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Sample records for rigid crystalline color

  1. Smeared gap equations in crystalline color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, M.

    2006-01-12

    In the framework of HDET, we discuss an averaging procedure of the NJL quark-quark interaction lagrangian, treated in the mean field approximation, for the two flavor LOFF phase of QCD. This procedure gives results which are valid in domains where Ginzburg-Landau results may be questionable. We compute and compare the free energy for different LOFF crystalline structures.

  2. Electrophoretic Deposition for Cholesteric Liquid-Crystalline Devices with Memory and Modulation of Reflection Colors.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shoichi; Itoh, Yoshimitsu; Yaguchi, Yuya; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo; Aida, Takuzo

    2016-06-01

    The first design strategy that allows both memorization and modulation of the liquid-crystalline reflection color is reported. Electrophoretic deposition of a tailored ionic chiral dopant is key to realizing this unprecedented function, which may pave the way for the development of full-color e-paper that can operate without the need of color filters. PMID:27027423

  3. Use of Rigid Liquid Crystalline Polypeptides as Alignment Matrices for Organic Nonlinear Optical Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarski, Zbigniew

    The orientation of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic molecules is crucial for the existence of high values for the macroscopic susceptibilities. The orientation and interaction of several smaller NLO active molecules with an easily alignable polypeptide host was investigated to determine which functional groups and molecular shapes would produce the largest orientation with the host material; these parameters included aromatic vs aliphatic, polar vs nonpolar, saturate vs unsaturated hydrocarbons and the length of the guest molecule. The host materials were either poly ( gamma-benzyl-l-glutamate) (PBLG) or poly ( gamma-ethyl-l-glutamate) (PELG) lyotropic liquid crystals. These host polymers formed pseudo-hexagonal crystalline structures with long rigid alpha -helical backbones. The interstitial alignment of the guest molecules was dictated by the overall alignment of the host polypeptide rigid rods. Within these films many of the guest molecules existed in a metastable state that delayed phase separation for several hours. The rate of phase separation was influenced by the concentration of the guest molecule and on the side chain moiety of the polypeptide. Guest phase separation to a solid or a liquid occurred at a faster rate in PELG films, due to the lack of the side chain induced hindrance, than in PBLG films. An indicator of the occurrence of phase separation was with the onset of opaqueness in the films. The thin polypeptide films containing the aligned guest molecules became optically opaque as the incompatibilities between the side chains of the polypeptides and the guest molecules increased. The nonlinear optical susceptibility measurements were hampered by either the low guest solubility or the low concentration level required to avoid the guest -host incompatibility. Electro-optic and degenerate two and four wave mixing were done and produced signals in solutions but not in the doped films. The semiflexible aromatic guest molecules, such as the derivatives

  4. Use of Crystalline Boron as a Burn Rate Retardant toward the Development of Green-Colored Handheld Signal Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Jesse J.; Poret, Jay C.; Broad, Russell N.

    2011-10-01

    The effect of using crystalline boron in green-colored handheld signal formulations is described. Due to its chemically inert nature, crystalline boron served to reduce the burn rates of the formulations. By adjusting crystalline boron percentages in the formulations, the pyrotechnic system could be tuned to meet burn time specifications.

  5. Design and characterization of an optimized simultaneous color and near-infrared fluorescence rigid endoscopic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vivek; Park, Minho; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Frangioni, John V.; Gangadharan, Sidhu P.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-12-01

    We report the design, characterization, and validation of an optimized simultaneous color and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence rigid endoscopic imaging system for minimally invasive surgery. This system is optimized for illumination and collection of NIR wavelengths allowing the simultaneous acquisition of both color and NIR fluorescence at frame rates higher than 6.8 fps with high sensitivity. The system employs a custom 10-mm diameter rigid endoscope optimized for NIR transmission. A dual-channel light source compatible with the constraints of an endoscope was built and includes a plasma source for white light illumination and NIR laser diodes for fluorescence excitation. A prism-based 2-CCD camera was customized for simultaneous color and NIR detection with a highly efficient filtration scheme for fluorescence imaging of both 700- and 800-nm emission dyes. The performance characterization studies indicate that the endoscope can efficiently detect fluorescence signal from both indocyanine green and methylene blue in dimethyl sulfoxide at the concentrations of 100 to 185 nM depending on the background optical properties. Finally, we performed the validation of this imaging system in vivo during a minimally invasive procedure for thoracic sentinel lymph node mapping in a porcine model.

  6. Design and characterization of an optimized simultaneous color and near-infrared fluorescence rigid endoscopic imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vivek; Park, Minho; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Frangioni, John V.; Gangadharan, Sidhu P.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We report the design, characterization, and validation of an optimized simultaneous color and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence rigid endoscopic imaging system for minimally invasive surgery. This system is optimized for illumination and collection of NIR wavelengths allowing the simultaneous acquisition of both color and NIR fluorescence at frame rates higher than 6.8 fps with high sensitivity. The system employs a custom 10-mm diameter rigid endoscope optimized for NIR transmission. A dual-channel light source compatible with the constraints of an endoscope was built and includes a plasma source for white light illumination and NIR laser diodes for fluorescence excitation. A prism-based 2-CCD camera was customized for simultaneous color and NIR detection with a highly efficient filtration scheme for fluorescence imaging of both 700- and 800-nm emission dyes. The performance characterization studies indicate that the endoscope can efficiently detect fluorescence signal from both indocyanine green and methylene blue in dimethyl sulfoxide at the concentrations of 100 to 185 nM depending on the background optical properties. Finally, we performed the validation of this imaging system in vivo during a minimally invasive procedure for thoracic sentinel lymph node mapping in a porcine model. PMID:24362927

  7. Constraining crystalline color superconducting quark matter with gravitational-wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lap-Ming

