Mitsuru Hattori; Alexander Heyl; Tadayoshi Hirai; Yuji Hiwatashi; Masaki Ishikawa; Mineko Iwata; Kenneth G. Karol; Barbara Koehler; Uener Kolukisaoglu; Minoru Kubo; Tetsuya Kurata; Sylvie Lalonde; Kejie Li; Ying Li; Amy Litt; Eric Lyons; Gerard Manning; Takeshi Maruyama; Todd P. Michael; Koji Mikami; Saori Miyazaki; Shin-ichi Morinaga; Takashi Murata; Bernd Mueller-Roeber; David R. Nelson; Mari Obara; Yasuko Oguri; Richard G. Olmstead; Naoko Onodera; Bent Larsen Petersen; Birgit Pils; Michael Prigge; Stefan A. Rensing; Diego Mauricio Riano-Pachon; Alison W. Roberts; Yoshikatsu Sato; Henrik Vibe Scheller; Burkhard Schulz; Christian Schulz; Eugene V. Shakirov; Nakako Shibagaki; Naoki Shinohara; Dorothy E. Shippen; Iben Sorensen; Ryo Sotooka; Nagisa Sugimoto; Mamoru Sugita; Naomi Sumikawa; Milos Tanurdzic; Gunter Theilsen; Peter Ulvskov; Sachiko Wakazuki; Jing-Ke Weng; William W. G. T. Willats; Daniel Wipf; Paul G. Wolf; Lixing Yang; Andreas D. Zimmer; Qihui Zhu; Therese Mitros; Uffe Hellsten; Dominique Loque; Robert Otillar; Asaf Salamov; Jeremy Schmutz; Harris Shapiro; Erika Lindquist; Susan Lucas; Daniel Rokhsar

    2011-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of the nonseed vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and by comparative genomics identify genes that likely played important roles in the early evolution of vascular plants and their subsequent evolution

  16. Decelerated genome evolution in modern vertebrates revealed by analysis of multiple lancelet genomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Zelin; Yan, Xinyu; Yu, Ting; Huang, Guangrui; Yan, Qingyu; Pontarotti, Pierre Antoine; Zhao, Hongchen; Li, Jie; Yang, Ping; Wang, Ruihua; Li, Rui; Tao, Xin; Deng, Ting; Wang, Yiquan; Li, Guang; Zhang, Qiujin; Zhou, Sisi; You, Leiming; Yuan, Shaochun; Fu, Yonggui; Wu, Fenfang; Dong, Meiling; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrates diverged from other chordates ~500?Myr ago and experienced successful innovations and adaptations, but the genomic basis underlying vertebrate origins are not fully understood. Here we suggest, through comparison with multiple lancelet (amphioxus) genomes, that ancient vertebrates experienced high rates of protein evolution, genome rearrangement and domain shuffling and that these rates greatly slowed down after the divergence of jawed and jawless vertebrates. Compared with lancelets, modern vertebrates retain, at least relatively, less protein diversity, fewer nucleotide polymorphisms, domain combinations and conserved non-coding elements (CNE). Modern vertebrates also lost substantial transposable element (TE) diversity, whereas lancelets preserve high TE diversity that includes even the long-sought RAG transposon. Lancelets also exhibit rapid gene turnover, pervasive transcription, fastest exon shuffling in metazoans and substantial TE methylation not observed in other invertebrates. These new lancelet genome sequences provide new insights into the chordate ancestral state and the vertebrate evolution. PMID:25523484

  17. Evolution of a microbial nitrilase gene family: a comparative and environmental genomics study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mircea Podar; Jonathan R Eads; Toby H Richardson

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Completed genomes and environmental genomic sequences are bringing a significant contribution to understanding the evolution of gene families, microbial metabolism and community eco-physiology. Here, we used comparative genomics and phylogenetic analyses in conjunction with enzymatic data to probe the evolution and functions of a microbial nitrilase gene family. Nitrilases are relatively rare in bacterial genomes, their biological function being

  18. Mitochondrial genome evolution in fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Complete mitochondrial genome sequences have become important tools for the study of genome architecture, phylogeny, and molecular evolution. Despite the rapid increase in available mitogenomes, the taxonomic sampling often poorly reflects phylogenetic diversity and is often also biased to represent deeper (family-level) evolutionary relationships. Results We present the first fully sequenced ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) mitochondrial genomes. We sampled four mitogenomes from three species of fire ants, genus Solenopsis, which represent various evolutionary depths. Overall, ant mitogenomes appear to be typical of hymenopteran mitogenomes, displaying a general A+T-bias. The Solenopsis mitogenomes are slightly more compact than other hymentoperan mitogenomes (~15.5 kb), retaining all protein coding genes, ribosomal, and transfer RNAs. We also present evidence of recombination between the mitogenomes of the two conspecific Solenopsis mitogenomes. Finally, we discuss potential ways to improve the estimation of phylogenies using complete mitochondrial genome sequences. Conclusions The ant mitogenome presents an important addition to the continued efforts in studying hymenopteran mitogenome architecture, evolution, and phylogenetics. We provide further evidence that the sampling across many taxonomic levels (including conspecifics and congeners) is useful and important to gain detailed insights into mitogenome evolution. We also discuss ways that may help improve the use of mitogenomes in phylogenetic analyses by accounting for non-stationary and non-homogeneous evolution among branches. PMID:20929580

  19. Genome Annotation and Selectional Analysis of Viral Evolution

    E-print Network

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    Genome Annotation and Selectional Analysis of Viral Evolution Saskia de Groot Under Supervision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.2.1 Biological Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.2.2 Sequence Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 2.4.3 Pairs of HIV2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 2.4.4 HIV1 vs. HIV2

  20. Genome Analysis The pattern and evolution of yeast promoter

    E-print Network

    Barkai, Naama

    Genome Analysis The pattern and evolution of yeast promoter bendability Itay Tirosh1 , Judith-less promoters from 11 yeast species, whereas the position of the rigid DNA varies substantially among species. cerevisiae promoters We examined the bendability pattern of yeast promoters. The promoters of many yeast

  1. Insights into hominid evolution from the gorilla genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Scally, Aylwyn; Dutheil, Julien Y.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Jordan, Greg E.; Goodhead, Ian; Herrero, Javier; Hobolth, Asger; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Mailund, Thomas; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; McCarthy, Shane; Montgomery, Stephen H.; Schwalie, Petra C.; Tang, Y. Amy; Ward, Michelle C.; Xue, Yali; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Alkan, Can; Andersen, Lars N.; Ayub, Qasim; Ball, Edward V.; Beal, Kathryn; Bradley, Brenda J.; Chen, Yuan; Clee, Chris M.; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Graves, Tina A.; Gu, Yong; Heath, Paul; Heger, Andreas; Karakoc, Emre; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Laird, Gavin K.; Lunter, Gerton; Meader, Stephen; Mort, Matthew; Mullikin, James C.; Munch, Kasper; O’Connor, Timothy D.; Phillips, Andrew D.; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Rogers, Anthony S.; Sajjadian, Saba; Schmidt, Dominic; Shaw, Katy; Simpson, Jared T.; Stenson, Peter D.; Turner, Daniel J.; Vigilant, Linda; Vilella, Albert J.; Whitener, Weldon; Zhu, Baoli; Cooper, David N.; de Jong, Pieter; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Eichler, Evan E.; Flicek, Paul; Goldman, Nick; Mundy, Nicholas I.; Ning, Zemin; Odom, Duncan T.; Ponting, Chris P.; Quail, Michael A.; Ryder, Oliver A.; Searle, Stephen M.; Warren, Wesley C.; Wilson, Richard K.; Schierup, Mikkel H.; Rogers, Jane; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Durbin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Summary Gorillas are humans’ closest living relatives after chimpanzees, and are of comparable importance for the study of human origins and evolution. Here we present the assembly and analysis of a genome sequence for the western lowland gorilla, and compare the whole genomes of all extant great ape genera. We propose a synthesis of genetic and fossil evidence consistent with placing the human-chimpanzee and human-chimpanzee-gorilla speciation events at approximately 6 and 10 million years ago (Mya). In 30% of the genome, gorilla is closer to human or chimpanzee than the latter are to each other; this is rarer around coding genes, indicating pervasive selection throughout great ape evolution, and has functional consequences in gene expression. A comparison of protein coding genes reveals approximately 500 genes showing accelerated evolution on each of the gorilla, human and chimpanzee lineages, and evidence for parallel acceleration, particularly of genes involved in hearing. We also compare the western and eastern gorilla species, estimating an average sequence divergence time 1.75 million years ago, but with evidence for more recent genetic exchange and a population bottleneck in the eastern species. The use of the genome sequence in these and future analyses will promote a deeper understanding of great ape biology and evolution. PMID:22398555

  2. The influence of the accessory genome on bacterial pathogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Vinatzer, Boris; Arnold, Dawn L; Dorus, Steve; Murillo, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens exhibit significant variation in their genomic content of virulence factors. This reflects the abundance of strategies pathogens evolved to infect host organisms by suppressing host immunity. Molecular arms-races have been a strong driving force for the evolution of pathogenicity, with pathogens often encoding overlapping or redundant functions, such as type III protein secretion effectors and hosts encoding ever more sophisticated immune systems. The pathogens' frequent exposure to other microbes, either in their host or in the environment, provides opportunities for the acquisition or interchange of mobile genetic elements. These DNA elements accessorize the core genome and can play major roles in shaping genome structure and altering the complement of virulence factors. Here, we review the different mobile genetic elements focusing on the more recent discoveries and highlighting their role in shaping bacterial pathogen evolution. PMID:22016845

  3. Genome Size Variation and Evolution in Veronica

    PubMed Central

    ALBACH, DIRK C.; GREILHUBER, J.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims The amount of DNA per chromosome set is known to be a fairly constant characteristic of a species. Its interspecific variation is enormous, but the biological significance of this variation is little understood. Some of the characters believed to be correlated with DNA amount are alpine habitat, life history and breeding system. In the present study, the aim is to distinguish between direct causal connections and chance correlation of the amount of DNA in the genus Veronica. • Methods Estimates of DNA amount were analysed for 42 members of Veroniceae in connection with results from a phylogenetic analysis of plastid trnL-F DNA sequences and tested correlations using standard statistical tests, phylogenetically independent contrasts and a model-based generalized least squares method to distinguish the phylogenetic effect on the results. • Key Results There appears to be a lower upper limit for DNA amount in annuals than in perennials. Most DNAC-values in Veroniceae are below the mean DNA C-value for annuals in angiosperms as a whole. However, the long-debated correlation of low genome size with annual life history is not significant (P = 0·12) using either standard statistical tests or independent contrasts, but it is significant with the generalized least squares method (P < 0·01). • Conclusions The correlation of annual life history and low genome size found in earlier studies could be due to the association of annual life history and selfing, which is significantly correlated with low genome size using any of the three tests applied. This correlation can be explained by models showing a reduction in transposable elements in selfers. A significant correlation of higher genome sizes with alpine habitats was also detected. PMID:15520022

  4. The Amphimedon queenslandica genome and the evolution of animal complexity

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Mansi; Simakov, Oleg; Chapman, Jarrod; Fahey, Bryony; Gauthier, Marie E. A.; Mitros, Therese; Richards, Gemma S.; Conaco, Cecilia; Dacre, Michael; Hellsten, Uffe; Larroux, Claire; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Stanke, Mario; Adamska, Maja; Darling, Aaron; Degnan, Sandie M.; Oakley, Todd H.; Plachetzki, David C.; Zhai, Yufeng; Adamski, Marcin; Calcino, Andrew; Cummins, Scott F.; Goodstein, David M.; Harris, Christina; Jackson, Daniel J.; Leys, Sally P.; Shu, Shengqiang; Woodcroft, Ben J.; Vervoort, Michel; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Manning, Gerard; Degnan, Bernard M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    Sponges are an ancient group of animals that diverged from other metazoans over 600 million years ago. Here we present the draft genome sequence of Amphimedon queenslandica, a demosponge from the Great Barrier Reef, and show that it is remarkably similar to other animal genomes in content, structure and organization. Comparative analysis enabled by the sequencing of the sponge genome reveals genomic events linked to the origin and early evolution of animals, including the appearance, expansion and diversification of pan-metazoan transcription factor, signalling pathway and structural genes. This diverse ‘toolkit’ of genes correlates with critical aspects of all metazoan body plans, and comprises cell cycle control and growth, development, somatic- and germ-cell specification, cell adhesion, innate immunity and allorecognition. Notably, many of the genes associated with the emergence of animals are also implicated in cancer, which arises from defects in basic processes associated with metazoan multicellularity. PMID:20686567

  5. The Amphimedon queenslandica genome and the evolution of animal complexity.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mansi; Simakov, Oleg; Chapman, Jarrod; Fahey, Bryony; Gauthier, Marie E A; Mitros, Therese; Richards, Gemma S; Conaco, Cecilia; Dacre, Michael; Hellsten, Uffe; Larroux, Claire; Putnam, Nicholas H; Stanke, Mario; Adamska, Maja; Darling, Aaron; Degnan, Sandie M; Oakley, Todd H; Plachetzki, David C; Zhai, Yufeng; Adamski, Marcin; Calcino, Andrew; Cummins, Scott F; Goodstein, David M; Harris, Christina; Jackson, Daniel J; Leys, Sally P; Shu, Shengqiang; Woodcroft, Ben J; Vervoort, Michel; Kosik, Kenneth S; Manning, Gerard; Degnan, Bernard M; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2010-08-01

    Sponges are an ancient group of animals that diverged from other metazoans over 600 million years ago. Here we present the draft genome sequence of Amphimedon queenslandica, a demosponge from the Great Barrier Reef, and show that it is remarkably similar to other animal genomes in content, structure and organization. Comparative analysis enabled by the sequencing of the sponge genome reveals genomic events linked to the origin and early evolution of animals, including the appearance, expansion and diversification of pan-metazoan transcription factor, signalling pathway and structural genes. This diverse 'toolkit' of genes correlates with critical aspects of all metazoan body plans, and comprises cell cycle control and growth, development, somatic- and germ-cell specification, cell adhesion, innate immunity and allorecognition. Notably, many of the genes associated with the emergence of animals are also implicated in cancer, which arises from defects in basic processes associated with metazoan multicellularity. PMID:20686567

  6. Chloroplast genome evolution in early diverged leptosporangiate ferns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chung, Myong Gi; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the chloroplast (cp) genome sequences from three early diverged leptosporangiate ferns were completed and analyzed in order to understand the evolution of the genome of the fern lineages. The complete cp genome sequence of Osmunda cinnamomea (Osmundales) was 142,812 base pairs (bp). The cp genome structure was similar to that of eusporangiate ferns. The gene/intron losses that frequently occurred in the cp genome of leptosporangiate ferns were not found in the cp genome of O. cinnamomea. In addition, putative RNA editing sites in the cp genome were rare in O. cinnamomea, even though the sites were frequently predicted to be present in leptosporangiate ferns. The complete cp genome sequence of Diplopterygium glaucum (Gleicheniales) was 151,007 bp and has a 9.7 kb inversion between the trnL-CAA and trnVGCA genes when compared to O. cinnamomea. Several repeated sequences were detected around the inversion break points. The complete cp genome sequence of Lygodium japonicum (Schizaeales) was 157,142 bp and a deletion of the rpoC1 intron was detected. This intron loss was shared by all of the studied species of the genus Lygodium. The GC contents and the effective numbers of codons (ENCs) in ferns varied significantly when compared to seed plants. The ENC values of the early diverged leptosporangiate ferns showed intermediate levels between eusporangiate and core leptosporangiate ferns. However, our phylogenetic tree based on all of the cp gene sequences clearly indicated that the cp genome similarity between O. cinnamomea (Osmundales) and eusporangiate ferns are symplesiomorphies, rather than synapomorphies. Therefore, our data is in agreement with the view that Osmundales is a distinct early diverged lineage in the leptosporangiate ferns. PMID:24823358

  7. Phylogenomics and the dynamic genome evolution of the genus Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Richards, Vincent P; Palmer, Sara R; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D; Qin, Xiang; Weinstock, George M; Highlander, Sarah K; Town, Christopher D; Burne, Robert A; Stanhope, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The genus Streptococcus comprises important pathogens that have a severe impact on human health and are responsible for substantial economic losses to agriculture. Here, we utilize 46 Streptococcus genome sequences (44 species), including eight species sequenced here, to provide the first genomic level insight into the evolutionary history and genetic basis underlying the functional diversity of all major groups of this genus. Gene gain/loss analysis revealed a dynamic pattern of genome evolution characterized by an initial period of gene gain followed by a period of loss, as the major groups within the genus diversified. This was followed by a period of genome expansion associated with the origins of the present extant species. The pattern is concordant with an emerging view that genomes evolve through a dynamic process of expansion and streamlining. A large proportion of the pan-genome has experienced lateral gene transfer (LGT) with causative factors, such as relatedness and shared environment, operating over different evolutionary scales. Multiple gene ontology terms were significantly enriched for each group, and mapping terms onto the phylogeny showed that those corresponding to genes born on branches leading to the major groups represented approximately one-fifth of those enriched. Furthermore, despite the extensive LGT, several biochemical characteristics have been retained since group formation, suggesting genomic cohesiveness through time, and that these characteristics may be fundamental to each group. For example, proteolysis: mitis group; urea metabolism: salivarius group; carbohydrate metabolism: pyogenic group; and transcription regulation: bovis group. PMID:24625962

  8. Nannochloropsis Genomes Reveal Evolution of Microalgal Oleaginous Traits

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianqiang; Han, Danxiang; Wang, Hui; Zeng, Xiaowei; Jing, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Qian; Su, Xiaoquan; Chang, Xingzhi; Wang, Anhui; Wang, Wei; Jia, Jing; Wei, Li; Xin, Yi; Qiao, Yinghe; Huang, Ranran; Chen, Jie; Han, Bo; Yoon, Kangsup; Hill, Russell T.; Zohar, Yonathan; Chen, Feng; Hu, Qiang; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Oleaginous microalgae are promising feedstock for biofuels, yet the genetic diversity, origin and evolution of oleaginous traits remain largely unknown. Here we present a detailed phylogenomic analysis of five oleaginous Nannochloropsis species (a total of six strains) and one time-series transcriptome dataset for triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis on one representative strain. Despite small genome sizes, high coding potential and relative paucity of mobile elements, the genomes feature small cores of ca. 2,700 protein-coding genes and a large pan-genome of >38,000 genes. The six genomes share key oleaginous traits, such as the enrichment of selected lipid biosynthesis genes and certain glycoside hydrolase genes that potentially shift carbon flux from chrysolaminaran to TAG synthesis. The eleven type II diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes (DGAT-2) in every strain, each expressed during TAG synthesis, likely originated from three ancient genomes, including the secondary endosymbiosis host and the engulfed green and red algae. Horizontal gene transfers were inferred in most lipid synthesis nodes with expanded gene doses and many glycoside hydrolase genes. Thus multiple genome pooling and horizontal genetic exchange, together with selective inheritance of lipid synthesis genes and species-specific gene loss, have led to the enormous genetic apparatus for oleaginousness and the wide genomic divergence among present-day Nannochloropsis. These findings have important implications in the screening and genetic engineering of microalgae for biofuels. PMID:24415958

  9. Evolution of the mitochondrial genome of Metazoa as exemplified by comparison of congeneric species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Gissi; F Iannelli; G Pesole

    2008-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) of Metazoa is a good model system for evolutionary genomic studies and the availability of more than 1000 sequences provides an almost unique opportunity to decode the mechanisms of genome evolution over a large phylogenetic range. In this paper, we review several structural features of the metazoan mtDNA, such as gene content, genome size, genome architecture

  10. Genome evolution and biodiversity in teleost fish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J-N Volff

    2005-01-01

    Teleost fish, which roughly make up half of the extant vertebrate species, exhibit an amazing level of biodiversity affecting their morphology, ecology and behaviour as well as many other aspects of their biology. This huge variability makes fish extremely attractive for the study of many biological questions, particularly of those related to evolution. New insights gained from different teleost species

  11. Genome-wide signatures of convergent evolution in echolocating mammals.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joe; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Cotton, James A; Liu, Yuan; Provero, Paolo; Stupka, Elia; Rossiter, Stephen J

    2013-10-10

    Evolution is typically thought to proceed through divergence of genes, proteins and ultimately phenotypes. However, similar traits might also evolve convergently in unrelated taxa owing to similar selection pressures. Adaptive phenotypic convergence is widespread in nature, and recent results from several genes have suggested that this phenomenon is powerful enough to also drive recurrent evolution at the sequence level. Where homoplasious substitutions do occur these have long been considered the result of neutral processes. However, recent studies have demonstrated that adaptive convergent sequence evolution can be detected in vertebrates using statistical methods that model parallel evolution, although the extent to which sequence convergence between genera occurs across genomes is unknown. Here we analyse genomic sequence data in mammals that have independently evolved echolocation and show that convergence is not a rare process restricted to several loci but is instead widespread, continuously distributed and commonly driven by natural selection acting on a small number of sites per locus. Systematic analyses of convergent sequence evolution in 805,053 amino acids within 2,326 orthologous coding gene sequences compared across 22 mammals (including four newly sequenced bat genomes) revealed signatures consistent with convergence in nearly 200 loci. Strong and significant support for convergence among bats and the bottlenose dolphin was seen in numerous genes linked to hearing or deafness, consistent with an involvement in echolocation. Unexpectedly, we also found convergence in many genes linked to vision: the convergent signal of many sensory genes was robustly correlated with the strength of natural selection. This first attempt to detect genome-wide convergent sequence evolution across divergent taxa reveals the phenomenon to be much more pervasive than previously recognized. PMID:24005325

  12. A unifying model of genome evolution under parsimony

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Parsimony and maximum likelihood methods of phylogenetic tree estimation and parsimony methods for genome rearrangements are central to the study of genome evolution yet to date they have largely been pursued in isolation. Results We present a data structure called a history graph that offers a practical basis for the analysis of genome evolution. It conceptually simplifies the study of parsimonious evolutionary histories by representing both substitutions and double cut and join (DCJ) rearrangements in the presence of duplications. The problem of constructing parsimonious history graphs thus subsumes related maximum parsimony problems in the fields of phylogenetic reconstruction and genome rearrangement. We show that tractable functions can be used to define upper and lower bounds on the minimum number of substitutions and DCJ rearrangements needed to explain any history graph. These bounds become tight for a special type of unambiguous history graph called an ancestral variation graph (AVG), which constrains in its combinatorial structure the number of operations required. We finally demonstrate that for a given history graph G, a finite set of AVGs describe all parsimonious interpretations of G, and this set can be explored with a few sampling moves. Conclusion This theoretical study describes a model in which the inference of genome rearrangements and phylogeny can be unified under parsimony. PMID:24946830

  13. Genome evolution in pocket gophers (genus Thomomys )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James L. Patton; Steven W. Sherwood

    1982-01-01

    A basic dichotomy exists in the amount and chromosomal position of constitutive heterochromatin (C-bands) in species of pocket gophers, genus Thomomys. Members of the “talpoides-group” of species (e.g., T. talpoides and T. monticola) have C-bands restricted to the centromeric regions. These taxa are characterized by Robertsonian patterns of karyotypic evolution. In contrast, species within the “bottae-group” are characterized by extensive

  14. Evolution of Metabolic Pathways and Evolution of Genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giovanni Emiliani; Marco Fondi; Pietro Liò; Renato Fani

    \\u000a Bacteria can be considered as the interface between geochemical cycles and the superior forms of life. Therefore, how the\\u000a origin of life has been constructing metabolic complexity from earth geochemistry and how bacterial evolution is continuously\\u000a modifying it represent major issues cross-linking both geochemical and evolutionary viewpoints.

  15. Evolution of genomic structural variation and genomic architecture in the adaptive radiations of African cichlid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shaohua; Meyer, Axel

    2014-01-01

    African cichlid fishes are an ideal system for studying explosive rates of speciation and the origin of diversity in adaptive radiation. Within the last few million years, more than 2000 species have evolved in the Great Lakes of East Africa, the largest adaptive radiation in vertebrates. These young species show spectacular diversity in their coloration, morphology and behavior. However, little is known about the genomic basis of this astonishing diversity. Recently, five African cichlid genomes were sequenced, including that of the Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a basal and only relatively moderately diversified lineage, and the genomes of four representative endemic species of the adaptive radiations, Neolamprologus brichardi, Astatotilapia burtoni, Metriaclima zebra, and Pundamila nyererei. Using the Tilapia genome as a reference genome, we generated a high-resolution genomic variation map, consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), short insertions and deletions (indels), inversions and deletions. In total, around 18.8, 17.7, 17.0, and 17.0 million SNPs, 2.3, 2.2, 1.4, and 1.9 million indels, 262, 306, 162, and 154 inversions, and 3509, 2705, 2710, and 2634 deletions were inferred to have evolved in N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei, and M. zebra, respectively. Many of these variations affected the annotated gene regions in the genome. Different patterns of genetic variation were detected during the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes. For SNPs, the highest rate of evolution was detected in the common ancestor of N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei, and M. zebra. However, for the evolution of inversions and deletions, we found that the rates at the terminal taxa are substantially higher than the rates at the ancestral lineages. The high-resolution map provides an ideal opportunity to understand the genomic bases of the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes. PMID:24917883

  16. Evolution of genomic structural variation and genomic architecture in the adaptive radiations of African cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shaohua; Meyer, Axel

    2014-01-01

    African cichlid fishes are an ideal system for studying explosive rates of speciation and the origin of diversity in adaptive radiation. Within the last few million years, more than 2000 species have evolved in the Great Lakes of East Africa, the largest adaptive radiation in vertebrates. These young species show spectacular diversity in their coloration, morphology and behavior. However, little is known about the genomic basis of this astonishing diversity. Recently, five African cichlid genomes were sequenced, including that of the Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a basal and only relatively moderately diversified lineage, and the genomes of four representative endemic species of the adaptive radiations, Neolamprologus brichardi, Astatotilapia burtoni, Metriaclima zebra, and Pundamila nyererei. Using the Tilapia genome as a reference genome, we generated a high-resolution genomic variation map, consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), short insertions and deletions (indels), inversions and deletions. In total, around 18.8, 17.7, 17.0, and 17.0 million SNPs, 2.3, 2.2, 1.4, and 1.9 million indels, 262, 306, 162, and 154 inversions, and 3509, 2705, 2710, and 2634 deletions were inferred to have evolved in N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei, and M. zebra, respectively. Many of these variations affected the annotated gene regions in the genome. Different patterns of genetic variation were detected during the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes. For SNPs, the highest rate of evolution was detected in the common ancestor of N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei, and M. zebra. However, for the evolution of inversions and deletions, we found that the rates at the terminal taxa are substantially higher than the rates at the ancestral lineages. The high-resolution map provides an ideal opportunity to understand the genomic bases of the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes. PMID:24917883

  17. Pan-Genomic Analysis Provides Insights into the Genomic Variation and Evolution of Salmonella Paratyphi A

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunxia; Cui, Xiaoying; Yu, Jun; Xiao, Jingfa; Kan, Biao

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella Paratyphi A (S. Paratyphi A) is a highly adapted, human-specific pathogen that causes paratyphoid fever. Cases of paratyphoid fever have recently been increasing, and the disease is becoming a major public health concern, especially in Eastern and Southern Asia. To investigate the genomic variation and evolution of S. Paratyphi A, a pan-genomic analysis was performed on five newly sequenced S. Paratyphi A strains and two other reference strains. A whole genome comparison revealed that the seven genomes are collinear and that their organization is highly conserved. The high rate of substitutions in part of the core genome indicates that there are frequent homologous recombination events. Based on the changes in the pan-genome size and cluster number (both in the core functional genes and core pseudogenes), it can be inferred that the sharply increasing number of pseudogene clusters may have strong correlation with the inactivation of functional genes, and indicates that the S. Paratyphi A genome is being degraded. PMID:23028950

  18. Heterogeneity of genomic evolution and mutational profiles in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bolli, Niccolo; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Wedge, David C.; Van Loo, Peter; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Martincorena, Inigo; Dawson, Kevin J.; Iorio, Francesco; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Bignell, Graham R.; Hinton, Jonathan W.; Li, Yilong; Tubio, Jose M.C.; McLaren, Stuart; O' Meara, Sarah; Butler, Adam P.; Teague, Jon W.; Mudie, Laura; Anderson, Elizabeth; Rashid, Naim; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Shammas, Masood A.; Sperling, Adam S.; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Richardson, Paul G.; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Magrangeas, Florence; Minvielle, Stephane; Moreau, Philippe; Attal, Michel; Facon, Thierry; Futreal, P Andrew; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Campbell, Peter J.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable plasma cell malignancy with a complex and incompletely understood molecular pathogenesis. Here we use whole-exome sequencing, copy-number profiling and cytogenetics to analyse 84 myeloma samples. Most cases have a complex subclonal structure and show clusters of subclonal variants, including subclonal driver mutations. Serial sampling reveals diverse patterns of clonal evolution, including linear evolution, differential clonal response and branching evolution. Diverse processes contribute to the mutational repertoire, including kataegis and somatic hypermutation, and their relative contribution changes over time. We find heterogeneity of mutational spectrum across samples, with few recurrent genes. We identify new candidate genes, including truncations of SP140, LTB, ROBO1 and clustered missense mutations in EGR1. The myeloma genome is heterogeneous across the cohort, and exhibits diversity in clonal admixture and in dynamics of evolution, which may impact prognostic stratification, therapeutic approaches and assessment of disease response to treatment. PMID:24429703

  19. Genomics of alternative splicing: evolution, development and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Gamazon, Eric R; Stranger, Barbara E

    2014-06-01

    Alternative splicing is a major cellular mechanism in metazoans for generating proteomic diversity. A large proportion of protein-coding genes in multicellular organisms undergo alternative splicing, and in humans, it has been estimated that nearly 90 % of protein-coding genes-much larger than expected-are subject to alternative splicing. Genomic analyses of alternative splicing have illuminated its universal role in shaping the evolution of genomes, in the control of developmental processes, and in the dynamic regulation of the transcriptome to influence phenotype. Disruption of the splicing machinery has been found to drive pathophysiology, and indeed reprogramming of aberrant splicing can provide novel approaches to the development of molecular therapy. This review focuses on the recent progress in our understanding of alternative splicing brought about by the unprecedented explosive growth of genomic data and highlights the relevance of human splicing variation on disease and therapy. PMID:24378600

  20. Viral diversity and clonal evolution from unphased genomic data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clonal expansion is a process in which a single organism reproduces asexually, giving rise to a diversifying population. It is pervasive in nature, from within-host pathogen evolution to emergent infectious disease outbreaks. Standard phylogenetic tools rely on full-length genomes of individual pathogens or population consensus sequences (phased genotypes). Although high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to sample population diversity, the short sequence reads inherent to them preclude assessing whether two reads originate from the same clone (unphased genotypes). This obstacle severely limits the application of phylogenetic methods and investigation of within-host dynamics of acute infections using this rich data source. Methods We introduce two measures of diversity to study the evolution of clonal populations using unphased genomic data, which eliminate the need to construct full-length genomes. Our method follows a maximum likelihood approach to estimate evolutionary rates and times to the most recent common ancestor, based on a relaxed molecular clock model; independent of a growth model. Deviations from neutral evolution indicate the presence of selection and bottleneck events. Results We evaluated our methods in silico and then compared it against existing approaches with the well-characterized 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. We then applied our method to high-throughput genomic data from marburgvirus-infected non-human primates and inferred the time of infection and the intra-host evolutionary rate, and identified purifying selection in viral populations. Conclusions Our method has the power to make use of minor variants present in less than 1% of the population and capture genomic diversification within days of infection, making it an ideal tool for the study of acute RNA viral infection dynamics. PMID:25573168

  1. Paternal leakage, heteroplasmy, and the evolution of plant mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    McCauley, David E

    2013-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes are usually transmitted to the progeny from the maternal parent. However, cases of paternal transmission are known and are perhaps more common than once thought. This review will consider recent evidence, both direct and indirect, of paternal transmission (leakage) of the mitochondrial genome of seed plants, especially in natural populations, and how this can result in offspring that carry a mixture of maternally and paternally derived copies of the genome; a type of heteroplasmy. It will further consider how this heteroplasmy facilitates recombination between genetically distinct partners; a process that can enhance mitochondrial genotypic diversity. This will then form the basis for a discussion of five evolutionary questions that arise from these observations. Questions include how plant mitochondrial genome evolution can be placed on a sexual to asexual continuum, whether cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) facilitates the evolution of paternal leakage, whether paternal leakage is more likely in populations undergoing admixture, how leakage influences patterns of gene flow, and whether heteroplasmy occurs in natural populations at a frequency greater than predicted by crossing experiments. It is proposed that each of these questions offers fertile ground for future research on a diversity of plant species. PMID:23952142

  2. Photosynthetic evolution in parasitic plants: insight from the chloroplast genome.

    PubMed

    Bungard, Ralph A

    2004-03-01

    Despite the enormous diversity in plant form, structure and growth environment across the seed-bearing plants (angiosperms and gymnosperms), the chloroplast genome has, with few exceptions, remained remarkably conserved. This conservation suggests the existence of universal evolutionary selection pressures associated with photosynthesis-the primary function of chloroplasts. The stark exceptions to this conservation occur in parasitic angiosperms, which have escaped the dominant model by evolving the capacity to obtain some or all of their carbon (and nutrients) from their plant hosts. The consequence of this evolution to parasitism is a relaxation of the evolutionary constraints associated with the need to maintain photosynthetic function, the very function that drove early stages of the ancient symbiotic relationship that produced the contemporary chloroplast. Extreme examples of reductionism among parasitic angiosperms reveals major alterations in chloroplast function with the loss of photosynthetic capacity and, with that, massive alterations in chloroplast genome content. This review highlights emerging patterns in reported gene loss and gene retention in the chloroplast genomes of parasitic plants. Some gene losses appear to occur in the early stages of parasitic evolution, even before the loss of photosynthetic capacity, like the chlororespiratory (ndh) genes. This contrasts with unexpected gene retentions, like that of the rbcL gene responsible for photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation, and belies current understanding of gene function. The review relates gene retention to current knowledge of protein function and gene processing that has implications to broader aspects of genome conservation in organelles. PMID:14988925

  3. Genome-wide analysis of mammalian promoter architecture and evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Piero Carninci; Albin Sandelin; Boris Lenhard; Shintaro Katayama; Kazuro Shimokawa; Jasmina Ponjavic; Colin A M Semple; Martin S Taylor; Pär G Engström; Martin C Frith; Alistair R R Forrest; Wynand B Alkema; Sin Lam Tan; Charles Plessy; Rimantas Kodzius; Timothy Ravasi; Takeya Kasukawa; Shiro Fukuda; Mutsumi Kanamori-Katayama; Yayoi Kitazume; Hideya Kawaji; Chikatoshi Kai; Mari Nakamura; Hideaki Konno; Kenji Nakano; Salim Mottagui-Tabar; Peter Arner; Alessandra Chesi; Stefano Gustincich; Francesca Persichetti; Harukazu Suzuki; Sean M Grimmond; Christine A Wells; Valerio Orlando; Claes Wahlestedt; Edison T Liu; Matthias Harbers; Jun Kawai; Vladimir B Bajic; David A Hume; Yoshihide Hayashizaki

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian promoters can be separated into two classes, conserved TATA box–enriched promoters, which initiate at a well-defined site, and more plastic, broad and evolvable CpG-rich promoters. We have sequenced tags corresponding to several hundred thousand transcription start sites (TSSs) in the mouse and human genomes, allowing precise analysis of the sequence architecture and evolution of distinct promoter classes. Different tissues

  4. Genomes and geography: genomic insights into the evolution and phylogeography of the genus Schistosoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Blood flukes within the genus Schistosoma still remain a major cause of disease in the tropics and subtropics and the study of their evolution has been an area of major debate and research. With the advent of modern molecular and genomic approaches deeper insights have been attained not only into the divergence and speciation of these worms, but also into the historic movement of these parasites from Asia into Africa, via migration and dispersal of definitive and snail intermediate hosts. This movement was subsequently followed by a radiation of Schistosoma species giving rise to the S. mansoni and S. haematobium groups, as well as the S. indicum group that reinvaded Asia. Each of these major evolutionary events has been marked by distinct changes in genomic structure evident in differences in mitochondrial gene order and nuclear chromosomal architecture between the species associated with Asia and Africa. Data from DNA sequencing, comparative molecular genomics and karyotyping are indicative of major constitutional genomic events which would have become fixed in the ancestral populations of these worms. Here we examine how modern genomic techniques may give a more in depth understanding of the evolution of schistosomes and highlight the complexity of speciation and divergence in this group. PMID:21736723

  5. Molecular cytogenetic and genomic insights into chromosomal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Herrera, A; Farré, M; Robinson, T J

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes aspects of the extensive literature on the patterns and processes underpinning chromosomal evolution in vertebrates and especially placental mammals. It highlights the growing synergy between molecular cytogenetics and comparative genomics, particularly with respect to fully or partially sequenced genomes, and provides novel insights into changes in chromosome number and structure across deep division of the vertebrate tree of life. The examination of basal numbers in the deeper branches of the vertebrate tree suggest a haploid (n) chromosome number of 10–13 in an ancestral vertebrate, with modest increases in tetrapods and amniotes most probably by chromosomal fissioning. Information drawn largely from cross-species chromosome painting in the data-dense Placentalia permits the confident reconstruction of an ancestral karyotype comprising n=23 chromosomes that is similarly retained in Boreoeutheria. Using in silico genome-wide scans that include the newly released frog genome we show that of the nine ancient syntenies detected in conserved karyotypes of extant placentals (thought likely to reflect the structure of ancestral chromosomes), the human syntenic segmental associations 3p/21, 4pq/8p, 7a/16p, 14/15, 12qt/22q and 12pq/22qt predate the divergence of tetrapods. These findings underscore the enhanced quality of ancestral reconstructions based on the integrative molecular cytogenetic and comparative genomic approaches that collectively highlight a pattern of conserved syntenic associations that extends back ?360 million years ago. PMID:22108627

  6. Genomic and epigenomic co-evolution in follicular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, M; Kreuz, M; Haake, A; Hasenclever, D; Trautmann, H; Arnold, C; Winter, K; Koch, K; Klapper, W; Scholtysik, R; Rosolowski, M; Hoffmann, S; Ammerpohl, O; Szczepanowski, M; Herrmann, D; Küppers, R; Pott, C; Siebert, R

    2015-02-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) with a t(14;18) is a B-cell neoplasm clinically characterized by multiple recurrencies. In order to investigate the clonal evolution of this lymphoma, we studied paired primary and relapse tumor samples from 33 patients with recurrent non-transformed t(14;18)-positive FL. We reconstructed phylogenetic trees of the evolution by taking advantage of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated somatic hypermutation (SHM) active in the germinal center reaction using sequences of the clonal VHDHJH rearrangements of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) locus. Mutational analysis of the IGH locus showed evidence for ongoing somatic mutation and for counter-selection of mutations affecting the BCR conformation during tumor evolution. We further followed evolutionary divergence by targeted sequencing of gene loci affected by aberrant SHM as well as of known driver genes of lymphomagenesis, and by array-based genome-wide chromosomal imbalance and DNA methylation analysis. We observed a wide spectrum of evolutionary patterns ranging from almost no evolution to divergent evolution within recurrent non-transformed t(14;18) FL. Remarkably, we observed a correlation of the magnitude of evolutionary divergence across all genetic and epigenetic levels suggesting co-evolution. The distribution of coding mutations in driver genes and the correlation with SHM suggest CREBBP and AID to be potential modifiers of genetic and epigenetic co-evolution in FL. PMID:25027518

  7. Massive comparative genomic analysis reveals convergent evolution of specialized bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Vicky; Royer-Carenzi, Manuela; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Background Genome size and gene content in bacteria are associated with their lifestyles. Obligate intracellular bacteria (i.e., mutualists and parasites) have small genomes that derived from larger free-living bacterial ancestors; however, the different steps of bacterial specialization from free-living to intracellular lifestyle have not been studied comprehensively. The growing number of available sequenced genomes makes it possible to perform a statistical comparative analysis of 317 genomes from bacteria with different lifestyles. Results Compared to free-living bacteria, host-dependent bacteria exhibit fewer rRNA genes, more split rRNA operons and fewer transcriptional regulators, linked to slower growth rates. We found a function-dependent and non-random loss of the same 100 orthologous genes in all obligate intracellular bacteria. Thus, we showed that obligate intracellular bacteria from different phyla are converging according to their lifestyle. Their specialization is an irreversible phenomenon characterized by translation modification and massive gene loss, including the loss of transcriptional regulators. Although both mutualists and parasites converge by genome reduction, these obligate intracellular bacteria have lost distinct sets of genes in the context of their specific host associations: mutualists have significantly more genes that enable nutrient provisioning whereas parasites have genes that encode Types II, IV, and VI secretion pathways. Conclusion Our findings suggest that gene loss, rather than acquisition of virulence factors, has been a driving force in the adaptation of parasites to eukaryotic cells. This comparative genomic analysis helps to explore the strategies by which obligate intracellular genomes specialize to particular host-associations and contributes to advance our knowledge about the mechanisms of bacterial evolution. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene V. Koonin, Nicolas Galtier, and Jeremy Selengut. PMID:19361336

  8. A time-invariant principle of genome evolution Subhajyoti De1

    E-print Network

    Babu, M. Madan

    A time-invariant principle of genome evolution Subhajyoti De1 and M. Madan Babu1 Medical Research (received for review December 19, 2009) Uncovering general principles of genome evolution that are time genomes that diverged at different times across germ- and somatic-cell lineages: (i) the reference human

  9. Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics

    E-print Network

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Evolution of Weediness and Invasiveness: Charting the Course for Weed Genomics C. Neal Stewart, Jr and their evolution remain poorly understood, but genomic approaches offer tremendous promise for elucidating these important features of weed biology. However, the genomic tools and resources available for weed research

  10. Reconstructing the Evolution of Brachypodium Genomes Using Comparative Chromosome Painting

    PubMed Central

    Betekhtin, Alexander; Jenkins, Glyn; Hasterok, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Brachypodium distachyon is a model for the temperate cereals and grasses and has a biology, genomics infrastructure and cytogenetic platform fit for purpose. It is a member of a genus with fewer than 20 species, which have different genome sizes, basic chromosome numbers and ploidy levels. The phylogeny and interspecific relationships of this group have not to date been resolved by sequence comparisons and karyotypical studies. The aims of this study are not only to reconstruct the evolution of Brachypodium karyotypes to resolve the phylogeny, but also to highlight the mechanisms that shape the evolution of grass genomes. This was achieved through the use of comparative chromosome painting (CCP) which hybridises fluorescent, chromosome-specific probes derived from B. distachyon to homoeologous meiotic chromosomes of its close relatives. The study included five diploids (B. distachyon 2n?=?10, B. sylvaticum 2n?=?18, B. pinnatum 2n?=?16; 2n?=?18, B. arbuscula 2n?=?18 and B. stacei 2n?=?20) three allotetraploids (B. pinnatum 2n?=?28, B. phoenicoides 2n?=?28 and B. hybridum 2n?=?30), and two species of unknown ploidy (B. retusum 2n?=?38 and B. mexicanum 2n?=?40). On the basis of the patterns of hybridisation and incorporating published data, we propose two alternative, but similar, models of karyotype evolution in the genus Brachypodium. According to the first model, the extant genome of B. distachyon derives from B. mexicanum or B. stacei by several rounds of descending dysploidy, and the other diploids evolve from B. distachyon via ascending dysploidy. The allotetraploids arise by interspecific hybridisation and chromosome doubling between B. distachyon and other diploids. The second model differs from the first insofar as it incorporates an intermediate 2n?=?18 species between the B. mexicanum or B. stacei progenitors and the dysploidic B. distachyon. PMID:25493646

  11. Peak expiratory flow changes during experimental rhinovirus infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. G. Bardin; D. J. Fraenkel; G. Sanderson; E. M. van Schalkwyk; S. T. Holgate; S. L. Johnston

    2000-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow changes during experimental rhinovirus infection. P.G. Bardin, D.J. Fraenkel, G. Sanderson, E.M. van Schalkwyk, S.T. Holgate, S.L. Johnston. #ERS Journals Ltd 2000. ABSTRACT: Rhinovirus (RV) colds are associated with asthma exacerbations and experimental infections are commonly used to investigate the mechanisms involved. However, a temporal association between experimental RV infections and falls in peak expiratory flow (PEF)

  12. The genome diversity and karyotype evolution of mammals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed an explosion of genome sequencing and mapping in evolutionary diverse species. While full genome sequencing of mammals is rapidly progressing, the ability to assemble and align orthologous whole chromosome regions from more than a few species is still not possible. The intense focus on building of comparative maps for companion (dog and cat), laboratory (mice and rat) and agricultural (cattle, pig, and horse) animals has traditionally been used as a means to understand the underlying basis of disease-related or economically important phenotypes. However, these maps also provide an unprecedented opportunity to use multispecies analysis as a tool for inferring karyotype evolution. Comparative chromosome painting and related techniques are now considered to be the most powerful approaches in comparative genome studies. Homologies can be identified with high accuracy using molecularly defined DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on chromosomes of different species. Chromosome painting data are now available for members of nearly all mammalian orders. In most orders, there are species with rates of chromosome evolution that can be considered as 'default' rates. The number of rearrangements that have become fixed in evolutionary history seems comparatively low, bearing in mind the 180 million years of the mammalian radiation. Comparative chromosome maps record the history of karyotype changes that have occurred during evolution. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of these recent advances in our endeavor to decipher the karyotype evolution of mammals by integrating the published results together with some of our latest unpublished results. PMID:21992653

  13. Thermodynamic Basis for the Emergence of Genomes during Prebiotic Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hyung-June; Vijaya Satya, Ravi; Reifman, Jaques

    2012-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis views modern organisms as descendants of RNA molecules. The earliest RNA molecules must have been random sequences, from which the first genomes that coded for polymerase ribozymes emerged. The quasispecies theory by Eigen predicts the existence of an error threshold limiting genomic stability during such transitions, but does not address the spontaneity of changes. Following a recent theoretical approach, we applied the quasispecies theory combined with kinetic/thermodynamic descriptions of RNA replication to analyze the collective behavior of RNA replicators based on known experimental kinetics data. We find that, with increasing fidelity (relative rate of base-extension for Watson-Crick versus mismatched base pairs), replications without enzymes, with ribozymes, and with protein-based polymerases are above, near, and below a critical point, respectively. The prebiotic evolution therefore must have crossed this critical region. Over large regions of the phase diagram, fitness increases with increasing fidelity, biasing random drifts in sequence space toward ‘crystallization.’ This region encloses the experimental nonenzymatic fidelity value, favoring evolutions toward polymerase sequences with ever higher fidelity, despite error rates above the error catastrophe threshold. Our work shows that experimentally characterized kinetics and thermodynamics of RNA replication allow us to determine the physicochemical conditions required for the spontaneous crystallization of biological information. Our findings also suggest that among many potential oligomers capable of templated replication, RNAs may have evolved to form prebiotic genomes due to the value of their nonenzymatic fidelity. PMID:22693440

  14. Genome-wide signals of positive selection in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Enard, David; Messer, Philipp W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    The role of positive selection in human evolution remains controversial. On the one hand, scans for positive selection have identified hundreds of candidate loci, and the genome-wide patterns of polymorphism show signatures consistent with frequent positive selection. On the other hand, recent studies have argued that many of the candidate loci are false positives and that most genome-wide signatures of adaptation are in fact due to reduction of neutral diversity by linked deleterious mutations, known as background selection. Here we analyze human polymorphism data from the 1000 Genomes Project and detect signatures of positive selection once we correct for the effects of background selection. We show that levels of neutral polymorphism are lower near amino acid substitutions, with the strongest reduction observed specifically near functionally consequential amino acid substitutions. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions are associated with signatures of recent adaptation that should not be generated by background selection, such as unusually long and frequent haplotypes and specific distortions in the site frequency spectrum. We use forward simulations to argue that the observed signatures require a high rate of strongly adaptive substitutions near amino acid changes. We further demonstrate that the observed signatures of positive selection correlate better with the presence of regulatory sequences, as predicted by the ENCODE Project Consortium, than with the positions of amino acid substitutions. Our results suggest that adaptation was frequent in human evolution and provide support for the hypothesis of King and Wilson that adaptive divergence is primarily driven by regulatory changes. PMID:24619126

  15. Polyadenylic acid sequences in rhinovirus RNA species from infected human diploid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Macnaughton, M R; Dimmock, N J

    1975-01-01

    Polyadenylic acid sequences were shown to be present in rhinovirus virion RNA. Virus-specified RNA from human embryo lung cells infected with rhinovirus also contained polyadenylic acid but did not contain any polyuridylic acid sequences. PMID:169395

  16. The ABCs of Rhinoviruses, Wheezing, and Asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Gern, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) were discovered as common cold pathogens over 50 years ago. Recent advances in molecular viral diagnostics have led to an appreciation of their role in more-significant respiratory illnesses, including bronchiolitis in infancy, childhood pneumonia, and acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, and cystic fibrosis. Until a few years ago, only two groups of HRVs (A and B) had been recognized. However, full and partial sequencing of HRVs led to the discovery of a third species of HRV (HRV-C) that has distinct structural and biologic features. Risk factors and pathogenic mechanisms for more-severe HRV infections are being defined, and yet fundamental questions persist about mechanisms relating this common pathogen to allergic diseases and asthma. The close relationship between HRV infections and asthma suggests that antiviral treatments could have a major impact on the morbidity associated with this chronic respiratory disease. PMID:20375160

  17. Camelid genomes reveal evolution and adaptation to desert environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiguang; Guang, Xuanmin; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B; Cao, Junwei; Pan, Shengkai; Zhou, Huanmin; Zhang, Li; Abutarboush, Mohammed H; Xing, Yanping; Xie, Zhiyuan; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Zhang, Yanru; Yao, Qiulin; Al-Shomrani, Badr M; Zhang, Dong; Li, Jiang; Manee, Manee M; Yang, Zili; Yang, Linfeng; Liu, Yiyi; Zhang, Jilin; Altammami, Musaad A; Wang, Shenyuan; Yu, Lili; Zhang, Wenbin; Liu, Sanyang; Ba, La; Liu, Chunxia; Yang, Xukui; Meng, Fanhua; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Lu; Li, Erli; Li, Xueqiong; Wu, Kaifeng; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Junyi; Yin, Ye; Yang, Huanming; Al-Swailem, Abdulaziz M; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) are economically important livestock. Although the Bactrian camel and dromedary are large, typically arid-desert-adapted mammals, alpacas are adapted to plateaus. Here we present high-quality genome sequences of these three species. Our analysis reveals the demographic history of these species since the Tortonian Stage of the Miocene and uncovers a striking correlation between large fluctuations in population size and geological time boundaries. Comparative genomic analysis reveals complex features related to desert adaptations, including fat and water metabolism, stress responses to heat, aridity, intense ultraviolet radiation and choking dust. Transcriptomic analysis of Bactrian camels further reveals unique osmoregulation, osmoprotection and compensatory mechanisms for water reservation underpinned by high blood glucose levels. We hypothesize that these physiological mechanisms represent kidney evolutionary adaptations to the desert environment. This study advances our understanding of camelid evolution and the adaptation of camels to arid-desert environments. PMID:25333821

  18. Evolutionary Design of Gene Networks: Forced Evolution by Genomic Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Spirov, A. V.; Zagriychuk, E. A.; Holloway, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    The co-evolution of species with their genomic parasites (transposons) is thought to be one of the primary ways of rewiring gene regulatory networks (GRNs). We develop a framework for conducting evolutionary computations (EC) using the transposon mechanism. We find that the selective pressure of transposons can speed evolutionary searches for solutions and lead to outgrowth of GRNs (through co-option of new genes to acquire insensitivity to the attacking transposons). We test the approach by finding GRNs which can solve a fundamental problem in developmental biology: how GRNs in early embryo development can robustly read maternal signaling gradients, despite continued attacks on the genome by transposons. We observed co-evolutionary oscillations in the abundance of particular GRNs and their transposons, reminiscent of predator-prey or host-parasite dynamics. PMID:25558118

  19. The structure of the protein universe and genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Wolf, Yuri I; Karev, Georgy P

    2002-11-14

    Despite the practically unlimited number of possible protein sequences, the number of basic shapes in which proteins fold seems not only to be finite, but also to be relatively small, with probably no more than 10,000 folds in existence. Moreover, the distribution of proteins among these folds is highly non-homogeneous -- some folds and superfamilies are extremely abundant, but most are rare. Protein folds and families encoded in diverse genomes show similar size distributions with notable mathematical properties, which also extend to the number of connections between domains in multidomain proteins. All these distributions follow asymptotic power laws, such as have been identified in a wide variety of biological and physical systems, and which are typically associated with scale-free networks. These findings suggest that genome evolution is driven by extremely general mechanisms based on the preferential attachment principle. PMID:12432406

  20. Rates of phenotypic and genomic evolution during the Cambrian explosion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S Y; Soubrier, Julien; Edgecombe, Gregory D

    2013-10-01

    The near-simultaneous appearance of most modern animal body plans (phyla) ~530 million years ago during the Cambrian explosion is strong evidence for a brief interval of rapid phenotypic and genetic innovation, yet the exact speed and nature of this grand adaptive radiation remain debated. Crucially, rates of morphological evolution in the past (i.e., in ancestral lineages) can be inferred from phenotypic differences among living organisms-just as molecular evolutionary rates in ancestral lineages can be inferred from genetic divergences. We here employed Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic clock methods on an extensive anatomical and genomic data set for arthropods, the most diverse phylum in the Cambrian and today. Assuming an Ediacaran origin for arthropods, phenotypic evolution was ~4 times faster, and molecular evolution ~5.5 times faster, during the Cambrian explosion compared to all subsequent parts of the Phanerozoic. These rapid evolutionary rates are robust to assumptions about the precise age of arthropods. Surprisingly, these fast early rates do not change substantially even if the radiation of arthropods is compressed entirely into the Cambrian (~542 mega-annum [Ma]) or telescoped into the Cryogenian (~650 Ma). The fastest inferred rates are still consistent with evolution by natural selection and with data from living organisms, potentially resolving "Darwin's dilemma." However, evolution during the Cambrian explosion was unusual (compared to the subsequent Phanerozoic) in that fast rates were present across many lineages. PMID:24035543

  1. Evolution of a transposon in Daphnia hybrid genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transposable elements play a major role in genome evolution. Their capacity to move and/or multiply in the genome of their host may have profound impacts on phenotypes, and may have dramatic consequences on genome structure. Hybrid and polyploid clones have arisen multiple times in the Daphnia pulex complex and are thought to reproduce by obligate parthenogenesis. Our study examines the evolution of a DNA transposable element named Pokey in the D. pulex complex. Results Portions of Pokey elements inserted in the 28S rRNA genes from various Daphnia hybrids (diploids and polyploids) were sequenced and compared to sequences from a previous study to understand the evolutionary history of the elements. Pokey sequences show a complex phylogenetic pattern. We found evidence of recombination events in numerous Pokey alleles from diploid and polyploid hybrids and also from non-hybrid diploids. The recombination rate in Pokey elements is comparable to recombination rates previously estimated for 28S rRNA genes in the congener, Daphnia obtusa. Some recombinant Pokey alleles were encountered in Daphnia isolates from multiple locations and habitats. Conclusions Phylogenetic and recombination analyses showed that recombination is a major force that shapes Pokey evolution. Based on Pokey phylogenies, reticulation has played and still plays an important role in shaping the diversity of the D. pulex complex. Horizontal transfer of Pokey seems to be rare and hybrids often possess Pokey elements derived from recombination among alleles encountered in the putative parental species. The insertion of Pokey in hotspots of recombination may have important impacts on the diversity and fitness of this transposable element. PMID:23384095

  2. Sequence analysis of a bovine rhinovirus type 1 strain RS3x

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine rhinoviruses, known to cause clinical and subclinical upper respiratory infections in bovines worldwide, include three serotypes. Bovine rhinovirus (BRV) 1, 2 and 3 were originally classified as tentative members of the genus Rhinovirus (family Picornaviridae), however, in 2008 this genus was...

  3. Insights into the genome evolution of Yersinia pestis through whole genome comparison with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, B; Stoutland, P; Derbise, A; Georgescu, A; Elliott, J; Land, M; Marceau, M; Motin, V; Hinnebusch, J; Simonet, M; Medigue, C; Dacheux, D; Chenal-Francisque, V; Regala, W; Brubaker, R R; Carniel, E; Chain, P; Verguez, L; Fowler, J; Garcia, E; Lamerdin, J; Hauser, L; Larimer, F

    2004-01-24

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a highly uniform clone that diverged recently from the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Despite their close genetic relationship, they differ radically in their pathogenicity and transmission. Here we report the complete genomic sequence of Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 and its use for detailed genome comparisons to available Y. pestis sequences. Analyses of identified differences across a panel of Yersinia isolates from around the world reveals 32 Y. pestis chromosomal genes that, together with the two Y. pestis-specific plasmids, represent the only new genetic material in Y. pestis acquired since the divergence from Y. pseudotuberculosis. In contrast, 149 new pseudogenes (doubling the previous estimate) and 317 genes absent from Y. pestis were detected, indicating that as many as 13% of Y. pseudotuberculosis genes no longer function in Y. pestis. Extensive IS-mediated genome rearrangements and reductive evolution through massive gene loss, resulting in elimination and modification of pre-existing gene expression pathways appear to be more important than acquisition of new genes in the evolution of Y. pestis. These results provide a sobering example of how a highly virulent epidemic clone can suddenly emerge from a less virulent, closely related progenitor.

