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Sample records for ribosomal dna intergenic

  1. PCR amplification and characterization of the intergenic spacer region of the ribosomal DNA in Pyrenophora graminea.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, S; Mercatelli, E; Vannacci, G

    1998-09-01

    Successful amplification of the whole intergenic spacer region of the nuclear ribosomal repeat (IGS) in Pyrenophora graminea was obtained with a PCR-based assay. Single amplification products showed length differences. Depending on the length of the IGS-PCR product, ca. 3.8 or 4.4 kb, two groups of isolates could be identified. The RFLP patterns of isolates obtained with the 6-base cutting enzymes Apal, BglII, DraI, EcoRV, HindIII and SacI were similar within each group and different between the two groups. Restriction patterns of IGS-PCR products digested with the 4-base cutting enzyme AluI were polymorphic among isolates in spite of their IGS-PCR product length. In order to characterize the long and short IGS-PCR products the restriction map is shown. The long product shows an additional HindIII site and a BglII site that is lacking in the short product. However, the latter shows a SacI site that is not present in the long IGS-PCR product. Therefore, the described PCR-RFLP analysis of the IGS appears to be a useful tool to resolve genetic variation between P. graminea isolates. PMID:9741081

  2. Extensive length variation in the ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer of yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    PubMed

    Kakou, Bidénam; Angers, Bernard; Glémet, Hélène

    2016-03-01

    The intergenic spacer (IGS) is located between ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies. Within the IGS, regulatory elements for rRNA gene transcription are found, as well as a varying number of other repetitive elements that are at the root of IGS length heterogeneity. This heterogeneity has been shown to have a functional significance through its effect on growth rate. Here, we present the structural organization of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) IGS based on its entire sequence, as well as the IGS length variation within a natural population. Yellow perch IGS structure has four discrete regions containing tandem repeat elements. For three of these regions, no specific length class was detected as allele size was seemingly normally distributed. However, for one repeat region, PCR amplification uncovered the presence of two distinctive IGS variants representing a length difference of 1116 bp. This repeat region was also devoid of any CpG sites despite a high GC content. Balanced selection may be holding the alleles in the population and would account for the high diversity of length variants observed for adjacent regions. Our study is an important precursor for further work aiming to assess the role of IGS length variation in influencing growth rate in fish. PMID:26841134

  3. Comparison of Sequences from the Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Region of Meloidogyne mayaguensis and Other Major Tropical Root-Knot Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Blok, V. C.; Phillips, M. S.; Fargette, M.

    1997-01-01

    The unusual arrangement of the 5S ribosomal gene within the intergenic sequence (IGS) of the ribosomal cistron, previously reported for Meloidogyne arenaria, was also found in the ribosomal DNA of two other economically important species of tropical root-knot nematodes, M, incognita and M. javanica. This arrangement also was found in M. hapla, which is important in temperate regions, and M. mayaguensis, a virulent species of concern in West Africa. Amplification of the region between the 5S and 18S genes by PCR yielded products of three different sizes such that M. mayaguensis could be readily differentiated from the other species in this study. This product can be amplified from single juveniles, females, or egg masses. The sequences obtained in this region for one line of each of M. incognita, M. arenaria, and M. javanica were very similar, reflecting the close relationships of these lineages. The M. mayaguensis sequence for this region had a number of small deletions and insertions of various sizes, including possible sequence duplications. PMID:19274129

  4. Diversity and Inheritance of Intergenic Spacer Sequences of 45S Ribosomal DNA among Accessions of Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kiwoung; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Lee, Jonghoon; Chung, Mi-Young; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of plants is present in high copy number and shows variation between and within species in the length of the intergenic spacer (IGS). The 45S rDNA of flowering plants includes the 5.8S, 18S and 25S rDNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2), and the intergenic spacer 45S-IGS (25S-18S). This study identified six different types of 45S-IGS, A to F, which at 363 bp, 1121 bp, 1717 bp, 1969 bp, 2036 bp and 2111 bp in length, respectively, were much shorter than the reported reference IGS sequences in B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The shortest two IGS types, A and B, lacked the transcription initiation site, non-transcribed spacer, and external transcribed spacer. Functional behavior of those two IGS types in relation to rRNA synthesis is a subject of further investigation. The other four IGSs had subtle variations in the transcription termination site, guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and number of tandem repeats, but the external transcribed spacers of these four IGSs were quite similar in length. The 45S IGSs were found to follow Mendelian inheritance in a population of 15 F1s and their 30 inbred parental lines, which suggests that these sequences could be useful for development of new breeding tools. In addition, this study represents the first report of intra-specific (within subspecies) variation of the 45S IGS in B. oleracea. PMID:26633391

  5. Differentiation of Closely Related Carnobacterium Food Isolates Based on 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer Region Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Kabadjova, Petia; Dousset, Xavier; Le Cam, Virginie; Prevost, Hervé

    2002-01-01

    A novel strategy for identification of Carnobacterium food isolates based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of PCR-amplified 16S-23S ribosomal intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) was developed. PCR amplification from all Carnobacterium strains studied always yielded three ISR amplicons, which were designated the small ISR (S-ISR), the medium ISR (M-ISR), and the large ISR (L-ISR). The lengths of these ISRs varied from one species to another. Carnobacterium divergens NCDO 2763T and C. mobile DSM 4849T generated one major S-ISR band (ca. 400 bp) and minor M-ISR and L-ISR bands (ca. 500 and ca. 600 bp, respectively). The ISRs amplified from C. gallinarum NCFB 2766T and C. piscicola NCDO 2762T were larger (S-ISR, ca. 600 bp; M-ISR, ca. 700 bp; and L-ISR, ca. 800 bp). The L-ISR contained two tDNAs coding for tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes. The M-ISR included one tRNAAla gene, and the S-ISR did not contain a tDNA gene. The RFLP scheme devised involves estimation of variable PCR product sizes together with HinfI, TaqI, and HindIII restriction analysis. Forty-two isolates yielded four unique band patterns that correctly resolved these isolates into four Carnobacterium species. This method is very suitable for rapid, low-cost identification of a wide variety of Carnobacterium species without sequencing. PMID:12406725

  6. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in an Aerated Lagoon Revealed by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analyses and 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongtang; Mohn, William W.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the bacterial community structure in an aerated plug-flow lagoon treating pulp and paper mill effluent. For this investigation, we developed a composite method based on analyses of PCR amplicons containing the ribosomal intergenic spacer (RIS) and its flanking partial 16S rRNA gene. Community percent similarity was determined on the basis of RIS length polymorphism. A community succession was evident in the lagoon, indicated by a progressive community transition through seven sample locations. The most abrupt changes in community structure were associated with a temperature change from 39 to 35°C and with increases in dissolved oxygen. The temporal differences in community structure, based on summer and winter samplings, were greater than the spatial differences during either season. Clone libraries of rDNA-RIS amplicons were constructed from each of three summer samples. Among 90 clones analyzed (30 clones from each sample), 56 phylotypes were distinguished by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Indices of phylotype richness, evenness, and diversity all increased in clone libraries from the beginning to the end of the lagoon. A representative clone of each phylotype was phylogenetically analyzed on the basis of its partial 16S rRNA gene sequence (ca. 450 bp). Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the increase in diversity and further indicated increasing richness of bacterial divisions. Pioneers in the community spatial succession appeared to include thermotolerant, microaerophilic methanol-oxidizing bacteria related to the genus Methylobacillus, as well as thermotolerant, microaerophilic nitrogen-fixing bacteria related to the genus Azospirillum. PMID:11282606

  7. PCR amplification of the 3' external transcribed and intergenic spacers of the ribosomal DNA repeat unit in three species of Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Molina, F I; Jong, S C; Huffman, J L

    1993-04-15

    Two spacer regions outside the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcriptional unit in three species of Saccharomyces, S. cerevisiae, S. carlsbergensis and S. pastorianus, were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction. These regions were composed of the 3' external transcribed spacer (ETS) and the intergenic spacer (IGS). Primers were developed from sequence alignments and by taking the reverse complement of a previously described sequence. The region amplified spanned base position 3110 on the 26S rRNA to base position 27 on the 5S rRNA of S. cerevisiae. Nine of the twelve strains used in this study exhibited different restriction profiles, showing that the spacers are highly variable between species. The results suggest that PCR fingerprinting of the non-coding spacer regions can be used to distinguish between closely related Saccharomyces species and may have potential in DNA profiling of other yeasts. PMID:8099889

  8. Detection and quantification of schistosome DNA in freshwater snails using either fluorescent probes in real-time PCR or oligochromatographic dipstick assays targeting the ribosomal intergenic spacer.

    PubMed

    Kane, Richard A; Stothard, J Russell; Rollinson, David; Leclipteux, Thierry; Evraerts, Jonathan; Standley, Claire J; Allan, Fiona; Betson, Martha; Kaba, Rehana; Mertens, Pascal; Laurent, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    Several DNA probes were designed for use in real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to target sequence variation within the ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS) of schistosomes. A sub-section of the IGS (∼300bp) was amplified, with cross-specific primers, after which group-specific fluorescent, locked nucleic acid probes were assessed for their ability to differentiate and quantify DNA from Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni group parasites. A number of fluorescent probe candidates were screened and validated against genomic DNA from adult schistosome worms and laboratory infected freshwater snails. Two fluorescent, locked nucleic acid probes ShaemLNA5 and SmanLNA2, of 20-26bp in length, were identified and found to be effective in providing evidence of infection in field-collected snails. To adapt these real-time PCR assays for more resource-poor laboratory settings, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay was developed and primer/probe combinations were modified for use in oligochromatography, a DNA 'dipstick' technology. An appropriate dipstick was developed, inclusive of internal amplification and amplicon migration controls that could be of particular importance for assessing schistosome transmission dynamics. These assays and tools also have future potential for use in detection of schistosome infections in humans and livestock. PMID:22100540

  9. Specific Detection of Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium Strains Colonizing Rice (Oryza sativa) Roots by 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer-Targeted PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhiyuan; Hurek, Thomas; Vinuesa, Pablo; Müller, Peter; Ladha, Jagdish K.; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    In addition to forming symbiotic nodules on legumes, rhizobial strains are members of soil or rhizosphere communities or occur as endophytes, e.g., in rice. Two rhizobial strains which have been isolated from root nodules of the aquatic legumes Aeschynomene fluminensis (IRBG271) and Sesbania aculeata (IRBG74) were previously found to promote rice growth. In addition to analyzing their phylogenetic positions, we assessed the suitability of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences for the differentiation of closely related rhizobial taxa and for the development of PCR protocols allowing the specific detection of strains in the environment. 16S rDNA sequence analysis (sequence identity, 99%) and phylogenetic analysis of IGS sequences showed that strain IRBG271 was related to but distinct from Bradyrhizobium elkanii. Rhizobium sp. (Sesbania) strain IRBG74 was located in the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium cluster as a novel lineage according to phylogenetic 16S rDNA analysis (96.8 to 98.9% sequence identity with Agrobacterium tumefaciens; emended name, Rhizobium radiobacter). Strain IRBG74 harbored four copies of rRNA operons whose IGS sequences varied only slightly (2 to 9 nucleotides). The IGS sequence analyses allowed intraspecies differentiation, especially in the genus Bradyrhizobium, as illustrated here for strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, B. elkanii, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Chamaecytisus) strain BTA-1. It also clearly differentiated fast-growing rhizobial species and strains, albeit with lower statistical significance. Moreover, the high sequence variability allowed the development of highly specific IGS-targeted nested-PCR assays. Strains IRBG74 and IRBG271 were specifically detected in complex DNA mixtures of numerous related bacteria and in the DNA of roots of gnotobiotically cultured or even of soil-grown rice plants after inoculation. Thus, IGS sequence analysis is an attractive technique for both microbial

  10. The nuclear ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer as a target sequence to study intraspecific diversity of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum directly on pinus root systems.

    PubMed

    Guidot, A; Lumini, E; Debaud, J C; Marmeisse, R

    1999-03-01

    Polymorphism of the nuclear ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum was studied to evaluate whether this sequence could be used in field studies to estimate the diversity of strains forming mycorrhizas on individual Pinus pinaster root systems. This sequence was amplified by PCR from 125 haploid homokaryotic strains collected in 14 P. pinaster stands along the Atlantic coast of France by using conserved oligonucleotide primers. Restriction enzyme digestion of the amplified 3.4-kbp-long IGS allowed us to characterize 24 alleles whose frequencies differed. Nine of these alleles were found only once, whereas about 60% of the strains contained four of the alleles. Local populations could be almost as diverse as the entire population along a 150-km stretch of coastline that was examined; for example, 13 alleles were found in a single forest stand. The IGS from one strain was partially sequenced, and the sequence data were used to design oligonucleotides which allowed separate PCR amplification of three different segments of the IGS. Most polymorphisms observed among the full-length IGS regions resulted from polymorphisms in an internal ca. 1,500-bp-long sequence characterized by length variations that may have resulted from variable numbers of a T2AG3 motif. This internal polymorphic sequence could not be amplified from the genomes of nine other Hebeloma species. Analysis of this internal sequence amplified from the haploid progenies of 10 fruiting bodies collected in a 70-m2 area resulted in identification of six allelic forms and seven distinct diplotypes out of the 21 possible different combinations. Moreover, optimization of the PCR conditions resulted in amplification of this sequence from more than 80% of the DNA samples extracted from individual H. cylindrosporum infected P. pinaster mycorrhizal root tips, thus demonstrating the usefulness of this sequence for studying the below-ground diversity of

  11. The Nuclear Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer as a Target Sequence To Study Intraspecific Diversity of the Ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum Directly on Pinus Root Systems

    PubMed Central

    Guidot, Alice; Lumini, Erica; Debaud, Jean-Claude; Marmeisse, Roland

    1999-01-01

    Polymorphism of the nuclear ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum was studied to evaluate whether this sequence could be used in field studies to estimate the diversity of strains forming mycorrhizas on individual Pinus pinaster root systems. This sequence was amplified by PCR from 125 haploid homokaryotic strains collected in 14 P. pinaster stands along the Atlantic coast of France by using conserved oligonucleotide primers. Restriction enzyme digestion of the amplified 3.4-kbp-long IGS allowed us to characterize 24 alleles whose frequencies differed. Nine of these alleles were found only once, whereas about 60% of the strains contained four of the alleles. Local populations could be almost as diverse as the entire population along a 150-km stretch of coastline that was examined; for example, 13 alleles were found in a single forest stand. The IGS from one strain was partially sequenced, and the sequence data were used to design oligonucleotides which allowed separate PCR amplification of three different segments of the IGS. Most polymorphisms observed among the full-length IGS regions resulted from polymorphisms in an internal ca. 1,500-bp-long sequence characterized by length variations that may have resulted from variable numbers of a T2AG3 motif. This internal polymorphic sequence could not be amplified from the genomes of nine other Hebeloma species. Analysis of this internal sequence amplified from the haploid progenies of 10 fruiting bodies collected in a 70-m2 area resulted in identification of six allelic forms and seven distinct diplotypes out of the 21 possible different combinations. Moreover, optimization of the PCR conditions resulted in amplification of this sequence from more than 80% of the DNA samples extracted from individual H. cylindrosporum infected P. pinaster mycorrhizal root tips, thus demonstrating the usefulness of this sequence for studying the below-ground diversity of

  12. Modular domains of the Dicistroviridae intergenic internal ribosome entry site

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Christopher J.; Jan, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The intergenic region internal ribosome entry site (IGR IRES) of the Dicistroviridae viral family can directly assemble 80S ribosomes and initiate translation at a non-AUG codon from the ribosomal A-site. These functions are directed by two independently folded domains of the IGR IRES. One domain, composed of overlapping pseudoknots II and III (PKII/III), mediates ribosome recruitment. The second domain, composed of PKI, mimics a tRNA anticodon–codon interaction to position the ribosome at the ribosomal A-site. Although adopting a common secondary structure, the dicistrovirus IGR IRESs can be grouped into two classes based on distinct features within each domain. In this study, we report on the modularity of the IGR IRESs and show that the ribosome-binding domain and the tRNA anticodon mimicry domain are functionally interchangeable between the Type I and the Type II IGR IRESs. Using structural probing, ribosome-binding assays, and ribosome positioning analysis by toeprinting assays, we show that the chimeric IRESs fold properly, assemble 80S ribosomes, and can mediate IRES translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysates. We also demonstrate that the chimeric IRESs can stimulate the ribosome-dependent GTPase activity of eEF2, which suggests that the ribosome is primed for a step downstream from IRES binding. Overall, the results demonstrate that the dicistrovirus IGR IRESs are composed of two modular domains that work in concert to manipulate the ribosome and direct translation initiation. PMID:20423979

  13. Phylogeny of Porphyromonas gingivalis by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Region Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Robert W.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2000-01-01

    Periodontitis has been associated with the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, and previous studies have shown phenotypic differences in the pathogenicities of strains of P. gingivalis. An accurate and comprehensive phylogeny of strains of P. gingivalis would be useful in determining if there is an evolutionary basis to pathogenicity in this species. Previous phylogenies of P. gingivalis strains based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) show little agreement. While the 16S ribosomal gene is the standard for phylogenetic reconstruction among bacterial species, it is insufficiently variable for this purpose. In the present study, the phylogeny of P. gingivalis was constructed on the basis of the sequence of the most variable region of the ribosomal operon, the intergenic spacer region (ISR). Heteroduplex analysis of the ISR has been used to study the variability of P. gingivalis strains in periodontitis. In the present study, typing by heteroduplex analysis was compared to ISR sequence-based phylogeny and close agreement was observed. The two strains of P. gingivalis whose heteroduplex types are strongly associated with periodontitis were found to be closely related and were well separated from strains whose heteroduplex types are less strongly associated with disease, suggesting a relationship between pathogenicity and phylogeny. PMID:10790104

  14. Molecular Identification of Closely Related Candida Species Using Two Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Fingerprinting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Muriel; Sendid, Boualem; Fradin, Chantal; Gaillardin, Claude; Poulain, Daniel; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2011-01-01

    Recent changes in the epidemiology of candidiasis highlighted an increase in non- Candida albicans species emphasizing the need for reliable identification methods. Molecular diagnostics in fungal infections may improve species characterization, particularly in cases of the closely related species in the Candida complexes. We developed two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, targeting either a part of the intergenic spacer 2 or the entire intergenic spacer (IGS) of ribosomal DNA using a panel of 270 isolates. A part of the intergenic spacer was used for discrimination between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and between species of the C. glabrata complex (C. glabrata/C. bracarensis/C. nivariensis). The whole IGS was applied to C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis, and to separate C. famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) from C. guilliermondii (Pichia guilliermondii) and from the other species within this complex (ie, C. carpophila, C. fermentati and C. xestobii). Sharing similar biochemical patterns, Pichia norvegensis and C. inconspicua exhibited specific IGS profiles. Our study confirmed that isolates of C. guilliermondii were frequently mis-identified as C. famata. As much as 67% of the clinical isolates phenotypically determined as C. famata were recognized mostly as true P. guilliermondii. Conversely, 44% of the isolates initially identified as C. guilliermondii were corrected by the IGS fingerprints as C. parapsilosis, C. fermentati, or C. zeylanoides. These two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism methods may be used as reference tools [either alternatively or adjunctively to the existing ribosomal DNA (26S or ITS) sequence comparisons] for unambiguous determination of the Candida species for which phenotypic characterization remains problematic. PMID:21227390

  15. Sequencing of the Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Region for Strain Identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Robert W.; Griffen, Ann L.; Wen, Bo-Gui; Leys, Eugene J.

    1999-01-01

    The ribosomal intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) of 19 laboratory strains and 30 clinical samples of Porphyromonas gingivalis were amplified by PCR and sequenced to provide a strain identifier. The ISR is a variable region of DNA located between the conserved 16S and 23S rRNA genes. This makes it an ideal locus for differentiation of strains within a species: primers specific for the conserved flanking genes were used to amplify the ISR, which was then sequenced to identify the strain. We have constructed a P. gingivalis ISR sequence database to facilitate strain identification. ISR sequence analysis provides a strain identifier that can be easily reproduced among laboratories and catalogued for unambiguous comparison. PMID:10405432

  16. Species-specific repeat units in the intergenic spacer of the ribosomal RNA cistron of Anopheles aquasalis Curry.

    PubMed

    Perera, O P; Cockburn, A F; Mitchell, S E; Conn, J; Seawright, J A

    1998-11-01

    A genomic DNA library of Anopheles aquasalis Curry was screened for clones that hybridized more intensely to DNA from A. aquasalis than to DNA from A. benarrochi Gabaldon, Cova Garcia, and Lopez, A. konderi Galvao and Damasceno, A. nuneztovari Gabaldon cytotypes A, B, and C, A. oswaldoi (Peryassu), A. rangeli Gabaldon, Cova Garcia, and Lopez, or A. trinkae Faran. Two specific clones (2.5 kilobasepairs [kbp] and 3.0 kbp) from A. aquasalis were isolated. Both A. aquasalis-specific clones were from the intergenic spacer region of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cistron. Upon digestion with Rsa I, a 900-bp fragment from the clone AA-1 hybridized specifically to A. aquasalis DNA. Analysis of the DNA sequence of this fragment revealed four tandemly repeated 36-bp units. Three of these repeat units were identical, and the fourth was 94% identical to the others. The DNA sequence of a highly conserved region of these repeats was used to synthesize an oligonucleotide probe specific to A. aquasalis. PMID:9840580

  17. RNA structure-based ribosome recruitment: lessons from the Dicistroviridae intergenic region IRESes.

    PubMed

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-07-01

    In eukaryotes, the canonical process of initiating protein synthesis on an mRNA depends on many large protein factors and the modified nucleotide cap on the 5' end of the mRNA. However, certain RNA sequences can bypass the need for these proteins and cap, using an RNA structure-based mechanism called internal initiation of translation. These RNAs are called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESes), and the cap-independent initiation pathway they support is critical for successful infection by many viruses of medical and economic importance. In this review, we briefly describe and compare mechanistic and structural groups of viral IRES RNAs, focusing on those IRESes that are capable of direct ribosome recruitment using specific RNA structures. We then discuss in greater detail some recent advances in our understanding of the intergenic region IRESes of the Dicistroviridae, which use the most streamlined ribosome-recruitment mechanism yet discovered. By combining these findings with knowledge of canonical translation and the behavior of other IRESes, mechanistic models of this RNA structure-based process are emerging. PMID:18515544

  18. Comparison of the bacterial community structure within the equine hindgut and faeces using Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA).

    PubMed

    Sadet-Bourgeteau, S; Philippeau, C; Dequiedt, S; Julliand, V

    2014-12-01

    The horse's hindgut bacterial ecosystem has often been studied using faecal samples. However few studies compared both bacterial ecosystems and the validity of using faecal samples may be questionable. Hence, the present study aimed to compare the structure of the equine bacterial community in the hindgut (caecum, right ventral colon) and faeces using a fingerprint technique known as Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA). Two DNA extraction methods were also assessed. Intestinal contents and faeces were sampled 3 h after the morning meal on four adult fistulated horses fed meadow hay and pelleted concentrate. Irrespective of the intestinal segment, Principal Component Analysis of ARISA profiles showed a strong individual effect (P<0.0001). However, across the study, faecal bacterial community structure significantly (P<0.001) differed from those of the caecum and colon, while there was no difference between the two hindgut communities. The use of a QIAamp(®) DNA Stool Mini kit increased the quality of DNA extracted irrespective of sample type. The differences observed between faecal and hindgut bacterial communities challenge the use of faeces as a representative for hindgut activity. Further investigations are necessary to compare bacterial activity between the hindgut and faeces in order to understand the validity of using faecal samples. PMID:25075719

  19. Detection of spatial and temporal influences on bacterial communities in an urban stream by automated ribosomal intergenic ribosomal spacer analysis.

    PubMed

    Or, Amitai; Gophna, Uri

    2011-01-01

    The Yarqon is the largest urban river in Israel, and is a slow-flowing stream whose water originates mostly from wastewater treatment plants. Thus, its microbial community is expected to be heavily impacted both by anthropogenic factors and by seasonal temporal variation. In order to identify the main factors that influence the bacterial community, and their spatial-temporal variation, 50 samples were collected representing five different time points and eleven locations. Samples were analyzed for biotic and a-biotic parameters and the bacterial populations were analyzed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA). Bacterial richness and diversity were calculated and compared across samples. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) showed that ARISA clustered the samples according to temporal variation. Molecular fingerprinting analysis provided a snapshot of the microbial community and showed good correlation with geochemical parameters, despite the rapid changes of the Mediterranean environment and the anthropogenic impact. Molecular fingerprinting methods based on natural fragment length polymorphisms may therefore represent a supplementary approach for stream monitoring, alongside physico-chemical measurements. PMID:21869567

  20. Influence of commonly used primer systems on automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis of bacterial communities in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Purahong, Witoon; Stempfhuber, Barbara; Lentendu, Guillaume; Francioli, Davide; Reitz, Thomas; Buscot, François; Schloter, Michael; Krüger, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high diversity of bacteria in many ecosystems, their slow generation times, specific but mostly unknown nutrient requirements and syntrophic interactions, isolation based approaches in microbial ecology mostly fail to describe microbial community structure. Thus, cultivation independent techniques, which rely on directly extracted nucleic acids from the environment, are a well-used alternative. For example, bacterial automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (B-ARISA) is one of the widely used methods for fingerprinting bacterial communities after PCR-based amplification of selected regions of the operon coding for rRNA genes using community DNA. However, B-ARISA alone does not provide any taxonomic information and the results may be severely biased in relation to the primer set selection. Furthermore, amplified DNA stemming from mitochondrial or chloroplast templates might strongly bias the obtained fingerprints. In this study, we determined the applicability of three different B-ARISA primer sets to the study of bacterial communities. The results from in silico analysis harnessing publicly available sequence databases showed that all three primer sets tested are specific to bacteria but only two primers sets assure high bacterial taxa coverage (1406f/23Sr and ITSF/ITSReub). Considering the study of bacteria in a plant interface, the primer set ITSF/ITSReub was found to amplify (in silico) sequences of some important crop species such as Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays. Bacterial genera and plant species potentially amplified by different primer sets are given. These data were confirmed when DNA extracted from soil and plant samples were analyzed. The presented information could be useful when interpreting existing B-ARISA results and planning B-ARISA experiments, especially when plant DNA can be expected. PMID:25749323

  1. Structure of Intergenic Spacer IGS1 of Ribosomal Operon from Schistidium Mosses.

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatova, E A; Ignatov, M S; Goryunov, D V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    The structure of the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) of the ribosomal operon from 12 species of Schistidium mosses was studied. In the IGS1 sequences of these species, three conserved regions and two areas of GC- and A-enriched repeats were identified. All of the studied mosses have a conserved pyrimidine-enriched motif at the 5'-end of IGS1. Species-specific nucleotide substitutions and insertions were found in the conserved areas. The repeated units contain single nucleotide substitutions that make unique the majority of repeated units. The positions of such repeats in IGS1 are species-specific, but their number can vary within the species and among operons of the same specimen. The comparison of IGS1 sequences from the Schistidium species and from representatives of ten other moss genera revealed the presence of common conserved motifs with similar localization. Presumably, these motifs are elements of termination of the pre-rRNA transcription and processing of rRNA. PMID:26615440

  2. Evaluation of automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis for bacterial fingerprinting of rumen microbiome compared to pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Jami, Elie; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian gut houses a complex microbial community which is believed to play a significant role in host physiology. In recent years, several microbial community analysis methods have been implemented to study the whole gut microbial environment, in contrast to classical microbiological methods focusing on bacteria which can be cultivated. One of these is automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), an inexpensive and popular way of analyzing bacterial diversity and community fingerprinting in ecological samples. ARISA uses the natural variability in length of the DNA fragment found between the 16S and 23S genes in different bacterial lineages to infer diversity. This method is now being supplanted by affordable next-generation sequencing technologies that can also simultaneously annotate operational taxonomic units for taxonomic identification. We compared ARISA and pyrosequencing of samples from the rumen microbiome of cows, previously sampled at different stages of development and varying in microbial complexity using several ecological parameters. We revealed close agreement between ARISA and pyrosequencing outputs, especially in their ability to discriminate samples from different ecological niches. In contrast, the ARISA method seemed to underestimate sample richness. The good performance of the relatively inexpensive ARISA makes it relevant for straightforward use in bacterial fingerprinting analysis as well as for quick cross-validation of pyrosequencing data. PMID:25437610

  3. Evaluation of Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis for Bacterial Fingerprinting of Rumen Microbiome Compared to Pyrosequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Jami, Elie; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian gut houses a complex microbial community which is believed to play a significant role in host physiology. In recent years, several microbial community analysis methods have been implemented to study the whole gut microbial environment, in contrast to classical microbiological methods focusing on bacteria which can be cultivated. One of these is automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), an inexpensive and popular way of analyzing bacterial diversity and community fingerprinting in ecological samples. ARISA uses the natural variability in length of the DNA fragment found between the 16S and 23S genes in different bacterial lineages to infer diversity. This method is now being supplanted by affordable next-generation sequencing technologies that can also simultaneously annotate operational taxonomic units for taxonomic identification. We compared ARISA and pyrosequencing of samples from the rumen microbiome of cows, previously sampled at different stages of development and varying in microbial complexity using several ecological parameters. We revealed close agreement between ARISA and pyrosequencing outputs, especially in their ability to discriminate samples from different ecological niches. In contrast, the ARISA method seemed to underestimate sample richness. The good performance of the relatively inexpensive ARISA makes it relevant for straightforward use in bacterial fingerprinting analysis as well as for quick cross-validation of pyrosequencing data. PMID:25437610

  4. Detection of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in milk to prevent late blowing in cheese by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis.

    PubMed

    Panelli, Simona; Brambati, Eva; Bonacina, Cesare; Feligini, Maria

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum has been identified as the main causal agent of the late blowing defect in cheese, with major effects on quality and commercial value. In this work, for the first time, we applied automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) approach to diagnose the presence of C. tyrobutyricum in raw milk before cheesemaking. A species-specific primer set was designed and used for this original application of the ARISA. Sensitivity of detection, reproducibility of the fluorescent PCR assay, and repeatability of the capillary electrophoretic analysis of amplicons were evaluated using DNA extracted from milk added with known amounts of C. tyrobutyricum genome copies, ranging from 3 × 10(6) to 3. Results indicated that the sensitivity of the technique permits to detect the bacterium in all the samples. The reproducibility, evaluated by analyzing 3 sets of serial dilutions, resulted satisfactory, with little deviation within PCR reactions amplifying the same starting amount of template (standard deviations ≤ 0.1, coefficients of variation ≤ 3%). The peaks' fluorescence displayed an evident correspondence with the number of genome copies contained in each dilution. The capillary electrophoretic analysis, tested by running a single PCR product per dilution point in 10 repeats, resulted efficient and highly repeatable, with excellent coefficients of variation ≤ 2% and standard deviations ≤ 0.1 in all the sample sets. This application of ARISA gives good estimates of the total C. tyrobutyricum DNA content allowing a specific, fine-scale resolution of this pollutant species in a complex system as milk. A further advantage linked to the automatization of the process. PMID:24106762

  5. Ribosomal operon intergenic sequence (IGS) heterogeneity in Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are closely related species that can not be distinguished by their 16S or 23S rRNA genes. However, the intergenic sequence (IGS) fragment that is between the 16S and 23S genes is markedly different and characteristic for each species. A peculiarity of th...

  6. Molecular analysis of a NOR site polymorphism in brown trout (Salmo trutta): organization of rDNA intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Castro, J; Sánchez, L; Martínez, P; Lucchini, S D; Nardi, I

    1997-12-01

    Using restriction endonuclease mapping, we have analyzed the organization of rDNA (DNA coding for ribosomal RNA (rRNA)) units in the salmonid fish Salmo trutta, as an initial step toward understand the molecular basis of a nucleolar organizer region (NOR) site polymorphism detected in this species. The size of the rDNA units ranged between 15 and 23 kb, with remarkable variation both within individuals and between populations. Three regions of internal tandem repetitiveness responsible for this length polymorphism were located to the intergenic spacers. NOR site polymorphic individuals showed a higher number of length classes, in some cases forming a complete 1 kb fragment ladder. The amount of rRNA genes was as much as 8-fold higher in polymorphic individuals compared with standard individuals. All individuals from the most polymorphic population showed a 14-kb insertion of unknown nature in a small proportion (below 25%) of the 28S rRNA genes. PMID:18464877

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of encapsulated and non-encapsulated Trichinella species by studying the 5S rDNA tandemly repeated intergenic region.

    PubMed

    van der Giessen, J W B; Fonville, M; Briels, I; Pozio, E

    2005-09-01

    The identification of sequence regions in the genomes of pathogens which can be useful to distinguish among species and genotypes, is of great importance for epidemiological, molecular, and phylogenetic studies. The 5S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer region has been identified as a good target to distinguish among eight Trichinella species and genotypes. The recent discovery of two non-encapsulated species in this genus, Trichinella papuae and Trichinella zimbabwensis, which can infect both mammals and reptiles, has suggested analyzing their 5S rDNA. Amplification of the tandem repeats of the 5S rDNA intergenic region of encapsulated species of Trichinella shows a 751bp fragment, whereas the three non-encapsulated species show a fragment of 800bp with T. pseudospiralis showing an additional fragment of 522bp. Although the size of the 800bp PCR fragments of T. papuae and T. zimbabwensis are similar to that of T. pseudospiralis, there are differences in the 5S rDNA intergenic regions among the three non-encapsulated species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 5S rDNA intergenic regions shows a clustering together of the three non-encapsulated Trichinella species that is well separated from the encapsulated ones. In addition, a single PCR-based method allows distinguishing non-encapsulated and encapsulated species. PMID:16076532

  8. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions. PMID:22510214

  9. Cladistic biogeography of Juglans (Juglandaceae) based on chloroplast DNA intergenic spacer sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phylogenetic utility of sequence variation from five chloroplast DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) regions: trnT-trnF, psbA-trnH, atpB-rbcL, trnV-16S rRNA, and trnS-trnfM was examined in the genus Juglans. A total of seventeen taxa representing the four sections within Juglans and an outgroup taxon, ...

  10. Analyses of the ribosomal DNA region in Nosema bombycis NIS 001.

    PubMed

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Chieda, Yuuka; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa; Hayasaka, Shoji; Shimizu, Susumu

    2004-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) containing small subunit (SSU) rDNA and both flanking regions in the entomopathogenic microsporidian Nosema bombycis NIS 001 was amplified from genomic DNA with a primer set based on the sequence of an inverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-derived fragment. In this fragment, SSU rDNA was divided by a 618-bp insert at nt 599, and 5S rDNA was located downstream of the SSU rDNA, fragmented by 284-bp intergenic spacer. In addition, the 48-bp 3'-end of large subunit (LSU) rDNA was located 118 bp upstream of the fragmented SSU rDNA. In the amplicon, the region upstream of the LSU rDNA was a homologue of the C-terminal CHARLIE8 transposon-like element of human GTF2IRD2. In this organism, another fragmented SSU rDNA, which was divided by a 231-bp insert at nt 50, was also detected. Both the intact (insertless) and fragmented SSU rDNAs clustered with LSU rDNA and 5S rDNA and the intergenic sequences between SSU rDNA and 5S rDNA were divergent in an organism. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay indicated that not only the intact SSU rDNA but also the fragmened SSU rDNA were transcribed in N. bombycis. PMID:15666716

  11. Correlation of maple sap composition with bacterial and fungal communities determined by multiplex automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (MARISA).