    2007-10-01

    We estimate the maximum equatorial ellipticity sustainable by compact stars composed of crystalline color-superconducting quark matter. For the theoretically allowed range of the gap parameter Δ, the maximum ellipticity could be as large as 10-2, which is about 4 orders of magnitude larger than the tightest upper limit obtained by the recent science runs of the LIGO and GEO600 gravitational-wave detectors based on the data from 78 radio pulsars. We point out that the current gravitational-wave strain upper limit already has some implications for the gap parameter. In particular, the upper limit for the Crab pulsar implies that Δ is less than O(20)MeV for a range of quark chemical potential accessible in compact stars, assuming that the pulsar has a mass 1.4M⊙, radius 10 km, breaking strain 10-3, and that it has the maximum quadrupole deformation it can sustain without fracturing.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and gelation and development of liquid crystalline order during isothermal cure of rigid rod epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seunghyun

    The liquid crystalline thermoset monomers 4,4'-diglycidyloxy-alpha-methylstilbene (DOMS) and D2A1 that resulted from reaction between DOMS and aniline were synthesized. The monomers were characterized with cross-polarized optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). DOMS showed monotropic liquid crystalline mesophase and D2A1 showed smectic phase even at room temperature and turned into nematic then cleared upon heating. DOMS was cured with sulfanilamide (SAA) and D2A1 was cured with catalytic curing agent, 1-methyl imidazole (MI). Thermal stability tests of DOMS-SAA, D2A1-MI and commercial nonliquid crystalline epoxy, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) SAA system via dynamic TGA shows that the factor that most influences thermal stability is the molecular structure of the material itself rather than liquid crystalline phases. The %conversion data were determined from dynamic DSC scan to examine the applicability of Flory's gelation theory. The results reveal that even though the amount of reaction that occurs in the liquid crystalline phase is different at different cure temperatures, the isoconversion theory of gelation fits quite well. The actual average value of the conversion at the gel point is 0.677, which is slightly higher than the calculated theoretical value of 0.577 because of the failed assumptions of this theory. That is, there might be reactivity differences among the same types of functional groups and intramolecular connections are possible. The phase transitions do not show isoconversion behavior in contrast to gelation. Instead, the conversion where phase changes from isotropic to a liquid crystalline phase tends to increase with temperature because the critical length of the molecules needed for the liquid crystallinity increases with temperature.

  9. Equilibrium sequences of nonrotating and rapidly rotating crystalline color-superconducting hybrid stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ippolito, Nicola D.; Ruggieri, Marco; Rischke, Dirk H.; Sedrakian, Armen; Weber, Fridolin

    2008-01-01

    The three-flavor crystalline color-superconducting (CCS) phase of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is a candidate phase for the ground state of cold matter at moderate densities above the density of the deconfinement phase transition. Apart from being a superfluid, the CCS phase has properties of a solid, such as a lattice structure and a shear modulus, and hence the ability to sustain multipolar deformations in gravitational equilibrium. We construct equilibrium configurations of hybrid stars composed of nuclear matter at low, and CCS quark matter at high, densities. Phase equilibrium between these phases is possible only for rather stiff equations of state of nuclear matter and large couplings in the effective Nambu—Jona-Lasinio Lagrangian describing the CCS state. We identify a new branch of stable CCS hybrid stars within a broad range of central densities which, depending on the details of the equations of state, either bifurcate from the nuclear sequence of stars when the central density exceeds that of the deconfinement phase transition or form a new family of configurations separated from the purely nuclear sequence by an instability region. The maximum masses of our nonrotating hybrid configurations are consistent with the presently available astronomical bounds. The sequences of hybrid configurations that rotate near the mass-shedding limit are found to be more compact and thus support substantially larger spins than their same mass nuclear counterparts.

  10. Testing the Ginzburg-Landau approximation for three-flavor crystalline color superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Rajagopal, Krishna; Sharma, Rishi

    2006-06-01

    It is an open challenge to analyze the crystalline color superconducting phases that may arise in cold dense, but not asymptotically dense, three-flavor quark matter. At present the only approximation within which it seems possible to compare the free energies of the myriad possible crystal structures is the Ginzburg-Landau approximation. Here, we test this approximation on a particularly simple “crystal” structure in which there are only two condensates ⟨us⟩˜Δexp⁡(iq2·r) and ⟨ud⟩˜Δexp⁡(iq3·r) whose position-space dependence is that of two plane waves with wave vectors q2 and q3 at arbitrary angles. For this case, we are able to solve the mean-field gap equation without making a Ginzburg-Landau approximation. We find that the Ginzburg-Landau approximation works in the Δ→0 limit as expected, find that it correctly predicts that Δ decreases with increasing angle between q2 and q3 meaning that the phase with q2∥q3 has the lowest free energy, and find that the Ginzburg-Landau approximation is conservative in the sense that it underestimates Δ at all values of the angle between q2 and q3.

  11. Human lens coloration and aging. Evidence for crystallin modification by the major ultraviolet filter, 3-hydroxy-kynurenine O-beta-D-glucoside.

    PubMed

    Hood, B D; Garner, B; Truscott, R J

    1999-11-12

    The human lens becomes increasingly yellow with age and thereby reduces our perception of blue light. This coloration is associated with lens proteins (crystallins), but its molecular basis was unknown. Here we show that the coloration occurs because of the interaction of crystallins with a UV filter compound, 3-hydroxykynurenine glucoside (3-OHKG). Crystallin modification results from deamination of the 3-OHKG amino acid side chain, yielding an unsaturated ketone that is susceptible to nucleophilic attack by cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues. This novel protein modification contributes to age-related lens coloration and may play a role in human nuclear cataractogenesis. PMID:10551806

  12. Ginzburg-Landau Free Energy of Crystalline Color Superconductors: A Matrix Formalism from Solid-State Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gao-Qing; He, Lian-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The Ginzburg-Landau (GL) free energy of crystalline color superconductors is important for understanding the nature of the phase transition to the normal quark matter and predicting the preferred crystal structure. So far the GL free energy at zero temperature has only been evaluated up to the sixth order in the condensate. To give quantitative reliable predictions we need to evaluate the higher-order terms. In this work, we present a new derivation of the GL free energy by using the discrete Bloch representation of the fermion field. This derivation introduces a simple matrix formalism without any momentum constraint, which may enable us to calculate the GL free energy to arbitrary order by using a computer. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11335005 and the Ministry of Science and Technology under Grant Nos. 2013CB922000 and 2014CB845400, and by the US Department of Energy Topical Collaboration “Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Matter”