  4. The African coelacanth genome provides insights into tetrapod evolution.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Chris T; Alföldi, Jessica; Lee, Alison P; Fan, Shaohua; Philippe, Hervé; Maccallum, Iain; Braasch, Ingo; Manousaki, Tereza; Schneider, Igor; Rohner, Nicolas; Organ, Chris; Chalopin, Domitille; Smith, Jeramiah J; Robinson, Mark; Dorrington, Rosemary A; Gerdol, Marco; Aken, Bronwen; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Barucca, Marco; Baurain, Denis; Berlin, Aaron M; Blatch, Gregory L; Buonocore, Francesco; Burmester, Thorsten; Campbell, Michael S; Canapa, Adriana; Cannon, John P; Christoffels, Alan; De Moro, Gianluca; Edkins, Adrienne L; Fan, Lin; Fausto, Anna Maria; Feiner, Nathalie; Forconi, Mariko; Gamieldien, Junaid; Gnerre, Sante; Gnirke, Andreas; Goldstone, Jared V; Haerty, Wilfried; Hahn, Mark E; Hesse, Uljana; Hoffmann, Steve; Johnson, Jeremy; Karchner, Sibel I; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Lara, Marcia; Levin, Joshua Z; Litman, Gary W; Mauceli, Evan; Miyake, Tsutomu; Mueller, M Gail; Nelson, David R; Nitsche, Anne; Olmo, Ettore; Ota, Tatsuya; Pallavicini, Alberto; Panji, Sumir; Picone, Barbara; Ponting, Chris P; Prohaska, Sonja J; Przybylski, Dariusz; Saha, Nil Ratan; Ravi, Vydianathan; Ribeiro, Filipe J; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Searle, Stephen M J; Sharpe, Ted; Simakov, Oleg; Stadler, Peter F; Stegeman, John J; Sumiyama, Kenta; Tabbaa, Diana; Tafer, Hakim; Turner-Maier, Jason; van Heusden, Peter; White, Simon; Williams, Louise; Yandell, Mark; Brinkmann, Henner; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Tabin, Clifford J; Shubin, Neil; Schartl, Manfred; Jaffe, David B; Postlethwait, John H; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Di Palma, Federica; Lander, Eric S; Meyer, Axel; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2013-04-18

    The discovery of a living coelacanth specimen in 1938 was remarkable, as this lineage of lobe-finned fish was thought to have become extinct 70 million years ago. The modern coelacanth looks remarkably similar to many of its ancient relatives, and its evolutionary proximity to our own fish ancestors provides a glimpse of the fish that first walked on land. Here we report the genome sequence of the African coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae. Through a phylogenomic analysis, we conclude that the lungfish, and not the coelacanth, is the closest living relative of tetrapods. Coelacanth protein-coding genes are significantly more slowly evolving than those of tetrapods, unlike other genomic features. Analyses of changes in genes and regulatory elements during the vertebrate adaptation to land highlight genes involved in immunity, nitrogen excretion and the development of fins, tail, ear, eye, brain and olfaction. Functional assays of enhancers involved in the fin-to-limb transition and in the emergence of extra-embryonic tissues show the importance of the coelacanth genome as a blueprint for understanding tetrapod evolution. PMID:23598338

  5. Molecular evolution of cytochrome bd oxidases across proteobacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Degli Esposti, Mauro; Rosas-Pérez, Tania; Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis Eduardo; Bolaños, Luis Manuel; Rosenblueth, Monica; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2015-03-01

    This work is aimed to resolve the complex molecular evolution of cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, a nearly ubiquitous bacterial enzyme that is involved in redox balance and bioenergetics. Previous studies have created an unclear picture of bd oxidases phylogenesis without considering the existence of diverse types of bd oxidases. Integrated approaches of genomic and protein analysis focused on proteobacteria have generated a molecular classification of diverse types of bd oxidases, which produces a new scenario for interpreting their evolution. A duplication of the original gene cluster of bd oxidase might have occurred in the ancestors of extant ?-proteobacteria of the Rhodospirillales order, such as Acidocella, from which the bd-I type of the oxidase might have diffused to other proteobacterial lineages. In contrast, the Cyanide-Insensitive Oxidase type may have differentiated into recognizable subtypes after another gene cluster duplication. These subtypes are widespread in the genomes of ?-, ?-, and ?-proteobacteria, with occasional instances of lateral gene transfer. In resolving the evolutionary pattern of proteobacterial bd oxidases, this work sheds new light on the basal taxa of ?-proteobacteria from which the ?-proteobacterial lineage probably emerged. PMID:25688108

  6. Cubozoan genome illuminates functional diversification of opsins and photoreceptor evolution.

    PubMed

    Liegertová, Michaela; Pergner, Ji?í; Kozmiková, Iryna; Fabian, Peter; Pombinho, Antonio R; Strnad, Hynek; Pa?es, Jan; Vl?ek, ?estmír; Bart?n?k, Petr; Kozmik, Zbyn?k

    2015-01-01

    Animals sense light primarily by an opsin-based photopigment present in a photoreceptor cell. Cnidaria are arguably the most basal phylum containing a well-developed visual system. The evolutionary history of opsins in the animal kingdom has not yet been resolved. Here, we study the evolution of animal opsins by genome-wide analysis of the cubozoan jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora, a cnidarian possessing complex lens-containing eyes and minor photoreceptors. A large number of opsin genes with distinct tissue- and stage-specific expression were identified. Our phylogenetic analysis unequivocally classifies cubozoan opsins as a sister group to c-opsins and documents lineage-specific expansion of the opsin gene repertoire in the cubozoan genome. Functional analyses provided evidence for the use of the Gs-cAMP signaling pathway in a small set of cubozoan opsins, indicating the possibility that the majority of other cubozoan opsins signal via distinct pathways. Additionally, these tests uncovered subtle differences among individual opsins, suggesting possible fine-tuning for specific photoreceptor tasks. Based on phylogenetic, expression and biochemical analysis we propose that rapid lineage- and species-specific duplications of the intron-less opsin genes and their subsequent functional diversification promoted evolution of a large repertoire of both visual and extraocular photoreceptors in cubozoans. PMID:26154478

  7. Fugu Genome Analysis Provides Evidence for a Whole-Genome Duplication Early During the Evolution of Ray-Finned Fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Christoffels; Esther G. L. Koh; Jer-ming Chia; Sydney Brenner; Samuel Aparicio; Byrappa Venkatesh

    2004-01-01

    With about 24,000 extant species, teleosts are the largest group of vertebrates. They constitute more than 99% of the ray- finned fishes (Actinopterygii) that diverged from the lobe-finned fish lineage (Sarcopterygii) about 450 MYA. Although the role of genome duplication in the evolution of vertebrates is now established, its role in structuring the teleost genomes has been controversial. At least

  8. Tracing the Evolution of Streptophyte Algae and Their Mitochondrial Genome

    PubMed Central

    Turmel, Monique; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Six monophyletic groups of charophycean green algae are recognized within the Streptophyta. Although incongruent with earlier studies based on genes from three cellular compartments, chloroplast and nuclear phylogenomic analyses have resolved identical relationships among these groups, placing the Zygnematales or the Zygnematales + Coleochaetales as sister to land plants. The present investigation aimed at determining whether this consensus view is supported by the mitochondrial genome and at gaining insight into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolution within and across streptophyte algal lineages and during the transition toward the first land plants. We present here the newly sequenced mtDNAs of representatives of the Klebsormidiales (Entransia fimbriata and Klebsormidium spec.) and Zygnematales (Closterium baillyanum and Roya obtusa) and compare them with their homologs in other charophycean lineages as well as in selected embryophyte and chlorophyte lineages. Our results indicate that important changes occurred at the levels of genome size, gene order, and intron content within the Zygnematales. Although the representatives of the Klebsormidiales display more similarity in genome size and intron content, gene order seems more fluid and gene losses more frequent than in other charophycean lineages. In contrast, the two members of the Charales display an extremely conservative pattern of mtDNA evolution. Collectively, our analyses of gene order and gene content and the phylogenies we inferred from 40 mtDNA-encoded proteins failed to resolve the relationships among the Zygnematales, Coleochaetales, and Charales; however, they are consistent with previous phylogenomic studies in favoring that the morphologically complex Charales are not sister to land plants. PMID:24022472

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the liverwort Pleurozia purpurea reveals extremely conservative mitochondrial genome evolution in liverworts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Xue, Jiayu; Li, Libo; Liu, Yang; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2009-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes have been known to be highly unusual in their large sizes, frequent intra-genomic rearrangement, and generally conservative sequence evolution. Recent studies show that in early land plants the mitochondrial genomes exhibit a mixed mode of conservative yet dynamic evolution. Here, we report the completely sequenced mitochondrial genome from the liverwort Pleurozia purpurea. The circular genome has a size of 168,526 base pairs, containing 43 protein-coding genes, 3 rRNA genes, 25 tRNA genes, and 31 group I or II introns. It differs from the Marchantia polymorpha mitochondrial genome, the only other liverwort chondriome that has been sequenced, in lacking two genes (trnRucg and trnTggu) and one intron (rrn18i1065gII). The two genomes have identical gene orders and highly similar sequences in exons, introns, and intergenic spacers. Finally, a comparative analysis of duplicated trnRucu and other trnR genes from the two liverworts and several other organisms identified the recent lateral origin of trnRucg in Marchantia mtDNA through modification of a duplicated trnRucu. This study shows that the mitochondrial genomes evolve extremely slowly in liverworts, the earliest-diverging lineage of extant land plants, in stark contrast to what is known of highly dynamic evolution of mitochondrial genomes in seed plants. PMID:19756627

  10. Host immune responses to rhinovirus: Mechanisms in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John T.; Busse, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Viral respiratory infections can have a profound effect on many aspects of asthma including its inception, exacerbations, and, possibly, severity. Of the many viral respiratory infections that influence asthma, the common cold virus, rhinovirus, has emerged as the most frequent illness associated with exacerbations and other aspects of asthma. The mechanisms by which rhinovirus influences asthma are not fully established, but current evidence indicates that the immune response to this virus is critical in this process. Many airway cell types are involved in the immune response to rhinovirus, but most important are respiratory epithelial cells and possibly macrophages. Infection of epithelial cells generates a variety of proinflammatory mediators to attract inflammatory cells to the airway with a subsequent worsening of underlying disease. Furthermore, there is evidence that the epithelial airway antiviral response to rhinovirus may be defective in asthma. Therefore, understanding the immune response to rhinovirus is a key step in defining mechanisms of asthma, exacerbations, and, perhaps most importantly, improved treatment. PMID:19014757

  11. A korarchaeal genome reveals insights into the evolution of the Archaea

    E-print Network

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    between deep-branching Korarchaeota and other phyla, we used whole-genome shotgun sequencing to constructA korarchaeal genome reveals insights into the evolution of the Archaea James G. Elkinsa,b , Mircea Aix-Marseille I, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3, France; iU.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute

  12. Genome evolution in cyanobacteria: The stable core and the variable shell

    E-print Network

    Genome evolution in cyanobacteria: The stable core and the variable shell Tuo Shi* and Paul G transformed the biology and geochemistry of Earth. The rapid increase in published genomic sequences on the scale of entire genomes. Here, we demonstrate the overall phylogenetic incongruence among 682

  13. Evolution of Red Algal Plastid Genomes: Ancient Architectures, Introns, Horizontal Gene Transfer, and

    E-print Network

    Martone, Patrick T.

    Evolution of Red Algal Plastid Genomes: Ancient Architectures, Introns, Horizontal Gene Transfer, Station Biologique, Roscoff, France Abstract Red algae have the most gene-rich plastid genomes known across all available red algal plastid genomes we show they all share a highly compact and slowly

  14. Host Genetic Variation Influences Gene Expression Response to Rhinovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Çal??kan, Minal; Baker, Samuel W.; Gilad, Yoav; Ober, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) is the most prevalent human respiratory virus and is responsible for at least half of all common colds. RV infections may result in a broad spectrum of effects that range from asymptomatic infections to severe lower respiratory illnesses. The basis for inter-individual variation in the response to RV infection is not well understood. In this study, we explored whether host genetic variation is associated with variation in gene expression response to RV infections between individuals. To do so, we obtained genome-wide genotype and gene expression data in uninfected and RV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 98 individuals. We mapped local and distant genetic variation that is associated with inter-individual differences in gene expression levels (eQTLs) in both uninfected and RV-infected cells. We focused specifically on response eQTLs (reQTLs), namely, genetic associations with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV infection. We identified local reQTLs for 38 genes, including genes with known functions in viral response (UBA7, OAS1, IRF5) and genes that have been associated with immune and RV-related diseases (e.g., ITGA2, MSR1, GSTM3). The putative regulatory regions of genes with reQTLs were enriched for binding sites of virus-activated STAT2, highlighting the role of condition-specific transcription factors in genotype-by-environment interactions. Overall, we suggest that the 38 loci associated with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV-infection represent promising candidates for affecting immune and RV-related respiratory diseases. PMID:25874939

  15. Evaluation of Isoprinosine in Experimental Human Rhinovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pachuta, Donald M.; Togo, Yasushi; Hornick, Richard B.; Schwarts, Andrew R.; Tominaga, Suketami

    1974-01-01

    The prophylactic efficacy of isoprinosine was evaluated in a double-blind fashion in volunteers challenged with two types of rhinovirus. In the rhinovirus 44 and 32 trials, each of 9 men received a placebo, and eight and 11 men received the drug, respectively. Oral isoprinosine, 6 g a day, was given for 2 days prior to intranasal challenge with 100 mean tissue culture infective doses of the virus and for 7 postchallenge days. In both trials the occurrence and severity of colds were greater in the placebo group, but the difference between the two groups was not significant. Higher antibody titers for both viruses and a greater number of rhinovirus 32 isolations were demonstrated in the drug group but without statistically significant differences. The prophylactic isoprinosine treatment may suppress the cold syndrome, but its effect was not convincingly apparent. PMID:15825396

  16. Proteases of human rhinovirus: role in infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lora M; Walker, Erin J; Jans, David A; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the major etiological agents of the common cold and asthma exacerbations, with significant worldwide health and economic impact. Although large-scale population vaccination has proved successful in limiting or even eradicating many viruses, the more than 100 distinct serotypes mean that conventional vaccination is not a feasible strategy to combat HRV. An alternative strategy is to target conserved viral proteins such as the HRV proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro), the focus of this review. Necessary for host cell shutoff, virus replication, and pathogenesis, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are clearly viable drug targets, and indeed, 3C(pro) has been successfully targeted for treating the common cold in experimental infection. 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are crucial for virus replication due to their role in polyprotein processing as well as cleavage of key cellular proteins to inhibit cellular transcription and translation. Intriguingly, the action of the HRV proteases also disrupts nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, contributing to HRV cytopathic effects. Improved understanding of the protease-cell interactions should enable new therapeutic approaches to be identified for drug development. PMID:25261311

  17. Modeling Bacterial Evolution with Comparative-Genome-Based Marker Systems: Application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Evolution and Pathogenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Alland; Thomas S. Whittam; Megan B. Murray; M. Donald Cave; Manzour H. Hazbon; Kim Dix; Mark Kokoris; Andreas Duesterhoeft; Jonathan A. Eisen; Claire M. Fraser; Robert D. Fleischmann

    2003-01-01

    The comparative-genomic sequencing of two Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains enabled us to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for studies of evolution, pathogenesis, and epidemiology in clinical M. tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis using these \\

  18. The Tarenaya hassleriana Genome Provides Insight into Reproductive Trait and Genome Evolution of Crucifers[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shifeng; van den Bergh, Erik; Zeng, Peng; Zhong, Xiao; Xu, Jiajia; Liu, Xin; Hofberger, Johannes; de Bruijn, Suzanne; Bhide, Amey S.; Kuelahoglu, Canan; Bian, Chao; Chen, Jing; Fan, Guangyi; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Hall, Jocelyn C.; Becker, Annette; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Andreas P.M.; Shi, Chengcheng; Zheng, Zhijun; Li, Wujiao; Lv, Mingju; Tao, Yimin; Wang, Junyi; Zou, Hongfeng; Quan, Zhiwu; Hibberd, Julian M.; Zhang, Gengyun; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Xu, Xun; Schranz, M. Eric

    2013-01-01

    The Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crops, is unmatched among plants in its wealth of genomic and functional molecular data and has long served as a model for understanding gene, genome, and trait evolution. However, genome information from a phylogenetic outgroup that is essential for inferring directionality of evolutionary change has been lacking. We therefore sequenced the genome of the spider flower (Tarenaya hassleriana) from the Brassicaceae sister family, the Cleomaceae. By comparative analysis of the two lineages, we show that genome evolution following ancient polyploidy and gene duplication events affect reproductively important traits. We found an ancient genome triplication in Tarenaya (Th-?) that is independent of the Brassicaceae-specific duplication (At-?) and nested Brassica (Br-?) triplication. To showcase the potential of sister lineage genome analysis, we investigated the state of floral developmental genes and show Brassica retains twice as many floral MADS (for MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE1, AGAMOUS, DEFICIENS and SERUM RESPONSE FACTOR) genes as Tarenaya that likely contribute to morphological diversity in Brassica. We also performed synteny analysis of gene families that confer self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae and found that the critical SERINE RECEPTOR KINASE receptor gene is derived from a lineage-specific tandem duplication. The T. hassleriana genome will facilitate future research toward elucidating the evolutionary history of Brassicaceae genomes. PMID:23983221

  19. Rapid evolution of cheating mitochondrial genomes in small yeast populations.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Zeyl, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    Outcrossed sex exposes genes to competition with their homologues, allowing alleles that transmit more often than their competitors to spread despite organismal fitness costs. Mitochondrial populations in species with biparental inheritance are thought to be especially susceptible to such cheaters because they lack strict transmission rules like meiosis or maternal inheritance. Yet the interaction between mutation and natural selection in the evolution of cheating mitochondrial genomes has not been tested experimentally. Using yeast experimental populations, we show that although cheaters were rare in a large sample of spontaneous respiratory-deficient mitochondrial mutations (petites), cheaters evolve under experimentally enforced outcrossing even when mutation supply and selection are restricted by repeatedly bottlenecking populations. PMID:24372606

  20. Molecular evolution of eukaryotic genomes: hemiascomycetous yeast spliceosomal introns

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Elisabeth; Casaregola, Serge; Blandin, Gaëlle; Llorente, Bertrand; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Munsterkotter, Martin; Guldener, Ulrich; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Helden, Jacques Van; Dujon, Bernard; Gaillardin, Claude

    2003-01-01

    As part of the exploratory sequencing program Génolevures, visual scrutinisation and bioinformatic tools were used to detect spliceosomal introns in seven hemiascomycetous yeast species. A total of 153 putative novel introns were identified. Introns are rare in yeast nuclear genes (<5% have an intron), mainly located at the 5? end of ORFs, and not highly conserved in sequence. They all share a clear non-random vocabulary: conserved splice sites and conserved nucleotide contexts around splice sites. Homologues of metazoan snRNAs and putative homologues of SR splicing factors were identified, confirming that the spliceosomal machinery is highly conserved in eukaryotes. Several introns’ features were tested as possible markers for phylogenetic analysis. We found that intron sizes vary widely within each genome, and according to the phylogenetic position of the yeast species. The evolutionary origin of spliceosomal introns was examined by analysing the degree of conservation of intron positions in homologous yeast genes. Most introns appeared to exist in the last common ancestor of present day yeast species, and then to have been differentially lost during speciation. However, in some cases, it is difficult to exclude a possible sliding event affecting a pre-existing intron or a gain of a novel intron. Taken together, our results indicate that the origin of spliceosomal introns is complex within a given genome, and that present day introns may have resulted from a dynamic flux between intron conservation, intron loss and intron gain during the evolution of hemiascomycetous yeasts. PMID:12582231

  1. Retrocopy contributions to the evolution of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Baertsch, Robert; Diekhans, Mark; Kent, W James; Haussler, David; Brosius, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Background Evolution via point mutations is a relatively slow process and is unlikely to completely explain the differences between primates and other mammals. By contrast, 45% of the human genome is composed of retroposed elements, many of which were inserted in the primate lineage. A subset of retroposed mRNAs (retrocopies) shows strong evidence of expression in primates, often yielding functional retrogenes. Results To identify and analyze the relatively recently evolved retrogenes, we carried out BLASTZ alignments of all human mRNAs against the human genome and scored a set of features indicative of retroposition. Of over 12,000 putative retrocopy-derived genes that arose mainly in the primate lineage, 726 with strong evidence of transcript expression were examined in detail. These mRNA retroposition events fall into three categories: I) 34 retrocopies and antisense retrocopies that added potential protein coding space and UTRs to existing genes; II) 682 complete retrocopy duplications inserted into new loci; and III) an unexpected set of 13 retrocopies that contributed out-of-frame, or antisense sequences in combination with other types of transposed elements (SINEs, LINEs, LTRs), even unannotated sequence to form potentially novel genes with no homologs outside primates. In addition to their presence in human, several of the gene candidates also had potentially viable ORFs in chimpanzee, orangutan, and rhesus macaque, underscoring their potential of function. Conclusion mRNA-derived retrocopies provide raw material for the evolution of genes in a wide variety of ways, duplicating and amending the protein coding region of existing genes as well as generating the potential for new protein coding space, or non-protein coding RNAs, by unexpected contributions out of frame, in reverse orientation, or from previously non-protein coding sequence. PMID:18842134

  2. Genomic comparison of closely related Giant Viruses supports an accordion-like model of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Filée, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Genome gigantism occurs so far in Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae (order Megavirales). Origin and evolution of these Giant Viruses (GVs) remain open questions. Interestingly, availability of a collection of closely related GV genomes enabling genomic comparisons offer the opportunity to better understand the different evolutionary forces acting on these genomes. Whole genome alignment for five groups of viruses belonging to the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families show that there is no trend of genome expansion or general tendency of genome contraction. Instead, GV genomes accumulated genomic mutations over the time with gene gains compensating the different losses. In addition, each lineage displays specific patterns of genome evolution. Mimiviridae (megaviruses and mimiviruses) and Chlorella Phycodnaviruses evolved mainly by duplications and losses of genes belonging to large paralogous families (including movements of diverse mobiles genetic elements), whereas Micromonas and Ostreococcus Phycodnaviruses derive most of their genetic novelties thought lateral gene transfers. Taken together, these data support an accordion-like model of evolution in which GV genomes have undergone successive steps of gene gain and gene loss, accrediting the hypothesis that genome gigantism appears early, before the diversification of the different GV lineages.

  3. Evolution of electron transfer out of the cell: comparative genomics of six Geobacter genomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Geobacter species grow by transferring electrons out of the cell - either to Fe(III)-oxides or to man-made substances like energy-harvesting electrodes. Study of Geobacter sulfurreducens has shown that TCA cycle enzymes, inner-membrane respiratory enzymes, and periplasmic and outer-membrane cytochromes are required. Here we present comparative analysis of six Geobacter genomes, including species from the clade that predominates in the subsurface. Conservation of proteins across the genomes was determined to better understand the evolution of Geobacter species and to create a metabolic model applicable to subsurface environments. Results The results showed that enzymes for acetate transport and oxidation, and for proton transport across the inner membrane were well conserved. An NADH dehydrogenase, the ATP synthase, and several TCA cycle enzymes were among the best conserved in the genomes. However, most of the cytochromes required for Fe(III)-reduction were not, including many of the outer-membrane cytochromes. While conservation of cytochromes was poor, an abundance and diversity of cytochromes were found in every genome, with duplications apparent in several species. Conclusions These results indicate there is a common pathway for acetate oxidation and energy generation across the family and in the last common ancestor. They also suggest that while cytochromes are important for extracellular electron transport, the path of electrons across the periplasm and outer membrane is variable. This combination of abundant cytochromes with weak sequence conservation suggests they may not be specific terminal reductases, but rather may be important in their heme-bearing capacity, as sinks for electrons between the inner-membrane electron transport chain and the extracellular acceptor. PMID:20078895

  4. GenomicusPlants: A Web Resource to Study Genome Evolution in Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Alexandra; Murat, Florent; Salse, Jérôme; Roest Crollius, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomics combined with phylogenetic reconstructions are powerful approaches to study the evolution of genes and genomes. However, the current rapid expansion of the volume of genomic information makes it increasingly difficult to interrogate, integrate and synthesize comparative genome data while taking into account the maximum breadth of information available. GenomicusPlants (http://www.genomicus.biologie.ens.fr/genomicus-plants) is an extension of the Genomicus webserver that addresses this issue by allowing users to explore flowering plant genomes in an intuitive way, across the broadest evolutionary scales. Extant genomes of 26 flowering plants can be analyzed, as well as 23 ancestral reconstructed genomes. Ancestral gene order provides a long-term chronological view of gene order evolution, greatly facilitating comparative genomics and evolutionary studies. Four main interfaces (‘views’) are available where: (i) PhyloView combines phylogenetic trees with comparisons of genomic loci across any number of genomes; (ii) AlignView projects loci of interest against all other genomes to visualize its topological conservation; (iii) MatrixView compares two genomes in a classical dotplot representation; and (iv) Karyoview visualizes chromosome karyotypes ‘painted’ with colours of another genome of interest. All four views are interconnected and benefit from many customizable features. PMID:25432975

  5. Convergence of ion channel genome content in early animal evolution.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J; Hillis, David M; Zakon, Harold H

    2015-02-24

    Multicellularity has evolved multiple times, but animals are the only multicellular lineage with nervous systems. This fact implies that the origin of nervous systems was an unlikely event, yet recent comparisons among extant taxa suggest that animal nervous systems may have evolved multiple times independently. Here, we use ancestral gene content reconstruction to track the timing of gene family expansions for the major families of ion-channel proteins that drive nervous system function. We find that animals with nervous systems have broadly similar complements of ion-channel types but that these complements likely evolved independently. We also find that ion-channel gene family evolution has included large loss events, two of which were immediately followed by rounds of duplication. Ctenophores, cnidarians, and bilaterians underwent independent bouts of gene expansion in channel families involved in synaptic transmission and action potential shaping. We suggest that expansions of these family types may represent a genomic signature of expanding nervous system complexity. Ancestral nodes in which nervous systems are currently hypothesized to have originated did not experience large expansions, making it difficult to distinguish among competing hypotheses of nervous system origins and suggesting that the origin of nerves was not attended by an immediate burst of complexity. Rather, the evolution of nervous system complexity appears to resemble a slow fuse in stem animals followed by many independent bouts of gene gain and loss. PMID:25675537

  6. Multiple Lineages of Ancient CR1 Retroposons Shaped the Early Genome Evolution of Amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Alexander; Churakov, Gennady; Ramakodi, Meganathan P.; Platt, Roy N.; Jurka, Jerzy; Kojima, Kenji K.; Caballero, Juan; Smit, Arian F.; Vliet, Kent A.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Brosius, Jürgen; Green, Richard E.; Braun, Edward L.; Ray, David A.; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Chicken repeat 1 (CR1) retroposons are long interspersed elements (LINEs) that are ubiquitous within amniote genomes and constitute the most abundant family of transposed elements in birds, crocodilians, turtles, and snakes. They are also present in mammalian genomes, where they reside as numerous relics of ancient retroposition events. Yet, despite their relevance for understanding amniote genome evolution, the diversity and evolution of CR1 elements has never been studied on an amniote-wide level. We reconstruct the temporal and quantitative activity of CR1 subfamilies via presence/absence analyses across crocodilian phylogeny and comparative analyses of 12 crocodilian genomes, revealing relative genomic stasis of retroposition during genome evolution of extant Crocodylia. Our large-scale phylogenetic analysis of amniote CR1 subfamilies suggests the presence of at least seven ancient CR1 lineages in the amniote ancestor; and amniote-wide analyses of CR1 successions and quantities reveal differential retention (presence of ancient relics or recent activity) of these CR1 lineages across amniote genome evolution. Interestingly, birds and lepidosaurs retained the fewest ancient CR1 lineages among amniotes and also exhibit smaller genome sizes. Our study is the first to analyze CR1 evolution in a genome-wide and amniote-wide context and the data strongly suggest that the ancestral amniote genome contained myriad CR1 elements from multiple ancient lineages, and remnants of these are still detectable in the relatively stable genomes of crocodilians and turtles. Early mammalian genome evolution was thus characterized by a drastic shift from CR1 prevalence to dominance and hyperactivity of L2 LINEs in monotremes and L1 LINEs in therians. PMID:25503085

  7. The Evolution of the Anopheles 16 Genomes Project

    PubMed Central

    Neafsey, Daniel E.; Christophides, George K.; Collins, Frank H.; Emrich, Scott J.; Fontaine, Michael C.; Gelbart, William; Hahn, Matthew W.; Howell, Paul I.; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Lawson, Daniel; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Williams, Louise J.; Besansky, Nora J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the imminent completion of a set of reference genome assemblies for 16 species of Anopheles mosquitoes. In addition to providing a generally useful resource for comparative genomic analyses, these genome sequences will greatly facilitate exploration of the capacity exhibited by some Anopheline mosquito species to serve as vectors for malaria parasites. A community analysis project will commence soon to perform a thorough comparative genomic investigation of these newly sequenced genomes. Completion of this project via the use of short next-generation sequence reads required innovation in both the bioinformatic and laboratory realms, and the resulting knowledge gained could prove useful for genome sequencing projects targeting other unconventional genomes. PMID:23708298

  8. Capsid protein VP4 of human rhinovirus induces membrane permeability by the formation of a size-selective multimeric pore.

    PubMed

    Panjwani, Anusha; Strauss, Mike; Gold, Sarah; Wenham, Hannah; Jackson, Terry; Chou, James J; Rowlands, David J; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Hogle, James M; Tuthill, Tobias J

    2014-08-01

    Non-enveloped viruses must deliver their viral genome across a cell membrane without the advantage of membrane fusion. The mechanisms used to achieve this remain poorly understood. Human rhinovirus, a frequent cause of the common cold, is a non-enveloped virus of the picornavirus family, which includes other significant pathogens such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus. During picornavirus cell entry, the small myristoylated capsid protein VP4 is released from the virus, interacts with the cell membrane and is implicated in the delivery of the viral RNA genome into the cytoplasm to initiate replication. In this study, we have produced recombinant C-terminal histidine-tagged human rhinovirus VP4 and shown it can induce membrane permeability in liposome model membranes. Dextran size-exclusion studies, chemical crosslinking and electron microscopy demonstrated that VP4 forms a multimeric membrane pore, with a channel size consistent with transfer of the single-stranded RNA genome. The membrane permeability induced by recombinant VP4 was influenced by pH and was comparable to permeability induced by infectious virions. These findings present a molecular mechanism for the involvement of VP4 in cell entry and provide a model system which will facilitate exploration of VP4 as a novel antiviral target for the picornavirus family. PMID:25102288

  9. Global Imprints of Genome Growth 1 Universal Global Imprints of Genome Growth and Evolution

    E-print Network

    Lee, H.C. Paul

    that these non-trivial results are natural consequences of a genome growth model characterized by random of genome growth (in computers) using models, suggest that genomes acquired the high- order property because­22]. There is also evidence of large-scale genomic rearrangements [23­27] and whole genome duplications [3

  10. Molecular Diagnosis of Human Rhinovirus Infections: Comparison with Virus Isolation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TIMO HYYPIA; TUOMO PUHAKKA; OLLI RUUSKANEN; MIKA MAKELA; ANITA AROLA; PERTTI ARSTILA

    1998-01-01

    To compare the sensitivity and specificity of RT-PCR with that of virus isolation in the detection of human rhinoviruses, we tested nasopharyngeal aspirates from 200 patients on the 1st and 7th days after the onset of the common cold. An assay utilizing a short amplicon in the conserved 5* noncoding region was found highly sensitive. Of 192 positive samples altogether,

  11. Rhinovirus Replication Causes RANTES Production in Primary Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary K. Schroth; Elizabeth Grimm; Paula Frindt; Dawn M. Galagan; Shin-Ichi Konno; Robert Love; James E. Gern

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms by which rhinovirus (RV) infections produce lower airway symptoms in asthmatic indi- viduals are not fully established. To determine effects of RV infection on lung epithelial cells, primary hu- man bronchial epithelial (BE) cells were infected with either RV16 or RV49, and viral replication, cell vi- ability, and cell activation were measured. Both viral serotypes replicated in BE

  12. Ineffectiveness of Echinacea for Prevention of Experimental Rhinovirus Colds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RONALD B. TURNER; DONALD K. RIKER; J. DAVID GANGEMI

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of echinacea for the prevention of experimental rhinovirus colds. Infection occurred in 44 and 57% and illness occurred in 36 and 43% of the echinacea- and placebo-treated subjects, respectively. This preparation of echinacea had no significant effect on either the occurrence of infection or the severity of illness. Since the

  13. An Evaluation of Echinacea angustifolia in Experimental Rhinovirus Infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald B. Turner; Rudolf Bauer; Karin Woelkart; Thomas C. Hulsey; J. David Gangemi

    2005-01-01

    Background Echinacea has been widely used as an herbal remedy for the common cold, but efficacy studies have produced conflicting results, and there are a variety of echinacea products on the market with different phytochemical compositions. We evaluated the effect of chemically defined extracts from Echinacea angustifolia roots on rhinovirus infection. Methods Three preparations of echinacea, with distinct phytochemical profiles,

  14. The Genome of the Obligate Intracellular Parasite Trachipleistophora hominis: New Insights into Microsporidian Genome Dynamics and Reductive Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Eva; Williams, Tom A.; Nakjang, Sirintra; Noël, Christophe J.; Swan, Daniel C.; Goldberg, Alina V.; Harris, Simon R.; Weinmaier, Thomas; Markert, Stephanie; Becher, Dörte; Bernhardt, Jörg; Dagan, Tal; Hacker, Christian; Lucocq, John M.; Schweder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Hall, Neil; Hirt, Robert P.; Embley, T. Martin

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of reductive genome evolution for eukaryotes living inside other eukaryotic cells are poorly understood compared to well-studied model systems involving obligate intracellular bacteria. Here we present 8.5 Mb of sequence from the genome of the microsporidian Trachipleistophora hominis, isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient, which is an outgroup to the smaller compacted-genome species that primarily inform ideas of evolutionary mode for these enormously successful obligate intracellular parasites. Our data provide detailed information on the gene content, genome architecture and intergenic regions of a larger microsporidian genome, while comparative analyses allowed us to infer genomic features and metabolism of the common ancestor of the species investigated. Gene length reduction and massive loss of metabolic capacity in the common ancestor was accompanied by the evolution of novel microsporidian-specific protein families, whose conservation among microsporidians, against a background of reductive evolution, suggests they may have important functions in their parasitic lifestyle. The ancestor had already lost many metabolic pathways but retained glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway to provide cytosolic ATP and reduced coenzymes, and it had a minimal mitochondrion (mitosome) making Fe-S clusters but not ATP. It possessed bacterial-like nucleotide transport proteins as a key innovation for stealing host-generated ATP, the machinery for RNAi, key elements of the early secretory pathway, canonical eukaryotic as well as microsporidian-specific regulatory elements, a diversity of repetitive and transposable elements, and relatively low average gene density. Microsporidian genome evolution thus appears to have proceeded in at least two major steps: an ancestral remodelling of the proteome upon transition to intracellular parasitism that involved reduction but also selective expansion, followed by a secondary compaction of genome architecture in some, but not all, lineages. PMID:23133373

  15. Evolution of Linear Mitochondrial Genomes in Medusozoan Cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Ehsan; Bentlage, Bastian; Collins, Allen G.; Pirro, Stacy; Lavrov, Dennis V.

    2012-01-01

    In nearly all animals, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) consists of a single circular molecule that encodes several subunits of the protein complexes involved in oxidative phosphorylation as well as part of the machinery for their expression. By contrast, mtDNA in species belonging to Medusozoa (one of the two major lineages in the phylum Cnidaria) comprises one to several linear molecules. Many questions remain on the ubiquity of linear mtDNA in medusozoans and the mechanisms responsible for its evolution, replication, and transcription. To address some of these questions, we determined the sequences of nearly complete linear mtDNA from 24 species representing all four medusozoan classes: Cubozoa, Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, and Staurozoa. All newly determined medusozoan mitochondrial genomes harbor the 17 genes typical for cnidarians and map as linear molecules with a high degree of gene order conservation relative to the anthozoans. In addition, two open reading frames (ORFs), polB and ORF314, are identified in cubozoan, schyphozoan, staurozoan, and trachyline hydrozoan mtDNA. polB belongs to the B-type DNA polymerase gene family, while the product of ORF314 may act as a terminal protein that binds telomeres. We posit that these two ORFs are remnants of a linear plasmid that invaded the mitochondrial genomes of the last common ancestor of Medusozoa and are responsible for its linearity. Hydroidolinan hydrozoans have lost the two ORFs and instead have duplicated cox1 at each end of their mitochondrial chromosome(s). Fragmentation of mtDNA occurred independently in Cubozoa and Hydridae (Hydrozoa, Hydroidolina). Our broad sampling allows us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of linear mtDNA in medusozoans. PMID:22113796

  16. Evolution of linear mitochondrial genomes in medusozoan cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Ehsan; Bentlage, Bastian; Collins, Allen G; Kayal, Mohsen; Pirro, Stacy; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2012-01-01

    In nearly all animals, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) consists of a single circular molecule that encodes several subunits of the protein complexes involved in oxidative phosphorylation as well as part of the machinery for their expression. By contrast, mtDNA in species belonging to Medusozoa (one of the two major lineages in the phylum Cnidaria) comprises one to several linear molecules. Many questions remain on the ubiquity of linear mtDNA in medusozoans and the mechanisms responsible for its evolution, replication, and transcription. To address some of these questions, we determined the sequences of nearly complete linear mtDNA from 24 species representing all four medusozoan classes: Cubozoa, Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, and Staurozoa. All newly determined medusozoan mitochondrial genomes harbor the 17 genes typical for cnidarians and map as linear molecules with a high degree of gene order conservation relative to the anthozoans. In addition, two open reading frames (ORFs), polB and ORF314, are identified in cubozoan, schyphozoan, staurozoan, and trachyline hydrozoan mtDNA. polB belongs to the B-type DNA polymerase gene family, while the product of ORF314 may act as a terminal protein that binds telomeres. We posit that these two ORFs are remnants of a linear plasmid that invaded the mitochondrial genomes of the last common ancestor of Medusozoa and are responsible for its linearity. Hydroidolinan hydrozoans have lost the two ORFs and instead have duplicated cox1 at each end of their mitochondrial chromosome(s). Fragmentation of mtDNA occurred independently in Cubozoa and Hydridae (Hydrozoa, Hydroidolina). Our broad sampling allows us to reconstruct the evolutionary history of linear mtDNA in medusozoans. PMID:22113796

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the hornwort Phaeoceros laevis : retention of many ancient pseudogenes and conservative evolution of mitochondrial genomes in hornworts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jia-Yu Xue; Yang Liu; Libo Li; Bin Wang; Yin-Long Qiu

    2010-01-01

    Plants have large and complex mitochondrial genomes in comparison to other eukaryotes. In bryophytes, the mitochondrial genomes\\u000a exhibit a mixed mode of conservative and dynamic evolution. Here, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome from hornwort\\u000a Phaeoceros laevis, to investigate the level of conservation in mitochondrial genome evolution within hornworts. The circular molecule consists\\u000a of 209,482 base pairs and represents the

  18. Human brain evolution: harnessing the genomics (r)evolution to link genes, cognition, and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Genevieve; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the human brain has resulted in numerous specialized features including higher cognitive processes, such as language. The combination of our newfound communication expertise together with the process of transgenerational evolution at the epigenetic level has led to an exponential increase in human knowledge and abilities. In balance with these beneficent attainments though, the human brain has also acquired vulnerabilities to neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, which reflect genetic and environmental factors. To understand the mechanisms of this disease susceptibility, a deeper appreciation of the developmental processes and their relationship to underlying features of brain evolution will be necessary. Knowledge of whole genome sequence and structural variation via high throughput sequencing technology provides an unprecedented opportunity to view human evolution at high resolution. However, phenotype discovery is a critical component of these endeavors and the use of non-traditional model organisms will also be critical for piecing together a complete picture. Ultimately, the union of developmental studies of the brain with studies of unique phenotypes in a myriad of species will result in a more thorough model of the groundwork the human brain built upon. Furthermore, these integrative approaches should provide important insights into human diseases. PMID:20955931

  19. Directed evolution combined with synthetic biology strategies expedite semi-rational engineering of genes and genomes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhen; Zhang, Junli; Jin, Peng; Yang, Sen

    2015-05-01

    Owing to our limited understanding of the relationship between sequence and function and the interaction between intracellular pathways and regulatory systems, the rational design of enzyme-coding genes and de novo assembly of a brand-new artificial genome for a desired functionality or phenotype are difficult to achieve. As an alternative approach, directed evolution has been widely used to engineer genomes and enzyme-coding genes. In particular, significant developments toward DNA synthesis, DNA assembly (in vitro or in vivo), recombination-mediated genetic engineering, and high-throughput screening techniques in the field of synthetic biology have been matured and widely adopted, enabling rapid semi-rational genome engineering to generate variants with desired properties. In this commentary, these novel tools and their corresponding applications in the directed evolution of genomes and enzymes are discussed. Moreover, the strategies for genome engineering and rapid in vitro enzyme evolution are also proposed. PMID:25621864

  20. Orthopoxvirus Genome Evolution: The Role of Gene Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Robert Curtis; Wang, Chunlin; Hatcher, Eneida L.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.

    2010-01-01

    Poxviruses are highly successful pathogens, known to infect a variety of hosts. The family Poxviridae includes Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, which has been eradicated as a public health threat but could potentially reemerge as a bioterrorist threat. The risk scenario includes other animal poxviruses and genetically engineered manipulations of poxviruses. Studies of orthologous gene sets have established the evolutionary relationships of members within the Poxviridae family. It is not clear, however, how variations between family members arose in the past, an important issue in understanding how these viruses may vary and possibly produce future threats. Using a newly developed poxvirus-specific tool, we predicted accurate gene sets for viruses with completely sequenced genomes in the genus Orthopoxvirus. Employing sensitive sequence comparison techniques together with comparison of syntenic gene maps, we established the relationships between all viral gene sets. These techniques allowed us to unambiguously identify the gene loss/gain events that have occurred over the course of orthopoxvirus evolution. It is clear that for all existing Orthopoxvirus species, no individual species has acquired protein-coding genes unique to that species. All existing species contain genes that are all present in members of the species Cowpox virus and that cowpox virus strains contain every gene present in any other orthopoxvirus strain. These results support a theory of reductive evolution in which the reduction in size of the core gene set of a putative ancestral virus played a critical role in speciation and confining any newly emerging virus species to a particular environmental (host or tissue) niche. PMID:21994715

  1. How Evolution of Genomes Is Reflected in Exact DNA Sequence Match Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Massip, Florian; Sheinman, Michael; Schbath, Sophie; Arndt, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Genome evolution is shaped by a multitude of mutational processes, including point mutations, insertions, and deletions of DNA sequences, as well as segmental duplications. These mutational processes can leave distinctive qualitative marks in the statistical features of genomic DNA sequences. One such feature is the match length distribution (MLD) of exactly matching sequence segments within an individual genome or between the genomes of related species. These have been observed to exhibit characteristic power law decays in many species. Here, we show that simple dynamical models consisting solely of duplication and mutation processes can already explain the characteristic features of MLDs observed in genomic sequences. Surprisingly, we find that these features are largely insensitive to details of the underlying mutational processes and do not necessarily rely on the action of natural selection. Our results demonstrate how analyzing statistical features of DNA sequences can help us reveal and quantify the different mutational processes that underlie genome evolution. PMID:25398628

  2. How evolution of genomes is reflected in exact DNA sequence match statistics.

    PubMed

    Massip, Florian; Sheinman, Michael; Schbath, Sophie; Arndt, Peter F

    2015-02-01

    Genome evolution is shaped by a multitude of mutational processes, including point mutations, insertions, and deletions of DNA sequences, as well as segmental duplications. These mutational processes can leave distinctive qualitative marks in the statistical features of genomic DNA sequences. One such feature is the match length distribution (MLD) of exactly matching sequence segments within an individual genome or between the genomes of related species. These have been observed to exhibit characteristic power law decays in many species. Here, we show that simple dynamical models consisting solely of duplication and mutation processes can already explain the characteristic features of MLDs observed in genomic sequences. Surprisingly, we find that these features are largely insensitive to details of the underlying mutational processes and do not necessarily rely on the action of natural selection. Our results demonstrate how analyzing statistical features of DNA sequences can help us reveal and quantify the different mutational processes that underlie genome evolution. PMID:25398628

  3. The Laccaria and Tuber Genomes Reveal Unique Signatures of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Evolution (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Steve

    2010-03-24

    Francis Martin from the French agricultural research institute INRA talks on how "The Laccaria and Tuber genomes reveal unique signatures of mycorrhizal symbiosis evolution" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  4. Variation in salamanders: an essay on genomes, development, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Brockes, Jeremy P

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration is studied in a few model species of salamanders, but the ten families of salamanders show considerable variation, and this has implications for our understanding of salamander biology. The most recent classification of the families identifies the cryptobranchoidea as the basal group which diverged in the early Jurassic. Variation in the sizes of genomes is particularly obvious, and reflects a major contribution from transposable elements which is already present in the basal group.Limb development has been a focus for evodevo studies, in part because of the variable property of pre-axial dominance which distinguishes salamanders from other tetrapods. This is thought to reflect the selective pressures that operate on a free-living aquatic larva, and might also be relevant for the evolution of limb regeneration. Recent fossil evidence suggests that both pre-axial dominance and limb regeneration were present 300 million years ago in larval temnospondyl amphibians that lived in mountain lakes. A satisfying account of regeneration in salamanders may need to address all these different aspects in the future. PMID:25740473

  5. Effectiveness of hand sanitizers with and without organic acids for removal of rhinovirus from hands.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ronald B; Fuls, Janice L; Rodgers, Nancy D

    2010-03-01

    These studies evaluated the effectiveness of ethanol hand sanitizers with or without organic acids to remove detectable rhinovirus from the hands and prevent experimental rhinovirus infection. Ethanol hand sanitizers were significantly more effective than hand washing with soap and water. The addition of organic acids to the ethanol provided residual virucidal activity that persisted for at least 4 h. Whether these treatments will reduce rhinovirus infection in the natural setting remains to be determined. PMID:20047916

  6. The contribution of slippage-like processes to genome evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. Hancock

    1995-01-01

    Simple sequences present in long (>30 kb) sequences representative of the single-copy genome of five species (Homo sapiens, Caenorhabditis elegans Saccharomyces cerevisiae, E. coli, and Mycobacterium leprae) have been analyzed. A close relationship was observed between genome size and the overall level of sequence repetition. This suggested that the incorporation of simple sequences had accompanied increases of genome size during

  7. A Case Study of Genome Evolution: From Continuous to Discrete Time Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerzy Tiuryn; Ryszard Rudnicki; Damian Wójtowicz

    2004-01-01

    \\u000a We introduce and analyse a simple model of genome evolution. It is based on two fundamental evolutionary events: gene loss\\u000a and gene duplication. We are mainly interested in asymptotic distributions of gene families in a genome. This is motovated\\u000a by previous work which consisted in fitting the available genomic data into, what is called paralog distributions. Two approaches are presented

  8. Genomic organization and evolution of the 5S ribosomal DNA in Tilapiini fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. A. Alves-Costa; A. P. Wasko; C. Oliveira; F. Foresti; C. Martins

    2006-01-01

    Summary  5S rDNA sequences present an intense dynamism and have proved to be valuable as genetic markers to distinguish closed related\\u000a species and also in the understanding of the evolutionary dynamic of repetitive sequences in the genomes. In order to identify\\u000a patterns of 5S rDNA organization and their evolution in the genome of fish species, such genomic segment was investigated\\u000a in

  9. The genome sequence of taurine cattle: A window to ruminant biology and evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (ma...

  10. Microcolinearity and genome evolution in the AdhA region of diploid and polyploid cotton (Gossypium)

    E-print Network

    Wendel, Jonathan F.

    Microcolinearity and genome evolution in the AdhA region of diploid and polyploid cotton (Gossypium. Prior analysis of the CesA region in two cotton genomes that diverged 5­10 million years ago (Ma to include BAC sequences surrounding the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase A (AdhA) from four cotton

  11. Rapid Genome Change in Synthetic Polyploids of Brassica and Its Implications for Polyploid Evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keming Song; Ping Lu; Keliang Tang; Thomas C. Osborn

    1995-01-01

    Although the evolutionary success of polyploidy in higher plants has been widely recognized, there is virtually no information on how polyploid genomes have evolved after their formation. In this report, we used synthetic polyploids of Brassica as a model system to study genome evolution in the early generations after polyploidization. The initial polyploids we developed were completely homozygous, and thus,

  12. Chloroplast Genome Rearrangements and the Evolution of Giant Lobelias from Herbaceous Ancestors '

    E-print Network

    Palmer, Jeffrey

    Chloroplast Genome Rearrangements and the Evolution of Giant Lobelias from Herbaceous Ancestors and Sclerotheca (Lobeliaceae) were assessed by mapping restriction sites and major structural rearrangements (deletions and inversions) in the large single-copy region of the chloroplast genome. Eleven inversions

  13. Comparative genomic analysis of C4 photosynthetic pathway evolution in grasses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiyin Wang; Udo Gowik; Haibao Tang; John E Bowers; Peter Westhoff; Andrew H Paterson

    2009-01-01

    Background  Sorghum is the first C4 plant and the second grass with a full genome sequence available. This makes it possible to perform\\u000a a whole-genome-level exploration of C4 pathway evolution by comparing key photosynthetic enzyme genes in sorghum, maize (C4)\\u000a and rice (C3), and to investigate a long-standing hypothesis that a reservoir of duplicated genes is a prerequisite for the\\u000a evolution

  14. Genome-wide expression dynamics of a marine virus and host reveal features of co-evolution

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    LETTERS Genome-wide expression dynamics of a marine virus and host reveal features of co to reciprocal genome evolution through a dynamic co- evolutionary process1­5 . Phage-mediated transfer of host genes-- often located in genome islands--has had a major impact on microbial evolution1

  15. Sequencing and Analyses of All Known Human Rhinovirus Genomes

    E-print Network

    of upper and lower respiratory tract disease worldwide and displays considerable phenotypic variation. We) as their receptor for cell entry (7). They have also been characterized by composite sensitivities across a panel of the viruses and has hampered investi- gations of the epidemiology of upper respiratory tract infections

  16. Insights from the complete chloroplast genome into the evolution of Sesamum indicum L.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Li, Chun; Miao, Hongmei; Xiong, Songjin

    2013-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the oldest oilseed crops. In order to investigate the evolutionary characters according to the Sesame Genome Project, apart from sequencing its nuclear genome, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of S. indicum cv. Yuzhi 11 (white seeded) using Illumina and 454 sequencing. Comparisons of chloroplast genomes between S. indicum and the 18 other higher plants were then analyzed. The chloroplast genome of cv. Yuzhi 11 contains 153,338 bp and a total of 114 unique genes (KC569603). The number of chloroplast genes in sesame is the same as that in Nicotiana tabacum, Vitis vinifera and Platanus occidentalis. The variation in the length of the large single-copy (LSC) regions and inverted repeats (IR) in sesame compared to 18 other higher plant species was the main contributor to size variation in the cp genome in these species. The 77 functional chloroplast genes, except for ycf1 and ycf2, were highly conserved. The deletion of the cp ycf1 gene sequence in cp genomes may be due either to its transfer to the nuclear genome, as has occurred in sesame, or direct deletion, as has occurred in Panax ginseng and Cucumis sativus. The sesame ycf2 gene is only 5,721 bp in length and has lost about 1,179 bp. Nucleotides 1-585 of ycf2 when queried in BLAST had hits in the sesame draft genome. Five repeats (R10, R12, R13, R14 and R17) were unique to the sesame chloroplast genome. We also found that IR contraction/expansion in the cp genome alters its rate of evolution. Chloroplast genes and repeats display the signature of convergent evolution in sesame and other species. These findings provide a foundation for further investigation of cp genome evolution in Sesamum and other higher plants. PMID:24303020

  17. Insights from the Complete Chloroplast Genome into the Evolution of Sesamum indicum L

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Li, Chun; Miao, Hongmei; Xiong, Songjin

    2013-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is one of the oldest oilseed crops. In order to investigate the evolutionary characters according to the Sesame Genome Project, apart from sequencing its nuclear genome, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of S. indicum cv. Yuzhi 11 (white seeded) using Illumina and 454 sequencing. Comparisons of chloroplast genomes between S. indicum and the 18 other higher plants were then analyzed. The chloroplast genome of cv. Yuzhi 11 contains 153,338 bp and a total of 114 unique genes (KC569603). The number of chloroplast genes in sesame is the same as that in Nicotiana tabacum, Vitis vinifera and Platanus occidentalis. The variation in the length of the large single-copy (LSC) regions and inverted repeats (IR) in sesame compared to 18 other higher plant species was the main contributor to size variation in the cp genome in these species. The 77 functional chloroplast genes, except for ycf1 and ycf2, were highly conserved. The deletion of the cp ycf1 gene sequence in cp genomes may be due either to its transfer to the nuclear genome, as has occurred in sesame, or direct deletion, as has occurred in Panax ginseng and Cucumis sativus. The sesame ycf2 gene is only 5,721 bp in length and has lost about 1,179 bp. Nucleotides 1–585 of ycf2 when queried in BLAST had hits in the sesame draft genome. Five repeats (R10, R12, R13, R14 and R17) were unique to the sesame chloroplast genome. We also found that IR contraction/expansion in the cp genome alters its rate of evolution. Chloroplast genes and repeats display the signature of convergent evolution in sesame and other species. These findings provide a foundation for further investigation of cp genome evolution in Sesamum and other higher plants. PMID:24303020

  18. Genome sequence of the brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Scherer, Steven; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Worley, Kim C.; Burch, Paula E.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Hines, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; DeRamo, Christine; Delgado, Oliver; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Hawes, Alicia; Gill, Rachel; Holt, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Amanatides, Peter G.; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Barnstead, Mary; Chin, Soo; Evans, Cheryl A.; Ferriera, Steven; Fosler, Carl; Glodek, Anna; Gu, Zhiping; Jennings, Don; Kraft, Cheryl L.; Nguyen, Trixie; Pfannkoch, Cynthia M.; Sitter, Cynthia; Sutton, Granger G.; Venter, J. Craig; Woodage, Trevor; Smith, Douglas; Lee, Hong-Maei; Gustafson, Erik; Cahill, Patrick; Kana, Arnold; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Weinstock, Keith; Fechtel, Kim; Weiss, Robert B.; Dunn, Diane M.; Green, Eric D.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline; Bosdet, Ian; Fjell, Chris; Jones, Steven; Krzywinski, Martin; Mathewson, Carrie; Siddiqui, Asim; Wye, Natasja; McPherson, John; Zhao, Shaying; Fraser, Claire M.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shatsman, Sofiya; Geer, Keita; Chen, Yixin; Abramzon, Sofyia; Nierman, William C.; Havlak, Paul H.; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Li, Bingshan; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Cawley, Simon; Cooney, A.J.; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Martin, Kirt; Wu, Jia Qian; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Kenneth J.; McLeod, Michael P.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Virk, Davinder; Volkov, Andrei; Wheeler, David A.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Tuzun, Eray; Birney, Ewan; Mongin, Emmanuel; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Woodwark, Cara; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Torrents, David; Alexandersson, Marina; Trask, Barbara J.; Young, Janet M.; et al.

    2004-02-02

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90 percent of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.