    PubMed

    Filteau, Marie; Lagacé, Luc; LaPointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2011-08-01

    During collection, maple sap is contaminated by bacteria and fungi that subsequently colonize the tubing system. The bacterial microbiota has been more characterized than the fungal microbiota, but the impact of both components on maple sap quality remains unclear. This study focused on identifying bacterial and fungal members of maple sap and correlating microbiota composition with maple sap properties. A multiplex automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (MARISA) method was developed to presumptively identify bacterial and fungal members of maple sap samples collected from 19 production sites during the tapping period. Results indicate that the fungal community of maple sap is mainly composed of yeast related to Mrakia sp., Mrakiella sp., Guehomyces pullulans, Cryptococcus victoriae and Williopsis saturnus. Mrakia, Mrakiella and Guehomyces peaks were identified in samples of all production sites and can be considered dominant and stable members of the fungal microbiota of maple sap. A multivariate analysis based on MARISA profiles and maple sap chemical composition data showed correlations between Candida sake, Janthinobacterium lividum, Williopsis sp., Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Mrakia sp., Rhodococcus sp., Pseudomonas tolaasii, G. pullulans and maple sap composition at different flow periods. This study provides new insights on the relationship between microbial community and maple sap quality. PMID:21569942

  12. Replication of ribosomal DNA in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Bozzoni, I; Baldari, C T; Amaldi, F; Buongiorno-Nardelli, M

    1981-09-01

    The study of the localization of the replication origins of rDNA in Xenopus laevis has been approached by two different methods. 1. The DNA of X. laevis larvae was fractionated by CsCl gradient centrifugation in bulk and ribosomal DNA and examined in the electron microscope. In bulk DNA, clusters of microbubbles, which are related with the origins of replication, appear to be spaced along the DNA molecules at intervals comparable with the size of the 'average' replicon of X. laevis. In ribosomal DNA, the distance between adjacent clusters is much shorter and corresponds to the size of the rDNA repeating unit. When ribosomal DNA was submitted to digestion with restriction enzymes (Eco RI and HindIII) the microbubbles are observed in the non-transcribed spacer-containing fragment. 2. Cultured cells of X. laevis were synchronized by mitotic selection and incubated with 5-fluoro-2-deoxyuridine for a time longer than the G1 phase. This treatment synchronizes the replicons and allows them to start replicating very slowly. It was thus possible to obtain a preferential labelling of the regions containing the origins. The analysis by gel electrophoresis of the Eco Ri-digested rDNA showed that the radioactivity was preferentially incorporated in the fragments which contain the non-transcribed spacer. The results of these two approaches indicate that the rRNA gene cluster consists of multiple units of replication, possibly one per gene unit. Furthermore they show that the origins of replication are localized into the non-transcribed spacer. PMID:7297565

  13. De novo DNA demethylation and noncoding transcription define active intergenic regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Felix; Smith, Andrew D; Gingeras, Thomas R; Hannon, Gregory J; Hodges, Emily

    2013-10-01

    Deep sequencing of mammalian DNA methylomes has uncovered a previously unpredicted number of discrete hypomethylated regions in intergenic space (iHMRs). Here, we combined whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data with extensive gene expression and chromatin-state data to define functional classes of iHMRs, and to reconstruct the dynamics of their establishment in a developmental setting. Comparing HMR profiles in embryonic stem and primary blood cells, we show that iHMRs mark an exclusive subset of active DNase hypersensitive sites (DHS), and that both developmentally constitutive and cell-type-specific iHMRs display chromatin states typical of distinct regulatory elements. We also observe that iHMR changes are more predictive of nearby gene activity than the promoter HMR itself, and that expression of noncoding RNAs within the iHMR accompanies full activation and complete demethylation of mature B cell enhancers. Conserved sequence features corresponding to iHMR transcript start sites, including a discernible TATA motif, suggest a conserved, functional role for transcription in these regions. Similarly, we explored both primate-specific and human population variation at iHMRs, finding that while enhancer iHMRs are more variable in sequence and methylation status than any other functional class, conservation of the TATA box is highly predictive of iHMR maintenance, reflecting the impact of sequence plasticity and transcriptional signals on iHMR establishment. Overall, our analysis allowed us to construct a three-step timeline in which (1) intergenic DHS are pre-established in the stem cell, (2) partial demethylation of blood-specific intergenic DHSs occurs in blood progenitors, and (3) complete iHMR formation and transcription coincide with enhancer activation in lymphoid-specified cells. PMID:23811145

  14. De novo DNA demethylation and noncoding transcription define active intergenic regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Felix; Smith, Andrew D.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Hodges, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Deep sequencing of mammalian DNA methylomes has uncovered a previously unpredicted number of discrete hypomethylated regions in intergenic space (iHMRs). Here, we combined whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data with extensive gene expression and chromatin-state data to define functional classes of iHMRs, and to reconstruct the dynamics of their establishment in a developmental setting. Comparing HMR profiles in embryonic stem and primary blood cells, we show that iHMRs mark an exclusive subset of active DNase hypersensitive sites (DHS), and that both developmentally constitutive and cell-type-specific iHMRs display chromatin states typical of distinct regulatory elements. We also observe that iHMR changes are more predictive of nearby gene activity than the promoter HMR itself, and that expression of noncoding RNAs within the iHMR accompanies full activation and complete demethylation of mature B cell enhancers. Conserved sequence features corresponding to iHMR transcript start sites, including a discernible TATA motif, suggest a conserved, functional role for transcription in these regions. Similarly, we explored both primate-specific and human population variation at iHMRs, finding that while enhancer iHMRs are more variable in sequence and methylation status than any other functional class, conservation of the TATA box is highly predictive of iHMR maintenance, reflecting the impact of sequence plasticity and transcriptional signals on iHMR establishment. Overall, our analysis allowed us to construct a three-step timeline in which (1) intergenic DHS are pre-established in the stem cell, (2) partial demethylation of blood-specific intergenic DHSs occurs in blood progenitors, and (3) complete iHMR formation and transcription coincide with enhancer activation in lymphoid-specified cells. PMID:23811145

  15. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Carmen V.; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M.; Keller, Markus A.; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions. PMID:26195783

  16. Does Blood of Healthy Subjects Contain Bacterial Ribosomal DNA?

    PubMed Central

    Nikkari, Simo; McLaughlin, Ian J.; Bi, Wanli; Dodge, Deborah E.; Relman, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Real-time PCR methods with primers and a probe targeting conserved regions of the bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) revealed a larger amount of rDNA in blood specimens from healthy individuals than in matched reagent controls. However, the origins and identities of these blood-associated bacterial rDNA sequences remain obscure. PMID:11326021

  17. DNA methylation signatures of long intergenic noncoding RNAs in porcine adipose and muscle tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhong-Yin; Li, Aimin; Wang, Li-Gang; Irwin, David M; Liu, Yan-Hu; Xu, Dan; Han, Xu-Man; Wang, Lu; Wu, Shi-Fang; Wang, Li-Xian; Xie, Hai-Bing; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are one of the major unexplored components of genomes. Here we re-analyzed a published methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) dataset to characterize the DNA methylation pattern of pig lincRNA genes in adipose and muscle tissues. Our study showed that the methylation level of lincRNA genes was higher than that of mRNA genes, with similar trends observed in comparisons of the promoter, exon or intron regions. Different methylation pattern were observed across the transcription start sites (TSS) of lincRNA and protein-coding genes. Furthermore, an overlap was observed between many lincRNA genes and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) identified among different breeds of pigs, which show different fat contents, sexes and anatomic locations of tissues. We identify a lincRNA gene, linc-sscg3623, that displayed differential methylation levels in backfat between Min and Large White pigs at 60 and 120 days of age. We found that a demethylation process occurred between days 150 and 180 in the Min and Large White pigs, which was followed by remethylation between days 180 and 210. These results contribute to our understanding of the domestication of domestic animals and identify lincRNA genes involved in adipogenesis and muscle development. PMID:26493951

  18. DNA methylation signatures of long intergenic noncoding RNAs in porcine adipose and muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Yin; Li, Aimin; Wang, Li-Gang; Irwin, David M; Liu, Yan-Hu; Xu, Dan; Han, Xu-Man; Wang, Lu; Wu, Shi-Fang; Wang, Li-Xian; Xie, Hai-Bing; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are one of the major unexplored components of genomes. Here we re-analyzed a published methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) dataset to characterize the DNA methylation pattern of pig lincRNA genes in adipose and muscle tissues. Our study showed that the methylation level of lincRNA genes was higher than that of mRNA genes, with similar trends observed in comparisons of the promoter, exon or intron regions. Different methylation pattern were observed across the transcription start sites (TSS) of lincRNA and protein-coding genes. Furthermore, an overlap was observed between many lincRNA genes and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) identified among different breeds of pigs, which show different fat contents, sexes and anatomic locations of tissues. We identify a lincRNA gene, linc-sscg3623, that displayed differential methylation levels in backfat between Min and Large White pigs at 60 and 120 days of age. We found that a demethylation process occurred between days 150 and 180 in the Min and Large White pigs, which was followed by remethylation between days 180 and 210. These results contribute to our understanding of the domestication of domestic animals and identify lincRNA genes involved in adipogenesis and muscle development. PMID:26493951

  19. Variability of chloroplast DNA and nuclear ribosomal DNA in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and its wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Fregene, M A; Vargas, J; Ikea, J; Angel, F; Tohme, J; Asiedu, R A; Akoroda, M O; Roca, W M

    1994-11-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cp) and nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) variation was investigated in 45 accessions of cultivated and wild Manihot species. Ten independent mutations, 8 point mutations and 2 length mutations were identified, using eight restriction enzymes and 12 heterologous cpDNA probes from mungbean. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis defined nine distinct chloroplast types, three of which were found among the cultivated accessions and six among the wild species. Cladistic analysis of the cpDNA data using parsimony yielded a hypothetical phylogeny of lineages among the cpDNAs of cassava and its wild relatives that is congruent with morphological evolutionary differentiation in the genus. The results of our survey of cpDNA, together with rDNA restriction site change at the intergenic spacer region and rDNA repeat unit length variation (using rDNA cloned fragments from taro as probe), suggest that cassava might have arisen from the domestication of wild tuberous accessions of some Manihot species, followed by intensive selection. M. esculenta subspp flabellifolia is probably a wild progenitor. Introgressive hybridization with wild forms and pressures to adapt to the widely varying climates and topography in which cassava is found might have enhanced the crop's present day variability. PMID:24178017

  20. Synthesis of Amplified DNA That Codes for Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, Marco; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P.

    1971-01-01

    During the amplification stage in ovaries, the complete repetitive unit of the DNA that codes for ribosomal RNA in Xenopus appears to be transcribed. This large RNA transcript is found in a complex with DNA. Substitution experiments with 5-bromodeoxyuridine do not show any evidence that a complete amplified cistron is used as a template for further amplification. A derivative of rifampicin, 2′,5′-dimethyl-N(4′)benzyl-N(4′)[desmethyl] rifampicin, preferentially inhibits the DNA synthesis responsible for ribosomal gene amplification. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that RNA-dependent DNA synthesis is involved in gene amplification. PMID:5288254

  1. The Dunaliella salina organelle genomes: large sequences, inflated with intronic and intergenic DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David R.; Lee, Robert W.; Cushman, John C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Tran, Duc; Polle, Juergen E.

    2010-05-07

    Abstract Background: Dunaliella salina Teodoresco, a unicellular, halophilic green alga belonging to the Chlorophyceae, is among the most industrially important microalgae. This is because D. salina can produce massive amounts of β-carotene, which can be collected for commercial purposes, and because of its potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. Although the biochemistry and physiology of D. salina have been studied in great detail, virtually nothing is known about the genomes it carries, especially those within its mitochondrion and plastid. This study presents the complete mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences of D. salina and compares them with those of the model green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. Results: The D. salina organelle genomes are large, circular-mapping molecules with ~60% noncoding DNA, placing them among the most inflated organelle DNAs sampled from the Chlorophyta. In fact, the D. salina plastid genome, at 269 kb, is the largest complete plastid DNA (ptDNA) sequence currently deposited in GenBank, and both the mitochondrial and plastid genomes have unprecedentedly high intron densities for organelle DNA: ~1.5 and ~0.4 introns per gene, respectively. Moreover, what appear to be the relics of genes, introns, and intronic open reading frames are found scattered throughout the intergenic ptDNA regions -- a trait without parallel in other characterized organelle genomes and one that gives insight into the mechanisms and modes of expansion of the D. salina ptDNA. Conclusions: These findings confirm the notion that chlamydomonadalean algae have some of the most extreme organelle genomes of all eukaryotes. They also suggest that the events giving rise to the expanded ptDNA architecture of D. salina and other Chlamydomonadales may have occurred early in the evolution of this lineage. Although interesting from a genome evolution standpoint, the D. salina organelle DNA sequences will aid in the development of a viable

  2. Intraspecific Variation in Ribosomal DNA in Populations of the Potato Cyst Nematode Globodera pallida.

    PubMed

    Blok, V C; Malloch, G; Harrower, B; Phillips, M S; Vrain, T C

    1998-06-01

    The relationships among a number of populations of Globodera pallida from Britian, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, and South America were examined using PCR amplification of the ribosomal cistron between the 18S and 28S genes that include the two intergenic spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene. Amplifications produced a similar-sized product of 1150 bp from all populations. Digestion of the amplified fragment with a number of restriction enzymes showed differences among the populations. The restriction enzyme RsaI distinguished the most populations. The RFLP patterns revealed by this enzyme were complex and could have arisen from heterogeneity between individuals within populations and from differences between the repeats of an individual. Sequence analysis from six of the populations, together with RFLP analysis of PCR products, shows that there is intraspecific variation in the rDNA of G. pallida. PMID:19274220

  3. Intraspecific Variation in Ribosomal DNA in Populations of the Potato Cyst Nematode Globodera pallida

    PubMed Central

    Blok, V. C.; Malloch, G.; Harrower, B.; Phillips, M. S.; Vrain, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The relationships among a number of populations of Globodera pallida from Britian, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, and South America were examined using PCR amplification of the ribosomal cistron between the 18S and 28S genes that include the two intergenic spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene. Amplifications produced a similar-sized product of 1150 bp from all populations. Digestion of the amplified fragment with a number of restriction enzymes showed differences among the populations. The restriction enzyme RsaI distinguished the most populations. The RFLP patterns revealed by this enzyme were complex and could have arisen from heterogeneity between individuals within populations and from differences between the repeats of an individual. Sequence analysis from six of the populations, together with RFLP analysis of PCR products, shows that there is intraspecific variation in the rDNA of G. pallida. PMID:19274220

  4. Technical note: Comparison of automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to assess bacterial diversity in the rumen of sheep.

    PubMed

    Saro, C; Ranilla, M J; Cifuentes, A; Rosselló-Mora, R; Carro, M D

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques to assess bacterial diversity in the rumen of sheep. Sheep were fed 2 diets with 70% of either alfalfa hay or grass hay, and the solid (SOL) and liquid (LIQ) phases of the rumen were sampled immediately before feeding (0 h) and at 4 and 8 h postfeeding. Both techniques detected similar differences between forages, with alfalfa hay promoting greater (P < 0.05) bacterial diversity than grass hay. In contrast, whereas ARISA analysis showed a decrease (P < 0.05) of bacterial diversity in SOL at 4 h postfeeding compared with 0 and 8 h samplings, no variations (P > 0.05) over the postfeeding period were detected by DGGE. The ARISA technique showed lower (P < 0.05) bacterial diversity in SOL than in LIQ samples at 4 h postfeeding, but no differences (P > 0.05) in bacterial diversity between both rumen phases were detected by DGGE. Under the conditions of this study, the DGGE was not sensitive enough to detect some changes in ruminal bacterial communities, and therefore ARISA was considered more accurate for assessing bacterial diversity of ruminal samples. The results highlight the influence of the fingerprinting technique used to draw conclusions on factors affecting ruminal bacterial diversity. PMID:24492564

  5. Species markers for equine strongyles detected in intergenic rDNA by PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Gasser, R B; Stevenson, L A; Chilton, N B; Nansen, P; Bucknell, D G; Beveridge, I

    1996-10-01

    Five species of equine strongyle belonging to the subfamily Strongylinae (Strongylus edentatus, S. equinus, S. vulgaris, Oesophagodontus robustus and Triodontophorus serratus) and 11 species belonging to the subfamily Cyathostominae (Poteriostomum imparidentatum, P. ratzii, Cylicocyclus insignis, Cc. leptostomus, Cc. nassatus, Cylicostephanus calicatus, Cs. longibursatus, Cs. goldi, Cyathostomum catinatum, Cy. labiatum and Cy. pateratum) were characterized using a polymerase chain reaction-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR-RFLP). Internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA was amplified from genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using conserved primers, digested separately with six restriction endonucleases (AluI, BfaI, CfoI, Hae III, VSpI and XbaI) and the fragments separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. The PCR products of the three Strongylus species were approx. 90-100 bp smaller in size compared with those of the other 13 species. The PCR-RFLP analysis of the rDNA region spanning the first and second internal transcribed spacers plus the 5.85 rDNA gene (ITS+) produced characteristic patterns for each of the 16 species examined, and no variation in RFLP patterns was detected within the species Cy. catinatum, where multiple isolates were analysed. The study demonstrates that the internal transcribed spacer sequences provide genetic markers for the species identification of a range of equine strongyles. These markers will be of use for the identification of egg and larval stages, where morphological characters alone are unreliable. The results also indicate that the spacer sequences will be of use to study the systematics of equine strongyles. PMID:8910892

  6. Analysis of histone modifications at human ribosomal DNA in liver cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Feng; Shen, Xingyong; Fan, Li; Yu, Zhaocai

    2015-01-01

    Human liver cancer is the cancer commonly seen clinically. The transcription of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a critical step for cells, and epigenetic marks such as post-translational histone modifications have been involved in the regulation of rDNA transcription. But less is known about the pathogenesis of the liver cancers concerning the rDNA transcription regulation. Here we aligned the ChIP-seq data of histone modification markers and CTCF to the human genome assembly which contains a single rDNA repeat in human liver cancer cell and validated their distribution with ChIP-QPCR. Human liver cancer cell possesses a higher enrichment of H3K4me1 and H3K27me3 at ~28 kb within the intergenic spacer (IGS) of rDNA and a higher enrichment of H3K4me3 and H3K27ac upstream of TSS. Furtherly, we studied whether UBF could affect histone modification markers and CTCF at rDNA in human liver cancer cell. UBF depletion leads to a decrease of gene activation mark H3K4me3 across the rDNA promoter. And other histone modification marks and CTCF were not altered after UBF depletion. Taken together, our data showed a high resolution map of histone modification marks at rDNA in human liver cancer cell and provide novel evidence to decipher chromatin-mediated regulation of rDNA in liver cancer. PMID:26657029

  7. PCR Primers for Metazoan Mitochondrial 12S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Kweskin, Matthew; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessment of the biodiversity of communities of small organisms is most readily done using PCR-based analysis of environmental samples consisting of mixtures of individuals. Known as metagenetics, this approach has transformed understanding of microbial communities and is beginning to be applied to metazoans as well. Unlike microbial studies, where analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence is standard, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In this study we designed a set of PCR primers for the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequence based on 64 complete mitochondrial genomes and then tested their efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of the 64 complete mitochondrial genome sequences representing all metazoan classes available in GenBank were downloaded using the NCBI Taxonomy Browser. Alignment of sequences was performed for the excised mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences, and conserved regions were identified for all 64 mitochondrial genomes. These regions were used to design a primer pair that flanks a more variable region in the gene. Then all of the complete metazoan mitochondrial genomes available in NCBI's Organelle Genome Resources database were used to determine the percentage of taxa that would likely be amplified using these primers. Results suggest that these primers will amplify target sequences for many metazoans. Conclusions/Significance Newly designed 12S ribosomal DNA primers have considerable potential for metazoan metagenetic analysis because of their ability to amplify sequences from many metazoans. PMID:22536450

  8. [Organization of 5S ribosomal DNA of Melitaea trivia].

    PubMed

    Cherevatov, O V; Volkov, R A

    2011-01-01

    Two length variants of 5S rDNA repeated units were detected in the genome of East European butterfly Melitaea trivia. Both repeat variants contain the 5S rRNA coding region of the same length of 120 bp, but possess the intergenic spacer region (IGS) of different size, 78 and 125 bp, respectively. The level of sequence similarity between the two 5S rDNA variants amounts to 43.9-45.5% in the IGS, whereas the coding region appears to be more conservative. In the IGS, microsatellite sequence motives were found; amplification of these motives could be involved in the evolution of the 5S rDNA. PMID:21574431

  9. A Sequence-Specific Interaction between the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA Gene Repeats and a Locus Encoding an RNA Polymerase I Subunit Affects Ribosomal DNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Cahyani, Inswasti; Cridge, Andrew G.; Engelke, David R.; Ganley, Austen R. D.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of eukaryotic genomes is linked to their functions. However, how individual features of the global spatial structure contribute to nuclear function remains largely unknown. We previously identified a high-frequency interchromosomal interaction within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome that occurs between the intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats and the intergenic sequence between the locus encoding the second largest RNA polymerase I subunit and a lysine tRNA gene [i.e., RPA135-tK(CUU)P]. Here, we used quantitative chromosome conformation capture in combination with replacement mapping to identify a 75-bp sequence within the RPA135-tK(CUU)P intergenic region that is involved in the interaction. We demonstrate that the RPA135-IGS1 interaction is dependent on the rDNA copy number and the Msn2 protein. Surprisingly, we found that the interaction does not govern RPA135 transcription. Instead, replacement of a 605-bp region within the RPA135-tK(CUU)P intergenic region results in a reduction in the RPA135-IGS1 interaction level and fluctuations in rDNA copy number. We conclude that the chromosomal interaction that occurs between the RPA135-tK(CUU)P and rDNA IGS1 loci stabilizes rDNA repeat number and contributes to the maintenance of nucleolar stability. Our results provide evidence that the DNA loci involved in chromosomal interactions are composite elements, sections of which function in stabilizing the interaction or mediating a functional outcome. PMID:25421713

  10. DNA homologies of ribosomal RNA genes of Neurospora species

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Mimiko, R.; Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNAs) of Neurospora crassa contain DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs, in addition to internal and external spacers. As has been reported for many eukaryotes, the DNA sequences which code for 17S, 5.8S, and 26S rRNAs in Neurospora species are probably conserved while the internal and external spacer regions are probably variable sequences. Extensive electron microscopic studies of 45S precursor rRNA of several cold and warm blooded animals confirm that spacer regions vary extensively from species to species. It was desirable to know whether such differences in rDNA sequences exist between Neurospora species. Any such difference should be detectable using standard procedures for DNA homology studies rDNA sequences were isolated from N. crassa mycelial cells using the procedure described previously. The purified rDNA was /sup 3/H-labeled (by nick translation) and reassociated with total DNA isolated from the heterothallic species N. crassa and from three homothalliospecies: N. dodgei, N. lineolata, and N. africana. In addition, /sup 32/P-labeled total DNA of N. crassa was reannealed with unlabeled bulk DNA from N. crassa, N. dodgei, and N. lineolata.

  11. Kinetoplast DNA-encoded ribosomal protein S12

    PubMed Central

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, which are encoded by the kinetoplast genome, and more than 150 proteins encoded in the nucleus and imported from the cytoplasm. However, a single ribosomal protein RPS12 is encoded by the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) in all trypanosomatid species examined. As typical for these organisms, the gene itself is cryptic and its transcript undergoes an extensive U-insertion/deletion editing. An evolutionary trend to reduce or eliminate RNA editing could be traced with other cryptogenes, but the invariably pan-edited RPS12 cryptogene is apparently spared. Here we inquired whether editing of RPS12 mRNA is essential for mitochondrial translation. By RNAi-mediated knockdowns of RNA editing complexes and inducible knock-in of a key editing enzyme in procyclic parasites, we could reversibly downregulate production of edited RPS12 mRNA and, by inference, synthesis of this protein. While inhibition of editing decreased edited mRNA levels, the translation of edited (Cyb) and unedited (COI) mRNAs was blocked. Furthermore, the population of SSU-related 45S complexes declined upon inactivation of editing and so did the amount of mRNA-bound ribosomes. In bloodstream parasites, which lack active electron transport chain but still require translation of ATP synthase subunit 6 mRNA (A6), both edited RPS12 and A6 mRNAs were detected in translation complexes. Collectively, our results indicate that a single ribosomal protein gene retained by the kinetoplast mitochondrion serves as a possible functional link between editing and translation processes and provide the rationale for the evolutionary conservation of RPS12 pan-editing. PMID:24270388

  12. H2A.Z has a function reminiscent of an activator required for preferential binding to intergenic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Larochelle, Marc; Gaudreau, Luc

    2003-01-01

    H2A.Z has been shown to regulate transcription in yeast, and that function resides in its C-terminal region as the reciprocal portion of H2A cannot substitute for the latter. We show that fusion of a transcriptional activating region to the C-terminal region of H2A, which is substituted for that of H2A.Z, can allow the chimera to fulfil the special role of H2A.Z in positive gene regulation, as well as complement growth deficiencies of htz1Δ cells. We further show that the ‘transcription’ function of H2A.Z is linked to its ability to preferentially localize to certain intergenic DNA regions. Our results suggest that H2A.Z modulates functional interactions with transcription regulatory components, and thus increases its localization to promoters where it helps poise chromatin for gene activation. PMID:12941702

  13. A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Carica L. (Caricaceae) based on restriction fragment length variation in a cpDNA intergenic spacer region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phylogenetic relationships among twelve wild and cultivated species of Carica (Caricaceae) were analyzed using restriction fragment length variation in a 3.2-kb PCR amplified intergenic spacer region of the chloroplast DNA. A total of 138 fragments representing 137 restriction sites accounting f...

  14. Coding DNA repeated throughout intergenic regions of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome: Evolutionary footprints of RNA silencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyknons are non-random sequence patterns significantly repeated throughout non-coding genomic DNA that also appear at least once among genes. They are interesting because they portend an unforeseen connection between coding and non-coding DNA. Pyknons have only been discovered in the human genome,...

  15. Polymorphism at the ribosomal DNA spacers and its relation to breeding structure of the widespread mushroom Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed Central

    James, T Y; Moncalvo, J M; Li, S; Vilgalys, R

    2001-01-01

    The common split-gilled mushroom Schizophyllum commune is found throughout the world on woody substrates. This study addresses the dispersal and population structure of this fungal species by studying the phylogeny and evolutionary dynamics of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) spacer regions. Extensive sampling (n = 195) of sequences of the intergenic spacer region (IGS1) revealed a large number of unique haplotypes (n = 143). The phylogeny of these IGS1 sequences revealed strong geographic patterns and supported three evolutionarily distinct lineages within the global population. The same three geographic lineages were found in phylogenetic analysis of both other rDNA spacer regions (IGS2 and ITS). However, nested clade analysis of the IGS1 phylogeny suggested the population structure of S. commune has undergone recent changes, such as a long distance colonization of western North America from Europe as well as a recent range expansion in the Caribbean. Among all spacer regions, variation in length and nucleotide sequence was observed between but not within the tandem rDNA repeats (arrays). This pattern is consistent with strong within-array and weak among-array homogenizing forces. We present evidence for the suppression of recombination between rDNA arrays on homologous chromosomes that may account for this pattern of concerted evolution. PMID:11139499

  16. Regulation of miR-200c/141 expression by intergenic DNA-looping and transcriptional read-through.

    PubMed

    Batista, Luciana; Bourachot, Brigitte; Mateescu, Bogdan; Reyal, Fabien; Mechta-Grigoriou, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    The miR-200 family members have been implicated in stress responses and ovarian tumorigenesis. Here, we find that miR-200c/141 transcription is intimately linked to the transcription of the proximal upstream gene PTPN6 (SHP1) in all physiological conditions tested. PTPN6 and miR-200c/141 are transcriptionally co-regulated by two complementary mechanisms. First, a bypass of the regular PTPN6 polyadenylation signal allows the transcription of the downstream miR-200c/141. Second, the promoters of the PTPN6 and miR-200c/141 transcription units physically interact through a 3-dimensional DNA loop and exhibit similar epigenetic regulation. Our findings highlight that transcription of intergenic miRNAs is a novel outcome of transcriptional read-through and reveal a yet unexplored type of DNA loop associating two closely located promoters. These mechanisms have significant relevance in ovarian cancers and stress response, pathophysiological conditions in which miR-200c/141 exert key functions. PMID:26725650

  17. Effectiveness of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting for Helicobacter pylori strain differentiation.

    PubMed

    Finger, S Alison; Velapatiño, Billie; Kosek, Margaret; Santivañez, Livia; Dailidiene, Daiva; Quino, Willi; Balqui, Jacqueline; Herrera, Phabiola; Berg, Douglas E; Gilman, Robert H

    2006-07-01

    We compared the robustness and discriminatory power of the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting methods for detecting cases of mixed Helicobacter pylori infection in Peruvian shantytown residents. H. pylori isolates from 63 participants were cultured, and five single colonies and a pool of additional colonies from each participant were analyzed by ERIC-PCR and by RAPD tests with four 10-nucleotide primers (one primer per reaction). There was 94% agreement between the ERIC and RAPD profiles in classifying sets of isolates as uniform versus closely related but not identical versus probably unrelated, indicating a high kappa statistic of 0.8942. Subtle differences in related ERIC or RAPD patterns likely reflect gene transfer between strains, recombination, and/or mutation, whereas markedly different patterns reflect infection by unrelated strains. At least half of infected shantytown residents seemed to carry more than one H. pylori strain, although in 19 of 31 persons, the strains were closely related. Three RAPD tests, each with a different primer, were needed to achieve the sensitivity of one ERIC test. ERIC-PCR constitutes a resource- and time-efficient method for H. pylori strain differentiation. PMID:16820463

  18. Phylogeny of the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group inferred from morphological comparisons, genomic fingerprinting, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Siering, P L; Ghiorse, W C

    1996-01-01

    Phase-contrast light microscopy revealed that only one of eight cultivated strains belonging to the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of sheathed bacteria actually produced a sheath in standard growth media. Two Sphaerotilus natans strains produced branched cells, but other morphological characteristics that were used to identify these bacteria were consistent with previously published descriptions. Genomic fingerprints, which were obtained by performing PCR amplification with primers corresponding to enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences, were useful for distinguishing between the genera Sphaerotilus and Leptothrix, as well as among individual strains. The complete 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of two strains of "Leptothrix discophora" (strains SP-6 and SS-1) were determined. In addition, partial sequences (approximately 300 nucleotides) of one strain of Leptothrix cholodnii (strain LMG 7171), an unidentified Leptothrix strain (strain NC-1), and four strains of Sphaerotilus natans (strains ATCC 13338T [T = type strain], ATCC 15291, ATCC 29329, and ATCC 29330) were determined. We found that two of the S. natans strains (ATCC 15291 and ATCC 13338T), which differed in morphology and in their genomic fingerprints, had identical sequences in the 300-nucleotide region sequenced. Both parsimony and distance matrix methods were used to infer the evolutionary relationships of the eight strains in a comparison of the 16S rDNA sequences of these organisms with 16S rDNA sequences obtained from ribosomal sequence databases. All of the strains clustered in the Rubrivivax subdivision of the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria, which confirmed previously published conclusions concerning selected individual strains. Additional analyses revealed that all of the S. natans strains clustered in one closely related group, while the Leptothrix strains clustered in two separate lineages that were approximately equidistant from the S. natans cluster. This finding

  19. ABH2 couples regulation of ribosomal DNA transcription with DNA alkylation repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Pishun; Gao, Shuman; Wang, Lina; Yu, Fang; Li, Jialun; Wang, Chuangui; Li, Jiwen; Wong, Jiemin

    2013-08-29

    Transcription has been linked to DNA damage. How the most highly transcribed mammalian ribosomal (rDNA) genes maintain genome integrity in the absence of transcription-coupled DNA damage repair is poorly understood. Here, we report that ABH2/ALKBH2, a DNA alkylation repair enzyme, is highly enriched in the nucleolus. ABH2 interacts with DNA repair proteins Ku70 and Ku80 as well as nucleolar proteins nucleolin, nucleophosmin 1, and upstream binding factor (UBF). ABH2 associates with and promotes rDNA transcription through its DNA repair activity. ABH2 knockdown impairs rDNA transcription and leads to increased single-stranded and double-stranded DNA breaks that are more pronounced in the rDNA genes, whereas ABH2 overexpression protects cells from methyl-methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage and inhibition of rDNA transcription. In response to massive alkylation damage, ABH2 rapidly redistributes from the nucleolus to nucleoplasm. Our study thus reveals a critical role of ABH2 in maintaining rDNA gene integrity and transcription and provides insight into the ABH2 DNA repair function. PMID:23972994

  20. Chromosome-wide mapping of DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells reveals pervasive methylation of gene-associated and conserved intergenic sequences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA methylation has been linked to genome regulation and dysregulation in health and disease respectively, and methods for characterizing genomic DNA methylation patterns are rapidly emerging. We have developed/refined methods for enrichment of methylated genomic fragments using the methyl-binding domain of the human MBD2 protein (MBD2-MBD) followed by analysis with high-density tiling microarrays. This MBD-chip approach was used to characterize DNA methylation patterns across all non-repetitive sequences of human chromosomes 21 and 22 at high-resolution in normal and malignant prostate cells. Results Examining this data using computational methods that were designed specifically for DNA methylation tiling array data revealed widespread methylation of both gene promoter and non-promoter regions in cancer and normal cells. In addition to identifying several novel cancer hypermethylated 5' gene upstream regions that mediated epigenetic gene silencing, we also found several hypermethylated 3' gene downstream, intragenic and intergenic regions. The hypermethylated intragenic regions were highly enriched for overlap with intron-exon boundaries, suggesting a possible role in regulation of alternative transcriptional start sites, exon usage and/or splicing. The hypermethylated intergenic regions showed significant enrichment for conservation across vertebrate species. A sampling of these newly identified promoter (ADAMTS1 and SCARF2 genes) and non-promoter (downstream or within DSCR9, C21orf57 and HLCS genes) hypermethylated regions were effective in distinguishing malignant from normal prostate tissues and/or cell lines. Conclusions Comparison of chromosome-wide DNA methylation patterns in normal and malignant prostate cells revealed significant methylation of gene-proximal and conserved intergenic sequences. Such analyses can be easily extended for genome-wide methylation analysis in health and disease. PMID:21669002

  1. Simultaneous Discrimination between 15 Fish Pathogens by Using 16S Ribosomal DNA PCR and DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Warsen, Adelaide E.; Krug, Melissa J.; LaFrentz, Stacey; Stanek, Danielle R.; Loge, Frank J.; Call, Douglas R.

    2004-01-01

    We developed a DNA microarray suitable for simultaneous detection and discrimination between multiple bacterial species based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymorphisms using glass slides. Microarray probes (22- to 31-mer oligonucleotides) were spotted onto Teflon-masked, epoxy-silane-derivatized glass slides using a robotic arrayer. PCR products (ca. 199 bp) were generated using biotinylated, universal primer sequences, and these products were hybridized overnight (55°C) to the microarray. Targets that annealed to microarray probes were detected using a combination of Tyramide Signal Amplification and Alexa Fluor 546. This methodology permitted 100% specificity for detection of 18 microbes, 15 of which were fish pathogens. With universal 16S rDNA PCR (limited to 28 cycles), detection sensitivity for purified control DNA was equivalent to <150 genomes (675 fg), and this sensitivity was not adversely impacted either by the presence of competing bacterial DNA (1.1 × 106 genomes; 5 ng) or by the addition of up to 500 ng of fish DNA. Consequently, coupling 16S rDNA PCR with a microarray detector appears suitable for diagnostic detection and surveillance for commercially important fish pathogens. PMID:15240304

  2. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  3. Phenotypic variability confirmed by nuclear ribosomal DNA suggests a possible natural hybrid zone of Triatoma brasiliensis species complex.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jane; Bargues, Maria Dolores; Neiva, Vanessa Lima; Lawrence, Gena G; Gumiel, Marcia; Oliveira, Genova; Cabello, Pedro; Lima, Marli Maria; Dotson, Ellen; Provance, David William; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Mateo, Lucia; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Dujardin, Jean Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma occurs in Pernambuco state, Brazil, which is situated between the distribution areas of Triatoma brasiliensis brasiliensis (north) and Triatoma juazeirensis (south). T. b. macromelasoma displays greater variations in its chromatic phenotype than either T. b. brasiliensis or T. juazeirensis, and patterns reminiscent of one or the other. Experimental crosses from each of these members of the T. brasiliensis species complex generated fertile offspring suggesting that viable hybrids could be present in nature, despite their significant genetic distances. Considering the geographical position of occurrence of the T. b. macromelasoma (in Pernambuco) it was proposed to be an area capable of supporting natural hybridization between T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis. Since phenotypic variability is expected, this study investigated the existence of intermediate chromatic phenotypes for T. b. macromelasoma in various locations in areas between the T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis occurrences. Thirteen different color patterns were for the first time characterized and nine of those displayed intermediate phenotypes. Molecular analysis performed using ribosomal DNA intergenic region, grouped all within the T. brasiliensis complex. The intermediate chromatic phenotypes, molecular analysis and experimental crosses all support the distinction of a zone of hybridization that gave rise to the T. b. macromelasoma through homoploidal evolution. PMID:26520796

  4. Morphology and Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA Sequence of Henneguya Adiposa (Myxosporea) From Ictalurus punctatus (Siluriformes)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The original description of Henneguya adiposa, a myxozoan parasitizing channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, is supplemented with new data on spore morphology, including photomicrographs and line drawings, as well as 18S small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence. Elongate, translucent, linear...

  5. Ultra-barcoding in cacao (Theobroma spp.; malvaceae) using whole chloroplast genomes and nuclear ribosomal DNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput next-generation sequencing was used to scan the genome and generate reliable sequence of high copy number regions. Using this method, we examined whole plastid genomes as well as nearly 6000 bases of nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences for nine genotypes of Theobroma cacao and an indivi...

  6. Computational and Experimental Characterization of Ribosomal DNA and RNA G-Quadruplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Samuel

    DNA G-quadruplexes in human telomeres and gene promoters are being extensively studied for their role in controlling the growth of cancer cells. Recent studies strongly suggest that guanine (G)-rich genes encoding pre-ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) are a potential anticancer target through the inhibition of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) in ribosome biogenesis. However, the structures of ribosomal G-quadruplexes at atomic resolution are unknown, and very little biophysical characterization has been performed on them to date. Here, we have modeled two putative rDNA G-quadruplex structures, NUC 19P and NUC 23P, which we observe via circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to adopt a predominantly parallel topology, and their counterpart rRNA. To validate and refine the putative ribosomal G-quadruplex structures, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the CHARMM36 force field in the presence and absence of stabilizing K + or Na + ions. We optimized the CHARMM36 force field K + parameters to be more consistent with quantum mechanical calculations (and the polarizable Drude model force field) so that the K + ion is predominantly in the G-quadruplex channel. Our MD simulations show that the rDNA G-quadruplex have more well-defined, predominantly parallel-topology structures than rRNA and NUC 19P is more structured than NUC 23P, which features extended loops. Our study demonstrates that they are both potential targets for the design of novel chemotherapeutics.