  13. Mechanoresponsive change in photoluminescent color of rod-like liquid-crystalline compounds and control of molecular orientation on photoaligned layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Mizuho; Miura, Seiya; Okumoto, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Mayuko; Fukae, Ryohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we reported novel liquid-crystalline luminophore that switches its photoluminescent color by mechanically grinding. Mechanochromic luminescence (MCL) is expected for mechanical sensor, cellular imaging, detection of microenvironmental changes, and optical memory. In this work, we focused on liquid-crystalline MCL compounds on alignment layer. Controlling the molecular alignment of MCL compounds with photoalignment layer have potential to succeed in functional MCL film such as polarized micropatterned MCL and directional detection of mechanical stimuli. Herein, we prepared asymmetric rodlike MCL compounds containing cyano- and pyridyl molecular terminal and explored their photoluminescence behavior under mechanical stimulus. The cyano terminated compound showed a nematic phase and tuned its photoluminescent color from green to yellow upon grinding, while the pyridyl-terminated compounds that show no mesophase changed its photoluminescent color from blue to green and reverted to its initial color by heating above its melting point. The cyano-terminated MCL was aligned along the orientation direction of photoalignment layer and pyridyl-terminated MCL exhibited uniaxial alignment when it coated on photoaligned film containing carboxylic acid.

  14. The rigidity of three flavor quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rishi; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Cold three flavor quark matter at large (but not asymptotically large) densities may exist in a crystalline color superconducting phase. These phases are characterized by a gap parameter {Delta} that varies periodieally in space, forming a crystal structure. A Ginzburg-Landau expansion in {Delta} shows that two crystal structures based on cubic symetry are particularly favorable, and may be the ground state of matter at densities present in neutron star cores. We derive the effective action for the phonon fields that describe space-and time-dependent fluctuations of the crystal structure formed by {Delta}, and obtain the shear modulus from the coefficients of the spatial derivative terms. Within a Ginzburg-Landau approximation, we find shear moduli which are 20 to 1000 times larger than those of neutron star crusts. This phase ofmatter is thus more rigid than any known material in the universe, but at the same time the crystalline color superconducting phase is also superftuid. These properties raise the possibility that the presence of this phase within neutron stars may have distinct implications for their phenomenology. For example, (some) pulsar glitches may originate in crystalline superconducting neutron star cores.

  15. Effect of ionic surfactants on the iridescent color in lamellar liquid crystalline phase of a nonionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjiang; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Goh; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Ohtani, Bunsho; Tsujii, Kaoru

    2007-01-15

    A nonionic surfactant, n-dodecyl glyceryl itaconate (DGI), self-assembles into bilayer membranes in water having a spacing distance of sub-micrometer in the presence of small amounts of ionic surfactants, and shows beautiful iridescent color. Ionic surfactants have strong effects on this iridescent system. We have interestingly found that the iridescent color changes with time after mixing DGI and ionic surfactants and the color in equilibrium state changes greatly with concentration of the ionic surfactants. The time-dependent color change results from the transformation of DGI aggregate structure after being mixed with ionic surfactant. It is first found that the iridescent color of this nonionic system can be changed from red to deep blue by altering the concentration of ionic surfactants added even though the total concentration of surfactant is almost constant. Such large blue shift of the iridescent color in equilibrium state cannot be fully explained by the ordinary undulation theory applied so far for this phenomenon. The flat lamellar sheets tend to curve by increasing the concentration of ionic surfactants to form separated onion-like and/or myelin-like structures. These separated structures of lamellar system result in the decrease of spacing distance between bilayer membranes because some vacant spaces necessarily appear among these structures. PMID:17046012

  16. Configuration effects of H-bonded sites and rigid core lengths on h-bonded banana-shaped liquid crystalline supramolecules consisting of symmetric trimers and asymmetric heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Yung; Chiang, I-Hung; Yang, Po-Jen; Li, Wan-Sheung; Chao, I-To; Lin, Hong-Cheu

    2009-11-01

    Several series of novel banana-shaped H-bonded symmetric trimers (with two H-bonds) and asymmetric heterodimers (with one H-bond) were self-assembled by appropriate molar ratios of proton donors (H-donors) and acceptors (H-acceptors). The influences of H-bonded linking positions and aromatic ring numbers (4-8 aromatic rings in the rigid cores) as well as the chain lengths (n, m = 12 or 16, respectively, in the flexible parts) on the mesomorphism and the switching behavior of the bent-core supramolecules were evaluated and theoretically analyzed. Except for the supramolecular structures with longer rigid cores or shorter flexible chains possessing the rectangular columnar (Col(r) or B1) phase, the SmC(A)P(A) phase was revealed in most supramolecular asymmetric heterodimers and switched to the SmC(S)P(F) phase by applying electric fields. The polar smectic C phase was dominated for those with H-bonded sites apart from the core center. Interestingly, the SmA and nematic phases were observed in H-bonded asymmetric dimers with H-bonded sites close to the core center, which theoretically proved that the polar smectic C phase was disfavored due to an unfavorable bend angle (smaller than the lower limit of 110 degrees ) in the lowest-energy H-bonded conformer. Compared with the fully covalently bonded analogue, lower transition temperatures and lower threshold voltages were developed in the H-bonded asymmetric dimers with the polar smectic C phase. On the basis of the theoretical calculations of molecular modeling, the existence of polar switching behavior in the polar smectic C phase of asymmetric heterodimers was proven to be associated with their configurations with higher dipole moments and suitable bend angles. Furthermore, the lack of polar switching behavior in supramolecular symmetric trimers, which exhibited the regular SmC phase with weak electrical stabilities, was related to their configurations with smaller dipole moments and confirmed by theoretical

  17. Abdominal rigidity

    MedlinePlus

    Rigidity of the abdomen ... is a sore area inside the belly or abdomen, the pain will get worse when a hand ... Causes can include: Abscess inside the abdomen Appendicitis ... small intestine, large bowel, or gallbladder ( gastrointestinal ...