  19. IS1096-mediated DNA rearrangements play a key role in genome evolution of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ming; Galamba, Alexandra; Warner, Digby F; Soetaert, Karine; Merkel, Jane S; Kalai, Michael; Bifani, Pablo; Lefèvre, Philippe; Mizrahi, Valerie; Content, Jean

    2008-09-01

    The acquisition of DNA and the loss of genetic information are two important mechanisms that contribute to strain-specific differences in genome content. In this study, comparative genomics has allowed us to infer the roles of genomic rearrangement and changes in both distribution and copy number of the insertion element, IS1096, in the evolution of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 from its progenitor, M. smegmatis ATCC 607. Comparative analysis revealed that the ATCC 607 genome contains only 11 IS1096 elements against the 24 reported in mc2155. As mc2155 evolved, there was a considerable expansion in the copy number of IS1096 (+13) as well as duplication of a 56-kb fragment flanked on both sides by IS1096; concurrently, a single IS1096 element and its flank were deleted. This study demonstrates that insertion sequence (IS) expansion and IS-induced rearrangements such as duplication, deletion and shuffling are major forces driving genomic diversity and evolution. PMID:18439874

  20. Genomics-Bioinformatics Day on "Pathogens, Molecular Evolution and Bionformatics" October Thursday 9th 2003

    E-print Network

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    Genomics-Bioinformatics Day on "Pathogens, Molecular Evolution and Bionformatics" October Thursday continue this with a day arranged by Jotun Hein and Eddie Holmes with the focus on Pathogens, Molecular Problems for Microbial Pathogens" Hein: "Models of viral evolution involving multiple constraints" Drummond

  1. Uncoating of human rhinovirus serotype 2 from late endosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Prchla, E; Kuechler, E; Blaas, D; Fuchs, R

    1994-01-01

    The internalization pathway and mechanism of uncoating of human rhinovirus serotype 2 (HRV2), a minor-group human rhinovirus, were investigated. Kinetic analysis revealed a late endosomal compartment as the site of capsid modification from D to C antigenicity. The conformational change as well as the infection was prevented by the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1. A requirement for ATP was also demonstrated with purified endosomes in vitro. Capsid modifications occurred at a pH of 5.5 regardless of whether the virus was entrapped in isolated endosomes or free in solution. These findings suggest that the receptor is not directly involved in the structural modification of HRV2. Viral particles found in purified endosomes of infected cells were mostly devoid of RNA. This supports the hypothesis that uncoating of HRV2 occurs in intact endosomes rather than by a mechanism involving endosomal disruption with subsequent release of the RNA into the cytoplasm. Images PMID:8189509

  2. The genome and the nucleus: a marriage made by evolution. Genome organisation and nuclear architecture.

    PubMed

    Foster, Helen A; Bridger, Joanna M

    2005-09-01

    Genomes are housed within cell nuclei as individual chromosome territories. Nuclei contain several architectural structures that interact and influence the genome. In this review, we discuss how the genome may be organised within its nuclear environment with the position of chromosomes inside nuclei being either influenced by gene density or by chromosomes size. We compare interphase genome organisation in diverse species and reveal similarities and differences between evolutionary divergent organisms. Genome organisation is also discussed with relevance to regulation of gene expression, development and differentiation and asks whether large movements of whole chromosomes are really observed during differentiation. Literature and data describing alterations to genome organisation in disease are also discussed. Further, the nuclear structures that are involved in genome function are described, with reference to what happens to the genome when these structures contain protein from mutant genes as in the laminopathies. PMID:16133352

  3. On the immortality of television sets: "function" in the human genome according to the evolution-free gospel of ENCODE

    E-print Network

    Dean, Matthew D.

    of the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) were mainly aimed at providing a "parts list" for the human genome1 On the immortality of television sets: "function" in the human genome according to the evolution

  4. Rhinovirus-induced basic fibroblast growth factor release mediates airway remodeling features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human rhinoviruses, major precipitants of asthma exacerbations, induce lower airway inflammation and mediate angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility that rhinoviruses may also contribute to the fibrotic component of airway remodeling. Methods Levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) mRNA and protein were measured following rhinovirus infection of bronchial epithelial cells. The profibrotic effect of epithelial products was assessed by DNA synthesis and matrix metalloproteinase activity assays. Moreover, epithelial cells were exposed to supernatants from cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells, obtained from healthy donors or atopic asthmatic subjects and subsequently infected by rhinovirus and bFGF release was estimated. bFGF was also measured in respiratory secretions from atopic asthmatic patients before and during rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbations. Results Rhinovirus epithelial infection stimulated mRNA expression and release of bFGF, the latter being positively correlated with cell death under conditions promoting rhinovirus-induced cytotoxicity. Supernatants from infected cultures induced lung fibroblast proliferation, which was inhibited by anti-bFGF antibody, and demonstrated increased matrix metalloproteinase activity. Rhinovirus-mediated bFGF release was significantly higher in an in vitro simulation of atopic asthmatic environment and, importantly, during rhinovirus-associated asthma exacerbations. Conclusions Rhinovirus infection induces bFGF release by airway epithelium, and stimulates stroma cell proliferation contributing to airway remodeling in asthma. Repeated rhinovirus infections may promote asthma persistence, particularly in the context of atopy; prevention of such infections may influence the natural history of asthma. PMID:22908984

  5. Legume genome evolution viewed through the Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven B. Cannon; Lieven Sterck; Stephane Rombauts; Shusei Sato; Foo Cheung; Jérôme Gouzy; Xiaohong Wang; Joann Mudge; Jayprakash Vasdewani; Thomas Scheix; Manuel Spannagl; Erin Monaghan; Christine Nicholson; Sean J. Humphray; Heiko Schoof; Klaus F. X. Mayer; Jane Rogers; Francis Quétier; Giles E. Oldroyd; Frédéric Debellé; Douglas R. Cook; Ernest F. Retzel; Bruce A. Roe; Christopher D. Town; Satoshi Tabata; Yves van de Peer; Nevin D. Young

    2006-01-01

    Genome sequencing of the model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, provides an opportunity for large-scale sequence-based comparison of two genomes in the same plant family. Here we report synteny comparisons between these species, including details about chromosome relationships, large-scale synteny blocks, microsynteny within blocks, and genome regions lacking clear correspondence. The Lotus and Medicago genomes share a minimum of

  6. Project 1: Microbial Genomes: A Genomic Approach to Understanding the Evolution of Virulence. Project 2: From Genomes to Life: Drosophilia Development in Space and Time

    SciTech Connect

    Robert DeSalle

    2004-09-10

    This project seeks to use the genomes of two close relatives, A. actinomycetemcomitans and H. aphrophilus, to understand the evolutionary changes that take place in a genome to make it more or less virulent. Our primary specific aim of this project was to sequence, annotate, and analyze the genomes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (CU1000, serotype f) and Haemophilus aphrophilus. With these genome sequences we have then compared the whole genome sequences to each other and to the current Aa (HK1651 www.genome.ou.edu) genome project sequence along with other fully sequenced Pasteurellaceae to determine inter and intra species differences that may account for the differences and similarities in disease. We also propose to create and curate a comprehensive database where sequence information and analysis for the Pasteurellaceae (family that includes the genera Actinobacillus and Haemophilus) are readily accessible. And finally we have proposed to develop phylogenetic techniques that can be used to efficiently and accurately examine the evolution of genomes. Below we report on progress we have made on these major specific aims. Progress on the specific aims is reported below under two major headings--experimental approaches and bioinformatics and systematic biology approaches.

  7. The Sex Chromosomes of Frogs: Variability and Tolerance Offer Clues to Genome Evolution and Function

    PubMed Central

    Malcom, Jacob W.; Kudra, Randal S.; Malone, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Frog sex chromosomes offer an ideal system for advancing our understanding of genome evolution and function because of the variety of sex determination systems in the group, the diversity of sex chromosome maturation states, the ease of experimental manipulation during early development. After briefly reviewing sex chromosome biology generally, we focus on what is known about frog sex determination, sex chromosome evolution, and recent, genomics-facilitated advances in the field. In closing we highlight gaps in our current knowledge of frog sex chromosomes, and suggest priorities for future research that can advance broad knowledge of gene dose and sex chromosome evolution. PMID:25031658

  8. Networks of lexical borrowing and lateral gene transfer in language and genome evolution

    PubMed Central

    List, Johann-Mattis; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Geisler, Hans; Martin, William

    2014-01-01

    Like biological species, languages change over time. As noted by Darwin, there are many parallels between language evolution and biological evolution. Insights into these parallels have also undergone change in the past 150 years. Just like genes, words change over time, and language evolution can be likened to genome evolution accordingly, but what kind of evolution? There are fundamental differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic evolution. In the former, natural variation entails the gradual accumulation of minor mutations in alleles. In the latter, lateral gene transfer is an integral mechanism of natural variation. The study of language evolution using biological methods has attracted much interest of late, most approaches focusing on language tree construction. These approaches may underestimate the important role that borrowing plays in language evolution. Network approaches that were originally designed to study lateral gene transfer may provide more realistic insights into the complexities of language evolution. PMID:24375688

  9. Evolution of base-substitution gradients in primate mitochondrial genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sameer Z. Raina; Jeremiah J. Faith; Todd R. Disotell; Hervé Seligmann; Caro-Beth Stewart; David D. Pollock

    2005-01-01

    Inferences of phylogenies and dates of divergence rely on accurate modeling of evolutionary processes; they may be confounded by variation in substitution rates among sites and changes in evolutionary processes over time. In vertebrate mitochondrial genomes, substitution rates are affected by a gradient along the genome of the time spent being single-stranded during replication, and different types of substitutions respond

  10. Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wesley C. Warren; Ladeana W. Hillier; Jennifer A. Marshall Graves; Ewan Birney; Chris P. Ponting; Frank Grützner; Katherine Belov; Webb Miller; Laura Clarke; Asif T. Chinwalla; Shiaw-Pyng Yang; Andreas Heger; Devin P. Locke; Pat Miethke; Paul D. Waters; Frédéric Veyrunes; Lucinda Fulton; Bob Fulton; Tina Graves; John Wallis; Xose S. Puente; Carlos López-Otín; Gonzalo R. Ordóñez; Evan E. Eichler; Lin Chen; Ze Cheng; Janine E. Deakin; Amber Alsop; Katherine Thompson; Patrick Kirby; Anthony T. Papenfuss; Matthew J. Wakefield; Tsviya Olender; Doron Lancet; Gavin A. Huttley; Arian F. A. Smit; Andrew Pask; Peter Temple-Smith; Mark A. Batzer; Jerilyn A. Walker; Miriam K. Konkel; Robert S. Harris; Camilla M. Whittington; Emily S. W. Wong; Neil J. Gemmell; Emmanuel Buschiazzo; Iris M. Vargas Jentzsch; Angelika Merkel; Juergen Schmitz; Anja Zemann; Gennady Churakov; Jan Ole Kriegs; Juergen Brosius; Elizabeth P. Murchison; Ravi Sachidanandam; Carly Smith; Gregory J. Hannon; Enkhjargal Tsend-Ayush; Daniel McMillan; Rosalind Attenborough; Willem Rens; Malcolm Ferguson-Smith; Christophe M. Lefèvre; Julie A. Sharp; Kevin R. Nicholas; David A. Ray; Michael Kube; Richard Reinhardt; Thomas H. Pringle; James Taylor; Russell C. Jones; Brett Nixon; Jean-Louis Dacheux; Hitoshi Niwa; Yoko Sekita; Xiaoqiu Huang; Alexander Stark; Pouya Kheradpour; Manolis Kellis; Paul Flicek; Yuan Chen; Caleb Webber; Ross Hardison; Joanne Nelson; Kym Hallsworth-Pepin; Kim Delehaunty; Chris Markovic; Pat Minx; Yucheng Feng; Colin Kremitzki; Makedonka Mitreva; Jarret Glasscock; Todd Wylie; Patricia Wohldmann; Prathapan Thiru; Michael N. Nhan; Craig S. Pohl; Scott M. Smith; Shunfeng Hou; Marilyn B. Renfree; Elaine R. Mardis; Richard K. Wilson

    2008-01-01

    We present a draft genome sequence of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. This monotreme exhibits a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. For example, platypuses have a coat of fur adapted to an aquatic lifestyle; platypus females lactate, yet lay eggs; and males are equipped with venom similar to that of reptiles. Analysis of the first monotreme genome aligned these

  11. A genomic view of 500 million years of cnidarian evolution

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Robert E.; David, Charles N.; Technau, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Cnidarians (corals, anemones, jellyfish, and hydras) are a diverse group of animals of interest to evolutionary biologists, ecologists, and developmental biologists. With the publication of the genome sequences of Hydra and Nematostella, whose last common ancestor was the stem cnidarian, we are beginning to see the genomic underpinnings of cnidarian biology. Cnidarians are known for the remarkable plasticity of their morphology and life cycles. This plasticity is reflected in the Hydra and Nematostella genomes, which differ to an exceptional degree in size, base composition, transposable element content, and gene conservation. We now know what cnidarian genomes are capable of doing given 500 million years; the next challenge is to understand how this genomic history has led to the striking diversity we see in cnidarians. PMID:21047698

  12. Distribution and evolution of cotton fiber development genes in the fibreless Gossypium raimondii genome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhanyou; Yu, Jing; Kohel, Russell J; Percy, Richard G; Beavis, William D; Main, Dorrie; Yu, John Z

    2015-07-01

    Cotton fiber represents the largest single cell in plants and they serve as models to study cell development. This study investigated the distribution and evolution of fiber Unigenes anchored to recombination hotspots between tetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) At and Dt subgenomes, and within a parental diploid cotton (Gossypium raimondii) D genome. Comparative analysis of At vs D and Dt vs D showed that 1) the D genome provides many fiber genes after its merger with another parental diploid cotton (Gossypium arboreum) A genome although the D genome itself does not produce any spinnable fiber; 2) similarity of fiber genes is higher between At vs D than between Dt vs D genomic hotspots. This is the first report that fiber genes have higher similarity between At and D than between Dt and D. The finding provides new insights into cotton genomic regions that would facilitate genetic improvement of natural fiber properties. PMID:25796538

  13. Mouse models of rhinovirus-induced disease and exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Nathan W; Walton, Ross P; Edwards, Michael R; Aniscenko, Juliya; Caramori, Gaetano; Zhu, Jie; Glanville, Nicholas; Choy, Katherine J; Jourdan, Patrick; Burnet, Jerome; Tuthill, Tobias J; Pedrick, Michael S; Hurle, Michael J; Plumpton, Chris; Sharp, Nigel A; Bussell, James N; Swallow, Dallas M; Schwarze, Jurgen; Guy, Bruno; Almond, Jeffrey W; Jeffery, Peter K; Lloyd, Clare M; Papi, Alberto; Killington, Richard A; Rowlands, David J; Blair, Edward D; Clarke, Neil J; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2012-01-01

    Rhinoviruses cause serious morbidity and mortality as the major etiological agents of asthma exacerbations and the common cold. A major obstacle to understanding disease pathogenesis and to the development of effective therapies has been the lack of a small-animal model for rhinovirus infection. Of the 100 known rhinovirus serotypes, 90% (the major group) use human intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as their cellular receptor and do not bind mouse ICAM-1; the remaining 10% (the minor group) use a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family and can bind the mouse counterpart. Here we describe three novel mouse models of rhinovirus infection: minor-group rhinovirus infection of BALB/c mice, major-group rhinovirus infection of transgenic BALB/c mice expressing a mouse-human ICAM-1 chimera and rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation. These models have features similar to those observed in rhinovirus infection in humans, including augmentation of allergic airway inflammation, and will be useful in the development of future therapies for colds and asthma exacerbations. PMID:18246079

  14. Spatio-temporal patterns of genome evolution in allotetraploid species of the genus Oryza.

    PubMed

    Ammiraju, Jetty S S; Fan, Chuanzhu; Yu, Yeisoo; Song, Xiang; Cranston, Karen A; Pontaroli, Ana Clara; Lu, Fei; Sanyal, Abhijit; Jiang, Ning; Rambo, Teri; Currie, Jennifer; Collura, Kristi; Talag, Jayson; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Chen, Mingsheng; Jackson, Scott; Wing, Rod A

    2010-08-01

    Despite knowledge that polyploidy is widespread and a major evolutionary force in flowering plant diversification, detailed comparative molecular studies on polyploidy have been confined to only a few species and families. The genus Oryza is composed of 23 species that are classified into ten distinct 'genome types' (six diploid and four polyploid), and is emerging as a powerful new model system to study polyploidy. Here we report the identification, sequence and comprehensive comparative annotation of eight homoeologous genomes from a single orthologous region (Adh1-Adh2) from four allopolyploid species representing each of the known Oryza genome types (BC, CD, HJ and KL). Detailed comparative phylogenomic analyses of these regions within and across species and ploidy levels provided several insights into the spatio-temporal dynamics of genome organization and evolution of this region in 'natural' polyploids of Oryza. The major findings of this study are that: (i) homoeologous genomic regions within the same nucleus experience both independent and parallel evolution, (ii) differential lineage-specific selection pressures do not occur between polyploids and their diploid progenitors, (iii) there have been no dramatic structural changes relative to the diploid ancestors, (iv) a variation in the molecular evolutionary rate exists between the two genomes in the BC complex species even though the BC and CD polyploid species appear to have arisen <2?million years ago, and (v) there are no clear distinctions in the patterns of genome evolution in the diploid versus polyploid species. PMID:20487382

  15. The complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus bulgaricus reveals extensive and ongoing reductive evolution

    PubMed Central

    van de Guchte, M.; Penaud, S.; Grimaldi, C.; Barbe, V.; Bryson, K.; Nicolas, P.; Robert, C.; Oztas, S.; Mangenot, S.; Couloux, A.; Loux, V.; Dervyn, R.; Bossy, R.; Bolotin, A.; Batto, J.-M.; Walunas, T.; Gibrat, J.-F.; Bessières, P.; Weissenbach, J.; Ehrlich, S. D.; Maguin, E.

    2006-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) is a representative of the group of lactic acid-producing bacteria, mainly known for its worldwide application in yogurt production. The genome sequence of this bacterium has been determined and shows the signs of ongoing specialization, with a substantial number of pseudogenes and incomplete metabolic pathways and relatively few regulatory functions. Several unique features of the L. bulgaricus genome support the hypothesis that the genome is in a phase of rapid evolution. (i) Exceptionally high numbers of rRNA and tRNA genes with regard to genome size may indicate that the L. bulgaricus genome has known a recent phase of important size reduction, in agreement with the observed high frequency of gene inactivation and elimination; (ii) a much higher GC content at codon position 3 than expected on the basis of the overall GC content suggests that the composition of the genome is evolving toward a higher GC content; and (iii) the presence of a 47.5-kbp inverted repeat in the replication termination region, an extremely rare feature in bacterial genomes, may be interpreted as a transient stage in genome evolution. The results indicate the adaptation of L. bulgaricus from a plant-associated habitat to the stable protein and lactose-rich milk environment through the loss of superfluous functions and protocooperation with Streptococcus thermophilus. PMID:16754859

  16. Association of intron loss with high mutation rate in Arabidopsis: implications for genome size evolution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Fei; Zhu, Tao; Niu, Deng-Ke

    2013-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of intron losses during eukaryotic evolution, the selective forces acting on them have not been extensively explored. Arabidopsis thaliana lost half of its genome and experienced an elevated rate of intron loss after diverging from A. lyrata. The selective force for genome reduction was suggested to have driven the intron loss. However, the evolutionary mechanism of genome reduction is still a matter of debate. In this study, we found that intron-lost genes have high synonymous substitution rates. Assuming that differences in mutability among different introns are conserved among closely related species, we used the nucleotide substitution rate between orthologous introns in other species as the proxy of the mutation rate of Arabidopsis introns, either lost or extant. The lost introns were found to have higher mutation rates than extant introns. At the genome-wide level, A. thaliana has a higher mutation rate than A. lyrata, which correlates with the higher rate of intron loss and rapid genome reduction of A. thaliana. Our results indicate that selection to minimize mutational hazards might be the selective force for intron loss, and possibly also for genome reduction, in the evolution of A. thaliana. Small genome size and lower genome-wide intron density were widely reported to be correlated with phenotypic features, such as high metabolic rates and rapid growth. We argue that the mutational-hazard hypothesis is compatible with these correlations, by suggesting that selection for rapid growth might indirectly increase mutational hazards. PMID:23516254

  17. Plastid genome evolution in mycoheterotrophic Ericaceae Thomas Braukmann Sasa Stefanovic

    E-print Network

    framework was conducted using a slot-blot Southern hybridization approach. This survey encompassed numerous. Keywords Mycoheteotrophs Á Ericaceae Á Plastid genome Á Southern hybridization Á Phylogeny Á PHYA

  18. The genomic basis of adaptive evolution in threespine sticklebacks

    E-print Network

    Lander, Eric S.

    Marine stickleback fish have colonized and adapted to thousands of streams and lakes formed since the last ice age, providing an exceptional opportunity to characterize genomic mechanisms underlying repeated ecological ...

  19. Social evolution. Genomic signatures of evolutionary transitions from solitary to group living.

    PubMed

    Kapheim, Karen M; Pan, Hailin; Li, Cai; Salzberg, Steven L; Puiu, Daniela; Magoc, Tanja; Robertson, Hugh M; Hudson, Matthew E; Venkat, Aarti; Fischman, Brielle J; Hernandez, Alvaro; Yandell, Mark; Ence, Daniel; Holt, Carson; Yocum, George D; Kemp, William P; Bosch, Jordi; Waterhouse, Robert M; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Stolle, Eckart; Kraus, F Bernhard; Helbing, Sophie; Moritz, Robin F A; Glastad, Karl M; Hunt, Brendan G; Goodisman, Michael A D; Hauser, Frank; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Pinheiro, Daniel Guariz; Nunes, Francis Morais Franco; Soares, Michelle Prioli Miranda; Tanaka, Érica Donato; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino; Hartfelder, Klaus; Evans, Jay D; Barribeau, Seth M; Johnson, Reed M; Massey, Jonathan H; Southey, Bruce R; Hasselmann, Martin; Hamacher, Daniel; Biewer, Matthias; Kent, Clement F; Zayed, Amro; Blatti, Charles; Sinha, Saurabh; Johnston, J Spencer; Hanrahan, Shawn J; Kocher, Sarah D; Wang, Jun; Robinson, Gene E; Zhang, Guojie

    2015-06-01

    The evolution of eusociality is one of the major transitions in evolution, but the underlying genomic changes are unknown. We compared the genomes of 10 bee species that vary in social complexity, representing multiple independent transitions in social evolution, and report three major findings. First, many important genes show evidence of neutral evolution as a consequence of relaxed selection with increasing social complexity. Second, there is no single road map to eusociality; independent evolutionary transitions in sociality have independent genetic underpinnings. Third, though clearly independent in detail, these transitions do have similar general features, including an increase in constrained protein evolution accompanied by increases in the potential for gene regulation and decreases in diversity and abundance of transposable elements. Eusociality may arise through different mechanisms each time, but would likely always involve an increase in the complexity of gene networks. PMID:25977371

  20. Genomic changes under rapid evolution: selection for parasitoid resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jalvingh, Kirsten M.; Chang, Peter L.; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.; Wertheim, Bregje

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we characterize changes in the genome during a swift evolutionary adaptation, by combining experimental selection with high-throughput sequencing. We imposed strong experimental selection on an ecologically relevant trait, parasitoid resistance in Drosophila melanogaster against Asobara tabida. Replicated selection lines rapidly evolved towards enhanced immunity. Larval survival after parasitization increased twofold after just five generations of selection. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that the fast and strong selection response in innate immunity produced multiple, highly localized genomic changes. We identified narrow genomic regions carrying a significant signature of selection, which were present across all chromosomes and covered in total less than 5% of the whole D. melanogaster genome. We identified segregating sites with highly significant changes in frequency between control and selection lines that fell within these narrow ‘selected regions’. These segregating sites were associated with 42 genes that constitute possible targets of selection. A region on chromosome 2R was highly enriched in significant segregating sites and may be of major effect on parasitoid defence. The high genetic variability and small linkage blocks in our base population are likely responsible for allowing this complex trait to evolve without causing widespread erosive effects in the genome, even under such a fast and strong selective regime. PMID:24500162

  1. Assessing Tumor Heterogeneity and Tracking Clonal Evolution Using Whole Genome or Exome Sequencing - Christopher Miller, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Assessing Tumor Heterogeneity and Tracking Clonal Evolution - Christopher Miller Assessing Tumor Heterogeneity and Tracking Clonal Evolution Using Whole Genome or Exome Sequencing - Christopher Miller,

  2. Distribution and Evolution of Repeated Sequences in Genomes of Triatominae (Hemiptera-Reduviidae) Inferred from Genomic In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Pita, Sebastian; Panzera, Francisco; Sánchez, Antonio; Panzera, Yanina; Palomeque, Teresa; Lorite, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The subfamily Triatominae, vectors of Chagas disease, comprises 140 species characterized by a highly homogeneous chromosome number. We analyzed the chromosomal distribution and evolution of repeated sequences in Triatominae genomes by Genomic in situ Hybridization using Triatoma delpontei and Triatoma infestans genomic DNAs as probes. Hybridizations were performed on their own chromosomes and on nine species included in six genera from the two main tribes: Triatomini and Rhodniini. Genomic probes clearly generate two different hybridization patterns, dispersed or accumulated in specific regions or chromosomes. The three used probes generate the same hybridization pattern in each species. However, these patterns are species-specific. In closely related species, the probes strongly hybridized in the autosomal heterochromatic regions, resembling C-banding and DAPI patterns. However, in more distant species these co-localizations are not observed. The heterochromatic Y chromosome is constituted by highly repeated sequences, which is conserved among 10 species of Triatomini tribe suggesting be an ancestral character for this group. However, the Y chromosome in Rhodniini tribe is markedly different, supporting the early evolutionary dichotomy between both tribes. In some species, sex chromosomes and autosomes shared repeated sequences, suggesting meiotic chromatin exchanges among these heterologous chromosomes. Our GISH analyses enabled us to acquire not only reliable information about autosomal repeated sequences distribution but also an insight into sex chromosome evolution in Triatominae. Furthermore, the differentiation obtained by GISH might be a valuable marker to establish phylogenetic relationships and to test the controversial origin of the Triatominae subfamily. PMID:25478792

  3. Tools for simulating evolution of aligned genomic regions with integrated parameter estimation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Avinash Varadarajan; Robert K Bradley; Ian H Holmes

    2008-01-01

    Controlled simulations of genome evolution are useful for benchmarking tools. However, many simulators lack extensibility\\u000a and cannot measure parameters directly from data. These issues are addressed by three new open-source programs: GSIMULATOR\\u000a (for neutrally evolving DNA), SIMGRAM (for generic structured features) and SIMGENOME (for syntenic genome blocks). Each offers\\u000a algorithms for parameter measurement and reconstruction of ancestral sequence. All three

  4. Repair-Mediated Duplication by Capture of Proximal Chromosomal DNA Has Shaped Vertebrate Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Pace, John K.; Sen, Shurjo K.; Batzer, Mark A.; Feschotte, Cédric

    2009-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a common form of cellular damage that can lead to cell death if not repaired promptly. Experimental systems have shown that DSB repair in eukaryotic cells is often imperfect and may result in the insertion of extra chromosomal DNA or the duplication of existing DNA at the breakpoint. These events are thought to be a source of genomic instability and human diseases, but it is unclear whether they have contributed significantly to genome evolution. Here we developed an innovative computational pipeline that takes advantage of the repetitive structure of genomes to detect repair-mediated duplication events (RDs) that occurred in the germline and created insertions of at least 50 bp of genomic DNA. Using this pipeline we identified over 1,000 probable RDs in the human genome. Of these, 824 were intra-chromosomal, closely linked duplications of up to 619 bp bearing the hallmarks of the synthesis-dependent strand-annealing repair pathway. This mechanism has duplicated hundreds of sequences predicted to be functional in the human genome, including exons, UTRs, intron splice sites and transcription factor binding sites. Dating of the duplication events using comparative genomics and experimental validation revealed that the mechanism has operated continuously but with decreasing intensity throughout primate evolution. The mechanism has produced species-specific duplications in all primate species surveyed and is contributing to genomic variation among humans. Finally, we show that RDs have also occurred, albeit at a lower frequency, in non-primate mammals and other vertebrates, indicating that this mechanism has been an important force shaping vertebrate genome evolution. PMID:19424419

  5. Genomic Science in Understanding Cholera Outbreaks and Evolution of Vibrio cholerae as a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Mekalanos, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic and bioinformatic approaches have been applied to interrogate the V. cholerae genome, the role of genomic elements in cholera disease, and the origin, relatedness, and dissemination of epidemic strains. A universal attribute of choleragenic strains includes a repertoire of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes, namely the CTX–? prophage and Toxin Co-regulated Pilus (TCP) in addition to other virulent genetic elements including those referred to as Seventh Pandemic Islands. During the last decade, the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has provided highly resolved and often complete genomic sequences of epidemic isolates in addition to both clinical and environmental strains isolated from geographically unconnected regions. Genomic comparisons of these strains, as was completed during and following the Haitian outbreak in 2010, reveals that most epidemic strains appear closely related, regardless of region of origin. Non-O1 clinical or environmental strains may also possess some virulence islands, but phylogenic analysis of the core genome suggests they are more diverse and distantly related than those isolated during epidemics. Like Haiti, genomic studies that examine both the Vibrio core- and pan-genome in addition to Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) conclude that a number of epidemics are caused by strains that closely resemble those in Asia, and often appear to originate there and then spread globally. The accumulation of SNPs in the epidemic strains over time can then be applied to better understand the evolution of the V. cholerae genome as an etiological agent. PMID:24590676

  6. Complete Chloroplast Genome of the Wollemi Pine (Wollemia nobilis): Structure and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Jia-Yee S.; Rohner, Thore; Greenfield, Abigail; Van Der Merwe, Marlien; McPherson, Hannah; Glenn, Wendy; Kornfeld, Geoff; Marendy, Elessa; Pan, Annie Y. H.; Wilkins, Marc R.; Rossetto, Maurizio; Delaney, Sven K.

    2015-01-01

    The Wollemi pine (Wollemia nobilis) is a rare Southern conifer with striking morphological similarity to fossil pines. A small population of W. nobilis was discovered in 1994 in a remote canyon system in the Wollemi National Park (near Sydney, Australia). This population contains fewer than 100 individuals and is critically endangered. Previous genetic studies of the Wollemi pine have investigated its evolutionary relationship with other pines in the family Araucariaceae, and have suggested that the Wollemi pine genome contains little or no variation. However, these studies were performed prior to the widespread use of genome sequencing, and their conclusions were based on a limited fraction of the Wollemi pine genome. In this study, we address this problem by determining the entire sequence of the W. nobilis chloroplast genome. A detailed analysis of the structure of the genome is presented, and the evolution of the genome is inferred by comparison with the chloroplast sequences of other members of the Araucariaceae and the related family Podocarpaceae. Pairwise alignments of whole genome sequences, and the presence of unique pseudogenes, gene duplications and insertions in W. nobilis and Araucariaceae, indicate that the W. nobilis chloroplast genome is most similar to that of its sister taxon Agathis. However, the W. nobilis genome contains an unusually high number of repetitive sequences, and these could be used in future studies to investigate and conserve any remnant genetic diversity in the Wollemi pine. PMID:26061691

  7. Replicon-Dependent Bacterial Genome Evolution: The Case of Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Galardini, Marco; Pini, Francesco; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Biondi, Emanuele G.; Mengoni, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Many bacterial species, such as the alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, are characterized by open pangenomes and contain multipartite genomes consisting of a chromosome and other large-sized replicons, such as chromids, megaplasmids, and plasmids. The evolutionary forces in both functional and structural aspects that shape the pangenome of species with multipartite genomes are still poorly understood. Therefore, we sequenced the genomes of 10 new S. meliloti strains, analyzed with four publicly available additional genomic sequences. Results indicated that the three main replicons present in these strains (a chromosome, a chromid, and a megaplasmid) partly show replicon-specific behaviors related to strain differentiation. In particular, the pSymB chromid was shown to be a hot spot for positively selected genes, and, unexpectedly, genes resident in the pSymB chromid were also found to be more widespread in distant taxa than those located in the other replicons. Moreover, through the exploitation of a DNA proximity network, a series of conserved “DNA backbones” were found to shape the evolution of the genome structure, with the rest of the genome experiencing rearrangements. The presented data allow depicting a scenario where the pSymB chromid has a distinctive role in intraspecies differentiation and in evolution through positive selection, whereas the pSymA megaplasmid mostly contributes to structural fluidity and to the emergence of new functions, indicating a specific evolutionary role for each replicon in the pangenome evolution. PMID:23431003

  8. DNA secondary structures and epigenetic determinants of cancer genome evolution

    PubMed Central

    De, Subhajyoti; Michor, Franziska

    2014-01-01

    An unstable genome is a hallmark of many cancers. It is unclear, however, whether some mutagenic features driving somatic alterations in cancer are encoded in the genome sequence and whether they can operate in a tissue-specific manner. We performed a genome-wide analysis of 663,446 DNA breakpoints associated with somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) from 2,792 cancer samples classified into 26 cancer types. Many SCNA breakpoints are spatially clustered in cancer genomes. We observed a significant enrichment for G-quadruplex sequences (G4s) in the vicinity of SCNA breakpoints and established that SCNAs show a strand bias consistent with G4-mediated structural alterations. Notably, abnormal hypomethylation near G4s-rich regions is a common signature for many SCNA breakpoint hotspots. We propose a mechanistic hypothesis that abnormal hypomethylation in genomic regions enriched for G4s acts as a mutagenic factor driving tissue-specific mutational landscapes in cancer. PMID:21725294

  9. Evolution and Diversity in Human Herpes Simplex Virus Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gatherer, Derek; Ochoa, Alejandro; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Dolan, Aidan; Bowden, Rory J.; Enquist, Lynn W.; Legendre, Matthieu; Davison, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes a chronic, lifelong infection in >60% of adults. Multiple recent vaccine trials have failed, with viral diversity likely contributing to these failures. To understand HSV-1 diversity better, we comprehensively compared 20 newly sequenced viral genomes from China, Japan, Kenya, and South Korea with six previously sequenced genomes from the United States, Europe, and Japan. In this diverse collection of passaged strains, we found that one-fifth of the newly sequenced members share a gene deletion and one-third exhibit homopolymeric frameshift mutations (HFMs). Individual strains exhibit genotypic and potential phenotypic variation via HFMs, deletions, short sequence repeats, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms, although the protein sequence identity between strains exceeds 90% on average. In the first genome-scale analysis of positive selection in HSV-1, we found signs of selection in specific proteins and residues, including the fusion protein glycoprotein H. We also confirmed previous results suggesting that recombination has occurred with high frequency throughout the HSV-1 genome. Despite this, the HSV-1 strains analyzed clustered by geographic origin during whole-genome distance analysis. These data shed light on likely routes of HSV-1 adaptation to changing environments and will aid in the selection of vaccine antigens that are invariant worldwide. PMID:24227835

  10. Genome size evolution at the speciation level: The cryptic species complex Brachionus plicatilis (Rotifera)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies on genome size variation in animals are rarely done at lower taxonomic levels, e.g., slightly above/below the species level. Yet, such variation might provide important clues on the tempo and mode of genome size evolution. In this study we used the flow-cytometry method to study the evolution of genome size in the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis, a cryptic species complex consisting of at least 14 closely related species. Results We found an unexpectedly high variation in this species complex, with genome sizes ranging approximately seven-fold (haploid '1C' genome sizes: 0.056-0.416 pg). Most of this variation (67%) could be ascribed to the major clades of the species complex, i.e. clades that are well separated according to most species definitions. However, we also found substantial variation (32%) at lower taxonomic levels - within and among genealogical species - and, interestingly, among species pairs that are not completely reproductively isolated. In one genealogical species, called B. 'Austria', we found greatly enlarged genome sizes that could roughly be approximated as multiples of the genomes of its closest relatives, which suggests that whole-genome duplications have occurred early during separation of this lineage. Overall, genome size was significantly correlated to egg size and body size, even though the latter became non-significant after controlling for phylogenetic non-independence. Conclusions Our study suggests that substantial genome size variation can build up early during speciation, potentially even among isolated populations. An alternative, but not mutually exclusive interpretation might be that reproductive isolation tends to build up unusually slow in this species complex. PMID:21473744

  11. Medfly transposable elements: diversity, evolution, genomic impact and possible applications.

    PubMed

    Gomulski, Ludvik M; Torti, Cristina; Murelli, Valentina; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Gasperi, Giuliano; Malacrida, Anna R

    2004-02-01

    The medfly genome has been shown to contain a rich assortment of transposable elements from the mariner, Tc1, hAT and gypsy/Ty3 families. These elements display different levels of diversity, abundance and distribution in the genome. The presence of actively transposing elements in the medfly genome is revealed by hybrid dysgenesis phenomena, insertion site polymorphisms and other genetic instabilities. The medfly has been a target of transformation studies involving the exogenous elements Minos, Hermes and piggyBac from three families. The presence of active endogenous homologous elements can have important implications for the stability of such transgenic lines. The potential applications of endogenous elements for medfly population analysis and control are discussed. PMID:14871610

  12. On the Immortality of Television Sets: "Function" in the Human Genome According to the Evolution-Free Gospel

    E-print Network

    Durand, Dannie

    that designed the E. coli genome. There is, however, no way that I would admit to serving on a committeeOn the Immortality of Television Sets: "Function" in the Human Genome According to the Evolution that more than 80% of the human genome is functional. This claim flies in the face of current

  13. The Pattern of Evolution of Smaller-Scale Gene Duplicates in Mammalian Genomes is More Consistent with Neo-than

    E-print Network

    Liberles, David

    The Pattern of Evolution of Smaller-Scale Gene Duplicates in Mammalian Genomes is More Consistent in the genome (Lynch and Conery 2000). The classical model (Ohno 1970) postulates that, as long as one is thought to be the key process that makes functional change in the coding and regulatory regions of genomes

  14. Insights into the evolution of cotton diploids and polyploids from whole-genome re-1 sequencing2

    E-print Network

    Wendel, Jonathan F.

    1 Insights into the evolution of cotton diploids and polyploids from whole-genome re-1 sequencing2, College Station, TX, 7784311 5 Seed Biotechnology Center, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA the composition, evolution, and function of the Gossypium hirsutum (cotton)2 genome is complicated by the joint

  15. 12 Gray, M.W. et al. (2001) The origin and early evolution of mitochondria. Genome Biol. 2, 1018

    E-print Network

    Eisenberg, Eli

    2001-01-01

    12 Gray, M.W. et al. (2001) The origin and early evolution of mitochondria. Genome Biol. 2, 1018 13) A comparative genomics approach to the evolution of eukaryotes and their mitochondria. J. Eukaryot. Micro- biol al. (1997) Evidence for loss of mitochondria in Microsporidia from a mitochondrial-type HSP70

  16. Multiplicative versus additive selection in relation to genome evolution: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Piganeau, G; Westrelin, R; Tourancheau, B; Gautier, C

    2001-10-01

    The evolution of molecular quantitative traits, such as codon usage bias or base frequencies, can be explained as the result of mutational biases alone, or as the result of mutation and selection. Whereas mutation models can be investigated easily, realistic modelling of selection-directed genome evolution is analytically intractable, and numerical calculations require substantial computer resources. We investigated the evolution of optimal codon frequency under additive and multiplicative effects of selected linked codons. We show that additive selective effects of many linked sites cannot be effective in genomes when the number of selected sites is greater than the effective population size, a realistic assumption according to current molecular data. We then discuss the implications of these results for isochore evolution in vertebrates. PMID:11732094

  17. Elephant shark genome provides unique insights into gnathostome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lee, Alison P.; Ravi, Vydianathan; Maurya, Ashish K.; Lian, Michelle M.; Swann, Jeremy B.; Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin F.; Sutoh, Yoichi; Kasahara, Masanori; Hoon, Shawn; Gangu, Vamshidhar; Roy, Scott W.; Irimia, Manuel; Korzh, Vladimir; Kondrychyn, Igor; Lim, Zhi Wei; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tohari, Sumanty; Kong, Kiat Whye; Ho, Shufen; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Quilez, Javier; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Raney, Brian J.; Ingham, Philip W.; Tay, Alice; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Minx, Patrick; Boehm, Thomas; Wilson, Richard K.; Brenner, Sydney; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) from jawless vertebrates was accompanied by major morphological and physiological innovations, such as hinged jaws, paired fins and immunoglobulin-based adaptive immunity. Gnathostomes subsequently diverged into two groups, the cartilaginous fishes and the bony vertebrates. Here we report the whole-genome analysis of a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii). We find that the C. milii genome is the slowest evolving of all known vertebrates, including the ‘living fossil’ coelacanth, and features extensive synteny conservation with tetrapod genomes, making it a good model for comparative analyses of gnathostome genomes. Our functional studies suggest that the lack of genes encoding secreted calcium-binding phosphoproteins in cartilaginous fishes explains the absence of bone in their endoskeleton. Furthermore, the adaptive immune system of cartilaginous fishes is unusual: it lacks the canonical CD4 co-receptor and most transcription factors, cytokines and cytokine receptors related to the CD4 lineage, despite the presence of polymorphic major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. It thus presents a new model for understanding the origin of adaptive immunity. PMID:24402279

  18. Evolution: a genomic guide to bird population history.

    PubMed

    Toews, David P L

    2015-06-01

    How species responded to the climatic oscillations during the past few million years is debated. A new study analyzing the genomes of 38 bird species finds variable patterns of population growth and declines that broadly correlate with global environmental change. PMID:26035791

  19. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal

    E-print Network

    lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding

  20. Extreme recombination frequencies shape genome variation and evolution in the honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Wallberg, Andreas; Glémin, Sylvain; Webster, Matthew T

    2015-04-01

    Meiotic recombination is a fundamental cellular process, with important consequences for evolution and genome integrity. However, we know little about how recombination rates vary across the genomes of most species and the molecular and evolutionary determinants of this variation. The honeybee, Apis mellifera, has extremely high rates of meiotic recombination, although the evolutionary causes and consequences of this are unclear. Here we use patterns of linkage disequilibrium in whole genome resequencing data from 30 diploid honeybees to construct a fine-scale map of rates of crossing over in the genome. We find that, in contrast to vertebrate genomes, the recombination landscape is not strongly punctate. Crossover rates strongly correlate with levels of genetic variation, but not divergence, which indicates a pervasive impact of selection on the genome. Germ-line methylated genes have reduced crossover rate, which could indicate a role of methylation in suppressing recombination. Controlling for the effects of methylation, we do not infer a strong association between gene expression patterns and recombination. The site frequency spectrum is strongly skewed from neutral expectations in honeybees: rare variants are dominated by AT-biased mutations, whereas GC-biased mutations are found at higher frequencies, indicative of a major influence of GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), which we infer to generate an allele fixation bias 5 - 50 times the genomic average estimated in humans. We uncover further evidence that this repair bias specifically affects transitions and favours fixation of CpG sites. Recombination, via gBGC, therefore appears to have profound consequences on genome evolution in honeybees and interferes with the process of natural selection. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the forces driving molecular evolution. PMID:25902173

  1. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation. PMID:26109237

  2. The Impact of Genome Triplication on Tandem Gene Evolution in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lu; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) and tandem duplication (TD) are both important modes of gene expansion. However, how WGD influences tandemly duplicated genes is not well studied. We used Brassica rapa, which has undergone an additional genome triplication (WGT) and shares a common ancestor with Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Thellungiella parvula, to investigate the impact of genome triplication on tandem gene evolution. We identified 2,137, 1,569, 1,751, and 1,135 tandem gene arrays in B. rapa, A. thaliana, A. lyrata, and T. parvula respectively. Among them, 414 conserved tandem arrays are shared by the three species without WGT, which were also considered as existing in the diploid ancestor of B. rapa. Thus, after genome triplication, B. rapa should have 1,242 tandem arrays according to the 414 conserved tandems. Here, we found 400 out of the 414 tandems had at least one syntenic ortholog in the genome of B. rapa. Furthermore, 294 out of the 400 shared syntenic orthologs maintain tandem arrays (more than one gene for each syntenic hit) in B. rapa. For the 294 tandem arrays, we obtained 426 copies of syntenic paralogous tandems in the triplicated genome of B. rapa. In this study, we demonstrated that tandem arrays in B. rapa were dramatically fractionated after WGT when compared either to non-tandem genes in the B. rapa genome or to the tandem arrays in closely related species that have not experienced a recent whole genome polyploidization event. PMID:23226149

  3. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation. PMID:26109237

  4. Retrotransposons - a major driving force in plant genome evolution and a useful tool for genome analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Zou; Huihui Gong; Tae-Jin Yang; Jinling Meng

    2009-01-01

    As a major part of most plant genomes, retrotransposons are distributed throughout the plant genome ubiquitously with high\\u000a copy number and extensive heterogeneity. Various retrotransposon families with distinct structures differ in their distribution\\u000a and roles among divergent plant species, due to unforeseen transposition activities. Regulation of transposition is relatively\\u000a complex and three factors such as maintaining structure for none- or

  5. Reproductive Mode and the Evolution of Genome Size and Structure in Caenorhabditis Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Fierst, Janna L.; Willis, John H.; Thomas, Cristel G.; Wang, Wei; Reynolds, Rose M.; Ahearne, Timothy E.; Cutter, Asher D.; Phillips, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    The self-fertile nematode worms Caenorhabditis elegans, C. briggsae, and C. tropicalis evolved independently from outcrossing male-female ancestors and have genomes 20-40% smaller than closely related outcrossing relatives. This pattern of smaller genomes for selfing species and larger genomes for closely related outcrossing species is also seen in plants. We use comparative genomics, including the first high quality genome assembly for an outcrossing member of the genus (C. remanei) to test several hypotheses for the evolution of genome reduction under a change in mating system. Unlike plants, it does not appear that reductions in the number of repetitive elements, such as transposable elements, are an important contributor to the change in genome size. Instead, all functional genomic categories are lost in approximately equal proportions. Theory predicts that self-fertilization should equalize the effective population size, as well as the resulting effects of genetic drift, between the X chromosome and autosomes. Contrary to this, we find that the self-fertile C. briggsae and C. elegans have larger intergenic spaces and larger protein-coding genes on the X chromosome when compared to autosomes, while C. remanei actually has smaller introns on the X chromosome than either self-reproducing species. Rather than being driven by mutational biases and/or genetic drift caused by a reduction in effective population size under self reproduction, changes in genome size in this group of nematodes appear to be caused by genome-wide patterns of gene loss, most likely generated by genomic adaptation to self reproduction per se. PMID:26114425

  6. IL-33–Dependent Type 2 Inflammation during Rhinovirus-induced Asthma Exacerbations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David J.; Makrinioti, Heidi; Rana, Batika M. J.; Shamji, Betty W. H.; Trujillo-Torralbo, Maria-Belen; Footitt, Joseph; Jerico del-Rosario; Telcian, Aurica G.; Nikonova, Alexandra; Zhu, Jie; Aniscenko, Julia; Gogsadze, Leila; Bakhsoliani, Eteri; Traub, Stephanie; Dhariwal, Jaideep; Porter, James; Hunt, Duncan; Hunt, Toby; Hunt, Trevor; Stanciu, Luminita A.; Khaitov, Musa; Bartlett, Nathan W.; Edwards, Michael R.; Kon, Onn Min; Mallia, Patrick; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Akdis, Cezmi A.; Westwick, John; Edwards, Matthew J.; Cousins, David J.; Walton, Ross P.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Rhinoviruses are the major cause of asthma exacerbations; however, its underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the epithelial cell–derived cytokine IL-33 plays a central role in exacerbation pathogenesis through augmentation of type 2 inflammation. Objectives: To assess whether rhinovirus induces a type 2 inflammatory response in asthma in vivo and to define a role for IL-33 in this pathway. Methods: We used a human experimental model of rhinovirus infection and novel airway sampling techniques to measure IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-33 levels in the asthmatic and healthy airways during a rhinovirus infection. Additionally, we cultured human T cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) with the supernatants of rhinovirus-infected bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) to assess type 2 cytokine production in the presence or absence of IL-33 receptor blockade. Measurements and Main Results: IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-33 are all induced by rhinovirus in the asthmatic airway in vivo and relate to exacerbation severity. Further, induction of IL-33 correlates with viral load and IL-5 and IL-13 levels. Rhinovirus infection of human primary BECs induced IL-33, and culture of human T cells and ILC2s with supernatants of rhinovirus-infected BECs strongly induced type 2 cytokines. This induction was entirely dependent on IL-33. Conclusions: IL-33 and type 2 cytokines are induced during a rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbation in vivo. Virus-induced IL-33 and IL-33–responsive T cells and ILC2s are key mechanistic links between viral infection and exacerbation of asthma. IL-33 inhibition is a novel therapeutic approach for asthma exacerbations. PMID:25350863

  7. Nuclear DNA changes, genome differentiation and evolution in Nicotiana ( Solanaceae )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. K. J. Narayan

    1987-01-01

    A survey of 51 species fromNicotiana subgg.Tabacum, Rustica andPetunioides has shown that evolution was accompanied by a five-fold variation in nuclear DNA amounts. This variation, however, was not directly correlated with the changes in chromosome number. Drastic rearrangement of karyotypes is characteristic for the evolution ofNicotiana spp. Significant gain or loss in nuclear DNA has often accompanied such changes, but

  8. Small inverted repeats drive mitochondrial genome evolution in Lake Baikal sponges.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Dennis V; Maikova, Olga O; Pett, Walker; Belikov, Sergey I

    2012-08-15

    Demosponges, the largest and most diverse class in the phylum Porifera, possess mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markedly different from that in other animals. Although several studies investigated evolution of demosponge mtDNA among major lineages of the group, the changes within these groups remain largely unexplored. Recently we determined mitochondrial genomic sequence of the Lake Baikal sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis and described proliferation of small inverted repeats (hairpins) that occurred in it since the divergence between L. baicalensis and the most closely related cosmopolitan freshwater sponge Ephydatia muelleri. Here we report mitochondrial genomes of three additional species of Lake Baikal sponges: Swartschewskia papyracea, Rezinkovia echinata and Baikalospongia intermedia morpha profundalis (Demospongiae, Haplosclerida, Lubomirskiidae) and from a more distantly related freshwater sponge Corvomeyenia sp. (Demospongiae, Haplosclerida, Metaniidae). We use these additional sequences to explore mtDNA evolution in Baikalian sponges, paying particular attention to the variation in the rates of nucleotide substitutions and the distribution of hairpins, abundant in these genomes. We show that most of the changes in Lubomirskiidae mitochondrial genomes are due to insertion/deletion/duplication of these elements rather than single nucleotide substitutions. Thus inverted repeats can act as an important force in evolution of mitochondrial genome architecture and be a valuable marker for population- and species-level studies in this group. In addition, we infer (((Rezinkovia+Lubomirskia)+Swartschewskia)+Baikalospongia) phylogeny for the family Lubomirskiidae based on the analysis of mitochondrial coding sequences from freshwater sponges. PMID:22669046

  9. Genomics of rapid adaptation to antibiotics: convergent evolution and scalable sequence amplification.

    PubMed

    Laehnemann, David; Peña-Miller, Rafael; Rosenstiel, Philip; Beardmore, Robert; Jansen, Gunther; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2014-06-01

    Evolutionary adaptation can be extremely fast, especially in response to high selection intensities. A prime example is the surge of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The genomic underpinnings of such rapid changes may provide information on the genetic processes that enhance fast responses and the particular trait functions under selection. Here, we use experimentally evolved Escherichia coli for a detailed dissection of the genomics of rapid antibiotic resistance evolution. Our new analyses demonstrate that amplification of a sequence region containing several known antibiotic resistance genes represents a fast genomic response mechanism under high antibiotic stress, here exerted by drug combination. In particular, higher dosage of such antibiotic combinations coincided with higher copy number of the sequence region. The amplification appears to be evolutionarily costly, because amplification levels rapidly dropped after removal of the drugs. Our results suggest that amplification is a scalable process, as copy number rapidly changes in response to the selective pressure encountered. Moreover, repeated patterns of convergent evolution were found across the experimentally evolved bacterial populations, including those with lower antibiotic selection intensities. Intriguingly, convergent evolution was identified on different organizational levels, ranging from the above sequence amplification, high variant frequencies in specific genes, prevalence of individual nonsynonymous mutations to the unusual repeated occurrence of a particular synonymous mutation in Glycine codons. We conclude that constrained evolutionary trajectories underlie rapid adaptation to antibiotics. Of the identified genomic changes, sequence amplification seems to represent the most potent, albeit costly genomic response mechanism to high antibiotic stress. PMID:24850796

  10. Strain-specific genes of Helicobacter pylori: genome evolution driven by a novel type IV secretion system and genomic island transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Wolfgang; Windhager, Lukas; Rohrer, Stefanie; Zeiller, Matthias; Karnholz, Arno; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Zimmer, Ralf; Haas, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    The availability of multiple bacterial genome sequences has revealed a surprising extent of variability among strains of the same species. The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is known as one of the most genetically diverse species. We have compared the genome sequence of the duodenal ulcer strain P12 and six other H. pylori genomes to elucidate the genetic repertoire and genome evolution mechanisms of this species. In agreement with previous findings, we estimate that the core genome comprises about 1200 genes and that H. pylori possesses an open pan-genome. Strain-specific genes are preferentially located at potential genome rearrangement sites or in distinct plasticity zones, suggesting two different mechanisms of genome evolution. The P12 genome contains three plasticity zones, two of which encode type IV secretion systems and have typical features of genomic islands. We demonstrate for the first time that one of these islands is capable of self-excision and horizontal transfer by a conjugative process. We also show that excision is mediated by a protein of the XerD family of tyrosine recombinases. Thus, in addition to its natural transformation competence, conjugative transfer of genomic islands has to be considered as an important source of genetic diversity in H. pylori. PMID:20478826

  11. Lotus japonicusandMedicago truncatulaLegume genome evolution viewed through the Bruce A. Roe, Christopher D. Town, Satoshi Tabata, Yves Van de Peer, and Nevin D. Young

    E-print Network

    Gent, Universiteit

    genomes Lotus japonicusandMedicago truncatulaLegume genome evolution viewed through the Bruce A.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes: #12;Legume genome evolution viewed through the Medicago truncatula and Lotus for review April 20, 2006) Genome sequencing of the model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus

  12. Whole-genome, deep pyrosequencing analysis of a duck influenza A virus evolution in swine cells

    E-print Network

    Bourret, Vincent; Croville, Guillaumec; Mariette, Jérôme; Klopp, Christophe; Bouchez, Olivier; Tiley, Laurence; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2013-05-07

    We studied the sub-population level evolution of a duck influenza A virus isolate during passage in swine tracheal cells. The complete genomes of the A/mallard/Netherlands/10-Nmkt/1999 strain and its swine cell-passaged descendent were analysed...

  13. Insights into the Evolution of Vitamin B12 Auxotrophy from Sequenced Algal Genomes

    E-print Network

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    Insights into the Evolution of Vitamin B12 Auxotrophy from Sequenced Algal Genomes Katherine E Abstract Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is a dietary requirement for humans because it is an essential cofactor microalgal species need the vitamin as a growth supplement, but there is no phylogenetic relationship between

  14. The Compositional Evolution of the Murid Genome Nick G.C. Smith,1

    E-print Network

    Eyre-Walker, Adam

    The Compositional Evolution of the Murid Genome Nick G.C. Smith,1 Adam Eyre-Walker2 1 Department-Walker 1999; Smith and Eyre- Walker 2001). Given that the GC content of protein- coding genes is highly polymorphism data fromCorrespondence to: Nick Smith; email: nick.smith@ebc.uu.se J Mol Evol (2002) 55

  15. Simulating Genomes and Populations in the Mutation Space: An example with the evolution of HIV drug

    E-print Network

    Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio

    of effective population size for HIV-1 but this will depend on the specific process of interest under study- 1 - Simulating Genomes and Populations in the Mutation Space: An example with the evolution When simulating biological populations under different evolutionary genetic models, backward or forward

  16. The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system

    E-print Network

    Dalang, Robert C.

    The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system Freek, and approved October 22, 2013 (received for review August 2, 2013) Snakes are limbless predators, and many species use venom to help overpower relatively large, agile prey. Snake venoms are complex protein

  17. Genomics and early cellular evolution. The origin of the DNA world

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Forterre

    2001-01-01

    The sequencing of several genomes from each of the three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya) has provided a huge amount of data that can be used to gain insight about early cellular evolution. Some features of the universal tree of life based on rRNA polygenies have been confirmed, such as the division of the cellular living world into

  18. Genomes & Developmental Control Med-type GATA factors and the evolution of mesendoderm

    E-print Network

    Maduro, Morris F.