  7. The ribosomal protein S26 regulates p53 activity in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cui, D; Li, L; Lou, H; Sun, H; Ngai, S-M; Shao, G; Tang, J

    2014-04-24

    Ribosomal proteins have emerged as novel regulators of the Mdm2-p53 feedback loop, especially in the context of ribosomal stress. RPS26 is a recently identified Diamond-Blackfan Anemia-related ribosomal protein and its role in p53 activation has not been previously explored. In this study we found knockdown of RPS26 induced p53 stabilization and activation via a RPL11-dependent mechanism, resulting in p53-dependent cell growth inhibition. Moreover, RPS26 has the ability to interact with Mdm2 and inhibits Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination that leads to p53 stabilization upon overexpression. Importantly, we discovered that RPS26 knockdown impaired p53's ability to transcriptionally activate its target genes in response to DNA damage, without affecting its stability. Accordingly, the cells lost the ability to induce G2/M cell cycle arrest. We further found that upon RPS26 knockdown, the DNA damage induced recruitment of p53 to the promoters of its target genes and p53 acetylation were both greatly reduced. In addition, RPS26 can interact with p53 independent of Mdm2 and coexist in a complex with p53 and p300. These data establish a role of RPS26 in DNA damage response by directly influencing p53 transcriptional activity, and suggest that RPS26 acts distinctively in different scenarios of p53 activation. Our finding also implicates p53 transcriptional activity control as an important mechanism of p53 regulation by ribosomal proteins. PMID:23728348

  8. PCR Primers for Metazoan Nuclear 18S and 28S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Metagenetic analyses, which amplify and sequence target marker DNA regions from environmental samples, are increasingly employed to assess the biodiversity of communities of small organisms. Using this approach, our understanding of microbial diversity has expanded greatly. In contrast, only a few studies using this approach to characterize metazoan diversity have been reported, despite the fact that many metazoan species are small and difficult to identify or are undescribed. One of the reasons for this discrepancy is the availability of universal primers for the target taxa. In microbial studies, analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA is standard. In contrast, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In the present study, we have designed primers that amplify the nuclear 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA sequences of most metazoan species with the goal of providing effective approaches for metagenetic analyses of metazoan diversity in environmental samples, with a particular emphasis on marine biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Conserved regions suitable for designing PCR primers were identified using 14,503 and 1,072 metazoan sequences of the nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA regions, respectively. The sequence similarity of both these newly designed and the previously reported primers to the target regions of these primers were compared for each phylum to determine the expected amplification efficacy. The nucleotide diversity of the flanking regions of the primers was also estimated for genera or higher taxonomic groups of 11 phyla to determine the variable regions within the genes. Conclusions/Significance The identified nuclear ribosomal DNA primers (five primer pairs for 18S and eleven for 28S) and the results of the nucleotide diversity analyses provide options for primer combinations for metazoan metagenetic analyses. Additionally, advantages and disadvantages of not only the 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA, but also other marker regions as targets

  9. Concerted copy number variation balances ribosomal DNA dosage in human and mouse genomes.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, John G; Branco, Alan T; Godinho, Susana A; Yu, Shoukai; Lemos, Bernardo

    2015-02-24

    Tandemly repeated ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are among the most evolutionary dynamic loci of eukaryotic genomes. The loci code for essential cellular components, yet exhibit extensive copy number (CN) variation within and between species. CN might be partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance between the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays. The arrays are nonhomologous, physically unlinked in mammals, and encode functionally interdependent RNA components of the ribosome. Here we show that the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays exhibit concerted CN variation (cCNV). Despite 5S and 45S rDNA elements residing on different chromosomes and lacking sequence similarity, cCNV between these loci is strong, evolutionarily conserved in humans and mice, and manifested across individual genotypes in natural populations and pedigrees. Finally, we observe that bisphenol A induces rapid and parallel modulation of 5S and 45S rDNA CN. Our observations reveal a novel mode of genome variation, indicate that natural selection contributed to the evolution and conservation of cCNV, and support the hypothesis that 5S CN is partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance with the 45S rDNA array. We suggest that human disease variation might be traced to disrupted rDNA dosage balance in the genome. PMID:25583482

  10. Karyotypic Variability in Ribosomal DNA Subchromosome Size among Colpodid Ciliates, a Possible Tool To Differentiate Colpodid Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, A.; Palacios, G.; Olmo, A.; Martin-Gonzalez, A.; Ruiz-Perez, L. M.; Gutierrez, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has been applied to analyze the karyotypic variability among colpodid ciliates. The 18S ribosomal gene was found at different locations in the electrophoretic pattern, and these size variations in the ribosomal DNA subchromosomal molecule seem to be species specific. This could potentially be a useful new tool with which to differentiate colpodid ciliates. PMID:16535582

  11. Dynamic changes in the distribution of a satellite homologous to intergenic 26-18S rDNA spacer in the evolution of Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, K Y; Skalicka, K; Koukalova, B; Volkov, R A; Matyasek, R; Hemleben, V; Leitch, A R; Kovarik, A

    2004-01-01

    An approximately 135-bp sequence called the A1/A2 repeat was isolated from the transcribed region of the 26-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) of Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and Southern blot analysis revealed its occurrence as an independent satellite (termed an A1/A2 satellite) outside of rDNA loci in species of Nicotiana section Tomentosae. The chromosomal location, patterns of genomic dispersion, and copy numbers of its tandemly arranged units varied between the species. In more distantly related Nicotiana species the A1/A2 repeats were found only at the nucleolar organizer regions (NOR). There was a trend toward the elimination of the A1/A2 satellite in N. tabacum (tobacco), an allotetraploid with parents closely related to the diploids N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. This process may have already commenced in an S(3) generation of synthetic tobacco. Cytosine residues in the IGS were significantly hypomethylated compared with the A1/A2 satellite. There was no clear separation between the IGS and satellite fractions in sequence analysis of individual clones and we found no evidence for CG suppression. Taken together the data indicate a dynamic nature of the A1/A2 repeats in Nicotiana genomes, with evidence for recurrent integration, copy number expansions, and contractions. PMID:15126410

  12. Telomerase stimulates ribosomal DNA transcription under hyperproliferative conditions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Omar Garcia; Assfalg, Robin; Koch, Sylvia; Schelling, Adrian; Meena, Jitendra K; Kraus, Johann; Lechel, Andre; Katz, Sarah-Fee; Benes, Vladimir; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Kestler, Hans A; Günes, Cagatay; Iben, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    In addition to performing its canonical function, Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) has been shown to participate in cellular processes independent of telomerase activity. Furthermore, although TERT mainly localizes to Cajal bodies, it is also present within the nucleolus. Because the nucleolus is the site of rDNA transcription, we investigated the possible role of telomerase in regulating RNA polymerase I (Pol I). Here we show that TERT binds to rDNA and stimulates transcription by Pol I during liver regeneration and Ras-induced hyperproliferation. Moreover, the inhibition of telomerase activity by TERT- or TERC-specific RNA interference, the overexpression of dominant-negative-TERT, and the application of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat reduce Pol I transcription and the growth of tumour cells. In vitro, telomerase can stimulate the formation of the transcription initiation complex. Our results demonstrate how non-canonical features of telomerase may direct Pol I transcription in oncogenic and regenerative hyperproliferation. PMID:25118183

  13. COII/tRNA[sup Lys] intergenic 9-bp deletion and other mtDNA markers clearly reveal that the Tharus (Southern Nepal) have oriental affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Passarino, G.; Semino, O.; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A.S.; Modiano, G. )

    1993-09-01

    The authors searched for the East Asian mtDNA 9-bp deletion in the intergenic COII/tRNA[sup Lys] region in a sample of 107 Tharus (50 from central Terai and 57 from eastern Terai), a population whose anthropological origin has yet to be completely clarified. The deletion, detected by electrophoresis of the PCR-amplified nt 7392-8628 mtDNA fragment after digestion with HaeIII, was found in about 8% of both Tharu groups but was found in none of the 76 Hindus who were examined as a non-Oriental neighboring control population. A complete triplication of the 9-bp unit, the second case so far reported, was also observed in one eastern Tharu. All the mtDNAs with the deletion, and that with the triplication, were further characterized (by PCR amplification of the relevant mTDNA fragments and their digestion with the appropriate enzymes) to locate them in the Ballinger et al. phylogeny of East Asian mtDNA haplotypes. The deletion was found to be associated with four different haplotypes, two of which are reported for the first time. One of the deletions and especially the triplication could be best explained by the assumption of novel length-change events. Ballinger's classification of East Asian mtDNA haplotypes is mainly based on the phenotypes for the DdeI site at nt 10394 and the AluI site at nt 10397. Analysis of the entire Tharu sample revealed that more than 70% of the Tharus have both sites, the association of which has been suggested as an ancient East Asian peculiarity. These results conclusively indicate that the Tharus have a predominantly maternal Oriental ancestry. Moreover, they show at least one and perhaps two further distinct length mutations, and this suggests that the examined region is a hot spot of rearrangements. 21 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A; Gwerder, Myriam; Gutsche, Katrin; Altmeyer, Matthias; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Toledo, Luis I; Fink, Daniel; Rask, Maj-Britt; Grøfte, Merete; Lukas, Claudia; Nielsen, Michael L; Smerdon, Stephen J; Lukas, Jiri; Stucki, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in-trans signaling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient recruitment of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein 1 (NBS1), a central regulator of DNA damage responses, into the nucleoli. We further identified TCOF1-Treacle, a nucleolar factor implicated in ribosome biogenesis and mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome, as an interaction partner of NBS1, and demonstrate that NBS1 translocation and accumulation in the nucleoli is Treacle-dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that Treacle-mediated NBS1 recruitment into the nucleoli regulates rRNA silencing in-trans in the presence of distant chromosome breaks. PMID:25064736

  15. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Conrad L; Seifert, Keith A; Huhndorf, Sabine; Robert, Vincent; Spouge, John L; Levesque, C André; Chen, Wen

    2012-04-17

    Six DNA regions were evaluated as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life, by a multinational, multilaboratory consortium. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it is difficult to amplify in fungi, often includes large introns, and can be insufficiently variable. Three subunits from the nuclear ribosomal RNA cistron were compared together with regions of three representative protein-coding genes (largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, and minichromosome maintenance protein). Although the protein-coding gene regions often had a higher percent of correct identification compared with ribosomal markers, low PCR amplification and sequencing success eliminated them as candidates for a universal fungal barcode. Among the regions of the ribosomal cistron, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has the highest probability of successful identification for the broadest range of fungi, with the most clearly defined barcode gap between inter- and intraspecific variation. The nuclear ribosomal large subunit, a popular phylogenetic marker in certain groups, had superior species resolution in some taxonomic groups, such as the early diverging lineages and the ascomycete yeasts, but was otherwise slightly inferior to the ITS. The nuclear ribosomal small subunit has poor species-level resolution in fungi. ITS will be formally proposed for adoption as the primary fungal barcode marker to the Consortium for the Barcode of Life, with the possibility that supplementary barcodes may be developed for particular narrowly circumscribed taxonomic groups. PMID:22454494

  16. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Conrad L.; Seifert, Keith A.; Huhndorf, Sabine; Robert, Vincent; Spouge, John L.; Levesque, C. André; Chen, Wen; Bolchacova, Elena; Voigt, Kerstin; Crous, Pedro W.; Miller, Andrew N.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Aime, M. Catherine; An, Kwang-Deuk; Bai, Feng-Yan; Barreto, Robert W.; Begerow, Dominik; Bergeron, Marie-Josée; Blackwell, Meredith; Boekhout, Teun; Bogale, Mesfin; Boonyuen, Nattawut; Burgaz, Ana R.; Buyck, Bart; Cai, Lei; Cai, Qing; Cardinali, G.; Chaverri, Priscila; Coppins, Brian J.; Crespo, Ana; Cubas, Paloma; Cummings, Craig; Damm, Ulrike; de Beer, Z. Wilhelm; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Del-Prado, Ruth; Dentinger, Bryn; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier; Divakar, Pradeep K.; Douglas, Brian; Dueñas, Margarita; Duong, Tuan A.; Eberhardt, Ursula; Edwards, Joan E.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Fliegerova, Katerina; Furtado, Manohar; García, Miguel A.; Ge, Zai-Wei; Griffith, Gareth W.; Griffiths, K.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Groenewald, Marizeth; Grube, Martin; Gryzenhout, Marieka; Guo, Liang-Dong; Hagen, Ferry; Hambleton, Sarah; Hamelin, Richard C.; Hansen, Karen; Harrold, Paul; Heller, Gregory; Herrera, Cesar; Hirayama, Kazuyuki; Hirooka, Yuuri; Ho, Hsiao-Man; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Hofstetter, Valérie; Högnabba, Filip; Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Hong, Seung-Beom; Hosaka, Kentaro; Houbraken, Jos; Hughes, Karen; Huhtinen, Seppo; Hyde, Kevin D.; James, Timothy; Johnson, Eric M.; Johnson, Joan E.; Johnston, Peter R.; Jones, E.B. Gareth; Kelly, Laura J.; Kirk, Paul M.; Knapp, Dániel G.; Kõljalg, Urmas; Kovács, Gábor M.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Landvik, Sara; Leavitt, Steven D.; Liggenstoffer, Audra S.; Liimatainen, Kare; Lombard, Lorenzo; Luangsa-ard, J. Jennifer; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Maganti, Harinad; Maharachchikumbura, Sajeewa S. N.; Martin, María P.; May, Tom W.; McTaggart, Alistair R.; Methven, Andrew S.; Meyer, Wieland; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc; Mongkolsamrit, Suchada; Nagy, László G.; Nilsson, R. Henrik; Niskanen, Tuula; Nyilasi, Ildikó; Okada, Gen; Okane, Izumi; Olariaga, Ibai; Otte, Jürgen; Papp, Tamás; Park, Duckchul; Petkovits, Tamás; Pino-Bodas, Raquel; Quaedvlieg, William; Raja, Huzefa A.; Redecker, Dirk; Rintoul, Tara L.; Ruibal, Constantino; Sarmiento-Ramírez, Jullie M.; Schmitt, Imke; Schüßler, Arthur; Shearer, Carol; Sotome, Kozue; Stefani, Franck O.P.; Stenroos, Soili; Stielow, Benjamin; Stockinger, Herbert; Suetrong, Satinee; Suh, Sung-Oui; Sung, Gi-Ho; Suzuki, Motofumi; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Tedersoo, Leho; Telleria, M. Teresa; Tretter, Eric; Untereiner, Wendy A.; Urbina, Hector; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Vialle, Agathe; Vu, Thuy Duong; Walther, Grit; Wang, Qi-Ming; Wang, Yan; Weir, Bevan S.; Weiß, Michael; White, Merlin M.; Xu, Jianping; Yahr, Rebecca; Yang, Zhu L.; Yurkov, Andrey; Zamora, Juan-Carlos; Zhang, Ning; Zhuang, Wen-Ying; Schindel, David

    2012-01-01

    Six DNA regions were evaluated as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life, by a multinational, multilaboratory consortium. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it is difficult to amplify in fungi, often includes large introns, and can be insufficiently variable. Three subunits from the nuclear ribosomal RNA cistron were compared together with regions of three representative protein-coding genes (largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, and minichromosome maintenance protein). Although the protein-coding gene regions often had a higher percent of correct identification compared with ribosomal markers, low PCR amplification and sequencing success eliminated them as candidates for a universal fungal barcode. Among the regions of the ribosomal cistron, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has the highest probability of successful identification for the broadest range of fungi, with the most clearly defined barcode gap between inter- and intraspecific variation. The nuclear ribosomal large subunit, a popular phylogenetic marker in certain groups, had superior species resolution in some taxonomic groups, such as the early diverging lineages and the ascomycete yeasts, but was otherwise slightly inferior to the ITS. The nuclear ribosomal small subunit has poor species-level resolution in fungi. ITS will be formally proposed for adoption as the primary fungal barcode marker to the Consortium for the Barcode of Life, with the possibility that supplementary barcodes may be developed for particular narrowly circumscribed taxonomic groups. PMID:22454494

  17. Complete nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence amplification and molecular analyses of Bangia (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiajie; Jiang, Bo; Chai, Sanming; He, Yuan; Zhu, Jianyi; Shen, Zonggen; Shen, Songdong

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous Bangia, which are distributed extensively throughout the world, have simple and similar morphological characteristics. Scientists can classify these organisms using molecular markers in combination with morphology. We successfully sequenced the complete nuclear ribosomal DNA, approximately 13 kb in length, from a marine Bangia population. We further analyzed the small subunit ribosomal DNA gene (nrSSU) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence regions along with nine other marine, and two freshwater Bangia samples from China. Pairwise distances of the nrSSU and 5.8S ribosomal DNA gene sequences show the marine samples grouping together with low divergences (00.003; 0-0.006, respectively) from each other, but high divergences (0.123-0.126; 0.198, respectively) from freshwater samples. An exception is the marine sample collected from Weihai, which shows high divergence from both other marine samples (0.063-0.065; 0.129, respectively) and the freshwater samples (0.097; 0.120, respectively). A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree based on a combined SSU-ITS dataset with maximum likelihood method shows the samples divided into three clades, with the two marine sample clades containing Bangia spp. from North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia; and one freshwater clade, containing Bangia atropurpurea from North America and China.

  18. Complete nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence amplification and molecular analyses of Bangia (Bangiales, Rhodophyta) from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiajie; Jiang, Bo; Chai, Sanming; He, Yuan; Zhu, Jianyi; Shen, Zonggen; Shen, Songdong

    2016-09-01

    Filamentous Bangia, which are distributed extensively throughout the world, have simple and similar morphological characteristics. Scientists can classify these organisms using molecular markers in combination with morphology. We successfully sequenced the complete nuclear ribosomal DNA, approximately 13 kb in length, from a marine Bangia population. We further analyzed the small subunit ribosomal DNA gene (nrSSU) and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence regions along with nine other marine, and two freshwater Bangia samples from China. Pairwise distances of the nrSSU and 5.8S ribosomal DNA gene sequences show the marine samples grouping together with low divergences (00.003; 0-0.006, respectively) from each other, but high divergences (0.123-0.126; 0.198, respectively) from freshwater samples. An exception is the marine sample collected from Weihai, which shows high divergence from both other marine samples (0.063-0.065; 0.129, respectively) and the freshwater samples (0.097; 0.120, respectively). A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree based on a combined SSU-ITS dataset with maximum likelihood method shows the samples divided into three clades, with the two marine sample clades containing Bangia spp. from North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia; and one freshwater clade, containing Bangia atropurpurea from North America and China.

  19. Phylogenetic Information Content of Copepoda Ribosomal DNA Repeat Units: ITS1 and ITS2 Impact

    PubMed Central

    Zagoskin, Maxim V.; Lazareva, Valentina I.; Grishanin, Andrey K.; Mukha, Dmitry V.

    2014-01-01

    The utility of various regions of the ribosomal repeat unit for phylogenetic analysis was examined in 16 species representing four families, nine genera, and two orders of the subclass Copepoda (Crustacea). Fragments approximately 2000 bp in length containing the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) 18S and 28S gene fragments, the 5.8S gene, and the internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS1 and ITS2) were amplified and analyzed. The DAMBE (Data Analysis in Molecular Biology and Evolution) software was used to analyze the saturation of nucleotide substitutions; this test revealed the suitability of both the 28S gene fragment and the ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions for the reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. Distance (minimum evolution) and probabilistic (maximum likelihood, Bayesian) analyses of the data revealed that the 28S rDNA and the ITS1 and ITS2 regions are informative markers for inferring phylogenetic relationships among families of copepods and within the Cyclopidae family and associated genera. Split-graph analysis of concatenated ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions of cyclopoid copepods suggested that the Mesocyclops, Thermocyclops, and Macrocyclops genera share complex evolutionary relationships. This study revealed that the ITS1 and ITS2 regions potentially represent different phylogenetic signals. PMID:25215300

  20. Mapping of replication initiation sites in human ribosomal DNA by nascent-strand abundance analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Y; Sanchez, J A; Brun, C; Huberman, J A

    1995-01-01

    New techniques for mapping mammalian DNA replication origins are needed. We have modified the existing nascent-strand size analysis technique (L. Vassilev and E.M. Johnson, Nucleic Acids Res. 17:7693-7705, 1989) to provide an independent means of studying replication initiation sites. We call the new method nascent-strand abundance analysis. We confirmed the validity of this method with replicating simian virus 40 DNA as a model. We then applied nascent-strand abundance and nascent-strand size analyses to mapping of initiation sites in human (HeLa) ribosomal DNA (rDNA), a region previously examined exclusively by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis methods (R.D. Little, T.H.K. Platt, and C.L. Schildkraut, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:6600-6613, 1993). Our results partly confirm those obtained by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis techniques. Both studies suggest that replication initiates at relatively high frequency a few kilobase pairs upstream of the transcribed region and that many additional low-frequency initiation sites are distributed through most of the remainder of the ribosomal DNA repeat unit. PMID:7739533

  1. Sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer DNA of the crayfish parasite Psorospermium haeckeli.

    PubMed

    Bangyeekhun, E; Ryynänen, H J; Henttonen, P; Huner, J V; Cerenius, L; Söderhäll, K

    2001-10-01

    Two morphotypes of the crayfish parasite Psorospermium haeckeli were isolated from 2 crayfish species of different geographical origin. The oval-shaped sporocysts were obtained from the epidermal and connective tissue beneath the carapace of the noble crayfish Astacus astacus from Sweden and Finland. Elongated spores were isolated from the abdominal muscle tissue of the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii from USA. To compare genetic divergence of 2 morphotypes of the parasite, the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) DNA (ITS 1 and ITS 2) and the 5.8S rRNA gene were cloned and sequenced. The analysed region is variable in length, with the ribosomal ITS sequence of the European morphotype longer than the North American one. Sequence diversity is found mainly in ITS 1 and ITS 2 regions, and there is 66% and 58% similarity between the 2 morphotypes, respectively. Thus, analysis of the ribosomal ITS DNA suggests that P. haeckeli forms obtained from Europe and North America are genetically diverse, which supports the previously reported morphological characteristics. PMID:11710556

  2. [Distribution of a deletion-insertion polymorphism in intergenic region V of mitochondrial DNA among the aboriginal population of Tuva].

    PubMed

    Golubenko, M V; Puzyrev, V P; Saliukov, V B; Kucher, A N; Sanchat, N O

    2000-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA region V deletion-insertion polymorphism was examined in three Tuvinian populations inhabiting western, northeastern, and southeastern parts of the republic. The 9-bp deletion was characterized by nonrandom distribution across the Tuva territory: its frequency in the western population (13.37%) was statistically significantly higher than that in the northeastern (4.62%), and southeastern populations, as well as in Mongols, who are territorially and ethnically close to Tuvinians. The insertion mutation in the region V was detected with a frequency of about 3% in two out of the three populations tested. PMID:10779913

  3. Ribosomal DNA and Stellate gene copy number variation on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1989-01-01

    Multigene families on the Y chromosome face an unusual array of evolutionary forces. Both ribosomal DNA and Stellate, the two families examined here, have multiple copies of similar sequences on the X and Y chromosomes. Although the rate of sequence divergence on the Y chromosome depends on rates of mutation, gene conversion and exchange with the X chromosome, as well as purifying selection, the regulation of gene copy number may also depend on other pleiotropic functions, such as maintenance of chromosome pairing. Gene copy numbers were estimated for a series of 34 Y chromosome replacement lines using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster. Scans of autoradiographs of the same blots probed with the cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene, a single copy gene, served as internal standards. Copy numbers span a 6-fold range for ribosomal DNA and a 3-fold range for Stellate DNA. Despite this magnitude of variation, there was no association between copy number and segregation variation of the sex chromosomes. Images PMID:2494656

  4. Characterization of unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi by using ribosomal DNA fingerprinting, DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Grattard, F; Etienne, J; Pozzetto, B; Tardy, F; Gaudin, O G; Fleurette, J

    1993-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of 31 unrelated strains of Staphylococcus schleiferi isolated from 13 hospitals between 1973 and 1991 were determined by ribosomal DNA fingerprinting by using a digoxigenin-labeled DNA probe, genomic DNA restriction patterns, and plasmid profiles. Only six strains harbored one or two plasmids. DNA restriction analysis, which was carried out with five endonucleases (EcoRI, HindIII, PstI, PvuII, and ClaI), did not allow us to discriminate between isolates. Ribotyping with HindIII, ClaI, or EcoRI enzymes generated six, seven, and nine distinct patterns, respectively. With the combination ClaI-EcoRI, 13 ribotypes were obtained among the 31 strains, suggesting a relative heterogeneity within the species. Moreover, all strains shared two or three common bands, according to the endonuclease used, which were relatively specific for S. schleiferi in comparison with the ribosomal banding patterns described for other coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results illustrate that ribotyping can be used for the epidemiological investigation of S. schleiferi isolates and possibly for taxonomic analysis in this species. Images PMID:8385149

  5. Ribosomal DNA haplotype distribution of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus in Kyushu and Okinawa islands, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nose, Mine; Shiraishi, Susumu; Miyahara, Fumihiko; Ohira, Mineko; Matsunaga, Koji; Tobase, Masashi; Koyama, Takao; Yoshimoto, Kikuo

    2009-09-01

    Ribosomal DNA region sequences (partial 18S, 28S and complete ITS1, 5.8S, and ITS2) of the pinewood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) were obtained from DNA extracted directly from wood pieces collected from wilted pine trees throughout the Kyushu and Okinawa islands, Japan. Either a 2569bp or 2573bp sequence was obtained from 88 of 143 samples. Together with the 45 rDNA sequences of pinewood nematode isolates previously reported, there were eight single nucleotide polymorphisms and two indels of two bases. Based on these mutations, nine haplotypes were estimated. The haplotype frequencies differed among regions in Kyushu island (northwest, northeast and center, southeast, and southwest), and the distribution was consistent with the invasion and spreading routes of the pinewood nematode previously estimated from past records of pine wilt and wood importation. There was no significant difference in haplotype frequencies among the collection sites on Okinawa island. PMID:22736814

  6. Specific primers for PCR amplification of the ITS1 (ribosomal DNA) of Trypanosoma lewisi.

    PubMed

    Desquesnes, Marc; Marc, Desquesnes; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Ketsarin, Kamyingkird; Yangtara, Sarawut; Sarawut, Yangtara; Milocco, Cristina; Cristina, Milocco; Ravel, Sophie; Sophie, Ravel; Wang, Ming-Hui; Ming-Hui, Wang; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Zhao-Rong, Lun; Morand, Serge; Serge, Morand; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Sathaporn, Jittapalapong

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma lewisi is a mild or non-pathogenic parasite of the sub-genus Herpetosoma transmitted by fleas to rats. In a previous study we described pan-trypanosome specific primers TRYP1 which amplify the ITS1 of ribosomal DNA by hybridizing in highly conserved regions of 18S and 5.8S genes. These primers proved to be useful for detecting T. lewisi DNA in laboratory rats, but a recent large scale survey in wild rodents demonstrated a lack of specificity. In the present study, we designed and evaluated mono-specific primers LEW1S and LEW1R, for the detection and identification of T. lewisi by a single-step PCR. These primers were designed inside the highly variable region of the ITS1 sequence of T. lewisi ribosomal DNA. The product size of 220 bp is specific to T. lewisi. The sensitivity limit was estimated between 0.055 and 0.55 pg of DNA per reaction, equivalent to 1-10 organisms per reaction. All the PCR products obtained from 6 different T. lewisi isolates were more than 98% similar with each other and similar to the sequences of T. lewisi already published in Genbank. All DNA of 7 T. lewisi stocks from China gave the specific 220 bp product. We showed that LEW1S and LEW1R primers enabled sensitive detection and identification of T. lewisi infection in laboratory and wild rats. This assay is recommended for monitoring T. lewisi infections in rat colonies or for studying infections in the wild fauna. An absence of cross reaction with human DNA means that these primers can be used to investigate atypical trypanosome infections in humans. Given the risk of T. lewisi infection in human, we believe that these primers will be beneficial for public health diagnosis and rodents investigation programmes. PMID:21570489

  7. Ribosomal DNA ITS-1 and ITS-2 sequence comparisons as a tool for predicting genetic relatedness.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A W; Mai, J C

    1997-08-01

    The determination of the secondary structure of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions separating nuclear ribosomal RNA genes of Chlorophytes has improved the fidelity of alignment of nuclear ribosomal ITS sequences from related organisms. Application of this information to sequences from green algae and plants suggested that a subset of the ITS-2 positions is relatively conserved. Organisms that can mate are identical at all of these 116 positions, or differ by at most, one nucleotide change. Here we sequenced and compared the ITS-1 and ITS-2 of 40 green flagellates in search of the nearest relative to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The analysis clearly revealed one unique candidate, C. incerta. Several ancillary benefits of the analysis included the identification of mislabelled cultures, the resolution of confusion concerning C. smithii, the discovery of misidentified sequences in GenBank derived from a green algal contaminant, and an overview of evolutionary relationships among the Volvocales, which is congruent with that derived from rDNA gene sequence comparisons but improves upon its resolution. The study further delineates the taxonomic level at which ITS sequences, in comparison to ribosomal gene sequences, are most useful in systematic and other studies. PMID:9236277

  8. IntergenicDB: a database for intergenic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Notari, Daniel Luis; Molin, Aurione; Davanzo, Vanessa; Picolotto, Douglas; Ribeiro, Helena Graziottin; Silva, Scheila de Avila e

    2014-01-01

    A whole genome contains not only coding regions, but also non-coding regions. These are located between the end of a given coding region and the beginning of the following coding region. For this reason, the information about gene regulation process underlies in intergenic regions. There is no easy way to obtain intergenic regions from current available databases. IntergenicDB was developed to integrate data of intergenic regions and their gene related information from NCBI databases. The main goal of INTERGENICDB is to offer friendly database for intergenic sequences of bacterial genomes. Availability http://intergenicdb.bioinfoucs.com/ PMID:25097383

  9. Detection of sequence variation in parasite ribosomal DNA by electrophoresis in agarose gels supplemented with a DNA-intercalating agent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X Q; Chilton, N B; Gasser, R B

    1998-05-01

    This study evaluated the use of a commercially available DNA intercalating agent (Resolver Gold) in agarose gels for the direct detection of sequence variation in ribosomal DNA (rDNA). This agent binds preferentially to AT sequence motifs in DNA. Regions of nuclear rDNA, known to provide genetic markers for the identification of species of parasitic ascarid nematodes (order Ascaridida), were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to electrophoresis in standard agarose gels versus gels supplemented with Resolver Gold. Individual taxa examined could not be distinguished reliably based on the size of their amplicons in standard agarose gels, whereas they could be readily delineated based on mobility using Resolver Gold-supplemented gels. The latter was achieved because of differences (approximately 0.1-8.2%) in the AT content of the fragments among different taxa, which were associated with significant interspecific differences (approximately 11-39%) in the rDNA sequences employed. There was a tendency for fragments with higher AT content to migrate slower in supplemented agarose gels compared with those of lower AT content. The results indicate the usefulness of this electrophoretic approach to rapidly screen for sequence variability within or among PCR-amplified rDNA fragments of similar sizes but differing AT contents. Although evaluated on rDNA of parasites, the approach has potential to be applied to a range of genes of different groups of infectious organisms. PMID:9629896

  10. Tandem Repeats in Extrachromosomal Ribosomal DNA of Dictyostelium Discoideum, Resulting from Chromosomal Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cole, R. A.; Williams, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA in the simple eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum is readily separated from chromosomal DNA by orthogonal field electrophoresis (OFAGE), forming a prominent band in the 110-kb region of the gel. Here we show that mutations in at least two chromosomal genes give rise to a ladder of rDNA bands increasing in size up to about 300 kb. One of these mutations, the rrcA350 allele, which is recessive to wild type and maps to the centromere-proximal region of linkage group II, has an unstable phenotype; spontaneous revertants, which no longer exhibit the rDNA ladder, have been recovered. Another mutation rrc-351, provisionally mapped to linkage group IV, is dominant to wild type. The rDNA ladder is caused by concatamerization of a 34-kb fragment in the nontranscribed central spacer region of the 88-kb linear rDNA palindrome. Restriction enzyme analysis has revealed that each concatamer is generated by crossovers between two rDNA molecules. PMID:1582557

  11. Molecular phylogeny of Asian Meconopsis based on nuclear ribosomal and chloroplast DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Ya-Nan; Yang, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2014-01-01

    The taxonomy and phylogeny of Asian Meconopsis (Himalayan blue poppy) remain largely unresolved. We used the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) and the chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) trnL-F region for phylogenetic reconstruction of Meconopsis and its close relatives Papaver, Roemeria, and Stylomecon. We identified five main clades, which were well-supported in the gene trees reconstructed with the nrDNA ITS and cpDNA trnL-F sequences. We found that 41 species of Asian Meconopsis did not constitute a monophyletic clade, but formed two solid clades (I and V) separated in the phylogenetic tree by three clades (II, III and IV) of Papaver and its allies. Clade V includes only four Asian Meconopsis species, with the remaining 90 percent of Asian species included in clade I. In this core Asian Meconopsis clade, five subclades (Ia-Ie) were recognized in the nrDNA ITS tree. Three species (Meconopsis discigera, M. pinnatifolia, and M. torquata) of subgenus Discogyne were imbedded in subclade Ia, indicating that the present definition of subgenera in Meconopsis should be rejected. These subclades are inconsistent with any series or sections of the present classifications, suggesting that classifications of the genus should be completely revised. Finally, proposals for further revision of the genus Meconopsis were put forward based on molecular, morphological, and biogeographical evidences. PMID:25118100

  12. Unexpected Diagnosis of Cerebral Toxoplasmosis by 16S and D2 Large-Subunit Ribosomal DNA PCR and Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kvich, Lasse; Eickhardt, Steffen; Omland, Lars H.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes severe opportunistic infections. Here, we report an unexpected diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis. T. gondii was diagnosed by 16S and D2 large-subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing of a cerebral biopsy specimen and confirmed by T. gondii-specific PCR and immunohistochemistry. The patient was later diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. PMID:25854484

  13. Development of molecular markers, based on chloroplast and ribosomal DNA regions, to discriminate three popular medicinal plant species, Cynanchum wilfordii, Cynanchum auriculatum, and Polygonum multiflorum.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun-Heui; Cho, KyeMan; Goo, YoungMin; Kim, ManBae; Shin, Young-Wook; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Identification of plant species is important for standardizing herbal medicine. Cynanchum wilfordii (Baekshuoh in Korean) and Polygonum multiflorum (Hashuoh in Korean) are important oriental medicinal herbs in Korea, Japan, and China. Cynanchum auriculatum is a faster growing and more productive plant than C. wilfordii; and, it is not recognized as a medicinal plant in the Korean Pharmacopoeia. C. wilfordii, P. multiflorum, and C. auriculatum are often misidentified in the Korean herbal medicine marketplace due to their morphological similarities and similar names. In this study, we investigated molecular authentication of these three medicinal plants using DNA sequences in the TrnL-F chloroplast intergenic region. Specific species identification was achieved by detecting allelic variations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) and high resolution melting curve analysis. Our results demonstrate that the intraspecific genetic distance between C. wilfordii and C. auriculatum is relatively low. We also developed a quantitative PCR assay using species-specific TrnL-F primers, which allowed us to estimate the ratio of C. wilfordii and C. auriculatum using varying ratios of mixed genomic DNA template from the two species. Additionally, to identify species in hybrid plants produced by cross-fertilization, we analyzed nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer regions in C. wilfordii and C. auriculatum by ARMS-PCR. Our results indicate that SNP-based molecular markers, usable to barcode tools could provide efficient and rapid authentication of these closely related medicinal plant species, and will be useful for preventing the distribution of products contaminated with adulterants. PMID:26902862

  14. Diversity and Recombination of Dispersed Ribosomal DNA and Protein Coding Genes in Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  15. An unusual case of Streptococcus anginosus group pyomyositis diagnosed using direct 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Walkty, Andrew; Embil, John M; Nichol, Kim; Karlowsky, James

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Streptococcus anginosus group (Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus anginosus) are capable of causing serious pyogenic infections, with a tendency for abscess formation. The present article reports a case of S anginosus group pyomyositis in a 47-year-old man. The pathogen was recovered from one of two blood cultures obtained from the patient, but speciation was initially not performed because the organism was considered to be a contaminant (viridans streptococci group). The diagnosis was ultimately confirmed using 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing of purulent fluid obtained from a muscle abscess aspirate. The present case serves to emphasize that finding even a single positive blood culture of an organism belonging to the S anginosus group should prompt careful evaluation of the patient for a pyogenic focus of infection. It also highlights the potential utility of 16S ribosomal DNA amplification and sequencing in direct pathogen detection from aspirated fluid in cases of pyomyositis in which antimicrobial therapy was initiated before specimen collection. PMID:24634686

  16. Strongylus asini (Nematoda, Strongyloidea): genetic relationships with other Strongylus species determined by ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Hung, G C; Jacobs, D E; Krecek, R C; Gasser, R B; Chilton, N B

    1996-12-01

    Genomic DNA was isolated from adult Strongylus asini collected from zebra. The second ribosomal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) was amplified and sequenced using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based techniques. The DNA sequence was compared with previously published data for 3 related Strongylus species. A PCR-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism method allowed the 4 species to be differentiated unequivocally. The ITS-2 sequence of S. asini was found to be more similar to those of S. edentatus (87.1%) and S. equinus (95.3%) than to that of S vulgaris (73.9%). This result confirms that S. Asini and S vulgaris represent separate species and supports the retention of the 4 species within 1 genus. PMID:9024894

  17. Wnt5a Signals through DVL1 to Repress Ribosomal DNA Transcription by RNA Polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Dass, Randall A; Sarshad, Aishe A; Carson, Brittany B; Feenstra, Jennifer M; Kaur, Amanpreet; Obrdlik, Ales; Parks, Matthew M; Prakash, Varsha; Love, Damon K; Pietras, Kristian; Serra, Rosa; Blanchard, Scott C; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Brown, Anthony M C; Vincent, C Theresa

    2016-08-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is essential for cell growth and proliferation and is commonly elevated in cancer. Accordingly, numerous oncogene and tumor suppressor signaling pathways target rRNA synthesis. In breast cancer, non-canonical Wnt signaling by Wnt5a has been reported to antagonize tumor growth. Here, we show that Wnt5a rapidly represses rDNA gene transcription in breast cancer cells and generates a chromatin state with reduced transcription of rDNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). These effects were specifically dependent on Dishevelled1 (DVL1), which accumulates in nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and binds to rDNA regions of the chromosome. Upon DVL1 binding, the Pol I transcription activator and deacetylase Sirtuin 7 (SIRT7) releases from rDNA loci, concomitant with disassembly of Pol I transcription machinery at the rDNA promoter. These findings reveal that Wnt5a signals through DVL1 to suppress rRNA transcription. This provides a novel mechanism for how Wnt5a exerts tumor suppressive effects and why disruption of Wnt5a signaling enhances mammary tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27500936

  18. Wnt5a Signals through DVL1 to Repress Ribosomal DNA Transcription by RNA Polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Dass, Randall A.; Sarshad, Aishe A.; Feenstra, Jennifer M.; Kaur, Amanpreet; Pietras, Kristian; Serra, Rosa; Blanchard, Scott C.; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Brown, Anthony M. C.; Vincent, C. Theresa

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is essential for cell growth and proliferation and is commonly elevated in cancer. Accordingly, numerous oncogene and tumor suppressor signaling pathways target rRNA synthesis. In breast cancer, non-canonical Wnt signaling by Wnt5a has been reported to antagonize tumor growth. Here, we show that Wnt5a rapidly represses rDNA gene transcription in breast cancer cells and generates a chromatin state with reduced transcription of rDNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). These effects were specifically dependent on Dishevelled1 (DVL1), which accumulates in nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and binds to rDNA regions of the chromosome. Upon DVL1 binding, the Pol I transcription activator and deacetylase Sirtuin 7 (SIRT7) releases from rDNA loci, concomitant with disassembly of Pol I transcription machinery at the rDNA promoter. These findings reveal that Wnt5a signals through DVL1 to suppress rRNA transcription. This provides a novel mechanism for how Wnt5a exerts tumor suppressive effects and why disruption of Wnt5a signaling enhances mammary tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27500936

  19. Genetic Differentiation and Hybridization Among Festuca Idahoensis, F. Roemeri, and F. Ovina Detected From AFLP, ITS, and Chloroplast DNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    North American forms of the F. ovina complex, Festuca idahoensis and F. roemert are distributed broadly east and narrowly west of the Cascade Mountains, respectively. The psbA-trnH and rps16-trnK chloroplast DNA intergenic sequences, 18S-5.8S-26S nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (I...