  18. Rigid molecular foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Aspen, P.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability, and processing. Rigid molecular foams or {open_quotes}organic zeolites{close_quotes} would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with dichloroxylene (DCX) as the pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and the crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6 {angstrom} to 2,000 {angstrom}.

  19. Rigid bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Machuzak, Michael S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction to rigid bronchoscopy (RB). We will briefly discuss its history, evolution, and resurgence while we highlight its versatility and usefulness for today's interventional pulmonologist and thoracic surgeon. Despite being one of the earliest pulmonary procedures described, RB is still an important technique. Advances in thoracic medicine have made this skill critical for a fully functional interventional pulmonary program. If the interventional pulmonologist of this century is to be successful, he or she should be facile in this technique. Despite the availability of RB for decades, the invention of flexible bronchoscopy in 1966 led to a significant downturn in its usage. The growth of the interventional pulmonology field brought RB back into the spot light. Apart from the historic role of RB in treatment of central airway lesions and mechanical debulking of endobronchial lesions, RB is the key instrument that can adapt modern therapeutic tools such as laser, argon plasma coagulation, electrocautery, cryotherapy, and stent deployment. Performing RB requires proper preprocedure preparation, exceptional understanding of upper airway anatomy, specific hand-eye coordination, and open communication between the bronchoscopist and the anesthesiologist. These skills can be primarily learned and maintained with repetition. This article will review information relevant to this technique and lay a foundation to be built upon for years to come. PMID:25463158

  20. Rigid plastic collars for marking geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballou, R.M.; Martin, F.W.

    1964-01-01

    Rigid plastic collars of one to three colors proved useful for recognition of individual Canada geese (Branta canadensis). The collars did not seem to affect the behavior of the geese, and there was little mortality caused by their use. In good light, bright colors are visible through a 20-power spotting scope for more than 1 mile. Retention of collars was about 90 percent for 1 year and more than 80 percent for 2 years.

  1. Rigid particulate matter sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Matthew

    2011-02-22

    A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

  2. Pneumatically erected rigid habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salles, Bradley

    1992-01-01

    The pneumatically erected rigid habitat concept consists of a structure based on an overexpanded metal bellows. The basic concept incorporates the advantages of both inflatable and rigid structures. The design and erection detail are presented with viewgraphs.

  3. An Electropolymerized Crystalline Film Incorporating Axially-Bound Metalloporphycenes: Remarkable Reversibility, Reproducibility, and Coloration Efficiency of Ruthenium(II/III)-Based Electrochromism.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masaaki; Futagawa, Hiroki; Ono, Toshikazu; Yamada, Teppei; Kimizuka, Nobuo; Hisaeda, Yoshio

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative electropolymeization of an axially bound, bithiophene-pyridine complex of ruthenium(III)-porphycene [Ru(TPrPc) (btp)2]PF6 (1) gives a submicrometer-thick, polymeric film on an ITO electrode with a crystalline morphology. The polymeric film, the first example of axially linked multimetalloporphycene coordination arrays, exhibits highly stable and reproducible electrochromic response with high electrochromic efficiency upon electrochemical control over the metal-centered electron transfer process (Ru(II)/Ru(III)). PMID:26569481

  4. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Stevenson, Paige; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers advantages of low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semi-rigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers.

  5. Fracturing rigid materials.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhaosheng; Hong, Jeong-Mo; Teran, Joseph; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to fracturing (and denting) brittle materials. To avoid the computational burden imposed by the stringent time step restrictions of explicit methods or with solving nonlinear systems of equations for implicit methods, we treat the material as a fully rigid body in the limit of infinite stiffness. In addition to a triangulated surface mesh and level set volume for collisions, each rigid body is outfitted with a tetrahedral mesh upon which finite element analysis can be carried out to provide a stress map for fracture criteria. We demonstrate that the commonly used stress criteria can lead to arbitrary fracture (especially for stiff materials) and instead propose the notion of a time averaged stress directly into the FEM analysis. When objects fracture, the virtual node algorithm provides new triangle and tetrahedral meshes in a straightforward and robust fashion. Although each new rigid body can be rasterized to obtain a new level set, small shards can be difficult to accurately resolve. Therefore, we propose a novel collision handling technique for treating both rigid bodies and rigid body thin shells represented by only a triangle mesh. PMID:17218752

  6. Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapatsis, Michael (Inventor); Lai, Zhiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    In certain aspects, the invention features methods for forming crystalline membranes (e.g., a membrane of a framework material, such as a zeolite) by inducing secondary growth in a layer of oriented seed crystals. The rate of growth of the seed crystals in the plane of the substrate is controlled to be comparable to the rate of growth out of the plane. As a result, a crystalline membrane can form a substantially continuous layer including grains of uniform crystallographic orientation that extend through the depth of the layer.

  7. Rigidity of melting DNA.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation. PMID:27300825

  8. Rigidity of melting DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation.

  9. Effective rigidity of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliti, L.

    1986-12-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations of shape (undulations) in reducing the effective rigidity of membranes is reviewed. The consequences of this effect on vesicle size distribution and on the structure of microemulsions, as well as on other physical phenomena, are sketched.

  10. Electrostatics of Rigid Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The organization of rigid biological polyelectrolytes by multivalent ions and macroions are important for many fundamental problems in biology and biomedicine, such as cytoskeletal regulation and antimicrobial sequestration in cystic fibrosis. These polyelectrolytes have been used as model systems for understanding electrostatics in complex fluids. Here, we review some recent results in theory, simulations, and experiments.

  11. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semirigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers. This paper will also highlight the interactions between academia and small businesses in developing new products and processes.