    Genomes & Developmental Control Med-type GATA factors and the evolution of mesendoderm. elegans, the divergent GATA-type transcription factors MED-1 and MED-2 are encoded by an unlinked that is not expected from the resemblance of its single C4-type zinc finger to those of other known GATA factors, which

  19. Recapitulating the evolution of Afrotheria: 57 genes and rare genomic changes (RGCs) consolidate their history

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Poulakakis; A. Stamatakis

    2010-01-01

    The decipherment of higher level relationships among the orders of Afrotheria – an extraordinary assumption in mammalian evolution – constitutes one of the major disputes in the evolutionary history of mammals. Recent comprehensive studies of various genomic data, including mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences, chromosomal syntenic associations and retroposon insertions support strongly the monophyly of Afrotheria. However, the relationships within

  20. Evolution of Genomic Imprinting with Biparental Care: Implications for Prader-Willi and Angelman Syndromes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisco Úbeda

    2008-01-01

    The term “imprinted gene” refers to genes whose expression is conditioned by their parental origin. Among theories to unravel the evolution of genomic imprinting, the kinship theory prevails as the most widely accepted, because it sheds light on many aspects of the biology of imprinted genes. While most assumptions underlying this theory have not escaped scrutiny, one remains overlooked: mothers

  1. A Genomic Approach to Examine the Complex Evolution of Laurasiatherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hallström, Björn M.; Schneider, Adrian; Zoller, Stefan; Janke, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Recent phylogenomic studies have failed to conclusively resolve certain branches of the placental mammalian tree, despite the evolutionary analysis of genomic data from 32 species. Previous analyses of single genes and retroposon insertion data yielded support for different phylogenetic scenarios for the most basal divergences. The results indicated that some mammalian divergences were best interpreted not as a single bifurcating tree, but as an evolutionary network. In these studies the relationships among some orders of the super-clade Laurasiatheria were poorly supported, albeit not studied in detail. Therefore, 4775 protein-coding genes (6,196,263 nucleotides) were collected and aligned in order to analyze the evolution of this clade. Additionally, over 200,000 introns were screened in silico, resulting in 32 phylogenetically informative long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE) insertion events. The present study shows that the genome evolution of Laurasiatheria may best be understood as an evolutionary network. Thus, contrary to the common expectation to resolve major evolutionary events as a bifurcating tree, genome analyses unveil complex speciation processes even in deep mammalian divergences. We exemplify this on a subset of 1159 suitable genes that have individual histories, most likely due to incomplete lineage sorting or introgression, processes that can make the genealogy of mammalian genomes complex. These unexpected results have major implications for the understanding of evolution in general, because the evolution of even some higher level taxa such as mammalian orders may sometimes not be interpreted as a simple bifurcating pattern. PMID:22164244

  2. Snake mitochondrial genomes: phylogenetic relationships and implications of extended taxon sampling for interpretations of mitogenomic evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Desirée A Douglas; David J Gower

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Snake mitochondrial genomes are of great interest in understanding mitogenomic evolution because of gene duplications and rearrangements and the fast evolutionary rate of their genes compared to other vertebrates. Mitochondrial gene sequences have also played an important role in attempts to resolve the contentious phylogenetic relationships of especially the early divergences among alethinophidian snakes. Two recent innovative studies found

  3. Gibbon genome and the fast karyotype evolution of small apes.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Lucia; Harris, R Alan; Gnerre, Sante; Veeramah, Krishna R; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Huddleston, John; Meyer, Thomas J; Herrero, Javier; Roos, Christian; Aken, Bronwen; Anaclerio, Fabio; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Baker, Carl; Barrell, Daniel; Batzer, Mark A; Beal, Kathryn; Blancher, Antoine; Bohrson, Craig L; Brameier, Markus; Campbell, Michael S; Capozzi, Oronzo; Casola, Claudio; Chiatante, Giorgia; Cree, Andrew; Damert, Annette; de Jong, Pieter J; Dumas, Laura; Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos; Flicek, Paul; Fuchs, Nina V; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Hahn, Matthew W; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Hillier, LaDeana W; Hubley, Robert; Ianc, Bianca; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Jablonski, Nina G; Johnstone, Laurel M; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Konkel, Miriam K; Kostka, Dennis; Lazar, Nathan H; Lee, Sandra L; Lewis, Lora R; Liu, Yue; Locke, Devin P; Mallick, Swapan; Mendez, Fernando L; Muffato, Matthieu; Nazareth, Lynne V; Nevonen, Kimberly A; O'Bleness, Majesta; Ochis, Cornelia; Odom, Duncan T; Pollard, Katherine S; Quilez, Javier; Reich, David; Rocchi, Mariano; Schumann, Gerald G; Searle, Stephen; Sikela, James M; Skollar, Gabriella; Smit, Arian; Sonmez, Kemal; ten Hallers, Boudewijn; Terhune, Elizabeth; Thomas, Gregg W C; Ullmer, Brygg; Ventura, Mario; Walker, Jerilyn A; Wall, Jeffrey D; Walter, Lutz; Ward, Michelle C; Wheelan, Sarah J; Whelan, Christopher W; White, Simon; Wilhelm, Larry J; Woerner, August E; Yandell, Mark; Zhu, Baoli; Hammer, Michael F; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E; Fulton, Lucinda; Fronick, Catrina; Muzny, Donna M; Warren, Wesley C; Worley, Kim C; Rogers, Jeffrey; Wilson, Richard K; Gibbs, Richard A

    2014-09-11

    Gibbons are small arboreal apes that display an accelerated rate of evolutionary chromosomal rearrangement and occupy a key node in the primate phylogeny between Old World monkeys and great apes. Here we present the assembly and analysis of a northern white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys) genome. We describe the propensity for a gibbon-specific retrotransposon (LAVA) to insert into chromosome segregation genes and alter transcription by providing a premature termination site, suggesting a possible molecular mechanism for the genome plasticity of the gibbon lineage. We further show that the gibbon genera (Nomascus, Hylobates, Hoolock and Symphalangus) experienced a near-instantaneous radiation ?5 million years ago, coincident with major geographical changes in southeast Asia that caused cycles of habitat compression and expansion. Finally, we identify signatures of positive selection in genes important for forelimb development (TBX5) and connective tissues (COL1A1) that may have been involved in the adaptation of gibbons to their arboreal habitat. PMID:25209798

  4. Short-term genome evolution of Listeria monocytogenes in a non-controlled environment

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Renato H; Borowsky, Mark L; Lauer, Peter; Young, Sarah K; Nusbaum, Chad; Galagan, James E; Birren, Bruce W; Ivy, Reid A; Sun, Qi; Graves, Lewis M; Swaminathan, Bala; Wiedmann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Background While increasing data on bacterial evolution in controlled environments are available, our understanding of bacterial genome evolution in natural environments is limited. We thus performed full genome analyses on four Listeria monocytogenes, including human and food isolates from both a 1988 case of sporadic listeriosis and a 2000 listeriosis outbreak, which had been linked to contaminated food from a single processing facility. All four isolates had been shown to have identical subtypes, suggesting that a specific L. monocytogenes strain persisted in this processing plant over at least 12 years. While a genome sequence for the 1988 food isolate has been reported, we sequenced the genomes of the 1988 human isolate as well as a human and a food isolate from the 2000 outbreak to allow for comparative genome analyses. Results The two L. monocytogenes isolates from 1988 and the two isolates from 2000 had highly similar genome backbone sequences with very few single nucleotide (nt) polymorphisms (1 – 8 SNPs/isolate; confirmed by re-sequencing). While no genome rearrangements were identified in the backbone genome of the four isolates, a 42 kb prophage inserted in the chromosomal comK gene showed evidence for major genome rearrangements. The human-food isolate pair from each 1988 and 2000 had identical prophage sequence; however, there were significant differences in the prophage sequences between the 1988 and 2000 isolates. Diversification of this prophage appears to have been caused by multiple homologous recombination events or possibly prophage replacement. In addition, only the 2000 human isolate contained a plasmid, suggesting plasmid loss or acquisition events. Surprisingly, besides the polymorphisms found in the comK prophage, a single SNP in the tRNA Thr-4 prophage represents the only SNP that differentiates the 1988 isolates from the 2000 isolates. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that the 2000 human listeriosis outbreak was caused by a L. monocytogenes strain that persisted in a food processing facility over 12 years and show that genome sequencing is a valuable and feasible tool for retrospective epidemiological analyses. Short-term evolution of L. monocytogenes in non-controlled environments appears to involve limited diversification beyond plasmid gain or loss and prophage diversification, highlighting the importance of phages in bacterial evolution. PMID:19014550

  5. Spatial and temporal diversity in genomic instability processes defines lung cancer evolution.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Elza C; McGranahan, Nicholas; Mitter, Richard; Salm, Max; Wedge, David C; Yates, Lucy; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Rowan, Andrew J; Grönroos, Eva; Muhammad, Madiha A; Horswell, Stuart; Gerlinger, Marco; Varela, Ignacio; Jones, David; Marshall, John; Voet, Thierry; Van Loo, Peter; Rassl, Doris M; Rintoul, Robert C; Janes, Sam M; Lee, Siow-Ming; Forster, Martin; Ahmad, Tanya; Lawrence, David; Falzon, Mary; Capitanio, Arrigo; Harkins, Timothy T; Lee, Clarence C; Tom, Warren; Teefe, Enock; Chen, Shann-Ching; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Phillimore, Benjamin; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Stamp, Gordon; Szallasi, Zoltan; Matthews, Nik; Stewart, Aengus; Campbell, Peter; Swanton, Charles

    2014-10-10

    Spatial and temporal dissection of the genomic changes occurring during the evolution of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may help elucidate the basis for its dismal prognosis. We sequenced 25 spatially distinct regions from seven operable NSCLCs and found evidence of branched evolution, with driver mutations arising before and after subclonal diversification. There was pronounced intratumor heterogeneity in copy number alterations, translocations, and mutations associated with APOBEC cytidine deaminase activity. Despite maintained carcinogen exposure, tumors from smokers showed a relative decrease in smoking-related mutations over time, accompanied by an increase in APOBEC-associated mutations. In tumors from former smokers, genome-doubling occurred within a smoking-signature context before subclonal diversification, which suggested that a long period of tumor latency had preceded clinical detection. The regionally separated driver mutations, coupled with the relentless and heterogeneous nature of the genome instability processes, are likely to confound treatment success in NSCLC. PMID:25301630

  6. Phylogeny, Genome, and Karyotype Evolution of Crucifers (Brassicaceae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin A. Lysak; Marcus A. Koch

    \\u000a Brassicaceae (crucifers or the mustard family) is a large plant family comprising over 330 genera and about 3,700 species,\\u000a including several important crop plants (e.g. Brassica species), ornamentals as well as model organisms in the plant sciences (e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana). In recent years, the wealth of Arabidopsis and Brassica genomic resources along with newly established tools and techniques fostered the

  7. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Hornwort Megaceros aenigmaticus Shows a Mixed Mode of Conservative Yet Dynamic Evolution in Early Land Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Libo Li; Bin Wang; Yang Liu; Yin-Long Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Land plants possess some of the most unusual mitochondrial genomes among eukaryotes. However, in early land plants these genomes\\u000a resemble those of green and red algae or early eukaryotes. The question of when during land plant evolution the dramatic change\\u000a in mtDNAs occurred remains unanswered. Here we report the first completely sequenced mitochondrial genome of the hornwort,\\u000a Megaceros aenigmaticus, a

  8. The evolution of genomic imprinting: theories, predictions and empirical tests

    PubMed Central

    Patten, M M; Ross, L; Curley, J P; Queller, D C; Bonduriansky, R; Wolf, J B

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic phenomenon of genomic imprinting has motivated the development of numerous theories for its evolutionary origins and genomic distribution. In this review, we examine the three theories that have best withstood theoretical and empirical scrutiny. These are: Haig and colleagues' kinship theory; Day and Bonduriansky's sexual antagonism theory; and Wolf and Hager's maternal–offspring coadaptation theory. These theories have fundamentally different perspectives on the adaptive significance of imprinting. The kinship theory views imprinting as a mechanism to change gene dosage, with imprinting evolving because of the differential effect that gene dosage has on the fitness of matrilineal and patrilineal relatives. The sexual antagonism and maternal–offspring coadaptation theories view genomic imprinting as a mechanism to modify the resemblance of an individual to its two parents, with imprinting evolving to increase the probability of expressing the fitter of the two alleles at a locus. In an effort to stimulate further empirical work on the topic, we carefully detail the logic and assumptions of all three theories, clarify the specific predictions of each and suggest tests to discriminate between these alternative theories for why particular genes are imprinted. PMID:24755983

  9. Homoploid hybrid speciation and genome evolution via chromosome sorting.

    PubMed

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A; Shapoval, Nazar A; Anokhin, Boris A; Saifitdinova, Alsu F; Kuznetsova, Valentina G

    2015-05-22

    Genomes of numerous diploid plant and animal species possess traces of interspecific crosses, and many researches consider them as support for homoploid hybrid speciation (HHS), a process by which a new reproductively isolated species arises through hybridization and combination of parts of the parental genomes, but without an increase in ploidy. However, convincing evidence for a creative role of hybridization in the origin of reproductive isolation between hybrid and parental forms is extremely limited. Here, through studying Agrodiaetus butterflies, we provide proof of a previously unknown mode of HHS based on the formation of post-zygotic reproductive isolation via hybridization of chromosomally divergent parental species and subsequent fixation of a novel combination of chromosome fusions/fissions in hybrid descendants. We show that meiotic segregation, operating in the hybrid lineage, resulted in the formation of a new diploid genome, drastically rearranged in terms of chromosome number. We also demonstrate that during the heterozygous stage of the hybrid species formation, recombination was limited between rearranged chromosomes of different parental origin, representing evidence that the reproductive isolation was a direct consequence of hybridization. PMID:25925097

  10. The genome and development-dependent transcriptomes of Pyronema confluens: a window into fungal evolution.

    PubMed

    Traeger, Stefanie; Altegoer, Florian; Freitag, Michael; Gabaldon, Toni; Kempken, Frank; Kumar, Abhishek; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Pöggeler, Stefanie; Stajich, Jason E; Nowrousian, Minou

    2013-01-01

    Fungi are a large group of eukaryotes found in nearly all ecosystems. More than 250 fungal genomes have already been sequenced, greatly improving our understanding of fungal evolution, physiology, and development. However, for the Pezizomycetes, an early-diverging lineage of filamentous ascomycetes, there is so far only one genome available, namely that of the black truffle, Tuber melanosporum, a mycorrhizal species with unusual subterranean fruiting bodies. To help close the sequence gap among basal filamentous ascomycetes, and to allow conclusions about the evolution of fungal development, we sequenced the genome and assayed transcriptomes during development of Pyronema confluens, a saprobic Pezizomycete with a typical apothecium as fruiting body. With a size of 50 Mb and ~13,400 protein-coding genes, the genome is more characteristic of higher filamentous ascomycetes than the large, repeat-rich truffle genome; however, some typical features are different in the P. confluens lineage, e.g. the genomic environment of the mating type genes that is conserved in higher filamentous ascomycetes, but only partly conserved in P. confluens. On the other hand, P. confluens has a full complement of fungal photoreceptors, and expression studies indicate that light perception might be similar to distantly related ascomycetes and, thus, represent a basic feature of filamentous ascomycetes. Analysis of spliced RNA-seq sequence reads allowed the detection of natural antisense transcripts for 281 genes. The P. confluens genome contains an unusually high number of predicted orphan genes, many of which are upregulated during sexual development, consistent with the idea of rapid evolution of sex-associated genes. Comparative transcriptomics identified the transcription factor gene pro44 that is upregulated during development in P. confluens and the Sordariomycete Sordaria macrospora. The P. confluens pro44 gene (PCON_06721) was used to complement the S. macrospora pro44 deletion mutant, showing functional conservation of this developmental regulator. PMID:24068976

  11. The Genome and Development-Dependent Transcriptomes of Pyronema confluens: A Window into Fungal Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Traeger, Stefanie; Altegoer, Florian; Freitag, Michael; Gabaldon, Toni; Kempken, Frank; Kumar, Abhishek; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Pöggeler, Stefanie; Stajich, Jason E.; Nowrousian, Minou

    2013-01-01

    Fungi are a large group of eukaryotes found in nearly all ecosystems. More than 250 fungal genomes have already been sequenced, greatly improving our understanding of fungal evolution, physiology, and development. However, for the Pezizomycetes, an early-diverging lineage of filamentous ascomycetes, there is so far only one genome available, namely that of the black truffle, Tuber melanosporum, a mycorrhizal species with unusual subterranean fruiting bodies. To help close the sequence gap among basal filamentous ascomycetes, and to allow conclusions about the evolution of fungal development, we sequenced the genome and assayed transcriptomes during development of Pyronema confluens, a saprobic Pezizomycete with a typical apothecium as fruiting body. With a size of 50 Mb and ?13,400 protein-coding genes, the genome is more characteristic of higher filamentous ascomycetes than the large, repeat-rich truffle genome; however, some typical features are different in the P. confluens lineage, e.g. the genomic environment of the mating type genes that is conserved in higher filamentous ascomycetes, but only partly conserved in P. confluens. On the other hand, P. confluens has a full complement of fungal photoreceptors, and expression studies indicate that light perception might be similar to distantly related ascomycetes and, thus, represent a basic feature of filamentous ascomycetes. Analysis of spliced RNA-seq sequence reads allowed the detection of natural antisense transcripts for 281 genes. The P. confluens genome contains an unusually high number of predicted orphan genes, many of which are upregulated during sexual development, consistent with the idea of rapid evolution of sex-associated genes. Comparative transcriptomics identified the transcription factor gene pro44 that is upregulated during development in P. confluens and the Sordariomycete Sordaria macrospora. The P. confluens pro44 gene (PCON_06721) was used to complement the S. macrospora pro44 deletion mutant, showing functional conservation of this developmental regulator. PMID:24068976

  12. Genome sequence of mungbean and insights into evolution within Vigna species.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Jae; Kim, Sue K; Kim, Moon Young; Lestari, Puji; Kim, Kil Hyun; Ha, Bo-Keun; Jun, Tae Hwan; Hwang, Won Joo; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Shim, Sangrea; Yoon, Min Young; Jang, Young Eun; Han, Kwang Soo; Taeprayoon, Puntaree; Yoon, Na; Somta, Prakit; Tanya, Patcharin; Kim, Kwang Soo; Gwag, Jae-Gyun; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Lee, Yeong-Ho; Park, Beom-Seok; Bombarely, Aureliano; Doyle, Jeffrey J; Jackson, Scott A; Schafleitner, Roland; Srinives, Peerasak; Varshney, Rajeev K; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata) is a fast-growing, warm-season legume crop that is primarily cultivated in developing countries of Asia. Here we construct a draft genome sequence of mungbean to facilitate genome research into the subgenus Ceratotropis, which includes several important dietary legumes in Asia, and to enable a better understanding of the evolution of leguminous species. Based on the de novo assembly of additional wild mungbean species, the divergence of what was eventually domesticated and the sampled wild mungbean species appears to have predated domestication. Moreover, the de novo assembly of a tetraploid Vigna species (V. reflexo-pilosa var. glabra) provides genomic evidence of a recent allopolyploid event. The species tree is constructed using de novo RNA-seq assemblies of 22 accessions of 18 Vigna species and protein sets of Glycine max. The present assembly of V. radiata var. radiata will facilitate genome research and accelerate molecular breeding of the subgenus Ceratotropis. PMID:25384727

  13. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of Plasmid Rts1: Implications for Evolution of Large Plasmid Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Takahiro; Ohnishi, Makoto; Ara, Takeshi; Kaneko, Jun; Han, Chang-Gyun; Fang Li, Yong; Takashima, Kayoko; Nojima, Hideaki; Nakayama, Keisuke; Kaji, Akira; Kamio, Yoshiyuki; Miki, Takeyoshi; Mori, Hirotada; Ohtsubo, Eiichi; Terawaki, Yoshiro; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2002-01-01

    Rts1, a large conjugative plasmid originally isolated from Proteus vulgaris, is a prototype for the IncT plasmids and exhibits pleiotropic thermosensitive phenotypes. Here we report the complete nucleotide sequence of Rts1. The genome is 217,182 bp in length and contains 300 potential open reading frames (ORFs). Among these, the products of 141 ORFs, including 9 previously identified genes, displayed significant sequence similarity to known proteins. The set of genes responsible for the conjugation function of Rts1 has been identified. A broad array of genes related to diverse processes of DNA metabolism were also identified. Of particular interest was the presence of tus-like genes that could be involved in replication termination. Inspection of the overall genome organization revealed that the Rts1 genome is composed of four large modules, providing an example of modular evolution of plasmid genomes. PMID:12029035

  14. Genome sequence of mungbean and insights into evolution within Vigna species

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yang Jae; Kim, Sue K.; Kim, Moon Young; Lestari, Puji; Kim, Kil Hyun; Ha, Bo-Keun; Jun, Tae Hwan; Hwang, Won Joo; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Shim, Sangrea; Yoon, Min Young; Jang, Young Eun; Han, Kwang Soo; Taeprayoon, Puntaree; Yoon, Na; Somta, Prakit; Tanya, Patcharin; Kim, Kwang Soo; Gwag, Jae-Gyun; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Lee, Yeong-Ho; Park, Beom-Seok; Bombarely, Aureliano; Doyle, Jeffrey J.; Jackson, Scott A.; Schafleitner, Roland; Srinives, Peerasak; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata) is a fast-growing, warm-season legume crop that is primarily cultivated in developing countries of Asia. Here we construct a draft genome sequence of mungbean to facilitate genome research into the subgenus Ceratotropis, which includes several important dietary legumes in Asia, and to enable a better understanding of the evolution of leguminous species. Based on the de novo assembly of additional wild mungbean species, the divergence of what was eventually domesticated and the sampled wild mungbean species appears to have predated domestication. Moreover, the de novo assembly of a tetraploid Vigna species (V. reflexo-pilosa var. glabra) provides genomic evidence of a recent allopolyploid event. The species tree is constructed using de novo RNA-seq assemblies of 22 accessions of 18 Vigna species and protein sets of Glycine max. The present assembly of V. radiata var. radiata will facilitate genome research and accelerate molecular breeding of the subgenus Ceratotropis. PMID:25384727

  15. Rhinovirus-associated wheeze during infancy and asthma development

    PubMed Central

    Jartti, Tuomas; Gern, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Rhinovirus is commonly associated with bronchiolitis - only second to RSV during the first year life. The prevalence of HRV-bronchiolitis may be very high in predisposed infants. HRV diagnosis is almost exclusively based on PCR, which detects respiratory infections with or without symptoms. Two immunologic factors, interferon responses and atopy, have been associated with susceptibility to HRV-bronchiolitis in multiple studies. The current data supports the hypothesis that susceptibility to HRV-bronchiolitis is likely to be an early manifestation of biased immune responses, which are linked to both decreased viral defence and atopic airway inflammation. Prospective studies have consistently shown that early wheezing associated with HRV infection is closely associated with recurrent wheezing and the development of asthma in children. Collectively, these studies suggest that HRV infection in wheezing children could serve as a clinically useful marker for early identification of asthma prone children. The findings to date provide the rationale for future studies to incorporate rhinovirus illnesses into asthma risk indices. PMID:23066381

  16. The Evolution and Functional Impact of Human Deletion Variants Shared with Archaic Hominin Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Lung; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Karakoc, Emre; Ajay, Jerry; Gokcumen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Allele sharing between modern and archaic hominin genomes has been variously interpreted to have originated from ancestral genetic structure or through non-African introgression from archaic hominins. However, evolution of polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes has yet to be studied. We identified 427 polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, approximately 87% of which originated before the Human–Neandertal divergence (ancient) and only approximately 9% of which have been introgressed from Neandertals (introgressed). Recurrence, incomplete lineage sorting between human and chimp lineages, and hominid-specific insertions constitute the remaining approximately 4% of allele sharing between humans and archaic hominins. We observed that ancient deletions correspond to more than 13% of all common (>5% allele frequency) deletion variation among modern humans. Our analyses indicate that the genomic landscapes of both ancient and introgressed deletion variants were primarily shaped by purifying selection, eliminating large and exonic variants. We found 17 exonic deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, including those leading to three fusion transcripts. The affected genes are involved in metabolism of external and internal compounds, growth and sperm formation, as well as susceptibility to psoriasis and Crohn’s disease. Our analyses suggest that these “exonic” deletion variants have evolved through different adaptive forces, including balancing and population-specific positive selection. Our findings reveal that genomic structural variants that are shared between humans and archaic hominin genomes are common among modern humans and can influence biomedically and evolutionarily important phenotypes. PMID:25556237

  17. A Twenty-First Century View of Evolution: Genome System Architecture, Repetitive DNA, and Natural Genetic Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, James A.

    It is essential for nonbiologists to understand that evolutionary theory based on random mutation of autonomous genes is far from the last word on how genomes have changed in the course of biological evolution. The last 50 years of molecular genetics have produced an abundance of new discoveries and data that make it useful to revisit some basic concepts and assumptions in our thinking about genomes and evolution. Chief among these observations are the complex modularity of genome organization, the biological ubiquity of mobile and repetitive DNA sequences, and the fundamental importance of DNA rearrangements in the evolution of sequenced genomes. This review will take a broad overview of these developments and suggest some new ways of thinking about genomes as sophisticated informatic storage systems and about evolution as a systems engineering process.

  18. Modeling of the human rhinovirus C capsid suggests possible causes for antiviral drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Holly A.; Ashraf, Shamaila; Sgro, Jean-Yves; Bochkov, Yury A.; Gern, James E.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses of the RV-C species are recently discovered pathogens with greater clinical significance than isolates in the RV-A+B species. The RV-C cannot be propagated in typical culture systems; so much of the virology is necessarily derivative, relying on comparative genomics, relative to the better studied RV-A+B. We developed a bioinformatics-based structural model for a C15 isolate. The model showed the VP1–3 capsid proteins retain their fundamental cores relative to the RV-A+B, but conserved, internal RV-C residues affect the shape and charge of the VP1 hydrophobic pocket that confers antiviral drug susceptibility. When predictions of the model were tested in organ cultures or ALI systems with recombinant C15 virus, there was a resistance to capsid-binding drugs, including pleconaril, BTA-188, WIN56291, WIN52035 and WIN52084. Unique to all RV-C, the model predicts conserved amino acids within the pocket and capsid surface pore leading to the pocket may correlate with this activity. PMID:24314639

  19. An Orally Available 3-Ethoxybenzisoxazole Capsid Binder with Clinical Activity against Human Rhinovirus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory infections caused by human rhinovirus are responsible for severe exacerbations of underlying clinical conditions such as asthma in addition to their economic cost in terms of lost working days due to illness. While several antiviral compounds for treating rhinoviral infections have been discovered, none have succeeded, to date, in reaching approval for clinical use. We have developed a potent, orally available rhinovirus inhibitor 6 that has progressed through early clinical trials. The compound shows favorable pharmacokinetic and activity profiles and has a confirmed mechanism of action through crystallographic studies of a rhinovirus?compound complex. The compound has now progressed to phase IIb clinical studies of its effect on natural rhinovirus infection in humans. PMID:24900468

  20. Evolution of a morphological novelty occurred before genome compaction in a lineage of extreme parasites

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Karen L.; James, Timothy Y.; Pombert, Jean-François; Larsson, Ronny; Schaer, Tobias M. M.; Refardt, Dominik; Ebert, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular parasitism results in extreme adaptations, whose evolutionary history is difficult to understand, because the parasites and their known free-living relatives are so divergent from one another. Microsporidia are intracellular parasites of humans and other animals, which evolved highly specialized morphological structures, but also extreme physiologic and genomic simplification. They are suggested to be an early-diverging branch on the fungal tree, but comparisons to other species are difficult because their rates of molecular evolution are exceptionally high. Mitochondria in microsporidia have degenerated into organelles called mitosomes, which have lost a genome and the ability to produce ATP. Here we describe a gut parasite of the crustacean Daphnia that despite having remarkable morphological similarity to the microsporidia, has retained genomic features of its fungal ancestors. This parasite, which we name Mitosporidium daphniae gen. et sp. nov., possesses a mitochondrial genome including genes for oxidative phosphorylation, yet a spore stage with a highly specialized infection apparatus—the polar tube—uniquely known only from microsporidia. Phylogenomics places M. daphniae at the root of the microsporidia. A comparative genomic analysis suggests that the reduction in energy metabolism, a prominent feature of microsporidian evolution, was preceded by a reduction in the machinery controlling cell cycle, DNA recombination, repair, and gene expression. These data show that the morphological features unique to M. daphniae and other microsporidia were already present before the lineage evolved the extreme host metabolic dependence and loss of mitochondrial respiration for which microsporidia are well known. PMID:25313038

  1. Insights on genome size evolution from a miniature inverted repeat transposon driving a satellite DNA.

    PubMed

    Scalvenzi, Thibault; Pollet, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    The genome size in eukaryotes does not correlate well with the number of genes they contain. We can observe this so-called C-value paradox in amphibian species. By analyzing an amphibian genome we asked how repetitive DNA can impact genome size and architecture. We describe here our discovery of a Tc1/mariner miniature inverted-repeat transposon family present in Xenopus frogs. These transposons named miDNA4 are unique since they contain a satellite DNA motif. We found that miDNA4 measured 331 bp, contained 25 bp long inverted terminal repeat sequences and a sequence motif of 119 bp present as a unique copy or as an array of 2-47 copies. We characterized the structure, dynamics, impact and evolution of the miDNA4 family and its satellite DNA in Xenopus frog genomes. This led us to propose a model for the evolution of these two repeated sequences and how they can synergize to increase genome size. PMID:25193611

  2. Identification, Diversity and Evolution of MITEs in the Genomes of Microsporidian Nosema Parasites.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Ma, Zhenggang; Dang, Xiaoqun; Xu, Jinshan; Zhou, Zeyang

    2015-01-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are short, non-autonomous DNA transposons, which are widespread in most eukaryotic genomes. However, genome-wide identification, origin and evolution of MITEs remain largely obscure in microsporidia. In this study, we investigated structural features for de novo identification of MITEs in genomes of silkworm microsporidia Nosema bombycis and Nosema antheraeae, as well as a honeybee microsporidia Nosema ceranae. A total of 1490, 149 and 83 MITE-related sequences from 89, 17 and five families, respectively, were found in the genomes of the above-mentioned species. Species-specific MITEs are predominant in each genome of microsporidian Nosema, with the exception of three MITE families that were shared by N. bombycis and N. antheraeae. One or multiple rounds of amplification occurred for MITEs in N. bombycis after divergence between N. bombycis and the other two species, suggesting that the more abundant families in N. bombycis could be attributed to the recent amplification of new MITEs. Significantly, some MITEs that inserted into the homologous protein-coding region of N. bombycis were recruited as introns, indicating that gene expansion occurred during the evolution of microsporidia. NbS31 and NbS24 had polymorphisms in different geographical strains of N. bombycis, indicating that they could still be active. In addition, several small RNAs in the MITEs in N. bombycis are mainly produced from both ends of the MITEs sequence. PMID:25898273

  3. Correlated evolution of LTR retrotransposons and genome size in the genus eleocharis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transposable elements (TEs) are considered to be an important source of genome size variation and genetic and phenotypic plasticity in eukaryotes. Most of our knowledge about TEs comes from large genomic projects and studies focused on model organisms. However, TE dynamics among related taxa from natural populations and the role of TEs at the species or supra-species level, where genome size and karyotype evolution are modulated in concert with polyploidy and chromosomal rearrangements, remain poorly understood. We focused on the holokinetic genus Eleocharis (Cyperaceae), which displays large variation in genome size and the occurrence of polyploidy and agmatoploidy/symploidy. We analyzed and quantified the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons Ty1-copia and Ty3-gypsy in relation to changes in both genome size and karyotype in Eleocharis. We also examined how this relationship is reflected in the phylogeny of Eleocharis. Results Using flow cytometry, we measured the genome sizes of members of the genus Eleocharis (Cyperaceae). We found positive correlation between the independent phylogenetic contrasts of genome size and chromosome number in Eleocharis. We analyzed PCR-amplified sequences of various reverse transcriptases of the LTR retrotransposons Ty1-copia and Ty3-gypsy (762 sequences in total). Using real-time PCR and dot blot approaches, we quantified the densities of Ty1-copia and Ty3-gypsy within the genomes of the analyzed species. We detected an increasing density of Ty1-copia elements in evolutionarily younger Eleocharis species and found a positive correlation between Ty1-copia densities and C/n-values (an alternative measure of monoploid genome size) in the genus phylogeny. In addition, our analysis of Ty1-copia sequences identified a novel retrotransposon family named Helos1, which is responsible for the increasing density of Ty1-copia. The transition:transversion ratio of Helos1 sequences suggests that Helos1 recently transposed in later-diverging Eleocharis species. Conclusions Using several different approaches, we were able to distinguish between the roles of LTR retrotransposons, polyploidy and agmatoploidy/symploidy in shaping Eleocharis genomes and karyotypes. Our results confirm the occurrence of both polyploidy and agmatoploidy/symploidy in Eleocharis. Additionally, we introduce a new player in the process of genome evolution in holokinetic plants: LTR retrotransposons. PMID:21118487

  4. Massively Convergent Evolution for Ribosomal Protein Gene Content in Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F.; Martin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force. PMID:24259312

  5. Massively convergent evolution for ribosomal protein gene content in plastid and mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F; Martin, William F

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force. PMID:24259312

  6. Outgrowth of the Bacterial Airway Microbiome after Rhinovirus Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molyneaux, Philip L.; Mallia, Patrick; Cox, Michael J.; Footitt, Joseph; Willis-Owen, Saffron A. G.; Homola, Daniel; Trujillo-Torralbo, Maria-Belen; Elkin, Sarah; Kon, Onn Min; Cookson, William O. C.; Johnston, Sebastian L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Rhinovirus infection is followed by significantly increased frequencies of positive, potentially pathogenic sputum cultures in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unclear whether these represent de novo infections or an increased load of organisms from the complex microbial communities (microbiome) in the lower airways. Objectives: To investigate the effect of rhinovirus infection on the airway bacterial microbiome. Methods: Subjects with COPD (n = 14) and healthy control subjects with normal lung function (n = 17) were infected with rhinovirus. Induced sputum was collected at baseline before rhinovirus inoculation and again on Days 5, 15, and 42 after rhinovirus infection and DNA was extracted. The V3–V5 region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified and pyrosequenced, resulting in 370,849 high-quality reads from 112 of the possible 124 time points. Measurements and Main Results: At 15 days after rhinovirus infection, there was a sixfold increase in 16S copy number (P = 0.007) and a 16% rise in numbers of proteobacterial sequences, most notably in potentially pathogenic Haemophilus influenzae (P = 2.7 × 10-20), from a preexisting community. These changes occurred only in the sputum microbiome of subjects with COPD and were still evident 42 days after infection. This was in contrast to the temporal stability demonstrated in the microbiome of healthy smokers and nonsmokers. Conclusions: After rhinovirus infection, there is a rise in bacterial burden and a significant outgrowth of Haemophilus influenzae from the existing microbiota of subjects with COPD. This is not observed in healthy individuals. Our findings suggest that rhinovirus infection in COPD alters the respiratory microbiome and may precipitate secondary bacterial infections. PMID:23992479

  7. Altered exhaled biomarker profiles in children during and after rhinovirus-induced wheeze.

    PubMed

    van der Schee, Marc P; Hashimoto, Simone; Schuurman, Annemarie C; van Driel, Janine S Repelaer; Adriaens, Nora; van Amelsfoort, Romy M; Snoeren, Tessa; Regenboog, Martine; Sprikkelman, Aline B; Haarman, Eric G; van Aalderen, Wim M C; Sterk, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Preschool rhinovirus-induced wheeze is associated with an increased risk of asthma. In adult asthma, exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOC) are associated with inflammatory activity. We therefore hypothesised that acute preschool wheeze is accompanied by a differential profile of exhaled VOC, which is maintained after resolution of symptoms in those children with rhinovirus-induced wheeze. We included 178 children (mean±sd age 22±9 months) from the EUROPA cohort comparing asymptomatic and wheezing children during respiratory symptoms and after recovery. Naso- and oropharyngeal swabs were tested for rhinovirus by quantitative PCR. Breath was collected via a spacer and analysed using an electronic nose. Between-group discrimination was assessed by constructing a 1000-fold cross-validated receiver operating characteristic curve. Analyses were stratified by rhinovirus presence/absence. Wheezing children demonstrated a different VOC profile when compared with asymptomatic children (p<0.001), regardless of the presence (area under the curve (AUC) 0.77, 95% CI 0.07) or absence (AUC 0.81, 95% CI 0.05) of rhinovirus. After symptomatic recovery, discriminative accuracy was maintained in children with rhinovirus-induced wheeze (AUC 0.84, 95% CI 0.06), whereas it dropped significantly in infants with non-rhinovirus-induced wheeze (AUC 0.67, 95% CI 0.06). Exhaled molecular profiles differ between preschool children with and without acute respiratory wheeze. This appears to be sustained in children with rhinovirus-induced wheeze after resolution of symptoms. Therefore, exhaled VOC may qualify as candidate biomarkers for early signs of asthma. PMID:25323245

  8. Evolution of a Pathogen: A Comparative Genomics Analysis Identifies a Genetic Pathway to Pathogenesis in Acinetobacter

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, Jason W.; Gillece, John D.; Schupp, James M.; Waddell, Victor G.; Driebe, Elizabeth M.; Engelthaler, David M.; Keim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emergent and global nosocomial pathogen. In addition to A. baumannii, other Acinetobacter species, especially those in the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, have also been associated with serious human infection. Although mechanisms of attachment, persistence on abiotic surfaces, and pathogenesis in A. baumannii have been identified, the genetic mechanisms that explain the emergence of A. baumannii as the most widespread and virulent Acinetobacter species are not fully understood. Recent whole genome sequencing has provided insight into the phylogenetic structure of the genus Acinetobacter. However, a global comparison of genomic features between Acinetobacter spp. has not been described in the literature. In this study, 136 Acinetobacter genomes, including 67 sequenced in this study, were compared to identify the acquisition and loss of genes in the expansion of the Acinetobacter genus. A whole genome phylogeny confirmed that A. baumannii is a monophyletic clade and that the larger Acb complex is also a well-supported monophyletic group. The whole genome phylogeny provided the framework for a global genomic comparison based on a blast score ratio (BSR) analysis. The BSR analysis demonstrated that specific genes have been both lost and acquired in the evolution of A. baumannii. In addition, several genes associated with A. baumannii pathogenesis were found to be more conserved in the Acb complex, and especially in A. baumannii, than in other Acinetobacter genomes; until recently, a global analysis of the distribution and conservation of virulence factors across the genus was not possible. The results demonstrate that the acquisition of specific virulence factors has likely contributed to the widespread persistence and virulence of A. baumannii. The identification of novel features associated with transcriptional regulation and acquired by clades in the Acb complex presents targets for better understanding the evolution of pathogenesis and virulence in the expansion of the genus. PMID:23365658

  9. Polyploidy in fungi: evolution after whole-genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Albertin, Warren; Marullo, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Polyploidy is a major evolutionary process in eukaryotes—particularly in plants and, to a less extent, in animals, wherein several past and recent whole-genome duplication events have been described. Surprisingly, the incidence of polyploidy in other eukaryote kingdoms, particularly within fungi, remained largely disregarded by the scientific community working on the evolutionary consequences of polyploidy. Recent studies have significantly increased our knowledge of the occurrence and evolutionary significance of fungal polyploidy. The ecological, structural and functional consequences of polyploidy in fungi are reviewed here and compared with the knowledge acquired with conventional plant and animal models. In particular, the genus Saccharomyces emerges as a relevant model for polyploid studies, in addition to plant and animal models. PMID:22492065

  10. Genome of the Rusty Millipede, Trigoniulus corallinus, Illuminates Diplopod, Myriapod, and Arthropod Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Nathan J.; Shen, Xin; Chan, Thomas T.H.; Wong, Nicola W.Y.; Chan, Ting Fung; Chu, Ka Hou; Lam, Hon-Ming; Hui, Jerome H.L.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing availability of genomic information from the Arthropoda continues to revolutionize our understanding of the biology of this most diverse animal phylum. However, our sampling of arthropod diversity remains uneven, and key clade such as the Myriapoda are severely underrepresented. Here we present the genome of the cosmopolitanly distributed Rusty Millipede Trigoniulus corallinus, which represents the first diplopod genome to be published, and the second example from the Myriapoda as a whole. This genomic resource contains the majority of core eukaryotic genes (94.3%), and key transcription factor classes that were thought to be lost in the Ecdysozoa. Mitochondrial genome and gene family (transcription factor, Dscam, circadian clock-driving protein, odorant receptor cassette, bioactive compound, and cuticular protein) analyses were also carried out to shed light on their states in the Diplopoda and Myriapoda. The ready availability of T. corallinus recommends it as a new model for evolutionary developmental biology, and the data set described here will be of widespread utility in investigating myriapod and arthropod genomics and evolution. PMID:25900922

  11. A Possible Role of DNA Superstructures in Genome Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Claudio; de Santis, Pasquale; Paparcone, Raffaella; Savino, Maria; Scipioni, Anita

    2004-02-01

    The concept of DNA as a simple repository of the gene information has changed in that of a polymorphic macromolecule, which plays a relevant part in the management of the complex biochemical transformations in living matter. As a consequence of the slight stereochemical differences between base pairs, the direction of the DNA double helix axis undergoes deterministic writhing. A useful representation of such sequence-dependent structural distortions is the curvature diagram. Here, it is reported as an evolution simulation obtained by extensive point mutations along a biologically important DNA tract. The curvature changes, consequence of the point mutations, were compared to the related experimental gel electrophoresis mobility. The curvature of most mutants decreases and the mobility increases accordingly, suggesting the curvature of that tract is genetically selected. Moreover, DNA images by scanning force microscopy, show evidence of a sequence-dependent adhesion of curved DNA tracts to inorganic crystal surfaces. In particular, mica shows a large affinity towards the TT-rich dinucleotide sequences. This suggests a possible mechanism of selection of curved DNA regions, characterized by AA ? TT dinucleotides in phase with double-helical periodicity, in the very early evolution steps.

  12. Fast Evolution from Precast Bricks: Genomics of Young Freshwater Populations of Threespine Stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus

    PubMed Central

    Terekhanova, Nadezhda V.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Penin, Aleksey A.; Neretina, Tatiana V.; Barmintseva, Anna E.; Bazykin, Georgii A.; Kondrashov, Alexey S.; Mugue, Nikolai S.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation is driven by natural selection; however, many adaptations are caused by weak selection acting over large timescales, complicating its study. Therefore, it is rarely possible to study selection comprehensively in natural environments. The threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is a well-studied model organism with a short generation time, small genome size, and many genetic and genomic tools available. Within this originally marine species, populations have recurrently adapted to freshwater all over its range. This evolution involved extensive parallelism: pre-existing alleles that adapt sticklebacks to freshwater habitats, but are also present at low frequencies in marine populations, have been recruited repeatedly. While a number of genomic regions responsible for this adaptation have been identified, the details of selection remain poorly understood. Using whole-genome resequencing, we compare pooled genomic samples from marine and freshwater populations of the White Sea basin, and identify 19 short genomic regions that are highly divergent between them, including three known inversions. 17 of these regions overlap protein-coding genes, including a number of genes with predicted functions that are relevant for adaptation to the freshwater environment. We then analyze four additional independently derived young freshwater populations of known ages, two natural and two artificially established, and use the observed shifts of allelic frequencies to estimate the strength of positive selection. Adaptation turns out to be quite rapid, indicating strong selection acting simultaneously at multiple regions of the genome, with selection coefficients of up to 0.27. High divergence between marine and freshwater genotypes, lack of reduction in polymorphism in regions responsible for adaptation, and high frequencies of freshwater alleles observed even in young freshwater populations are all consistent with rapid assembly of G. aculeatus freshwater genotypes from pre-existing genomic regions of adaptive variation, with strong selection that favors this assembly acting simultaneously at multiple loci. PMID:25299485

  13. Fast evolution from precast bricks: genomics of young freshwater populations of threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus.

    PubMed

    Terekhanova, Nadezhda V; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Neretina, Tatiana V; Barmintseva, Anna E; Bazykin, Georgii A; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Mugue, Nikolai S

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation is driven by natural selection; however, many adaptations are caused by weak selection acting over large timescales, complicating its study. Therefore, it is rarely possible to study selection comprehensively in natural environments. The threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is a well-studied model organism with a short generation time, small genome size, and many genetic and genomic tools available. Within this originally marine species, populations have recurrently adapted to freshwater all over its range. This evolution involved extensive parallelism: pre-existing alleles that adapt sticklebacks to freshwater habitats, but are also present at low frequencies in marine populations, have been recruited repeatedly. While a number of genomic regions responsible for this adaptation have been identified, the details of selection remain poorly understood. Using whole-genome resequencing, we compare pooled genomic samples from marine and freshwater populations of the White Sea basin, and identify 19 short genomic regions that are highly divergent between them, including three known inversions. 17 of these regions overlap protein-coding genes, including a number of genes with predicted functions that are relevant for adaptation to the freshwater environment. We then analyze four additional independently derived young freshwater populations of known ages, two natural and two artificially established, and use the observed shifts of allelic frequencies to estimate the strength of positive selection. Adaptation turns out to be quite rapid, indicating strong selection acting simultaneously at multiple regions of the genome, with selection coefficients of up to 0.27. High divergence between marine and freshwater genotypes, lack of reduction in polymorphism in regions responsible for adaptation, and high frequencies of freshwater alleles observed even in young freshwater populations are all consistent with rapid assembly of G. aculeatus freshwater genotypes from pre-existing genomic regions of adaptive variation, with strong selection that favors this assembly acting simultaneously at multiple loci. PMID:25299485

  14. Genetics, genomics and evolution of ergot alkaloid diversity.

    PubMed

    Young, Carolyn A; Schardl, Christopher L; Panaccione, Daniel G; Florea, Simona; Takach, Johanna E; Charlton, Nikki D; Moore, Neil; Webb, Jennifer S; Jaromczyk, Jolanta

    2015-04-01

    The ergot alkaloid biosynthesis system has become an excellent model to study evolutionary diversification of specialized (secondary) metabolites. This is a very diverse class of alkaloids with various neurotropic activities, produced by fungi in several orders of the phylum Ascomycota, including plant pathogens and protective plant symbionts in the family Clavicipitaceae. Results of comparative genomics and phylogenomic analyses reveal multiple examples of three evolutionary processes that have generated ergot-alkaloid diversity: gene gains, gene losses, and gene sequence changes that have led to altered substrates or product specificities of the enzymes that they encode (neofunctionalization). The chromosome ends appear to be particularly effective engines for gene gains, losses and rearrangements, but not necessarily for neofunctionalization. Changes in gene expression could lead to accumulation of various pathway intermediates and affect levels of different ergot alkaloids. Genetic alterations associated with interspecific hybrids of Epichloë species suggest that such variation is also selectively favored. The huge structural diversity of ergot alkaloids probably represents adaptations to a wide variety of ecological situations by affecting the biological spectra and mechanisms of defense against herbivores, as evidenced by the diverse pharmacological effects of ergot alkaloids used in medicine. PMID:25875294

  15. Genetics, Genomics and Evolution of Ergot Alkaloid Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Carolyn A.; Schardl, Christopher L.; Panaccione, Daniel G.; Florea, Simona; Takach, Johanna E.; Charlton, Nikki D.; Moore, Neil; Webb, Jennifer S.; Jaromczyk, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The ergot alkaloid biosynthesis system has become an excellent model to study evolutionary diversification of specialized (secondary) metabolites. This is a very diverse class of alkaloids with various neurotropic activities, produced by fungi in several orders of the phylum Ascomycota, including plant pathogens and protective plant symbionts in the family Clavicipitaceae. Results of comparative genomics and phylogenomic analyses reveal multiple examples of three evolutionary processes that have generated ergot-alkaloid diversity: gene gains, gene losses, and gene sequence changes that have led to altered substrates or product specificities of the enzymes that they encode (neofunctionalization). The chromosome ends appear to be particularly effective engines for gene gains, losses and rearrangements, but not necessarily for neofunctionalization. Changes in gene expression could lead to accumulation of various pathway intermediates and affect levels of different ergot alkaloids. Genetic alterations associated with interspecific hybrids of Epichloë species suggest that such variation is also selectively favored. The huge structural diversity of ergot alkaloids probably represents adaptations to a wide variety of ecological situations by affecting the biological spectra and mechanisms of defense against herbivores, as evidenced by the diverse pharmacological effects of ergot alkaloids used in medicine. PMID:25875294

  16. Mechanisms of Gene Duplication and Translocation and Progress towards Understanding Their Relative Contributions to Animal Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mendivil Ramos, Olivia; Ferrier, David E. K.

    2012-01-01

    Duplication of genetic material is clearly a major route to genetic change, with consequences for both evolution and disease. A variety of forms and mechanisms of duplication are recognised, operating across the scales of a few base pairs upto entire genomes. With the ever-increasing amounts of gene and genome sequence data that are becoming available, our understanding of the extent of duplication is greatly improving, both in terms of the scales of duplication events as well as their rates of occurrence. An accurate understanding of these processes is vital if we are to properly understand important events in evolution as well as mechanisms operating at the level of genome organisation. Here we will focus on duplication in animal genomes and how the duplicated sequences are distributed, with the aim of maintaining a focus on principles of evolution and organisation that are most directly applicable to the shaping of our own genome. PMID:22919542

  17. Dynamics and Innovations within Oomycete Genomes: Insights into Biology, Pathology, and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The eukaryotic microbes known as oomycetes are common inhabitants of terrestrial and aquatic environments and include saprophytes and pathogens. Lifestyles of the pathogens extend from biotrophy to necrotrophy, obligate to facultative pathogenesis, and narrow to broad host ranges on plants or animals. Sequencing of several pathogens has revealed striking variation in genome size and content, a plastic set of genes related to pathogenesis, and adaptations associated with obligate biotrophy. Features of genome evolution include repeat-driven expansions, deletions, gene fusions, and horizontal gene transfer in a landscape organized into gene-dense and gene-sparse sectors and influenced by transposable elements. Gene expression profiles are also highly dynamic throughout oomycete life cycles, with transcriptional polymorphisms as well as differences in protein sequence contributing to variation. The genome projects have set the foundation for functional studies and should spur the sequencing of additional species, including more diverse pathogens and nonpathogens. PMID:22923046

  18. Nematode and Arthropod Genomes Provide New Insights into the Evolution of Class 2 B1 GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, João C. R.; Félix, Rute C.; Power, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Nematodes and arthropods are the most speciose animal groups and possess Class 2 B1 G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Existing models of invertebrate Class 2 B1 GPCR evolution are mainly centered on Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster and a few other nematode and arthropod representatives. The present study reevaluates the evolution of metazoan Class 2 B1 GPCRs and orthologues by exploring the receptors in several nematode and arthropod genomes and comparing them to the human receptors. Three novel receptor phylogenetic clusters were identified and designated cluster A, cluster B and PDF-R-related cluster. Clusters A and B were identified in several nematode and arthropod genomes but were absent from D. melanogaster and Culicidae genomes, whereas the majority of the members of the PDF-R-related cluster were from nematodes. Cluster A receptors were nematode and arthropod-specific but shared a conserved gene environment with human receptor loci. Cluster B members were orthologous to human GCGR, PTHR and Secretin members with which they probably shared a common origin. PDF-R and PDF-R related clusters were present in representatives of both nematodes and arthropods. The results of comparative analysis of GPCR evolution and diversity in protostomes confirm previous notions that C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes are not good representatives of nematode and arthropod phyla. We hypothesize that at least four ancestral Class 2 B1 genes emerged early in the metazoan radiation, which after the protostome-deuterostome split underwent distinct selective pressures that resulted in duplication and deletion events that originated the current Class 2 B1 GPCRs in nematode and arthropod genomes. PMID:24651821

  19. Nematode and arthropod genomes provide new insights into the evolution of class 2 B1 GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Power, Deborah M

    2014-01-01

    Nematodes and arthropods are the most speciose animal groups and possess Class 2 B1 G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Existing models of invertebrate Class 2 B1 GPCR evolution are mainly centered on Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster and a few other nematode and arthropod representatives. The present study reevaluates the evolution of metazoan Class 2 B1 GPCRs and orthologues by exploring the receptors in several nematode and arthropod genomes and comparing them to the human receptors. Three novel receptor phylogenetic clusters were identified and designated cluster A, cluster B and PDF-R-related cluster. Clusters A and B were identified in several nematode and arthropod genomes but were absent from D. melanogaster and Culicidae genomes, whereas the majority of the members of the PDF-R-related cluster were from nematodes. Cluster A receptors were nematode and arthropod-specific but shared a conserved gene environment with human receptor loci. Cluster B members were orthologous to human GCGR, PTHR and Secretin members with which they probably shared a common origin. PDF-R and PDF-R related clusters were present in representatives of both nematodes and arthropods. The results of comparative analysis of GPCR evolution and diversity in protostomes confirm previous notions that C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes are not good representatives of nematode and arthropod phyla. We hypothesize that at least four ancestral Class 2 B1 genes emerged early in the metazoan radiation, which after the protostome-deuterostome split underwent distinct selective pressures that resulted in duplication and deletion events that originated the current Class 2 B1 GPCRs in nematode and arthropod genomes. PMID:24651821

  20. Monitoring of Ebola Virus Makona Evolution through Establishment of Advanced Genomic Capability in Liberia.

    PubMed

    Kugelman, Jeffrey R; Wiley, Michael R; Mate, Suzanne; Ladner, Jason T; Beitzel, Brett; Fakoli, Lawrence; Taweh, Fahn; Prieto, Karla; Diclaro, Joseph W; Minogue, Timothy; Schoepp, Randal J; Schaecher, Kurt E; Pettitt, James; Bateman, Stacey; Fair, Joseph; Kuhn, Jens H; Hensley, Lisa; Park, Daniel J; Sabeti, Pardis C; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Bolay, Fatorma K; Palacios, Gustavo

    2015-07-01

    To support Liberia's response to the ongoing Ebola virus (EBOV) disease epidemic in Western Africa, we established in-country advanced genomic capabilities to monitor EBOV evolution. Twenty-five EBOV genomes were sequenced at the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research, which provided an in-depth view of EBOV diversity in Liberia during September 2014-February 2015. These sequences were consistent with a single virus introduction to Liberia; however, shared ancestry with isolates from Mali indicated at least 1 additional instance of movement into or out of Liberia. The pace of change is generally consistent with previous estimates of mutation rate. We observed 23 nonsynonymous mutations and 1 nonsense mutation. Six of these changes are within known binding sites for sequence-based EBOV medical countermeasures; however, the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of EBOV evolution within Liberia appears to be low. PMID:26079255

  1. Genome differentiation in Aegilops . 3. Evolution of the D-genome cluster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. D. Badaeva; A. V. Amosova; O. V. Muravenko; T. E. Samatadze; N. N. Chikida; A. V. Zelenin; B. Friebe; B. S. Gill

    2002-01-01

    .  ?Six polyploid Aegilops species containing the D genome were studied by C-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using clones pTa71\\u000a (18S-5.8S-26S rDNA), pTa794 (5S rDNA), and pAs1 (non-coding repetitive DNA sequence) as probes. The C-banding and pAs1-FISH\\u000a patterns of Ae. cylindrica chromosomes were identical to those of the parental species. However, inactivation of the NOR on chromosome 5D with

  2. Genome Size, Quantitative Genetics and the Genomic Basis for Flower Size Evolution in Silene latifolia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    THOMAS R. MEAGHER; AMANDA C. M. GILLIES; DENISE E. COSTICH

    2005-01-01

    Background and Aims The overall goal of this paper is to construct an overview of the genetic basis for flower size evolution in Silene latifolia. It aims to examine the relationship between the molecular bases for flower size and the underlying assumption of quantitative genetics theory that quantitative variation is ultimately due to the impact of a number of structural

  3. Functional Convergence in Reduced Genomes of Bacterial Symbionts Spanning 200 My of Evolution

    PubMed Central

    McCutcheon, John P.; Moran, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    The main genomic changes in the evolution of host-restricted microbial symbionts are ongoing inactivation and loss of genes combined with rapid sequence evolution and extreme structural stability; these changes reflect high levels of genetic drift due to small population sizes and strict clonality. This genomic erosion includes irreversible loss of genes in many functional categories and can include genes that underlie the nutritional contributions to hosts that are the basis of the symbiotic association. Candidatus Sulcia muelleri is an ancient symbiont of sap-feeding insects and is typically coresident with another bacterial symbiont that varies among host subclades. Previously sequenced Sulcia genomes retain pathways for the same eight essential amino acids, whereas coresident symbionts synthesize the remaining two. Here, we describe a dual symbiotic system consisting of Sulcia and a novel species of Betaproteobacteria, Candidatus Zinderia insecticola, both living in the spittlebug Clastoptera arizonana. This Sulcia has completely lost the pathway for the biosynthesis of tryptophan and, therefore, retains the ability to make only 7 of the 10 essential amino acids. Zinderia has a tiny genome (208 kb) and the most extreme nucleotide base composition (13.5% G + C) reported to date, yet retains the ability to make the remaining three essential amino acids, perfectly complementing capabilities of the coresident Sulcia. Combined with the results from related symbiotic systems with complete genomes, these data demonstrate the critical role that bacterial symbionts play in the host insect’s biology and reveal one outcome following the loss of a critical metabolic activity through genome reduction. PMID:20829280

  4. Accelerated Evolution of Mitochondrial but Not Nuclear Genomes of Hymenoptera: New Evidence from Crabronid Wasps

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenpoth, Martin; Showers Corneli, Patrice; Dunn, Diane M.; Weiss, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genes in animals are especially useful as molecular markers for the reconstruction of phylogenies among closely related taxa, due to the generally high substitution rates. Several insect orders, notably Hymenoptera and Phthiraptera, show exceptionally high rates of mitochondrial molecular evolution, which has been attributed to the parasitic lifestyle of current or ancestral members of these taxa. Parasitism has been hypothesized to entail frequent population bottlenecks that increase rates of molecular evolution by reducing the efficiency of purifying selection. This effect should result in elevated substitution rates of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, but to date no extensive comparative study has tested this hypothesis in insects. Here we report the mitochondrial genome of a crabronid wasp, the European beewolf (Philanthus triangulum, Hymenoptera, Crabronidae), and we use it to compare evolutionary rates among the four largest holometabolous insect orders (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera) based on phylogenies reconstructed with whole mitochondrial genomes as well as four single-copy nuclear genes (18S rRNA, arginine kinase, wingless, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase). The mt-genome of P. triangulum is 16,029 bp in size with a mean A+T content of 83.6%, and it encodes the 37 genes typically found in arthropod mt genomes (13 protein-coding, 22 tRNA, and two rRNA genes). Five translocations of tRNA genes were discovered relative to the putative ancestral genome arrangement in insects, and the unusual start codon TTG was predicted for cox2. Phylogenetic analyses revealed significantly longer branches leading to the apocritan Hymenoptera as well as the Orussoidea, to a lesser extent the Cephoidea, and, possibly, the Tenthredinoidea than any of the other holometabolous insect orders for all mitochondrial but none of the four nuclear genes tested. Thus, our results suggest that the ancestral parasitic lifestyle of Apocrita is unlikely to be the major cause for the elevated substitution rates observed in hymenopteran mitochondrial genomes. PMID:22412929