  20. Dynamic distribution patterns of ribosomal DNA and chromosomal evolution in Paphiopedilum, a lady's slipper orchid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paphiopedilum is a horticulturally and ecologically important genus of ca. 80 species of lady's slipper orchids native to Southeast Asia. These plants have long been of interest regarding their chromosomal evolution, which involves a progressive aneuploid series based on either fission or fusion of centromeres. Chromosome number is positively correlated with genome size, so rearrangement processes must include either insertion or deletion of DNA segments. We have conducted Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) studies using 5S and 25S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probes to survey for rearrangements, duplications, and phylogenetically-correlated variation within Paphiopedilum. We further studied sequence variation of the non-transcribed spacers of 5S rDNA (5S-NTS) to examine their complex duplication history, including the possibility that concerted evolutionary forces may homogenize diversity. Results 5S and 25S rDNA loci among Paphiopedilum species, representing all key phylogenetic lineages, exhibit a considerable diversity that correlates well with recognized evolutionary groups. 25S rDNA signals range from 2 (representing 1 locus) to 9, the latter representing hemizygosity. 5S loci display extensive structural variation, and show from 2 specific signals to many, both major and minor and highly dispersed. The dispersed signals mainly occur at centromeric and subtelomeric positions, which are hotspots for chromosomal breakpoints. Phylogenetic analysis of cloned 5S rDNA non-transcribed spacer (5S-NTS) sequences showed evidence for both ancient and recent post-speciation duplication events, as well as interlocus and intralocus diversity. Conclusions Paphiopedilum species display many chromosomal rearrangements - for example, duplications, translocations, and inversions - but only weak concerted evolutionary forces among highly duplicated 5S arrays, which suggests that double-strand break repair processes are dynamic and ongoing. These results make the genus

  1. Molecular phylogeny of the Blastocladiomycota (Fungi) based on nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Porter, Teresita M; Martin, Wallace; James, Timothy Y; Longcore, Joyce E; Gleason, Frank H; Adler, Peter H; Letcher, Peter M; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2011-01-01

    The Blastocladiomycota is a recently described phylum of ecologically diverse zoosporic fungi whose species have not been thoroughly sampled and placed within a molecular phylogeny. In this study, we investigated the phylogeny of the Blastocladiomycota based on ribosomal DNA sequences from strains identified by traditional morphological and ultrastructural characters. Our results support the monophyly of the Coelomomycetaceae and Physodermataceae but the Blastocladiaceae and Catenariaceae are paraphyletic or polyphyletic. The data support two clades within Allomyces with strains identified as Allomyces arbusculus in both clades, suggesting that species concepts in Allomyces are in need of revision. A clade of Catenaria species isolated from midge larvae group separately from other Catenaria species, suggesting that this genus may need revision. In the Physodermataceae, Urophlyctis species cluster with a clade of Physoderma species. The algal parasite Paraphysoderma sedebokerensis nom. prov. clusters sister to other taxa in the Physodermataceae. Catenomyces persicinus, which has been classified in the Catenariaceae, groups with the Chytridiomycota rather than Blastocladiomycota. The rDNA operon seems to be suitable for classification within the Blastocladiomycota and distinguishes among genera; however, this region alone is not suitable to determine the position of the Blastocladiomycota among other basal fungal phyla with statistical support. A focused effort to find and isolate, or directly amplify DNA from additional taxa will be necessary to evaluate diversity in this phylum. We provide this rDNA phylogeny as a preliminary framework to guide further taxon and gene sampling and to facilitate future ecological, morphological, and systematic studies. PMID:21530920

  2. An abundant nucleolar phosphoprotein is associated with ribosomal DNA in Tetrahymena macronuclei.

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, K E; Smothers, J F; Dadd, C A; Madireddi, M T; Gorovsky, M A; Allis, C D

    1997-01-01

    An abundant 52-kDa phosphoprotein was identified and characterized from macronuclei of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. Immunoblot analyses combined with light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry demonstrate that this polypeptide, termed Nopp52, is enriched in the nucleoli of transcriptionally active macronuclei and missing altogether from transcriptionally inert micronuclei. The cDNA sequence encoding Nopp52 predicts a polypeptide whose amino-terminal half consists of multiple acidic/serine-rich regions alternating with basic/proline-rich regions. Multiple serines located in these acidic stretches lie within casein kinase II consensus motifs, and Nopp52 is an excellent substrate for casein kinase II in vitro. The carboxyl-terminal half of Nopp52 contains two RNA recognition motifs and an extreme carboxyl-terminal domain rich in glycine, arginine, and phenylalanine, motifs common in many RNA processing proteins. A similar combination and order of motifs is found in vertebrate nucleolin and yeast NSR1, suggesting that Nopp52 is a member of a family of related nucleolar proteins. NSR1 and nucleolin have been implicated in transcriptional regulation of rDNA and rRNA processing. Consistent with a role in ribosomal gene metabolism, rDNA and Nopp52 colocalize in situ, as well as by cross-linking and immunoprecipitation experiments, demonstrating an association between Nopp52 and rDNA in vivo. Images PMID:9017598

  3. Differences in a ribosomal DNA sequence of Strongylus species allows identification of single eggs.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A J; Gasser, R B; Chilton, N B

    1995-03-01

    In the current study, molecular techniques were evaluated for the species identification of individual strongyle eggs. Adult worms of Strongylus edentatus, S. equinus and S. vulgaris were collected at necropsy from horses from Australia and the U.S.A. Genomic DNA was isolated and a ribosomal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) amplified and sequenced using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. The length of the ITS-2 sequence of S. edentatus, S. equinus and S. vulgaris ranged between 217 and 235 nucleotides. Extensive sequence analysis demonstrated a low degree (0-0.9%) of intraspecific variation in the ITS-2 for the Strongylus species examined, whereas the levels of interspecific differences (13-29%) were significantly greater. Interspecific differences in the ITS-2 sequences allowed unequivocal species identification of single worms and eggs using PCR-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism. These results demonstrate the potential of the ribosomal spacers as genetic markers for species identification of single strongyle eggs from horse faeces. PMID:7601594

  4. Development and Evaluation of a Quality-Controlled Ribosomal Sequence Database for 16S Ribosomal DNA-Based Identification of Staphylococcus Species

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Karsten; Harmsen, Dag; Mellmann, Alexander; Meier, Christian; Schumann, Peter; Peters, Georg; von Eiff, Christof

    2004-01-01

    To establish an improved ribosomal gene sequence database as part of the Ribosomal Differentiation of Microorganisms (RIDOM) project and to overcome the drawbacks of phenotypic identification systems and publicly accessible sequence databases, both strands of the 5′ end of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of 81 type and reference strains comprising all validly described staphylococcal (sub)species were sequenced. Assuming a normal distribution for pairwise distances of all unique staphylococcal sequences and choosing a reporting criterion of ≥98.7% similarity for a “distinct species,” a statistical error probability of 1.0% was calculated. To evaluate this database, a 16S rDNA fragment (corresponding to Escherichia coli positions 54 to 510) of 55 clinical Staphylococcus isolates (including those of the small-colony variant phenotype) were sequenced and analyzed by the RIDOM approach. Of these isolates, 54 (98.2%) had a similarity score above the proposed threshold using RIDOM; 48 (87.3%) of the sequences gave a perfect match, whereas 83.6% were found by searching National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database entries. In contrast to RIDOM, which showed four ambiguities at the species level (mainly concerning Staphylococcus intermedius versus Staphylococcus delphini), the NCBI database search yielded 18 taxon-related ambiguities and showed numerous matches exhibiting redundant or unspecified entries. Comparing molecular results with those of biochemical procedures, ID 32 Staph (bioMérieux, Marcy I'Etoile, France) and VITEK 2 (bioMérieux) failed to identify 13 (23.6%) and 19 (34.5%) isolates, respectively, due to incorrect identification and/or categorization below acceptable values. In contrast to phenotypic methods and the NCBI database, the novel high-quality RIDOM sequence database provides excellent identification of staphylococci, including rarely isolated species and phenotypic variants. PMID:15528685

  5. B-Chromosome Ribosomal DNA Is Functional in the Grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.

    2012-01-01

    B-chromosomes are frequently argued to be genetically inert elements, but activity for some particular genes has been reported, especially for ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes whose expression can easily be detected at the cytological level by the visualization of their phenotypic expression, i.e., the nucleolus. The B24 chromosome in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans frequently shows a nucleolus attached to it during meiotic prophase I. Here we show the presence of rRNA transcripts that unequivocally came from the B24 chromosome. To detect these transcripts, we designed primers specifically anchoring at the ITS-2 region, so that the reverse primer was complementary to the B chromosome DNA sequence including a differential adenine insertion being absent in the ITS2 of A chromosomes. PCR analysis carried out on genomic DNA showed amplification in B-carrying males but not in B-lacking ones. PCR analyses performed on complementary DNA showed amplification in about half of B-carrying males. Joint cytological and molecular analysis performed on 34 B-carrying males showed a close correspondence between the presence of B-specific transcripts and of nucleoli attached to the B chromosome. In addition, the molecular analysis revealed activity of the B chromosome rDNA in 10 out of the 13 B-carrying females analysed. Our results suggest that the nucleoli attached to B chromosomes are actively formed by expression of the rDNA carried by them, and not by recruitment of nucleolar materials formed in A chromosome nucleolar organizing regions. Therefore, B-chromosome rDNA in E. plorans is functional since it is actively transcribed to form the nucleolus attached to the B chromosome. This demonstrates that some heterochromatic B chromosomes can harbour functional genes. PMID:22570730

  6. Use of 16S Ribosomal DNA for Delineation of Marine Bacterioplankton Species

    PubMed Central

    Hagström, Åke; Pommier, Thomas; Rohwer, Forest; Simu, Karin; Stolte, Willem; Svensson, Dominika; Zweifel, Ulla Li

    2002-01-01

    All of the marine bacterioplankton-derived 16S ribosomal DNA sequences previously deposited in GenBank were reanalyzed to determine the number of bacterial species in the oceanic surface waters. These sequences have been entered into the database since 1990. The rate of new additions reached a peak in 1999 and subsequently leveled off, suggesting that much of the marine microbial species richness has been sampled. When the GenBank sequences were dereplicated by using 97% similarity as a cutoff, 1,117 unique ribotypes were found. Of the unique sequences, 609 came from uncultured environmental clones and 508 came from cultured bacteria. We conclude that the apparent bacterioplankton species richness is relatively low. PMID:12089052

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of Bambusa (Poaceae: Bambusoideae) based on internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Xia, Nianhe; Lin, Rushun

    2005-12-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of Bambusa species were performed using internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The 21 species sampled included members of Bambusa (sensu stricto), Dendrocalamopsis, Dendrocalamus, Guadua, Leleba, and Lingnania. Arundinaria gigantea was used as an outgroup. Using the maximum parsimony method with PAUP*, gaps were treated as missing states or new states. Parsimonious analysis revealed that Dendrocalamus latiflorus was closely related to the members of Dendrocalamopsis. Dendrocalamus membranaceus was a sister species to Dendrocalamus strictus. Three Dendrocalamus species were closely related to and nested in a polyphyletic Bambusa. Bambusa subaequalis was a sister species to B. multiplex, B. emeiensis to B. chungii, B. contracta to B. hainanensis, and B. flexuosa was a sister species to B. sinospinosa, B. tuldoides, B. surrecta, B. intermedia, and B. valida group, which raised doubts about the monophyly of the subgenera Bambusa (sensu stricto), Dendrocalamopsis, Leleba, and Lingnania under the genus Bambusa. PMID:16382365

  8. A phylogeny of cockroaches and related insects based on DNA sequence of mitochondrial ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, S

    1995-01-01

    Cockroaches are among the most ancient winged insects, the earliest fossils dating back to about 400 million years. Several conflicting phylogenies for cockroach families, subfamilies, and genera have been proposed in the past. In addition, the relationship of Cryptocercidae to other cockroach families and the relationship between the cockroach, Cryptocercus punctulatus, and the termite, Mastotermes darwiniensis, have generated debate. In this paper, a phylogeny for cockroaches, mantids, and termites based on DNA sequence of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA genes is presented. The results indicated that cockroaches are a monophyletic group, whose sister group is Mantoidea. The inferred relationship among cockroach families was in agreement with the presently accepted phylogeny. However, there was only partial congruence at the subfamily and the generic levels. The phylogeny inferred here does not support a close relationship between C. punctulatus and M. darwiniensis. The apparent synapomorphies of these two species are likely a manifestation of convergent evolution because there are similarities in biology and habitat. PMID:7534409

  9. Ribosomal DNA phylogenies of Cyathus: is the current infrageneric classification appropriate?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui-Lin; Jeewon, Rajesh; Desjardin, Dennis E; Soytong, Kasem; Hyde, Kevin D

    2007-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the genus Cyathus (bird's nest fungi) were investigated with neighbor joining, maximum likelihood, weighted maximum parsimony and MrBayes analyses of ITS and LSU ribosomal DNA sequences datasets. Twenty-two taxa of Cyathus were used in the analyses based primarily on type and authentic specimens. The current infrageneric classification system of Brodie recognizes seven infrageneric groups based on morphological characters, including peridium plications and variations in peridium hair anatomy, peridiole structure and fruit-body color. These groups are not supported by molecular data. Instead the ITS and LSU datasets support recognition of three infrageneric groups herein named the ollum, pallidum and striatum groups. Morphological characters useful in distinguishing these groups include basidiospore size, fruit-body coloration and peridium anatomy. Cyathus africanus var. latisporus is considered a synonym of Cyathus jiayuguanensis, and a new combination Cyathus lanatus (Brodie) R.L. Zhao is proposed based on morphological and molecular data. PMID:17883030

  10. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of Enterobius vermicularis and Development of an 18S Ribosomal DNA-Targeted Diagnostic PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Zelck, Ulrike E.; Bialek, Ralf; Weiß, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We genetically characterized pinworms obtained from 37 children from different regions of Germany and established new species-specific molecular diagnostic tools. No ribosomal DNA diversity was found; the phylogenetic position of Enterobius vermicularis within the Oxyurida order and its close relationship to the Ascaridida and Spirurida orders was confirmed. PMID:21248085

  11. [Unusual motifs of the nucleotide sequence adjacent to the putative transcription initiation site in the rDNA intergenic spacer of diploid wheat Triticum urartu Thum. ex Gandil, T. boeoticum Boiss, and T. monococcum L].

    PubMed

    Akhunov, E D; Chemeris, A V; Vakhitov, V A

    1997-11-01

    In the intergenic spacer (IGS) of rDNA of diploid wheats Triticum urartu, T. boeoticum, and T. monococcum, the uncommon motives adjacent to the site of transcription initiation (TIS) are revealed. They are located in the region from -6 to +1 relative to the putative TIS and are not encountered in cereals studied earlier. In T. urartu and T. boeoticum, the motif TACTATG has been revealed, in T. monococcum--TATTATG, while diploid Aegilops speltoides has the motif TATAGTA, typical of the remaining cereal species. The TIS-surrounding rDNA IGS region of diploid wheats was compared to the correspondent known rDNA IGS regions of different plant and animal species. PMID:9480224

  12. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects

    PubMed Central

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  13. Testing the potential of a ribosomal 16S marker for DNA metabarcoding of insects.

    PubMed

    Elbrecht, Vasco; Taberlet, Pierre; Dejean, Tony; Valentini, Alice; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Coissac, Eric; Boyer, Frederic; Leese, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) is a powerful marker for DNA barcoding of animals, with good taxonomic resolution and a large reference database. However, when used for DNA metabarcoding, estimation of taxa abundances and species detection are limited due to primer bias caused by highly variable primer binding sites across the COI gene. Therefore, we explored the ability of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as an alternative metabarcoding marker for species level assessments. Ten bulk samples, each containing equal amounts of tissue from 52 freshwater invertebrate taxa, were sequenced with the Illumina NextSeq 500 system. The 16S primers amplified three more insect species than the Folmer COI primers and amplified more equally, probably due to decreased primer bias. Estimation of biomass might be less biased with 16S than with COI, although variation in read abundances of two orders of magnitudes is still observed. According to these results, the marker choice depends on the scientific question. If the goal is to obtain a taxonomic identification at the species level, then COI is more appropriate due to established reference databases and known taxonomic resolution of this marker, knowing that a greater proportion of insects will be missed using COI Folmer primers. If the goal is to obtain a more comprehensive survey the 16S marker, which requires building a local reference database, or optimised degenerated COI primers could be more appropriate. PMID:27114891

  14. Repeated reunions and splits feature the highly dynamic evolution of 5S and 35S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) in the Asteraceae family

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In flowering plants and animals the most common ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) organisation is that in which 35S (encoding 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA) and 5S genes are physically separated occupying different chromosomal loci. However, recent observations established that both genes have been unified to a single 35S-5S unit in the genus Artemisia (Asteraceae), a genomic arrangement typical of primitive eukaryotes such as yeast, among others. Here we aim to reveal the origin, distribution and mechanisms leading to the linked organisation of rDNA in the Asteraceae by analysing unit structure (PCR, Southern blot, sequencing), gene copy number (quantitative PCR) and chromosomal position (FISH) of 5S and 35S rRNA genes in ~200 species representing the family diversity and other closely related groups. Results Dominant linked rDNA genotype was found within three large groups in subfamily Asteroideae: tribe Anthemideae (93% of the studied cases), tribe Gnaphalieae (100%) and in the "Heliantheae alliance" (23%). The remaining five tribes of the Asteroideae displayed canonical non linked arrangement of rDNA, as did the other groups in the Asteraceae. Nevertheless, low copy linked genes were identified among several species that amplified unlinked units. The conserved position of functional 5S insertions downstream from the 26S gene suggests a unique, perhaps retrotransposon-mediated integration event at the base of subfamily Asteroideae. Further evolution likely involved divergence of 26S-5S intergenic spacers, amplification and homogenisation of units across the chromosomes and concomitant elimination of unlinked arrays. However, the opposite trend, from linked towards unlinked arrangement was also surmised in few species indicating possible reversibility of these processes. Conclusions Our results indicate that nearly 25% of Asteraceae species may have evolved unusual linked arrangement of rRNA genes. Thus, in plants, fundamental changes in intrinsic structure of rDNA units

  15. Phylogeography of East Asian Lespedeza buergeri (Fabaceae) based on chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence variations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dong-Pil; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Xu, Bo; Choi, Byoung-Hee

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic changes in land configuration during the Quaternary that were accompanied by climatic oscillations have significantly influenced the current distribution and genetic structure of warm-temperate forests in East Asia. Although recent surveys have been conducted, the historical migration of forest species via land bridges and, especially, the origins of Korean populations remains conjectural. Here, we reveal the genetic structure of Lespedeza buergeri, a warm-temperate shrub that is disjunctively distributed around the East China Sea (ECS) at China, Korea, and Japan. Two non-coding regions (rpl32-trnL, psbA-trnH) of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and the internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrITS) were analyzed for 188 individuals from 16 populations, which covered almost all of its distribution. The nrITS data demonstrated a genetic structure that followed geographic boundaries. This examination utilized AMOVA, comparisons of genetic differentiation based on haplotype frequency/genetic mutations among haplotypes, and Mantel tests. However, the cpDNA data showed contrasting genetic pattern, implying that this difference was due to a slower mutation rate in cpDNA than in nrITS. These results indicated frequent migration by this species via an ECS land bridge during the early Pleistocene that then tapered gradually toward the late Pleistocene. A genetic isolation between western and eastern Japan coincided with broad consensus that was suggested by the presence of other warm-temperate plants in that country. For Korean populations, high genetic diversity indicated the existence of refugia during the Last Glacial Maximum on the Korean Peninsula. However, their closeness with western Japanese populations at the level of haplotype clade implied that gene flow from western Japanese refugia was possible until post-glacial processing occurred through the Korea/Tsushima Strait land bridge. PMID:27206725

  16. Helianthus annuus ssp. texanus has chloroplast DNA and nuclear ribosomal RNA genes of Helianthus debilis ssp. cucumerifolius.

    PubMed Central

    Rieseberg, L H; Beckstrom-Sternberg, S; Doan, K

    1990-01-01

    Heiser [Heiser, C. B. (1951) Evolution 5, 42-51] hypothesized that Helianthus annuus ssp. texanus was derived by the introduction of H. annuus into Texas and subsequent introgression of genes from Helianthus debilis ssp. cucumerifolius into H. annuus. Although often considered to be one of the best cases of introgression in plants, alternative hypotheses to introgression, such as convergence or the joint retention of the ancestral condition, could not be ruled out in the original study. To test for the occurrence of introgression we examined 14 populations of H. annuus ssp. texanus, 14 allopatric populations of H. annuus, and three populations of H. debilis ssp. cucumerifolius with reference to diagnostic chloroplast DNA and nuclear ribosomal DNA markers. Thirteen of the 14 populations of H. annuus ssp. texanus had chloroplast DNA and/or ribosomal DNA markers of H. debilis ssp. cucumerifolius. In contrast, no chloroplast DNA or ribosomal DNA markers of H. debilis ssp. cucumerifolius were found in the 14 allopatric populations of H. annuus. Our findings provide strong support, therefore, for the hypothesized introgressive origin of H. annuus ssp. texanus. PMID:11607056

  17. A two-locus DNA sequence database for identifying host-specific pathogens and phylogenetic diversity within the Fusarium oxysporum species complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An electronically portable two-locus DNA sequence database, comprising partial sequences of the translation elongation factor gene (EF-1a, 634 bp alignment) and nearly complete sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA, 2220 bp alignment) for 850 isolates spanning the phy...

  18. Variation in Ribosomal DNA among Isolates of the Mycorrhizal Fungus Cenococcum Geophilum FR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobuglio, Katherine Frances

    1990-01-01

    Cenococcum geophilum Fr., a cosmopolitan mycorrhizal fungus, is well-known for its extremely wide host and habitat range. The ecological diversity of C. geophilum sharply contrasts its present taxonomic status as a monotypic form -genus. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was used to assess the degree of genetic variation among 72 isolates of C. geophilum. The probe used in this study was the rDNA repeat cloned from C. geophilum isolate A145 (pCG15). Length of the rDNA repeat was approximately 9 kb. The rDNA clone was mapped for 5 restriction endonucleases. Hybridization with cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae rDNA (pSR118, and pSR125 containing the 18S, and 5.8-25S rRNA genes respectively), and alignment of restriction endonuclease sites conserved in the rDNA genes of other fungi, were used to position the corresponding rDNAs of C. geophilum. Southern hybridizations with EcoRI, HindIII, XhoI, and PstI digested DNAs indicated extensive variation among the C. geophilum isolates, greater than has been previously reported to occur within a fungal species. Most of the rDNA polymorphisms occurred in the IGS region. Restriction endonuclease site and length polymorphisms were also observed in the 5.8S-26S genic regions. Sixteen size categories of length mutations, 6 restriction endonuclease site additions, and 4 restriction endonuclease site deletions were determined using isolate A145 as a reference. The rDNA repeat length among the isolates varied from approximately 8.5 to 10.2 kb. RFLPs were also observed in the mitochondrial (mt) 24S rRNA gene and flanking regions of HindIII digested DNAs of C. geophilum isolates representing both geographically distinct and similar origins. Among the C. geophilum isolates analyzed there were fewer RFLPs in mt-DNA than in nuclear rDNA. EcoRI rDNA phenotypes between C. geophilum and Elaphomyces anthracinus, its proposed teleomorph or sexual state, did not correspond. In addition, the four

  19. Application of the Ribosomal DNA ITS2 Region of Physalis (Solanaceae): DNA Barcoding and Phylogenetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shangguo; Jiang, Mengying; Shi, Yujun; Jiao, Kaili; Shen, Chenjia; Lu, Jiangjie; Ying, Qicai; Wang, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, commercial interest in Physalis species has grown worldwide due to their high nutritional value, edible fruit, and potential medicinal properties. However, many Physalis species have similar shapes and are easily confused, and consequently the phylogenetic relationships between Physalis species are poorly understood. This hinders their safe utilization and genetic resource conservation. In this study, the nuclear ribosomal ITS2 region was used to identify species and phylogenetically examine Physalis. Eighty-six ITS2 regions from 45 Physalis species were analyzed. The ITS2 sequences were aligned using Clustal W and genetic distances were calculated using MEGA V6.0. The results showed that ITS2 regions have significant intra- and inter-specific divergences, obvious barcoding gaps, and higher species discrimination rates (82.2% for both the BLASTA1 and nearest distance methods). In addition, the secondary structure of ITS2 provided another way to differentiate species. Cluster analysis based on ITS2 regions largely concurred with the relationships among Physalis species established by many previous molecular analyses, and showed that most sections of Physalis appear to be polyphyletic. Our results demonstrated that ITS2 can be used as an efficient and powerful marker in the identification and phylogenetic study of Physalis species. The technique provides a scientific basis for the conservation of Physalis plants and for utilization of resources. PMID:27486467

  20. Application of the Ribosomal DNA ITS2 Region of Physalis (Solanaceae): DNA Barcoding and Phylogenetic Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; Jiang, Mengying; Shi, Yujun; Jiao, Kaili; Shen, Chenjia; Lu, Jiangjie; Ying, Qicai; Wang, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, commercial interest in Physalis species has grown worldwide due to their high nutritional value, edible fruit, and potential medicinal properties. However, many Physalis species have similar shapes and are easily confused, and consequently the phylogenetic relationships between Physalis species are poorly understood. This hinders their safe utilization and genetic resource conservation. In this study, the nuclear ribosomal ITS2 region was used to identify species and phylogenetically examine Physalis. Eighty-six ITS2 regions from 45 Physalis species were analyzed. The ITS2 sequences were aligned using Clustal W and genetic distances were calculated using MEGA V6.0. The results showed that ITS2 regions have significant intra- and inter-specific divergences, obvious barcoding gaps, and higher species discrimination rates (82.2% for both the BLASTA1 and nearest distance methods). In addition, the secondary structure of ITS2 provided another way to differentiate species. Cluster analysis based on ITS2 regions largely concurred with the relationships among Physalis species established by many previous molecular analyses, and showed that most sections of Physalis appear to be polyphyletic. Our results demonstrated that ITS2 can be used as an efficient and powerful marker in the identification and phylogenetic study of Physalis species. The technique provides a scientific basis for the conservation of Physalis plants and for utilization of resources. PMID:27486467

  1. Molecular discrimination of lactobacilli used as starter and probiotic cultures by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis.

    PubMed

    Roy, D; Sirois, S; Vincent, D

    2001-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and L. casei related taxa which are widely used as starter or probiotic cultures can be identified by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). The genetic discrimination of the related species belonging to these groups was first obtained by PCR amplifications by using group-specific or species-specific 16S rDNA primers. The numerical analysis of the ARDRA patterns obtained by using CfoI, HinfI, Tru9I, and ScrFI was an efficient typing tool for identification of species of the L. acidophilus and L. casei complex. ARDRA by using CfoI was a reliable method for differentiation of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis. Finally, strains ATCC 393 and ATCC 15820 exhibited unique ARDRA patterns with CfoI and Tru9I restriction enzymes as compared with the other strains of L. casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus. PMID:11178730

  2. Hirudinella ventricosa (Pallas, 1774) Baird, 1853 represents a species complex based on ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Dana M; Curran, Stephen S; Pulis, Eric E; Provaznik, Jennifer M; Franks, James S

    2013-10-01

    Digeneans in the genus Hirudinella de Blainville, 1828 (Hirudinellidae) from three species of pelagic fishes, Acanthocybium solandri (Cuvier), Makaira nigricans Lacépède and Thunnus albacares (Bonnaterre), and one benthic fish, Mulloidichthys martinicus (Cuvier), from the Gulf of Mexico are investigated using comparison of ribosomal DNA. Four species are identified based on molecular differences: Hirudinella ventricosa (Pallas, 1774) Baird, 1853 from A. solandri, Hirudinella ahi Yamaguti, 1970 from T. albacares, and two unidentified but distinct species of Hirudinella, herein referred to as Hirudinella sp. A (from both M. nigricans and M. martinicus) and Hirudinella sp. B from M. nigricans. Additionally, H. ahi, based tentatively on morphological identification, is reported from Thunnus thynnus (Linnaeus). This represents the first record of a hirudinellid from M. martinicus and the first record of H. ahi from T. thynnus. A phylogeny of some Hemiurata Skrjabin & Guschanskaja, 1954 using partial fragments of the 28S rDNA sequences is consistent with earlier phylogenies and the position of the Hirudinellidae Dollfus, 1932 is well-supported as a derived group most closely related to the Syncoeliidae Looss, 1899. PMID:24048751

  3. Prevalence and Dynamics of Ribosomal DNA Micro-heterogeneity Are Linked to Population History in Two Contrasting Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephen A.; West, Claire; Davey, Robert P.; Dicks, Jo; Roberts, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable number and taxonomic breadth of past and current genome sequencing projects, many of which necessarily encompass the ribosomal DNA, detailed information on the prevalence and evolutionary significance of sequence variation in this ubiquitous genomic region are severely lacking. Here, we attempt to address this issue in two closely related yet contrasting yeast species, the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus. By drawing on existing datasets from the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project, we identify a rich seam of ribosomal DNA sequence variation, characterising 1,068 and 970 polymorphisms in 34 S. cerevisiae and 26 S. paradoxus strains respectively. We discover the two species sets exhibit distinct mutational profiles. Furthermore, we show for the first time that unresolved rDNA sequence variation resulting from imperfect concerted evolution of the ribosomal DNA region follows a U-shaped allele frequency distribution in each species, similar to loci that evolve under non-concerted mechanisms but arising through rather different evolutionary processes. Finally, we link differences between the shapes of these allele frequency distributions to the two species’ contrasting population histories. PMID:27345953

  4. Prevalence and Dynamics of Ribosomal DNA Micro-heterogeneity Are Linked to Population History in Two Contrasting Yeast Species.

    PubMed

    James, Stephen A; West, Claire; Davey, Robert P; Dicks, Jo; Roberts, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Despite the considerable number and taxonomic breadth of past and current genome sequencing projects, many of which necessarily encompass the ribosomal DNA, detailed information on the prevalence and evolutionary significance of sequence variation in this ubiquitous genomic region are severely lacking. Here, we attempt to address this issue in two closely related yet contrasting yeast species, the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the wild yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus. By drawing on existing datasets from the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project, we identify a rich seam of ribosomal DNA sequence variation, characterising 1,068 and 970 polymorphisms in 34 S. cerevisiae and 26 S. paradoxus strains respectively. We discover the two species sets exhibit distinct mutational profiles. Furthermore, we show for the first time that unresolved rDNA sequence variation resulting from imperfect concerted evolution of the ribosomal DNA region follows a U-shaped allele frequency distribution in each species, similar to loci that evolve under non-concerted mechanisms but arising through rather different evolutionary processes. Finally, we link differences between the shapes of these allele frequency distributions to the two species' contrasting population histories. PMID:27345953

  5. Global functional analysis of nucleophosmin in Taxol response, cancer, chromatin regulation, and ribosomal DNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstralh, Daniel T. . E-mail: dan.bergstralh@med.unc.edu; Conti, Brian J.; Moore, Chris B.; Brickey, W. June; Taxman, Debra J.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of lung cancer response to chemotherapeutic agents showed the accumulation of a Taxol-induced protein that reacted with an anti-phospho-MEK1/2 antibody. Mass spectroscopy identified the protein as nucleophosmin/B23 (NPM), a multifunctional protein with diverse roles: ribosome biosynthesis, p53 regulation, nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, and centrosome duplication. Our work demonstrates that following cellular exposure to mitosis-arresting agents, NPM is phosphorylated and its chromatographic property is altered, suggesting changes in function during mitosis. To determine the functional relevance of NPM, its expression in tumor cells was reduced by siRNA. Cells with reduced NPM were treated with Taxol followed by microarray profiling accompanied by gene/protein pathway analyses. These studies demonstrate several expected and unexpected consequences of NPM depletion. The predominant downstream effectors of NPM are genes involved in cell proliferation, cancer, and the cell cycle. In congruence with its role in cancer, NPM is over-expressed in primary malignant lung cancer tissues. We also demonstrate a role for NPM in the expression of genes encoding SET (TAF1{beta}) and the histone methylase SET8. Additionally, we show that NPM is required for a previously unobserved G2/M upregulation of TAF1A, which encodes the rDNA transcription factor TAF{sub I}48. These results demonstrate multi-faceted functions of NPM that can affect cancer cells.

  6. Origin and relationships of Saintpaulia (Gesneriaceae) based on ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences.

    PubMed

    Moller, M; Cronk, Q

    1997-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of eight species of Saintpaulia H. Wendl., 19 species of Streptocarpus Lindl. (representing all major growth forms within the genus), and two outgroups (Haberlea rhodopensis Friv., Chirita spadiciformis W. T. Wang) were examined using comparative nucleotide sequences from the two internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The length of the ITS 1 region ranged from 228 to 249 base pairs (bp) and the ITS 2 region from 196 to 245 bp. Pairwise sequence divergence across both spacers for ingroup and outgroup species ranged from 0 to 29%. Streptocarpus is not monophyletic, and Saintpaulia is nested within Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpus is monophyletic. The ITS sequence data demonstrate that the unifoliate Streptocarpus species form a clade, and are also characterized by a unique 47-bp deletion in ITS 2. The results strongly support the monophyly of (1) Saintpaulia, and (2) Saintpaulia plus the African members of the subgenus Streptocarpella of Streptocarpus. The data suggest the evolution of Saintpaulia from Streptocarpus subgenus Streptocarpella. The differences in flower and vegetative characters are probably due to ecological adaptation leading to a relatively rapid radiation of Saintpaulia. PMID:21708650

  7. Main airborne Ascomycota spores: characterization by culture, spore morphology, ribosomal DNA sequences and enzymatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Manuela; Amorim, M Isabel; Ferreira, Elsa; Delgado, Luís; Abreu, Ilda

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this work was to identify the main allergy-related Ascomycetes fungal spores present in the atmosphere of Porto, using different and complementary techniques. The atmospheric sampling, performed in the atmosphere of Porto (Portugal) from August 2006 to July 2008, indicated Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus and Alternaria as the main fungal spore taxa. Alternaria and Cladosporium peaks were registered during summer. Aspergillus and Penicillium highest values were registered from late winter to early spring. Additionally, the Andersen sampler allowed the culture and isolation of the collected viable spores subsequently used for different identification approaches. The internal-transcribed spacer region of the nuclear ribosomal repeat unit sequences of airborne Ascomycetes fungi isolates revealed 11 taxonomically related fungal species. Among the identified taxa, Penicillum and Aspergillus presented the highest diversity, while only one species of Cladosporium and Alternaria, respectively, were identified. All selected fungal spore taxa possessed phosphatase, esterase, leucine arylamidase and beta-glucosidase enzymatic activity, while none had lipase, cystine arylamidase, trypsin or beta-glucuronidase activity. The association between the spore cell wall morphology, DNA-based techniques and enzymatic activity approaches allowed a more reliable identification procedure of the airborne Ascomycota fungal spores. PMID:20143229

  8. Ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer analysis supports synonomy of Scedosporium inflatum and Lomentospora prolificans.