  12. Great apes select tools on the basis of their rigidity.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Héctor Marín; Gross, Alexandra Nam-Mi; Call, Josep

    2010-10-01

    Wild chimpanzees select tools according to their rigidity. However, little is known about whether choices are solely based on familiarity with the materials or knowledge about tool properties. Furthermore, it is unclear whether tool manipulation is required prior to selection or whether observation alone can suffice. We investigated whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) (n = 9), bonobos (Pan paniscus) (n = 4), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) (n = 6), and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) (n = 2) selected new tools on the basis of their rigidity. Subjects faced an out-of-reach reward and a choice of three tools differing in color, diameter, material, and rigidity. We used 10 different 3-tool sets (1 rigid, 2 flexible). Subjects were unfamiliar with the tools and needed to select and use the rigid tool to retrieve the reward. Experiment 1 showed that subjects chose the rigid tool from the first trial with a 90% success rate. Experiments 2a and 2b addressed the role of manipulation and observation in tool selection. Subjects performed equally well in conditions in which they could manipulate the tools themselves or saw the experimenter manipulate the tools but decreased their performance if they could only visually inspect the tools. Experiment 3 showed that subjects could select flexible tools (as opposed to rigid ones) to meet new task demands. We conclude that great apes spontaneously selected unfamiliar rigid or flexible tools even after gathering minimal observational information. PMID:20718558

  13. Color tunable and near white-light emission of two solvent-induced 2D lead(II) coordination networks based on a rigid ligand 1-tetrazole-4-imidazole-benzene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Zhi-Fa; Wang, Shuai-Hua; Xiao, Yu; Li, Rong; Xu, Jian-Gang; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Zheng, Fa-Kun; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2015-06-01

    Two new lead(II) coordination polymers, [Pb(NO3)(tzib)]n (1) and [Pb(tzib)2]n (2), were successfully synthesized from the reaction of a rigid ligand 1-tetrazole-4-imidazole-benzene (Htzib) and lead(II) nitrate in different solvents. The obtained polymers have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, which show that both polymers feature 2D layer structures. The inorganic anion nitrate in 1 shows a μ2-κO3:κO3 bridging mode to connect adjacent lead ions into a zigzag chain, and then the organic ligands tzib(-) join the neighboring chains into a 2D layer by a μ3-κN1:κN2:κN6 connection mode. In 2, there are two different bridging modes of the tzib(-) ligand: μ3-κN1:κN2:κN6 and μ3-κN1:κN6 to coordinate the lead ions into a 2D layer structure. Interestingly, both polymers displayed broadband emissions covering the entire visible spectra, which could be tunable to near white-light emission by varying excitation wavelengths. PMID:25952460

  14. How rigid are viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartschuh, R. D.; Wargacki, S. P.; Xiong, H.; Neiswinger, J.; Kisliuk, A.; Sihn, S.; Ward, V.; Vaia, R. A.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2008-08-01

    Viruses have traditionally been studied as pathogens, but in recent years they have been adapted for applications ranging from drug delivery and gene therapy to nanotechnology, photonics, and electronics. Although the structures of many viruses are known, most of their biophysical properties remain largely unexplored. Using Brillouin light scattering, we analyzed the mechanical rigidity, intervirion coupling, and vibrational eigenmodes of Wiseana iridovirus (WIV). We identified phonon modes propagating through the viral assemblies as well as the localized vibrational eigenmode of individual viruses. The measurements indicate a Young’s modulus of ˜7GPa for single virus particles and their assemblies, surprisingly high for “soft” materials. Mechanical modeling confirms that the DNA core dominates the WIV rigidity. The results also indicate a peculiar mechanical coupling during self-assembly of WIV particles.

  15. Liquid crystalline order in mucus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viney, C.; Huber, A. E.; Verdugo, P.

    1993-01-01

    Mucus plays an exceptionally wide range of important biological roles. It operates as a protective, exchange, and transport medium in the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems of humans and other vertebrates. Mucus is a polymer hydrogel. It is secreted as discrete packages (secretory granules) by specialized secretory cells. Mucus hydrogel is stored in a condensed state inside the secretory granules. Depending upon the architecture of their constituent macromolecules and on the composition of the solvent, polymer gels can form liquid crystalline microstructures, with orientational order being exhibited over optically resolvable distances. Individual mucin molecules consist of alternating rigid segments (heavily glycosylated; hydrophilic) and flexible segments (nonglycosylated; hydrophobic). Polymer molecules consisting of rigid units linked by flexible spacers are frequently associated with liquid crystalline behavior, which again raises the possibility that mucus could form anisotropic fluid phases. Suggestions that mucins may be self-associating in dilute solution have previously been challenged on the basis of sedimentation-equilibrium studies performed on mucus in which potential sites of association were competitively blocked with inhibitors. However, the formation of stable liquid crystalline phases does not depend on the existence of inter- or intramolecular associations; these phases can form on the basis of steric considerations alone.

  16. Advanced Rigid Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate s (ESMD) Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project (TDP) and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate s (ARMD) Hypersonics Project are developing new advanced rigid ablators in an effort to substantially increase reliability, decrease mass, and reduce life cycle cost of rigid aeroshell-based entry systems for multiple missions. Advanced Rigid Ablators combine ablation resistant top layers capable of high heat flux entry and enable high-speed EDL with insulating mass-efficient bottom that, insulate the structure and lower the areal weight. These materials may benefit Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) vendors and may potentially enable new NASA missions for higher velocity returns (e.g. asteroid, Mars). The materials have been thermally tested to 400-450 W/sq cm at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Lab (LHMEL), Hypersonics Materials Evaluation Test System (HyMETS) and in arcjet facilities. Tested materials exhibit much lower backface temperatures and reduced recession over the baseline materials (PICA). Although the EDL project is ending in FY11, NASA in-house development of advanced ablators will continue with a focus on varying resin systems and fiber/resin interactions.

  17. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... rose in full bloom. If you have a color vision defect, you may see these colors differently than most people. There are three main kinds of color vision defects. Red-green color vision defects are the most ...

  18. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... three color cone cells to determine our color perception. Color blindness can occur when one or more ... Anyone who experiences a significant change in color perception should see an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.). Next ...

  19. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... rose in full bloom. If you have a color vision defect, you may see these colors differently than most people. There are three main kinds of color vision defects. Red-green color vision defects are the ...