  5. Genome of Acanthamoeba castellanii highlights extensive lateral gene transfer and early evolution of tyrosine kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Amoebozoa constitute one of the primary divisions of eukaryotes, encompassing taxa of both biomedical and evolutionary importance, yet its genomic diversity remains largely unsampled. Here we present an analysis of a whole genome assembly of Acanthamoeba castellanii (Ac) the first representative from a solitary free-living amoebozoan. Results Ac encodes 15,455 compact intron-rich genes, a significant number of which are predicted to have arisen through inter-kingdom lateral gene transfer (LGT). A majority of the LGT candidates have undergone a substantial degree of intronization and Ac appears to have incorporated them into established transcriptional programs. Ac manifests a complex signaling and cell communication repertoire, including a complete tyrosine kinase signaling toolkit and a comparable diversity of predicted extracellular receptors to that found in the facultatively multicellular dictyostelids. An important environmental host of a diverse range of bacteria and viruses, Ac utilizes a diverse repertoire of predicted pattern recognition receptors, many with predicted orthologous functions in the innate immune systems of higher organisms. Conclusions Our analysis highlights the important role of LGT in the biology of Ac and in the diversification of microbial eukaryotes. The early evolution of a key signaling facility implicated in the evolution of metazoan multicellularity strongly argues for its emergence early in the Unikont lineage. Overall, the availability of an Ac genome should aid in deciphering the biology of the Amoebozoa and facilitate functional genomic studies in this important model organism and environmental host. PMID:23375108

  6. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  7. Segmented structure of protein sequences and early evolution of genome by combinatorial fusion of DNA elements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. N. Trifonov

    1995-01-01

    A theory of an early stage of genome evolution by combinatorial fusion of circular DNA units is suggested, based on protein sequence “fossil” evidence. The evidence includes preference of protein sequence lengths for certain sizes—multiples of 123 as for eukaryotes and multiples of 152 as for prokaryotes. At the DNA level these sizes correspond to 350–450 base pairs—the known optimal

  8. Bacterial evolution by genomic island transfer occurs via DNA transformation in planta.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Helen C; Mansfield, John W; Godfrey, Scott A C; Jackson, Robert W; Hancock, John T; Arnold, Dawn L

    2009-09-29

    Our understanding of the evolution of microbial pathogens has been advanced by the discovery of "islands" of DNA that differ from core genomes and contain determinants of virulence. The acquisition of genomic islands (GIs) by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is thought to have played a major role in microbial evolution. There are, however, few practical demonstrations of the acquisition of genes that control virulence, and, significantly, all have been achieved outside the animal or plant host. Loss of a GI from the bean pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) is driven by exposure to the stress imposed by the plant's resistance response. Here, we show that the complete episomal island, which carries pathogenicity genes including the effector avrPphB, transfers between strains of Pph by transformation in planta and inserts at a specific att site in the genome of the recipient. Our results show that the evolution of bacterial pathogens by HGT may be achieved via transformation, the simplest mechanism of DNA exchange. This process is activated by exposure to plant defenses, when the pathogen is in greatest need of acquiring new genetic traits to alleviate the antimicrobial stress imposed by plant innate immunity. PMID:19747826

  9. Strict Host-Symbiont Cospeciation and Reductive Genome Evolution in Insect Gut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Nikoh, Naruo; Shimada, Masakazu; Fukatsu, Takema

    2006-01-01

    Host-symbiont cospeciation and reductive genome evolution have been identified in obligate endocellular insect symbionts, but no such example has been identified from extracellular ones. Here we first report such a case in stinkbugs of the family Plataspidae, wherein a specific gut bacterium is vertically transmitted via “symbiont capsule.” In all of the plataspid species, females produced symbiont capsules upon oviposition and their gut exhibited specialized traits for capsule production. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the plataspid symbionts constituted a distinct group in the ?-Proteobacteria, whose sister group was the aphid obligate endocellular symbionts Buchnera. Removal of the symbionts resulted in retarded growth, mortality, and sterility of the insects. The host phylogeny perfectly agreed with the symbiont phylogeny, indicating strict host-symbiont cospeciation despite the extracellular association. The symbionts exhibited AT-biased nucleotide composition, accelerated molecular evolution, and reduced genome size, as has been observed in obligate endocellular insect symbionts. These findings suggest that not the endocellular conditions themselves but the population genetic attributes of the vertically transmitted symbionts are probably responsible for the peculiar genetic traits of these insect symbionts. We proposed the designation “Candidatus Ishikawaella capsulata” for the plataspid symbionts. The plataspid stinkbugs, wherein the host-symbiont associations can be easily manipulated, provide a novel system that enables experimental approaches to previously untouched aspects of the insect-microbe mutualism. Furthermore, comparative analyses of the sister groups, the endocellular Buchnera and the extracellular Ishikawaella, would lead to insights into how the different symbiotic lifestyles have affected their genomic evolution. PMID:17032065

  10. Comparative genomics and the evolution of human mitochondrial DNA: assessing the effects of selection.

    PubMed

    Elson, J L; Turnbull, D M; Howell, Neil

    2004-02-01

    This article provides evidence that selection has been a significant force during the evolution of the human mitochondrial genome. Both gene-by-gene and whole-genome approaches were used here to assess selection in the 560 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) coding-region sequences that were used previously for reduced-median-network analysis. The results of the present analyses were complex, in that the action of selection was not indicated by all tests, but this is not surprising, in view of the characteristics and limitations of the different analytical methods. Despite these limitations, there is evidence for both gene-specific and lineage-specific variation in selection. Whole-genome sliding-window approaches indicated a lack of selection in large-scale segments of the coding region. In other tests, we analyzed the ratio of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitutions in the 13 protein-encoding mtDNA genes. The most straightforward interpretation of those results is that negative selection has acted on the mtDNA during evolution. Single-gene analyses indicated significant departures from neutrality in the CO1, ND4, and ND6 genes, although the data also suggested the possible operation of positive selection on the AT6 gene. Finally, our results and those of other investigators do not support a simple model in which climatic adaptation has been a major force during human mtDNA evolution. PMID:14712420

  11. Whole-Genome Positive Selection and Habitat-Driven Evolution in a Shallow and a Deep-Sea Urchin

    E-print Network

    Palumbi, Stephen

    Whole-Genome Positive Selection and Habitat-Driven Evolution in a Shallow and a Deep-Sea Urchin of Biology, Center for Systems Biology, Duke University 3 Department of Biology, Syracuse University more diffuse changes throughout the genome? Are all classes of genes equally visible to the actions

  12. Dynamic genome organization and gene evolution by positive selection in geminivirus (Geminiviridae).

    PubMed

    Bradeen, J M; Timmermans, M C; Messing, J

    1997-11-01

    Geminiviruses (Geminiviridae) are a diverse group of plant viruses differing from other known plant viruses in possessing circular, single-stranded DNA. Current classification divides the family into three subgroups, defined in part by genome organization, insect vector, and plant host range. Previous phylogenetic assessments of geminiviruses have used DNA and/or amino acid sequences from the replication-associated and coat protein genes and have relied predominantly on distance analyses. We used amino acid and DNA sequence data from the replication-associated and coat protein genes from 22 geminivirus types in distance and parsimony analyses. Although the results of our analyses largely agree with those reported previously, we could not always predict viral relationships based on genome organization, plant host, or insect vector. Loss of correlation of these traits with phylogeny is likely due to improved sampling of geminivirus types. Unrooted parsimony trees suggest multiple independent origins for the monopartite genome. genome organization is therefore a dynamic character. Estimates of nonsynonymous and synonymous nucleotide substitutions for extant and inferred ancestral sequences were used to evaluate hypotheses that the replication-associated and coat protein sequences evolve to accommodate plant host and insect vector specificities, respectively. Results suggest that plant host specificity does not solely direct replication-associated protein-evolution but that coat protein sequence does evolve in response to insect vector specificity. Genome organization and, possibly, plant host specificity are not reliable taxonomic characters. PMID:9364769

  13. Genomic rearrangements and the evolution of clusters of locally adaptive loci

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies of ecological genetics have found that alleles contributing to local adaptation sometimes cluster together, forming “genomic islands of divergence.” Divergence hitchhiking theory posits that these clusters evolve by the preferential establishment of tightly linked locally adapted mutations, because such linkage reduces the rate that recombination breaks up locally favorable combinations of alleles. Here, I use calculations based on previously developed analytical models of divergence hitchhiking to show that very few clustered mutations should be expected in a single bout of adaptation, relative to the number of unlinked mutations, suggesting that divergence hitchhiking theory alone may often be insufficient to explain empirical observations. Using individual-based simulations that allow for the transposition of a single genetic locus from one position on a chromosome to another, I then show that tight clustering of the loci involved in local adaptation tends to evolve on biologically realistic time scales. These results suggest that genomic rearrangements may often be an important component of local adaptation and the evolution of genomic islands of divergence. More generally, these results suggest that genomic architecture and functional neighborhoods of genes may be actively shaped by natural selection in heterogeneous environments. Because small-scale changes in gene order are relatively common in some taxa, comparative genomic studies could be coupled with studies of adaptation to explore how commonly such rearrangements are involved in local adaptation. PMID:23610436

  14. Parasitic plants have increased rates of molecular evolution across all three genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Theoretical models and experimental evidence suggest that rates of molecular evolution could be raised in parasitic organisms compared to non-parasitic taxa. Parasitic plants provide an ideal test for these predictions, as there are at least a dozen independent origins of the parasitic lifestyle in angiosperms. Studies of a number of parasitic plant lineages have suggested faster rates of molecular evolution, but the results of some studies have been mixed. Comparative analysis of all parasitic plant lineages, including sequences from all three genomes, is needed to examine the generality of the relationship between rates of molecular evolution and parasitism in plants. Results We analysed DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial, nuclear and chloroplast genomes for 12 independent evolutionary origins of parasitism in angiosperms. We demonstrated that parasitic lineages have a faster rate of molecular evolution than their non-parasitic relatives in sequences for all three genomes, for both synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions. Conclusions Our results prove that raised rates of molecular evolution are a general feature of parasitic plants, not confined to a few taxa or specific genes. We discuss possible causes for this relationship, including increased positive selection associated with host-parasite arms races, relaxed selection, reduced population size or repeated bottlenecks, increased mutation rates, and indirect causal links with generation time and body size. We find no evidence that faster rates are due to smaller effective populations sizes or changes in selection pressure. Instead, our results suggest that parasitic plants have a higher mutation rate than their close non-parasitic relatives. This may be due to a direct connection, where some aspect of the parasitic lifestyle drives the evolution of raised mutation rates. Alternatively, this pattern may be driven by an indirect connection between rates and parasitism: for example, parasitic plants tend to be smaller than their non-parasitic relatives, which may result in more cell generations per year, thus a higher rate of mutations arising from DNA copy errors per unit time. Demonstration that adoption of a parasitic lifestyle influences the rate of genomic evolution is relevant to attempts to infer molecular phylogenies of parasitic plants and to estimate their evolutionary divergence times using sequence data. PMID:23782527

  15. Incongruent Patterns of Local and Global Genome Size Evolution in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Corrinne E.; Kim, HyeRan; Wing, Rod A.; Paterson, Andrew H.; Wendel, Jonathan F.

    2004-01-01

    Genome sizes in plants vary over several orders of magnitude, reflecting a combination of differentially acting local and global forces such as biases in indel accumulation and transposable element proliferation or removal. To gain insight into the relative role of these and other forces, ?105 kb of contiguous sequence surrounding the cellulose synthase gene CesA1 was compared for the two coresident genomes (AT and DT) of the allopolyploid cotton species, Gossypium hirsutum. These two genomes differ approximately twofold in size, having diverged from a common ancestor ?5–10 million years ago (Mya) and been reunited in the same nucleus at the time of polyploid formation, ?1–2 Mya. Gene content, order, and spacing are largely conserved between the two genomes, although a few transposable elements and a single cpDNA fragment distinguish the two homoeologs. Sequence conservation is high in both intergenic and genic regions, with 14 conserved genes detected in both genomes yielding a density of 1 gene every 7.5 kb. In contrast to the twofold overall difference in DNA content, no disparity in size was observed for this 105-kb region, and 555 indels were detected that distinguish the two homoeologous BACs, approximately equally distributed between AT and DT in number and aggregate size. The data demonstrate that genome size evolution at this phylogenetic scale is not primarily caused by mechanisms that operate uniformly across different genomic regions and components; instead, the twofold overall difference in DNA content must reflect locally operating forces between gene islands or in largely gene-free regions. PMID:15256507

  16. Consequences of Lineage-Specific Gene Loss on Functional Evolution of Surviving Paralogs: ALDH1A and Retinoic Acid Signaling in Vertebrate Genomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristian Cañestro; Julian M. Catchen; Adriana Rodríguez-Marí; Hayato Yokoi; John H. Postlethwait

    2009-01-01

    Genome duplications increase genetic diversity and may facilitate the evolution of gene subfunctions. Little attention, however, has focused on the evolutionary impact of lineage-specific gene loss. Here, we show that identifying lineage-specific gene loss after genome duplication is important for understanding the evolution of gene subfunctions in surviving paralogs and for improving functional connectivity among human and model organism genomes.

  17. Comparative analysis of syntenic genes in grass genomes reveals accelerated rates of gene structure and coding sequence evolution in polyploid wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cycles of whole genome duplication (WGD) and diploidization are hallmarks of eukaryotic genome evolution and speciation. Polyploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) has had a massive increase in genome size largely due to recent WGDs. How these processes may impact the dynamics of gene evolution was studied...

  18. Bistability of endosymbiont evolution of genome size and host sex control.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Atsushi; Telschow, Arndt

    2012-09-21

    Eukaryotic organisms often harbor several genetic factors in their cytoplasm. These cytoplasmic genetic elements (CGEs) include both eukaryotic organelles (mitochondria, chloroplasts) and bacterial endosymbionts, which have evolved from free-living bacteria. A common feature of CGEs is their cytoplasmic inheritance from mother to offspring. A striking difference is that some CGEs have evolved a short genome size (e.g., animal mitochondria), while others cause a sex ratio distortion (SRD) in their hosts (e.g., Wolbachia). In this study, we sought to resolve the evolution of these endosymbiont properties using a population genetics approach. Our model divides the endosymbiont genome into a functional part and a part that can cause SRD, and our results indicate that the cytoplasmic inheritance system at the initiation of symbiosis plays a key role in determining the evolutionary trajectory of CGEs. We show that in endosymbiotic evolution, two states can be bistable, depending on the parameters. The evolution of the cytoplasmic inheritance system from biparental to uniparental can result in hysteresis in the evolution of cytoplasmic symbionts. PMID:22677398

  19. The mitochondrial genomes of the early land plants Treubia lacunosa and Anomodon rugelii: dynamic and conservative evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Xue, Jia-Yu; Wang, Bin; Li, Libo; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2011-01-01

    Early land plant mitochondrial genomes captured important changes of mitochondrial genome evolution when plants colonized land. The chondromes of seed plants show several derived characteristics, e.g., large genome size variation, rapid intra-genomic rearrangement, abundant introns, and highly variable levels of RNA editing. On the other hand, the chondromes of charophytic algae are still largely ancestral in these aspects, resembling those of early eukaryotes. When the transition happened has been a long-standing question in studies of mitochondrial genome evolution. Here we report complete mitochondrial genome sequences from an early-diverging liverwort, Treubia lacunosa, and a late-evolving moss, Anomodon rugelii. The two genomes, 151,983 and 104,239 base pairs in size respectively, contain standard sets of protein coding genes for respiration and protein synthesis, as well as nearly full sets of rRNA and tRNA genes found in the chondromes of the liverworts Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea and the moss Physcomitrella patens. The gene orders of these two chondromes are identical to those of the other liverworts and moss. Their intron contents, with all cis-spliced group I or group II introns, are also similar to those in the previously sequenced liverwort and moss chondromes. These five chondromes plus the two from the hornworts Phaeoceros laevis and Megaceros aenigmaticus for the first time allowed comprehensive comparative analyses of structure and organization of mitochondrial genomes both within and across the three major lineages of bryophytes. These analyses led to the conclusion that the mitochondrial genome experienced dynamic evolution in genome size, gene content, intron acquisition, gene order, and RNA editing during the origins of land plants and their major clades. However, evolution of this organellar genome has remained rather conservative since the origin and initial radiation of early land plants, except within vascular plants. PMID:21998706

  20. Complete DNA sequences of the mitochondrial genomes of the pathogenic yeasts Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis: insight into the evolution of linear DNA genomes from mitochondrial telomere mutants

    PubMed Central

    Kosa, Peter; Valach, Matus; Tomaska, Lubomir; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Nosek, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    We determined complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of the two yeast species, Candida orthopsilosis and Candida metapsilosis, and compared them with the linear mitochondrial genome of their close relative, C.parapsilosis. Mitochondria of all the three species harbor compact genomes encoding the same set of genes arranged in the identical order. Differences in the length of these genomes result mainly from the presence/absence of introns. Multiple alterations were identified also in the sequences of the ribosomal and transfer RNAs, and proteins. However, the most striking feature of C.orthopsilosis and C.metapsilosis is the existence of strains differing in the molecular form of the mitochondrial genome (circular-mapping versus linear). Their analysis opens a unique window for understanding the role of mitochondrial telomeres in the stability and evolution of molecular architecture of the genome. Our results indicate that the circular-mapping mitochondrial genome derived from the linear form by intramolecular end-to-end fusions. Moreover, we suggest that the linear mitochondrial genome evolved from a circular-mapping form present in a common ancestor of the three species and, at the same time, the emergence of mitochondrial telomeres enabled the formation of linear monomeric DNA forms. In addition, comparison of isogenic C.metapsilosis strains differing in the form of the organellar genome suggests a possibility that, under some circumstances, the linearity and/or the presence of telomeres provide a competitive advantage over a circular-mapping mitochondrial genome. PMID:16684995

  1. Genome diversity and divergence in Drosophila mauritiana: multiple signatures of faster X evolution.

    PubMed

    Garrigan, Daniel; Kingan, Sarah B; Geneva, Anthony J; Vedanayagam, Jeffrey P; Presgraves, Daven C

    2014-09-01

    Drosophila mauritiana is an Indian Ocean island endemic species that diverged from its two sister species, Drosophila simulans and Drosophila sechellia, approximately 240,000 years ago. Multiple forms of incomplete reproductive isolation have evolved among these species, including sexual, gametic, ecological, and intrinsic postzygotic barriers, with crosses among all three species conforming to Haldane's rule: F(1) hybrid males are sterile and F(1) hybrid females are fertile. Extensive genetic resources and the fertility of hybrid females have made D. mauritiana, in particular, an important model for speciation genetics. Analyses between D. mauritiana and both of its siblings have shown that the X chromosome makes a disproportionate contribution to hybrid male sterility. But why the X plays a special role in the evolution of hybrid sterility in these, and other, species remains an unsolved problem. To complement functional genetic analyses, we have investigated the population genomics of D. mauritiana, giving special attention to differences between the X and the autosomes. We present a de novo genome assembly of D. mauritiana annotated with RNAseq data and a whole-genome analysis of polymorphism and divergence from ten individuals. Our analyses show that, relative to the autosomes, the X chromosome has reduced nucleotide diversity but elevated nucleotide divergence; an excess of recurrent adaptive evolution at its protein-coding genes; an excess of recent, strong selective sweeps; and a large excess of satellite DNA. Interestingly, one of two centimorgan-scale selective sweeps on the D. mauritiana X chromosome spans a region containing two sex-ratio meiotic drive elements and a high concentration of satellite DNA. Furthermore, genes with roles in reproduction and chromosome biology are enriched among genes that have histories of recurrent adaptive protein evolution. Together, these genome-wide analyses suggest that genetic conflict and frequent positive natural selection on the X chromosome have shaped the molecular evolutionary history of D. mauritiana, refining our understanding of the possible causes of the large X-effect in speciation. PMID:25193308

  2. Genome Diversity and Divergence in Drosophila mauritiana: Multiple Signatures of Faster X Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Garrigan, Daniel; Kingan, Sarah B.; Geneva, Anthony J.; Vedanayagam, Jeffrey P.; Presgraves, Daven C.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila mauritiana is an Indian Ocean island endemic species that diverged from its two sister species, Drosophila simulans and Drosophila sechellia, approximately 240,000 years ago. Multiple forms of incomplete reproductive isolation have evolved among these species, including sexual, gametic, ecological, and intrinsic postzygotic barriers, with crosses among all three species conforming to Haldane’s rule: F1 hybrid males are sterile and F1 hybrid females are fertile. Extensive genetic resources and the fertility of hybrid females have made D. mauritiana, in particular, an important model for speciation genetics. Analyses between D. mauritiana and both of its siblings have shown that the X chromosome makes a disproportionate contribution to hybrid male sterility. But why the X plays a special role in the evolution of hybrid sterility in these, and other, species remains an unsolved problem. To complement functional genetic analyses, we have investigated the population genomics of D. mauritiana, giving special attention to differences between the X and the autosomes. We present a de novo genome assembly of D. mauritiana annotated with RNAseq data and a whole-genome analysis of polymorphism and divergence from ten individuals. Our analyses show that, relative to the autosomes, the X chromosome has reduced nucleotide diversity but elevated nucleotide divergence; an excess of recurrent adaptive evolution at its protein-coding genes; an excess of recent, strong selective sweeps; and a large excess of satellite DNA. Interestingly, one of two centimorgan-scale selective sweeps on the D. mauritiana X chromosome spans a region containing two sex-ratio meiotic drive elements and a high concentration of satellite DNA. Furthermore, genes with roles in reproduction and chromosome biology are enriched among genes that have histories of recurrent adaptive protein evolution. Together, these genome-wide analyses suggest that genetic conflict and frequent positive natural selection on the X chromosome have shaped the molecular evolutionary history of D. mauritiana, refining our understanding of the possible causes of the large X-effect in speciation. PMID:25193308

  3. Genomics, evolution and development of amphioxus and tunicates: The Goldilocks principle.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda Z

    2015-06-01

    Morphological comparisons among extant animals have long been used to infer their long-extinct ancestors for which the fossil record is poor or non-existent. For evolution of the vertebrates, the comparison has typically involved amphioxus and vertebrates. Both groups are evolving relatively slowly, and their genomes share a high level of synteny. Both vertebrates and amphioxus have regulative development in which cell fates become fixed only gradually during embryogenesis. Thus, their development fits a modified hourglass model in which constraints are greatest at the phylotypic stage (i.e., the late neurula/early larva), but are somewhat greater on earlier development than on later development. In contrast, the third group of chordates, the tunicates, which are sister group to vertebrates, are evolving rapidly. Constraints on evolution of tunicate genomes are relaxed, and they have discarded key developmental genes and organized much of their coding sequences into operons, which are transcribed as a single mRNA that undergoes trans-splicing. This contrasts with vertebrates and amphioxus, whose genomes are not organized into operons. Concomitantly, tunicates have switched to determinant development with very early fixation of cell fates. Thus, tunicate development more closely fits a progressive divergence model (shaped more like a wine glass than an hourglass) in which the constraints on the zygote and very early development are greatest. This model can help explain why tunicate body plans are so very diverse. The relaxed constraints on development after early cleavage stages are correlated with relaxed constraints on genome evolution. The question remains: which came first? J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 342-352, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24665055

  4. Ancestral genome sizes specify the minimum rate of lateral gene transfer during prokaryote evolution

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Tal; Martin, William

    2007-01-01

    The amount of lateral gene transfer (LGT) that has occurred in microbial evolution is heavily debated. Efforts to quantify LGT through gene-tree comparisons have delivered estimates that between 2% and 60% of all prokaryotic genes have been affected by LGT, the 30-fold discrepancy reflecting differences among gene samples studied and uncertainties inherent in phylogenetic reconstruction. Here we present a simple method that is independent of gene-tree comparisons to estimate the LGT rate among sequenced prokaryotic genomes. If little or no LGT has occurred during evolution, ancestral genome sizes would become unrealistically large, whereas too much LGT would render them far too small. We determine the amount of LGT that is necessary and sufficient to bring the distribution of inferred ancestral genome sizes into agreement with that observed among modern microbes. Rather than testing for phylogenetic congruence or lack thereof across genes, we assume that all gene trees are compatible; hence, our method delivers very conservative lower-bound estimates of the average LGT rate. The results indicate that among 57,670 gene families distributed across 190 sequenced genomes, at least two-thirds and probably all, have been affected by LGT at some time in their evolutionary past. A component of common ancestry nonetheless remains detectable in gene distribution patterns. We estimate the minimum lower bound for the average LGT rate across all genes as 1.1 LGT events per gene family and gene family lifespan and this minimum rate increases sharply when genes present in only a few genomes are excluded from the analysis. PMID:17213324

  5. Whole genome duplication events in plant evolution reconstructed and predicted using myosin motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The evolution of land plants is characterized by whole genome duplications (WGD), which drove species diversification and evolutionary novelties. Detecting these events is especially difficult if they date back to the origin of the plant kingdom. Established methods for reconstructing WGDs include intra- and inter-genome comparisons, KS age distribution analyses, and phylogenetic tree constructions. Results By analysing 67 completely sequenced plant genomes 775 myosins were identified and manually assembled. Phylogenetic trees of the myosin motor domains revealed orthologous and paralogous relationships and were consistent with recent species trees. Based on the myosin inventories and the phylogenetic trees, we have identified duplications of the entire myosin motor protein family at timings consistent with 23 WGDs, that had been reported before. We also predict 6 WGDs based on further protein family duplications. Notably, the myosin data support the two recently reported WGDs in the common ancestor of all extant angiosperms. We predict single WGDs in the Manihot esculenta and Nicotiana benthamiana lineages, two WGDs for Linum usitatissimum and Phoenix dactylifera, and a triplication or two WGDs for Gossypium raimondii. Our data show another myosin duplication in the ancestor of the angiosperms that could be either the result of a single gene duplication or a remnant of a WGD. Conclusions We have shown that the myosin inventories in angiosperms retain evidence of numerous WGDs that happened throughout plant evolution. In contrast to other protein families, many myosins are still present in extant species. They are closely related and have similar domain architectures, and their phylogenetic grouping follows the genome duplications. Because of its broad taxonomic sampling the dataset provides the basis for reliable future identification of further whole genome duplications. PMID:24053117

  6. GENOMICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomics is the science of taking a holistic approach to studying the genome. A useful analogy of genomics is that it is like looking at the entire forest, rather than individual trees. Genomics is more a thought process than a science and truly came to fruition when high throughput genetic technolo...

  7. Solution Structure of the 2A Protease from a Common Cold Agent, Human Rhinovirus C2, Strain W12

    E-print Network

    Solution Structure of the 2A Protease from a Common Cold Agent, Human Rhinovirus C2, Strain W12 al. (2014) Solution Structure of the 2A Protease from a Common Cold Agent, Human Rhinovirus C2 of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any

  8. Effects of Rhinovirus Infection on Hydrogen Peroxide induced Alterations of Barrier Function in the Cultured Human Tracheal Epithelium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TAKASHI OHRUI; MUTSUO YAMAYA; KIYOHISA SEKIZAWA; NORIHIRO YAMADA; TOMOKO SUZUKI; MASANORI TERAJIMA; SHOJI OKINAGA; HIDETADA SASAKI

    1998-01-01

    To investigate whether rhinovirus infection impairs epithelial barrier functions, human rhinovirus 14 (HRV-14) was infected to primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells and experiments were performed on Day 2 after HRV-14 infection. Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ; 3 3 10 2 4 M) increased electri- cal conductance (G ) across the epithelial cell sheet measured with Ussing's

  9. Comparative genomics reveals conservative evolution of the xylem transcriptome in vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Wood is a valuable natural resource and a major carbon sink. Wood formation is an important developmental process in vascular plants which played a crucial role in plant evolution. Although genes involved in xylem formation have been investigated, the molecular mechanisms of xylem evolution are not well understood. We use comparative genomics to examine evolution of the xylem transcriptome to gain insights into xylem evolution. Results The xylem transcriptome is highly conserved in conifers, but considerably divergent in angiosperms. The functional domains of genes in the xylem transcriptome are moderately to highly conserved in vascular plants, suggesting the existence of a common ancestral xylem transcriptome. Compared to the total transcriptome derived from a range of tissues, the xylem transcriptome is relatively conserved in vascular plants. Of the xylem transcriptome, cell wall genes, ancestral xylem genes, known proteins and transcription factors are relatively more conserved in vascular plants. A total of 527 putative xylem orthologs were identified, which are unevenly distributed across the Arabidopsis chromosomes with eight hot spots observed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that evolution of the xylem transcriptome has paralleled plant evolution. We also identified 274 conifer-specific xylem unigenes, all of which are of unknown function. These xylem orthologs and conifer-specific unigenes are likely to have played a crucial role in xylem evolution. Conclusions Conifers have highly conserved xylem transcriptomes, while angiosperm xylem transcriptomes are relatively diversified. Vascular plants share a common ancestral xylem transcriptome. The xylem transcriptomes of vascular plants are more conserved than the total transcriptomes. Evolution of the xylem transcriptome has largely followed the trend of plant evolution. PMID:20565927

  10. Three rounds (1R\\/2R\\/3R) of genome duplications and the evolution of the glycolytic pathway in vertebrates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dirk Steinke; Simone Hoegg; Henner Brinkmann; Axel Meyer

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evolution of the deuterostome lineage was accompanied by an increase in systematic complexity especially with regard to highly specialized tissues and organs. Based on the observation of an increased number of paralogous genes in vertebrates compared with invertebrates, two entire genome duplications (2R) were proposed during the early evolution of vertebrates. Most glycolytic enzymes occur as several copies in

  11. Core-SINE blocks comprise a large fraction of monotreme genomes; implications for vertebrate chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Patrick J; Greaves, Ian K; Koina, Edda; Waters, Paul D; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A

    2007-01-01

    The genomes of the egg-laying platypus and echidna are of particular interest because monotremes are the most basal mammal group. The chromosomal distribution of an ancient family of short interspersed repeats (SINEs), the core-SINEs, was investigated to better understand monotreme genome organization and evolution. Previous studies have identified the core-SINE as the predominant SINE in the platypus genome, and in this study we quantified, characterized and localized subfamilies. Dot blot analysis suggested that a very large fraction (32% of the platypus and 16% of the echidna genome) is composed of Mon core-SINEs. Core-SINE-specific primers were used to amplify PCR products from platypus and echidna genomic DNA. Sequence analysis suggests a common consensus sequence Mon 1-B, shared by platypus and echidna, as well as platypus-specific Mon 1-C and echidna specific Mon 1-D consensus sequences. FISH mapping of the Mon core-SINE products to platypus metaphase spreads demonstrates that the Mon-1C subfamily is responsible for the striking Mon core-SINE accumulation in the distal regions of the six large autosomal pairs and the largest X chromosome. This unusual distribution highlights the dichotomy between the seven large chromosome pairs and the 19 smaller pairs in the monotreme karyotype, which has some similarity to the macro- and micro-chromosomes of birds and reptiles, and suggests that accumulation of repetitive sequences may have enlarged small chromosomes in an ancestral vertebrate. In the forthcoming sequence of the platypus genome there are still large gaps, and the extensive Mon core-SINE accumulation on the distal regions of the six large autosomal pairs may provide one explanation for this missing sequence. PMID:18185983

  12. Insights into the evolution of Yersinia pestis through whole-genome comparison with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Carniel, E. [Yersinia Research Unit, Institut Pasteur; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Lamerdin, Jane [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Vergez, Lisa [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Motin, V. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Brubaker, R. R. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Fowler, J. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hinnebusch, J. [Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT; Marceau, M. [Institut National de la Sante etdela Recherche Medicale; Medigue, Claudine [Genoscope/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Unite Mixte de Recherche; Simonet, M. [Institut National de la Sante etdela Recherche Medicale; Chenal-Francisque, V. [Yersinia Research Unit, Institut Pasteur; Souza, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Dacheux, D. [Yersinia Research Unit, Institut Pasteur; Elliott, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Derbise, A. [Yersinia Research Unit, Institut Pasteur; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Garcia, Emilio [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2004-09-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a highly uniform clone that diverged recently from the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Despite their close genetic relationship, they differ radically in their pathogenicity and transmission. Here, we report the complete genomic sequence of Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 and its use for detailed genome comparisons with available Y. pestis sequences. Analyses of identified differences across a panel of Yersinia isolates from around the world reveal 32 Y. pestis chromosomal genes that, together with the two Y. pestis-specific plasmids, to our knowledge, represent the only new genetic material in Y. pestis acquired since the the divergence from Y. pseudotuberculosis. In contrast, 149 other pseudogenes (doubling the previous estimate) and 317 genes absent from Y. pestis were detected, indicating that as many as 13% of Y. pseudotuberculosis genes no longer function in Y. pestis. Extensive insertion sequence-mediated genome rearrangements and reductive evolution through massive gene loss, resulting in elimination and modification of preexisting gene expression pathways, appear to be more important than acquisition of genes in the evolution of Y. pestis. These results provide a sobering example of how a highly virulent epidemic clone can suddenly emerge from a less virulent, closely related progenitor.

  13. Identification of Nucleotide-Level Changes Impacting Gene Content and Genome Evolution in Orthopoxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Eneida L.; Hendrickson, Robert Curtis

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poxviruses are composed of large double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes coding for several hundred genes whose variation has supported virus adaptation to a wide variety of hosts over their long evolutionary history. Comparative genomics has suggested that the Orthopoxvirus genus in particular has undergone reductive evolution, with the most recent common ancestor likely possessing a gene complement consisting of all genes present in any existing modern-day orthopoxvirus species, similar to the current Cowpox virus species. As orthopoxviruses adapt to new environments, the selection pressure on individual genes may be altered, driving sequence divergence and possible loss of function. This is evidenced by accumulation of mutations and loss of protein-coding open reading frames (ORFs) that progress from individual missense mutations to gene truncation through the introduction of early stop mutations (ESMs), gene fragmentation, and in some cases, a total loss of the ORF. In this study, we have constructed a whole-genome alignment for representative isolates from each Orthopoxvirus species and used it to identify the nucleotide-level changes that have led to gene content variation. By identifying the changes that have led to ESMs, we were able to determine that short indels were the major cause of gene truncations and that the genome length is inversely proportional to the number of ESMs present. We also identified the number and types of protein functional motifs still present in truncated genes to assess their functional significance. IMPORTANCE This work contributes to our understanding of reductive evolution in poxviruses by identifying genomic remnants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels left behind by evolutionary processes. Our comprehensive analysis of the genomic changes leading to gene truncation and fragmentation was able to detect some of the remnants of these evolutionary processes still present in orthopoxvirus genomes and suggests that these viruses are under continual adaptation due to changes in their environment. These results further our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms that drive virus variation, allowing orthopoxviruses to adapt to particular environmental niches. Understanding the evolutionary history of these virus pathogens may help predict their future evolutionary potential. PMID:25231308

  14. Impact of homologous and non-homologous recombination in the genomic evolution of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is an important species of bacteria that can live as a harmless inhabitant of the guts of many animals, as a pathogen causing life-threatening conditions or freely in the non-host environment. This diversity of lifestyles has made it a particular focus of interest for studies of genetic variation, mainly with the aim to understand how a commensal can become a deadly pathogen. Many whole genomes of E. coli have been fully sequenced in the past few years, which offer helpful data to help understand how this important species evolved. Results We compared 27 whole genomes encompassing four phylogroups of Escherichia coli (A, B1, B2 and E). From the core-genome we established the clonal relationships between the isolates as well as the role played by homologous recombination during their evolution from a common ancestor. We found strong evidence for sexual isolation between three lineages (A+B1, B2, E), which could be explained by the ecological structuring of E. coli and may represent on-going speciation. We identified three hotspots of homologous recombination, one of which had not been previously described and contains the aroC gene, involved in the essential shikimate metabolic pathway. We also described the role played by non-homologous recombination in the pan-genome, and showed that this process was highly heterogeneous. Our analyses revealed in particular that the genomes of three enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC) strains within phylogroup B1 have converged from originally separate backgrounds as a result of both homologous and non-homologous recombination. Conclusions Recombination is an important force shaping the genomic evolution and diversification of E. coli, both by replacing fragments of genes with an homologous sequence and also by introducing new genes. In this study, several non-random patterns of these events were identified which correlated with important changes in the lifestyle of the bacteria, and therefore provide additional evidence to explain the relationship between genomic variation and ecological adaptation. PMID:22712577

  15. On the genome constitution and evolution of intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium: Poaceae, Triticeae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The wheat tribe Triticeae (Poaceae) is a diverse group of grasses representing a textbook example of reticulate evolution. Apart from globally important grain crops, there are also wild grasses which are of great practical value. Allohexaploid intermediate wheatgrass, Thinopyrum intermedium (2n = 6x = 42), possesses many desirable agronomic traits that make it an invaluable source of genetic material useful in wheat improvement. Although the identification of its genomic components has been the object of considerable investigation, the complete genomic constitution and its potential variability are still being unravelled. To identify the genomic constitution of this allohexaploid, four accessions of intermediate wheatgrass from its native area were analysed by sequencing of chloroplast trnL-F and partial nuclear GBSSI, and genomic in situ hybridization. Results The results confirmed the allopolyploid origin of Thinopyrum intermedium and revealed new aspects in its genomic composition. Genomic heterogeneity suggests a more complex origin of the species than would be expected if it originated through allohexaploidy alone. While Pseudoroegneria is the most probable maternal parent of the accessions analysed, nuclear GBSSI sequences suggested the contribution of distinct lineages corresponding to the following present-day genera: Pseudoroegneria, Dasypyrum, Taeniatherum, Aegilops and Thinopyrum. Two subgenomes of the hexaploid have most probably been contributed by Pseudoroegneria and Dasypyrum, but the identity of the third subgenome remains unresolved satisfactorily. Possibly it is of hybridogenous origin, with contributions from Thinopyrum and Aegilops. Surprising diversity of GBSSI copies corresponding to a Dasypyrum-like progenitor indicates either multiple contributions from different sources close to Dasypyrum and maintenance of divergent copies or the presence of divergent paralogs, or a combination of both. Taeniatherum-like GBSSI copies are most probably pseudogenic, and the mode of their acquisition by Th. intermedium remains unclear. Conclusions Hybridization has played a key role in the evolution of the Triticeae. Transfer of genetic material via extensive interspecific hybridization and/or introgression could have enriched the species' gene pools significantly. We have shown that the genomic heterogeneity of intermediate wheatgrass is higher than has been previously assumed, which is of particular concern to wheat breeders, who frequently use it as a source of desirable traits in wheat improvement. PMID:21592357

  16. Snake mitochondrial genomes: phylogenetic relationships and implications of extended taxon sampling for interpretations of mitogenomic evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Snake mitochondrial genomes are of great interest in understanding mitogenomic evolution because of gene duplications and rearrangements and the fast evolutionary rate of their genes compared to other vertebrates. Mitochondrial gene sequences have also played an important role in attempts to resolve the contentious phylogenetic relationships of especially the early divergences among alethinophidian snakes. Two recent innovative studies found dramatic gene- and branch-specific relative acceleration in snake protein-coding gene evolution, particularly along internal branches leading to Serpentes and Alethinophidia. It has been hypothesized that some of these rate shifts are temporally (and possibly causally) associated with control region duplication and/or major changes in ecology and anatomy. Results The near-complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes of three henophidian snakes were sequenced: Anilius scytale, Rhinophis philippinus, and Charina trivirgata. All three genomes share a duplicated control region and translocated tRNALEU, derived features found in all alethinophidian snakes studied to date. The new sequence data were aligned with mt genome data for 21 other species of snakes and used in phylogenetic analyses. Phylogenetic results agreed with many other studies in recovering several robust clades, including Colubroidea, Caenophidia, and Cylindrophiidae+Uropeltidae. Nodes within Henophidia that have been difficult to resolve robustly in previous analyses remained uncompellingly resolved here. Comparisons of relative rates of evolution of rRNA vs. protein-coding genes were conducted by estimating branch lengths across the tree. Our expanded sampling revealed dramatic acceleration along the branch leading to Typhlopidae, particularly long rRNA terminal branches within Scolecophidia, and that most of the dramatic acceleration in protein-coding gene rate along Serpentes and Alethinophidia branches occurred before Anilius diverged from other alethinophidians. Conclusions Mitochondrial gene sequence data alone may not be able to robustly resolve basal divergences among alethinophidian snakes. Taxon sampling plays an important role in identifying mitogenomic evolutionary events within snakes, and in testing hypotheses explaining their origin. Dramatic rate shifts in mitogenomic evolution occur within Scolecophidia as well as Alethinophidia, thus falsifying the hypothesis that these shifts in snakes are associated exclusively with evolution of a non-burrowing lifestyle, macrostomatan feeding ecology and/or duplication of the control region, both restricted to alethinophidians among living snakes. PMID:20055998

  17. Clade- and species-specific features of genome evolution in the Saccharomycetaceae.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Kenneth H; Armisén, David; Proux-Wera, Estelle; ÓhÉigeartaigh, Seán S; Azam, Haleema; Gordon, Jonathan L; Byrne, Kevin P

    2015-08-01

    Many aspects of the genomes of yeast species in the family Saccharomycetaceae have been well conserved during evolution. They have similar genome sizes, genome contents, and extensive collinearity of gene order along chromosomes. Gene functions can often be inferred reliably by using information from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Beyond this conservative picture however, there are many instances where a species or a clade diverges substantially from the S. cerevisiae paradigm-for example, by the amplification of a gene family, or by the absence of a biochemical pathway or a protein complex. Here, we review clade-specific features, focusing on genomes sequenced in our laboratory from the post-WGD genera Naumovozyma, Kazachstania and Tetrapisispora, and from the non-WGD species Torulaspora delbrueckii. Examples include the loss of the pathway for histidine synthesis in the cockroach-associated species Tetrapisispora blattae; the presence of a large telomeric GAL gene cluster in To. delbrueckii; losses of the dynein and dynactin complexes in several independent yeast lineages; fragmentation of the MAT locus and loss of the HO gene in Kazachstania africana; and the patchy phylogenetic distribution of RNAi pathway components. PMID:26066552

  18. Accelerated Evolution of Conserved Noncoding Sequences in theHuman Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Prambhakar, Shyam; Noonan, James P.; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, EdwardM.

    2006-07-06

    Genomic comparisons between human and distant, non-primatemammals are commonly used to identify cis-regulatory elements based onconstrained sequence evolution. However, these methods fail to detect"cryptic" functional elements, which are too weakly conserved amongmammals to distinguish from nonfunctional DNA. To address this problem,we explored the potential of deep intra-primate sequence comparisons. Wesequenced the orthologs of 558 kb of human genomic sequence, coveringmultiple loci involved in cholesterol homeostasis, in 6 nonhumanprimates. Our analysis identified 6 noncoding DNA elements displayingsignificant conservation among primates, but undetectable in more distantcomparisons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that at least three ofthese 6 elements have regulatory function. Notably, the mouse orthologsof these three functional human sequences had regulatory activity despitetheir lack of significant sequence conservation, indicating that they arecryptic ancestral cis-regulatory elements. These regulatory elementscould still be detected in a smaller set of three primate speciesincluding human, rhesus and marmoset. Since the human and rhesus genomesequences are already available, and the marmoset genome is activelybeing sequenced, the primate-specific conservation analysis describedhere can be applied in the near future on a whole-genome scale, tocomplement the annotation provided by more distant speciescomparisons.

  19. Genomic characterization of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato species: Backdrop to the evolution of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Zwick, Michael E.; Joseph, Sandeep J.; Didelot, Xavier; Chen, Peter E.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Stewart, Andrew C.; Willner, Kristin; Nolan, Nichole; Lentz, Shannon; Thomason, Maureen K.; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Mateczun, Alfred J.; Du, Lei; Read, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    The key genes required for Bacillus anthracis to cause anthrax have been acquired recently by horizontal gene transfer. To understand the genetic background for the evolution of B. anthracis virulence, we obtained high-redundancy genome sequences of 45 strains of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato (s.l.) species that were chosen for their genetic diversity within the species based on the existing multilocus sequence typing scheme. From the resulting data, we called more than 324,000 new genes representing more than 12,333 new gene families for this group. The core genome size for the B. cereus s.l. group was ?1750 genes, with another 2150 genes found in almost every genome constituting the extended core. There was a paucity of genes specific and conserved in any clade. We found no evidence of recent large-scale gene loss in B. anthracis or for unusual accumulation of nonsynonymous DNA substitutions in the chromosome; however, several B. cereus genomes isolated from soil and not previously associated with human disease were degraded to various degrees. Although B. anthracis has undergone an ecological shift within the species, its chromosome does not appear to be exceptional on a macroscopic scale compared with close relatives. PMID:22645259

  20. A little bit of sex matters for genome evolution in asexual plants.

    PubMed

    Hojsgaard, Diego; Hörandl, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Genome evolution in asexual organisms is theoretically expected to be shaped by various factors: first, hybrid origin, and polyploidy confer a genomic constitution of highly heterozygous genotypes with multiple copies of genes; second, asexuality confers a lack of recombination and variation in populations, which reduces the efficiency of selection against deleterious mutations; hence, the accumulation of mutations and a gradual increase in mutational load (Muller's ratchet) would lead to rapid extinction of asexual lineages; third, allelic sequence divergence is expected to result in rapid divergence of lineages (Meselson effect). Recent transcriptome studies on the asexual polyploid complex Ranunculus auricomus using single-nucleotide polymorphisms confirmed neutral allelic sequence divergence within a short time frame, but rejected a hypothesis of a genome-wide accumulation of mutations in asexuals compared to sexuals, except for a few genes related to reproductive development. We discuss a general model that the observed incidence of facultative sexuality in plants may unmask deleterious mutations with partial dominance and expose them efficiently to purging selection. A little bit of sex may help to avoid genomic decay and extinction. PMID:25750646

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of Helicobacter pylori from Malaysia identifies three distinct lineages suggestive of differential evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narender; Mariappan, Vanitha; Baddam, Ramani; Lankapalli, Aditya K.; Shaik, Sabiha; Goh, Khean-Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Perkins, Tim; Benghezal, Mohammed; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Marshall, Barry J.; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2015-01-01

    The discordant prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and its related diseases, for a long time, fostered certain enigmatic situations observed in the countries of the southern world. Variation in H. pylori infection rates and disease outcomes among different populations in multi-ethnic Malaysia provides a unique opportunity to understand dynamics of host–pathogen interaction and genome evolution. In this study, we extensively analyzed and compared genomes of 27 Malaysian H. pylori isolates and identified three major phylogeographic lineages: hspEastAsia, hpEurope and hpSouthIndia. The analysis of the virulence genes within the core genome, however, revealed a comparable pathogenic potential of the strains. In addition, we identified four genes limited to strains of East-Asian lineage. Our analyses identified a few strain-specific genes encoding restriction modification systems and outlined 311 core genes possibly under differential evolutionary constraints, among the strains representing different ethnic groups. The cagA and vacA genes also showed variations in accordance with the host genetic background of the strains. Moreover, restriction modification genes were found to be significantly enriched in East-Asian strains. An understanding of these variations in the genome content would provide significant insights into various adaptive and host modulation strategies harnessed by H. pylori to effectively persist in a host-specific manner. PMID:25452339

  2. Multiple classes of antiviral agents exhibit in vitro activity against human rhinovirus type C.

    PubMed

    Mello, Chris; Aguayo, Esmeralda; Rodriguez, Madeleine; Lee, Gary; Jordan, Robert; Cihlar, Tomas; Birkus, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Human rhinovirus type C (HRV-C) is a newly discovered enterovirus species frequently associated with exacerbation of asthma and other acute respiratory conditions. Until recently, HRV-C could not be propagated in vitro, hampering in-depth characterization of the virus replication cycle and preventing efficient testing of antiviral agents. Herein we describe several subgenomic RNA replicon systems and a cell culture infectious model for HRV-C that can be used for antiviral screening. The replicon constructs consist of genome sequences from HRVc15, HRVc11, HRVc24, and HRVc25 strains, with the P1 capsid region replaced by a Renilla luciferase coding sequence. Following transfection of the replicon RNA into HeLa cells, the constructs produced time-dependent increases in luciferase signal that can be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by known inhibitors of HRV replication, including the 3C protease inhibitor rupintrivir, the nucleoside analog inhibitor MK-0608, and the phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III? (PI4K-III?) kinase inhibitor PIK93. Furthermore, with the exception of pleconaril and pirodavir, the other tested classes of HRV inhibitors blocked the replication of full-length HRVc15 and HRVc11 in human airway epithelial cells (HAEs) that were differentiated in the air-liquid interface, exhibiting antiviral activities similar to those observed with HRV-16. In summary, this study is the first comprehensive profiling of multiple classes of antivirals against HRV-C, and the set of newly developed quantitative HRV-C antiviral assays represent indispensable tools for the identification and evaluation of novel panserotype HRV inhibitors. PMID:24366736

  3. The rice endophyte Harpophora oryzae genome reveals evolution from a pathogen to a mutualistic endophyte

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xi-Hui; Su, Zhen-Zhu; Wang, Chen; Kubicek, Christian P.; Feng, Xiao-Xiao; Mao, Li-Juan; Wang, Jia-Ying; Chen, Chen; Lin, Fu-Cheng; Zhang, Chu-Long

    2014-01-01

    The fungus Harpophora oryzae is a close relative of the pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae and a beneficial endosymbiont of wild rice. Here, we show that H. oryzae evolved from a pathogenic ancestor. The overall genomic structures of H. and M. oryzae were found to be similar. However, during interactions with rice, the expression of 11.7% of all genes showed opposing trends in the two fungi, suggesting differences in gene regulation. Moreover, infection patterns, triggering of host defense responses, signal transduction and nutritional preferences exhibited remarkable differentiation between the two fungi. In addition, the H. oryzae genome was found to contain thousands of loci of transposon-like elements, which led to the disruption of 929 genes. Our results indicate that the gain or loss of orphan genes, DNA duplications, gene family expansions and the frequent translocation of transposon-like elements have been important factors in the evolution of this endosymbiont from a pathogenic ancestor. PMID:25048173

  4. Plant genetics. Early allopolyploid evolution in the post-Neolithic Brassica napus oilseed genome.

    PubMed

    Chalhoub, Boulos; Denoeud, France; Liu, Shengyi; Parkin, Isobel A P; Tang, Haibao; Wang, Xiyin; Chiquet, Julien; Belcram, Harry; Tong, Chaobo; Samans, Birgit; Corréa, Margot; Da Silva, Corinne; Just, Jérémy; Falentin, Cyril; Koh, Chu Shin; Le Clainche, Isabelle; Bernard, Maria; Bento, Pascal; Noel, Benjamin; Labadie, Karine; Alberti, Adriana; Charles, Mathieu; Arnaud, Dominique; Guo, Hui; Daviaud, Christian; Alamery, Salman; Jabbari, Kamel; Zhao, Meixia; Edger, Patrick P; Chelaifa, Houda; Tack, David; Lassalle, Gilles; Mestiri, Imen; Schnel, Nicolas; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; Fan, Guangyi; Renault, Victor; Bayer, Philippe E; Golicz, Agnieszka A; Manoli, Sahana; Lee, Tae-Ho; Thi, Vinh Ha Dinh; Chalabi, Smahane; Hu, Qiong; Fan, Chuchuan; Tollenaere, Reece; Lu, Yunhai; Battail, Christophe; Shen, Jinxiong; Sidebottom, Christine H D; Wang, Xinfa; Canaguier, Aurélie; Chauveau, Aurélie; Bérard, Aurélie; Deniot, Gwenaëlle; Guan, Mei; Liu, Zhongsong; Sun, Fengming; Lim, Yong Pyo; Lyons, Eric; Town, Christopher D; Bancroft, Ian; Wang, Xiaowu; Meng, Jinling; Ma, Jianxin; Pires, J Chris; King, Graham J; Brunel, Dominique; Delourme, Régine; Renard, Michel; Aury, Jean-Marc; Adams, Keith L; Batley, Jacqueline; Snowdon, Rod J; Tost, Jorg; Edwards, David; Zhou, Yongming; Hua, Wei; Sharpe, Andrew G; Paterson, Andrew H; Guan, Chunyun; Wincker, Patrick

    2014-08-22

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was formed ~7500 years ago by hybridization between B. rapa and B. oleracea, followed by chromosome doubling, a process known as allopolyploidy. Together with more ancient polyploidizations, this conferred an aggregate 72× genome multiplication since the origin of angiosperms and high gene content. We examined the B. napus genome and the consequences of its recent duplication. The constituent An and Cn subgenomes are engaged in subtle structural, functional, and epigenetic cross-talk, with abundant homeologous exchanges. Incipient gene loss and expression divergence have begun. Selection in B. napus oilseed types has accelerated the loss of glucosinolate genes, while preserving expansion of oil biosynthesis genes. These processes provide insights into allopolyploid evolution and its relationship with crop domestication and improvement. PMID:25146293

  5. Evolution and phylogeny of the mud shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda) revealed from complete mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evolutionary history and relationships of the mud shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gebiidea and Axiidea) are contentious, with previous attempts revealing mixed results. The mud shrimps were once classified in the infraorder Thalassinidea. Recent molecular phylogenetic analyses, however, suggest separation of the group into two individual infraorders, Gebiidea and Axiidea. Mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence and structure can be especially powerful in resolving higher systematic relationships that may offer new insights into the phylogeny of the mud shrimps and the other decapod infraorders, and test the hypothesis of dividing the mud shrimps into two infraorders. Results We present the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of five mud shrimps, Austinogebia edulis, Upogebia major, Thalassina kelanang (Gebiidea), Nihonotrypaea thermophilus and Neaxius glyptocercus (Axiidea). All five genomes encode a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a putative control region. Except for T. kelanang, mud shrimp mitochondrial genomes exhibited rearrangements and novel patterns compared to the pancrustacean ground pattern. Each of the two Gebiidea species (A. edulis and U. major) and two Axiidea species (N. glyptocercus and N. thermophiles) share unique gene order specific to their infraorders and analyses further suggest these two derived gene orders have evolved independently. Phylogenetic analyses based on the concatenated nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 13 protein-coding genes indicate the possible polyphyly of mud shrimps, supporting the division of the group into two infraorders. However, the infraordinal relationships among the Gebiidea and Axiidea, and other reptants are poorly resolved. The inclusion of mt genome from more taxa, in particular the reptant infraorders Polychelida and Glypheidea is required in further analysis. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses on the mt genome sequences and the distinct gene orders provide further evidences for the divergence between the two mud shrimp infraorders, Gebiidea and Axiidea, corroborating previous molecular phylogeny and justifying their infraordinal status. Mitochondrial genome sequences appear to be promising markers for resolving phylogenetic issues concerning decapod crustaceans that warrant further investigations and our present study has also provided further information concerning the mt genome evolution of the Decapoda. PMID:23153176

  6. Study of Modern Human Evolution via Comparative Analysis with the Neanderthal Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Musaddeque

    2013-01-01

    Many other human species appeared in evolution in the last 6 million years that have not been able to survive to modern times and are broadly known as archaic humans, as opposed to the extant modern humans. It has always been considered fascinating to compare the modern human genome with that of archaic humans to identify modern human-specific sequence variants and figure out those that made modern humans different from their predecessors or cousin species. Neanderthals are the latest humans to become extinct, and many factors made them the best representatives of archaic humans. Even though a number of comparisons have been made sporadically between Neanderthals and modern humans, mostly following a candidate gene approach, the major breakthrough took place with the sequencing of the Neanderthal genome. The initial genome-wide comparison, based on the first draft of the Neanderthal genome, has generated some interesting inferences regarding variations in functional elements that are not shared by the two species and the debated admixture question. However, there are certain other genetic elements that were not included or included at a smaller scale in those studies, and they should be compared comprehensively to better understand the molecular make-up of modern humans and their phenotypic characteristics. Besides briefly discussing the important outcomes of the comparative analyses made so far between modern humans and Neanderthals, we propose that future comparative studies may include retrotransposons, pseudogenes, and conserved non-coding regions, all of which might have played significant roles during the evolution of modern humans. PMID:24465235

  7. Probing genomic diversity and evolution of Escherichia coli O157 by single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Qi, Weihong; Albert, Thomas J.; Motiwala, Alifiya S.; Alland, David; Hyytia-Trees, Eija K.; Ribot, Efrain M.; Fields, Patricia I.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Swaminathan, Bala

    2006-01-01

    Infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157) are the predominant cause of bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome in the United States. In silico comparison of the two complete STEC O157 genomes (Sakai and EDL933) revealed a strikingly high level of sequence identity in orthologous protein-coding genes, limiting the use of nucleotide sequences to study the evolution and epidemiology of this bacterial pathogen. To systematically examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at a genome scale, we designed comparative genome sequencing microarrays and analyzed 1199 chromosomal genes (a total of 1,167,948 bp) and 92,721 bp of the large virulence plasmid (pO157) of eleven outbreak-associated STEC O157 strains. We discovered 906 SNPs in 523 chromosomal genes and observed a high level of DNA polymorphisms among the pO157 plasmids. Based on a uniform rate of synonymous substitution for Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica (4.7 × 10?9 per site per year), we estimate that the most recent common ancestor of the contemporary ?-glucuronidase-negative, non-sorbitolfermenting STEC O157 strains existed ca. 40 thousand years ago. The phylogeny of the STEC O157 strains based on the informative synonymous SNPs was compared to the maximum parsimony trees inferred from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus variable numbers of tandem repeats analysis. The topological discrepancies indicate that, in contrast to the synonymous mutations, parts of STEC O157 genomes have evolved through different mechanisms with highly variable divergence rates. The SNP loci reported here will provide useful genetic markers for developing high-throughput methods for fine-resolution genotyping of STEC O157. Functional characterization of nucleotide polymorphisms should shed new insights on the evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of STEC O157 and related pathogens. PMID:16606700

  8. Systematics and plastid genome evolution of the cryptically photosynthetic parasitic plant genus Cuscuta (Convolvulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    McNeal, Joel R; Arumugunathan, Kathiravetpilla; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Boore, Jeffrey L; dePamphilis, Claude W

    2007-01-01

    Background The genus Cuscuta L. (Convolvulaceae), commonly known as dodders, are epiphytic vines that invade the stems of their host with haustorial feeding structures at the points of contact. Although they lack expanded leaves, some species are noticeably chlorophyllous, especially as seedlings and in maturing fruits. Some species are reported as crop pests of worldwide distribution, whereas others are extremely rare and have local distributions and apparent niche specificity. A strong phylogenetic framework for this large genus is essential to understand the interesting ecological, morphological and molecular phenomena that occur within these parasites in an evolutionary context. Results Here we present a well-supported phylogeny of Cuscuta using sequences of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer and plastid rps2, rbcL and matK from representatives across most of the taxonomic diversity of the genus. We use the phylogeny to interpret morphological and plastid genome evolution within the genus. At least three currently recognized taxonomic sections are not monophyletic and subgenus Cuscuta is unequivocally paraphyletic. Plastid genes are extremely variable with regards to evolutionary constraint, with rbcL exhibiting even higher levels of purifying selection in Cuscuta than photosynthetic relatives. Nuclear genome size is highly variable within Cuscuta, particularly within subgenus Grammica, and in some cases may indicate the existence of cryptic species in this large clade of morphologically similar species. Conclusion Some morphological characters traditionally used to define major taxonomic splits within Cuscuta are homoplastic and are of limited use in defining true evolutionary groups. Chloroplast genome evolution seems to have evolved in a punctuated fashion, with episodes of loss involving suites of genes or tRNAs followed by stabilization of gene content in major clades. Nearly all species of Cuscuta retain some photosynthetic ability, most likely for nutrient apportionment to their seeds, while complete loss of photosynthesis and possible loss of the entire chloroplast genome is limited to a single small clade of outcrossing species found primarily in western South America. PMID:18078516

  9. A 4-gigabase physical map unlocks the structure and evolution of the complex genome of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Cheng; Gu, Yong Q.; You, Frank M.; Deal, Karin R.; Ma, Yaqin; Hu, Yuqin; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Wang, Jirui; Chen, Shiyong; Jorgensen, Chad M.; Zhang, Yong; McGuire, Patrick E.; Pasternak, Shiran; Stein, Joshua C.; Ware, Doreen; Kramer, Melissa; McCombie, W. Richard; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Martis, Mihaela M.; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Sehgal, Sunish K.; Li, Wanlong; Gill, Bikram S.; Bevan, Michael W.; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Weining, Song; Lazo, Gerard R.; Anderson, Olin D.; Dvorak, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The current limitations in genome sequencing technology require the construction of physical maps for high-quality draft sequences of large plant genomes, such as that of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor. To construct a physical map of the Ae. tauschii genome, we fingerprinted 461,706 bacterial artificial chromosome clones, assembled contigs, designed a 10K Ae. tauschii Infinium SNP array, constructed a 7,185-marker genetic map, and anchored on the map contigs totaling 4.03 Gb. Using whole genome shotgun reads, we extended the SNP marker sequences and found 17,093 genes and gene fragments. We showed that collinearity of the Ae. tauschii genes with Brachypodium distachyon, rice, and sorghum decreased with phylogenetic distance and that structural genome evolution rates have been high across all investigated lineages in subfamily Pooideae, including that of Brachypodieae. We obtained additional information about the evolution of the seven Triticeae chromosomes from 12 ancestral chromosomes and uncovered a pattern of centromere inactivation accompanying nested chromosome insertions in grasses. We showed that the density of noncollinear genes along the Ae. tauschii chromosomes positively correlates with recombination rates, suggested a cause, and showed that new genes, exemplified by disease resistance genes, are preferentially located in high-recombination chromosome regions. PMID:23610408

  10. Genome evolution in the primary endosymbiont of whiteflies sheds light on their divergence.

    PubMed

    Santos-Garcia, Diego; Vargas-Chavez, Carlos; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo; Silva, Francisco J

    2015-03-01

    Whiteflies are important agricultural insect pests, whose evolutionary success is related to a long-term association with a bacterial endosymbiont, Candidatus Portiera aleyrodidarum. To completely characterize this endosymbiont clade, we sequenced the genomes of three new Portiera strains covering the two extant whitefly subfamilies. Using endosymbiont and mitochondrial sequences we estimated the divergence dates in the clade and used these values to understand the molecular evolution of the endosymbiont coding sequences. Portiera genomes were maintained almost completely stable in gene order and gene content during more than 125 Myr of evolution, except in the Bemisia tabaci lineage. The ancestor had already lost the genetic information transfer autonomy but was able to participate in the synthesis of all essential amino acids and carotenoids. The time of divergence of the B. tabaci complex was much more recent than previous estimations. The recent divergence of biotypes B (MEAM1 species) and Q (MED species) suggests that they still could be considered strains of the same species. We have estimated the rates of evolution of Portiera genes, synonymous and nonsynonymous, and have detected significant differences among-lineages, with most Portiera lineages evolving very slowly. Although the nonsynonymous rates were much smaller than the synonymous, the genomic dN/dS ratios were similar, discarding selection as the driver of among-lineage variation. We suggest variation in mutation rate and generation time as the responsible factors. In conclusion, the slow evolutionary rates of Portiera may have contributed to its long-term association with whiteflies, avoiding its replacement by a novel and more efficient endosymbiont. PMID:25716826

  11. Multi-locus analysis of genomic time series data from experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Terhorst, Jonathan; Schlötterer, Christian; Song, Yun S

    2015-04-01

    Genomic time series data generated by evolve-and-resequence (E&R) experiments offer a powerful window into the mechanisms that drive evolution. However, standard population genetic inference procedures do not account for sampling serially over time, and new methods are needed to make full use of modern experimental evolution data. To address this problem, we develop a Gaussian process approximation to the multi-locus Wright-Fisher process with selection over a time course of tens of generations. The mean and covariance structure of the Gaussian process are obtained by computing the corresponding moments in discrete-time Wright-Fisher models conditioned on the presence of a linked selected site. This enables our method to account for the effects of linkage and selection, both along the genome and across sampled time points, in an approximate but principled manner. We first use simulated data to demonstrate the power of our method to correctly detect, locate and estimate the fitness of a selected allele from among several linked sites. We study how this power changes for different values of selection strength, initial haplotypic diversity, population size, sampling frequency, experimental duration, number of replicates, and sequencing coverage depth. In addition to providing quantitative estimates of selection parameters from experimental evolution data, our model can be used by practitioners to design E&R experiments with requisite power. We also explore how our likelihood-based approach can be used to infer other model parameters, including effective population size and recombination rate. Then, we apply our method to analyze genome-wide data from a real E&R experiment designed to study the adaptation of D. melanogaster to a new laboratory environment with alternating cold and hot temperatures. PMID:25849855

  12. Efficacy of Organic Acids in Hand Cleansers for Prevention of Rhinovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Ronald B.; Biedermann, Kim A.; Morgan, Jeffery M.; Keswick, Bruce; Ertel, Keith D.; Barker, Mark F.