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, P A; Cooper, C R; Salkin, I F; Lee, S B

    1994-01-01

    Scedosporium inflatum is a dematiaceous opportunistic pathogen originally described by D. Malloch and I.F. Salkin (Mycotaxon 21:247-255, 1984). However, E. Gueho and G. S. De Hoog (J. Mycol. Med. 118:3-9, 1991) recently suggested reducing this mold to synonomy with Lomentospora prolificans on the basis of their similar morphological and molecular characteristics. We have investigated the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS), i.e., ITS I and ITS II, of 18 isolates, including these two fungi and a closely related pathogen, Scedosporium apiospermum, and its telemorph, Pseudallescheria boydii. Identical ITS restriction fragment length polymorphisms were found in eight isolates of S. inflatum and L. prolificans. These results support Gueho and De Hoog's proposal to combine S. inflatum and L. prolificans into the binomial Scedosporium prolificans. However, the ITS I sequence of S. apiospermum and the ITS restriction fragment length polymorphisms of S. apiospermum and P. boydii were found to be significantly different from those of S. inflatum and L. prolificans. The ITS restriction pattern differences may be valuable in clinical settings for distinguishing these fungi. Images PMID:7814476

  9. Characterization of Cryptocaryon irritans isolates from marine fishes in Mainland China by ITS ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sun, H Y; Zhu, X Q; Xie, M Q; Wu, X Y; Li, A X; Lin, R Q; Song, H Q

    2006-07-01

    Seven isolates of Cryptocaryon irritans from different host species and geographical locations in Mainland China were characterized by the first (ITS-1) and second (ITS-2) internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) using two isolates of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis for comparative purposes. The rDNA region including the ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2, and flanking 18S and 28S sequences were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the amplicons were sequenced directly. The ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 sequences were 129, 160, and 190 bp in length, respectively, for all seven C. irritans isolates, whereas the corresponding sequences for the two I. multifiliis isolates were 142, 153, and 194 bp, respectively. While sequence variation among the seven C. irritans isolates ranged from 0 to 1.6% in both the ITS-1 and ITS-2, and the two I. multifiliis isolates differed by 1.4% in the ITS-1 and 1.0% in the ITS-2; C. irritans differed from I. multifiliis by 57.1-60.9% in the ITS-1 and 79.4-83.0% in the ITS-2, indicating that ITS sequences provide reliable genetic markers for the identification and differentiation of the two species. Phylogenetic analysis using the sequence pairwise-distance data using the neighbor-joining method inferred that the seven C. irritans isolates from Mainland China and two other isolates (T.A and Aus.C) from other countries clustered together to show monophyly, which could be readily distinguished from the other monophyletic group all from other regions. Therefore, ITS sequence data and phylogenetic analysis provided strong support that C. irritans isolates from Mainland China represent a single species. The definition of genetic markers in the ITS rDNA provide opportunities for studying the ecology and population genetic structures of the C. irritans from Mainland China and elsewhere and is also relevant to the diagnosis and control of fish diseases they cause. PMID:16523350

  10. Pseudanoplocephala crawfordi is a member of genus Hymenolepis based on phylogenetic analysis using ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan-Qing; Yan, Wen-Chao; Du, Shuai-Zhi; Song, Jun-Ke; Zhao, Wen; Zhao, Yu-Xin; Cheng, Wen-Yu; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Pseudanoplocephala crawfordi is one of the important zoonotic cestodes causing economic significance and public health concern. In the present study, the phylogenetic position of P. crawfordi isolated from pigs was re-inferred using molecular markers of internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA (ITS rDNA) and partial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (pnad1) mitochondrial DNA. The lengths of ITS1, ITS2 rDNA and pnad1 were 757 bp, 628 bp and 458 bp, respectively. Sequence differences in the ITS1, ITS2 rDNA and pnad1 between P. crawfordi and Hymenolepis species were smaller than that between cestodes within genus Hymenolepis. Phylogenetic analyses based on three gene fragments showed that P. crawfordi was grouped into cluster of Hymenolepis species. These results suggested that P. crawfordi would be one member of genus Hymenolepis but not in a new genus Pseudanoplocephala. PMID:25211088

  11. A Two-locus DNA Sequence Database for Typing Plant and Human Pathogens Within the Fusarium oxysporum Species Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We constructed a two-locus database, comprising partial translation elongation factor (EF-1alpha) gene sequences and nearly full-length sequences of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region (IGS rDNA) for 850 isolates spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex ...

  12. 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA and internal transcribed spacers ribosomal DNA as differential markers of Trichuris discolor populations.

    PubMed

    Callejón, R; Halajian, A; de Rojas, M; Marrugal, A; Guevara, D; Cutillas, C

    2012-05-25

    Comparative morphological, biometrical and molecular studies of Trichuris discolor isolated from Bos taurus from Spain and Iran was carried out. Furthermore, Trichuris ovis isolated from B. taurus and Capra hircus from Spain has been, molecularly, analyzed. Morphological studies revealed clear differences between T. ovis and T. discolor isolated from B. taurus but differences were not observed between populations of T. discolor isolated from different geographical regions. Nevertheless, the molecular studies based on the amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 ribosomal DNA and 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA showed clear differences between both populations of T. discolor from Spain and Iran suggesting two cryptic species. Phylogenetic studies corroborated these data. Thus, phylogenetic trees based on ITS1, ITS2 and 16S partial gene sequences showed that individuals of T. discolor from B. taurus from Iran clustered together and separated, with high bootstrap values, of T. discolor isolated from B. taurus from Spain, while populations of T. ovis from B. taurus and C. hircus from Spain clustered together but separated with high bootstrap values of both populations of T. discolor. Furthermore, a comparative phylogenetic study has been carried out with the ITS1and ITS2 sequences of Trichuris species from different hosts. Three clades were observed: the first clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing herbivores (T. discolor, T. ovis, Trichuris leporis and Trichuris skrjabini), the second clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing omnivores (Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis) and finally, the third clustered species of Trichuris parasitizing carnivores (Trichuris muris, Trichuris arvicolae and Trichuris vulpis). PMID:22136768

  13. Non-random expression of ribosomal DNA units in a grasshopper showing high intragenomic variation for the ITS2 region.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Estévez, M; Ruiz-Ruano, F J; Cabrero, J; Bakkali, M; Perfectti, F; López-León, M D; Camacho, J P M

    2015-06-01

    We analyse intragenomic variation of the ITS2 internal transcribed spacer of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans, by means of tagged PCR 454 amplicon sequencing performed on both genomic DNA (gDNA) and RNA-derived complementary DNA (cDNA), using part of the ITS2 flanking coding regions (5.8S and 28S rDNA) as an internal control for sequencing errors. Six different ITS2 haplotypes (i.e. variants for at least one nucleotide in the complete ITS2 sequence) were found in a single population, one of them (Hap4) being specific to a supernumerary (B) chromosome. The analysis of both gDNA and cDNA from the same individuals provided an estimate of the expression efficiency of the different haplotypes. We found random expression (i.e. about similar recovery in gDNA and cDNA) for three haplotypes (Hap1, Hap2 and Hap5), but significant underexpression for three others (Hap3, Hap4 and Hap6). Hap4 was the most extremely underexpressed and, remarkably, it showed the lowest sequence conservation for the flanking 5.8-28S coding regions in the gDNA reads but the highest conservation (100%) in the cDNA ones, suggesting the preferential expression of mutation-free rDNA units carrying this ITS2 haplotype. These results indicate that the ITS2 region of rDNA is far from complete homogenization in this species, and that the different rDNA units are not expressed at random, with some of them being severely downregulated. PMID:25565136

  14. Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric (TTAGG)n repeats in blue butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) with low and high chromosome numbers

    PubMed Central

    Vershinina, Alisa O.; Anokhin, Boris A.; Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric repeats are important parts of eukaryotic genome. However, little is known about their organization and localization in karyotypes of organisms with holocentric chromosomes. Here we present first cytogenetic study of these molecular structures in seven blue butterflies of the genus Polyommatus Latreille, 1804 with low and high chromosome numbers (from n=10 to n=ca.108) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG)n telomeric probes. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe showed the presence of two different variants of the location of major rDNA clusters in Polyommatus species: with one or two rDNA-carrying chromosomes in haploid karyotype. We discuss evolutionary trends and possible mechanisms of changes in the number of ribosomal clusters. We also demonstrate that Polyommatus species have the classical insect (TTAGG)n telomere organization. This chromosome end protection mechanism probably originated de novo in small chromosomes that evolved via fragmentations. PMID:26140159

  15. Advantages and limitations of ribosomal RNA PCR and DNA sequencing for identification of bacteria in cardiac valves of danish patients.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael; Bangsborg, Jette; Kjerulf, Anne; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Christensen, John; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon 6; Bruun, Niels Eske; Dargis, Rimtas; Andresen, Keld; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Studies on the value of culture-independent molecular identification of bacteria in cardiac valves are mostly restricted to comparing agreement of identification to what is obtained by culture to the number of identified bacteria in culture-negative cases. However, evaluation of the usefulness of direct molecular identification should also address weaknesses, their relevance in the given setting, and possible improvements. In this study cardiac valves from 56 Danish patients referred for surgery for infective endocarditis were analysed by microscopy and culture as well as by PCR targeting part of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene followed by DNA sequencing of the PCR product. PCR and DNA sequencing identified significant bacteria in 49 samples from 43 patients, including five out of 13 culture-negative cases. No rare, exotic, or intracellular bacteria were identified. There was a general agreement between bacterial identity obtained by ribosomal PCR and DNA sequencing from the valves and bacterial isolates from blood culture. However, DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene did not discriminate well among non-haemolytic streptococci, especially within the Streptococcus mitis group. Ribosomal PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing is an efficient and reliable method of identifying the cause of IE, but exact species identification of some of the most common causes, i.e. non-haemolytic streptococci, may be improved with other molecular methods. PMID:24403979

  16. Conversion of Topoisomerase I Cleavage Complexes on the Leading Strand of Ribosomal DNA into 5′-Phosphorylated DNA Double-Strand Breaks by Replication Runoff

    PubMed Central

    Strumberg, Dirk; Pilon, André A.; Smith, Melanie; Hickey, Robert; Malkas, Linda; Pommier, Yves

    2000-01-01

    Topoisomerase I cleavage complexes can be induced by a variety of DNA damages and by the anticancer drug camptothecin. We have developed a ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR) assay to analyze replication-mediated DNA double-strand breaks induced by topoisomerase I cleavage complexes in human colon carcinoma HT29 cells at the nucleotide level. We found that conversion of topoisomerase I cleavage complexes into replication-mediated DNA double-strand breaks was only detectable on the leading strand for DNA synthesis, which suggests an asymmetry in the way that topoisomerase I cleavage complexes are metabolized on the two arms of a replication fork. Extension by Taq DNA polymerase was not required for ligation to the LM-PCR primer, indicating that the 3′ DNA ends are extended by DNA polymerase in vivo closely to the 5′ ends of the topoisomerase I cleavage complexes. These findings suggest that the replication-mediated DNA double-strand breaks generated at topoisomerase I cleavage sites are produced by replication runoff. We also found that the 5′ ends of these DNA double-strand breaks are phosphorylated in vivo, which suggests that a DNA 5′ kinase activity acts on the double-strand ends generated by replication runoff. The replication-mediated DNA double-strand breaks were rapidly reversible after cessation of the topoisomerase I cleavage complexes, suggesting the existence of efficient repair pathways for removal of topoisomerase I-DNA covalent adducts in ribosomal DNA. PMID:10805740

  17. A phylogenetic study on galactose-containing Candida species based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Suh, Sung-Oui; Sugita, Takashi; Nakase, Takashi

    1999-10-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of 33 Candida species containing galactose in the cells were investigated by using 18S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Galactose-containing Candida species and galactose-containing species from nine ascomycetous genera were a heterogeneous assemblage. They were divided into three clusters (II, III, and IV) which were phylogenetically distant from cluster I, comprising 9 galactose-lacking Candida species, C. glabrata, C. holmii, C. krusei, C. tropicalis (the type species of Candida), C. albicans, C. viswanathii, C. maltosa, C. parapsilosis, C. guilliermondii, and C. lusitaniae, and 17 related ascomycetous yeasts. These three clusters were also phylogenetically distant from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which contains galactomannan in its cell wall. Cluster II comprised C. magnoliae, C. vaccinii, C. apis, C. gropengiesseri, C. etchellsii, C. floricola, C. lactiscondensi, Wickerhamiella domercqiae, C. versatilis, C. azyma, C. vanderwaltii, C. pararugosa, C. sorbophila, C. spandovensis, C. galacta, C. ingens, C. incommunis, Yarrowia lipolytica, Galactomyces geotrichum, and Dipodascus albidus. Cluster III comprised C. tepae, C. antillancae and its synonym C. bondarzewiae, C. ancudensis, C. petrohuensis, C. santjacobensis, C. ciferrii (anamorph of Stephanoascus ciferrii), Arxula terrestris, C. castrensis, C. valdiviana, C. paludigena, C. blankii, C. salmanticensis, C. auringiensis, C. bertae, and its synonym C. bertae var. chiloensis, C. edax (anamorph of Stephanoascus smithiae), Arxula adeninivorans, and C. steatolytica (synonym of Zygoascus hellenicus). Cluster IV comprised C. cantarellii, C. vinaria, Dipodascopsis uninucleata, and Lipomyces lipofer. Two galactose-lacking and Q-8-forming species, C. stellata and Pichia pastoris, and 5 galactose-lacking and Q-9-forming species, C. apicola, C. bombi, C. bombicola, C. geochares, and C. insectalens, were included in Cluster II. Two galactose-lacking and Q-9-forming species, C. drimydis and C

  18. Phylogenetic Relationships in Bupleurum (Apiaceae) Based on Nuclear Ribosomal DNA ITS Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    NEVES, SUSANA S.; WATSON, MARK F.

    2004-01-01

    • Backgroud and Aims The genus Bupleurum has long been recognized as a natural group, but its infrageneric classification is controversial and has not yet been studied in the light of sequence data. • Methods Phylogenetic relationships among 32 species (35 taxa) of the genus Bupleurum were investigated by comparative sequencing of the ITS region of the 18–26S nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat. Exemplar taxa from all currently accepted sections and subsections of the genus were included, along with outgroups from four other early branching Apioideae genera (Anginon, Heteromorpha, Physospermum and Pleurospermum). • Key Results Phylogenies generated by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and neighbour‐joining methods show similar topologies, demonstrating monophyly of Bupleurum and the division of the genus into two major clades. This division is also supported by analysis of the 5.8S coding sequence alone. The first branching clade is formed by all the species of the genus with pinnate‐reticulate veined leaves and B. rigidum with a unique type of leaf venation. The other major clade includes the remaining species studied, all of which have more or less parallel‐veined leaves. • Conclusions These phylogenetic results do not agree with any previous classifications of the genus. Molecular data also suggest that the endemic Macaronesian species B. salicifolium is a neoendemic, as the sequence divergence between the populations in Madeira and Canary Islands, and closer mainland relatives in north‐west Africa is small. All endemic north‐west African taxa are included in a single unresolved but well‐supported clade, and the low nucleotide variation of ITS suggests a recent radiation within this group. The only southern hemisphere species, B. mundii (southern Africa), is shown to be a neoendemic, apparently closely related to B. falcatum, a Eurasian species. PMID:14980972

  19. Use of Quantitative 16S Ribosomal DNA Detection for Diagnosis of Central Vascular Catheter-Associated Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, S.; Wilks, M.; Hennessy, E.; Powell-Tuck, J.; Small, M.; Sharp, J.; Millar, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    Many central vascular catheters (CVCs) are removed unnecessarily because current diagnostic methods for CVC-associated infection are unreliable. A quantitative PCR assay using primers and probe targeted to bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA was used to measure the levels of bacterial DNA in blood samples drawn through the CVC in a population of patients receiving intravenous nutrition. Bacterial DNA concentrations were raised in 16 of 16 blood samples taken during episodes of probable bacterial CVC-associated infection. Bacterial DNA concentrations were raised in 4 of 29 episodes in which bacterial CVC-associated infection was unlikely. The use of this technique has the potential to substantially reduce the unnecessary removal of CVCs. PMID:15070980

  20. Characterization of the nuclear ribosomal DNA units and phylogeny of Beta L. wild forms and cultivated beets.

    PubMed

    Santoni, S; Bervillé, A

    1992-03-01

    The nuclear rDNA units of species belonging to the genus Beta were characterized using heterologous probes of flax (entire unit and 25S) and sunflower (6.1-kb Eco fragment containing the 18S, the entire intergenic spacer (IGS) and a small piece of the 25S). The physical maps of one species from each section of the genus was constructed by localization of the EcoRI, BamHI, HindIII, KpnI and SacI restriction sites. For each species a single individual was used to obtain total DNA. The major unit length is 11 kb, but variant length units at 10.4, 10.7 and 11.3 kb were found as minor forms. However, some individuals carried the 10.4-kb or the 10.7-kb variant length unit as the major form. For the variant length units of one species the restriction sites were conserved, so that the variation in length occurred in the IGS. The EcoRI fragment corresponding to the intergenic spacer appeared to be the best indicator of variation. The variable sequence in the IGS sometimes generated new restriction sites for the Corollinae and mainly, did so, for the Vulgares relative to the Procumbentes. The variable sites were able, to differentiate the three sections and species within the sections. Corollinae species belong to two different groups according to the absence or the presence of the BamHI (B4) site. The Vulgares species contain several unit types. We proposed that all the unit types derived from a unique unit, V-11-2.3, by unequal crossing-overs or conversion. We also supposed a homogenization mechanism because we found individuals homogeneous for every unit type. Among the cultivated beets, all the root beets contain only one rDNA unit type, V-11-2.9. Thus, we supposed that the common unit type of cultivated beets either brings a physiological advantage or is strictly linked to a favorable allele. It is likely that the rDNA unit of B. maritima were eliminated from sugar beet by the breeding process since they were not recovered. Whatever the process, we deduced that all the

  1. Seasonal Succession Leads to Habitat-Dependent Differentiation in Ribosomal RNA:DNA Ratios among Freshwater Lake Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; Schmidt, Marian L.

    2016-01-01

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA gene sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. However, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors. PMID:27199936

  2. Seasonal succession leads to habitat-dependent differentiation in ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios among freshwater lake bacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; Schmidt, Marian L.

    2016-04-29

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA genemore » sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. Furthermore, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors.« less

  3. Decreased ribosomal DNA transcription in dorsal raphe nucleus neurons is specific for suicide regardless of psychiatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Krzyżanowska, Marta; Steiner, Johann; Brisch, Ralf; Mawrin, Christian; Busse, Stefan; Karnecki, Karol; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Gos, Tomasz

    2016-07-30

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is the main source of serotonergic innervation of forebrain limbic structures disturbed in suicidal behaviour. We have evaluated the transcriptional activity of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in DRN neurons by AgNOR silver staining method. The cohort (containing 24 suicidal and 20 non-suicidal patients, and 28 controls) was previously analysed regarding diagnosis-related differences between schizophrenia and affective disorders. Significant decreases in both AgNOR and nuclear areas suggestive of attenuated rDNA activity were currently found in suicidal versus non-suicidal patients. This effect, which was more accentuated in affective disorders patients, was not explained by antidepressant and antipsychotic medication. PMID:27155286

  4. New Primers for Discovering Fungal Diversity Using Nuclear Large Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gloor, Gregory B.; Lindo, Zoë

    2016-01-01

    Metabarcoding has become an important tool in the discovery of biodiversity, including fungi, which are the second most speciose group of eukaryotes, with diverse and important ecological roles in terrestrial ecosystems. We have designed and tested new PCR primers that target the D1 variable region of nuclear large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA; one set that targets the phylum Ascomycota and another that recovers all other fungal phyla. The primers yield amplicons compatible with the Illumina MiSeq platform, which is cost-effective and has a lower error rate than other high throughput sequencing platforms. The new primer set LSU200A-F/LSU476A-R (Ascomycota) yielded 95–98% of reads of target taxa from environmental samples, and primers LSU200-F/LSU481-R (all other fungi) yielded 72–80% of target reads. Both primer sets have fairly low rates of data loss, and together they cover a wide variety of fungal taxa. We compared our results with these primers by amplifying and sequencing a subset of samples using the previously described ITS3_KYO2/ITS4_KYO3 primers, which amplify the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. With approximately equivalent read depth, our LSU primers recovered a greater number and phylogenetic diversity of sequences than the ITS2 primers. For instance, ITS3_KYO2/ITS4_KYO3 primers failed to pick up any members of Eurotiales, Mytilinidiales, Pezizales, Saccharomycetales, or Venturiales within Ascomycota, or members of Exobasidiomycetes, Microbotryomycetes, Pucciniomycetes, or Tremellomycetes within Basidiomycota, which were retrieved in good numbers from the same samples by our LSU primers. Among the OTUs recovered using the LSU primers were 127 genera and 28 species that were not obtained using the ITS2 primers, although the ITS2 primers recovered 10 unique genera and 16 species that were not obtained using either of the LSU primers These features identify the new primer sets developed in this study as useful

  5. Loss of Nucleolar Histone Chaperone NPM1 Triggers Rearrangement of Heterochromatin and Synergizes with a Deficiency in DNA Methyltransferase DNMT3A to Drive Ribosomal DNA Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg Olausson, Karl; Nistér, Monica; Lindström, Mikael S.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoli are prominent nuclear structures assembled and organized around actively transcribed ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The nucleolus has emerged as a platform for the organization of chromatin enriched for repressive histone modifications associated with repetitive DNA. NPM1 is a nucleolar protein required for the maintenance of genome stability. However, the role of NPM1 in nucleolar chromatin dynamics and ribosome biogenesis remains unclear. We found that normal fibroblasts and cancer cells depleted of NPM1 displayed deformed nucleoli and a striking rearrangement of perinucleolar heterochromatin, as identified by immunofluorescence staining of trimethylated H3K9, trimethylated H3K27, and heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ/CBX3). By co-immunoprecipitation we found NPM1 associated with HP1γ and core and linker histones. Moreover, NPM1 was required for efficient tethering of HP1γ-enriched chromatin to the nucleolus. We next tested whether the alterations in perinucleolar heterochromatin architecture correlated with a difference in the regulation of rDNA. U1242MG glioma cells depleted of NPM1 presented with altered silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions, coupled to a modest decrease in H3K9 di- and trimethylation at the rDNA promoter. rDNA transcription and cell proliferation were sustained in these cells, indicating that altered organization of heterochromatin was not secondary to inhibition of rDNA transcription. Furthermore, knockdown of DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A markedly enhanced rDNA transcription in NPM1-depleted U1242MG cells. In summary, this study highlights a function of NPM1 in the spatial organization of nucleolus-associated heterochromatin. PMID:25349213

  6. [RIBOSOMAL DNA INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER 2 SEQUENCE AS A PHYLOGENETIC MARKER FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF TRICHINELLA NEMATODES].

    PubMed

    Odoyevskaya, I M; Spiridonov, S E

    2015-01-01

    The results of testing several primer combinations were used to choose an optimal pair for the amplification of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of ribosomal DNA (direct: Tri58s F 5 CGG TGG ATC RCT TGG CTC GTA CG and reverse: AB28 Rr (CGA CCG CTT ATT GAT ATG C). This pair of primers yields a 900 bp PCR product. Comparative analysis of obtained ITS2 sequences, for 8 Trichinella isolates from different regions of the Russian Federation permits different species and individual genotypes of these parasitic nematodes to be validly distinguished. PMID:26152035

  7. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Weitemier, Kevin; Straub, Shannon C K; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual's consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%). Most nrDNA positions (91%) were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the "noncoding" ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming). PMID:25653903

  8. Evaluation of DNA encoding acidic ribosomal protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum as a potential vaccine candidate for cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Alvaro; Priest, Jeffrey W.; Ehigiator, Humphrey N.; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R.

    2011-01-01

    The Cryptosporidium parvum acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2) is an important immunodominant marker in C. parvum infection. In this study, the CpP2 antigen was evaluated as a vaccine candidate using a DNA vaccine model in adult C57BL/6 IL-12 knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding CpP2 (CpP2-DNA) cloned into the pUMVC4b vector induced a significant anti-CpP2 IgG antibody response that was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Compared to control KO mice immunized with plasmid alone, CpP2-immunized mice demonstrated specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation as well as enhanced IFN-γ production to recombinant CpP2. Further, parasite loads in CpP2 DNA-immunized mice were compared to control mice challenged with C. parvum oocysts. Although a trend in reduction of infection was observed in the CpP2 DNA-immunized mice, differences between groups were not statistically significant. These results suggest that a DNA vaccine encoding the C. parvum P2 antigen is able to provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and has the potential to generate protective immunity against C. parvum infection but may require using alternative vectors or adjuvant to generate a more potent and balanced response. PMID:21968447

  9. Analysis of a new strain of Euphorbia mosaic virus with distinct replication specificity unveils a lineage of begomoviruses with short Rep sequences in the DNA-B intergenic region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV) is a member of the SLCV clade, a lineage of New World begomoviruses that display distinctive features in their replication-associated protein (Rep) and virion-strand replication origin. The first entirely characterized EuMV isolate is native from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico; subsequently, EuMV was detected in weeds and pepper plants from another region of Mexico, and partial DNA-A sequences revealed significant differences in their putative replication specificity determinants with respect to EuMV-YP. This study was aimed to investigate the replication compatibility between two EuMV isolates from the same country. Results A new isolate of EuMV was obtained from pepper plants collected at Jalisco, Mexico. Full-length clones of both genomic components of EuMV-Jal were biolistically inoculated into plants of three different species, which developed symptoms indistinguishable from those induced by EuMV-YP. Pseudorecombination experiments with EuMV-Jal and EuMV-YP genomic components demonstrated that these viruses do not form infectious reassortants in Nicotiana benthamiana, presumably because of Rep-iteron incompatibility. Sequence analysis of the EuMV-Jal DNA-B intergenic region (IR) led to the unexpected discovery of a 35-nt-long sequence that is identical to a segment of the rep gene in the cognate viral DNA-A. Similar short rep sequences ranging from 35- to 51-nt in length were identified in all EuMV isolates and in three distinct viruses from South America related to EuMV. These short rep sequences in the DNA-B IR are positioned downstream to a ~160-nt non-coding domain highly similar to the CP promoter of begomoviruses belonging to the SLCV clade. Conclusions EuMV strains are not compatible in replication, indicating that this begomovirus species probably is not a replicating lineage in nature. The genomic analysis of EuMV-Jal led to the discovery of a subgroup of SLCV clade viruses that contain in the non-coding region of

  10. A ribosomal protein gene cluster is encoded in the mitochondrial DNA of Dictyostelium discoideum: UGA termination codons and similarity of gene order to Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, M; Pi, M; Kurihara, M; Morio, T; Tanaka, Y

    1998-04-01

    We sequenced a region of about 14.5 kb downstream from the ribosomal protein L11 gene (rpl11) in the mitochondrial DNA (54+/-2 kb) of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Sequence analysis revealed that eleven ribosomal protein genes and six open reading frames (ORFs) formed a cluster arranged in the order: rpl11-orf189-rps12-rps7-rpl2-rps19-+ ++orf425-orf1740-rpl16-rpl14-orf188- rps14-rps8-rpl6-rps13-orf127-orf796. This order was very similar to that of homologous genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial DNA. The N-terminal region of ORF425 and the C-terminal region of ORF1740 had partial similarities to the S3 ribosomal protein of other organisms. The termination codons of rpl16 and orf188 were UGA, which has not hitherto been found in genes encoded in D. discoideum mitochondrial DNA. PMID:9560439

  11. Identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeasts based on nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzman, C P; Robnett, C J

    1997-01-01

    Clinically important species of Candida and related organisms were compared for extent of nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene. This rDNA region is sufficiently variable to allow reliable separation of all known clinically significant yeast species. Of the 204 described species examined, 21 appeared to be synonyms of previously described organisms. Phylogenetic relationships among the species are presented. PMID:9114410

  12. Regulation of p53 translation and induction after DNA damage by ribosomal protein L26 and nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Masatoshi; Absalon, Michael J; McLure, Kevin G; Kastan, Michael B

    2005-10-01

    Increases in p53 protein levels after DNA damage have largely been attributed to an increase in the half-life of p53 protein. Here we demonstrate that increased translation of p53 mRNA is also a critical step in the induction of p53 protein in irradiated cells. Ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) and nucleolin were found to bind to the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of p53 mRNA and to control p53 translation and induction after DNA damage. RPL26 preferentially binds to the 5'UTR after DNA damage, and its overexpression enhances association of p53 mRNA with heavier polysomes, increases the rate of p53 translation, induces G1 cell-cycle arrest, and augments irradiation-induced apoptosis. Opposite effects were seen when RPL26 expression was inhibited. In contrast, nucleolin overexpression suppresses p53 translation and induction after DNA damage, whereas nucleolin downregulation promotes p53 expression. These findings demonstrate the importance of increased translation of p53 in DNA-damage responses and suggest critical roles for RPL26 and nucleolin in affecting p53 induction. PMID:16213212

  13. Ribosomal DNA organization patterns within the dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium as revealed by FISH: life cycle and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rosa Isabel; Cuadrado, Angeles; Stüken, Anke; Rodríguez, Francisco; Fraga, Santiago

    2014-05-01

    Dinoflagellates are a group of protists whose genome differs from that of other eukaryotes in terms of size (contains up to 250pg per haploid cell), base composition, chromosomal organization, and gene expression. But rDNA gene mapping of the active nucleolus in this unusual eukaryotic genome has not been carried out thus far. Here we used FISH in dinoflagellate species belonging to the genus Alexandrium (genome sizes ranging from 21 to 170 pg of DNA per haploid genome) to localize the sequences encoding the 18S, 5.8S, and 28S rRNA genes. The results can be summarized as follows: 1) Each dinoflagellate cell contains only one active nucleolus, with no hybridization signals outside it. However, the rDNA organization varies among species, from repetitive clusters forming discrete nuclear organizer regions (NORs) in some to specialized "ribosomal chromosomes" in other species. The latter chromosomes, never reported before in other eukaryotes, are mainly formed by rDNA genes and appeared in the species with the highest DNA content. 2) Dinoflagellate chromosomes are first characterized by several eukaryotic features, such as structural differentiation (centromere-like constrictions), size differences (dot chromosomes), and SAT (satellite) chromosomes. 3) NOR patterns prove to be useful in discriminating between cryptic species and life cycle stages in protists. PMID:24846057

  14. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA in three species of Agave (Asparagales, Asparagaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Victor Manuel; Rodriguez-Garay, Benjamin; Palomino, Guadalupe; Martínez, Javier; Barba-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Agave Linnaeus, 1753 is endemic of America and is considered one of the most important crops in Mexico due to its key role in the country’s economy. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in Agave tequilana Weber, 1902 ‘Azul’, Agave cupreata Trelease et Berger, 1915 and Agave angustifolia Haworth, 1812. The analysis showed that in all species the diploid chromosome number was 2n = 60, with bimodal karyotypes composed of five pairs of large chromosomes and 25 pairs of small chromosomes. Furthermore, different karyotypical formulae as well as a secondary constriction in a large chromosome pair were found in all species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). All species analyzed showed that 5S rDNA was located in both arms of a small chromosome pair, while 18S rDNA was associated with the secondary constriction of a large chromosome pair. Data of FISH analysis provides new information about the position and number of rDNA loci and helps for detection of hybrids in breeding programs as well as evolutionary studies. PMID:24260700

  15. Systematics of Chaetognatha under the light of molecular data, using duplicated ribosomal 18S DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Papillon, Daniel; Perez, Yvan; Caubit, Xavier; Le Parco, Yannick

    2006-03-01

    While the phylogenetic position of Chaetognatha has became central to the question of early bilaterian evolution, the internal systematics of the phylum are still not clear. The phylogenetic relationships of the chaetognaths were investigated using newly obtained small subunit ribosomal RNA nuclear 18S (SSU rRNA) sequences from 16 species together with 3 sequences available in GenBank. As previously shown with the large subunit ribosomal RNA 28S gene, two classes of Chaetognatha SSU rRNA gene can be identified, suggesting a duplication of the whole ribosomal cluster; allowing the rooting of one class of genes by another in phylogenetic analyses. Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analyses of the molecular data, and statistical tests showed (1) that there are three main monophyletic groups: Sagittidae/Krohnittidae, Spadellidae/Pterosagittidae, and Eukrohniidae/Heterokrohniidae, (2) that the group of Aphragmophora without Pterosagittidae (Sagittidae/Krohnittidae) is monophyletic, (3) the Spadellidae/Pterosagittidae and Eukrohniidae/Heterokrohniidae families are very likely clustered, (4) the Krohnittidae and Pterosagittidae groups should no longer be considered as families as they are included in other groups designated as families, (5) suborder Ctenodontina is not monophyletic and the Flabellodontina should no longer be considered as a suborder, and (6) the Syngonata/Chorismogonata and the Monophragmophora/Biphragmophora hypotheses are rejected. Such conclusions are considered in the light of morphological characters, several of which are shown to be prone to homoplasy. PMID:16434216

  16. Nuclear Ribosomal DNA Variation and Pathogenic Specialization in Alternaria Fungi Known To Produce Host-Specific Toxins †

    PubMed Central

    Kusaba, Motoaki; Tsuge, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    A total of 99 strains of 11 Alternaria species, including 68 strains of seven fungi known to produce host-specific toxins, were subjected to analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Total DNA was digested with XbaI, and the Southern blots were probed with a nuclear rDNA clone of Alternaria kikuchiana. The hybridization gave 17 different RFLPs from the 99 strains. On the basis of these RFLPs, populations of host-specific toxin-producing fungi could not be differentiated from one another nor from nonpathogenic A. alternata. Each population of the toxin-producing fungi carried rDNA variants. Nine different types, named A1 to A6 and B1 to B3, were detected among the toxin-producing fungi and nonpathogenic A. alternata. All of the populations contained the type A4 variant, and the other rDNA types were also shared by different toxin-producing fungi and A. alternata. In contrast, Alternaria species that are morphologically distinguishable from A. alternata could be differentiated from A. alternata on the basis of the rDNA RFLPs. Polymorphisms in rDNA digested with HaeIII and MspI were also evaluated in 61 Alternaria strains. These restriction enzymes produced 31 variations among all of the samples. The seven toxin-producing fungi and nonpathogenic A. alternata could not be resolved by phylogenetic analysis based on the RFLPs, although they could be differentiated from the other Alternaria species studied. These results provide support for the hypothesis that Alternaria fungi known to produce host-specific toxins are intraspecific variants of A. alternata specialized in pathogenicity. Images PMID:16349367

  17. Intergenic Locations of Rice Centromeric Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Huihuang; Talbert, Paul B; Lee, Hye-Ran; Jett, Jamie; Henikoff, Steven; Chen, Feng; Jiang, Jiming

    2008-01-01

    Centromeres are sites for assembly of the chromosomal structures that mediate faithful segregation at mitosis and meiosis. Plant and animal centromeres are typically located in megabase-sized arrays of tandem satellite repeats, making their precise mapping difficult. However, some rice centromeres are largely embedded in nonsatellite DNA, providing an excellent model to study centromere structure and evolution. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation and 454 sequencing to define the boundaries of nine of the 12 centromeres of rice. Centromere regions from chromosomes 8 and 9 were found to share synteny, most likely reflecting an ancient genome duplication. For four centromeres, we mapped discrete subdomains of binding by the centromeric histone variant CENH3. These subdomains were depleted in both intact and nonfunctional genes relative to interspersed subdomains lacking CENH3. The intergenic location of rice centromeric chromatin resembles the situation for human neocentromeres and supports a model of the evolution of centromeres from gene-poor regions. PMID:19067486

  18. Identification of the Bacterial Community of Maple Sap by Using Amplified Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) Restriction Analysis and rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lagacé, L.; Pitre, M.; Jacques, M.; Roy, D.

    2004-01-01

    The bacterial community of maple sap was characterized by analysis of samples obtained at the taphole of maple trees for the 2001 and 2002 seasons. Among the 190 bacterial isolates, 32 groups were formed according to the similarity of the banding patterns obtained by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). A subset of representative isolates for each ARDRA group was identified by 16S rRNA gene fragment sequencing. Results showed a wide variety of organisms, with 22 different genera encountered. Pseudomonas and Ralstonia, of the γ- and β-Proteobacteria, respectively, were the most frequently encountered genera. Gram-positive bacteria were also observed, and Staphylococcus, Plantibacter, and Bacillus were the most highly represented genera. The sampling period corresponding to 50% of the cumulative sap flow percentage presented the greatest bacterial diversity according to its Shannon diversity index value (1.1). γ-Proteobacteria were found to be dominant almost from the beginning of the season to the end. These results are providing interesting insights on maple sap microflora that will be useful for further investigation related to microbial contamination and quality of maple products and also for guiding new strategies on taphole contamination control. PMID:15066796

  19. A nuclear ribosomal DNA pseudogene in triatomines opens a new research field of fundamental and applied implications in Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Zuriaga, María Angeles; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Bargues, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    A pseudogene, designated as "ps(5.8S+ITS-2)", paralogous to the 5.8S gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-2 of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), has been recently found in many triatomine species distributed throughout North America, Central America and northern South America. Among characteristics used as criteria for pseudogene verification, secondary structures and free energy are highlighted, showing a lower fit between minimum free energy, partition function and centroid structures, although in given cases the fit only appeared to be slightly lower. The unique characteristics of "ps(5.8S+ITS-2)" as a processed or retrotransposed pseudogenic unit of the ghost type are reviewed, with emphasis on its potential functionality compared to the functionality of genes and spacers of the normal rDNA operon. Besides the technical problem of the risk for erroneous sequence results, the usefulness of "ps(5.8S+ITS-2)" for specimen classification, phylogenetic analyses and systematic/taxonomic studies should be highlighted, based on consistence and retention index values, which in pseudogenic sequence trees were higher than in functional sequence trees. Additionally, intraindividual, interpopulational and interspecific differences in pseudogene amount and the fact that it is a pseudogene in the nuclear rDNA suggests a potential relationships with fitness, behaviour and adaptability of triatomine vectors and consequently its potential utility in Chagas disease epidemiology and control. PMID:25760450

  20. Ribosomal DNA Sequencing for Identification of Aerobic Gram-Positive Rods in the Clinical Laboratory (an 18-Month Evaluation)

    PubMed Central

    Bosshard, P. P.; Abels, S.; Zbinden, R.; Böttger, E. C.; Altwegg, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have evaluated over a period of 18 months the use of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis as a means of identifying aerobic gram-positive rods in the clinical laboratory. Two collections of strains were studied: (i) 37 clinical strains of gram-positive rods well identified by phenotypic tests, and (ii) 136 clinical isolates difficult to identify by standard microbiological investigations, i.e., identification at the species level was impossible. Results of molecular analyses were compared with those of conventional phenotypic identification procedures. Good overall agreement between phenotypic and molecular identification procedures was found for the collection of 37 clinical strains well identified by conventional means. For the 136 clinical strains which were difficult to identify by standard microbiological investigations, phenotypic characterization identified 71 of 136 (52.2%) isolates at the genus level; 65 of 136 (47.8%) isolates could not be discriminated at any taxonomic level. In comparison, 16S rDNA sequencing identified 89 of 136 (65.4%) isolates at the species level, 43 of 136 (31.6%) isolates at the genus level, and 4 of 136 (2.9%) isolates at the family level. We conclude that (i) rDNA sequencing is an effective means for the identification of aerobic gram-positive rods which are difficult to identify by conventional techniques, and (ii) molecular identification procedures are not required for isolates well identified by phenotypic investigations. PMID:12958237

  1. Identification of Aspergillus fumigatus and Related Species by Nested PCR Targeting Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Kong, Fanrong; Li, Ruoyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Wan, Zhe; Wang, Duanli

    2001-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common species that causes invasive aspergillosis. In order to identify A. fumigatus, partial ribosomal DNA (rDNA) from two to six strains of five different Aspergillus species was sequenced. By comparing sequence data from GenBank, we designed specific primer pairs targeting rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of A. fumigatus. A nested PCR method for identification of other A. fumigatus-related species was established by using the primers. To evaluate the specificities and sensitivities of those primers, 24 isolates of A. fumigatus and variants, 8 isolates of Aspergillus nidulans, 7 isolates of Aspergillus flavus and variants, 8 isolates of Aspergillus terreus, 9 isolates of Aspergillus niger, 1 isolate each of Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus penicilloides, Aspergillus versicolor, Aspergillus wangduanlii, Aspergillus qizutongii, Aspergillus beijingensis, and Exophiala dermatitidis, 4 isolates of Candida, 4 isolates of bacteria, and human DNA were used. The nested PCR method specifically identified the A. fumigatus isolates and closely related species and showed a high degree of sensitivity. Additionally, four A. fumigatus strains that were recently isolated from our clinic were correctly identified by this method. Our results demonstrate that these primers are useful for the identification of A. fumigatus and closely related species in culture and suggest further studies for the identification of Aspergillus fumigatus species in clinical specimens. PMID:11376067

  2. Decreased ribosomal DNA transcription in dorsal raphe nucleus neurons differentiates between suicidal and non-suicidal death.