  20. Applying Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, David

    1984-01-01

    Most schools teach the triadic color system, utilizing red, blue, and yellow as primary colors. Other systems, such as additive and subtractive color systems, Munsell's Color Notation System, and the Hering Opponent Color Theory, can broaden children's concepts and free them to better choose color in their own work. (IS)

  1. Rigid porous filter

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  2. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed Central

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions. PMID:12223827

  3. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions. PMID:12223827

  4. Generalized flexibility-rigidity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc Duy; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) has been developed as a robust, accurate, and efficient method for macromolecular thermal fluctuation analysis and B-factor prediction. The performance of FRI depends on its formulations of rigidity index and flexibility index. In this work, we introduce alternative rigidity and flexibility formulations. The structure of the classic Gaussian surface is utilized to construct a new type of rigidity index, which leads to a new class of rigidity densities with the classic Gaussian surface as a special case. Additionally, we introduce a new type of flexibility index based on the domain indicator property of normalized rigidity density. These generalized FRI (gFRI) methods have been extensively validated by the B-factor predictions of 364 proteins. Significantly outperforming the classic Gaussian network model, gFRI is a new generation of methodologies for accurate, robust, and efficient analysis of protein flexibility and fluctuation. Finally, gFRI based molecular surface generation and flexibility visualization are demonstrated.

  5. Rigid substructure search

    PubMed Central

    Shirvanyants, David; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying the location of binding sites on proteins is of fundamental importance for a wide range of applications, including molecular docking, de novo drug design, structure identification and comparison of functional sites. Here we present Erebus, a web server that searches the entire Protein Data Bank for a given substructure defined by a set of atoms of interest, such as the binding scaffolds for small molecules. The identified substructure contains atoms having the same names, belonging to same amino acids and separated by the same distances (within a given tolerance) as the atoms of the query structure. The accuracy of a match is measured by the root-mean-square deviation or by the normal weight with a given variance. Tests show that our approach can reliably locate rigid binding scaffolds of drugs and metal ions. Availability and Implementation: We provide this service through a web server at http://erebus.dokhlab.org. Contact: dokh@unc.edu PMID:21460026

  6. Fractal rigidity in migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J.

    2004-04-01

    We study the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAfv) in humans using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). Scaling properties of time series of the axial flow velocity averaged over a cardiac beat interval may be characterized by two exponents. The short time scaling exponent (STSE) determines the statistical properties of fluctuations of blood flow velocities in short-time intervals while the Hurst exponent describes the long-term fractal properties. In many migraineurs the value of the STSE is significantly reduced and may approach that of the Hurst exponent. This change in dynamical properties reflects the significant loss of short-term adaptability and the overall hyperexcitability of the underlying cerebral blood flow control system. We call this effect fractal rigidity.

  7. Rigid collapsible dish structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, William B. (Inventor); Giebler, Martin M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A collapsible dish structure composed of a plurality of rows of rigid radial petal assemblies concentric with the axis of the dish. The petal assemblies consist of a center petal and two side petals, the center petal hinged on an axis tangent to a circle concentric with the axis of the dish and the side petals hinged to the center petal at their mating edge. The center petal is foldable inwardly and the side petals rotate about their hinges such that the collapsed dish structure occupies a much smaller volume than the deployed dish. Means of controlling the shape of the dish to compensate for differential expansion of the deployed dish are also provided.

  8. Puzzle geometry and rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smania, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    We describe a new and robust method to prove rigidity results in complex dynamics. The new ingredient is the geometry of the critical puzzle pieces: under control of geometry and ``complex bounds'', two generalized polynomial-like maps which admit a topological conjugacy, quasiconformal outside the filled-in Julia set, are indeed quasiconformally conjugate. The proof uses a new abstract removability-type result for quasiconformal maps, following ideas of Heinonen and Koskela and of Kallunki and Koskela, optimized for applications in complex dynamics. We prove, as the first application of this new method, that, for even criticalities distinct from two, the period two cycle of the Fibonacci renormalization operator is hyperbolic with 1 -dimensional unstable manifold.

  9. Color blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... have trouble telling the difference between red and green. This is the most common type of color ... color blindness often have problems seeing reds and greens, too. The most severe form of color blindness ...

  10. Color blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... care provider or eye specialist can check your color vision in several ways. Testing for color blindness is ... Adams AJ, Verdon WA, Spivey BE. Color vision. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. ... PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol. 2, chap ...

  11. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  12. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  13. Colorful Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    Described is an color-making activity where students use food coloring, eyedroppers, and water to make various colored solutions. Included are the needed materials and procedures. Students are asked to write up the formulas for making their favorite color. (KR)

  14. Switchable tackiness and wettability of a liquid crystalline polymer

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier G; Fabre; Corpart; Leibler

    1999-08-20

    The spreading velocity of liquids on the surface of a liquid crystalline polymer can be tremendously affected by a slight temperature change. Indeed, a bulk transition between a highly ordered smectic and an isotropic phase induces a sharp change from a rigid to a soft behavior, with consequent effects on the tack properties of the liquid crystalline polymer and on the dewetting dynamics of a liquid on its surface. PMID:10455047

  15. Mesogen-jacketed liquid crystalline polymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Fang; Shen, Zhihao; Wan, Xin-Hua; Fan, Xing-He; Chen, Er-Qiang; Ma, Yuguo; Zhou, Qi-Feng

    2010-08-01

    This critical review covers the recent progress in the research of mesogen-jacketed liquid crystalline polymers (MJLCPs), special side-on side-chain liquid crystalline polymers with very short spacers or without spacers. MJLCPs can self-organize into supramolecular columnar phases with the polymer chains aligned parallel to one another or smectic phases with the backbones embedded in the smectic layers. The semi-rigid rod-like MJLCP with a tunable rod shape in both length and diameter provides an excellent building block in designing novel rod-coil liquid crystalline block copolymers which can self-assemble into hierarchical supramolecular nanostructures depending on the competition between liquid crystal formation and microphase separation (229 references). PMID:20559597

  16. Uncalibrated color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroney, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Color calibration or the use of color measurement processes to characterize the color properties of a device or workflow is often expected or assumed for many color reproduction applications. However it is interesting to consider applications or situations in which color calibration is not as critical. In the first case it is possible to imagine an implicit color calibration resulting from a standardization or convergence of the colorant and substrate spectrum. In the second case it is possible to imagine cases where the device color variability is significantly less than the user color thresholds or expectations for color consistency. There are still general requirements for this form of pragmatic color but they are generally lower than for the higher end of digital color reproduction. Finally it is possible to imagine an implicit calibration that leverages in some way the highly accurate memory color for the hue of common objects. This scenario culminates with a challenge to create a natural capture calibration standard that does not require individual calibration, is spectrally diverse, is inexpensive and is environmentally friendly.