    2004-01-01

    Direct hand-to-hand contact is an important mechanism of transmission of rhinovirus infection. The rhinoviruses are inactivated at a low pH. A survey of organic acids in vitro revealed that these compounds have antirhinoviral activity that persists for at least 3 h after application to the skin. In additional studies of salicylic acid (SA) and pyroglutamic acid (PGA), the hands of volunteers were contaminated with rhinovirus at defined times after application of the acid, and then volunteers attempted to inoculate the nasal mucosa with one hand and quantitative viral cultures were done on the other hand. In one study, 3.5% SA or 1% SA with 3.5% PGA was compared with controls 15 min after application to assess the efficacy of the inactivation of virus and prevention of infection. Virus was recovered from the hands of 28 out of 31 (90%) of the volunteers in the control group compared to 4 out of 27 (15%) and 0 out of 27 in the groups administered 3.5 and 1% SA, respectively (P < 0.05). Rhinovirus infection occurred in 10 out of 31 (32%) of the controls and 2 out of 27 (7%) of volunteers in both treatment groups (P < 0.05 compared with control). In a second study, the efficacy of 4% PGA was evaluated 15 min, 1 h, and 3 h after application. Significantly fewer volunteers had positive hand cultures at all time points compared with the control group, but the proportion that developed rhinovirus infection was not significantly reduced. These results suggest the feasibility of the prevention of rhinovirus transmission by hand treatments that are virucidal on contact and have activity that persists after application. PMID:15215114

  13. Genomic evolution and transmission of Helicobacter pylori in two South African families

    PubMed Central

    Didelot, Xavier; Nell, Sandra; Yang, Ines; Woltemate, Sabrina; van der Merwe, Schalk; Suerbaum, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the stomachs of one in two humans and can cause sequelae that include ulcers and cancer. Here we sequenced the genomes of 97 H. pylori isolates from 52 members of two families living in rural conditions in South Africa. From each of 45 individuals, two H. pylori strains were isolated from the antrum and corpus parts of the stomach, and comparisons of their genomes enabled us to study within-host evolution. In 5 of these 45 hosts, the two genomes were too distantly related to be derived from each other and therefore represented evidence of multiple infections. From the remaining 40 genome pairs, we estimated that the synonymous mutation rate was 1.38 × 10?5 per site per year, with a low effective population size within host probably reflecting population bottlenecks and immune selection. Some individuals showed very little evidence for recombination, whereas in others, recombination introduced up to 100-times more substitutions than mutation. These differences may reflect unequal opportunities for recombination depending on the presence or absence of multiple infections. Comparing the genomes carried by distinct individuals enabled us to establish probable transmission links. Transmission events were found significantly more frequently between close relatives, and between individuals living in the same house. We found, however, that a majority of individuals (27/52) were not linked by transmission to other individuals. Our results suggest that transmission does not always occur within families, and that coinfection with multiple strains is frequent and evolutionarily important despite a fast turnover of the infecting strains within-host. PMID:23898187

  14. Transcriptomic and genomic evolution under constant cold in Antarctic notothenioid fish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zuozhou; Cheng, C-H Christina; Zhang, Junfang; Cao, Lixue; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Longhai; Jin, Yudong; Ye, Hua; Deng, Cheng; Dai, Zhonghua; Xu, Qianghua; Hu, Peng; Sun, Shouhong; Shen, Yu; Chen, Liangbiao

    2008-09-01

    The antifreeze glycoprotein-fortified Antarctic notothenioid fishes comprise the predominant fish suborder in the isolated frigid Southern Ocean. Their ecological success undoubtedly entailed evolutionary acquisition of a full suite of cold-stable functions besides antifreeze protection. Prior studies of adaptive changes in these teleost fishes generally examined a single genotype or phenotype. We report here the genome-wide investigations of transcriptional and genomic changes associated with Antarctic notothenioid cold adaptation. We sequenced and characterized 33,560 ESTs from four tissues of the Antarctic notothenioid Dissostichus mawsoni and derived 3,114 nonredundant protein gene families and their expression profiles. Through comparative analyses of same-tissue transcriptome profiles of D. mawsoni and temperate/tropical teleost fishes, we identified 177 notothenioid protein families that were expressed many fold over the latter, indicating cold-related up-regulation. These up-regulated gene families operate in protein biosynthesis, protein folding and degradation, lipid metabolism, antioxidation, antiapoptosis, innate immunity, choriongenesis, and others, all of recognizable functional importance in mitigating stresses in freezing temperatures during notothenioid life histories. We further examined the genomic and evolutionary bases for this expressional up-regulation by comparative genomic hybridization of DNA from four pairs of Antarctic and basal non-Antarctic notothenioids to 10,700 D. mawsoni cDNA probes and discovered significant to astounding (3- to >300-fold, P < 0.05) Antarctic-specific duplications of 118 protein-coding genes, many of which correspond to the up-regulated gene families. Results of our integrative tripartite study strongly suggest that evolution under constant cold has resulted in dramatic genomic expansions of specific protein gene families, augmenting gene expression and gene functions contributing to physiological fitness of Antarctic notothenioids in freezing polar conditions. PMID:18753634

  15. Transcriptomic and genomic evolution under constant cold in Antarctic notothenioid fish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zuozhou; Cheng, C.-H. Christina; Zhang, Junfang; Cao, Lixue; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Longhai; Jin, Yudong; Ye, Hua; Deng, Cheng; Dai, Zhonghua; Xu, Qianghua; Hu, Peng; Sun, Shouhong; Shen, Yu; Chen, Liangbiao

    2008-01-01

    The antifreeze glycoprotein-fortified Antarctic notothenioid fishes comprise the predominant fish suborder in the isolated frigid Southern Ocean. Their ecological success undoubtedly entailed evolutionary acquisition of a full suite of cold-stable functions besides antifreeze protection. Prior studies of adaptive changes in these teleost fishes generally examined a single genotype or phenotype. We report here the genome-wide investigations of transcriptional and genomic changes associated with Antarctic notothenioid cold adaptation. We sequenced and characterized 33,560 ESTs from four tissues of the Antarctic notothenioid Dissostichus mawsoni and derived 3,114 nonredundant protein gene families and their expression profiles. Through comparative analyses of same-tissue transcriptome profiles of D. mawsoni and temperate/tropical teleost fishes, we identified 177 notothenioid protein families that were expressed many fold over the latter, indicating cold-related up-regulation. These up-regulated gene families operate in protein biosynthesis, protein folding and degradation, lipid metabolism, antioxidation, antiapoptosis, innate immunity, choriongenesis, and others, all of recognizable functional importance in mitigating stresses in freezing temperatures during notothenioid life histories. We further examined the genomic and evolutionary bases for this expressional up-regulation by comparative genomic hybridization of DNA from four pairs of Antarctic and basal non-Antarctic notothenioids to 10,700 D. mawsoni cDNA probes and discovered significant to astounding (3- to >300-fold, P < 0.05) Antarctic-specific duplications of 118 protein-coding genes, many of which correspond to the up-regulated gene families. Results of our integrative tripartite study strongly suggest that evolution under constant cold has resulted in dramatic genomic expansions of specific protein gene families, augmenting gene expression and gene functions contributing to physiological fitness of Antarctic notothenioids in freezing polar conditions. PMID:18753634

  16. Genome sequence and rapid evolution of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99A

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, Steven L; Sommer, Daniel D; Schatz, Michael C; Phillippy, Adam M; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Tsuge, Seiji; Furutani, Ayako; Ochiai, Hirokazu; Delcher, Arthur L; Kelley, David; Madupu, Ramana; Puiu, Daniela; Radune, Diana; Shumway, Martin; Trapnell, Cole; Aparna, Gudlur; Jha, Gopaljee; Pandey, Alok; Patil, Prabhu B; Ishihara, Hiromichi; Meyer, Damien F; Szurek, Boris; Verdier, Valerie; Koebnik, Ralf; Dow, J Maxwell; Ryan, Robert P; Hirata, Hisae; Tsuyumu, Shinji; Won Lee, Sang; Ronald, Pamela C; Sonti, Ramesh V; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Leach, Jan E; White, Frank F; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2008-01-01

    Background Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight of rice (Oryza sativa L.), a major disease that constrains production of this staple crop in many parts of the world. We report here on the complete genome sequence of strain PXO99A and its comparison to two previously sequenced strains, KACC10331 and MAFF311018, which are highly similar to one another. Results The PXO99A genome is a single circular chromosome of 5,240,075 bp, considerably longer than the genomes of the other strains (4,941,439 bp and 4,940,217 bp, respectively), and it contains 5083 protein-coding genes, including 87 not found in KACC10331 or MAFF311018. PXO99A contains a greater number of virulence-associated transcription activator-like effector genes and has at least ten major chromosomal rearrangements relative to KACC10331 and MAFF311018. PXO99A contains numerous copies of diverse insertion sequence elements, members of which are associated with 7 out of 10 of the major rearrangements. A rapidly-evolving CRISPR (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats) region contains evidence of dozens of phage infections unique to the PXO99A lineage. PXO99A also contains a unique, near-perfect tandem repeat of 212 kilobases close to the replication terminus. Conclusion Our results provide striking evidence of genome plasticity and rapid evolution within Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The comparisons point to sources of genomic variation and candidates for strain-specific adaptations of this pathogen that help to explain the extraordinary diversity of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae genotypes and races that have been isolated from around the world. PMID:18452608

  17. Comparative genomics and evolution of regulons of the LacI-family transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Khoroshkin, Matvei S.; Laikova, Olga N.; Tsoy, Olga V.; Sernova, Natalia V.; Petrova, Svetlana A.; Rakhmaninova, Aleksandra B.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are essential components of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. LacI-family TFs (LacI-TFs) are broadly distributed among certain lineages of bacteria. The majority of characterized LacI-TFs sense sugar effectors and regulate carbohydrate utilization genes. The comparative genomics approaches enable in silico identification of TF-binding sites and regulon reconstruction. To study the function and evolution of LacI-TFs, we performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of their regulons. For over 1300 LacI-TFs from over 270 bacterial genomes, we predicted their cognate DNA-binding motifs and identified target genes. Using the genome context and metabolic subsystem analyses of reconstructed regulons, we tentatively assigned functional roles and predicted candidate effectors for 78 and 67% of the analyzed LacI-TFs, respectively. Nearly 90% of the studied LacI-TFs are local regulators of sugar utilization pathways, whereas the remaining 125 global regulators control large and diverse sets of metabolic genes. The global LacI-TFs include the previously known regulators CcpA in Firmicutes, FruR in Enterobacteria, and PurR in Gammaproteobacteria, as well as the three novel regulators—GluR, GapR, and PckR—that are predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism in three lineages of Alphaproteobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of regulators combined with the reconstructed regulons provides a model of evolutionary diversification of the LacI protein family. The obtained genomic collection of in silico reconstructed LacI-TF regulons in bacteria is available in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov). It provides a framework for future structural and functional classification of the LacI protein family and identification of molecular determinants of the DNA and ligand specificity. The inferred regulons can be also used for functional gene annotation and reconstruction of sugar catabolic networks in diverse bacterial lineages. PMID:24966856

  18. Infectivity assays of human rhinovirus-A and -B serotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai-Ming; Chen, Yin; Wang, Wensheng; Mosser, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Infectivity is a fundamental property of viral pathogens such as human rhinoviruses (HRVs). This chapter describes two methods for measuring the infectivity of HRV-A and -B serotypes: end point dilution (TCID50) assay and plaque assay. End point dilution assay is a quantal, not quantitative, assay that determines the dilution of the sample at which 50 % of the aliquots have infectious virus. It can be used for all the HRV-A and -B serotypes and related clinical isolates that grow in cell culture and induce cytopathic effect (CPE), degenerative changes in cells that are visible under a microscope. Plaque assay is a quantitative assay that determines the number of infectious units of a virus in a sample. After an infectious unit of virus infects one cell, the infected cell produces progeny viruses that then infect and kill a circle of adjacent cells. This circle of dead cells detaches from the dish and thus leaves a clear hole in a cell monolayer. Plaque assay works only for HeLa-adapted HRV-A and -B serotypes that can make visible plaques on the cell monolayer. Currently the end point dilution assay and plaque assay have not been developed for the newly discovered HRV-C. PMID:25261308

  19. Impact of rhinoviruses on pediatric community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Daleno, Cristina; Tagliabue, Claudia; Scala, Alessia; Tenconi, Rossana; Borzani, Irene; Fossali, Emilio; Pelucchi, Claudio; Piralla, Antonio; Principi, Nicola

    2012-07-01

    This study of 592 children seen in our Emergency Department with radiographically confirmed community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) was designed to evaluate the role of rhinoviruses (RVs) in the disease. The respiratory secretions of each child were assayed using RVP Fast in order to detect 17 respiratory viruses, and the RV-positive samples were characterised by means of real-time polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. RVs were identified in 172 cases (29.0%): 48/132 children aged<1 year (36.3%), 80/293 aged 1-3 years (27.3%), and 44/167 aged?4 years (26.3%). Sequencing demonstrated that 82 RVs (49.1%) were group A, 17 (10.1%) group B, and 52 (31.1%) group C; 21 (12.2%) were untyped. RVs were found as single agents in 99 cases, and together with two or more other viruses in 73 (40.7%). There were only marginal differences between the different RV groups and between single RV infection and RV co-infections. RV CAP is frequent not only in younger but also in older children, and RV-A is the most common strain associated with it. The clinical relevance of RV CAP seems to be mild to moderate without any major differences between the A and B strains and the recently identified RV C. PMID:22124536

  20. Phylogeny and molecular evolution of the Acc1 gene within the StH genome species in Triticeae (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Sha, Li-Na; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Hai-Qin; Kang, Hou-Yang; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Yong-Hong

    2013-10-15

    To estimate the phylogeny and molecular evolution of a single-copy gene encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1) within the StH genome species, two Acc1 homoeologous sequences were isolated from nearly all the sampled StH genome species and were analyzed with those from 35 diploid taxa representing 19 basic genomes in Triticeae. Sequence diversity patterns and genealogical analysis suggested that (1) the StH genome species from the same areas or neighboring geographic regions are closely related to each other; (2) the Acc1 gene sequences of the StH genome species from North America and Eurasia are evolutionarily distinct; (3) Dasypyrum has contributed to the nuclear genome of Elymus repens and Elymus mutabilis; (4) the StH genome polyploids have higher levels of sequence diversity in the H genome homoeolog than the St genome homoeolog; and (5) the Acc1 sequence may evolve faster in the polyploid species than in the diploids. Our result provides some insight on evolutionary dynamics of duplicate Acc1 gene, the polyploidy speciation and phylogeny of the StH genome species. PMID:23911302

  1. The genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi and its implications for cell type evolution.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph F; Pang, Kevin; Schnitzler, Christine E; Nguyen, Anh-Dao; Moreland, R Travis; Simmons, David K; Koch, Bernard J; Francis, Warren R; Havlak, Paul; Smith, Stephen A; Putnam, Nicholas H; Haddock, Steven H D; Dunn, Casey W; Wolfsberg, Tyra G; Mullikin, James C; Martindale, Mark Q; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2013-12-13

    An understanding of ctenophore biology is critical for reconstructing events that occurred early in animal evolution. Toward this goal, we have sequenced, assembled, and annotated the genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi. Our phylogenomic analyses of both amino acid positions and gene content suggest that ctenophores rather than sponges are the sister lineage to all other animals. Mnemiopsis lacks many of the genes found in bilaterian mesodermal cell types, suggesting that these cell types evolved independently. The set of neural genes in Mnemiopsis is similar to that of sponges, indicating that sponges may have lost a nervous system. These results present a newly supported view of early animal evolution that accounts for major losses and/or gains of sophisticated cell types, including nerve and muscle cells. PMID:24337300

  2. The genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi and its implications for cell type evolution

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Joseph F.; Pang, Kevin; Schnitzler, Christine E.; Nguyen, Anh-Dao; Moreland, R. Travis; Simmons, David K.; Koch, Bernard J.; Francis, Warren R.; Havlak, Paul; Smith, Stephen A.; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Haddock, Steven H. D.; Dunn, Casey W.; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.; Mullikin, James C.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Baxevanis, Andreas D.

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of ctenophore biology is critical for reconstructing events that occurred early in animal evolution. Towards this goal, we have sequenced, assembled, and annotated the genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi. Our phylogenomic analyses of both amino acid positions and gene content suggests that ctenophores rather than sponges are the sister lineage to all other animals. Mnemiopsis lacks many of the genes found in bilaterian mesodermal cell types, suggesting that these cell types evolved independently. The set of neural genes in Mnemiopsis is similar to that of sponges, indicating that sponges may have lost a nervous system. These results present a new view of early animal evolution that accounts for major losses and/or gains of sophisticated cell types, including nerve and muscle cells. PMID:24337300

  3. Genetic and Genomic Architecture of the Evolution of Resistance to Antifungal Drug Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jessica A.; Ammar, Ron; Torti, Dax; Nislow, Corey; Cowen, Leah E.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistance in fungal pathogens compromises the efficacy of the limited number of antifungal drugs. Drug combinations have emerged as a powerful strategy to enhance antifungal efficacy and abrogate drug resistance, but the impact on the evolution of drug resistance remains largely unexplored. Targeting the molecular chaperone Hsp90 or its downstream effector, the protein phosphatase calcineurin, abrogates resistance to the most widely deployed antifungals, the azoles, which inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis. Here, we evolved experimental populations of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the leading human fungal pathogen Candida albicans with azole and an inhibitor of Hsp90, geldanamycin, or calcineurin, FK506. To recapitulate a clinical context where Hsp90 or calcineurin inhibitors could be utilized in combination with azoles to render resistant pathogens responsive to treatment, the evolution experiment was initiated with strains that are resistant to azoles in a manner that depends on Hsp90 and calcineurin. Of the 290 lineages initiated, most went extinct, yet 14 evolved resistance to the drug combination. Drug target mutations that conferred resistance to geldanamycin or FK506 were identified and validated in five evolved lineages. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in a gene encoding a transcriptional activator of drug efflux pumps, PDR1, and a gene encoding a transcriptional repressor of ergosterol biosynthesis genes, MOT3, that transformed azole resistance of two lineages from dependent on calcineurin to independent of this regulator. Resistance also arose by mutation that truncated the catalytic subunit of calcineurin, and by mutation in LCB1, encoding a sphingolipid biosynthetic enzyme. Genome analysis revealed extensive aneuploidy in four of the C. albicans lineages. Thus, we identify molecular determinants of the transition of azole resistance from calcineurin dependence to independence and establish multiple mechanisms by which resistance to drug combinations evolves, providing a foundation for predicting and preventing the evolution of drug resistance. PMID:23593013

  4. The evolution of the avian genome as revealed by comparative molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, D K; Robertson, L B W; Tempest, H G; Skinner, B M

    2007-01-01

    Birds are characterised by feathers, flight, a small genome and a very distinctive karyotype. Despite the large numbers of chromosomes, the diploid count of 2n approximately 80 has remained remarkably constant with 63% of birds where 2n = 74-86, 24% with 2n = 66-74 and extremes of 2n = 40 and 2n = 142. Of these, the most studied is the chicken (2n = 78), and molecular cytogenetic probes generated from this species have been used to further understand the evolution of the avian genome. The ancestral karyotype is, it appears, very similar to that of the chicken, with chicken chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4q, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 4p and Z representing the ancestral avian chromosomes 1-10 + Z; chromosome 4 being the most ancient. Avian evolution occurred primarily in three stages: the divergence of the group represented by extant ratites (emu, ostrich etc.) from the rest; divergence of the Galloanserae (chicken, turkey, duck, goose etc.)--the most studied group; and divergence of the 'land' and 'water' higher birds. Other than sex chromosome differentiation in the first divergence there are no specific changes associated with any of these evolutionary milestones although certain families and orders have undergone multiple fusions (and some fissions), which has reduced their chromosome number; the Falconiformes are the best described. Most changes, overall, seem to involve chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 10 and Z where the Z changes are intrachromosomal; there are also some recurring (convergent) events. Of these, the most puzzling involves chromosomes 4 and 10, which appear to have undergone multiple fissions and/or fusions throughout evolution - three possible hypotheses are presented to explain the findings. We conclude by speculating as to the reasons for the strange behaviour of these chromosomes as well as the role of telomeres and nuclear organisation in avian evolution. PMID:17675846

  5. Genome size variation and evolution in allotetraploid Arabidopsis kamchatica and its parents, Arabidopsis lyrata and Arabidopsis halleri.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Diana E; Steets, Janette A; Houliston, Gary J; Takebayashi, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidization and subsequent changes in genome size are fundamental processes in evolution and diversification. Little is currently known about the extent of genome size variation within taxa and the evolutionary forces acting on this variation. Arabidopsis kamchatica has been reported to contain both diploid and tetraploid individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the genome size of A. kamchatica, whether there is variation in ploidy and/or genome size in A. kamchatica and to study how genome size has evolved. We used propidium iodide flow cytometry to measure 2C DNA content of 73 plants from 25 geographically diverse populations of the putative allotetraploid A. kamchatica and its parents, Arabidopsis lyrata and Arabidopsis halleri. All A. kamchatica plants appear to be tetraploids. The mean 2C DNA content of A. kamchatica was 1.034 pg (1011 Mbp), which is slightly smaller than the sum of its diploid parents (A. lyrata: 0.502 pg; A. halleri: 0.571 pg). Arabidopsis kamchatica appears to have lost ?37.594 Mbp (3.6 %) of DNA from its 2C genome. Tetraploid A. lyrata from Germany and Austria appears to have lost ?70.366 Mbp (7.2 %) of DNA from the 2C genome, possibly due to hybridization with A. arenosa, which has a smaller genome than A. lyrata. We did find genome size differences among A. kamchatica populations, which varied up to 7 %. Arabidopsis kamchatica ssp. kawasakiana from Japan appears to have a slightly larger genome than A. kamchatica ssp. kamchatica from North America, perhaps due to multiple allopolyploid origins or hybridization with A. halleri. However, the among-population coefficient of variation in 2C DNA content is lower in A. kamchatica than in other Arabidopsis taxa. Due to its close relationship to A. thaliana, A. kamchatica has the potential to be very useful in the study of polyploidy and genome evolution. PMID:24887004

  6. Inhibition of Human Rhinovirus-Induced Cytokine Production by AG7088, a Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zalman, L. S.; Brothers, M. A.; Dragovich, P. S.; Zhou, R.; Prins, T. J.; Worland, S. T.; Patick, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    Symptom severity in patients with human rhinovirus (HRV)-induced respiratory illness is associated with elevated levels of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8. AG7088 is a novel, irreversible inhibitor of the HRV 3C protease. In this study, AG7088 was tested for its antiviral activity and ability to inhibit the production of IL-6 and IL-8 in a human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. Infection of BEAS-2B cells with HRV 14 resulted in the production of both infectious virus and the cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Treatment of HRV 14-infected cells with AG7088 resulted in a statistically significant (P, <0.05) dose-dependent reduction in the levels of infectious virus as well as IL-6 and IL-8 released into the cell supernatant compared to the results obtained for compound-free infected cells. AG7088 was also able to inhibit the replication of HRV 2 and 16 in BEAS-2B cells. In time-of-addition studies, AG7088 could be added as late as 14 to 26 h after HRV 14 infection of BEAS-2B cells and still result in a statistically significant (P, <0.05) reduction in the levels of infectious virus, IL-6, and IL-8 compared to the results obtained for compound-free infected cells. These findings have implications for the development of an antirhinovirus agent that may not only block virus replication but also diminish symptoms. PMID:10770757

  7. Inhibition of human rhinovirus-induced cytokine production by AG7088, a human rhinovirus 3C protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zalman, L S; Brothers, M A; Dragovich, P S; Zhou, R; Prins, T J; Worland, S T; Patick, A K

    2000-05-01

    Symptom severity in patients with human rhinovirus (HRV)-induced respiratory illness is associated with elevated levels of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8. AG7088 is a novel, irreversible inhibitor of the HRV 3C protease. In this study, AG7088 was tested for its antiviral activity and ability to inhibit the production of IL-6 and IL-8 in a human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. Infection of BEAS-2B cells with HRV 14 resulted in the production of both infectious virus and the cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Treatment of HRV 14-infected cells with AG7088 resulted in a statistically significant (P, <0.05) dose-dependent reduction in the levels of infectious virus as well as IL-6 and IL-8 released into the cell supernatant compared to the results obtained for compound-free infected cells. AG7088 was also able to inhibit the replication of HRV 2 and 16 in BEAS-2B cells. In time-of-addition studies, AG7088 could be added as late as 14 to 26 h after HRV 14 infection of BEAS-2B cells and still result in a statistically significant (P, <0.05) reduction in the levels of infectious virus, IL-6, and IL-8 compared to the results obtained for compound-free infected cells. These findings have implications for the development of an antirhinovirus agent that may not only block virus replication but also diminish symptoms. PMID:10770757

  8. Clonal evolution in relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia revealed by whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Ley, Timothy J; Larson, David E; Miller, Christopher A; Koboldt, Daniel C; Welch, John S; Ritchey, Julie K; Young, Margaret A; Lamprecht, Tamara; McLellan, Michael D; McMichael, Joshua F; Wallis, John W; Lu, Charles; Shen, Dong; Harris, Christopher C; Dooling, David J; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Chen, Ken; Schmidt, Heather; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle; Magrini, Vincent J; Cook, Lisa; McGrath, Sean D; Vickery, Tammi L; Wendl, Michael C; Heath, Sharon; Watson, Mark A; Link, Daniel C; Tomasson, Michael H; Shannon, William D; Payton, Jacqueline E; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Westervelt, Peter; Walter, Matthew J; Graubert, Timothy A; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; DiPersio, John F

    2012-01-26

    Most patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) die from progressive disease after relapse, which is associated with clonal evolution at the cytogenetic level. To determine the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, we sequenced the primary tumour and relapse genomes from eight AML patients, and validated hundreds of somatic mutations using deep sequencing; this allowed us to define clonality and clonal evolution patterns precisely at relapse. In addition to discovering novel, recurrently mutated genes (for example, WAC, SMC3, DIS3, DDX41 and DAXX) in AML, we also found two major clonal evolution patterns during AML relapse: (1) the founding clone in the primary tumour gained mutations and evolved into the relapse clone, or (2) a subclone of the founding clone survived initial therapy, gained additional mutations and expanded at relapse. In all cases, chemotherapy failed to eradicate the founding clone. The comparison of relapse-specific versus primary tumour mutations in all eight cases revealed an increase in transversions, probably due to DNA damage caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy. These data demonstrate that AML relapse is associated with the addition of new mutations and clonal evolution, which is shaped, in part, by the chemotherapy that the patients receive to establish and maintain remissions. PMID:22237025

  9. Insight into the evolution and origin of leprosy bacilli from the genome sequence of Mycobacterium lepromatosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pushpendra; Benjak, Andrej; Schuenemann, Verena J; Herbig, Alexander; Avanzi, Charlotte; Busso, Philippe; Nieselt, Kay; Krause, Johannes; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Cole, Stewart T

    2015-04-01

    Mycobacterium lepromatosis is an uncultured human pathogen associated with diffuse lepromatous leprosy and a reactional state known as Lucio's phenomenon. By using deep sequencing with and without DNA enrichment, we obtained the near-complete genome sequence of M. lepromatosis present in a skin biopsy from a Mexican patient, and compared it with that of Mycobacterium leprae, which has undergone extensive reductive evolution. The genomes display extensive synteny and are similar in size (?3.27 Mb). Protein-coding genes share 93% nucleotide sequence identity, whereas pseudogenes are only 82% identical. The events that led to pseudogenization of 50% of the genome likely occurred before divergence from their most recent common ancestor (MRCA), and both M. lepromatosis and M. leprae have since accumulated new pseudogenes or acquired specific deletions. Functional comparisons suggest that M. lepromatosis has lost several enzymes required for amino acid synthesis whereas M. leprae has a defective heme pathway. M. lepromatosis has retained all functions required to infect the Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system and therefore may also be neuropathogenic. A phylogeographic survey of 227 leprosy biopsies by differential PCR revealed that 221 contained M. leprae whereas only six, all from Mexico, harbored M. lepromatosis. Phylogenetic comparisons indicate that M. lepromatosis is closer than M. leprae to the MRCA, and a Bayesian dating analysis suggests that they diverged from their MRCA approximately 13.9 Mya. Thus, despite their ancient separation, the two leprosy bacilli are remarkably conserved and still cause similar pathologic conditions. PMID:25831531

  10. Genomic imprinting in the development and evolution of psychotic spectrum conditions.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Bernard

    2008-11-01

    I review and evaluate genetic and genomic evidence salient to the hypothesis that the development and evolution of psychotic spectrum conditions have been mediated in part by alterations of imprinted genes expressed in the brain. Evidence from the genetics and genomics of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, Prader-Willi syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, and other neurogenetic conditions support the hypothesis that the etiologies of psychotic spectrum conditions commonly involve genetic and epigenetic imbalances in the effects of imprinted genes, with a bias towards increased relative effects from imprinted genes with maternal expression or other genes favouring maternal interests. By contrast, autistic spectrum conditions, including Kanner autism, Asperger syndrome, Rett syndrome, Turner syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, commonly engender increased relative effects from paternally expressed imprinted genes, or reduced effects from genes favouring maternal interests. Imprinted-gene effects on the etiologies of autistic and psychotic spectrum conditions parallel the diametric effects of imprinted genes in placental and foetal development, in that psychotic spectrum conditions tend to be associated with undergrowth and relatively-slow brain development, whereas some autistic spectrum conditions involve brain and body overgrowth, especially in foetal development and early childhood. An important role for imprinted genes in the etiologies of psychotic and autistic spectrum conditions is consistent with neurodevelopmental models of these disorders, and with predictions from the conflict theory of genomic imprinting. PMID:18783362

  11. Analysis of horse genomes provides insight into the diversification and adaptive evolution of karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinlong; Zhao, Yiping; Shiraigol, Wunierfu; Li, Bei; Bai, Dongyi; Ye, Weixing; Daidiikhuu, Dorjsuren; Yang, Lihua; Jin, Burenqiqige; Zhao, Qinan; Gao, Yahan; Wu, Jing; Bao, Wuyundalai; Li, Anaer; Zhang, Yuhong; Han, Haige; Bai, Haitang; Bao, Yanqing; Zhao, Lele; Zhai, Zhengxiao; Zhao, Wenjing; Sun, Zikui; Zhang, Yan; Meng, He; Dugarjaviin, Manglai

    2014-01-01

    Karyotypic diversification is more prominent in Equus species than in other mammals. Here, using next generation sequencing technology, we generated and de novo assembled quality genomes sequences for a male wild horse (Przewalski's horse) and a male domestic horse (Mongolian horse), with about 93-fold and 91-fold coverage, respectively. Portion of Y chromosome from wild horse assemblies (3?M bp) and Mongolian horse (2?M bp) were also sequenced and de novo assembled. We confirmed a Robertsonian translocation event through the wild horse's chromosomes 23 and 24, which contained sequences that were highly homologous with those on the domestic horse's chromosome 5. The four main types of rearrangement, insertion of unknown origin, inserted duplication, inversion, and relocation, are not evenly distributed on all the chromosomes, and some chromosomes, such as the X chromosome, contain more rearrangements than others, and the number of inversions is far less than the number of insertions and relocations in the horse genome. Furthermore, we discovered the percentages of LINE_L1 and LTR_ERV1 are significantly increased in rearrangement regions. The analysis results of the two representative Equus species genomes improved our knowledge of Equus chromosome rearrangement and karyotype evolution. PMID:24828444

  12. Green evolution and dynamic adaptations revealed by genomes of the marine picoeukaryotes Micromonas

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, Alexandra Z.; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Mock, Thomas; Rouze, Pierre; Simmons, Melinda P.; Aerts, Andrea L.; Allen, Andrew E.; Cuvelier, Marie L.; Derelle, Evelyne; Everett, Meredieht V.; Foulon, Elodie; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Henrissat, Bernard; Napoli, Carolyn; McDonald, Sarah M.; Parker, Micaela S.; Rombauts, Stephane; Salamov, Asaf; von Dassow, Peter; Badger, Jonathan G,; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Demir, Elif; Dubchak, Inna; Gentemann, Chelle; Eikrem, Wenche; Gready, Jill E.; John, Uwe; Lanier, William; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Mayer, Kluas F. X.; Moreau, Herve; Not, Fabrice; Otillar, Robert; Panaud, Olivier; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Paulsen, Ian; Piegu, Benoit; Poliakov, Aaron; Robbens, Steven; Schmutz, Jeremy; Roulza, Eve; Wyss, Tania; Zelensky, Alexander; Zhou, Kemin; Armbrust, E. Virginia; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Goodenough, Ursula W.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2009-10-14

    Picoeukaryotes are a taxonomically diverse group of organisms less than 2 micrometers in diameter. Photosynthetic marine picoeukaryotes in the genus Micromonas thrive in ecosystems ranging from tropical to polar and could serve as sentinel organisms for biogeochemical fluxes of modern oceans during climate change. These broadly distributed primary producers belong to an anciently diverged sister clade to land plants. Although Micromonas isolates have high 18S ribosomal RNA gene identity, we found that genomes from two isolates shared only 90percent of their predicted genes. Their independent evolutionary paths were emphasized by distinct riboswitch arrangements as well as the discovery of intronic repeat elements in one isolate, and in metagenomic data, but not in other genomes. Divergence appears to have been facilitated by selection and acquisition processes that actively shape the repertoire of genes that are mutually exclusive between the two isolates differently than the core genes. Analyses of the Micromonas genomes offer valuable insights into ecological differentiation and the dynamic nature of early plant evolution.

  13. Linking genomics and ecology to investigate the complex evolution of an invasive Drosophila pest.

    PubMed

    Ometto, Lino; Cestaro, Alessandro; Ramasamy, Sukanya; Grassi, Alberto; Revadi, Santosh; Siozios, Stefanos; Moretto, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Varotto, Claudio; Pisani, Davide; Dekker, Teun; Wrobel, Nicola; Viola, Roberto; Pertot, Ilaria; Cavalieri, Duccio; Blaxter, Mark; Anfora, Gianfranco; Rota-Stabelli, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Drosophilid fruit flies have provided science with striking cases of behavioral adaptation and genetic innovation. A recent example is the invasive pest Drosophila suzukii, which, unlike most other Drosophila, lays eggs and feeds on undamaged, ripening fruits. This not only poses a serious threat for fruit cultivation but also offers an interesting model to study evolution of behavioral innovation. We developed genome and transcriptome resources for D. suzukii. Coupling analyses of these data with field observations, we propose a hypothesis of the origin of its peculiar ecology. Using nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic analyses, we confirm its Asian origin and reveal a surprising sister relationship between the eugracilis and the melanogaster subgroups. Although the D. suzukii genome is comparable in size and repeat content to other Drosophila species, it has the lowest nucleotide substitution rate among the species analyzed in this study. This finding is compatible with the overwintering diapause of D. suzukii, which results in a reduced number of generations per year compared with its sister species. Genome-scale relaxed clock analyses support a late Miocene origin of D. suzukii, concomitant with paleogeological and climatic conditions that suggest an adaptation to temperate montane forests, a hypothesis confirmed by field trapping. We propose a causal link between the ecological adaptations of D. suzukii in its native habitat and its invasive success in Europe and North America. PMID:23501831

  14. Linking Genomics and Ecology to Investigate the Complex Evolution of an Invasive Drosophila Pest

    PubMed Central

    Ometto, Lino; Cestaro, Alessandro; Ramasamy, Sukanya; Grassi, Alberto; Revadi, Santosh; Siozios, Stefanos; Moretto, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Varotto, Claudio; Pisani, Davide; Dekker, Teun; Wrobel, Nicola; Viola, Roberto; Pertot, Ilaria; Cavalieri, Duccio; Blaxter, Mark; Anfora, Gianfranco; Rota-Stabelli, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Drosophilid fruit flies have provided science with striking cases of behavioral adaptation and genetic innovation. A recent example is the invasive pest Drosophila suzukii, which, unlike most other Drosophila, lays eggs and feeds on undamaged, ripening fruits. This not only poses a serious threat for fruit cultivation but also offers an interesting model to study evolution of behavioral innovation. We developed genome and transcriptome resources for D. suzukii. Coupling analyses of these data with field observations, we propose a hypothesis of the origin of its peculiar ecology. Using nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenetic analyses, we confirm its Asian origin and reveal a surprising sister relationship between the eugracilis and the melanogaster subgroups. Although the D. suzukii genome is comparable in size and repeat content to other Drosophila species, it has the lowest nucleotide substitution rate among the species analyzed in this study. This finding is compatible with the overwintering diapause of D. suzukii, which results in a reduced number of generations per year compared with its sister species. Genome-scale relaxed clock analyses support a late Miocene origin of D. suzukii, concomitant with paleogeological and climatic conditions that suggest an adaptation to temperate montane forests, a hypothesis confirmed by field trapping. We propose a causal link between the ecological adaptations of D. suzukii in its native habitat and its invasive success in Europe and North America. PMID:23501831

  15. Reshuffling genomic landscapes to study the regulatory evolution of Hox gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Tschopp, Patrick; Fraudeau, Nadine; Béna, Frédérique; Duboule, Denis

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of Vertebrata was accompanied by two rounds of whole-genome duplications. This enabled paralogous genes to acquire novel functions with high evolutionary potential, a process suggested to occur mostly by changes in gene regulation, rather than in protein sequences. In the case of Hox gene clusters, such duplications favored the appearance of distinct global regulations. To assess the impact of such “regulatory evolution” upon neo-functionalization, we developed PANTHERE (PAN-genomic Translocation for Heterologous Enhancer RE-shuffling) to bring the entire megabase-scale HoxD regulatory landscape in front of the HoxC gene cluster via a targeted translocation in vivo. At this chimeric locus, Hoxc genes could both interpret this foreign regulation and functionally substitute for their Hoxd counterparts. Our results emphasize the importance of evolving regulatory modules rather than their target genes in the process of neo-functionalization and offer a genetic tool to study the complexity of the vertebrate regulatory genome. PMID:21670281

  16. Reshuffling genomic landscapes to study the regulatory evolution of Hox gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Tschopp, Patrick; Fraudeau, Nadine; Béna, Frédérique; Duboule, Denis

    2011-06-28

    The emergence of Vertebrata was accompanied by two rounds of whole-genome duplications. This enabled paralogous genes to acquire novel functions with high evolutionary potential, a process suggested to occur mostly by changes in gene regulation, rather than in protein sequences. In the case of Hox gene clusters, such duplications favored the appearance of distinct global regulations. To assess the impact of such "regulatory evolution" upon neo-functionalization, we developed PANTHERE (PAN-genomic Translocation for Heterologous Enhancer RE-shuffling) to bring the entire megabase-scale HoxD regulatory landscape in front of the HoxC gene cluster via a targeted translocation in vivo. At this chimeric locus, Hoxc genes could both interpret this foreign regulation and functionally substitute for their Hoxd counterparts. Our results emphasize the importance of evolving regulatory modules rather than their target genes in the process of neo-functionalization and offer a genetic tool to study the complexity of the vertebrate regulatory genome. PMID:21670281

  17. Molecular evolution of the HD-ZIP I gene family in legume genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Haiyang; Zhou, Lingyan; Deng, Lin; Lin, Yongxiang; Peng, Xiaojian; Yan, Hanwei; Cheng, Beijiu

    2014-01-01

    Homeodomain leucine zipper I (HD-ZIP I) genes were used to increase the plasticity of plants by mediating external signals and regulating growth in response to environmental conditions. The way genomic histories drove the evolution of the HD-ZIP I family in legume species was described; HD-ZIP I genes were searched in Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, Cajanus cajan and Phaseolus vulgaris, and then divided into five clades through phylogenetic analysis. Microsynteny analysis was made based on genomic segments containing the HD-ZIP I genes. Some pairs turned out to conform with syntenic genome regions, while others corresponded to those that were inverted, expanded, or contracted after the divergence of legumes. Besides, we dated their duplications by Ks analysis and demonstrated that all the blocks were formed after the monocot-dicot split; we observed Ka/Ks ratios representing strong purifying selections in the four legume species which might have been followed by gene loss and rearrangement. PMID:24095777

  18. Analysis of the African coelacanth genome sheds light on tetrapod evolution

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Chris T.; Alföldi, Jessica; Lee, Alison P.; Fan, Shaohua; Philippe, Hervé; MacCallum, Iain; Braasch, Ingo; Manousaki, Tereza; Schneider, Igor; Rohner, Nicolas; Organ, Chris; Chalopin, Domitille; Smith, Jeramiah J.; Robinson, Mark; Dorrington, Rosemary A.; Gerdol, Marco; Aken, Bronwen; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Barucca, Marco; Baurain, Denis; Berlin, Aaron M.; Blatch, Gregory L.; Buonocore, Francesco; Burmester, Thorsten; Campbell, Michael S.; Canapa, Adriana; Cannon, John P.; Christoffels, Alan; De Moro, Gianluca; Edkins, Adrienne L.; Fan, Lin; Fausto, Anna Maria; Feiner, Nathalie; Forconi, Mariko; Gamieldien, Junaid; Gnerre, Sante; Gnirke, Andreas; Goldstone, Jared V.; Haerty, Wilfried; Hahn, Mark E.; Hesse, Uljana; Hoffmann, Steve; Johnson, Jeremy; Karchner, Sibel I.; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Lara, Marcia; Levin, Joshua Z.; Litman, Gary W.; Mauceli, Evan; Miyake, Tsutomu; Mueller, M. Gail; Nelson, David R.; Nitsche, Anne; Olmo, Ettore; Ota, Tatsuya; Pallavicini, Alberto; Panji, Sumir; Picone, Barbara; Ponting, Chris P.; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Przybylski, Dariusz; Saha, Nil Ratan; Ravi, Vydianathan; Ribeiro, Filipe J.; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Searle, Stephen M. J.; Sharpe, Ted; Simakov, Oleg; Stadler, Peter F.; Stegeman, John J.; Sumiyama, Kenta; Tabbaa, Diana; Tafer, Hakim; Turner-Maier, Jason; van Heusden, Peter; White, Simon; Williams, Louise; Yandell, Mark; Brinkmann, Henner; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Tabin, Clifford J.; Shubin, Neil; Schartl, Manfred; Jaffe, David; Postlethwait, John H.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Di Palma, Federica; Lander, Eric S.; Meyer, Axel; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    It was a zoological sensation when a living specimen of the coelacanth was first discovered in 1938, as this lineage of lobe-finned fish was thought to have gone extinct 70 million years ago. The modern coelacanth looks remarkably similar to many of its ancient relatives, and its evolutionary proximity to our own fish ancestors provides a glimpse of the fish that first walked on land. Here we report the genome sequence of the African coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae. Through a phylogenomic analysis, we conclude that the lungfish, and not the coelacanth, is the closest living relative of tetrapods. Coelacanth protein-coding genes are significantly more slowly evolving than those of tetrapods, unlike other genomic features . Analyses of changes in genes and regulatory elements during the vertebrate adaptation to land highlight genes involved in immunity, nitrogen excretion and the development of fins, tail, ear, eye, brain, and olfaction. Functional assays of enhancers involved in the fin-to-limb transition and in the emergence of extra-embryonic tissues demonstrate the importance of the coelacanth genome as a blueprint for understanding tetrapod evolution. PMID:23598338

  19. Clonal Evolution in Breast Cancer Revealed by Single Nucleus Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Waters, Jill; Leung, Marco L.; Unruh, Anna; Roh, Whijae; Shi, Xiuqing; Chen, Ken; Scheet, Paul; Vattathil, Selina; Liang, Han; Multani, Asha; Zhang, Hong; Zhao, Rui; Michor, Franziska; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Navin, Nicholas E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Sequencing studies of breast tumor cohorts have identified many prevalent mutations, but provide limited insight into the genomic diversity within tumors. Here, we developed a whole-genome and exome single cell sequencing approach called Nuc-Seq that utilizes G2/M nuclei to achieve 91% mean coverage breadth. We applied this method to sequence single normal and tumor nuclei from an estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer and a triple-negative ductal carcinoma. In parallel, we performed single nuclei copy number profiling. Our data show that aneuploid rearrangements occurred early in tumor evolution and remained highly stable as the tumor masses clonally expanded. In contrast, point mutations evolved gradually, generating extensive clonal diversity. Many of the diverse mutations were shown to occur at low frequencies (<10%) in the tumor mass by targeted single-molecule sequencing. Using mathematical modeling we found that the triple-negative tumor cells had an increased mutation rate (13.3X) while the ER+ tumor cells did not. These findings have important implications for the diagnosis, therapeutic treatment and evolution of chemoresistance in breast cancer. PMID:25079324

  20. Evolution and Classification of Myosins, a Paneukaryotic Whole-Genome Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Grau-Bové, Xavier; Richards, Thomas A.; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2014-01-01

    Myosins are key components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton, providing motility for a broad diversity of cargoes. Therefore, understanding the origin and evolutionary history of myosin classes is crucial to address the evolution of eukaryote cell biology. Here, we revise the classification of myosins using an updated taxon sampling that includes newly or recently sequenced genomes and transcriptomes from key taxa. We performed a survey of eukaryotic genomes and phylogenetic analyses of the myosin gene family, reconstructing the myosin toolkit at different key nodes in the eukaryotic tree of life. We also identified the phylogenetic distribution of myosin diversity in terms of number of genes, associated protein domains and number of classes in each taxa. Our analyses show that new classes (i.e., paralogs) and domain architectures were continuously generated throughout eukaryote evolution, with a significant expansion of myosin abundance and domain architectural diversity at the stem of Holozoa, predating the origin of animal multicellularity. Indeed, single-celled holozoans have the most complex myosin complement among eukaryotes, with paralogs of most myosins previously considered animal specific. We recover a dynamic evolutionary history, with several lineage-specific expansions (e.g., the myosin III-like gene family diversification in choanoflagellates), convergence in protein domain architectures (e.g., fungal and animal chitin synthase myosins), and important secondary losses. Overall, our evolutionary scheme demonstrates that the ancestral eukaryote likely had a complex myosin repertoire that included six genes with different protein domain architectures. Finally, we provide an integrative and robust classification, useful for future genomic and functional studies on this crucial eukaryotic gene family. PMID:24443438

  1. Comparative genomics of a cannabis pathogen reveals insight into the evolution of pathogenicity in Xanthomonas

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Pesce, Céline; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Koebnik, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas cause diseases on over 350 plant species, including cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.). Because of regulatory limitations, the biology of the Xanthomonas-cannabis pathosystem remains largely unexplored. To gain insight into the evolution of Xanthomonas strains pathogenic to cannabis, we sequenced the genomes of two geographically distinct Xanthomonas strains, NCPPB 3753 and NCPPB 2877, which were previously isolated from symptomatic plant tissue in Japan and Romania. Comparative multilocus sequence analysis of housekeeping genes revealed that they belong to Group 2, which comprises most of the described species of Xanthomonas. Interestingly, both strains lack the Hrp Type III secretion system and do not contain any of the known Type III effectors. Yet their genomes notably encode two key Hrp pathogenicity regulators HrpG and HrpX, and hrpG and hrpX are in the same genetic organization as in the other Group 2 xanthomonads. Promoter prediction of HrpX-regulated genes suggests the induction of an aminopeptidase, a lipase and two polygalacturonases upon plant colonization, similar to other plant-pathogenic xanthomonads. Genome analysis of the distantly related Xanthomonas maliensis strain 97M, which was isolated from a rice leaf in Mali, similarly demonstrated the presence of HrpG, HrpX, and a HrpX-regulated polygalacturonase, and the absence of the Hrp Type III secretion system and known Type III effectors. Given the observation that some Xanthomonas strains across distinct taxa do not contain hrpG and hrpX, we speculate a stepwise evolution of pathogenicity, which involves (i) acquisition of key regulatory genes and cell wall-degrading enzymes, followed by (ii) acquisition of the Hrp Type III secretion system, which is ultimately accompanied by (iii) successive acquisition of Type III effectors. PMID:26136759

  2. Genomics, evolution, and expression of TBPL2, a member of the TBP family.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Cinzia; Ragusa, Marco; Duro, Laura; Guglielmino, Maria Rosa; Barbagallo, Davide; Carnemolla, Alisia; Laganà, Alessandro; Buffa, Pietro; Angelica, Rosario; Rinaldi, Antonella; Calafato, Maria Stella; Milicia, Ionella; Caserta, Cinzia; Giugno, Rosalba; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giunta, Veronica; Rapisarda, Antonella; Di Pietro, Valentina; Grillo, Agata; Messina, Angelo; Ferro, Alfredo; Grzeschik, Karl Heinz; Purrello, Michele

    2007-06-01

    TBPL2 is the most recently discovered and less characterized member of the TATA box binding protein (TBP) family that also comprises TBP, TATA box binding protein-like 1 (TBPL1), and Drosophila melanogaster TBP related factor (TRF). In this paper we report our in silico and in vitro data on (i) the genomics of the TBPL2 gene in Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Gallus gallus, Xenopus tropicalis, and Takifugu rubripes; (ii) its evolution and phylogenetic relationship with TBP, TBPL1, and TRF; (iii) the structure of the TBPL2 proteins that belong to the recently identified group of the intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs); and (iv) TBPL2 expression in different organs and cell types of Homo sapiens and Rattus norvegicus. Similar to TBP, both the TBPL2 gene and protein are bimodular. The 3' region of the gene encoding the DNA binding domain (DBD) was well conserved during evolution. Its high homology to vertebrate TBP suggests that TBPL2 also should bind to the TATA box and interact with the proteins binding to TBP carboxy-terminal domain, such as the TBP associated factors (TAFs). As already demonstrated for TBP, TBPL2 amino-terminal segment is intrinsically unstructured and, even though variable among vertebrates, comprises a highly conserved motif not found in any other known protein. Absence of TBPL2 from the genome of invertebrates and plants demonstrates its specific origin within the subphylum of vertebrates. Our RT-PCR analysis of human and rat RNA shows that, similar to TBP, TBPL2 is ubiquitously synthesized even though at variable levels that are at least two orders of magnitude lower. Higher expression of TBPL2 in the gonads than in other organs suggests that it could perform important functions in gametogenesis. Our genomic and expression data should contribute to clarify why TBP has a general master role within the transcription apparatus (TA), whereas both TBPL1 and TBPL2 perform tissue-specific functions. PMID:17570761

  3. Evolutionary Genomics and Adaptive Evolution of the Hedgehog Gene Family (Shh, Ihh and Dhh) in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Joana; Johnson, Warren E.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Jarvis, Erich D.; Zhang, Guojie; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) gene family codes for a class of secreted proteins composed of two active domains that act as signalling molecules during embryo development, namely for the development of the nervous and skeletal systems and the formation of the testis cord. While only one Hh gene is found typically in invertebrate genomes, most vertebrates species have three (Sonic hedgehog – Shh; Indian hedgehog – Ihh; and Desert hedgehog – Dhh), each with different expression patterns and functions, which likely helped promote the increasing complexity of vertebrates and their successful diversification. In this study, we used comparative genomic and adaptive evolutionary analyses to characterize the evolution of the Hh genes in vertebrates following the two major whole genome duplication (WGD) events. To overcome the lack of Hh-coding sequences on avian publicly available databases, we used an extensive dataset of 45 avian and three non-avian reptilian genomes to show that birds have all three Hh paralogs. We find suggestions that following the WGD events, vertebrate Hh paralogous genes evolved independently within similar linkage groups and under different evolutionary rates, especially within the catalytic domain. The structural regions around the ion-binding site were identified to be under positive selection in the signaling domain. These findings contrast with those observed in invertebrates, where different lineages that experienced gene duplication retained similar selective constraints in the Hh orthologs. Our results provide new insights on the evolutionary history of the Hh gene family, the functional roles of these paralogs in vertebrate species, and on the location of mutational hotspots. PMID:25549322

  4. Gene Content Evolution in Discobid Mitochondria Deduced from the Phylogenetic Position and Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Tsukubamonas globosa

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Kolisko, Martin; Nishimura, Yuki; Yabuki, Akinori; Brown, Matthew W.; Ishikawa, Sohta A.; Ishida, Ken-ichiro; Roger, Andrew J.; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Inagaki, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryotic assemblage Discoba (Excavata) comprises four lineages: the Heterolobosea, Euglenozoa, Jakobida, and Tsukubamonadida. Discoba has been considered as a key assemblage for understanding the early evolution of mitochondrial (mt) genomes, as jakobids retain the most gene-rich (i.e., primitive) genomes compared with any other eukaryotes determined to date. However, to date, mt genome sequences have been completed for only a few groups within Discoba, including jakobids, two closely related heteroloboseans, and kinetoplastid euglenozoans. The Tsukubamonadida is the least studied lineage, as the order was only recently established with the description of a sole representative species, Tsukubamonas globosa. The evolutionary relationship between T. globosa and other discobids has yet to be resolved, and no mt genome data are available for this particular organism. Here, we use a “phylogenomic” approach to resolve the relationship between T. globosa, heteroloboseans, euglenozoans, and jakobids. In addition, we have characterized the mt genome of T. globosa (48,463 bp in length), which encodes 52 putative protein-coding and 29 RNA genes. By mapping the gene repertoires of discobid mt genomes onto the well-resolved Discoba tree, we model gene loss events during the evolution of discobid mt genomes. PMID:24448982

  5. Conservation of Amino Acids in Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Correlates with Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Activity of Rupintrivir, a Novel Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Inhibitor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L. Binford; F. Maldonado; M. A. Brothers; P. T. Weady; L. S. Zalman; J. W. Meador; D. A. Matthews; A. K. Patick

    2005-01-01

    The picornavirus 3C protease is required for the majority of proteolytic cleavages that occur during the viral life cycle. Comparisons of published amino acid sequences from 6 human rhinoviruses (HRV) and 20 human enteroviruses (HEV) show considerable variability in the 3C protease-coding region but strict conservation of the catalytic triad residues. Rupintrivir (formerly AG7088) is an irreversible inhibitor of HRV

  6. Production, purification, and capsid stability of rhinovirus C types.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Theodor F; Bochkov, Yury A; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Palmenberg, Ann C; Gern, James E

    2015-06-01

    The rhinovirus C (RV-C) were discovered in 2006 and these agents are an important cause of respiratory morbidity. Little is known about their biology. RV-C15 (C15) can be produced by transfection of recombinant viral RNA into cells and subsequent purification over a 30% sucrose cushion, even though yields and infectivity of other RV-C genotypes with this protocol are low. The goal of this study was to determine whether poor RV-C yields were due to capsid instability, and moreover, to develop a robust protocol suitable for the purification of many RV-C types. Capsid stability assays indicated that virions of RV-C41 (refractory to purification) have similar tolerance for osmotic and temperature stress as RV-A16 (purified readily), although C41 is more sensitive to low pH. Modification to the purification protocol by removing detergent increased the yield of RV-C. Addition of nonfat dry milk to the sucrose cushion increased the virus yield but sacrificed purity of the viral suspension. Analysis of virus distribution following centrifugation indicated that the majority of detectable viral RNA (vRNA) was found in pellets refractory to resuspension. Reduction of the centrifugal force with commiserate increase in spin-time improved the recovery of RV-C for both C41 and C2. Transfection of primary lung fibroblasts (WisL cells) followed by the modified purification protocol further improved yields of infectious C41 and C2. Described herein is a higher yield purification protocol suitable for RV-C types refractory to the standard purification procedure. The findings suggest that aggregation-adhesion problems rather than capsid instability influence RV-C yield during purification. PMID:25724434

  7. Structure-assisted design of mechanism-based irreversible inhibitors of human rhinovirus 3C protease with potent antiviral activity against multiple rhinovirus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Matthews, D A; Dragovich, P S; Webber, S E; Fuhrman, S A; Patick, A K; Zalman, L S; Hendrickson, T F; Love, R A; Prins, T J; Marakovits, J T; Zhou, R; Tikhe, J; Ford, C E; Meador, J W; Ferre, R A; Brown, E L; Binford, S L; Brothers, M A; DeLisle, D M; Worland, S T

    1999-09-28

    Human rhinoviruses, the most important etiologic agents of the common cold, are messenger-active single-stranded monocistronic RNA viruses that have evolved a highly complex cascade of proteolytic processing events to control viral gene expression and replication. Most maturation cleavages within the precursor polyprotein are mediated by rhinovirus 3C protease (or its immediate precursor, 3CD), a cysteine protease with a trypsin-like polypeptide fold. High-resolution crystal structures of the enzyme from three viral serotypes have been used for the design and elaboration of 3C protease inhibitors representing different structural and chemical classes. Inhibitors having alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl groups combined with peptidyl-binding elements specific for 3C protease undergo a Michael reaction mediated by nucleophilic addition of the enzyme's catalytic Cys-147, resulting in covalent-bond formation and irreversible inactivation of the viral protease. Direct inhibition of 3C proteolytic activity in virally infected cells treated with these compounds can be inferred from dose-dependent accumulations of viral precursor polyproteins as determined by SDS/PAGE analysis of radiolabeled proteins. Cocrystal-structure-assisted optimization of 3C-protease-directed Michael acceptors has yielded molecules having extremely rapid in vitro inactivation of the viral protease, potent antiviral activity against multiple rhinovirus serotypes and low cellular toxicity. Recently, one compound in this series, AG7088, has entered clinical trials. PMID:10500114

  8. Structure-assisted design of mechanism-based irreversible inhibitors of human rhinovirus 3C protease with potent antiviral activity against multiple rhinovirus serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, D. A.; Dragovich, P. S.; Webber, S. E.; Fuhrman, S. A.; Patick, A. K.; Zalman, L. S.; Hendrickson, T. F.; Love, R. A.; Prins, T. J.; Marakovits, J. T.; Zhou, R.; Tikhe, J.; Ford, C. E.; Meador, J. W.; Ferre, R. A.; Brown, E. L.; Binford, S. L.; Brothers, M. A.; DeLisle, D. M.; Worland, S. T.