    PubMed

    Krzyżanowska, Marta; Steiner, Johann; Karnecki, Karol; Kaliszan, Michał; Brisch, Ralf; Wiergowski, Marek; Braun, Katharina; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Gos, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    An involvement of the central serotonergic system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of suicide. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is the main source of serotonergic innervation of forebrain limbic structures disturbed in suicidal behaviour. The study was carried out on paraffin-embedded brainstem blocks containing the DRN obtained from 27 suicide completers (predominantly violent) with unknown psychiatric diagnosis and 30 non-suicidal controls. The transcriptional activity of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in DRN neurons as a surrogate marker of protein biosynthesis was evaluated by the AgNOR silver staining method. Significant decreases in AgNOR parameters suggestive of attenuated rDNA activity were found in the cumulative analysis of all DRN subnuclei in suicide victims versus controls (U test P values < 0.00001). Our findings suggest that the decreased activity of rDNA transcription in DRN neurons plays an important role in suicide pathogenesis. The method accuracy represented by the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (>80 %) suggests a diagnostic value of the observed effect. However, the possible application of the method in forensic differentiation diagnostics between suicidal and non-suicidal death needs further research. PMID:26590846

  3. A pathogenic non-coding RNA induces changes in dynamic DNA methylation of ribosomal RNA genes in host plants.

    PubMed

    Martinez, German; Castellano, Mayte; Tortosa, Maria; Pallas, Vicente; Gomez, Gustavo

    2014-02-01

    Viroids are plant-pathogenic non-coding RNAs able to interfere with as yet poorly known host-regulatory pathways and to cause alterations recognized as diseases. The way in which these RNAs coerce the host to express symptoms remains to be totally deciphered. In recent years, diverse studies have proposed a close interplay between viroid-induced pathogenesis and RNA silencing, supporting the belief that viroid-derived small RNAs mediate the post-transcriptional cleavage of endogenous mRNAs by acting as elicitors of symptoms expression. Although the evidence supporting the role of viroid-derived small RNAs in pathogenesis is robust, the possibility that this phenomenon can be a more complex process, also involving viroid-induced alterations in plant gene expression at transcriptional levels, has been considered. Here we show that plants infected with the 'Hop stunt viroid' accumulate high levels of sRNAs derived from ribosomal transcripts. This effect was correlated with an increase in the transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursors during infection. We observed that the transcriptional reactivation of rRNA genes correlates with a modification of DNA methylation in their promoter region and revealed that some rRNA genes are demethylated and transcriptionally reactivated during infection. This study reports a previously unknown mechanism associated with viroid (or any other pathogenic RNA) infection in plants providing new insights into aspects of host alterations induced by the viroid infectious cycle. PMID:24178032

  4. Factors That Affect Large Subunit Ribosomal DNA Amplicon Sequencing Studies of Fungal Communities: Classification Method, Primer Choice, and Error

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Teresita M.; Golding, G. Brian

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA is widely used in fungal phylogenetics and to an increasing extent also amplicon-based environmental sequencing. The relatively short reads produced by next-generation sequencing, however, makes primer choice and sequence error important variables for obtaining accurate taxonomic classifications. In this simulation study we tested the performance of three classification methods: 1) a similarity-based method (BLAST + Metagenomic Analyzer, MEGAN); 2) a composition-based method (Ribosomal Database Project naïve Bayesian classifier, NBC); and, 3) a phylogeny-based method (Statistical Assignment Package, SAP). We also tested the effects of sequence length, primer choice, and sequence error on classification accuracy and perceived community composition. Using a leave-one-out cross validation approach, results for classifications to the genus rank were as follows: BLAST + MEGAN had the lowest error rate and was particularly robust to sequence error; SAP accuracy was highest when long LSU query sequences were classified; and, NBC runs significantly faster than the other tested methods. All methods performed poorly with the shortest 50–100 bp sequences. Increasing simulated sequence error reduced classification accuracy. Community shifts were detected due to sequence error and primer selection even though there was no change in the underlying community composition. Short read datasets from individual primers, as well as pooled datasets, appear to only approximate the true community composition. We hope this work informs investigators of some of the factors that affect the quality and interpretation of their environmental gene surveys. PMID:22558215

  5. Evolutionary site-number changes of ribosomal DNA loci during speciation: complex scenarios of ancestral and more recent polyploid events

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Moreno-Saiz, Juan C.; Galián, José A.; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2015-01-01

    Several genome duplications have been identified in the evolution of seed plants, providing unique systems for studying karyological processes promoting diversification and speciation. Knowledge about the number of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci, together with their chromosomal distribution and structure, provides clues about organismal and molecular evolution at various phylogenetic levels. In this work, we aim to elucidate the evolutionary dynamics of karyological and rDNA site-number variation in all known taxa of subtribe Vellinae, showing a complex scenario of ancestral and more recent polyploid events. Specifically, we aim to infer the ancestral chromosome numbers and patterns of chromosome number variation, assess patterns of variation of both 45S and 5S rDNA families, trends in site-number change of rDNA loci within homoploid and polyploid series, and reconstruct the evolutionary history of rDNA site number using a phylogenetic hypothesis as a framework. The best-fitting model of chromosome number evolution with a high likelihood score suggests that the Vellinae core showing x = 17 chromosomes arose by duplication events from a recent x = 8 ancestor. Our survey suggests more complex patterns of polyploid evolution than previously noted for Vellinae. High polyploidization events (6x, 8x) arose independently in the basal clade Vella castrilensis–V. lucentina, where extant diploid species are unknown. Reconstruction of ancestral rDNA states in Vellinae supports the inference that the ancestral number of loci in the subtribe was two for each multigene family, suggesting that an overall tendency towards a net loss of 5S rDNA loci occurred during the splitting of Vellinae ancestors from the remaining Brassiceae lineages. A contrasting pattern for rDNA site change in both paleopolyploid and neopolyploid species was linked to diversification of Vellinae lineages. This suggests dynamic and independent changes in rDNA site number during speciation processes and a

  6. Intragenomic polymorphisms among high-copy loci: a genus-wide study of nuclear ribosomal DNA in Asclepias (Apocynaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Shannon C.K.; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Despite knowledge that concerted evolution of high-copy loci is often imperfect, studies that investigate the extent of intragenomic polymorphisms and comparisons across a large number of species are rarely made. We present a bioinformatic pipeline for characterizing polymorphisms within an individual among copies of a high-copy locus. Results are presented for nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) across the milkweed genus, Asclepias. The 18S-26S portion of the nrDNA cistron of Asclepias syriaca served as a reference for assembly of the region from 124 samples representing 90 species of Asclepias. Reads were mapped back to each individual’s consensus and at each position reads differing from the consensus were tallied using a custom perl script. Low frequency polymorphisms existed in all individuals (mean = 5.8%). Most nrDNA positions (91%) were polymorphic in at least one individual, with polymorphic sites being less frequent in subunit regions and loops. Highly polymorphic sites existed in each individual, with highest abundance in the “noncoding” ITS regions. Phylogenetic signal was present in the distribution of intragenomic polymorphisms across the genus. Intragenomic polymorphisms in nrDNA are common in Asclepias, being found at higher frequency than any other study to date. The high and variable frequency of polymorphisms across species highlights concerns that phylogenetic applications of nrDNA may be error-prone. The new analytical approach provided here is applicable to other taxa and other high-copy regions characterized by low coverage genome sequencing (genome skimming). PMID:25653903

  7. Ribosomal DNA analysis of tsetse and non-tsetse transmitted Ethiopian Trypanosoma vivax strains in view of improved molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fikru, Regassa; Matetovici, Irina; Rogé, Stijn; Merga, Bekana; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria; Büscher, Philippe; Van Reet, Nick

    2016-04-15

    Animal trypanosomosis caused by Trypanosoma vivax (T. vivax) is a devastating disease causing serious economic losses. Most molecular diagnostics for T. vivax infection target the ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA) but are challenged by the heterogeneity among T. vivax strains. In this study, we investigated the rDNA heterogeneity of Ethiopian T. vivax strains in relation to their presence in tsetse-infested and tsetse-free areas and its effect on molecular diagnosis. We sequenced the rDNA loci of six Ethiopian (three from tsetse-infested and three from tsetse-free areas) and one Nigerian T. vivax strain. We analysed the obtained sequences in silico for primer-mismatches of some commonly used diagnostic PCR assays and for GC content. With these data, we selected some rDNA diagnostic PCR assays for evaluation of their diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore we constructed two phylogenetic networks based on sequences within the smaller subunit (SSU) of 18S and within the 5.8S and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) to assess the relatedness of Ethiopian T. vivax strains to strains from other African countries and from South America. In silico analysis of the rDNA sequence showed important mismatches of some published diagnostic PCR primers and high GC content of T. vivax rDNA. The evaluation of selected diagnostic PCR assays with specimens from cattle under natural T. vivax challenge showed that this high GC content interferes with the diagnostic accuracy of PCR, especially in cases of mixed infections with T. congolense. Adding betain to the PCR reaction mixture can enhance the amplification of T. vivax rDNA but decreases the sensitivity for T. congolense and Trypanozoon. The networks illustrated that Ethiopian T. vivax strains are considerably heterogeneous and two strains (one from tsetse-infested and one from tsetse-free area) are more related to the West African and South American strains than to the East African strains. The rDNA locus sequence of six Ethiopian T. vivax

  8. 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequence Analysis of a Large Collection of Environmental and Clinical Unidentifiable Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Drancourt, Michel; Bollet, Claude; Carlioz, Antoine; Martelin, Rolland; Gayral, Jean-Pierre; Raoult, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Some bacteria are difficult to identify with phenotypic identification schemes commonly used outside reference laboratories. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA)-based identification of bacteria potentially offers a useful alternative when phenotypic characterization methods fail. However, as yet, the usefulness of 16S rDNA sequence analysis in the identification of conventionally unidentifiable isolates has not been evaluated with a large collection of isolates. In this study, we evaluated the utility of 16S rDNA sequencing as a means to identify a collection of 177 such isolates obtained from environmental, veterinary, and clinical sources. For 159 isolates (89.8%) there was at least one sequence in GenBank that yielded a similarity score of ≥97%, and for 139 isolates (78.5%) there was at least one sequence in GenBank that yielded a similarity score of ≥99%. These similarity score values were used to defined identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. For isolates identified to the species level, conventional identification failed to produce accurate results because of inappropriate biochemical profile determination in 76 isolates (58.7%), Gram staining in 16 isolates (11.6%), oxidase and catalase activity determination in 5 isolates (3.6%) and growth requirement determination in 2 isolates (1.5%). Eighteen isolates (10.2%) remained unidentifiable by 16S rDNA sequence analysis but were probably prototype isolates of new species. These isolates originated mainly from environmental sources (P = 0.07). The 16S rDNA approach failed to identify Enterobacter and Pantoea isolates to the species level (P = 0.04; odds ratio = 0.32 [95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 1.14]). Elsewhere, the usefulness of 16S rDNA sequencing was compromised by the presence of 16S rDNA sequences with >1% undetermined positions in the databases. Unlike phenotypic identification, which can be modified by the variability of expression of characters, 16S rDNA sequencing provides

  9. Comparison of Antifungal Activities and 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequences of Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Minkwitz, Arite; Berg, Gabriele

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, the gram-negative bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has become increasingly important in biotechnology and as a nosocomial pathogen, giving rise to a need for new information about its taxonomy and epidemiology. To determine intraspecies diversity and whether strains can be distinguished based on the sources of their isolation, 50 S. maltophilia isolates from clinical and environmental sources, including strains of biotechnological interest, were investigated. The isolates were characterized by in vitro antagonism against pathogenic fungi and the production of antifungal metabolites and enzymes. Phenotypically the strains showed variability that did not correlate significantly with their sources of isolation. Clinical strains displayed remarkable activity against the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Antifungal activity against plant pathogens was more common and generally more severe from the environmental isolates, although not exclusive to them. All isolates, clinical and environmental, produced a range of antifungal metabolites including antibiotics, siderophores, and the enzymes proteases and chitinases. From 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing analysis, the isolates could be separated into three clusters, two of which consisted of isolates originating from the environment, especially rhizosphere isolates, and one of which consisted of clinical and aquatic strains. In contrast to the results of other recent investigations, these strains could be grouped based on their sources of isolation, with the exception of three rhizosphere isolates. Because there was evidence of nucleotide signature positions within the sequences that are suitable for distinguishing among the clusters, the clusters could be defined as different genomovars of S. maltophilia. Key sequences on the 16S ribosomal DNA could be used to develop a diagnostic method that differentiates these genomovars. PMID:11136762

  10. Ribosomal DNA and Plastid Markers Used to Sample Fungal and Plant Communities from Wetland Soils Reveals Complementary Biotas

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Teresita M.; Shokralla, Shadi; Baird, Donald; Golding, G. Brian; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Though the use of metagenomic methods to sample below-ground fungal communities is common, the use of similar methods to sample plants from their underground structures is not. In this study we use high throughput sequencing of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (rbcL) plastid marker to study the plant community as well as the internal transcribed spacer and large subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) markers to investigate the fungal community from two wetland sites. Observed community richness and composition varied by marker. The two rDNA markers detected complementary sets of fungal taxa and total fungal composition clustered according to primer rather than by site. The composition of the most abundant plants, however, clustered according to sites as expected. We suggest that future studies consider using multiple genetic markers, ideally generated from different primer sets, to detect a more taxonomically diverse suite of taxa compared with what can be detected by any single marker alone. Conclusions drawn from the presence of even the most frequently observed taxa should be made with caution without corroborating lines of evidence. PMID:26731732

  11. Ribosomal DNA and Plastid Markers Used to Sample Fungal and Plant Communities from Wetland Soils Reveals Complementary Biotas.

    PubMed

    Porter, Teresita M; Shokralla, Shadi; Baird, Donald; Golding, G Brian; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Though the use of metagenomic methods to sample below-ground fungal communities is common, the use of similar methods to sample plants from their underground structures is not. In this study we use high throughput sequencing of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (rbcL) plastid marker to study the plant community as well as the internal transcribed spacer and large subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) markers to investigate the fungal community from two wetland sites. Observed community richness and composition varied by marker. The two rDNA markers detected complementary sets of fungal taxa and total fungal composition clustered according to primer rather than by site. The composition of the most abundant plants, however, clustered according to sites as expected. We suggest that future studies consider using multiple genetic markers, ideally generated from different primer sets, to detect a more taxonomically diverse suite of taxa compared with what can be detected by any single marker alone. Conclusions drawn from the presence of even the most frequently observed taxa should be made with caution without corroborating lines of evidence. PMID:26731732

  12. Intraspecific polymorphism of ribosomal DNA loci number and morphology in Brachypodium pinnatum and Brachypodium sylvaticum.

    PubMed

    Breda, Ewa; Wolny, Elzbieta; Hasterok, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The genus Brachypodium has become the target of extensive cytomolecular studies since one of its representatives, B. distachyon, has been accepted as a model plant for temperate cereals and forage grasses. Recent preliminary studies suggested that intraspecific rDNA polymorphism can occur in at least two members of the genus, B. sylvaticum and B. pinnatum, so the aim of this study was to further analyse this phenomenon. FISH with 25S rDNA and 5S rDNA probes was performed on somatic metaphase chromosomes, supplemented by the silver staining technique which distinguishes transcriptionally active from inactive 18S-5.8S-25S rDNA loci. The number, size and chromosomal distribution of 5S rDNA loci were very constant: two loci were invariably observed in all studied diploid accessions of both species, while four 5S rDNA loci were present in the tetraploid B. pinnatum. In contrast to 5S rDNA loci, those of the 35S rDNA were more variable. Two or three loci were observed in the diploid B. pinnatum and four in tetraploid accessions. In chromosome complements of B. sylvaticum accessions from two to six 35S rDNA sites were detected. Regardless of total rDNA locus number, only two were transcriptionally active in diploid accessions of both species, while two or four were active in the tetraploid B. pinnatum. Additionally, the fluorescent CMA/DAPI banding method was used to identify the relation between rDNA sites and CMA+ bands. It was revealed that the number and chromosomal distribution of CMA+ bands are in congruence only with 35S rDNA loci which gave strong FISH signals. PMID:22893263

  13. FOB1 affects DNA topoisomerase I in vivo cleavages in the enhancer region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal DNA locus

    PubMed Central

    Di Felice, Francesca; Cioci, Francesco; Camilloni, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the FOB1 gene affects replication fork blocking activity at the replication fork block (RFB) sequences and promotes recombination events within the rDNA cluster. Using in vivo footprinting assays we mapped two in vivo Fob1p-binding sites, RFB1 and RFB3, located in the rDNA enhancer region and coincident with those previously reported to be in vitro binding sites. We previously provided evidences that DNA topoisomerase I is able to cleave two sites within this region. The results reported in this paper, indicate that the DNA topoisomerase I cleavage specific activity at the enhancer region is affected by the presence of Fob1p and independent of replication and transcription activities. We thus hypothesize that the binding to DNA of Fob1p itself may be the cause of the DNA topoisomerase I activity in the rDNA enhancer. PMID:16269824

  14. From DNA to proteins via the ribosome: structural insights into the workings of the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Frank, Joachim

    2010-04-01

    Understanding protein synthesis in bacteria and humans is important for understanding the origin of many human diseases and devising treatments for them. Over the past decade, the field of structural biology has made significant advances in the visualisation of the molecular machinery involved in protein synthesis. It is now possible to discern, at least in outline, the way that interlocking ribosomal components and factors adapt their conformations throughout this process. The determination of structures in various functional contexts, along with the application of kinetic and fluorescent resonance energy transfer approaches to the problem, has given researchers the frame of reference for what remains as the greatest challenge: the complete dynamic portrait of protein synthesis in the cell. PMID:20511136

  15. From DNA to proteins via the ribosome: Structural insights into the workings of the translation machinery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Understanding protein synthesis in bacteria and humans is important for understanding the origin of many human diseases and devising treatments for them. Over the past decade, the field of structural biology has made significant advances in the visualisation of the molecular machinery involved in protein synthesis. It is now possible to discern, at least in outline, the way that interlocking ribosomal components and factors adapt their conformations throughout this process. The determination of structures in various functional contexts, along with the application of kinetic and fluorescent resonance energy transfer approaches to the problem, has given researchers the frame of reference for what remains as the greatest challenge: the complete dynamic portrait of protein synthesis in the cell. PMID:20511136

  16. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six DNA regions were evaluated in a multi-national, multi-laboratory consortium as potential DNA barcodes for Fungi, the second largest kingdom of eukaryotic life. The region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 used as the animal barcode was excluded as a potential marker, because it...

  17. Phylogenetic Diversity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Associated with Paddy Rice Silage as Determined by 16S Ribosomal DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ennahar, Saïd; Cai, Yimin; Fujita, Yasuhito

    2003-01-01

    A total of 161 low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria isolated from whole-crop paddy rice silage were classified and subjected to phenotypic and genetic analyses. Based on morphological and biochemical characters, these presumptive lactic acid bacterium (LAB) isolates were divided into 10 groups that included members of the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, and Weissella. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was used to confirm the presence of the predominant groups indicated by phenotypic analysis and to determine the phylogenetic affiliation of representative strains. The virtually complete 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced. The sequences from the various LAB isolates showed high degrees of similarity to those of the GenBank reference strains (between 98.7 and 99.8%). Phylogenetic trees based on the 16S rDNA sequence displayed high consistency, with nodes supported by high bootstrap values. With the exception of one species, the genetic data was in agreement with the phenotypic identification. The prevalent LAB, predominantly homofermentative (66%), consisted of Lactobacillus plantarum (24%), Lactococcus lactis (22%), Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides (20%), Pediococcus acidilactici (11%), Lactobacillus brevis (11%), Enterococcus faecalis (7%), Weissella kimchii (3%), and Pediococcus pentosaceus (2%). The present study, the first to fully document rice-associated LAB, showed a very diverse community of LAB with a relatively high number of species involved in the fermentation process of paddy rice silage. The comprehensive 16S rDNA-based approach to describing LAB community structure was valuable in revealing the large diversity of bacteria inhabiting paddy rice silage and enabling the future design of appropriate inoculants aimed at improving its fermentation quality. PMID:12514026

  18. Extensive Pyrosequencing Reveals Frequent Intra-Genomic Variations of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dezhu; Sun, Yongzhen; Niu, Yunyun; Chen, Zhiduan; Luo, Hongmei; Pang, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhiying; Liu, Chang; Lv, Aiping; Deng, Youping; Larson-Rabin, Zachary; Wilkinson, Mike; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background Internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) is already one of the most popular phylogenetic and DNA barcoding markers. However, the existence of its multiple copies has complicated such usage and a detailed characterization of intra-genomic variations is critical to address such concerns. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used sequence-tagged pyrosequencing and genome-wide analyses to characterize intra-genomic variations of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions from 178 plant species. We discovered that mutation of ITS2 is frequent, with a mean of 35 variants per species. And on average, three of the most abundant variants make up 91% of all ITS2 copies. Moreover, we found different congeneric species share identical variants in 13 genera. Interestingly, different species across different genera also share identical variants. In particular, one minor variant of ITS2 in Eleutherococcus giraldii was found identical to the ITS2 major variant of Panax ginseng, both from Araliaceae family. In addition, DNA barcoding gap analysis showed that the intra-genomic distances were markedly smaller than those of the intra-specific or inter-specific variants. When each of 5543 variants were examined for its species discrimination efficiency, a 97% success rate was obtained at the species level. Conclusions Identification of identical ITS2 variants across intra-generic or inter-generic species revealed complex species evolutionary history, possibly, horizontal gene transfer and ancestral hybridization. Although intra-genomic multiple variants are frequently found within each genome, the usage of the major variants alone is sufficient for phylogeny construction and species determination in most cases. Furthermore, the inclusion of minor variants further improves the resolution of species identification. PMID:22952830

  19. Rapid Concerted Evolution of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA in Two Tragopogon Allopolyploids of Recent and Recurrent Origin

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, A.; Pires, J. C.; Leitch, A. R.; Lim, K. Y.; Sherwood, A. M.; Matyasek, R.; Rocca, J.; Soltis, D. E.; Soltis, P. S.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated concerted evolution of rRNA genes in multiple populations of Tragopogon mirus and T. miscellus, two allotetraploids that formed recurrently within the last 80 years following the introduction of three diploids (T. dubius, T. pratensis, and T. porrifolius) from Europe to North America. Using the earliest herbarium specimens of the allotetraploids (1949 and 1953) to represent the genomic condition near the time of polyploidization, we found that the parental rDNA repeats were inherited in roughly equal numbers. In contrast, in most present-day populations of both tetraploids, the rDNA of T. dubius origin is reduced and may occupy as little as 5% of total rDNA in some individuals. However, in two populations of T. mirus the repeats of T. dubius origin outnumber the repeats of the second diploid parent (T. porrifolius), indicating bidirectional concerted evolution within a single species. In plants of T. miscellus having a low rDNA contribution from T. dubius, the rDNA of T. dubius was nonetheless expressed. We have apparently caught homogenization of rDNA repeats (concerted evolution) in the act, although it has not proceeded to completion in any allopolyploid population yet examined. PMID:15654116

  20. Genomic organization and evolution of the 5S ribosomal DNA in Tilapiini fishes.

    PubMed

    Alves-Costa, F A; Wasko, A P; Oliveira, C; Foresti, F; Martins, C

    2006-05-01

    5S rDNA sequences present an intense dynamism and have proved to be valuable as genetic markers to distinguish closed related species and also in the understanding of the evolutionary dynamic of repetitive sequences in the genomes. In order to identify patterns of 5S rDNA organization and their evolution in the genome of fish species, such genomic segment was investigated in the tilapias Oreochromis niloticus and Tilapia rendalli, and in the hybrid O. urolepis hornorum x O. mossambicus. A dual 5S rDNA system was identified in the three analyzed tilapia samples. Although each 5S rDNA class was conserved among the three samples, a distinct 5S rDNA genome organization pattern could be evidenced for each sample. The presence of a dual 5S rDNA system seems to be a general trait among non-related teleost fish orders, suggesting that evolutionary events of duplication have occurred before the divergence of the main groups of teleost fishes. PMID:16850228

  1. Sequence analysis of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 2 from populations of Anopheles nuneztovari (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Fritz, G N; Conn, J; Cockburn, A; Seawright, J

    1994-05-01

    Sequence variation of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) was examined for populations of the malaria vector Anopheles nuneztovari collected in Colombia, Venezuela, Bolivia, Suriname, and Brazil. Mosquitoes from Colombia and Venezuela had identical ITS2 sequences and were distinguished from sequences in other populations by three insertion/deletion events (indels) and by one transversion. The length of the ITS2 was 363-369 bp, and it had a G+C content of 55.3%-55.7%. Variation in the length of the ITS2 between and within populations was due to indels in simple repeats. ITS2 consensus sequences were similar or identical for samples from the following three groups: (1) Colombia, Bolivia, and Venezuela; (2) Suriname and northern Brazil; and (3) eastern and central Brazil. The presence of two different consensus sequences from a single location near Manaus, Brazil, suggests that populations from eastern Brazil and those from Suriname converge in this region of the Amazon Basin. These data show that putative cryptic species of An. nuneztovari are distinguished by very minor differences in DNA sequence of the ITS2 region. PMID:8015435

  2. Analysis of Fungal Flora in Indoor Dust by Ribosomal DNA Sequence Analysis, Quantitative PCR, and Culture▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pitkäranta, M.; Meklin, T.; Hyvärinen, A.; Paulin, L.; Auvinen, P.; Nevalainen, A.; Rintala, H.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years increasing attention has been given to the potential health effects of fungal exposure in indoor environments. We used large-scale sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA to describe the mycoflora of two office buildings over the four seasons. DNA sequencing was complemented by cultivation, ergosterol determination, and quantitative PCR analyses. Sequences of 1,339 clones were clustered into 394 nonredundant fungal operational taxonomical units containing sequences from 18 fungal subclasses. The observed flora differed markedly from that recovered by cultivation, the major differences being the near absence of several typical indoor mold genera such as Penicillium and Aspergillus spp. and a high prevalence of basidiomycetes in clone libraries. A total of 55% of the total diversity constituted of unidentifiable ITS sequences, some of which may represent novel fungal species. Dominant species were Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. herbarum, Cryptococcus victoriae, Leptosphaerulina americana and L. chartarum, Aureobasidium pullulans, Thekopsora areolata, Phaeococcomyces nigricans, Macrophoma sp., and several Malassezia species. Seasonal differences were observed for community composition, with ascomycetous molds and basidiomycetous yeasts predominating in the winter and spring and Agaricomycetidae basidiomycetes predominating in the fall. The comparison of methods suggested that the cloning, cultivation, and quantitative PCR methods complemented each other, generating a more comprehensive picture of fungal flora than any of the methods would give alone. The current restrictions of the methods are discussed. PMID:17981947

  3. Phylogenetic Relationships and Genetic Variation in Longidorus and Xiphinema Species (Nematoda: Longidoridae) Using ITS1 Sequences of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Weimin; Szalanski, Allen L.; Robbins, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Genetic analyses using DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS1 were conducted to determine the extent of genetic variation within and among Longidorus and Xiphinema species. DNA sequences were obtained from samples collected from Arkansas, California and Australia as well as 4 Xiphinema DNA sequences from GenBank. The sequences of the ITS1 region including the 3' end of the 18S rDNA gene and the 5' end of the 5.8S rDNA gene ranged from 1020 bp to 1244 bp for the 9 Longidorus species, and from 870 bp to 1354 bp for the 7 Xiphinema species. Nucleotide frequencies were: A = 25.5%, C = 21.0%, G = 26.4%, and T = 27.1%. Genetic variation between the two genera had a maximum divergence of 38.6% between X. chambersi and L. crassus. Genetic variation among Xiphinema species ranged from 3.8% between X. diversicaudatum and X. bakeri to 29.9% between X. chambersi and X. italiae. Within Longidorus, genetic variation ranged from 8.9% between L. crassus and L. grandis to 32.4% between L. fragilis and L. diadecturus. Intraspecific genetic variation in X. americanum sensu lato ranged from 0.3% to 1.9%, while genetic variation in L. diadecturus had 0.8% and L. biformis ranged from 0.6% to 10.9%. Identical sequences were obtained between the two populations of L. grandis, and between the two populations of X. bakeri. Phylogenetic analyses based on the ITS1 DNA sequence data were conducted on each genus separately using both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analysis. Among the Longidorus taxa, 4 subgroups are supported: L. grandis, L. crassus, and L. elongatus are in one cluster; L. biformis and L. paralongicaudatus are in a second cluster; L. fragilis and L. breviannulatus are in a third cluster; and L. diadecturus is in a fourth cluster. Among the Xiphinema taxa, 3 subgroups are supported: X. americanum with X. chambersi, X. bakeri with X. diversicaudatum, and X. italiae and X. vuittenezi forming a sister group with X. index. The relationships observed in this study

  4. Characteristics and significance of intergenic polyadenylated RNA transcription in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Moghe, Gaurav D; Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D; Seddon, Alex E; Yin, Shan; Chen, Yani; Juntawong, Piyada; Brandizzi, Federica; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome is the most well-annotated plant genome. However, transcriptome sequencing in Arabidopsis continues to suggest the presence of polyadenylated (polyA) transcripts originating from presumed intergenic regions. It is not clear whether these transcripts represent novel noncoding or protein-coding genes. To understand the nature of intergenic polyA transcription, we first assessed its abundance using multiple messenger RNA sequencing data sets. We found 6,545 intergenic transcribed fragments (ITFs) occupying 3.6% of Arabidopsis intergenic space. In contrast to transcribed fragments that map to protein-coding and RNA genes, most ITFs are significantly shorter, are expressed at significantly lower levels, and tend to be more data set specific. A surprisingly large number of ITFs (32.1%) may be protein coding based on evidence of translation. However, our results indicate that these "translated" ITFs tend to be close to and are likely associated with known genes. To investigate if ITFs are under selection and are functional, we assessed ITF conservation through cross-species as well as within-species comparisons. Our analysis reveals that 237 ITFs, including 49 with translation evidence, are under strong selective constraint and relatively distant from annotated features. These ITFs are likely parts of novel genes. However, the selective pressure imposed on most ITFs is similar to that of randomly selected, untranscribed intergenic sequences. Our findings indicate that despite the prevalence of ITFs, apart from the possibility of genomic contamination, many may be background or noisy transcripts derived from "junk" DNA, whose production may be inherent to the process of transcription and which, on rare occasions, may act as catalysts for the creation of novel genes. PMID:23132786

  5. Phylogenetic relationships of three hymenolepidid species inferred from nuclear ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M; Agatsuma, T; Kurosawa, T; Ito, A

    1997-12-01

    Three hymenolepidid tapeworms, Hymenolepis diminuta, H. nana and H. microstoma, are commonly maintained in laboratory rodents and used in many experimental model systems of tapeworm infections. We examined partial sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships of the 3 hymenolepidid species. Parts of the CO1 gene and ITS2 were amplified by PCR and sequenced directly. The CO1 gene sequence obtained was the same in length (391 bp) among all specimens. In the case of ITS2, however, several insertions and deletions were detected (671-741 bp) not only among species but also between an American isolate and a Japanese isolate of H. diminuta. Percentage nucleotide differences between H. diminuta and H. microstoma, or H. diminuta and H. nana were 16.6-18.2% for the CO1 gene and 21.3-22.9% for ITS2. The differences in both sequences between H. microstoma and H. nana were about 14%. Phylogenetic trees inferred from both of the nucleotide sequences showed similar topology, and suggest that H. diminuta may have diverged from the common ancestral line the earliest, and that H. nana is closer to H. microstoma than to H. diminuta. PMID:9488878

  6. Revealing pancrustacean relationships: Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal protein genes places Collembola (springtails) in a monophyletic Hexapoda and reinforces the discrepancy between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background In recent years, several new hypotheses on phylogenetic relations among arthropods have been proposed on the basis of DNA sequences. One of the challenged hypotheses is the monophyly of hexapods. This discussion originated from analyses based on mitochondrial DNA datasets that, due to an unusual positioning of Collembola, suggested that the hexapod body plan evolved at least twice. Here, we re-evaluate the position of Collembola using ribosomal protein gene sequences. Results In total 48 ribosomal proteins were obtained for the collembolan Folsomia candida. These 48 sequences were aligned with sequence data on 35 other ecdysozoans. Each ribosomal protein gene was available for 25% to 86% of the taxa. However, the total sequence information was unequally distributed over the taxa and ranged between 4% and 100%. A concatenated dataset was constructed (5034 inferred amino acids in length), of which ~66% of the positions were filled. Phylogenetic tree reconstructions, using Maximum Likelihood, Maximum Parsimony, and Bayesian methods, resulted in a topology that supports monophyly of Hexapoda. Conclusion Although ribosomal proteins in general may not evolve independently, they once more appear highly valuable for phylogenetic reconstruction. Our analyses clearly suggest that Hexapoda is monophyletic. This underpins the inconsistency between nuclear and mitochondrial datasets when analyzing pancrustacean relationships. Caution is needed when applying mitochondrial markers in deep phylogeny. PMID:18366624

  7. Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping using a region neighboring dkgB links genovar to Kauffman-White serotype of Salmonella enterica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping using a region neighboring dkgB links genovar to Kauffman-White serotype of Salmonella enterica Previous research identified that the 5S ribosomal (rrn) gene and associated flanking sequences that are closely linked to the dkgB gene of Salmonella enterica were highly ...

  8. Restriction enzyme mapping of ribosomal DNA can distinguish between fasciolid (liver fluke) species.

    PubMed

    Blair, D; McManus, D P

    1989-10-01

    Recognition sites for nine different restriction endonucleases were mapped on rDNA genes of fasciolid species. Southern blots of digested DNA from individual worms were probed sequentially with three different probes derived from rDNA of Schistosoma mansoni and known to span between them the entire rDNA repeat unit in that species. Eighteen recognition sites were mapped for Fasciola hepatica, and seventeen for Fasciola gigantica and Fascioloides magna. Each fasciolid species had no more than two unique recognition sites, the remainder being common to one or both of the other two species. No intraspecific variation in restriction sites was noted in F. hepatica (individuals from 11 samples studied; hosts were sheep, cattle and laboratory animals; geographical origins. Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, U.K., Hungary and Spain), or in F. gigantica (two samples; Indonesia and Malaysia). Only one sample of F. magna was available. One specimen of Fasciola sp. from Japan (specific identity regarded in the literature as uncertain) yielded a restriction map identical to that of F. gigantica. Almost all recognition sites occurred in or near the putative rRNA coding regions. The non-transcribed spacer region had few or no cut sites despite the fact that this region is up to about one half of the entire repeat unit in length. Length heterogeneity was noted in the non-transcribed spacer, even within individual worms. PMID:2552311

  9. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product. PMID:26789074

  10. Chromosome fission associated with growth of ribosomal DNA in Neodiprion abietis (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae).