  17. Color realism and color science.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Alex; Hilbert, David R

    2003-02-01

    The target article is an attempt to make some progress on the problem of color realism. Are objects colored? And what is the nature of the color properties? We defend the view that physical objects (for instance, tomatoes, radishes, and rubies) are colored, and that colors are physical properties, specifically, types of reflectance. This is probably a minority opinion, at least among color scientists. Textbooks frequently claim that physical objects are not colored, and that the colors are "subjective" or "in the mind." The article has two other purposes: First, to introduce an interdisciplinary audience to some distinctively philosophical tools that are useful in tackling the problem of color realism and, second, to clarify the various positions and central arguments in the debate. The first part explains the problem of color realism and makes some useful distinctions. These distinctions are then used to expose various confusions that often prevent people from seeing that the issues are genuine and difficult, and that the problem of color realism ought to be of interest to anyone working in the field of color science. The second part explains the various leading answers to the problem of color realism, and (briefly) argues that all views other than our own have serious difficulties or are unmotivated. The third part explains and motivates our own view, that colors are types of reflectances and defends it against objections made in the recent literature that are often taken as fatal. PMID:14598439

  18. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Hari S.; Chu, Shaoping; Reimus, Paul William; Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Karra, Satish; Dittrich, Timothy M.

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  19. Seeing Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2005-01-01

    Colors are powerful tools for engaging children, from the youngest years onward. We hang brightly patterned mobiles above their cribs and help them learn the names of colors as they begin to record their own ideas in pictures and words. Colors can also open the door to an invisible world of electromagnetism, even when children can barely imagine…

  20. Color Categories and Color Appearance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Michael A.; Kay, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We examined categorical effects in color appearance in two tasks, which in part differed in the extent to which color naming was explicitly required for the response. In one, we measured the effects of color differences on perceptual grouping for hues that spanned the blue-green boundary, to test whether chromatic differences across the boundary…

  1. Color Terms and Color Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Jules

    2006-01-01

    In their lead articles, both Kowalski and Zimiles (2006) and O'Hanlon and Roberson (2006) declare a general relation between color term knowledge and the ability to conceptually represent color. Kowalski and Zimiles, in particular, argue for a priority for the conceptual representation in color term acquisition. The complexities of the interaction…

  2. Rigidity generation by nonthermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheshka, R.; Recho, P.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2016-05-01

    Active stabilization in systems with zero or negative stiffness is an essential element of a wide variety of biological processes. We study a prototypical example of this phenomenon and show how active rigidity, interpreted as a formation of a pseudowell in the effective energy landscape, can be generated in an overdamped stochastic system. We link the transition from negative to positive rigidity with time correlations in the additive noise, and we show that subtle differences in the out-of-equilibrium driving may compromise the emergence of a pseudowell.

  3. Broadband Dielectric Investigation of Amorphous and Semi-Crystalline Polylactides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchanasopa, Mantana; Runt, James

    2003-03-01

    Molecular dynamics of poly (L-lactide) and several L-lactide/meso-lactide random copolymers were investigated in the frequency domain using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. The dielectric relaxation spectra of fully amorphous and crystalline samples reveal the influence of crystalline content and microstructure on chain motion in the amorphous phase. Differences in relaxation strength of the segmental processes were observed in these samples. While the strength of the crystalline samples increases with temperature, that of the amorphous samples changes only very little or in the opposite direction with temperature. This behavior will be discussed in the context of a rigid amorphous phase. As expected, mean segmental relaxation time is longer and its distribution is broader (at lower frequencies) in samples with higher crystallinity. Differences in the details of the relaxation processes as a function of the crystallinity and morphology will be discussed.

  4. Color Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrolstad, Ronald E.; Smith, Daniel E.

    Color, flavor, and texture are the three principal quality attributes that determine food acceptance, and color has a far greater influence on our judgment than most of us appreciate. We use color to determine if a banana is at our preferred ripeness level, and a discolored meat product can warn us that the product may be spoiled. The marketing departments of our food corporations know that, for their customers, the color must be "right." The University of California Davis scorecard for wine quality designates four points out of 20, or 20% of the total score, for color and appearance (1). Food scientists who establish quality control specifications for their product are very aware of the importance of color and appearance. While subjective visual assessment and use of visual color standards are still used in the food industry, instrumental color measurements are extensively employed. Objective measurement of color is desirable for both research and industrial applications, and the ruggedness, stability, and ease of use of today's color measurement instruments have resulted in their widespread adoption.

  5. [Structural nucleic acid nanotechnology: liquid-crystalline approach].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The properties of the particles of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA molecules obtained as a result of phase exclusion of these molecules from water-salt polymer-containing solutions are briefly described. Physicochemical properties of quasinematic layers of dispersion particles and double-stranded DNA molecules in their content are taken into account in the course of developing fundamental background of the liquid-crystalline approach to the DNA structural nanotechnology. According to different versions of this approach, which is based on intraparticle gelation of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions, spatial structures (DNA nanoconstructions, "rigid" DNA particles) with unique properties, are created. By means of atomic force microscopy images of "rigid" DNA particles of different type are registered. Specific properties of metallic nanoparticles (in particular, gold nanoparticles) are considered while developing the other approach to DNA structural nanotechnology, which provides the basis for "metallized" DNA nanoconstructions. PMID:25508888

  6. [Structural nucleic acid nanotechnology: liquid-crystalline approach].