    1999-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses, the most important etiologic agents of the common cold, are messenger-active single-stranded monocistronic RNA viruses that have evolved a highly complex cascade of proteolytic processing events to control viral gene expression and replication. Most maturation cleavages within the precursor polyprotein are mediated by rhinovirus 3C protease (or its immediate precursor, 3CD), a cysteine protease with a trypsin-like polypeptide fold. High-resolution crystal structures of the enzyme from three viral serotypes have been used for the design and elaboration of 3C protease inhibitors representing different structural and chemical classes. Inhibitors having ?,?-unsaturated carbonyl groups combined with peptidyl-binding elements specific for 3C protease undergo a Michael reaction mediated by nucleophilic addition of the enzyme’s catalytic Cys-147, resulting in covalent-bond formation and irreversible inactivation of the viral protease. Direct inhibition of 3C proteolytic activity in virally infected cells treated with these compounds can be inferred from dose-dependent accumulations of viral precursor polyproteins as determined by SDS/PAGE analysis of radiolabeled proteins. Cocrystal-structure-assisted optimization of 3C-protease-directed Michael acceptors has yielded molecules having extremely rapid in vitro inactivation of the viral protease, potent antiviral activity against multiple rhinovirus serotypes and low cellular toxicity. Recently, one compound in this series, AG7088, has entered clinical trials. PMID:10500114

  9. Rhinovirus induced IL-25 in asthma exacerbation drives type-2 immunity and allergic pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, Jonathan D. R.; Edwards, Michael R.; Walton, Ross P.; Zhu, Jie; Man Ching, Yee; Shamji, Betty; Edwards, Matt; Westwick, John; Cousins, David J.; Yi Hwang, You; McKenzie, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Rhinoviruses are the most common cause of virally-induced asthma exacerbations which continue to account for the greatest burden in terms of morbidity, mortality and cost associated with this disease. IL-25 activates type-2-driven inflammation and is potentially important in virally-induced asthma exacerbations. Rhinovirus-infected cultured asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells exhibited a heightened intrinsic capacity for IL-25 expression which correlated with donor atopic status. In vivo human IL-25 expression was greater in asthmatics at baseline and during experimental rhinovirus infection. In mice rhinovirus infection induced IL-25 expression and augmented allergen-induced IL-25. Blockade of the IL-25 receptor reduced many RV-induced exacerbation-specific responses including type-2 cytokine expression, mucus production and recruitment of eosinophils, neutrophils, basophils, T and non-T type-2 cells. We have identified that asthmatic epithelial cells possess increased intrinsic capacity for expression of a pro-type-2 cytokine in response to a viral infection and identify IL-25 as a key mediator in RV-induced exacerbations of pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25273095

  10. Evidence of Recombination and Genetic Diversity in Human Rhinoviruses in Children with Acute Respiratory

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Background: Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are a highly prevalent cause of acute respiratory infection in children diagnosis of HRV strains in a 2-year study of children with acute respiratory infection visiting one amongst 827 children with acute low respiratory tract infection. Two samples were co-infected with HRV

  11. In Vitro Resistance Study of Rupintrivir, a Novel Inhibitor of Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L. Binford; P. T. Weady; F. Maldonado; M. A. Brothers; D. A. Matthews; A. K. Patick

    2007-01-01

    Rupintrivir (formerly AG7088) is an irreversible inhibitor of the human rhinovirus (HRV) 3C protease that has been demonstrated to have in vitro activity against all HRVs tested, consistent with its interaction with a strictly conserved subset of amino acids in the 3C protease. The potential for resistance was studied following in vitro serial passage of HRV serotypes 14, 2, 39,

  12. Comparison of rhinovirus A infection in human primary epithelial and HeLa cells

    E-print Network

    targets of HRV are human bronchial epithelial cells (hBE), it is generally more difficult to obtainComparison of rhinovirus A infection in human primary epithelial and HeLa cells S. P. Amineva,1,2 A and maintain the relevant primary cell cultures, relative to HeLa cells. Given that the HRV are now identified

  13. Inhibition of polyprotein processing and RNA replication of human rhinovirus by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate involves metal ions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. M. Krenn; B. Holzer; E. Gaudernak; A. Triendl; F. J. M. van Kuppeveld; J. Seipelt

    2005-01-01

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is an antiviral compound that was shown to inhibit the replication of human rhinoviruses (HRVs), poliovirus, and influenza virus. To elucidate the mechanism of PDTC, the effects on the individual steps of the infection cycle of HRV were investigated. PDTC did not interfere with receptor binding or internalization by receptor mediated endocytosis of HRV2 particles into HeLa

  14. Effect of respiratory virus infections including rhinovirus on clinical status in cystic fibrosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A R Smyth; R L Smyth; C Y Tong; C A Hart; D P Heaf

    1995-01-01

    One hundred and eight patients with cystic fibrosis were investigated over one year to determine whether an association existed between rhinovirus or other respiratory virus infection and clinical status. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), Shwachman score, Chrispin-Norman chest radiograph score, and percentage weight for height were recorded at the beginning and end of the

  15. Insights into the genetic basis for natural phenotypic resistance of human rhinoviruses to pleconaril

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca M. Ledford; Marc S. Collett; Daniel C. Pevear

    2005-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses of the deduced amino acid sequence of the major viral capsid protein (VP1) of all human rhinovirus (HRV) serotypes revealed two distinct species within the genus: species A (75 serotypes) and species B (25 serotypes). Pleconaril is a novel capsid inhibitor of HRVs. All 75 species A serotypes and 18 of the 25 species B serotypes are

  16. Bichir HoxA Cluster Sequence Reveals Surprising Trends in Ray-Finned Fish Genomic Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-hua; Dewar, Ken; Wagner, Günter P.; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Ruddle, Frank; Ledje, Christina; Bartsch, Peter; Scemama, Jean-Luc; Stellwag, Edmund; Fried, Claudia; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Stadler, Peter F.; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Hox clusters and genes provides insights into the evolution of genomic regulation of development. Derived ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii, Teleostei) such as zebrafish and pufferfish possess duplicated Hox clusters that have undergone considerable sequence evolution. Whether these changes are associated with the duplication(s) that produced extra Hox clusters is unresolved because comparison with basal lineages is unavailable. We sequenced and analyzed the HoxA cluster of the bichir (Polypterus senegalus), a phylogenetically basal actinopterygian. Independent lines of evidence indicate that bichir has one HoxA cluster that is mosaic in its patterns of noncoding sequence conservation and gene retention relative to the HoxA clusters of human and shark, and the HoxA? and HoxA? clusters of zebrafish, pufferfish, and striped bass. HoxA cluster noncoding sequences conserved between bichir and euteleosts indicate that novel cis-sequences were acquired in the stem actinopterygians and maintained after cluster duplication. Hence, in the earliest actinopterygians, evolution of the single HoxA cluster was already more dynamic than in human and shark. This tendency peaked among teleosts after HoxA cluster duplication. PMID:14707166

  17. The population genomics of repeated evolution in the blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus.

    PubMed

    Bradic, Martina; Teotónio, Henrique; Borowsky, Richard L

    2013-11-01

    Distinct populations of Astyanax mexicanus cavefish offer striking examples of repeatable convergence or parallelism in their independent evolutions from surface to cave phenotypes. However, the extent to which the repeatability of evolution occurred at the genetic level remains poorly understood. To address this, we first characterized the genetic diversity of 518 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), obtained through RAD tag sequencing and distributed throughout the genome, in seven cave and three groups of surface populations. The cave populations represented two distinct lineages (old and new). Thirty-one SNPs were significantly differentiated between surface and old cave populations, two SNPs were differentiated between surface and new cave populations, and 44 SNPs were significantly differentiated in both old and new cave populations. In addition, we determined whether these SNPs map to the same locations of previously described quantitative trait loci (QTL) between surface and cave populations. A total of 25 differentiated SNPs co-map with several QTL, such as one containing a fibroblast growth factor gene (Fgf8) involved in eye development and lens size. Further, the identity of many SNPs that co-mapped with QTL was the same in independently derived cave populations. These conclusions were further confirmed by haplotype analyses of SNPs within QTL regions. Our findings indicate that the repeatability of evolution at the genetic level is substantial, suggesting that ancestral standing genetic variation significantly contributed to the population genetic variability used in adaptation to the cave environment. PMID:23927992

  18. The evolution of chloroplast genes and genomes in ferns Paul G. Wolf Joshua P. Der Aaron M. Duffy

    E-print Network

    dePamphilis, Claude

    The evolution of chloroplast genes and genomes in ferns Paul G. Wolf · Joshua P. Der · Aaron M their sister group, the ferns. Here we describe several broad evolutionary patterns and processes in fern the evolutionary history of plastome structure across the fern phylogeny and we compare plas- tome organization

  19. A statistical analysis of the three-fold evolution of genomic compression through frame overlaps in prokaryotes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabrizio Lillo; David C Krakauer

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among microbial genomes, genetic information is frequently compressed, exploiting redundancies in the genetic code in order to store information in overlapping genes. We investigate the length, phase and orientation properties of overlap in 58 prokaryotic species evaluating neutral and selective mechanisms of evolution. RESULTS: Using a variety of statistical null models we find patterns of compressive coding that can

  20. Host-symbiont co-speciation and reductive genome evolution in gut symbiotic bacteria of acanthosomatid stinkbugs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshitomo Kikuchi; Takahiro Hosokawa; Naruo Nikoh; Xian-Ying Meng; Yoichi Kamagata; Takema Fukatsu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Host-symbiont co-speciation and reductive genome evolution have been commonly observed among obligate endocellular insect symbionts, while such examples have rarely been identified among extracellular ones, the only case reported being from gut symbiotic bacteria of stinkbugs of the family Plataspidae. Considering that gut symbiotic communities are vulnerable to invasion of foreign microbes, gut symbiotic associations have been thought to

  1. Volff J-N (ed): Gene and Protein Evolution. Genome Dyn. Basel, Karger, 2007, vol 3, pp 6680

    E-print Network

    Babu, M. Madan

    that the transcriptional network inferred from model organisms may be approximated by a scale-free topology, which in turnRevises Volff J-N (ed): Gene and Protein Evolution. Genome Dyn. Basel, Karger, 2007, vol 3, pp 66 on the regulatory interactions between transcription fac- tors and their target genes in various model prokaryotes

  2. Analyzing epigenome data in context of genome evolution and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Feuerbach, Lars; Halachev, Konstantin; Assenov, Yassen; Müller, Fabian; Bock, Christoph; Lengauer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes bioinformatic tools for analyzing epigenome differences between species and in diseased versus normal cells. We illustrate the interplay of several Web-based tools in a case study of CpG island evolution between human and mouse. Starting from a list of orthologous genes, we use the Galaxy Web service to obtain gene coordinates for both species. These data are further analyzed in EpiGRAPH, a Web-based tool that identifies statistically significant epigenetic differences between genome region sets. Finally, we outline how the use of the statistical programming language R enables deeper insights into the epigenetics of human diseases, which are difficult to obtain without writing custom scripts. In summary, our tutorial describes how Web-based tools provide an easy entry into epigenome data analysis while also highlighting the benefits of learning a scripting language in order to unlock the vast potential of public epigenome datasets. PMID:22399470

  3. Genome evolution predicts genetic interactions in protein complexes and reveals cancer drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaowen; Kensche, Philip R.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Notebaart, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic interactions reveal insights into cellular function and can be used to identify drug targets. Here we construct a new model to predict negative genetic interactions in protein complexes by exploiting the evolutionary history of genes in parallel converging pathways in metabolism. We evaluate our model with protein complexes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and show that the predicted protein pairs more frequently have a negative genetic interaction than random proteins from the same complex. Furthermore, we apply our model to human protein complexes to predict novel cancer drug targets, and identify 20 candidate targets with empirical support and 10 novel targets amenable to further experimental validation. Our study illustrates that negative genetic interactions can be predicted by systematically exploring genome evolution, and that this is useful to identify novel anti-cancer drug targets. PMID:23851603

  4. Comparative Genomics of 28 Salmonella enterica Isolates: Evidence for CRISPR-Mediated Adaptive Sublineage Evolution ?†

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, W. Florian; Mammel, Mark K.; McDermott, Patrick F.; Tartera, Carmen; White, David G.; LeClerc, J. Eugene; Ravel, Jacques; Cebula, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive surveillance, food-borne Salmonella enterica infections continue to be a significant burden on public health systems worldwide. As the S. enterica species comprises sublineages that differ greatly in antigenic representation, virulence, and antimicrobial resistance phenotypes, a better understanding of the species' evolution is critical for the prediction and prevention of future outbreaks. The roles that virulence and resistance phenotype acquisition, exchange, and loss play in the evolution of S. enterica sublineages, which to a certain extent are represented by serotypes, remains mostly uncharacterized. Here, we compare 17 newly sequenced and phenotypically characterized nontyphoidal S. enterica strains to 11 previously sequenced S. enterica genomes to carry out the most comprehensive comparative analysis of this species so far. These phenotypic and genotypic data comparisons in the phylogenetic species context suggest that the evolution of known S. enterica sublineages is mediated mostly by two mechanisms, (i) the loss of coding sequences with known metabolic functions, which leads to functional reduction, and (ii) the acquisition of horizontally transferred phage and plasmid DNA, which provides virulence and resistance functions and leads to increasing specialization. Matches between S. enterica clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), part of a defense mechanism against invading plasmid and phage DNA, and plasmid and prophage regions suggest that CRISPR-mediated immunity could control short-term phenotype changes and mediate long-term sublineage evolution. CRISPR analysis could therefore be critical in assessing the evolutionary potential of S. enterica sublineages and aid in the prediction and prevention of future S. enterica outbreaks. PMID:21602358

  5. The Genome of Tolypocladium inflatum: Evolution, Organization, and Expression of the Cyclosporin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bushley, Kathryn E.; Raja, Rajani; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Cumbie, Jason S.; Nonogaki, Mariko; Boyd, Alexander E.; Owensby, C. Alisha; Knaus, Brian J.; Elser, Justin; Miller, Daniel; Di, Yanming; McPhail, Kerry L.; Spatafora, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    The ascomycete fungus Tolypocladium inflatum, a pathogen of beetle larvae, is best known as the producer of the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin. The draft genome of T. inflatum strain NRRL 8044 (ATCC 34921), the isolate from which cyclosporin was first isolated, is presented along with comparative analyses of the biosynthesis of cyclosporin and other secondary metabolites in T. inflatum and related taxa. Phylogenomic analyses reveal previously undetected and complex patterns of homology between the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) that encodes for cyclosporin synthetase (simA) and those of other secondary metabolites with activities against insects (e.g., beauvericin, destruxins, etc.), and demonstrate the roles of module duplication and gene fusion in diversification of NRPSs. The secondary metabolite gene cluster responsible for cyclosporin biosynthesis is described. In addition to genes necessary for cyclosporin biosynthesis, it harbors a gene for a cyclophilin, which is a member of a family of immunophilins known to bind cyclosporin. Comparative analyses support a lineage specific origin of the cyclosporin gene cluster rather than horizontal gene transfer from bacteria or other fungi. RNA-Seq transcriptome analyses in a cyclosporin-inducing medium delineate the boundaries of the cyclosporin cluster and reveal high levels of expression of the gene cluster cyclophilin. In medium containing insect hemolymph, weaker but significant upregulation of several genes within the cyclosporin cluster, including the highly expressed cyclophilin gene, was observed. T. inflatum also represents the first reference draft genome of Ophiocordycipitaceae, a third family of insect pathogenic fungi within the fungal order Hypocreales, and supports parallel and qualitatively distinct radiations of insect pathogens. The T. inflatum genome provides additional insight into the evolution and biosynthesis of cyclosporin and lays a foundation for further investigations of the role of secondary metabolite gene clusters and their metabolites in fungal biology. PMID:23818858

  6. Evolution of the Influenza A Virus Genome during Development of Oseltamivir Resistance In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Renzette, Nicholas; Caffrey, Daniel R.; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Liu, Ping; Gallagher, Glen R.; Aiello, Daniel; Porter, Alyssa J.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Bolon, Daniel N.; Poh, Yu-Ping; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Schiffer, Celia A.; Kowalik, Timothy F.; Finberg, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Current antiviral therapies include oseltamivir, a neuraminidase inhibitor that prevents the release of nascent viral particles from infected cells. However, the IAV genome can evolve rapidly, and oseltamivir resistance mutations have been detected in numerous clinical samples. Using an in vitro evolution platform and whole-genome population sequencing, we investigated the population genomics of IAV during the development of oseltamivir resistance. Strain A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1) was grown in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells with or without escalating concentrations of oseltamivir over serial passages. Following drug treatment, the H274Y resistance mutation fixed reproducibly within the population. The presence of the H274Y mutation in the viral population, at either a low or a high frequency, led to measurable changes in the neuraminidase inhibition assay. Surprisingly, fixation of the resistance mutation was not accompanied by alterations of viral population diversity or differentiation, and oseltamivir did not alter the selective environment. While the neighboring K248E mutation was also a target of positive selection prior to H274Y fixation, H274Y was the primary beneficial mutation in the population. In addition, once evolved, the H274Y mutation persisted after the withdrawal of the drug, even when not fixed in viral populations. We conclude that only selection of H274Y is required for oseltamivir resistance and that H274Y is not deleterious in the absence of the drug. These collective results could offer an explanation for the recent reproducible rise in oseltamivir resistance in seasonal H1N1 IAV strains in humans. PMID:24155392

  7. Three tiers of genome evolution in reptiles Chris L. Organ,1

    E-print Network

    Edwards, Scott

    genome is not even ten years past (IHGSC 2001; Venter et al. 2001) and already genome browsers of this ances- tor's genome (Shedlock et al. 2007). For instance, how do the forces of drift, draft (hitchhiking

  8. The compact Selaginella genome identifies changes in gene content associated with the evolution of vascular plants

    E-print Network

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-01-01

    report the genome sequence of the non?seed vascular  plant, plants) and the lycophytes  (1).   We report here the genome sequence genome sequence to uncover genes associated  with major evolutionary transitions in land plants.    

  9. Hybridization Capture Reveals Evolution and Conservation across the Entire Koala Retrovirus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yasuko; Cui, Pin; Vielgrader, Hanna; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Roca, Alfred L.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2014-01-01

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is the only retrovirus known to be in the midst of invading the germ line of its host species. Hybridization capture and next generation sequencing were used on modern and museum DNA samples of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) to examine ca. 130 years of evolution across the full KoRV genome. Overall, the entire proviral genome appeared to be conserved across time in sequence, protein structure and transcriptional binding sites. A total of 138 polymorphisms were detected, of which 72 were found in more than one individual. At every polymorphic site in the museum koalas, one of the character states matched that of modern KoRV. Among non-synonymous polymorphisms, radical substitutions involving large physiochemical differences between amino acids were elevated in env, potentially reflecting anti-viral immune pressure or avoidance of receptor interference. Polymorphisms were not detected within two functional regions believed to affect infectivity. Host sequences flanking proviral integration sites were also captured; with few proviral loci shared among koalas. Recently described variants of KoRV, designated KoRV-B and KoRV-J, were not detected in museum samples, suggesting that these variants may be of recent origin. PMID:24752422

  10. Metabolism and evolution: A comparative study of reconstructed genome-level metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2008-03-01

    The availability of high-quality annotations of sequenced genomes has made it possible to generate organism-specific comprehensive maps of cellular metabolism. Currently, more than twenty such metabolic reconstructions are publicly available, with the majority focused on bacteria. A typical metabolic reconstruction for a bacterium results in a complex network containing hundreds of metabolites (nodes) and reactions (links), while some even contain more than a thousand. The constrain-based optimization approach of flux-balance analysis (FBA) is used to investigate the functional characteristics of such large-scale metabolic networks, making it possible to estimate an organism's growth behavior in a wide variety of nutrient environments, as well as its robustness to gene loss. We have recently completed the genome-level metabolic reconstruction of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, as well as the three Yersinia pestis biovars Antiqua, Mediaevalis, and Orientalis. While Y. pseudotuberculosis typically only causes fever and abdominal pain that can mimic appendicitis, the evolutionary closely related Y. pestis strains are the aetiological agents of the bubonic plague. In this presentation, I will discuss our results and conclusions from a comparative study on the evolution of metabolic function in the four Yersiniae networks using FBA and related techniques, and I will give particular focus to the interplay between metabolic network topology and evolutionary flexibility.

  11. The amphioxus genome provides unique insight into the evolution of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dishaw, Larry J.; Haire, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Immune systems evolve as essential strategies to maintain homeostasis with the environment, prevent microbial assault and recycle damaged host tissues. The immune system is composed of two components, innate and adaptive immunity. The former is common to all animals while the latter consists of a vertebrate-specific system that relies on somatically derived lymphocytes and is associated with near limitless genetic diversity as well as long-term memory. Deuterostome invertebrates provide a view of immune repertoires in phyla that immediately predate the origins of vertebrates. Genomic studies in amphioxus, a cephalochordate, have revealed homologs of genes encoding most innate immune receptors found in vertebrates; however, many of the gene families have undergone dramatic expansions, greatly increasing the innate immune repertoire. In addition, domain-swapping accounts for the innovation of new predicted pathways of receptor function. In both amphioxus and Ciona, a urochordate, the VCBPs (variable region containing chitin-binding proteins), which consist of immunoglobulin V (variable) and chitin binding domains, mediate recognition through the V domains. The V domains of VCBPs in amphioxus exhibit high levels of allelic complexity that presumably relate to functional specificity. Various features of the amphioxus immune repertoire reflect novel selective pressures, which likely have resulted in innovative strategies. Functional genomic studies underscore the value of amphioxus as a model for studying innate immunity and may help reveal how unique relationships between innate immune receptors and both pathogens and symbionts factored in the evolution of adaptive immune systems. PMID:22402506

  12. Genome-Wide Identification and Evolution of HECT Genes in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianwen; Wang, Chen; Rahman, Siddiq Ur; Wang, Yaxu; Wang, Ailan; Tao, Shiheng

    2015-01-01

    Proteins containing domains homologous to the E6-associated protein (E6-AP) carboxyl terminus (HECT) are an important class of E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. HECT-type E3s play crucial roles in plant growth and development. However, current understanding of plant HECT genes and their evolution is very limited. In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the HECT domain-containing genes in soybean. Using high-quality genome sequences, we identified 19 soybean HECT genes. The predicted HECT genes were distributed unevenly across 15 of 20 chromosomes. Nineteen of these genes were inferred to be segmentally duplicated gene pairs, suggesting that in soybean, segmental duplications have made a significant contribution to the expansion of the HECT gene family. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these HECT genes can be divided into seven groups, among which gene structure and domain architecture was relatively well-conserved. The Ka/Ks ratios show that after the duplication events, duplicated HECT genes underwent purifying selection. Moreover, expression analysis reveals that 15 of the HECT genes in soybean are differentially expressed in 14 tissues, and are often highly expressed in the flowers and roots. In summary, this work provides useful information on which further functional studies of soybean HECT genes can be based. PMID:25894222

  13. Genome Comparisons Reveal a Dominant Mechanism of Chromosome Number Reduction in Grasses and Accelerated Genome Evolution in Triticeae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphism was employed in the construction of a high-resolution, expressed sequence tag (EST) map of Aegilops tauschii, the diploid source of the wheat D genome. Comparison of the map with the rice and sorghum genome sequences revealed 50 inversions and translocations; 2, 8, and...

  14. Genome sequence of an Australian kangaroo, Macropus eugenii, provides insight into the evolution of mammalian reproduction and development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We present the genome sequence of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii, which is a member of the kangaroo family and the first representative of the iconic hopping mammals that symbolize Australia to be sequenced. The tammar has many unusual biological characteristics, including the longest period of embryonic diapause of any mammal, extremely synchronized seasonal breeding and prolonged and sophisticated lactation within a well-defined pouch. Like other marsupials, it gives birth to highly altricial young, and has a small number of very large chromosomes, making it a valuable model for genomics, reproduction and development. Results The genome has been sequenced to 2 × coverage using Sanger sequencing, enhanced with additional next generation sequencing and the integration of extensive physical and linkage maps to build the genome assembly. We also sequenced the tammar transcriptome across many tissues and developmental time points. Our analyses of these data shed light on mammalian reproduction, development and genome evolution: there is innovation in reproductive and lactational genes, rapid evolution of germ cell genes, and incomplete, locus-specific X inactivation. We also observe novel retrotransposons and a highly rearranged major histocompatibility complex, with many class I genes located outside the complex. Novel microRNAs in the tammar HOX clusters uncover new potential mammalian HOX regulatory elements. Conclusions Analyses of these resources enhance our understanding of marsupial gene evolution, identify marsupial-specific conserved non-coding elements and critical genes across a range of biological systems, including reproduction, development and immunity, and provide new insight into marsupial and mammalian biology and genome evolution. PMID:21854559

  15. Insights into the evolution of Darwin’s finches from comparative analysis of the Geospiza magnirostris genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A classical example of repeated speciation coupled with ecological diversification is the evolution of 14 closely related species of Darwin’s (Galápagos) finches (Thraupidae, Passeriformes). Their adaptive radiation in the Galápagos archipelago took place in the last 2–3 million years and some of the molecular mechanisms that led to their diversification are now being elucidated. Here we report evolutionary analyses of genome of the large ground finch, Geospiza magnirostris. Results 13,291 protein-coding genes were predicted from a 991.0 Mb?G. magnirostris genome assembly. We then defined gene orthology relationships and constructed whole genome alignments between the G. magnirostris and other vertebrate genomes. We estimate that 15% of genomic sequence is functionally constrained between G. magnirostris and zebra finch. Genic evolutionary rate comparisons indicate that similar selective pressures acted along the G. magnirostris and zebra finch lineages suggesting that historical effective population size values have been similar in both lineages. 21 otherwise highly conserved genes were identified that each show evidence for positive selection on amino acid changes in the Darwin's finch lineage. Two of these genes (Igf2r and Pou1f1) have been implicated in beak morphology changes in Darwin’s finches. Five of 47 genes showing evidence of positive selection in early passerine evolution have cilia related functions, and may be examples of adaptively evolving reproductive proteins. Conclusions These results provide insights into past evolutionary processes that have shaped G. magnirostris genes and its genome, and provide the necessary foundation upon which to build population genomics resources that will shed light on more contemporaneous adaptive and non-adaptive processes that have contributed to the evolution of the Darwin’s finches. PMID:23402223

  16. Coevolution with bacteriophages drives genome-wide host evolution and constrains the acquisition of abiotic-beneficial mutations.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Pauline D; Hall, Alex R; Blackshields, Gordon; Friman, Ville-P; Davis, Michael R; Goldberg, Joanna B; Buckling, Angus

    2015-06-01

    Studies of antagonistic coevolution between hosts and parasites typically focus on resistance and infectivity traits. However, coevolution could also have genome-wide effects on the hosts due to pleiotropy, epistasis, or selection for evolvability. Here, we investigate these effects in the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 during approximately 400 generations of evolution in the presence or absence of bacteriophage (coevolution or evolution treatments, respectively). Coevolution resulted in variable phage resistance, lower competitive fitness in the absence of phages, and greater genome-wide divergence both from the ancestor and between replicates, in part due to the evolution of increased mutation rates. Hosts from coevolution and evolution treatments had different suites of mutations. A high proportion of mutations observed in coevolved hosts were associated with a known phage target binding site, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and correlated with altered LPS length and phage resistance. Mutations in evolved bacteria were correlated with higher fitness in the absence of phages. However, the benefits of these growth-promoting mutations were completely lost when these bacteria were subsequently coevolved with phages, indicating that they were not beneficial in the presence of resistance mutations (consistent with negative epistasis). Our results show that in addition to affecting genome-wide evolution in loci not obviously linked to parasite resistance, coevolution can also constrain the acquisition of mutations beneficial for growth in the abiotic environment. PMID:25681383

  17. Origin and evolution of the Notch signalling pathway: an overview from eukaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gazave, Eve; Lapébie, Pascal; Richards, Gemma S; Brunet, Frédéric; Ereskovsky, Alexander V; Degnan, Bernard M; Borchiellini, Carole; Vervoort, Michel; Renard, Emmanuelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Of the 20 or so signal transduction pathways that orchestrate cell-cell interactions in metazoans, seven are involved during development. One of these is the Notch signalling pathway which regulates cellular identity, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis via the developmental processes of lateral inhibition and boundary induction. In light of this essential role played in metazoan development, we surveyed a wide range of eukaryotic genomes to determine the origin and evolution of the components and auxiliary factors that compose and modulate this pathway. Results We searched for 22 components of the Notch pathway in 35 different species that represent 8 major clades of eukaryotes, performed phylogenetic analyses and compared the domain compositions of the two fundamental molecules: the receptor Notch and its ligands Delta/Jagged. We confirm that a Notch pathway, with true receptors and ligands is specific to the Metazoa. This study also sheds light on the deep ancestry of a number of genes involved in this pathway, while other members are revealed to have a more recent origin. The origin of several components can be accounted for by the shuffling of pre-existing protein domains, or via lateral gene transfer. In addition, certain domains have appeared de novo more recently, and can be considered metazoan synapomorphies. Conclusion The Notch signalling pathway emerged in Metazoa via a diversity of molecular mechanisms, incorporating both novel and ancient protein domains during eukaryote evolution. Thus, a functional Notch signalling pathway was probably present in Urmetazoa. PMID:19825158

  18. Convergent Molecular Evolution of Genomic Cores in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sandip; Kisiela, Dagmara I.; Linardopoulou, Elena V.

    2012-01-01

    One of the strongest signals of adaptive molecular evolution of proteins is the occurrence of convergent hot spot mutations: repeated changes in the same amino acid positions. We performed a comparative genome-wide analysis of mutation-driven evolution of core (omnipresent) genes in 17 strains of Salmonella enterica subspecies I and 22 strains of Escherichia coli. More than 20% of core genes in both Salmonella and E. coli accumulated hot spot mutations, with a predominance of identical changes having recent evolutionary origin. There is a significant overlap in the functional categories of the adaptively evolving genes in both species, although mostly via separate molecular mechanisms. As a strong evidence of the link between adaptive mutations and virulence in Salmonella, two human-restricted serovars, Typhi and Paratyphi A, shared the highest number of genes with serovar-specific hot spot mutations. Many of the core genes affected by Typhi/Paratyphi A-specific mutations have known virulence functions. For each species, a list of nonrecombinant core genes (and the hot spot mutations therein) under positive selection is provided. PMID:22797756

  19. Empirical testing of hypotheses about the evolution of genomic imprinting in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar

    2013-01-01

    The close interaction between mother and offspring in mammals is thought to contribute to the evolution of genomic imprinting or parent-of-origin dependent gene expression. Empirical tests of theories about the evolution of imprinting have been scant for several reasons. Models make different assumptions about the traits affected by imprinted genes and the scenarios in which imprinting is predicted to have been selected for. Thus, competing hypotheses cannot readily be tested against each other. Further, it is far from clear how predictions about expression patterns of genes with specific phenotypic effects can be tested given current methodology of assaying gene expression levels, be it in the brain or in other tissues. We first set out a scenario for testing competing hypotheses and delineate the different assumptions and predictions of models. We then outline how predictions may be tested using mouse models such as intercrosses or recombinant inbred (RI) systems that can be phenotyped for traits relevant to imprinting theories. Further, we briefly discuss different molecular approaches that may be used in conjunction with experiments to ascertain expression patterns of imprinted genes and thus the testing of predictions. PMID:23641202

  20. Genomic potential hypothesis of evolution: a concept of biogenesis in habitable spaces of the universe.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Christian

    2002-11-01

    The new hypothesis of evolution establishes a contiguity of life sciences with cosmology, physics, and chemistry, and provides a basis for the search for life on other planets. Chemistry is the sole driving force of the assembly of life, under the subtle guidance exerted by bonding orbital geometry. That phenomenon leads to multiple origins that function on the same principles but are different to the extent that their nucleic acid core varies. Thus, thoughts about the origins of life and the development of complexity have been transferred from the chance orientation of the past to the realm of atomic structures, which are subject to the laws of thermodynamics and kinetics. Evolution is a legitimate subject of basic science, and the complexity of life will submit to the laws of chemistry and physics as the problem is viewed from a new perspective. The paradigm connects life to the big events that formed every sphere of our living space and that keeps conditions fine-tuned for life to persist, perhaps a billion years or more. The "genomic potential" hypothesis leads to the prediction that life like ours is likely to exist in galaxies that are as distant from the origin of the universe as the Milky Way, and that the habitable zone of our galaxy harbors other living planets as well. PMID:12382315

  1. Genetic Analysis of Genome-Scale Recombination Rate Evolution in House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Beth L.; Payseur, Bret A.

    2011-01-01

    The rate of meiotic recombination varies markedly between species and among individuals. Classical genetic experiments demonstrated a heritable component to population variation in recombination rate, and specific sequence variants that contribute to recombination rate differences between individuals have recently been identified. Despite these advances, the genetic basis of species divergence in recombination rate remains unexplored. Using a cytological assay that allows direct in situ imaging of recombination events in spermatocytes, we report a large (?30%) difference in global recombination rate between males of two closely related house mouse subspecies (Mus musculus musculus and M. m. castaneus). To characterize the genetic basis of this recombination rate divergence, we generated an F2 panel of inter-subspecific hybrid males (n?=?276) from an intercross between wild-derived inbred strains CAST/EiJ (M. m. castaneus) and PWD/PhJ (M. m. musculus). We uncover considerable heritable variation for recombination rate among males from this mapping population. Much of the F2 variance for recombination rate and a substantial portion of the difference in recombination rate between the parental strains is explained by eight moderate- to large-effect quantitative trait loci, including two transgressive loci on the X chromosome. In contrast to the rapid evolution observed in males, female CAST/EiJ and PWD/PhJ animals show minimal divergence in recombination rate (?5%). The existence of loci on the X chromosome suggests a genetic mechanism to explain this male-biased evolution. Our results provide an initial map of the genetic changes underlying subspecies differences in genome-scale recombination rate and underscore the power of the house mouse system for understanding the evolution of this trait. PMID:21695226

  2. Comparison of mitochondrial genomes provides insights into intron dynamics and evolution in the caterpillar fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Guozhen; Liu, Xingzhong; Wang, Chengshu; Xu, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    Intra-specific comparison of mitochondrial genomes can help elucidate the evolution of a species, however it has not been performed for hypocrealean fungi that form diverse symbiotic associations with other organisms. In this study, comparative analyses of three completely sequenced mitochondrial genomes of a hypocrealean fungus, Cordyceps militaris, the type species of Cordyceps genus, revealed that the introns were the main contributors to mitochondrial genome size variations among strains. Mitochondrial genes in C. militaris have been invaded by group I introns in at least eight positions. PCR assays of various C. militaris isolates showed abundant variations of intron presence/absence among strains at seven of the eight intronic loci. Although the ancestral intron pattern was inferred to contain all eight introns, loss and/or gain events occurred for seven of the eight introns. These introns invaded the C. militaris mitochondrial genome probably by horizontal transfer from other fungi, and intron insertions into intronless genes in C. militaris were accompanied by co-conversions of upstream exon sequences especially for those introns targeting protein-coding genes. We also detected phylogenetic congruence between the intron and exon trees at each individual locus, consistent with the ancestral mitochondria of C. militaris as having all eight introns. This study helps to explain the evolution of C. militaris mitochondrial genomes and will facilitate population genetic studies of this medicinally important fungus. PMID:25896956

  3. Equine rhinovirus 1 is more closely related to foot-and-mouth disease virus than to other picornaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Li, F; Browning, G F; Studdert, M J; Crabb, B S

    1996-01-01

    Equine rhinovirus 1 (ERhV1) is a respiratory pathogen of horses which has an uncertain taxonomic status. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the ERhV1 genome except for a small region at the 5' end. The predicted polyprotein was encoded by 6741 nucleotides and possessed a typical picornavirus proteolytic cleavage pattern, including a leader polypeptide. The genomic structure and predicted amino acid sequence of ERhV1 were more similar to those of foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDVs), the only members of the aphthovirus genus, than to those of other picornaviruses. Features which were most similar to FMDV included a 16-amino acid 2A protein which was 87.5% identical in sequence of FMDV 2A, a leader (L) protein similar in size to FMDV Lab and the possibility of a truncated L protein similar in size to FMDV Lb, and a 3C protease which recognizes different cleavage sites. However, unlike FMDV, ERhV1 had only one copy of the 3B (VPg) polypeptide. The phylogenetic relationships of the ERhV1 sequence and nucleotide sequences of representative species of the five genera of the family Picornaviridae were examined. Nucleotide sequences coding for the complete polyprotein, the RNA polymerase, and VP1 were analyzed separately. The phylogenetic trees confirmed that ERhV1 was more closely related to FMDV than to other picornaviruses and suggested that ERhV1 may be a member, albeit very distant, of the aphthovirus genus. PMID:8577774

  4. The genome sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the role of genome evolution in cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michelle A; Lauro, Federico M; Williams, Timothy J; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S; De Francisci, Davide; Chong, Kevin W Y; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H; De Maere, Matthew Z; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R; Galperin, Michael Y; Anderson, Iain J; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michele; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-09-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five-tiered evidence rating (ER) system that ranked annotations from ER1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea, which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino-acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall, membrane, envelope biogenesis COG genes are overrepresented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are overrepresented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two overrepresented COG categories appear to have been acquired from epsilon- and delta-Proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they have an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have occurred over the last several thousand years as it adapted from a marine to an Antarctic lake environment. PMID:19404327

  5. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have occurred over the last several thousand years as it adapted from a marine, to an Antarctic lake environment.

  6. Predominant and substoichiometric isomers of the plastid genome coexist within Juniperus plants and have shifted multiple times during cupressophyte evolution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenhu; Grewe, Felix; Cobo-Clark, Amie; Fan, Weishu; Duan, Zelin; Adams, Robert P; Schwarzbach, Andrea E; Mower, Jeffrey P

    2014-03-01

    Most land plant plastomes contain two copies of a large inverted repeat (IR) that promote high-frequency homologous recombination to generate isomeric genomic forms. Among conifer plastomes, this canonical IR is highly reduced in Pinaceae and completely lost from cupressophytes. However, both lineages have acquired short, novel IRs, some of which also exhibit recombinational activity to generate genomic structural diversity. This diversity has been shown to exist between, and occasionally within, cupressophyte species, but it is not known whether multiple genomic forms coexist within individual plants. To examine the recombinational potential of the novel cupressophyte IRs within individuals and between species, we sequenced the plastomes of four closely related species of Juniperus. The four plastomes have identical gene content and genome organization except for a large 36 kb inversion between approximately 250 bp IR containing trnQ-UUG. Southern blotting showed that different isomeric versions of the plastome predominate among individual junipers, whereas polymerase chain reaction and high-throughput read-pair mapping revealed the substoichiometric presence of the alternative isomeric form within each individual plant. Furthermore, our comparative genomic studies demonstrate that the predominant and substoichiometric arrangements of this IR have changed several times in other cupressophytes as well. These results provide compelling evidence for substoichiometric shifting of plastomic forms during cupressophyte evolution and suggest that substoichiometric shifting activity in plastid genomes may be adaptive. PMID:24586030

  7. Insights into archaeal evolution and symbiosis from the genomes of a Nanoarchaeon and its crenarchaeal host from Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Podar, Mircea [ORNL] [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL] [ORNL; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise [Portland State University] [Portland State University; Koonin, Eugene [National Center for Biotechnology Information] [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Wolf, Yuri [National Center for Biotechnology Information] [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Makarova, Kira S. [National Center for Biotechnology Information] [National Center for Biotechnology Information

    2013-01-01

    A hyperthemophilic member of the Nanoarchaeota from Obsidian Pool, a thermal feature in Yellowstone National Park was characterized using single cell isolation and sequencing, together with its putative host, a Sulfolobales archaeon. This first representative of a non-marine Nanoarchaeota (Nst1) resembles Nanoarchaeum equitans by lacking most biosynthetic capabilities, the two forming a deep-branching archaeal lineage. However, the Nst1 genome is over 20% larger, encodes a complete gluconeogenesis pathway and a full complement of archaeal flagellum proteins. Comparison of the two genomes suggests that the marine and terrestrial Nanoarchaeota lineages share a common ancestor that was already a symbiont of another archaeon. With a larger genome, a smaller repertoire of split protein encoding genes and no split non-contiguous tRNAs, Nst1 appears to have experienced less severe genome reduction than N. equitans. The inferred host of Nst1 is potentially autotrophic, with a streamlined genome and simplified central and energetic metabolism as compared to other Sulfolobales. The two distinct Nanoarchaeota-host genomic data sets offer insights into the evolution of archaeal symbiosis and parasitism and will further enable studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of these relationships.

  8. Insights into Ongoing Evolution of the Hexachlorocyclohexane Catabolic Pathway from Comparative Genomics of Ten Sphingomonadaceae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Stephen L.; Oakeshott, John G.; Pandey, Gunjan

    2015-01-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), a synthetic organochloride, was first used as a broad-acre insecticide in the 1940s, and many HCH-degrading bacterial strains have been isolated from around the globe during the last 20 years. To date, the same degradation pathway (the lin pathway) has been implicated in all strains characterized, although the pathway has only been characterized intensively in two strains and for only a single HCH isomer. To further elucidate the evolution of the lin pathway, we have biochemically and genetically characterized three HCH-degrading strains from the Czech Republic and compared the genomes of these and seven other HCH-degrading bacterial strains. The three new strains each yielded a distinct set of metabolites during their degradation of HCH isomers. Variable assembly of the pathway is a common feature across the 10 genomes, eight of which (including all three Czech strains) were either missing key lin genes or containing duplicate copies of upstream lin genes (linA-F). The analysis also confirmed the important role of horizontal transfer mediated by insertion sequence IS6100 in the acquisition of the pathway, with a stronger association of IS6100 to the lin genes in the new strains. In one strain, a linA variant was identified that likely caused a novel degradation phenotype involving a shift in isomer preference. This study identifies a number of strains that are in the early stages of lin pathway acquisition and shows that the state of the pathway can explain the degradation patterns observed. PMID:25850427

  9. Evolution of a Cellular Immune Response in Drosophila: A Phenotypic and Genomic Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Jaramillo, Laura; Paspati, Angeliki; van de Zande, Louis; Vermeulen, Cornelis Joseph; Schwander, Tanja; Wertheim, Bregje

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genomic basis of evolutionary adaptation requires insight into the molecular basis underlying phenotypic variation. However, even changes in molecular pathways associated with extreme variation, gains and losses of specific phenotypes, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we investigate the large interspecific differences in the ability to survive infection by parasitoids across 11 Drosophila species and identify genomic changes associated with gains and losses of parasitoid resistance. We show that a cellular immune defense, encapsulation, and the production of a specialized blood cell, lamellocytes, are restricted to a sublineage of Drosophila, but that encapsulation is absent in one species of this sublineage, Drosophila sechellia. Our comparative analyses of hemopoiesis pathway genes and of genes differentially expressed during the encapsulation response revealed that hemopoiesis-associated genes are highly conserved and present in all species independently of their resistance. In contrast, 11 genes that are differentially expressed during the response to parasitoids are novel genes, specific to the Drosophila sublineage capable of lamellocyte-mediated encapsulation. These novel genes, which are predominantly expressed in hemocytes, arose via duplications, whereby five of them also showed signatures of positive selection, as expected if they were recruited for new functions. Three of these novel genes further showed large-scale and presumably loss-of-function sequence changes in D. sechellia, consistent with the loss of resistance in this species. In combination, these convergent lines of evidence suggest that co-option of duplicated genes in existing pathways and subsequent neofunctionalization are likely to have contributed to the evolution of the lamellocyte-mediated encapsulation in Drosophila. PMID:24443439

  10. Genome Dynamics Explain the Evolution of Flowering Time CCT Domain Gene Families in the Poaceae

    PubMed Central

    Cockram, James; Thiel, Thomas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Stein, Nils; Taudien, Stefan; Bailey, Paul C.; O'Sullivan, Donal M.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous CCT domain genes are known to control flowering in plants. They belong to the CONSTANS-like (COL) and PREUDORESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) gene families, which in addition to a CCT domain possess B-box or response-regulator domains, respectively. Ghd7 is the most recently identified COL gene to have a proven role in the control of flowering time in the Poaceae. However, as it lacks B-box domains, its inclusion within the COL gene family, technically, is incorrect. Here, we show Ghd7 belongs to a larger family of previously uncharacterized Poaceae genes which possess just a single CCT domain, termed here CCT MOTIF FAMILY (CMF) genes. We molecularly describe the CMF (and related COL and PRR) gene families in four sequenced Poaceae species, as well as in the draft genome assembly of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Genetic mapping of the ten barley CMF genes identified, as well as twelve previously unmapped HvCOL and HvPRR genes, finds the majority map to colinear positions relative to their Poaceae orthologues. Combined inter-/intra-species comparative and phylogenetic analysis of CMF, COL and PRR gene families indicates they evolved prior to the monocot/dicot divergence ?200 mya, with Poaceae CMF evolution described as the interplay between whole genome duplication in the ancestral cereal, and subsequent clade-specific mutation, deletion and duplication events. Given the proven role of CMF genes in the modulation of cereals flowering, the molecular, phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the Poaceae CMF, COL and PRR gene families presented here provides the foundation from which functional investigation can be undertaken. PMID:23028921

  11. New Markov Model Approaches to Deciphering Microbial Genome Function and Evolution: Comparative Genomics of Laterally Transferred Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Borodovsky, M.

    2013-04-11

    Algorithmic methods for gene prediction have been developed and successfully applied to many different prokaryotic genome sequences. As the set of genes in a particular genome is not homogeneous with respect to DNA sequence composition features, the GeneMark.hmm program utilizes two Markov models representing distinct classes of protein coding genes denoted "typical" and "atypical". Atypical genes are those whose DNA features deviate significantly from those classified as typical and they represent approximately 10% of any given genome. In addition to the inherent interest of more accurately predicting genes, the atypical status of these genes may also reflect their separate evolutionary ancestry from other genes in that genome. We hypothesize that atypical genes are largely comprised of those genes that have been relatively recently acquired through lateral gene transfer (LGT). If so, what fraction of atypical genes are such bona fide LGTs? We have made atypical gene predictions for all fully completed prokaryotic genomes; we have been able to compare these results to other "surrogate" methods of LGT prediction.

  12. Rhinovirus Induction of the CXC Chemokine Epithelial?Neutrophil Activating Peptide?78 in Bronchial Epithelium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Howard Donninger; Richard Glashoff; Reena Ghildyal

    2003-01-01

    Epithelial-neutrophil activating peptide-78 (ENA-78) induces neutrophil migration, an early response to viral infection. Rhinovirus serotype 16 (RV16) was used to infect primary bronchial epithelial cells and a cell line (BEAS-2B). Release of ENA-78 protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, ENA-78 mRNA production was quantified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and ENA-78 promoter activity was assessed by use of a

  13. Comparative genomics of the classical Bordetella subspecies: the evolution and exchange of virulence-associated diversity amongst closely related pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The classical Bordetella subspecies are phylogenetically closely related, yet differ in some of the most interesting and important characteristics of pathogens, such as host range, virulence and persistence. The compelling picture from previous comparisons of the three sequenced genomes was of genome degradation, with substantial loss of genome content (up to 24%) associated with adaptation to humans. Results For a more comprehensive picture of lineage evolution, we employed comparative genomic and phylogenomic analyses using seven additional diverse, newly sequenced Bordetella isolates. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis supports a reevaluation of the phylogenetic relationships between the classical Bordetella subspecies, and suggests a closer link between ovine and human B. parapertussis lineages than has been previously proposed. Comparative analyses of genome content revealed that only 50% of the pan-genome is conserved in all strains, reflecting substantial diversity of genome content in these closely related pathogens that may relate to their different host ranges, virulence and persistence characteristics. Strikingly, these analyses suggest possible horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in multiple loci encoding virulence factors, including O-antigen and pertussis toxin (Ptx). Segments of the pertussis toxin locus (ptx) and its secretion system locus (ptl) appear to have been acquired by the classical Bordetella subspecies and are divergent in different lineages, suggesting functional divergence in the classical Bordetellae. Conclusions Together, these observations, especially in key virulence factors, reveal that multiple mechanisms, such as point mutations, gain or loss of genes, as well as HGTs, contribute to the substantial phenotypic diversity of these versatile subspecies in various hosts. PMID:23051057

  14. Integrating phenotypic plasticity within an Ecological Genomics framework: recent insights from the genomics, evolution, ecology, and fitness of plasticity.

    PubMed

    Morris, Matthew; Rogers, Sean M

    2014-01-01

    E.B. Ford's 1964 book Ecological Genetics was a call for biologists to engage in multidisciplinary work in order to elucidate the link between genotype, phenotype, and fitness for ecologically relevant traits. In this review, we argue that the integration of an ecological genomics framework in studies of phenotypic plasticity is a promising approach to elucidate the causal links between genes and the environment, particularly during colonization of novel environments, environmental change, and speciation. This review highlights some of the questions and hypotheses generated from a mechanistic, evolutionary, and ecological perspective, in order to direct the continued and future use of genomic tools in the study of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:24277296

  15. Dynamic evolution of plant mitochondrial genomes: Mobile genes and introns and highly variable

    E-print Network

    Parkinson, Christopher L.

    our recent studies showing that angiosperm mito- chondrial (mt) genomes have experienced remarkably rapidly; for exam- ple, within the cucumber family, mt genome size varies by more than six-fold (9). Plant

  16. Sequencing three crocodilian genomes to illuminate the evolution of archosaurs and amniotes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The International Crocodilian Genomes Working Group (ICGWG) will sequence and assemble the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and Indian gharial (Gavialis gangeticus) genomes. The status of these projects and our planned analyses are described. PMID:22293439

  17. The battle of the sexes over seed size: support for both kinship genomic imprinting and interlocus contest evolution.