    PubMed Central

    Rousselet, J; Monti, L; Auger-Rozenberg, M A; Parker, J S; Lemeunier, F

    2000-01-01

    The haploid complement consists of seven metacentric chromosomes in most diprionid species but has evolved to n = 8 by fission in Neodiprion abietis. This fission generated a small telocentric chromosome and a large pseudoacrocentric chromosome with a short arm carrying a satellite. In situ hybridization indicated that the location of the rRNA gene cluster corresponds to the whole short arm. This suggests that (i) the breaking point was located close to an rRNA gene cluster, and (ii) fission was associated with growth of rDNA. These results suggest rDNA as a preferential breaking point but with a role in the healing of naked chromosome ends. PMID:11052531

  11. Ribosomal DNA of fly Sciara coprophila has a very small and homogeneous repeat unit.

    PubMed

    Renkawitz, R; Gerbi, S A; Glätzer, K H

    1979-05-23

    In this report we show by hybridization of restriction fragments and by Miller spreads that the unit repeat of the fly Sciara coprophila is only 8.4 kb which is the smallest known for a multicellular eukaryote. The 8.4 kb EcoR1 fragment containing a complete unit of Sciara rDNA was cloned in pBR322, and mapped by the method of Parker (1977) and also by double digestions. The coding regions for 28S, 18S, and 5.8S RNA were localized by the method of Berk and Sharp (1977). From these data we conclude that the nontranscribed spacer, external transcribed spacer, and internal transcribed spacer are all shorter than in other organisms, thereby giving rise to the shorter overall rDNA repeat unit of Sciara. At least 90% of the Sciara rDNA repeats are homogeneous, with a length of 8.4 kb, but a 700 bp ladder of minor bands can also be found in digestions of total genome DNA. This profile of major and minor bands is identical between the X and X' chromosomes, as seen by a comparison of several genotypes. There are only 45 rRNA genes per X chromosome of Sciara (Gerbi and Crouse, 1976). These can easily be counted by low magnification Miller spreads which show that virtually all gene copies are actively being transcribed in the stage of spermatogenesis examined. This is the first demonstration for any reiterated gene family where all copies are shown to be simultaneously active. PMID:288964

  12. Identification of Dermatophyte Species by 28S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing with a Commercial Kit

    PubMed Central

    Ninet, Béatrice; Jan, Isabelle; Bontems, Olympia; Léchenne, Barbara; Jousson, Olivier; Panizzon, Renato; Lew, Daniel; Monod, Michel

    2003-01-01

    We have shown that dermatophyte species can be easily identified on the basis of a DNA sequence encoding a part of the large-subunit (LSU) rRNA (28S rRNA) by using the MicroSeq D2 LSU rRNA Fungal Sequencing Kit. Two taxa causing distinct dermatophytoses were clearly distinguished among isolates of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes species complex. PMID:12574293

  13. Ribosomal DNA in diploid and polyploid Setaria (Poaceae) species: number and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Nani, Thaís Furtado; Cenzi, Gisele; Pereira, Daniele Lais; Davide, Lisete Chamma; Techio, Vânia Helena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Setaria Beauvois, 1812 is a genus of economically important forage species, including Setaria italica (Linnaeus, 1753) Beauvois, 1812 and Setaria viridis (Linnaeus, 1753) Beauvois, 1812, closely related species and considered as model systems for studies of C4 plants. However, complications and uncertainties related to taxonomy of other species of the genus are frequent due to the existence of numerous synonyms for the same species or multiple species with the same name, and overlapping of morphological characteristics. Cytogenetic studies in Setaria can be useful for taxonomic and evolutionary studies as well as for applications in breeding. Thus, this study is aimed at locating 45S and 5S rDNA sites through fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in Setaria italica, Setaria viridis and Setaria sphacelata (Schumacher, 1827) Stapf, Hubbard, Moss, 1929 cultivars (cvs.) Narok and Nandi. Setaria italica and Setaria viridis have 18 chromosomes with karyotype formulas 6m + 3sm and 9m, respectively. The location of 45S and 5S rDNA for these species was in different chromosome pairs among the evaluated species. Setaria viridis presented a more symmetrical karyotype, strengthening the ancestral relationship with Setaria italica. Setaria sphacelata cvs. Narok and Nandi have 36 chromosomes, and karyotype formulas 11m+7sm and 16m+2sm, respectively. The 45S rDNA signals for both cultivars were also observed in distinct chromosome pairs; however chromosomes bearing 5S rDNA are conserved. Karyotypic variations found among the studied species are evidence of chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:26753080

  14. Phylogeny of Panax using chloroplast trnC-trnD intergenic region and the utility of trnC-trnD in interspecific studies of plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chunghee; Wen, Jun

    2004-06-01

    Sequences of the chloroplast trnC-trnD region and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were obtained for all species of Panax L. (the ginseng plant genus, Araliaceae) to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships. The trnC-trnD phylogeny is congruent with the ITS phylogeny for the diploid taxa of Panax. This study is the first use of the trnC-trnD sequence data for phylogenetic analysis at the interspecific level. We evaluated this DNA region for its phylogenetic utility at the lower taxonomic level for flowering plants. The trnC-trnD region includes the trnC-petN intergenic spacer, the petN gene, the petN-psbM intergenic spacer, the psbM gene, and the psbM-trnD intergenic spacer. The petN and psbM genes are small, 90 and 104-114 bp across angiosperms, respectively, and have conserved sequences. We have designed universal amplification and sequencing primers within these two genes. Using these primers, we have successfully amplified the entire trnC-trnD region for a diversity of flowering plant groups, including Aralia L. (Araliaceae), Calycanthus L. (Calycanthaceae), Corylus L. (Betulaceae), Hamamelis L. (Hamamelidaceae), Hydrocotyle L. (Apiaceae), Illigera Blume (Hernandiaceae), Nelumbo Adans. (Nelumbonaceae), Nolana L. ex L.f. (Solanaceae), Prunus L. (Rosaceae), and Staphylea L. (Staphyleaceae). In Panax, the trnC-trnD region provides a similar number of informative phylogenetic characters as the ITS regions and a slightly higher number of informative characters than the chloroplast ndhF gene. We thus demonstrate the utility of the trnC-trnD region for lower-level phylogenetic studies in flowering plants. PMID:15120387

  15. Physical localisation of repetitive DNA sequences in Alstroemeria: karyotyping of two species with species-specific and ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Kuipers, A G; De Jeu, M J; Ramanna, M S; Jacobsen, E

    1997-10-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to localise two species-specific repetitive DNA sequences, A001-I and D32-13, and two highly conserved 25S and 5S rDNA sequences on the metaphase chromosomes of two species of Alstroemeria. The Chilean species, Alstroemeria aurea (2n = 16), has abundant constitutive heterochromatin, whereas the Brazilian species, Alstroemeria inodora, has hardly any heterochromatin. The A. aurea specific A001-I probe hybridized specifically to the C-band regions on all chromosomes. The FISH patterns on A. inodora chromosomes using species-specific probe D32-13 resembled the C-banding pattern and the A001-I pattern on A. aurea chromosomes. There were notable differences in number and distribution of rDNA sites between the two species. The 25S rDNA probe revealed 16 sites in A. aurea that closely colocalised with A001-I sites and 12 in A. inodora that were predominantly detected in the centromeric regions. FISH karyotypes of the two Alstroemeria species were constructed accordingly, enabling full identification of all individual chromosomes. These FISH karyotypes will be useful for monitoring the chromosomes of both Alstroemeria species in hybrids and backcross derivatives. PMID:9352644

  16. Phylogenetics of Bonamia parasites based on small subunit and internal transcribed spacer region ribosomal DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kristina M; Stokes, Nancy A; Webb, Stephen C; Hine, P Mike; Kroeck, Marina A; Moore, James D; Morley, Margaret S; Reece, Kimberly S; Burreson, Eugene M; Carnegie, Ryan B

    2014-07-24

    The genus Bonamia (Haplosporidia) includes economically significant oyster parasites. Described species were thought to have fairly circumscribed host and geographic ranges: B. ostreae infecting Ostrea edulis in Europe and North America, B. exitiosa infecting O. chilensis in New Zealand, and B. roughleyi infecting Saccostrea glomerata in Australia. The discovery of B. exitiosa-like parasites in new locations and the observation of a novel species, B. perspora, in non-commercial O. stentina altered this perception and prompted our wider evaluation of the global diversity of Bonamia parasites. Samples of 13 oyster species from 21 locations were screened for Bonamia spp. by PCR, and small subunit and internal transcribed spacer regions of Bonamia sp. ribosomal DNA were sequenced from PCR-positive individuals. Infections were confirmed histologically. Phylogenetic analyses using parsimony and Bayesian methods revealed one species, B. exitiosa, to be widely distributed, infecting 7 oyster species from Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, eastern and western USA, and Tunisia. More limited host and geographic distributions of B. ostreae and B. perspora were confirmed, but nothing genetically identifiable as B. roughleyi was found in Australia or elsewhere. Newly discovered diversity included a Bonamia sp. in Dendostrea sandvicensis from Hawaii, USA, that is basal to the other Bonamia species and a Bonamia sp. in O. edulis from Tomales Bay, California, USA, that is closely related to both B. exitiosa and the previously observed Bonamia sp. from O. chilensis in Chile. PMID:25060496

  17. Identification of Ustilago cynodontis as a new producer of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, based on ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2008-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are one of the most promising glycolipid biosurfactants known because of their multifunctionality and biocompatibility. The search for novel producers of MELs was undertaken based on the analysis of ribosomal DNA sequences on basidiomycetous yeasts. The bermuda grass smut fungus Ustilago cynodontis NBRC 7530, which taxonomically relates to Pseudozyma shanxiensis known as a MEL-C producer, was found to accumulate glycolipids in the cultured medium. Under a shake flask culture with soybean oil, the amount of the glycolipids was 1.4 g/L for 7 days at 25 degrees C. As a result of the structural characterization, the main glycolipids was identified as 4-O-[(4'-O-acetyl-3'-O-alka(e)noyl-2'-O-butanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-D-erythritol, and the major fatty acids were C(14) and C(16) ones. The glycolipid was highly hydrophilic MEL-C, and very similar to those produced by P. shanxiensis. The fungi of the genus Ustilago are thus likely to be potential producers of MELs as well as the yeasts of the genus Pseudozyma. PMID:18781055

  18. Genetic heterogeneity and phylogeny of Trichuris spp. from captive non-human primates based on ribosomal DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Cavallero, Serena; De Liberato, Claudio; Friedrich, Klaus G; Di Cave, David; Masella, Valentina; D'Amelio, Stefano; Berrilli, Federica

    2015-08-01

    Nematodes of the genus Trichuris, known as whipworms, are recognized to infect numerous mammalian species including humans and non-human primates. Several Trichuris spp. have been described and species designation/identification is traditionally based on host-affiliation, although cross-infection and hybridization events may complicate species boundaries. The main aims of the present study were to genetically characterize adult Trichuris specimens from captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) and grivets (Chlorocebus aethiops), using the ribosomal DNA (ITS) as molecular marker and to investigate the phylogeny and the extent of genetic variation also by comparison with data on isolates from other humans, non-human primates and other hosts. The phylogenetic analysis of Trichuris sequences from M. fuscata and C. aethiops provided evidences of distinct clades and subclades thus advocating the existence of additional separated taxa. Neighbor Joining and Bayesian trees suggest that specimens from M. fuscata may be distinct from, but related to Trichuris trichiura, while a close relationship is suggested between the subclade formed by the specimens from C. aethiops and the subclade formed by T. suis. The tendency to associate Trichuris sp. to host species can lead to misleading taxonomic interpretations (i.e. whipworms found in primates are identified as T. trichiura). The results here obtained confirm previous evidences suggesting the existence of Trichuris spp. other than T. trichiura infecting non-human living primates. PMID:26066463

  19. Diversity of Salmonella Strains Isolated from the Aquatic Environment as Determined by Serotyping and Amplification of the Ribosomal DNA Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Baudart, Julia; Lemarchand, Karine; Brisabois, Anne; Lebaron, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella species are pathogenic bacteria often detected in sewage, freshwater, marine coastal water, and groundwater. Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in natural waters, and the persistence of specific and epidemic strains is of great concern in public health. However, the diversity of species found in the natural environment remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from different natural aquatic systems within a Mediterranean coastal watershed (river, wastewater, and marine coastal areas). A total of 574 strains isolated from these natural environments were identified by both conventional serotyping and the ribosomal spacer-heteroduplex polymorphism (RS-HP) method (M. A. Jensen and N. Straus, PCR Methods Appl. 3:186–194, 1993). More than 40 different serotypes were found, and some serotypes probably mobilized from widespread animal-rearing activities were detected only during storm events. These serotypes may be good indicators of specific contamination sources. Furthermore, the RS-HP method based on the PCR amplification of the intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes can produce amplicon profiles allowing the discrimination of species at both serotype and intraserotype levels. This method represents a powerful tool that could be used for rapid typing of Salmonella isolates. PMID:10742240

  20. Ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA analysis of Trichuridae nematodes of carnivores and small mammals.

    PubMed

    Guardone, Lisa; Deplazes, Peter; Macchioni, Fabio; Magi, Marta; Mathis, Alexander

    2013-10-18

    Several species of Trichuridae nematodes can infect dogs, cats and wild mammals. The diagnosis of these infections relies on the microscopic identification of eggs which are characterized by a similar "lemon" shape and polar plugs in all Trichuridae. Thus, morphological diagnosis to species level is challenging. The use of biomolecular diagnostic methods is desirable but very little genetic data are known from Trichuridae of carnivores and small mammals. The aim of this work was to genetically characterize several species of Trichuridae that can affect dogs, cats and wild mammals, as a basis to develop molecular diagnostic tests. Specimens (adult worms or eggs) of Eucoleus aerophilus (syn. Capillaria aerophila), Eucoleus boehmi (syn. Capillaria boehmi), Pearsonema plica (syn. Capillaria plica), Aonchotheca putorii (syn. Capillaria putorii), Calodium hepaticum (syn. Capillaria hepatica), Calodium splenaecum (syn. Capillaria splenaeca) and Trichuris vulpis were obtained from carcasses of red foxes, feces of dogs, the liver of a vole and from the spleen of Crocidura sp. Parts of the small subunit rRNA (18S rRNA) gene and of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox 1 mtDNA) gene were amplified from the above mentioned nematodes, yielding the first 18S rRNA gene sequences of all the capillariid nematodes and the first cox 1 mtDNA sequences of E. boehmi, P. plica, C. hepaticum, A. putorii and T. vulpis. The 18S rRNA gene is highly conserved among the different species and not suitable as a target for specific diagnostic oligonucleotides. However, these sequences contribute to a better understanding of the complex taxonomic relations among Trichuridae. Indeed, a dendrogram based on the 18S rRNA gene locus supports the latest taxonomic revision. Interspecies divergence was much higher at the cox 1 mtDNA gene locus, rendering it suitable for DNA barcoding and particularly valuable in resolving closely related species. Furthermore, the mitochondrial genetic

  1. Comparison of fungi within the Gaeumannomyces-Phialophora complex by analysis of ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, G T; Daniels, M J; Osbourn, A E

    1995-01-01

    Four ascomycete species of the genus Gaeumannomyces infect roots of monocotyledons. Gaeumannomyces graminis contains four varieties, var. tritici, var. avenae, var. graminis, and var. maydis. G. graminis varieties tritici, avenae, and graminis have Phialophora-like anamorphs and, together with the other Gaeumannomyces and Phialophora species found on cereal roots, constitute the Gaeumannomyces-Phialophora complex. Relatedness of a number of Gaeumannomyces and Phialophora isolates was assessed by comparison of DNA sequences of the 18S rRNA gene, the 5.8S rRNA gene, and the internal transcribed spacers (ITS). G. graminis var. tritici, G. graminis var. avenae, and G. graminis var. graminis isolates can be distinguished from each other by nucleotide sequence differences in the ITS regions. The G. graminis var. tritici isolates can be further subdivided into R and N isolates (correlating with ability [R] or inability [N] to infect rye). Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS regions of several oat-infecting G. graminis var. tritici isolates suggests that these isolates are actually more closely related to G. graminis var. avenae. The isolates of Magnaporthe grisea included in the analysis showed a surprising degree of relatedness to members of the Gaeumannomyces-Phialophora complex. G. graminis variety-specific oligonucleotide primers were used in PCRs to amplify DNA from cereal seedlings infected with G. graminis var. tritici or G. graminis var. avenae, and these should be valuable for sensitive detection of pathogenic isolates and for diagnosis of take-all. PMID:7574606

  2. Identification of airborne bacterial and fungal species in the clinical microbiology laboratory of a university teaching hospital employing ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR and gene sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Yuriko; Walker, Jim; Loughrey, Anne; Millar, Cherie; Goldsmith, Colin; Rooney, Paul; Elborn, Stuart; Moore, John

    2009-06-01

    Universal or "broad-range" PCR-based ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was performed on a collection of 58 isolates (n = 30 bacteria + 28 fungi), originating from environmental air from several locations within a busy clinical microbiology laboratory, supporting a university teaching hospital. A total of 10 bacterial genera were identified including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative genera. Gram-positive organisms accounted for 27/30 (90%) of total bacterial species, consisting of seven genera and included (in descending order of frequency) Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, Paenibacillus, Arthrobacter, Janibacter and Rothia. Gram-negative organisms were less frequently isolated 3/30 (10%) and comprised three genera, including Moraxella, Psychrobacter and Haloanella. Eight fungal genera were identified among the 28 fungal organisms isolated, including (in descending order of frequency) Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Thanatephorus, Absidia, Eurotium, Paraphaeosphaeria and Tritirachium, with Cladosporium accounting for 10/28 (35.7%) of the total fungal isolates. In conclusion, this study identified the presence of 10 bacterial and eight fungal genera in the air within the laboratory sampled. Although this reflected diversity of the microorganisms present, none of these organisms have been described previously as having an inhalational route of laboratory-acquired infection. Therefore, we believe that the species of organisms identified and the concentration levels of these airborne contaminants determined, do not pose a significant health and safety threat for immunocompotent laboratory personnel and visitors. PMID:20183192

  3. DNaseI-hypersensitive sites at promoter-like sequences in the spacer of Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    La Volpe, A; Taggart, M; McStay, B; Bird, A

    1983-01-01

    We have detected a DNAseI hypersensitive site in the ribosomal DNA spacer of Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis. The site is present in blood and embryonic nuclei of each species. In interspecies hybrids, however, the site is absent in unexpressed borealis rDNA, but is present normally in expressed laevis rDNA. Hypersensitive sites are located well upstream (over lkb) of the pre-ribosomal RNA promoter. Sequencing of the hypersensitive region in borealis rDNA, however, shows extensive homology with the promoter sequence, and with the hypersensitive region in X. laevis. Of two promoter-like duplications in each spacer, only the most upstream copy is associated with hypersensitivity to DNAaseI. Unlike DNAaseI, Endo R. MspI digests the rDNA of laevis blood nuclei at a domain extending downstream from the hypersensitive site to near the 40S promoter. Since the organisation of conserved sequence elements within this "proximal domain" is similar in three Xenopus species whose spacers have otherwise evolved rapidly, we conclude that this domain plays an important role in rDNA function. Images PMID:6310495

  4. The phylogenetic position of Rhopalura ophiocomae (Orthonectida) based on 18S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Hanelt, B; Van Schyndel, D; Adema, C M; Lewis, L A; Loker, E S

    1996-11-01

    The Orthonectida is a small, poorly known phylum of parasites of marine invertebrates. Their phylogenetic placement is obscure; they have been considered to be multicellular protozoans, primitive animals at a "mesozoan" grade of organization, or secondarily simplified flatworm-like organisms. The best known species in the phylum, Rhopalura ophiocomae, was collected on San Juan Island, Wash. and a complete 18S rDNA sequence was obtained. Using the models of minimum evolution and parsimony, phylogenetic analyses were undertaken and the results lend support to the following hypotheses about orthonectids: (1) orthonectids are more closely aligned with triploblastic metazoan taxa than with the protist or diploblastic metazoan taxa considered in this analysis; (2) orthonectids are not derived members of the phylum Platyhelminthes; and (3) orthonectids and rhombozoans are not each other's closest relatives, thus casting further doubt on the validity of the phylum Mesozoa previously used to encompass both groups. PMID:8896370

  5. Comparison of ribosomal DNA sites in Lolium species by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Thomas, H M; Harper, J A; Meredith, M R; Morgan, W G; Thomas, I D; Timms, E; King, I P

    1996-11-01

    The position of the 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S rRNA genes have been physically mapped on the chromosomes of seven Lolium taxa. 18S-5.8S-26S sites were seen on two pairs of chromosomes in the inbreeding taxa. In the outbreeding taxa six sites were found in the L. multiflorum, seven in L. perenne and nine in L. rigidum var. rigidum. Two 5S sites were found in each of the taxa. In the inbreeders, the 5S sites were found adjacent to the 18S-5.8S-26S sites on chromosome 2. In L. multifiorum and L.perenne the 5S sites were on the short arm of chromosome 3. However, in L. rigidum var. rigidum the 5S rDNA site was found in either of the two positions. PMID:8939359

  6. A deeply conserved, noncanonical miRNA hosted by ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chak, Li-Ling; Mohammed, Jaaved; Lai, Eric C.; Tucker-Kellogg, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Advances in small RNA sequencing technologies and comparative genomics have fueled comprehensive microRNA (miRNA) gene annotations in humans and model organisms. Although new miRNAs continue to be discovered in recent years, these have universally been lowly expressed, recently evolved, and of debatable endogenous activity, leading to the general assumption that virtually all biologically important miRNAs have been identified. Here, we analyzed small RNAs that emanate from the highly repetitive rDNA arrays of Drosophila. In addition to endo-siRNAs derived from sense and antisense strands of the pre-rRNA sequence, we unexpectedly identified a novel, deeply conserved, noncanonical miRNA. Although this miRNA is widely expressed, this miRNA was not identified by previous studies due to bioinformatics filters removing such repetitive sequences. Deep-sequencing data provide clear evidence for specific processing with precisely defined 5′ and 3′ ends. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mature miRNA species is incorporated in the effector complexes and has detectable trans regulatory activity. Processing of this miRNA requires Dicer-1, whereas the Drosha–Pasha complex is dispensable. The miRNA hairpin sequence is located in the internal transcribed spacer 1 region of rDNA and is highly conserved among Dipteran species that were separated from their common ancestor ∼100 million years ago. Our results suggest that biologically active miRNA genes may remain unidentified even in well-studied organisms. PMID:25605965

  7. Commandeering the Ribosome: Lessons Learned from Dicistroviruses about Translation.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Craig H; Jan, Eric

    2016-06-15

    To replicate, all viruses depend entirely on the enslavement of host cell ribosomes for their own advantage. To this end, viruses have evolved a multitude of translational strategies to usurp the ribosome. RNA-based structures known as internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are among the most notable mechanisms employed by viruses to seize host ribosomes. In this article, we spotlight the intergenic region IRES from the Dicistroviridae family of viruses and its importance as a model for IRES-dependent translation and in understanding fundamental properties of translation. PMID:27053555

  8. Directed gene copy number amplification in Pichia pastoris by vector integration into the ribosomal DNA locus.

    PubMed

    Marx, Hans; Mecklenbräuker, Astrid; Gasser, Brigitte; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2009-12-01

    The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used host organism for heterologous protein production. One of the basic steps for strain improvement is to ensure a sufficient level of transcription of the heterologous gene, based on promoter strength and gene copy number. To date, high-copy-number integrants of P. pastoris are achievable only by screening of random events or by cloning of gene concatemers. Methods for rapid and reliable multicopy integration of the expression cassette are therefore desirable. Here we present such a method based on vector integration into the rDNA locus and post-transformational vector amplification by repeated selection on increased antibiotic concentrations. Data are presented for two exemplary products: human serum albumin, which is secreted into the supernatant, and human superoxide dismutase, which is accumulated in the cytoplasm of the cells. The striking picture evolving is that intracellular protein production is tightly correlated with gene copy number, while use of the secretory pathway introduces a high clonal variability and the correlation with gene copy number is valid only for low gene copy numbers. PMID:19799640

  9. Ribosomal DNA locus variation and REMAP analysis of the diploid and triploid complexes of Lilium lancifolium.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Truong Xuan; Lee, Sung-Il; Rai, Rameshwar; Kim, Nam-Soo; Kim, Jong Hwa

    2016-08-01

    Lilium lancifolium Thunb. (2n = 2x = 24) is a cytologically conspicuous species with both diploids and triploids in nature. Cytological and molecular genetic analyses were carried out in both diploids and triploids that were collected from 55 geographical locations in Korea, Japan, and China. While the 5S rRNA gene loci were located at duplicated loci on the long arm of chromosome 2, the 45S rRNA gene loci were present in chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, and 11. While the loci on chromosomes 1 and 7 were constant, the loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 6, 7, and 11 were variable in some plants so that the L. lancifolium accessions were grouped into 7 cytotypes in diploids and 12 cytotypes in triploids. REMAP marker analysis revealed that the diploids were classified into seven clusters, and the triploids were classified into a large cluster. Geographic, cytological, and genetic differentiations were not related in both the diploid and triploid accessions of L. lancifolium. Thus, current genetic variations occurred prior to the geographic differentiation in both diploids and triploids, and the 45S rDNA cytotype variations occurred after geographic differentiation in the current habitats of L. lancifolium. PMID:27458741

  10. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  11. Independent host switching events by digenean parasites of cetaceans inferred from ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Fraija-Fernández, Natalia; Olson, Peter D; Crespo, Enrique A; Raga, Juan A; Aznar, Francisco J; Fernández, Mercedes

    2015-02-01

    Cetaceans harbour a unique fauna of digeneans whose origin and relationships have sparked considerable debate during recent decades. Disparity in the species reported indicates that they do not share close affinities, but their unusual morphology has made their taxonomic identities and phylogenetic positions uncertain. Here we use sequence data to investigate the phylogenetic relationships of the main species of flukes infecting cetaceans. We sequenced the 18S, 28S and internal transcribed spacer 2 rDNA of digenean species representing all known families reported from cetaceans: Braunina cordiformis (Brauninidae), Ogmogaster antarcticus (Notocotylidae), Pholeter gastrophilus (Heterophyidae), and Campula oblonga, Nasitrema sp. and Oschmarinella rochebruni (Brachycladiidae). The phylogenetic position of the taxa was estimated by Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood incorporating published sequences of 177 species of Digenea. Further Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses were performed with sequences of 14 Heterophyidae and Opisthorchiidae taxa, incorporating new sequences of P. gastrophilus. Species nominally assigned to the Brachycladiidae formed a clade that was embedded among species of the Acanthocolpidae, thus making the latter family paraphyletic. Braunina cordiformis formed a sister lineage to the Strigeidae and Diplostomidae, whereas O. antarcticus was placed within the Notocotylidae, in agreement with the previous taxonomy of this genus. Similarly, P. gastrophilus was placed within the Heterophyidae as originally described. Our results suggest a paraphyletic relationship between the Heterophyidae and Opisthorchiidae, mirroring the uncertain taxonomic placement of P. gastrophilus, which has been assigned to both families in the past. The digenean families involved are parasites of fish-eating birds and mammals (i.e. Strigeidae, Diplostomidae and Heterophyidae), parasites of marine fish (i.e. Acanthocolpidae) and other herbivorous aquatic birds and

  12. Human acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins P0, P1, and P2: Analysis of cDNA clones, in vitro synthesis, and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, B.E.; Steitz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    cDNA clones encoding three antigenically related human ribosomal phosophoproteins (P-proteins) P0, P1, and P2 were isolated and sequenced. P1 and P2 are analogous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L7/L12, and P0 is likely to be an analog of L10. The three proteins have a nearly identical carboxy-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (KEESEESD(D/E)DMGFGLFD-COOH) that is the basis of their immunological cross-reactivity. The identifies of the P1 and P2 cDNAs were confirmed by the strong similarities of their encoded amino acid sequences to published primary structures of the homologous rat, brine shrimp, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. The P0 cDNA was initially identified by translation of hybrid-selected mRNA and immunoprecipitation of the products. To demonstrate that the coding sequences are full length, the P0, P1, and P2 cDNAs were transcribed in vitro by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and the resulting mRNAs were translated in vitro. The synthetic P0, P1, and P2 proteins were serologically and electrophoretically identical to P-proteins extracted from HeLa cells. These synthetic P-proteins were incorporated into 60S but not 40S ribosomes and also assembled into a complex similar to that described for E. coli L7/L12 and L10.

  13. Brachyspira aalborgi Infection Diagnosed by Culture and 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing Using Human Colonic Biopsy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Kraaz, Wolfgang; Pettersson, Bertil; Thunberg, Ulf; Engstrand, Lars; Fellström, Claes

    2000-01-01

    In this study we report on the isolation and characterization of the intestinal spirochete Brachyspira aalborgi using human mucosal biopsy specimens taken from the colon of a young adult male with intestinal spirochetosis. A selective medium, containing 400 μg of spectinomycin/ml and 5 μg of polymyxin/ml was used for the isolation procedure. A high degree of similarity, in terms of phenotypic properties and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence, was observed between the isolated strain, named W1, and the type strain, 513A, of B. aalborgi. A similarity of 99.7% in the nucleotide sequence was found between W1 and 513AT, based on the almost-complete gene. A short segment of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR using genetic material enriched from paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens, which were taken from the patient on two occasions. The products showed 16S rRNA gene sequences virtually identical to that of strain 513AT in the actual region. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the colonic biopsy specimens with a polyclonal antibody raised against an intestinal spirochete isolated in a previous case of human intestinal spirochetosis. The antibody reacted strongly with the spirochete on the luminal epithelium. No immune reaction was seen within or below the surface epithelium. Routine histology did not reveal signs of colitis. Electron microscopy showed spirochetes attached end-on to the colonic mucosal surface. The isolate grew poorly on a commonly used selective medium for intestinal spirochetes, which may explain previous failures to isolate B. aalborgi. PMID:11015363

  14. Reexamination of Culex pipiens Hybridization Zone in the Eastern United States by Ribosomal DNA-Based Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaoming; Molaei, Goudarz; Andreadis, Theodore G.

    2011-01-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex are important vectors of several disease-causing pathogens, including West Nile virus. In North America, the complex consists of Cx. pipiens pipiens form pipiens, Cx. pipiens pipiens form molestus, Cx. pipiens quinquefasciatus, and their hybrids that exhibit substantial diversity in physiology, behavior, and geographic range. Hybridization among these mosquitoes is of concern because of potential implications for disease transmission. Currently, several morphological and molecular markers exist for differentiating members of the Cx. pipiens complex; however, these markers have specific limitations. We report here two highly reliable ribosomal DNA-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, CxpG2T and CxpA2d, for detecting Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes containing Cx. p. quinquefasciatus alleles. Both CxpG2T and CxpA2d contain one allele that is present in all members of the Cx. pipiens complex, and the other allele is specific to Cx. p. quinquefasciatus. Testing of field populations from the eastern United States showed that these two SNP markers are capable of identifying a south to north gradient of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and hybrids. The northern limit of detection of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus alleles in this study was in Fort Totten, NY (40.79°N), whereas the southern boundary was determined between Atlanta, GA (33.81°N) and Gainesville, FL (29.64°N). CxpG2T and CxpA2d were more accurate than the ACE-2 marker, and they may conceivably provide comparable resolution with microsatellite markers for detecting Cx. p. quinquefasciatus alleles. PMID:21896800

  15. The Mitochondrial Genome of Conus textile, coxI-coxII Intergenic Sequences and Conoidean Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K; Stevenson, Bradford J.; Ownby, John-Paul; Cady, Matthew T.; Watkins, Maren; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2009-01-01

    The cone snails belong to the superfamily Conoidea, comprising ∼10,000 venomous marine gastropods. We determined the complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of Conus textile. The gene order is identical in Conus textile, Lophiotoma cerithiformis (another Conoidean gastropod), and the neogastropod Ilyanassa obsoleta, (not in the superfamily Conoidea). However, the intergenic interval between the coxI/coxII genes, was much longer in C. textile (165 bp) than in any other previously analyzed gastropod. We used the intergenic region to evaluate evolutionary patterns. In most neogastropods and three conidean families the intergenic interval is small (<30 nucleotides). Within Conus, the variation is from 130-170 bp, and each different clade within Conus has a narrower size distribution. In Conasprella, a subgenus traditionally assigned to Conus, the intergenic regions vary between 200-500 bp, suggesting that the species in Conasprella are not congeneric with Conus. The intergenic region was used for phylogenetic analysis of a group of fish-hunting Conus, despite the short length resolution was better than using standard markers. Thus, the coxI/coxII intergenic region can be used both to define evolutionary relationships between species in a clade, and to understand broad evolutionary patterns across the large superfamily Conoidea. PMID:17936021

  16. The Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Nol11 Is Required for Optimal rDNA Transcription and Craniofacial Development in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, John N.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; del Viso, Florencia; Baserga, Susan J.; Khokha, Mustafa K.

    2015-01-01

    The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC) of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival. PMID:25756904

  17. The ribosome biogenesis factor Nol11 is required for optimal rDNA transcription and craniofacial development in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John N; Sondalle, Samuel B; Del Viso, Florencia; Baserga, Susan J; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2015-03-01

    The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC) of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival. PMID:25756904

  18. The site-specific ribosomal DNA insertion element R1Bm belongs to a class of non-long-terminal-repeat retrotransposons

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Y.; Eickbush, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    Two types of insertion elements, R1 and R2 (previously called type I and type II), are known to interrupt the 28S ribosomal genes of several insect species. In the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, each element occupies approximately 10% of the estimated 240 ribosomal DNA units, while at most only a few copies are located outside the ribosomal DNA units. The authors present here the complete nucleotide sequence of an R1 insertion from B. mori (R1Bm). This 5.1-kilobase element contains two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) which together occupy 88% of its length. ORF1 is 461 amino acids in length and exhibits characteristics of retroviral gag genes. ORF2 is 1,051 amino acids in length and contains homology to reverse transcriptase-like enzymes. The analysis of 3' and 5' ends of independent isolates from the ribosomal locus supports the suggestion that R1 is still functioning as a transposable element. The precise location of the element within the genome implies that its transposition must occur with remarkable insertion sequence specificity. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences from six retrotransposons, R1 and R2 of B. mori, I factor and F element of Drosophila melanogaster, L1 of Mus domesticus, and Ingi of Trypanosoma brucei, reveals a relatively high level of sequence homology in the reverse transcriptase region. Like R1, these elements lack long terminal repeats. The authors therefore named this class of related elements the non-long-terminal-repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons.

  19. Genome differentiation in a species pair of coregonine fishes: an extremely rapid speciation driven by stress-activated retrotransposons mediating extensive ribosomal DNA multiplications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sympatric species pairs are particularly common in freshwater fishes associated with postglacial lakes in northern temperate environments. The nature of divergences between co-occurring sympatric species, factors contributing to reproductive isolation and modes of genome evolution is a much debated topic in evolutionary biology addressed by various experimental tools. To the best of our knowledge, nobody approached this field using molecular cytogenetics. We examined chromosomes and genomes of one postglacial species pair, sympatric European winter-spawning Coregonus albula and the local endemic dwarf-sized spring-spawning C. fontanae, both originating in Lake Stechlin. We have employed molecular cytogenetic tools to identify the genomic differences between the two species of the sympatric pair on the sub-chromosomal level of resolution. Results Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments consistently revealed a distinct variation in the copy number of loci of the major ribosomal DNA (the 45S unit) between C. albula and C. fontanae genomes. In C. fontanae, up to 40 chromosomes were identified to bear a part of the major ribosomal DNA, while in C. albula only 8–10 chromosomes possessed these genes. To determine mechanisms how such extensive genome alternation might have arisen, a PCR screening for retrotransposons from genomic DNA of both species was performed. The amplified retrotransposon Rex1 was used as a probe for FISH mapping onto chromosomes of both species. These experiments showed a clear co-localization of the ribosomal DNA and the retrotransposon Rex1 in a pericentromeric region of one or two acrocentric chromosomes in both species. Conclusion We demonstrated genomic consequences of a rapid ecological speciation on the level undetectable by neither sequence nor karyotype analysis. We provide indirect evidence that ribosomal DNA probably utilized the spreading mechanism of retrotransposons subsequently affecting recombination rates

  20. Nuclear-encoded chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 of Nicotiana tabacum: characterization of mature protein and isolation and sequence analysis of cDNA clones encoding its cytoplasmic precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, G A; Thomas, F J; McCreery, T P; Bourque, D P

    1992-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Petite Havana) leaves was used to prepare a cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11. Recombinant phage containing cDNAs coding for chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 were identified and sequenced. Mature tobacco L12 protein has 44% amino acid identity with ribosomal protein L7/L12 of Escherichia coli. The longest L12 cDNA (733 nucleotides) codes for a 13,823 molecular weight polypeptide with a transit peptide of 53 amino acids and a mature protein of 133 amino acids. The transit peptide and mature protein share 43% and 79% amino acid identity, respectively, with corresponding regions of spinach chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. The predicted amino terminus of the mature protein was confirmed by partial sequence analysis of HPLC-purified tobacco chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. A single L12 mRNA of about 0.8 kb was detected by hybridization of L12 cDNA to poly(A)+ and total leaf RNA. Hybridization patterns of restriction fragments of tobacco genomic DNA probed with the L12 cDNA suggested the existence of more than one gene for ribosomal protein L12. Characterization of a second cDNA with an identical L12 coding sequence but a different 3'-noncoding sequence provided evidence that at least two L12 genes are expressed in tobacco. Images PMID:1542565

  1. Deriving ribosomal binding site (RBS) statistical models from unannotated DNA sequences and the use of the RBS model for N-terminal prediction.

    PubMed

    Hayes, W S; Borodovsky, M

    1998-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the position of translation initiation (N-terminal prediction) is a difficult problem. N-terminal prediction from DNA sequence alone is ambiguous is several candidate start sites are close to each other. Protein similarity search is usually unable to indicate the true start of a gene as it would require a strong protein sequence similarity at the N-terminal portion of a protein where conservative regions are rarely situated. With the aid of the GeneMark program for gene identification, we extract DNA sequence fragments presumably containing ribosome binding sites (RBS) from unannotated complete genomic sequences. These DNA segments are aligned to generate the RBS model using the Gibbs' sampling method. N-terminal prediction is then performed by using the RBS model in conjunction with the GeneMark start codon prediction to aid in determining the true N-terminal site. PMID:9697189

  2. Yeast linker histone Hho1p is required for efficient RNA polymerase I processivity and transcriptional silencing at the ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Anat; Eyal, Miri; Hershkovits, Gitit; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Klutstein, Michael; Katcoff, Don Jay

    2008-01-01

    Nucleosome core particles in eukaryotes are linked by a stretch of DNA that is usually associated with a linker histone. Here, we show in yeast, that the presence of yeast linker histone Hho1p represses expression of a pol II transcribed gene (MET15) embedded in the rDNA. In vivo deletions of Hho1p sequences showed that the second globular domain is sufficient for that repression, whereas the presence of the N terminus is required for its derepression. In contrast, a run-on assay confirmed by a ChIP experiment showed that Hho1p is required for maximal pol I processivity during rDNA transcription. Psoralen accessibility experiments indicated that Hho1p is necessary for normal rDNA compaction. DNA array expression analysis comparing RNA transcripts in wild-type and hho1 strains before and after a heat-shock showed that Hho1p is necessary to achieve wild-type mRNA levels of transcripts that encode ribosomal components. Taken together, our results suggest that Hho1p is involved in rDNA compaction, and like core histones, is required for efficient rDNA transcription by pol I. PMID:18687885

  3. Conservation and diversity among the three-dimensional folds of the Dicistroviridae intergenic region IRESes.

    PubMed

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Costantino, David A; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2007-07-27

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are necessary for successful infection of many pathogenic viruses, but the details of the RNA structure-based mechanism used to bind and manipulate the ribosome remain poorly understood. The IRES RNAs from the Dicistroviridae intergenic region (IGR) are an excellent model system to understand the fundamental tenets of IRES function, requiring no protein factors to manipulate the ribosome and initiate translation. Here, we explore the architecture of four members of the IGR IRESes, representative of the two divergent classes of these IRES RNAs. Using biochemical and structural probing methods, we show that despite sequence variability they contain a common three-dimensional fold. The three-dimensional architecture of the ribosome binding domain from these IRESes is organized around a core helical scaffold, around which the rest of the RNA molecule folds. However, subtle variation in the folds of these IRESes and the presence of an additional secondary structure element suggest differences in the details of their manipulation of the large ribosomal subunit. Overall, the results demonstrate how a conserved three-dimensional RNA fold governs ribosome binding and manipulation. PMID:17544444

  4. Double trouble for grasshopper molecular systematics: intra-individual heterogeneity of both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequences in Hesperotettix viridis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hesperotettix viridis grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae:Melanoplinae) exhibit intra-individual variation in both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA sequences. These findings violate core assumptions underlying DNA sequence data obtained via pol...

  5. Single-step co-integration of multiple expressible heterologous genes into the ribosomal DNA of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, J; Diesel, A; Waschk, D; Gellissen, G; Hollenberg, C P; Suckow, M

    2002-05-01

    We have investigated the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha as a host for the co-integration and expression of multiple heterologous genes using an rDNA integration approach. The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of H. polymorpha was found to consist of a single rDNA cluster of about 50-60 repeats of an 8-kb unit located on chromosome II. A 2.4-kb segment of H. polymorpha rDNA encompassing parts of the 25S, the complete 5S and the non-transcribed spacer region between 25S and 18S rDNA was isolated and inserted into conventional integrative H. polymorpha plasmids harboring the Saccharomyces- cerevisiae-derived URA3 gene for selection. These rDNA plasmids integrated homologously into the rDNA repeats of a H. polymorpha (odc1) host as several independent clusters. Anticipating that this mode of multiple-cluster integration could be used for the simultaneous integration of several distinct rDNA plasmids, the host strain was co-transformed with a mixture of up to three different plasmids, all bearing the same URA3 selection marker. Transformations indeed resulted in mitotically stable strains harboring one, two, or all three plasmids integrated into the rDNA. The overall copy number of the plasmids integrated did not exceed the number of rDNA repeats present in the untransformed host strain, irrespective of the number of different plasmids involved. Strains harboring different plasmids co-expressed the introduced genes, resulting in functional proteins. Thus, this approach provides a new and attractive tool for the rapid generation of recombinant strains that simultaneously co-produce several proteins in desired stoichiometric ratios. PMID:12021801

  6. Myc-induced anchorage of the rDNA IGS region to nucleolar matrix modulates growth-stimulated changes in higher-order rDNA architecture.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Chiou-Nan; Nematollahi-Mahani, Amir; Wright, Anthony P H

    2014-05-01

    Chromatin domain organization and the compartmentalized distribution of chromosomal regions are essential for packaging of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the eukaryotic nucleus as well as regulated gene expression. Nucleoli are the most prominent morphological structures of cell nuclei and nucleolar organization is coupled to cell growth. It has been shown that nuclear scaffold/matrix attachment regions often define the base of looped chromosomal domains in vivo and that they are thereby critical for correct chromosome architecture and gene expression. Here, we show regulated organization of mammalian ribosomal ribonucleic acid genes into distinct chromatin loops by tethering to nucleolar matrix via the non-transcribed inter-genic spacer region of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The rDNA gene loop structures are induced specifically upon growth stimulation and are dependent on the activity of the c-Myc protein. Matrix-attached rDNA genes are hypomethylated at the promoter and are thus available for transcriptional activation. rDNA genes silenced by methylation are not recruited to the matrix. c-Myc, which has been shown to induce rDNA transcription directly, is physically associated with rDNA gene looping structures and the intergenic spacer sequence in growing cells. Such a role of Myc proteins in gene activation has not been reported previously. PMID:24609384

  7. Three-Dimensional Distribution of UBF and Nopp140 in Relationship to Ribosomal DNA Transcription During Mouse Preimplantation Development.

    PubMed

    Koné, Maïmouna Coura; Fleurot, Renaud; Chebrout, Martine; Debey, Pascale; Beaujean, Nathalie; Bonnet-Garnier, Amélie

    2016-04-01

    The nucleolus is a dynamic nuclear compartment that is mostly involved in ribosome subunit biogenesis; however, it may also play a role in many other biological processes, such as stress response and the cell cycle. Mainly using electron microscopy, several studies have tried to decipher how active nucleoli are set up during early development in mice. In this study, we analyzed nucleologenesis during mouse early embryonic development using 3D-immunofluorescent detection of UBF and Nopp140, two proteins associated with different nucleolar compartments. UBF is a transcription factor that helps maintain the euchromatic state of ribosomal genes; Nopp140 is a phosphoprotein that has been implicated in pre-rRNA processing. First, using detailed image analyses and the in situ proximity ligation assay technique, we demonstrate that UBF and Nopp140 dynamic redistribution between the two-cell and blastocyst stages (time of implantation) is correlated with morphological and structural modifications that occur in embryonic nucleolar compartments. Our results also support the hypothesis that nucleoli develop at the periphery of nucleolar precursor bodies. Finally, we show that the RNA polymerase I inhibitor CX-5461: 1) disrupts transcriptional activity, 2) alters preimplantation development, and 3) leads to a complete reorganization of UBF and Nopp140 distribution. Altogether, our results underscore that highly dynamic changes are occurring in the nucleoli of embryos and confirm a close link between ribosomal gene transcription and nucleologenesis during the early stages of development. PMID:26984997

  8. A mobile group I intron from Physarum polycephalum can insert itself and induce point mutations in the nuclear ribosomal DNA of saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Muscarella, D E; Vogt, V M

    1993-01-01

    Pp LSU3 is a mobile group I intron in the extrachromosomal nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of Physarum polycephalum. As found for other mobile introns, Pp LSU3 encodes a site-specific endonuclease, I-Ppo, which mediates "homing" to unoccupied target sites in Physarum rDNA. The recognition sequence for this enzyme is conserved in all eucaryotic nuclear rDNAs. We have introduced this intron into a heterologous species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which nuclear group I introns have not been detected. The expression of Pp LSU3, under control of the inducible GAL10 promoter, was found to be lethal as a consequence of double-strand breaks in the rDNA. However, surviving colonies that are resistant to the lethal effects of I-Ppo because of alterations in the rDNA at the cleavage site were recovered readily. These survivors are of two classes. The first comprises cells that acquired one of three types of point mutations. The second comprises cells in which Pp LSU3 became inserted into the rDNA. In both cases, each resistant survivor appears to carry the same alterations in all approximately 150 rDNA repeats. When it is embedded in yeast rDNA, Pp LSU3 leads to the synthesis of I-Ppo and appears to be mobile in appropriate genetic crosses. The existence of yeast cells carrying a mobile intron should allow dissection of the steps that allow expression of the highly unusual I-Ppo gene. Images PMID:8380887

  9. Complete Sequence Construction of the Highly Repetitive Ribosomal RNA Gene Repeats in Eukaryotes Using Whole Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Saumya; Ganley, Austen R D

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) encode the major rRNA species of the ribosome, and thus are essential across life. These genes are highly repetitive in most eukaryotes, forming blocks of tandem repeats that form the core of nucleoli. The primary role of the rDNA in encoding rRNA has been long understood, but more recently the rDNA has been implicated in a number of other important biological phenomena, including genome stability, cell cycle, and epigenetic silencing. Noncoding elements, primarily located in the intergenic spacer region, appear to mediate many of these phenomena. Although sequence information is available for the genomes of many organisms, in almost all cases rDNA repeat sequences are lacking, primarily due to problems in assembling these intriguing regions during whole genome assemblies. Here, we present a method to obtain complete rDNA repeat unit sequences from whole genome assemblies. Limitations of next generation sequencing (NGS) data make them unsuitable for assembling complete rDNA unit sequences; therefore, the method we present relies on the use of Sanger whole genome sequence data. Our method makes use of the Arachne assembler, which can assemble highly repetitive regions such as the rDNA in a memory-efficient way. We provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for generating rDNA sequences from whole genome Sanger sequence data using Arachne, for refining complete rDNA unit sequences, and for validating the sequences obtained. In principle, our method will work for any species where the rDNA is organized into tandem repeats. This will help researchers working on species without a complete rDNA sequence, those working on evolutionary aspects of the rDNA, and those interested in conducting phylogenetic footprinting studies with the rDNA. PMID:27576718

  10. Ribosomal proteins: functions beyond the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Liao, Wen-Juan; Liao, Jun-Ming; Liao, Peng; Lu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Although ribosomal proteins are known for playing an essential role in ribosome assembly and protein translation, their ribosome-independent functions have also been greatly appreciated. Over the past decade, more than a dozen of ribosomal proteins have been found to activate the tumor suppressor p53 pathway in response to ribosomal stress. In addition, these ribosomal proteins are involved in various physiological and pathological processes. This review is composed to overview the current understanding of how ribosomal stress provokes the accumulation of ribosome-free ribosomal proteins, as well as the ribosome-independent functions of ribosomal proteins in tumorigenesis, immune signaling, and development. We also propose the potential of applying these pieces of knowledge to the development of ribosomal stress-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:25735597

  11. Characterization of I-Ppo, an intron-encoded endonuclease that mediates homing of a group I intron in the ribosomal DNA of Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed Central

    Muscarella, D E; Ellison, E L; Ruoff, B M; Vogt, V M

    1990-01-01

    A novel and only recently recognized class of enzymes is composed of the site-specific endonucleases encoded by some group I introns. We have characterized several aspects of I-Ppo, the endonuclease that mediates the mobility of intron 3 in the ribosomal DNA of Physarum polycephalum. This intron is unique among mobile group I introns in that it is located in nuclear DNA. We found that I-Ppo is encoded by an open reading frame in the 5' half of intron 3, upstream of the sequences required for self-splicing of group I introns. Either of two AUG initiation codons could start this reading frame, one near the beginning of the intron and the other in the upstream exon, leading to predicted polypeptides of 138 and 160 amino acid residues. The longer polypeptide was the major form translated in vitro in a reticulocyte extract. From nuclease assays of proteins synthesized in vitro with partially deleted DNAs, we conclude that both polypeptides possess endonuclease activity. We also have expressed I-Ppo in Escherichia coli, using a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase expression system. The longer polypeptide also was the predominant form made in this system. It showed enzymatic activity in bacteria in vivo, as demonstrated by the cleavage of a plasmid carrying the target site. Like several other intron-encoded endonucleases, I-Ppo makes a four-base staggered cut in its ribosomal DNA target sequence, very near the site where intron 3 becomes integrated in crosses of intron 3-containing and intron 3-lacking Physarum strains. Images PMID:2355911

  12. New Degenerate Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides-Specific 16S Ribosomal DNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes Reveal High Bacterial Diversity in River Taff Epilithon

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Louise A.; Weightman, Andrew J.; Fry, John C.

    2002-01-01

    River microbial communities play an important role in global nutrient cycles, and aggregated bacteria such as those in epilithic biofilms may be major contributors. In this study the bacterial diversity of River Taff epilithon in South Wales was investigated. A 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clone library was constructed and analyzed by partial sequencing of 76 of 347 clones and hybridization with taxon-specific probes. The epilithon was found to be very diverse, with an estimated 59.6% of the bacterial populations not accounted for by these clones. Members of the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides division (CFBs) were most abundant in the library, representing 25% of clones, followed by members of the α subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (α-Proteobacteria), γ-Proteobacteria, gram-positive bacteria, Cyanobacteria, β-Proteobacteria, δ-Proteobacteria, and the Prosthecobacter group. This study concentrated on the epilithic CFB populations, and a new set of degenerate 16S rDNA probes was developed to enhance their detection, namely, CFB560, CFB562, and CFB376. The commonly used probe CF319a/b may frequently lead to the underestimation of CFB populations in environmental studies, because it does not fully detect members of the division. CFB560 had exact matches to 95.6% of CFBs listed in the Ribosomal Database Project (release 8.0) small-subunit phylogenetic trees, compared to 60% for CF319a/b. The CFB probes detected 66 of 347 epilithon TAF clones, and 60 of these were partially sequenced. They affiliated with the RDP-designated groups Cytophaga, Sphingobacterium, Lewinella, and Cytophaga aurantiaca. CFB560 and CF319a/b detected 94% (62 of 66) and 48.5% (32 of 66) of clones, respectively, and therefore CFB560 is recommended for future use. Probe design in this study illustrated that multiple degenerate positions can greatly increase target range without adversely effecting specificity or experimental performance. PMID:11772628

  13. Variation in the number of nucleoli and incomplete homogenization of 18S ribosomal DNA sequences in leaf cells of the cultivated Oriental ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer)

    PubMed Central

    Chelomina, Galina N.; Rozhkovan, Konstantin V.; Voronova, Anastasia N.; Burundukova, Olga L.; Muzarok, Tamara I.; Zhuravlev, Yuri N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Wild ginseng, Panax ginseng Meyer, is an endangered species of medicinal plants. In the present study, we analyzed variations within the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) cluster to gain insight into the genetic diversity of the Oriental ginseng, P. ginseng, at artificial plant cultivation. Methods The roots of wild P. ginseng plants were sampled from a nonprotected natural population of the Russian Far East. The slides were prepared from leaf tissues using the squash technique for cytogenetic analysis. The 18S rDNA sequences were cloned and sequenced. The distribution of nucleotide diversity, recombination events, and interspecific phylogenies for the total 18S rDNA sequence data set was also examined. Results In mesophyll cells, mononucleolar nuclei were estimated to be dominant (75.7%), while the remaining nuclei contained two to four nucleoli. Among the analyzed 18S rDNA clones, 20% were identical to the 18S rDNA sequence of P. ginseng from Japan, and other clones differed in one to six substitutions. The nucleotide polymorphism was more expressed at the positions 440–640 bp, and distributed in variable regions, expansion segments, and conservative elements of core structure. The phylogenetic analysis confirmed conspecificity of ginseng plants cultivated in different regions, with two fixed mutations between P. ginseng and other species. Conclusion This study identified the evidences of the intragenomic nucleotide polymorphism in the 18S rDNA sequences of P. ginseng. These data suggest that, in cultivated plants, the observed genome instability may influence the synthesis of biologically active compounds, which are widely used in traditional medicine. PMID:27158239

  14. Sequencing of whole plastid genomes and nuclear ribosomal DNA of Diospyros species (Ebenaceae) endemic to New Caledonia: many species, little divergence

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Barbara; Paun, Ovidiu; Munzinger, Jérôme; Chase, Mark W.; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Some plant groups, especially on islands, have been shaped by strong ancestral bottlenecks and rapid, recent radiation of phenotypic characters. Single molecular markers are often not informative enough for phylogenetic reconstruction in such plant groups. Whole plastid genomes and nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) are viewed by many researchers as sources of information for phylogenetic reconstruction of groups in which expected levels of divergence in standard markers are low. Here we evaluate the usefulness of these data types to resolve phylogenetic relationships among closely related Diospyros species. Methods Twenty-two closely related Diospyros species from New Caledonia were investigated using whole plastid genomes and nrDNA data from low-coverage next-generation sequencing (NGS). Phylogenetic trees were inferred using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference on separate plastid and nrDNA and combined matrices. Key Results The plastid and nrDNA sequences were, singly and together, unable to provide well supported phylogenetic relationships among the closely related New Caledonian Diospyros species. In the nrDNA, a 6-fold greater percentage of parsimony-informative characters compared with plastid DNA was found, but the total number of informative sites was greater for the much larger plastid DNA genomes. Combining the plastid and nuclear data improved resolution. Plastid results showed a trend towards geographical clustering of accessions rather than following taxonomic species. Conclusions In plant groups in which multiple plastid markers are not sufficiently informative, an investigation at the level of the entire plastid genome may also not be sufficient for detailed phylogenetic reconstruction. Sequencing of complete plastid genomes and nrDNA repeats seems to clarify some relationships among the New Caledonian Diospyros species, but the higher percentage of parsimony-informative characters in nrDNA compared with

  15. Effects of anti-C23 (nucleolin) antibody on transcription of ribosomal DNA in Chironomus salivary gland cells

    SciTech Connect

    Egyhazi, E.; Pigon, A. ); Chang, Jinhong; Ghaffari, S.H.; Dreesen, T.D.; Wellman, S.E.; Case, S.T.; Olson, M.O.J. )

    1988-10-01

    Protein C23 (also called nucleolin or 100-kDa nucleolar protein) is a major nucleolar phosphoprotein involved in ribosome biogenesis. To determine the effects of protein C23 on preribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) synthesis anti-C23 antiserum was microinjected into nuclei of Chironomus tentans salivary glands. Transcription was measured by incubation of the glands with {sup 32}P-labeled RNA precursors followed by microdissection of nucleoli, RNA extraction, and electrophoretic analyses. Injection of the anti-C23 antibody caused a 2- to 3.5-fold stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation into 38 S pre-rRNA. No stimulation was observed in salivary glands injected with preimmune serum or antiserum preabsorbed with protein C23. The stimulatory effect was selective for pre-rRNA as indicated by the lack of stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation into extranucleolar RNA. Injection of the antiserum produced little or no effect on pre-RNA processing as measured by the relative amounts of {sup 32}P-labeled intermediate cleavage products of pre-rRNA in stimulated versus control glands. These results suggest that protein C23 not only is involved in ribosome assembly but also plays a role in regulating the transcription of the preribosomal RNA.

  16. Molecular phylogenetic relationships among members of the family Phytolaccaceae sensu lato inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Kim, S Y; Park, S H; Ali, M A

    2013-01-01

    The phylogeny of a phylogenetically poorly known family, Phytolaccaceae sensu lato (s.l.), was constructed for resolving conflicts concerning taxonomic delimitations. Cladistic analyses were made based on 44 sequences of the internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA from 11 families (Aizoaceae, Basellaceae, Didiereaceae, Molluginaceae, Nyctaginaceae, Phytolaccaceae s.l., Polygonaceae, Portulacaceae, Sarcobataceae, Tamaricaceae, and Nepenthaceae) of the order Caryophyllales. The maximum parsimony tree from the analysis resolved a monophyletic group of the order Caryophyllales; however, the members, Agdestis, Anisomeria, Gallesia, Gisekia, Hilleria, Ledenbergia, Microtea, Monococcus, Petiveria, Phytolacca, Rivinia, Schindleria, Seguieria, Stegnosperma, and Trichostigma, which belong to the family Phytolaccaceae s.l., did not cluster under a single clade, demonstrating that Phytolaccaceae is polyphyletic. PMID:23479160

  17. Detection and discrimination of Loa loa, Mansonella perstans and Wuchereria bancrofti by PCR-RFLP and nested-PCR of ribosomal DNA ITS1 region.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Maribel; González, Luis Miguel; Carranza, Cristina; Bailo, Begoña; Pérez-Ayala, Ana; Muro, Antonio; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Gárate, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1) of two filarial nematodes, Loa loa and Mansonella perstans, was amplified and further sequenced to develop an species-specific polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) protocol for the differentiation of both species from Wuchereria bancrofti, three filarial nematodes with blood circulating microfilariae. The ITS1-PCR product digested with the restriction endonuclease Ase I generated an specific diagnostic pattern for each of the three species. Moreover, three new specific nested-PCRs, targeting the ITS1 region, for differential detection of L. loa, M. perstans and W. bancrofti were developed and used when the ITS1-PCR products were insufficient for the Ase I enzymatic digestion. These filarial species-specific molecular protocols were evaluated in forty blood samples from African adult immigrants attending in the Hospital Insular of Gran Canaria, Canarias, Spain. PMID:20599994

  18. Evaluation of the MicroSeq System for Identification of Mycobacteria by 16S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing and Its Integration into a Routine Clinical Mycobacteriology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Leslie; Doerr, Kelly A.; Wohlfiel, Sherri L.; Roberts, Glenn D.

    2003-01-01

    An evaluation of the MicroSeq 500 microbial identification system by nucleic acid sequencing and the Mayo Clinic experience with its integration into a routine clinical laboratory setting are described. Evaluation of the MicroSeq 500 microbial identification system was accomplished with 59 American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains and 328 clinical isolates of mycobacteria identified by conventional and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing by using the MicroSeq 500 microbial identification system. Nucleic acid sequencing identified 58 of 59 (98.3%) ATCC strains to the species level or to the correct group or complex level. The identification results for 219 of 243 clinical isolates (90.1%) with a distance score of <1% were concordant with the identifications made by phenotypic methods. The remaining 85 isolates had distance scores of >1%; 35 (41.1%) were identified to the appropriate species level or group or complex level; 13 (15.3%) were identified to the species level. All 85 isolates were determined to be mycobacterial species, either novel species or species that exhibited significant genotypic divergence from an organism in the database with the closest match. Integration of nucleic acid sequencing into the routine mycobacteriology laboratory and use of the MicroSeq 500 microbial identification system and Mayo Clinic databases containing additional genotypes of common species and added species significantly reduced the number of organisms that could not be identified by phenotypic methods. The turnaround time was shortened to 24 h, and results were reported much earlier. A limited number of species could not be differentiated from one another by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing; however, the method provides for the identification of unusual species and more accurate identifications and offers the promise of being the most accurate method available. PMID:12682128

  19. Deregulation of Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Mediated p53 Translation in Cancer Cells with Defective p53 Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Halaby, Marie-Jo; Harris, Benjamin R. E.; Miskimins, W. Keith; Cleary, Margot P.

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of the p53 tumor suppressor and its subsequent activation following DNA damage are critical for its protection against tumorigenesis. We previously discovered an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) at the 5′ untranslated region of the p53 mRNA. However, the connection between IRES-mediated p53 translation and p53's tumor suppressive function is unknown. In this study, we identified two p53 IRES trans-acting factors, translational control protein 80 (TCP80), and RNA helicase A (RHA), which positively regulate p53 IRES activity. Overexpression of TCP80 and RHA also leads to increased expression and synthesis of p53. Furthermore, we discovered two breast cancer cell lines that retain wild-type p53 but exhibit defective p53 induction and synthesis following DNA damage. The levels of TCP80 and RHA are extremely low in both cell lines, and expression of both proteins is required to significantly increase the p53 IRES activity in these cells. Moreover, we found cancer cells transfected with a shRNA against TCP80 not only exhibit decreased expression of TCP80 and RHA but also display defective p53 induction and diminished ability to induce senescence following DNA damage. Therefore, our findings reveal a novel mechanism of p53 inactivation that links deregulation of IRES-mediated p53 translation with tumorigenesis. PMID:26391949

  20. An 18S ribosomal DNA barcode for the study of Isomermis lairdi, a parasite of the blackfly Simulium damnosum s.l.

    PubMed

    Crainey, J L; Wilson, M D; Post, R J

    2009-09-01

    The mermithid parasite, Isomermis lairdi Mondet, Poinar & Bernadou (Nematoda: Mermithidae), is known to have a major impact on populations of Simulium damnosum s.l. Theobald (Diptera: Simuliidae) and on their efficiency as vectors of Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart) (Nematoda: Filarioidea). However, the value of I. lairdi and other mermithid parasites as potential means of integrated vector control has not been fully realized. This is partly because traditional taxonomic approaches have been insufficient for describing and analysing important aspects of their biology and host range. In total, rDNA barcode sequences have been obtained from over 70 I. lairdi mermithids found parasitizing S. damnosum s.l. larvae in three different rivers. No two sequences were found to vary by more than 0.5%, and cytospecies identification of mermithid hosts revealed that I. lairdi with identical rDNA barcodes can parasitize multiple cytoforms of the S. damnosum complex, including S. squamosum (Enderlein). Phylogenetic analysis using a partial sequence from the 18S ribosomal DNA barcode, grouped I. lairdi in a monophyletic group with Gastromermis viridis Welch (Nematoda: Mermithidae) and Isomermis wisconsinensis Welch (Nematoda: Mermithidae). PMID:19712154

  1. DIVERSITY OF BAT-ASSOCIATED LEPTOSPIRA IN THE PERUVIAN AMAZON INFERRED BY BAYESIAN PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF 16S RIBOSOMAL DNA SEQUENCES

    PubMed Central

    MATTHIAS, MICHAEL A.; DÍAZ, M. MÓNICA; CAMPOS, KALINA J.; CALDERON, MARITZA; WILLIG, MICHAEL R.; PACHECO, VICTOR; GOTUZZO, EDUARDO; GILMAN, ROBERT H.; VINETZ, JOSEPH M.

    2008-01-01

    The role of bats as potential sources of transmission to humans or as maintenance hosts of leptospires is poorly understood. We quantified the prevalence of leptospiral colonization in bats in the Peruvian Amazon in the vicinity of Iquitos, an area of high biologic diversity. Of 589 analyzed bats, culture (3 of 589) and molecular evidence (20 of 589) of leptospiral colonization was found in the kidneys, yielding an overall colonization rate of 3.4%. Infection rates differed with habitat and location, and among different bat species. Bayesian analysis was used to infer phylogenic relationships of leptospiral 16S ribosomal DNA sequences. Tree topologies were consistent with groupings based on DNA-DNA hybridization studies. A diverse group of leptospires was found in peri-Iquitos bat populations including Leptospira interrogans (5 clones), L. kirschneri (1), L. borgpetersenii (4), L. fainei (1), and two previously undescribed leptospiral species (8). Although L. kirschenri and L. interrogans have been previously isolated from bats, this report is the first to describe L. borgpetersenii and L. fainei infection of bats. A wild animal reservoir of L. fainei has not been previously described. The detection in bats of the L. interrogans serovar Icterohemorrhagiae, a leptospire typically maintained by peridomestic rats, suggests a rodent-bat infection cycle. Bats in Iquitos maintain a genetically diverse group of leptospires. These results provide a solid basis for pursuing molecular epidemiologic studies of bat-associated Leptospira, a potentially new epidemiologic reservoir of transmission of leptospirosis to humans. PMID:16282313

  2. Stimulation of ribosomal RNA gene promoter by transcription factor Sp1 involves active DNA demethylation by Gadd45-NER pathway.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Pallavi; Pandey, Vijaya; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    The well-studied Pol II transcription factor Sp1 has not been investigated for its regulatory role in rDNA transcription. Here, we show that Sp1 bound to specific sites on rDNA and localized into the nucleoli during the G1 phase of cell cycle to activate rDNA transcription. It facilitated the recruitment of Pol I pre-initiation complex and impeded the binding of nucleolar remodeling complex (NoRC) to rDNA resulting in the formation of euchromatin active state. More importantly, Sp1 also orchestrated the site-specific binding of Gadd45a-nucleotide excision repair (NER) complex resulting in active demethylation and transcriptional activation of rDNA. Interestingly, knockdown of Sp1 impaired rDNA transcription due to reduced engagement of the Gadd45a-NER complex and hypermethylation of rDNA. Thus, the present study unveils a novel role of Sp1 in rDNA transcription involving promoter demethylation. PMID:27156884

  3. Optimization of PCR—RFLP Directly from the Skin and Nails in Cases of Dermatophytosis, Targeting the ITS and the 18S Ribosomal DNA Regions

    PubMed Central

    Elavarashi, Elangovan; Kindo, Anupma Jyoti; Kalyani, Jagannathan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A pan fungal primer targeting the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region and optimization of PCR-RFLP using a dermatophyte specific primer targeted the 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) region were performed for the identification of dermatophyte species and strains directly from clinical specimens. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty eight specimens (129 skin scrapings and 9 nail clippings) from clinically suspected cases of dermatophytosis were collected and subjected to direct microscopy and culture. Among them, 66 skin scrapings and 3 nail clippings were processed for genotyping by PCR-RFLP analysis using the Mva I, Hae III and the Dde I restriction enzymes. Results: Of the 138 specimens, 81 specimens were positive for dermatophytosis, the most common one being Trichophyton rubrum (47), followed by Trichophyton mentagrophytes (25) and Epidermophyton floccosum (9). Of the 47 T. rubrum isolates, 10 were T. rubrum var. raubitschekii which were identified phenotypically as urease positive and by DNA sequencing. Since they exhibited minor morphological and physiological features, they have currently been synonymized with T. rubrum. Of the 25 T. mentagrophytes isolates, three were Trichophyton interdigitale, which were identified by DNA sequencing. Among the 66 skin specimens smear, culture and PCR showed the presence of dermatophytes in 36 (54.54%), 42 (63.63%) and 47 (71.21%) cases respectively. Among the three nail specimens, only one was found to be positive for dermatophytosis by smear, culture and PCR. Conclusion: Amplification of the dermatophyte specific primer is appropriate in the identification of dermatophytes directly from the clinical material. PCR targeting the ITS region by using the Mva I and the Dde I enzymes was equally good for the RFLP analysis. However, by using the above three restriction enzymes, no strain variations were detected among the T. rubrum and the T. mentagrophytes strains. PMID:23730638

  4. Chromosomal localization and molecular characterization of three different 5S ribosomal DNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Fabio; Bellavia, Daniele; Clemente, Ann Maria; Sisino, Giorgia; Barbieri, Rainer

    2007-09-01

    In this paper the chromosomal localization and molecular cloning and characterization of three 5S rDNA clusters of 700 bp (base pairs), 900 bp, and 950 bp in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus are reported. Southern blot hybridization demonstrated the existence of three 5S rDNA repeats of differing length in the P. lividus genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, performed in parallel on both haploid and diploid metaphases and interphase nuclei using different 5S rDNA units as probes, localized these 5S rDNA clusters in 3 different pairs of P. lividus chromosomes. This is the first complete gene mapping not only in a sea urchin but also in the phylum of echinoderms as a whole. PMID:17893727

  5. The DNA virus white spot syndrome virus uses an internal ribosome entry site for translation of the highly expressed nonstructural protein ICP35.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shih-Ting; Wang, Han-Ching; Yang, Yi-Ting; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2013-12-01

    Although shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus (∼300 kbp), it expresses many polycistronic mRNAs that are likely to use internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements for translation. A polycistronic mRNA encodes the gene of the highly expressed nonstructural protein ICP35, and here we use a dual-luciferase assay to demonstrate that this protein is translated cap independently by an IRES element located in the 5' untranslated region of icp35. A deletion analysis of this region showed that IRES activity was due to stem-loops VII and VIII. A promoterless assay, a reverse transcription-PCR together with quantitative real-time PCR analysis, and a stable stem-loop insertion upstream of the Renilla luciferase open reading frame were used, respectively, to rule out the possibility that cryptic promoter activity, abnormal splicing, or read-through was contributing to the IRES activity. In addition, a Northern blot analysis was used to confirm that only a single bicistronic mRNA was expressed. The importance of ICP35 to viral replication was demonstrated in a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) interference knockdown experiment in which the mortality of the icp35 dsRNA group was significantly reduced. Tunicamycin was used to show that the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 is required for icp35 IRES activity. We also found that the intercalating drug quinacrine significantly inhibited icp35 IRES activity in vitro and reduced the mortality rate and viral copy number in WSSV-challenged shrimp. Lastly, in Sf9 insect cells, we found that knockdown of the gene for the Spodoptera frugiperda 40S ribosomal protein RPS10 decreased icp35 IRES-regulated firefly luciferase activity but had no effect on cap-dependent translation. PMID:24089551

  6. Ultrastructural characteristics and small subunit ribosomal DNA sequence of Vairimorpha cheracis sp. nov., (Microspora: Burenellidae), a parasite of the Australian yabby, Cherax destructor (Decapoda: Parastacidae).

    PubMed

    Moodie, Elizabeth G; Le Jambre, Leo F; Katz, Margaret E

    2003-11-01

    This is the first record of a species of Vairimorpha infecting a crustacean host. Vairimorpha cheracis sp. nov. was found in a highland population of the Australian freshwater crayfish, Cherax destructor. The majority of spores and earlier developmental stages of V. cheracis sp. nov. were found within striated muscle cells of the thorax, abdomen, and appendages of the crayfish. Only octosporoblastic sporogony within sporophorous vesicles (SPVs) was observed. Diplokaryotic sporonts separated into two uninucleate daughter cells, each of which gave rise to four sporoblasts in a rosette-shaped plasmodium, so that eight uninucleate spores were produced within the persistent ovoid SPV. Ultrastructural features of stages in the octosporoblastic sequence were similar to those described for Vairimorpha necatrix, the type species. Mature spores were pyriform in shape and averaged 3.4x1.9 microm in dimensions. The anterior polaroplast was lamellar in structure, and the posterior polaroplast vesicular. The polar filament was coiled 10-12 times, lateral to the posterior vacuole. The small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) of V. cheracis sp. nov. was sequenced and compared with other microsporidia. V. cheracis sp. nov. showed over 97% sequence identity with Vairimorpha imperfecta and five species of Nosema, and only 86% sequence identity with V. necatrix. The need for a taxonomic revision of the Nosema/Vairimorpha group of species is discussed. PMID:14726242

  7. Ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer sequences do not support the species status of Ampelomyces quisqualis, a hyperparasite of powdery mildew fungi.

    PubMed

    Kiss, L; Nakasone, K K

    1998-05-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Ampelomyces isolates, pycnidial hyperparasites and biological control agents of powdery mildews, were inferred from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Currently, these hyperparasites are considered to be a single species, A. quisqualis, despite observed morphological and cultural differences. Ten Ampelomyces isolates, representing seven previously defined ITS RFLP groups, were sequenced and analyzed. Sequence-divergence values among isolates belonging to different RFLP groups ranged from 4.3 to 22.4%, suggesting that these isolates may represent different taxa. When Ampelomyces ITS sequences were analyzed by cladistic methods with the sequences of other ascomycetous fungi, they formed two lineages in the Dothideales. Slow-growing Ampelomyces isolates formed a clade with Leptosphaeria microscopica and L. nodorum, whereas fast-growing Ampelomyces isolates formed a clade with Epicoccum nigrum. Sequence-divergence values between these two clades ranged from 17.3 to 22.4%, suggesting that the taxa in the two clades are not closely related and possibly not congeneric. The data presented here indicate that the identification of 'A. quisqualis' isolates used in biological control experiments should be re-evaluated. PMID:9618587

  8. Prospective Study of Use of PCR Amplification and Sequencing of 16S Ribosomal DNA from Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Schuurman, Tim; de Boer, Richard F.; Kooistra-Smid, Anna M. D.; van Zwet, Anton A.

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the use of a broad-range PCR aimed at the 16S rRNA gene in detecting bacterial meningitis in a clinical setting. To achieve a uniform DNA extraction procedure for both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, a combination of physical disruption (bead beating) and a silica-guanidiniumthiocyanate procedure was used for nucleic acid preparation. To diminish the risk of contamination as much as possible, we chose to amplify almost the entire 16S rRNA gene. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was approximately 1 × 102 to 2 × 102 CFU/ml of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. In a prospective study of 227 CSF samples, broad-range PCR proved to be superior to conventional methods in detecting bacterial meningitis when antimicrobial therapy had already started. Overall, our assay showed a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 97%, a positive predictive value of 80%, and a negative predictive value of 98% compared to culture. We are currently adapting the standard procedures in our laboratory for detecting bacterial meningitis; broad-range 16S ribosomal DNA PCR detection is indicated when antimicrobial therapy has already started at time of lumbar puncture or when cultures remain negative, although the suspicion of bacterial meningitis remains. PMID:14766845

  9. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Devi, Khumuckcham Sangeeta; Tandon, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNAs were explored to study the genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili. Our study indicated the occurrence of nucleotide polymorphism and haplotypic diversity in the ITS regions. The present study demonstrated that the variability of ITS1 with respect to nucleotide diversity and sequence polymorphism exceeded that of ITS2. Sequence analysis of 5.8S gene revealed a much conserved region in all the accessions of Naga King Chili. However, strong phylogenetic information of this species is the distinct 13 bp deletion in the 5.8S gene which discriminated Naga King Chili from the rest of the Capsicum sp. Neutrality test results implied a neutral variation, and population seems to be evolving at drift–mutation equilibrium and free from directed selection pressure. Furthermore, mismatch analysis showed multimodal curve indicating a demographic equilibrium. Phylogenetic relationships revealed by Median Joining Network (MJN) analysis denoted a clear discrimination of Naga King Chili from its closest sister species (Capsicumchinense and Capsicumfrutescens). The absence of star-like network of haplotypes suggested an ancient population expansion of this chili. PMID:26862481

  10. Genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili inferred from internal transcribed spacer sequence of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Devi, Khumuckcham Sangeeta; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-02-01

    Sequences of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNAs were explored to study the genetic diversity and molecular evolution of Naga King Chili. Our study indicated the occurrence of nucleotide polymorphism and haplotypic diversity in the ITS regions. The present study demonstrated that the variability of ITS1 with respect to nucleotide diversity and sequence polymorphism exceeded that of ITS2. Sequence analysis of 5.8S gene revealed a much conserved region in all the accessions of Naga King Chili. However, strong phylogenetic information of this species is the distinct 13 bp deletion in the 5.8S gene which discriminated Naga King Chili from the rest of the Capsicum sp. Neutrality test results implied a neutral variation, and population seems to be evolving at drift-mutation equilibrium and free from directed selection pressure. Furthermore, mismatch analysis showed multimodal curve indicating a demographic equilibrium. Phylogenetic relationships revealed by Median Joining Network (MJN) analysis denoted a clear discrimination of Naga King Chili from its closest sister species (Capsicum chinense and Capsicum frutescens). The absence of star-like network of haplotypes suggested an ancient population expansion of this chili. PMID:26862481