    PubMed

    Willi, Yvonne

    2013-06-01

    Outcrossing creates a venue for parental conflict. When one sex provides parental care to offspring fertilized by several partners, the nonproviding sex is under selection to maximally exploit the caring sex. The caring sex may counteradapt, and a coevolutionary arms race ensues. Genetic models of this conflict include the kinship theory of genomic imprinting (parent-of-origin-specific expression of maternal-care effectors) and interlocus conflict evolution (interaction between male selfish signals and female abatement). Predictions were tested by measuring the sizes of seeds produced by within-population crosses (diallel design) and between-population crosses in outcrossing and selfing populations of Arabidopsis lyrata. Within-population diallel crosses revealed substantial maternal variance in seed size in most populations. The comparison of between- and within-population crosses showed that seeds were larger when pollen came from another outcrossing population than when pollen came from a selfing or the same population, supporting interlocus contest evolution between male selfish genes and female recognition genes. Evidence for kinship genomic imprinting came from complementary trait means of seed size in reciprocal between-population crosses independent of whether populations were predominantly selfing or outcrossing. Hence, both kinship genomic imprinting and interlocus contest are supported in outcrossing Arabidopsis, whereas only kinship genomic imprinting is important in selfing populations. PMID:23669541

  18. Satellite DNAs between selfishness and functionality: Structure, genomics and evolution of tandem repeats in centromeric (hetero)chromatin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miroslav Plohl; Andrea Luchetti; Nevenka Meštrovi?; Barbara Mantovani

    2008-01-01

    Satellite DNAs (tandemly repeated, non-coding DNA sequences) stretch over almost all native centromeres and surrounding pericentromeric heterochromatin. Once considered as inert by-products of genome dynamics in heterochromatic regions, recent studies showed that satellite DNA evolution is interplay of stochastic events and selective pressure. This points to a functional significance of satellite sequences, which in (peri)centromeres may play some fundamental functional

  19. Genome-Wide SNP-Genotyping Array to Study the Evolution of the Human Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 3

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Ryan B.; Bar-On, Yudi; Linetsky, Alex; Shmoish, Michael; Sanjuán, Eva; Amaro, Carmen; Walt, David R.; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is an aquatic bacterium and an important human pathogen. Strains of V. vulnificus are classified into three different biotypes. The newly emerged biotype 3 has been found to be clonal and restricted to Israel. In the family Vibrionaceae, horizontal gene transfer is the main mechanism responsible for the emergence of new pathogen groups. To better understand the evolution of the bacterium, and in particular to trace the evolution of biotype 3, we performed genome-wide SNP genotyping of 254 clinical and environmental V. vulnificus isolates with worldwide distribution recovered over a 30-year period, representing all phylogeny groups. A custom single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array implemented on the Illumina GoldenGate platform was developed based on 570 SNPs randomly distributed throughout the genome. In general, the genotyping results divided the V. vulnificus species into three main phylogenetic lineages and an additional subgroup, clade B, consisting of environmental and clinical isolates from Israel. Data analysis suggested that 69% of biotype 3 SNPs are similar to SNPs from clade B, indicating that biotype 3 and clade B have a common ancestor. The rest of the biotype 3 SNPs were scattered along the biotype 3 genome, probably representing multiple chromosomal segments that may have been horizontally inserted into the clade B recipient core genome from other phylogroups or bacterial species sharing the same ecological niche. Results emphasize the continuous evolution of V. vulnificus and support the emergence of new pathogenic groups within this species as a recurrent phenomenon. Our findings contribute to a broader understanding of the evolution of this human pathogen. PMID:25526263

  20. Genome evolution in pocket gophers (genus Thomomys). I. Heterochromatin variation and speciation potential.

    PubMed

    Patton, J L; Sherwood, S W

    1982-01-01

    A basic dichotomy exists in the amount and chromosomal position of constitutive heterochromatin (C-bands) in species of pocket gophers, genus Thomomys. Members of the "talpoides-group" of species (e.g., T. talpoides and T. monticola) have C-bands restricted to the centromeric regions. These taxa are characterized by Robertsonian patterns of karyotypic evolution. In contrast, species within the "bottae-group" are characterized by extensive amounts of heterochromatin, placed as whole-arm and apparent whole-chromosome (T. bottae) or as large interstitial blocks (T. umbrinus). These species are characterized by extensive non-Robertsonian variation in karyotype, variation which may be expressed from local population polymorphism to between population or species polytypy. Within T. bottae, the number of whole-arm heterochromatic autosomes is inversely proportional to the number of uniarmed chromosomes in the complement, which ranges from 0 to 36 across the species populations. In all-biarmed karyotypic populations, upward to 60 percent of the linear length of the genome is composed of heterochromatin. Populations with extensive heterochromatin variation and those with similar amounts meet and hybridize freely in nature. The implications of these date for current ideas on the function of heterochromatin, particularly as related to speciation models, are discussed. PMID:7117026

  1. Evolution and Quantitative Comparison of Genome-Wide Protein Domain Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Parikesit, Arli A.; Stadler, Peter F.; Prohaska, Sonja J.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic and regulatory capabilities of an organism are implicit in its protein content. This is often hard to estimate, however, due to ascertainment biases inherent in the available genome annotations. Its complement of recognizable functional protein domains and their combinations convey essentially the same information and at the same time are much more readily accessible, although protein domain models trained for one phylogenetic group frequently fail on distantly related sequences. Pooling related domain models based on their GO-annotation in combination with de novo gene prediction methods provides estimates that seem to be less affected by phylogenetic biases. We show here for 18 diverse representatives from all eukaryotic kingdoms that a pooled analysis of the tendencies for co-occurrence or avoidance of protein domains is indeed feasible. This type of analysis can reveal general large-scale patterns in the domain co-occurrence and helps to identify lineage-specific variations in the evolution of protein domains. Somewhat surprisingly, we do not find strong ubiquitous patterns governing the evolutionary behavior of specific functional classes. Instead, there are strong variations between the major groups of Eukaryotes, pointing at systematic differences in their evolutionary constraints. PMID:24710298

  2. Evolution and quantitative comparison of genome-wide protein domain distributions.

    PubMed

    Parikesit, Arli A; Stadler, Peter F; Prohaska, Sonja J

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic and regulatory capabilities of an organism are implicit in its protein content. This is often hard to estimate, however, due to ascertainment biases inherent in the available genome annotations. Its complement of recognizable functional protein domains and their combinations convey essentially the same information and at the same time are much more readily accessible, although protein domain models trained for one phylogenetic group frequently fail on distantly related sequences. Pooling related domain models based on their GO-annotation in combination with de novo gene prediction methods provides estimates that seem to be less affected by phylogenetic biases. We show here for 18 diverse representatives from all eukaryotic kingdoms that a pooled analysis of the tendencies for co-occurrence or avoidance of protein domains is indeed feasible. This type of analysis can reveal general large-scale patterns in the domain co-occurrence and helps to identify lineage-specific variations in the evolution of protein domains. Somewhat surprisingly, we do not find strong ubiquitous patterns governing the evolutionary behavior of specific functional classes. Instead, there are strong variations between the major groups of Eukaryotes, pointing at systematic differences in their evolutionary constraints. PMID:24710298

  3. Mitochondrial Genomes Suggest Rapid Evolution of Dwarf California Channel Islands Foxes (Urocyon littoralis)

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Courtney A.; Rick, Torben C.; Hawkins, Melissa T. R.; Funk, W. Chris; Ralls, Katherine; Boser, Christina L.; Collins, Paul W.; Coonan, Tim; King, Julie L.; Morrison, Scott A.; Newsome, Seth D.; Sillett, T. Scott; Fleischer, Robert C.; Maldonado, Jesus E.

    2015-01-01

    Island endemics are typically differentiated from their mainland progenitors in behavior, morphology, and genetics, often resulting from long-term evolutionary change. To examine mechanisms for the origins of island endemism, we present a phylogeographic analysis of whole mitochondrial genomes from the endangered island fox (Urocyon littoralis), endemic to California’s Channel Islands, and mainland gray foxes (U. cinereoargenteus). Previous genetic studies suggested that foxes first appeared on the islands >16,000 years ago, before human arrival (~13,000 cal BP), while archaeological and paleontological data supported a colonization >7000 cal BP. Our results are consistent with initial fox colonization of the northern islands probably by rafting or human introduction ~9200–7100 years ago, followed quickly by human translocation of foxes from the northern to southern Channel Islands. Mitogenomes indicate that island foxes are monophyletic and most closely related to gray foxes from northern California that likely experienced a Holocene climate-induced range shift. Our data document rapid morphological evolution of island foxes (in ~2000 years or less). Despite evidence for bottlenecks, island foxes have generated and maintained multiple mitochondrial haplotypes. This study highlights the intertwined evolutionary history of island foxes and humans, and illustrates a new approach for investigating the evolutionary histories of other island endemics. PMID:25714775

  4. Morphological homoplasy, life history evolution, and historical biogeography of plethodontid salamanders inferred from complete mitochondrial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Rachel Lockridge; Macey, J. Robert; Jaekel, Martin; Wake, David B.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-08-01

    The evolutionary history of the largest salamander family (Plethodontidae) is characterized by extreme morphological homoplasy. Analysis of the mechanisms generating such homoplasy requires an independent, molecular phylogeny. To this end, we sequenced 24 complete mitochondrial genomes (22 plethodontids and two outgroup taxa), added data for three species from GenBank, and performed partitioned and unpartitioned Bayesian, ML, and MP phylogenetic analyses. We explored four dataset partitioning strategies to account for evolutionary process heterogeneity among genes and codon positions, all of which yielded increased model likelihoods and decreased numbers of supported nodes in the topologies (PP > 0.95) relative to the unpartitioned analysis. Our phylogenetic analyses yielded congruent trees that contrast with the traditional morphology-based taxonomy; the monophyly of three out of four major groups is rejected. Reanalysis of current hypotheses in light of these new evolutionary relationships suggests that (1) a larval life history stage re-evolved from a direct-developing ancestor multiple times, (2) there is no phylogenetic support for the ''Out of Appalachia'' hypothesis of plethodontid origins, and (3) novel scenarios must be reconstructed for the convergent evolution of projectile tongues, reduction in toe number, and specialization for defensive tail loss. Some of these novel scenarios imply morphological transformation series that proceed in the opposite direction than was previously thought. In addition, they suggest surprising evolutionary lability in traits previously interpreted to be conservative.

  5. Repeated big bangs and the expanding universe: Directionality in plant genome size evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer S. Hawkins; Corrinne E. Grover; Jonathan F. Wendel

    2008-01-01

    The lack of correlation between genome size and organismal complexity has long been a topic of great interest. Over the last decade it has become clear that transposable elements play a dominant role in genome size growth, and that most of the observed genome size variation in plants can be ascribed to differential accumulation of transposable elements, particularly long terminal

  6. Incongruent Patterns of Local and Global Genome Size Evolution in Cotton

    E-print Network

    Wendel, Jonathan F.

    of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; 3 Plant Genome Mapping Laboratory, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA Genome sizes in plants vary over several orders of magnitude, reflecting a combination sequence surrounding the cellulose synthase gene CesA1 was compared for the two coresident genomes (AT

  7. Crop evolution: from genetics to genomics John M Burke, Jutta C Burger and Mark A Chapman

    E-print Network

    Burke, John M.

    sequence in 2000 [13]; however, the genome sequences of only two economically important plants (rice sequencing projects are underway for just a handful of crop plants, recent years have witnessed a tremendous are we now? The genomics age in plants was ushered in by the publication of the Arabidopsis genome

  8. Evolution of pigment synthesis pathways by gene and genome duplication in fish

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingo Braasch; Manfred Schartl; Jean-Nicolas Volff

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coloration and color patterning belong to the most diverse phenotypic traits in animals. Particularly, teleost fishes possess more pigment cell types than any other group of vertebrates. As the result of an ancient fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD), teleost genomes might contain more copies of genes involved in pigment cell development than tetrapods. No systematic genomic inventory allowing to test

  9. SEQUENCE AND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE CHICKEN GENOME PROVIDE UNIQUE PERSPECTIVES ON VERTEBRATE EVOLUTION.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome--composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence ...

  10. New insights into Oryza genome evolution: high gene colinearity and differential retrotransposon amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genomic region (~247kb) from an FF genome, wild Oryza species, O. brachyantha L., was sequenced and compared to the orthologous region (~450 kb) from AA genome rice, O. sativa L. ssp japonica ¬ the first such comparison reported between cultivated Oryza and a distantly related wild species. Among ...

  11. Genome structure drives patterns of gene family evolution in ciliates, a case study using Chilodonella uncinata (Protista, Ciliophora, Phyllopharyngea).

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Song, Weibo; Katz, Laura A

    2014-08-01

    In most lineages, diversity among gene family members results from gene duplication followed by sequence divergence. Because of the genome rearrangements during the development of somatic nuclei, gene family evolution in ciliates involves more complex processes. Previous work on the ciliate Chilodonella uncinata revealed that macronuclear ?-tubulin gene family members are generated by alternative processing, in which germline regions are alternatively used in multiple macronuclear chromosomes. To further study genome evolution in this ciliate, we analyzed its transcriptome and found that (1) alternative processing is extensive among gene families; and (2) such gene families are likely to be C. uncinata specific. We characterized additional macronuclear and micronuclear copies of one candidate alternatively processed gene family-a protein kinase domain containing protein (PKc)-from two C. uncinata strains. Analysis of the PKc sequences reveals that (1) multiple PKc gene family members in the macronucleus share some identical regions flanked by divergent regions; and (2) the shared identical regions are processed from a single micronuclear chromosome. We discuss analogous processes in lineages across the eukaryotic tree of life to provide further insights on the impact of genome structure on gene family evolution in eukaryotes. PMID:24749903

  12. Genome Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Genome Research, the Web version of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's printed journal, focuses on "genome studies in all species, including genetic and physical mapping, DNA sequencing, genome-based analyses of biological processes, gene discovery, comparative genome analyses, evolution studies, forensics, informatics, statistical and mathematical methods, genome structure and function, and technological innovations and applications." Online issues are available from April 1997; tables of contents and abstracts begin August 1995. The free access period for Genome Research ends December 31, 1998. Genome Research is made available through Stanford University's HighWire Press.

  13. Social insect genomes exhibit dramatic evolution in gene composition and regulation while preserving regulatory features linked to sociality

    PubMed Central

    Simola, Daniel F.; Wissler, Lothar; Donahue, Greg; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Helmkampf, Martin; Roux, Julien; Nygaard, Sanne; Glastad, Karl M.; Hagen, Darren E.; Viljakainen, Lumi; Reese, Justin T.; Hunt, Brendan G.; Graur, Dan; Elhaik, Eran; Kriventseva, Evgenia V.; Wen, Jiayu; Parker, Brian J.; Cash, Elizabeth; Privman, Eyal; Childers, Christopher P.; Muñoz-Torres, Monica C.; Boomsma, Jacobus J.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Currie, Cameron R.; Elsik, Christine G.; Suen, Garret; Goodisman, Michael A.D.; Keller, Laurent; Liebig, Jürgen; Rawls, Alan; Reinberg, Danny; Smith, Chris D.; Smith, Chris R.; Tsutsui, Neil; Wurm, Yannick; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Berger, Shelley L.; Gadau, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Genomes of eusocial insects code for dramatic examples of phenotypic plasticity and social organization. We compared the genomes of seven ants, the honeybee, and various solitary insects to examine whether eusocial lineages share distinct features of genomic organization. Each ant lineage contains ?4000 novel genes, but only 64 of these genes are conserved among all seven ants. Many gene families have been expanded in ants, notably those involved in chemical communication (e.g., desaturases and odorant receptors). Alignment of the ant genomes revealed reduced purifying selection compared with Drosophila without significantly reduced synteny. Correspondingly, ant genomes exhibit dramatic divergence of noncoding regulatory elements; however, extant conserved regions are enriched for novel noncoding RNAs and transcription factor–binding sites. Comparison of orthologous gene promoters between eusocial and solitary species revealed significant regulatory evolution in both cis (e.g., Creb) and trans (e.g., fork head) for nearly 2000 genes, many of which exhibit phenotypic plasticity. Our results emphasize that genomic changes can occur remarkably fast in ants, because two recently diverged leaf-cutter ant species exhibit faster accumulation of species-specific genes and greater divergence in regulatory elements compared with other ants or Drosophila. Thus, while the “socio-genomes” of ants and the honeybee are broadly characterized by a pervasive pattern of divergence in gene composition and regulation, they preserve lineage-specific regulatory features linked to eusociality. We propose that changes in gene regulation played a key role in the origins of insect eusociality, whereas changes in gene composition were more relevant for lineage-specific eusocial adaptations. PMID:23636946

  14. Genomic organization, evolution, and expression of photoprotein and opsin genes in Mnemiopsis leidyi: a new view of ctenophore photocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Calcium-activated photoproteins are luciferase variants found in photocyte cells of bioluminescent jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria) and comb jellies (Phylum Ctenophora). The complete genomic sequence from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, a representative of the earliest branch of animals that emit light, provided an opportunity to examine the genome of an organism that uses this class of luciferase for bioluminescence and to look for genes involved in light reception. To determine when photoprotein genes first arose, we examined the genomic sequence from other early-branching taxa. We combined our genomic survey with gene trees, developmental expression patterns, and functional protein assays of photoproteins and opsins to provide a comprehensive view of light production and light reception in Mnemiopsis. Results The Mnemiopsis genome has 10 full-length photoprotein genes situated within two genomic clusters with high sequence conservation that are maintained due to strong purifying selection and concerted evolution. Photoprotein-like genes were also identified in the genomes of the non-luminescent sponge Amphimedon queenslandica and the non-luminescent cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, and phylogenomic analysis demonstrated that photoprotein genes arose at the base of all animals. Photoprotein gene expression in Mnemiopsis embryos begins during gastrulation in migrating precursors to photocytes and persists throughout development in the canals where photocytes reside. We identified three putative opsin genes in the Mnemiopsis genome and show that they do not group with well-known bilaterian opsin subfamilies. Interestingly, photoprotein transcripts are co-expressed with two of the putative opsins in developing photocytes. Opsin expression is also seen in the apical sensory organ. We present evidence that one opsin functions as a photopigment in vitro, absorbing light at wavelengths that overlap with peak photoprotein light emission, raising the hypothesis that light production and light reception may be functionally connected in ctenophore photocytes. We also present genomic evidence of a complete ciliary phototransduction cascade in Mnemiopsis. Conclusions This study elucidates the genomic organization, evolutionary history, and developmental expression of photoprotein and opsin genes in the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, introduces a novel dual role for ctenophore photocytes in both bioluminescence and phototransduction, and raises the possibility that light production and light reception are linked in this early-branching non-bilaterian animal. PMID:23259493

  15. Genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus strain Newman and comparative analysis of staphylococcal genomes: polymorphism and evolution of two major pathogenicity islands.

    PubMed

    Baba, Tadashi; Bae, Taeok; Schneewind, Olaf; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    Strains of Staphylococcus aureus, an important human pathogen, display up to 20% variability in their genome sequence, and most sequence information is available for human clinical isolates that have not been subjected to genetic analysis of virulence attributes. S. aureus strain Newman, which was also isolated from a human infection, displays robust virulence properties in animal models of disease and has already been extensively analyzed for its molecular traits of staphylococcal pathogenesis. We report here the complete genome sequence of S. aureus Newman, which carries four integrated prophages, as well as two large pathogenicity islands. In agreement with the view that S. aureus Newman prophages contribute important properties to pathogenesis, fewer virulence factors are found outside of the prophages than for the highly virulent strain MW2. The absence of drug resistance genes reflects the general antibiotic-susceptible phenotype of S. aureus Newman. Phylogenetic analyses reveal clonal relationships between the staphylococcal strains Newman, COL, NCTC8325, and USA300 and a greater evolutionary distance to strains MRSA252, MW2, MSSA476, N315, Mu50, JH1, JH9, and RF122. However, polymorphism analysis of two large pathogenicity islands distributed among these strains shows that the two islands were acquired independently from the evolutionary pathway of the chromosomal backbones of staphylococcal genomes. Prophages and pathogenicity islands play central roles in S. aureus virulence and evolution. PMID:17951380

  16. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in Anostomidae species: implications for genomic and sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Members of the Anostomidae family provide an interesting model system for the study of the influence of repetitive elements on genome composition, mainly because they possess numerous heterochromatic segments and a peculiar system of female heterogamety that is restricted to a few species of the Leporinus genus. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify important new repetitive DNA elements in Anostomidae through restriction enzyme digestion, followed by cloning, characterisation and chromosome mapping of this fragment. To identify repetitive elements in other Leporinus species and expand on studies of repetitive elements in Anostomidae, hybridisation experiments were also performed using previously described probes of LeSpeI repetitive elements. Results The 628-base pair (bp) LeSpeII fragment was hybridised to metaphase cells of L. elongatus individuals as well as those of L. macrocephalus, L. obtusidens, L. striatus, L. lacustris, L. friderici, Schizodon borellii and S. isognathus. In L. elongatus, both male and female cells contained small clusters of LeSpeII repetitive elements dispersed on all of the chromosomes, with enrichment near most of the terminal portions of the chromosomes. In the female sex chromosomes of L. elongatus (Z2,Z2/W1W2), however, this repeated element was absent. In the remaining species, a dispersed pattern of hybridisation was observed on all chromosomes irrespective of whether or not they were sex chromosomes. The repetitive element LeSpeI produced positive hybridisations signals only in L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens, i.e., species with differentiated sex chromosomes. In the remaining species, the LeSpeI element did not produce hybridisation signals. Conclusions Results are discussed in terms of the effects of repetitive sequences on the differentiation of the Anostomidae genome, especially with respect to sex chromosome evolution. LeSpeII showed hybridisation patterns typical of Long Interspersed Elements (LINEs). The differential distribution of this element may be linked to sex chromosome differentiation in L. elongatus species. The relationship between sex chromosome specificity and the LeSpeI element is confirmed in the species L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens. PMID:23228116

  17. Comparative genomics of chemosensory protein genes reveals rapid evolution and positive selection in ant-specific duplicates.

    PubMed

    Kulmuni, J; Wurm, Y; Pamilo, P

    2013-06-01

    Gene duplications can have a major role in adaptation, and gene families underlying chemosensation are particularly interesting due to their essential role in chemical recognition of mates, predators and food resources. Social insects add yet another dimension to the study of chemosensory genomics, as the key components of their social life rely on chemical communication. Still, chemosensory gene families are little studied in social insects. Here we annotated chemosensory protein (CSP) genes from seven ant genomes and studied their evolution. The number of functional CSP genes ranges from 11 to 21 depending on species, and the estimated rates of gene birth and death indicate high turnover of genes. Ant CSP genes include seven conservative orthologous groups present in all the ants, and a group of genes that has expanded independently in different ant lineages. Interestingly, the expanded group of genes has a differing mode of evolution from the orthologous groups. The expanded group shows rapid evolution as indicated by a high dN/dS (nonsynonymous to synonymous changes) ratio, several sites under positive selection and many pseudogenes, whereas the genes in the seven orthologous groups evolve slowly under purifying selection and include only one pseudogene. These results show that adaptive changes have played a role in ant CSP evolution. The expanded group of ant-specific genes is phylogenetically close to a conservative orthologous group CSP7, which includes genes known to be involved in ant nestmate recognition, raising an interesting possibility that the expanded CSPs function in ant chemical communication. PMID:23403962

  18. Comparative genomics of chemosensory protein genes reveals rapid evolution and positive selection in ant-specific duplicates

    PubMed Central

    Kulmuni, J; Wurm, Y; Pamilo, P

    2013-01-01

    Gene duplications can have a major role in adaptation, and gene families underlying chemosensation are particularly interesting due to their essential role in chemical recognition of mates, predators and food resources. Social insects add yet another dimension to the study of chemosensory genomics, as the key components of their social life rely on chemical communication. Still, chemosensory gene families are little studied in social insects. Here we annotated chemosensory protein (CSP) genes from seven ant genomes and studied their evolution. The number of functional CSP genes ranges from 11 to 21 depending on species, and the estimated rates of gene birth and death indicate high turnover of genes. Ant CSP genes include seven conservative orthologous groups present in all the ants, and a group of genes that has expanded independently in different ant lineages. Interestingly, the expanded group of genes has a differing mode of evolution from the orthologous groups. The expanded group shows rapid evolution as indicated by a high dN/dS (nonsynonymous to synonymous changes) ratio, several sites under positive selection and many pseudogenes, whereas the genes in the seven orthologous groups evolve slowly under purifying selection and include only one pseudogene. These results show that adaptive changes have played a role in ant CSP evolution. The expanded group of ant-specific genes is phylogenetically close to a conservative orthologous group CSP7, which includes genes known to be involved in ant nestmate recognition, raising an interesting possibility that the expanded CSPs function in ant chemical communication. PMID:23403962

  19. Normalization of Complete Genome Characteristics: Application to Evolution from Primitive Organisms to Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, Kenji; Okayasu, Teiji; Ohhira, Shuji

    2015-04-01

    Normalized nucleotide and amino acid contents of complete genome sequences can be visualized as radar charts. The shapes of these charts depict the characteristics of an organism's genome. The normalized values calculated from the genome sequence theoretically exclude experimental errors. Further, because normalization is independent of both target size and kind, this procedure is applicable not only to single genes but also to whole genomes, which consist of a huge number of different genes. In this review, we discuss the applications of the normalization of the nucleotide and predicted amino acid contents of complete genomes to the investigation of genome structure and to evolutionary research from primitive organisms to Homo sapiens. Some of the results could never have been obtained from the analysis of individual nucleotide or amino acid sequences but were revealed only after the normalization of nucleotide and amino acid contents was applied to genome research. The discovery that genome structure was homogeneous was obtained only after normalization methods were applied to the nucleotide or predicted amino acid contents of genome sequences. Normalization procedures are also applicable to evolutionary research. Thus, normalization of the contents of whole genomes is a useful procedure that can help to characterize organisms. PMID:26085808

  20. [Trends of genome evolution in land and secondary-water herbs].

    PubMed

    Gamale?, Iu V; Sheremet'ev, S N

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analysis of genome sizes in two groups of herbs, land and secondary-water, has been released. It is shown that their genomes are changed to opposite topics in cenozoic. The genome of land herbs is increased, and it is decreased in secondary water herbs. Genome growth in land herbs is analyzed as the result of unfavourable changes in global climate: cooling, aridization and atmospheric CO2 deficit. Genome minimization in secondary-water herbs is interpreted as the sequence of united effect of two groups of factors: returning to more stable water environment and breakdown of symbiotic relations with fungi partner. The influence of environmental discomfort and development of symbiotic or parasitic relations on genome size is discussed in association with established differences. PMID:22997729

  1. Sequencing of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) genome provides insights into vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeramiah J; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Holt, Carson; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Jiang, Ning; Campbell, Michael S; Yandell, Mark D; Manousaki, Tereza; Meyer, Axel; Bloom, Ona E; Morgan, Jennifer R; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Sims, Carrie; Garruss, Alexander S; Cook, Malcolm; Krumlauf, Robb; Wiedemann, Leanne M; Sower, Stacia A; Decatur, Wayne A; Hall, Jeffrey A; Amemiya, Chris T; Saha, Nil R; Buckley, Katherine M; Rast, Jonathan P; Das, Sabyasachi; Hirano, Masayuki; McCurley, Nathanael; Guo, Peng; Rohner, Nicolas; Tabin, Clifford J; Piccinelli, Paul; Elgar, Greg; Ruffier, Magali; Aken, Bronwen L; Searle, Stephen M J; Muffato, Matthieu; Pignatelli, Miguel; Herrero, Javier; Jones, Matthew; Brown, C Titus; Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Nanlohy, Kaben G; Libants, Scot V; Yeh, Chu-Yin; McCauley, David W; Langeland, James A; Pancer, Zeev; Fritzsch, Bernd; de Jong, Pieter J; Zhu, Baoli; Fulton, Lucinda L; Theising, Brenda; Flicek, Paul; Bronner, Marianne E; Warren, Wesley C; Clifton, Sandra W; Wilson, Richard K; Li, Weiming

    2013-04-01

    Lampreys are representatives of an ancient vertebrate lineage that diverged from our own ?500 million years ago. By virtue of this deeply shared ancestry, the sea lamprey (P. marinus) genome is uniquely poised to provide insight into the ancestry of vertebrate genomes and the underlying principles of vertebrate biology. Here, we present the first lamprey whole-genome sequence and assembly. We note challenges faced owing to its high content of repetitive elements and GC bases, as well as the absence of broad-scale sequence information from closely related species. Analyses of the assembly indicate that two whole-genome duplications likely occurred before the divergence of ancestral lamprey and gnathostome lineages. Moreover, the results help define key evolutionary events within vertebrate lineages, including the origin of myelin-associated proteins and the development of appendages. The lamprey genome provides an important resource for reconstructing vertebrate origins and the evolutionary events that have shaped the genomes of extant organisms. PMID:23435085

  2. Insights into the evolution of vitamin B12 auxotrophy from sequenced algal genomes.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, Katherine E; Wheeler, Glen L; Leptos, Kyriacos C; Goldstein, Raymond E; Smith, Alison G

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin B(12) (cobalamin) is a dietary requirement for humans because it is an essential cofactor for two enzymes, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and methionine synthase (METH). Land plants and fungi neither synthesize or require cobalamin because they do not contain methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, and have an alternative B(12)-independent methionine synthase (METE). Within the algal kingdom, approximately half of all microalgal species need the vitamin as a growth supplement, but there is no phylogenetic relationship between these species, suggesting that the auxotrophy arose multiple times through evolution. We set out to determine the underlying cellular mechanisms for this observation by investigating elements of B(12) metabolism in the sequenced genomes of 15 different algal species, with representatives of the red, green, and brown algae, diatoms, and coccolithophores, including both macro- and microalgae, and from marine and freshwater environments. From this analysis, together with growth assays, we found a strong correlation between the absence of a functional METE gene and B(12) auxotrophy. The presence of a METE unitary pseudogene in the B(12)-dependent green algae Volvox carteri and Gonium pectorale, relatives of the B(12)-independent Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, suggest that B(12) dependence evolved recently in these lineages. In both C. reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, growth in the presence of cobalamin leads to repression of METE transcription, providing a mechanism for gene loss. Thus varying environmental conditions are likely to have been the reason for the multiple independent origins of B(12) auxotrophy in these organisms. Because the ultimate source of cobalamin is from prokaryotes, the selective loss of METE in different algal lineages will have had important physiological and ecological consequences for these organisms in terms of their dependence on bacteria. PMID:21551270

  3. Molecular Evolution of Viruses of the Family Filoviridae Based on 97 Whole-Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Serena A.; Towner, Jonathan S.; Sealy, Tara K.; McMullan, Laura K.; Khristova, Marina L.; Burt, Felicity J.; Swanepoel, Robert; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    Viruses in the Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus genera (family Filoviridae) have been associated with large outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever in human and nonhuman primates. The first documented cases occurred in primates over 45 years ago, but the amount of virus genetic diversity detected within bat populations, which have recently been identified as potential reservoir hosts, suggests that the filoviruses are much older. Here, detailed Bayesian coalescent phylogenetic analyses are performed on 97 whole-genome sequences, 55 of which are newly reported, to comprehensively examine molecular evolutionary rates and estimate dates of common ancestry for viruses within the family Filoviridae. Molecular evolutionary rates for viruses belonging to different species range from 0.46 × 10?4 nucleotide substitutions/site/year for Sudan ebolavirus to 8.21 × 10?4 nucleotide substitutions/site/year for Reston ebolavirus. Most recent common ancestry can be traced back only within the last 50 years for Reston ebolavirus and Zaire ebolavirus species and suggests that viruses within these species may have undergone recent genetic bottlenecks. Viruses within Marburg marburgvirus and Sudan ebolavirus species can be traced back further and share most recent common ancestors approximately 700 and 850 years before the present, respectively. Examination of the whole family suggests that members of the Filoviridae, including the recently described Lloviu virus, shared a most recent common ancestor approximately 10,000 years ago. These data will be valuable for understanding the evolution of filoviruses in the context of natural history as new reservoir hosts are identified and, further, for determining mechanisms of emergence, pathogenicity, and the ongoing threat to public health. PMID:23255795

  4. Genomic Evolution of the Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons in Hemiascomycetous Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Neuvéglise, Cécile; Feldmann, Horst; Bon, Elisabeth; Gaillardin, Claude; Casaregola, and Serge

    2002-01-01

    We identified putative long terminal repeat- (LTR) retrotransposon sequences among the 50,000 random sequence tags (RSTs) obtained by the Génolevures project from genomic libraries of 13 Hemiascomycetes species. In most cases additional sequencing enabled us to assemble the whole sequences of these retrotransposons. These approaches identified 17 distinct families, 10 of which are defined by full-length elements. We also identified five families of solo LTRs that were not associated with retrotransposons. Ty1-like retrotransposons were found in four of five species that are phylogenetically related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. uvarum, S. exiguus, S. servazzii, and S. kluyveri but not Zygosaccharomyces rouxii), and in two of three Kluyveromyces species (K. lactis and K. marxianus but not K. thermotolerans). Only multiply crippled elements could be identified in the K. lactis and S. servazzii strains analyzed, and only solo LTRs could be identified in S. uvarum. Ty4-like elements were only detected in S. uvarum, indicating that these elements appeared recently before speciation of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto species. Ty5-like elements were detected in S. exiguus, Pichia angusta, and Debaryomyces hansenii. A retrotransposon homologous with Tca2 from Candida albicans, an element absent from S. cerevisiae, was detected in the closely related species D. hansenii. A complete Ty3/gypsy element was present in S. exiguus, whereas only partial, often degenerate, sequences resembling this element were found in S. servazzii, Z. rouxii, S. kluyveri, C. tropicalis, and Yarrowica lipolytica. P. farinosa (syn. P. sorbitophila) is currently the only yeast species in which no LTR retrotransposons or remnants have been found. Thorough analysis of protein sequences, structural characteristics of the elements, and phylogenetic relationships deduced from these data allowed us to propose a classification for the Ty1/copia elements of hemiascomycetous yeasts and a model of LTR-retrotransposon evolution in yeasts. PMID:12045146

  5. Genomic evolution of the long terminal repeat retrotransposons in hemiascomycetous yeasts.

    PubMed

    Neuvéglise, Cécile; Feldmann, Horst; Bon, Elisabeth; Gaillardin, Claude; Casaregola, Serge

    2002-06-01

    We identified putative long terminal repeat- (LTR) retrotransposon sequences among the 50,000 random sequence tags (RSTs) obtained by the Génolevures project from genomic libraries of 13 Hemiascomycetes species. In most cases additional sequencing enabled us to assemble the whole sequences of these retrotransposons. These approaches identified 17 distinct families, 10 of which are defined by full-length elements. We also identified five families of solo LTRs that were not associated with retrotransposons. Ty1-like retrotransposons were found in four of five species that are phylogenetically related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. uvarum, S. exiguus, S. servazzii, and S. kluyveri but not Zygosaccharomyces rouxii), and in two of three Kluyveromyces species (K. lactis and K. marxianus but not K. thermotolerans). Only multiply crippled elements could be identified in the K. lactis and S. servazzii strains analyzed, and only solo LTRs could be identified in S. uvarum. Ty4-like elements were only detected in S. uvarum, indicating that these elements appeared recently before speciation of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto species. Ty5-like elements were detected in S. exiguus, Pichia angusta, and Debaryomyces hansenii. A retrotransposon homologous with Tca2 from Candida albicans, an element absent from S. cerevisiae, was detected in the closely related species D. hansenii. A complete Ty3/gypsy element was present in S. exiguus, whereas only partial, often degenerate, sequences resembling this element were found in S. servazzii, Z. rouxii, S. kluyveri, C. tropicalis, and Yarrowica lipolytica. P. farinosa (syn. P. sorbitophila) is currently the only yeast species in which no LTR retrotransposons or remnants have been found. Thorough analysis of protein sequences, structural characteristics of the elements, and phylogenetic relationships deduced from these data allowed us to propose a classification for the Ty1/copia elements of hemiascomycetous yeasts and a model of LTR-retrotransposon evolution in yeasts. PMID:12045146

  6. The complete chloroplast genome provides insight into the evolution and polymorphism of Panax ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongbing; Yin, Jinlong; Guo, Haiyan; Zhang, Yuyu; Xiao, Wen; Sun, Chen; Wu, Jiayan; Qu, Xiaobo; Yu, Jun; Wang, Xumin; Xiao, Jingfa

    2015-01-01

    Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (P. ginseng) is an important medicinal plant and is often used in traditional Chinese medicine. With next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, we determined the complete chloroplast genome sequences for four Chinese P. ginseng strains, which are Damaya (DMY), Ermaya (EMY), Gaolishen (GLS), and Yeshanshen (YSS). The total chloroplast genome sequence length for DMY, EMY, and GLS was 156,354 bp, while that for YSS was 156,355 bp. Comparative genomic analysis of the chloroplast genome sequences indicate that gene content, GC content, and gene order in DMY are quite similar to its relative species, and nucleotide sequence diversity of inverted repeat region (IR) is lower than that of its counterparts, large single copy region (LSC) and small single copy region (SSC). A comparison among these four P. ginseng strains revealed that the chloroplast genome sequences of DMY, EMY, and GLS were identical and YSS had a 1-bp insertion at base 5472. To further study the heterogeneity in chloroplast genome during domestication, high-resolution reads were mapped to the genome sequences to investigate the differences at the minor allele level; 208 minor allele sites with minor allele frequencies (MAF) of ?0.05 were identified. The polymorphism site numbers per kb of chloroplast genome sequence for DMY, EMY, GLS, and YSS were 0.74, 0.59, 0.97, and 1.23, respectively. All the minor allele sites located in LSC and IR regions, and the four strains showed the same variation types (substitution base or indel) at all identified polymorphism sites. Comparison results of heterogeneity in the chloroplast genome sequences showed that the minor allele sites on the chloroplast genome were undergoing purifying selection to adapt to changing environment during domestication process. A study of P. ginseng chloroplast genome with particular focus on minor allele sites would aid in investigating the dynamics on the chloroplast genomes and different P. ginseng strains typing. PMID:25642231

  7. The COG database: a tool for genome-scale analysis of protein functions and evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roman L. Tatusov; M. Y. Galperin; Darren A. Natale; Eugene V. Koonin

    2000-01-01

    Rational classification of proteins encoded in sequenced genomes is critical for making the genome sequences maximally useful for functional and evolutionary studies. The database of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) is an attempt on a phylogenetic classification of the proteins encoded in 21 complete genomes of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes (http:\\/\\/www. ncbi.nlm. nih.gov\\/COG). The COGs were constructed by

  8. Genome organisation and retrotransposon driven molecular evolution of the endosperm Hardness (Ha) locus in Triticum aestivum cv Glenlea.

    PubMed

    Ragupathy, Raja; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2008-12-01

    Wheat endosperm texture is controlled primarily by a locus (Ha), which comprises Gsp-1, Pina and Pinb genes encoding the so-called grain softness protein, puroindoline-a and puroindoline-b, respectively. Pina and Pinb were detected only on the D-genome of hexaploid wheat and its diploid progenitors while Gsp-1 was on all three homoeologous loci. Hexaploid cultivar Glenlea has a hard phenotype due to a null Pina genotype (D-genome) but the sequence organization is not reported. This study aimed at understanding the evolution of homoeologous Ha loci. Sequencing of three BAC clones from cv Glenlea was performed and sequence analyses delimited the Ha loci which spanned 3,925, 5,330 and 31,607 bp in the A-, B- and D-genomes, respectively. A solo LTR of Angela retroelement, downstream to Gsp-A1 and a fragment of Sabrina retroelement, downstream of Gsp-B1, were discovered. We propose that the insertion of these elements into the intergenic regions have driven the deletions of genomic segments harbouring Pina and Pinb genes in the A- and B-genomes of hexaploid wheat. Similarly, fragments of Romani and Vagabond retroelements were identified between truncated Pina and Pinb genes, indicating their role in the deletion of Pina in Glenlea, leading to its hard texture. Structural differences of the Ha locus region of the A-genome between two hexaploid wheat varieties namely Glenlea and Renan (CR626929), suggested the presence of more than one tetraploid ancestor in the origin of hexaploid wheat. PMID:18830712

  9. Clonal expansion and linear genome evolution through breast cancer progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis.

    PubMed

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Knoop, Ann S; Jensen, Jeanette D; Bak, Martin; Mollenhauer, Jan; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads

    2015-03-20

    Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer necessitates knowledge of the degree of genomic concordance between different steps of malignant progression as primary tumors often are used as surrogates of systemic disease. Based on exome sequencing we performed copy number profiling and point mutation detection on successive steps of breast cancer progression from one breast cancer patient, including two different regions of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), primary tumor and an asynchronous metastasis. We identify a remarkable landscape of somatic mutations, retained throughout breast cancer progression and with new mutational events emerging at each step. Our data, contrary to the proposed model of early dissemination of metastatic cells and parallel progression of primary tumors and metastases, provide evidence of linear progression of breast cancer with relatively late dissemination from the primary tumor. The genomic discordance between the different stages of tumor evolution in this patient emphasizes the importance of molecular profiling of metastatic tissue directing molecularly targeted therapy at recurrence. PMID:25730902

  10. Comparative Genomic Analysis of 45 Type Strains of the Genus Bifidobacterium: A Snapshot of Its Genetic Diversity and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhihong; Zhang, Wenyi; Guo, Chenyi; Yang, Xianwei; Liu, Wenjun; Wu, Yarong; Song, Yuqin; Kwok, Lai Yu; Cui, Yujun; Menghe, Bilige; Yang, Ruifu; Hu, Liangping; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are well known for their human health-promoting effects and are therefore widely applied in the food industry. Members of the Bifidobacterium genus were first identified from the human gastrointestinal tract and were then found to be widely distributed across various ecological niches. Although the genetic diversity of Bifidobacterium has been determined based on several marker genes or a few genomes, the global diversity and evolution scenario for the entire genus remain unresolved. The present study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 45 type strains. We built a robust genealogy for Bifidobacterium based on 402 core genes and defined its root according to the phylogeny of the tree of bacteria. Our results support that all human isolates are of younger lineages, and although species isolated from bees dominate the more ancient lineages, the bee was not necessarily the original host for bifidobacteria. Moreover, the species isolated from different hosts are enriched with specific gene sets, suggesting host-specific adaptation. Notably, bee-specific genes are strongly associated with respiratory metabolism and are potential in helping those bacteria adapt to the oxygen-rich gut environment in bees. This study provides a snapshot of the genetic diversity and evolution of Bifidobacterium, paving the way for future studies on the taxonomy and functional genomics of the genus. PMID:25658111

  11. Comparative genomic analysis of 45 type strains of the genus Bifidobacterium: a snapshot of its genetic diversity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihong; Zhang, Wenyi; Guo, Chenyi; Yang, Xianwei; Liu, Wenjun; Wu, Yarong; Song, Yuqin; Kwok, Lai Yu; Cui, Yujun; Menghe, Bilige; Yang, Ruifu; Hu, Liangping; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are well known for their human health-promoting effects and are therefore widely applied in the food industry. Members of the Bifidobacterium genus were first identified from the human gastrointestinal tract and were then found to be widely distributed across various ecological niches. Although the genetic diversity of Bifidobacterium has been determined based on several marker genes or a few genomes, the global diversity and evolution scenario for the entire genus remain unresolved. The present study comparatively analyzed the genomes of 45 type strains. We built a robust genealogy for Bifidobacterium based on 402 core genes and defined its root according to the phylogeny of the tree of bacteria. Our results support that all human isolates are of younger lineages, and although species isolated from bees dominate the more ancient lineages, the bee was not necessarily the original host for bifidobacteria. Moreover, the species isolated from different hosts are enriched with specific gene sets, suggesting host-specific adaptation. Notably, bee-specific genes are strongly associated with respiratory metabolism and are potential in helping those bacteria adapt to the oxygen-rich gut environment in bees. This study provides a snapshot of the genetic diversity and evolution of Bifidobacterium, paving the way for future studies on the taxonomy and functional genomics of the genus. PMID:25658111

  12. Clonal expansion and linear genome evolution through breast cancer progression from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Knoop, Ann S.; Jensen, Jeanette D.; Bak, Martin; Mollenhauer, Jan; Kruse, Torben A.; Thomassen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of the breast cancer genome from pre-invasive stages to asynchronous metastasis is complex and mostly unexplored, but highly demanded as it may provide novel markers for and mechanistic insights in cancer progression. The increasing use of personalized therapy of breast cancer necessitates knowledge of the degree of genomic concordance between different steps of malignant progression as primary tumors often are used as surrogates of systemic disease. Based on exome sequencing we performed copy number profiling and point mutation detection on successive steps of breast cancer progression from one breast cancer patient, including two different regions of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), primary tumor and an asynchronous metastasis. We identify a remarkable landscape of somatic mutations, retained throughout breast cancer progression and with new mutational events emerging at each step. Our data, contrary to the proposed model of early dissemination of metastatic cells and parallel progression of primary tumors and metastases, provide evidence of linear progression of breast cancer with relatively late dissemination from the primary tumor. The genomic discordance between the different stages of tumor evolution in this patient emphasizes the importance of molecular profiling of metastatic tissue directing molecularly targeted therapy at recurrence. PMID:25730902

  13. High genetic diversity and predominance of Rhinovirus A and C from Panamanian hospitalized children under five years with respiratory infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Rhinoviruses (HRVs) have high genetic diversity and three species have been described: HRV-A, HRV-B, and the recently recognized HRV-C, which has been rapidly identified worldwide. Findings In the present study, we report the frequency and diversity of Human Rhinovirus (HRV) strains circulating in Panama from children hospitalized with respiratory infections. Conclusions HRVs of species A, B and C have been identified with a predominance of HRV-A and HRV-C over HRV-B, and marked genetic diversity within each species. PMID:23116216

  14. Origin and evolution of B chromosomes in the cichlid fish Astatotilapia latifasciata based on integrated genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Valente, Guilherme T; Conte, Matthew A; Fantinatti, Bruno E A; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C; Carvalho, Robson F; Vicari, Marcelo R; Kocher, Thomas D; Martins, Cesar

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 15% of eukaryotes contain supernumerary B chromosomes. When present, B chromosomes frequently represent as much as 5% of the genome. Despite thousands of reports describing the distribution of supernumeraries in various taxa, a comprehensive theory for the origin, maintenance, and evolution of B chromosomes has not emerged. Here, we sequence the complete genomes of individual cichlid fish (Astatotilapia latifasciata) with and without B chromosomes, as well as microdissected B chromosomes, to identify DNA sequences on the B. B sequences were further analyzed through quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. We find that the B chromosome contains thousands of sequences duplicated from essentially every chromosome in the ancestral karyotype. Although most genes on the B chromosome are fragmented, a few are largely intact, and we detect evidence that at least three of them are transcriptionally active. We propose a model in which the B chromosome originated early in the evolutionary history of Lake Victoria cichlids from a small fragment of one autosome. DNA sequences originating from several autosomes, including protein-coding genes and transposable elements, subsequently inserted into this proto-B. We propose that intact B chromosome genes involved with microtubule organization, kinetochore structure, recombination and progression through the cell cycle may play a role in driving the transmission of the B chromosome. Furthermore, our work suggests that karyotyping is an essential step prior to genome sequencing to avoid problems in genome assembly and analytical biases created by the presence of high copy number sequences on the B chromosome. PMID:24770715

  15. To Tree or Not to Tree? Genome-Wide Quantification of Recombination and Reticulate Evolution during the Diversification of Strict Intracellular Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-López, Antonio; Chabrol, Olivier; Royer-Carenzi, Manuela; Merhej, Vicky; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major force in the evolution of prokaryotes. During the adaptation of a bacterial population to a new ecological niche, and particularly for intracellular bacteria, selective pressures are shifted and ecological niches reduced, resulting in a lower rate of genetic connectivity. HGT and positive selection are therefore two important evolutionary forces in microbial pathogens that drive adaptation to new hosts. In this study, we use genomic distance analyses, phylogenomic networks, tree topology comparisons, and Bayesian inference methods to investigate to what extent HGT has occurred during the evolution of the genus Rickettsia, the effect of the use of different genomic regions in estimating reticulate evolution and HGT events, and the link of these to host range. We show that ecological specialization restricts recombination occurrence in Rickettsia, but other evolutionary processes and genome architecture are also important for the occurrence of HGT. We found that recombination, genomic rearrangements, and genome conservation all show evidence of network-like evolution at whole-genome scale. We show that reticulation occurred mainly, but not only, during the early Rickettsia radiation, and that core proteome genes of every major functional category have experienced reticulated evolution and possibly HGT. Overall, the evolution of Rickettsia bacteria has been tree-like, with evidence of HGT and reticulated evolution for around 10–25% of the core Rickettsia genome. We present evidence of extensive recombination/incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) during the radiation of the genus, probably linked with the emergence of intracellularity in a wide range of hosts. PMID:24259310

  16. The Genome of the Diatom Thalassiosira Pseudonana: Ecology, Evolution and Metabolism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E V Armbrust; J A Berges; C Bowler; B R Green; D Martinez; N H Putnam; S Zhou; A E Allen; K E Apt; M Bechner; M A Brzezinski; B K Chaal; A Chiovitti; A K Davis; M S Demarest; J C Detter; T G del Rio; D Goodstein; M Z Hadi; U Hellsten; M Hildebrand; B D Jenkins; J Jurka; V V Kapitonov; N Kroger; W Y Lau; F W Larimer; J C Lippmeier; S Lucas; M Medina; A Montsant; M Obornik; M S Parker; B Palenik; G J Pazour; P M Richardson; T A Rynearson; M A Saito; D C Schwartz; K Thamatrakoln; K Valentin; A Vardi; F P Wilkerson; D S Rokhsar

    2005-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae with plastids acquired by secondary endosymbiosis. They are responsible for â20% of global carbon fixation. We report the 34 Mbp draft nuclear genome of the marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana and its 129 Kbp plastid and 44 Kbp mitochondrial genomes. Sequence and optical restriction mapping revealed 24 diploid nuclear chromosomes. We identified novel genes for silicic acid

  17. Analysis of pig genomes provide insight into porcine demography and evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For nearly 8,000 years pigs and humans have shared a close and complex relationship, and through domestication and breeding, humans have shaped the genomes of current diverse pig breeds. Here we present the assembly and analysis of the genome sequence of a female domestic pig from the European Duroc...

  18. Deciphering the evolution and metabolism of an anammox bacterium from a community genome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Strous; Eric Pelletier; Sophie Mangenot; Thomas Rattei; Angelika Lehner; Michael W. Taylor; Matthias Horn; Holger Daims; Delphine Bartol-Mavel; Patrick Wincker; Valérie Barbe; Nuria Fonknechten; David Vallenet; Béatrice Segurens; Chantal Schenowitz-Truong; Claudine Médigue; Astrid Collingro; Berend Snel; Bas E. Dutilh; Chris van der Drift; Irina Cirpus; Katinka T. van de Pas-Schoonen; Harry R. Harhangi; Laura van Niftrik; Markus Schmid; J. T. M. Keltjens; J. L. C. M. van de Vossenberg; Boran Kartal; Harald Meier; Dmitrij Frishman; Martijn A. Huynen; Hans-Werner Mewes; Jean Weissenbach; Mike S. M. Jetten; Michael Wagner; Denis Le Paslier

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has become a main focus in oceanography and wastewater treatment. It is also the nitrogen cycle's major remaining biochemical enigma. Among its features, the occurrence of hydrazine as a free intermediate of catabolism, the biosynthesis of ladderane lipids and the role of cytoplasm differentiation are unique in biology. Here we use environmental genomics-the reconstruction of genomic

  19. Transcriptomic and genomic evolution under constant cold in Antarctic notothenioid fish

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Chi-Hing Christina

    of the Southern Ocean during early Cenozoic (1, 2). The circumpolar barriers and the ensuing climatic changes protection. Prior studies of adaptive changes in these teleost fishes generally examined a single genotype or phenotype. We report here the genome-wide investigations of transcriptional and genomic changes associated

  20. Insights into the evolution of Yersinia pestis through whole-genome comparison with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick S. G. Chain; E. Carniel; Frank W Larimer; Jane Lamerdin; P. O. Stoutland; W. M. Regala; A. M. Georgescu; L. M. Vergez; M. L. Land; V. L. Motin; R. R. Brubaker; J. Fowler; J. Hinnebusch; M. Marceau; C. Medigue; M. Simonet; V. Chenal-Francisque; B. Souza; D. Dacheux; J. M. Elliott; A. Derbise; L. J. Hauser; E. Garcia

    2004-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is a highly uniform clone that diverged recently from the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Despite their close genetic relationship, they differ radically in their pathogenicity and transmission. Here, we report the complete genomic sequence of Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 and its use for detailed genome comparisons with available Y. pestis sequences. Analyses of identified

  1. The Selaginella genome identifies genetic changes associated with the evolution of vascular plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Banks; T. Nishiyama; Mitsuyasu Hasebe; J. L. Bowman; Michael Gribskov; C. dePamphilis; V. A. Albert; N. Aono; T. Aoyama; B. A. Ambrose; N. W. Ashton; M. J. Axtell; E. Barker; M. S. Barker; J. L. Bennetzen; N. D. Bonawitz; Clint Chapple; C. Cheng; L. G. Correa; M. Dacre; J. DeBarry; I. Dreyer; M. Elias; E. M. Engstrom; Mark Estelle; L. Feng; C. Finet; S. K. Floyd; W. B. Frommer; T. Fujita; L. Gramzow; M. Gutensohn; J. Harholt; M. Hattori; A. Heyl; T. Hirai; Y. Hiwatashi; M. Ishikawa; M. Iwata; K. G. Karol; B. Koehler; U. Kolukisaoglu; M. Kubo; T. Kurata; S. Lalonde; K. Li; Y. Li; A. Litt; E. Lyons; G. Manning; T. Maruyama; T. P. Michael; K. Mikami; S. Miyazaki; S. Morinaga; T. Murata; Bernd Mueller-Roeber; D. R. Nelson; M. Obara; Y. Oguri; R. G. Olmstead; N. Onodera; B. L. Petersen; B. Pils; M. Prigge; S. A. Rensing; D. M. Riano-Pachon; A. W. Roberts; Y. Sato; H. V. Scheller; B. Schulz; C. Schulz; E. V. Shakirov; N. Shibagaki; N. Shinohara; D. E. Shippen; I. Sorensen; Ryo Sotooka; N. Sugimoto; M. Sugita; N. Sumikawa; M. Tanurdzic; G. Theissen; Peter Ulvskov; Sachiko Wakazuki; J. K. Weng; W. W. Willats; D. Wipf; P. G. Wolf; L. Yang; A. D. Zimmer; Q. Zhu; Therese Mitros; Uffe Hellsten; D. Loque; R. Otillar; Asaf Salamov; Jeremy Schmutz; H. Shapiro; E. Lindquist

    2011-01-01

    Vascular plants appeared ~410 million years ago, then diverged into several lineages of which only two survive: the euphyllophytes (ferns and seed plants) and the lycophytes. We report here the genome sequence of the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii (Selaginella), the first nonseed vascular plant genome reported. By comparing gene content in evolutionarily diverse taxa, we found that the transition from a

  2. Metabolism and evolution of Haemophilus influenzae deduced from a whole-genome comparison with Escherichia coli

    E-print Network

    Fernando, Chrisantha

    % of the E. coli genome revealed 1128 pairs of apparent orthologs, with an average of 59 % identity, a comparison of the E. coli and H. influenzae genomes is expected to be instrumental in deducing the metabolism in human upper respiratory mucosa and can be cultivated only on rich media, whereas E. coli is a saprophyte

  3. Genomic Exploration of the Hemiascomycetous Yeasts: 20. Evolution of gene redundancy compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bertrand Llorente; Pascal Durrens; Alain Malpertuy; Michel Aigle; François Artiguenave; Gaëlle Blandin; Monique Bolotin-Fukuhara; Elisabeth Bon; Philippe Brottier; Serge Casaregola; Bernard Dujon; Jacky de Montigny; Andrée Lépingle; Cécile Neuvéglise; Odile Ozier-Kalogeropoulos; Serge Potier; William Saurin; Fredj Tekaia; Claire Toffano-Nioche; Micheline Wésolowski-Louvel; Patrick Wincker; Jean Weissenbach; Jean-Luc Souciet; Claude Gaillardin

    2000-01-01

    We have evaluated the degree of gene redundancy in the nuclear genomes of 13 hemiascomycetous yeast species. Saccharomyces cerevisiae singletons and gene families appear generally conserved in these species as singletons and families of similar size, respectively. Variations of the number of homologues with respect to that expected affect from 7 to less than 24% of each genome. Since S.

  4. The Wolbachia Genome of Brugia malayi: Endosymbiont Evolution within a Human Pathogenic Nematode

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeremy Foster; Mehul Ganatra; Ibrahim Kamal; Jennifer Ware; Kira Makarova; Natalia Ivanova; Anamitra Bhattacharyya; Vinayak Kapatral; Sanjay Kumar; Janos Posfai; Tamas Vincze; Jessica Ingram; Laurie Moran; Alla Lapidus; Marina Omelchenko; Nikos Kyrpides; Elodie Ghedin; Shiliang Wang; Eugene Goltsman; Victor Joukov; Olga Ostrovskaya; Kiryl Tsukerman; Mikhail Mazur; Donald Comb; Eugene Koonin; Barton Slatko

    2005-01-01

    Complete genome DNA sequence and analysis is presented for Wolbachia, the obligate alpha-proteobacterial endosymbiont required for fertility and survival of the human filarial parasitic nematode Brugia malayi. Although, quantitatively, the genome is even more degraded than those of closely related Rickettsia species, Wolbachia has retained more intact metabolic pathways. The ability to provide riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, heme, and nucleotides