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Iu M; Salianov, V I; Kats, E I; Skuridin, S G

    2013-01-01

    The properties of the particles of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA molecules obtained as a result of phase exclusion of these molecules from water-salt polymer-containing solutions are briefly described. Physicochemical properties of quasinematic layers of dispersion particles and double-stranded DNA molecules in their content are taken into account in the course of developing fundamental background of the liquid-crystalline approach to the DNA structural nanotechnology. According to different versions of this approach, which is based on intraparticle gelation of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions, spatial structures (DNA nanoconstructions, "rigid" DNA particles) with unique properties, are created. By means of atomic force microscopy images of "rigid" DNA particles of different type are registered. Specific properties of metallic nanoparticles (in particular, gold nanoparticles) are considered while developing the other approach to DNA structural nanotechnology, which provides the basis for "metallized" DNA nanoconstructions. PMID:25486757

  7. Processing of Color Words Activates Color Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Tobias; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether color representations are routinely activated when color words are processed. Congruency effects of colors and color words were observed in both directions. Lexical decisions on color words were faster when preceding colors matched the color named by the word. Color-discrimination responses…

  8. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE-PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ˜6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE-PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE-PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation.

  9. [Hair colorants].

    PubMed

    Urbanek-Karłowska, B; Luks, E; Jedra, M; Kiss, E; Malanowska, M

    1997-01-01

    The properties, mode of action and its duration of the preparations used for hair dyeing are described, together with their chemical components, and also preparations of herbal origin. The chemical reactions are described in detail which lead the development of a color polymer occurring during hair dyeing. The studies are presented which are used for toxicological assessment of the raw materials which are the components of the colorants, and the list is included of hair colorants permitted for use in Poland. PMID:9562811

  10. Polar Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 3 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on January 1, 2003 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Troughs.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79, Longitude 346 East (14 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  11. Quantum Color

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-16

    The idea of electric charges and electricity in general is a familiar one to the science savvy viewer. However, electromagnetism is but one of the four fundamental forces and not the strongest one. The strongest of the fundamental forces is called the strong nuclear force and it has its own associated charge. Physicists call this charge ?color? in analogy with the primary colors, although there is no real connection with actual color. In this video, Fermilab?s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why it is that we live in a colorful world.

  12. Investigation of the Rigid Amorphous Fraction in Nylon-6

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,H.; Cebe, P.

    2007-01-01

    A three-phase model, comprising crystalline, mobile amorphous, and rigid amorphous fractions (X{sub c}, X{sub MA}, X{sub rA}, respectively) has been applied in the study of semicrystalline Nylon-6. The samples studied were Nylon-6 alpha phase prepared by subsequent annealing of a parent sample slowly cooled from the melt. The treated samples were annealed at 110 C, then briefly heated to 136 C, then re-annealed at 110 C. Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) measurements allow the devitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction to be examined. We observe a lower endotherm, termed the 'annealing' peak in the non-reversing heat flow after annealing at 110 C. By brief heating above this lower endotherm and immediately quenching in LN{sub 2}-cooled glass beads, the glass transition temperature and X{sub RA} decrease substantially, X{sub MA} increases, and the annealing peak disappears. The annealing peak corresponds to the point at which partial de-vitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) occurs. Re-annealing at 110 C causes the glass transition and X{sub RA} to increase, and X{sub MA} to decrease. None of these treatments affected the measured degree of crystallinity, but it cannot be excluded that crystal reorganization or recrystallization may also occur at the annealing peak, contributing to the de-vitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction. Using a combined approach of thermal analysis with wide and small angle X-ray scattering, we analyze the location of the rigid amorphous and mobile amorphous fractions within the context of the Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Stack Models. Results show the homogeneous stack model is the correct one for Nylon-6. The cooperativity length ({var_epsilon}{sub A}) increases with a decrease of rigid amorphous fraction, or, increase of the mobile amorphous fraction. Devitrification of some of the RAF leads to the broadening of the glass transition region and shift of T{sub g}.

  13. Comparative analysis of rigidity across protein families.

    PubMed

    Wells, S A; Jimenez-Roldan, J E; Römer, R A

    2009-01-01

    We present a comparative study in which 'pebble game' rigidity analysis is applied to multiple protein crystal structures, for each of six different protein families. We find that the main-chain rigidity of a protein structure at a given hydrogen bond energy cutoff is quite sensitive to small structural variations, and conclude that the hydrogen bond constraints in rigidity analysis should be chosen so as to form and test specific hypotheses about the rigidity of a particular protein. Our comparative approach highlights two different characteristic patterns ('sudden' or 'gradual') for protein rigidity loss as constraints are removed, in line with recent results on the rigidity transitions of glassy networks. PMID:19773604

  14. Colored Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 7 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on May 30, 2002 during the Southern Fall season in Atlantis Chaos.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.5, Longitude 183.6 East (176.4 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of

  15. Color Metric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This booklet was designed to convey metric information in pictoral form. The use of pictures in the coloring book enables the more mature person to grasp the metric message instantly, whereas the younger person, while coloring the picture, will be exposed to the metric information long enough to make the proper associations. Sheets of the booklet…

  16. Color Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferry, John E.

    1980-01-01

    Elementary students were asked to find 12 colors and 5 sounds in their immediate natural environment and to describe in writing where they saw each color in relationship to themselves. The writings formed a type of poetry which expressed involvement with and observation of the environment. (CM)

  17. Liquid is More Rigid than Solid in a High-Frequency Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Naoki; Yuge, Tatsuro; Shimizu, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We compare rigidity of materials in two phases, liquid and solid phases. As a measure of the rigidity, we employ the one characterizing how firmly the material is fixed by low density of pinning centers, such as impurities and rough surfaces of walls, against a weak force. Although a solid is more rigid than a liquid against a low-frequency force, we find that against a high-frequency force the liquid becomes more rigid than the solid of the same material. Since this result is derived from universal properties of a response function, it is valid for wide classes of materials, including quantum and classical systems and crystalline and amorphous solids. An instructive example is studied using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the frequency region in which a solid is more flexible than a liquid is not purely determined by intrinsic properties of the solid. It depends also on extrinsic factors such as the density of pinning centers.

  18. Rigidity of the fault zones in the Earth's crust estimated from seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, A. A.

    2011-07-01

    Nonlinear effects in seismic wave propagation are analyzed to determine the mechanical rigidity of different-order faults that thread the tectonic structures in the central part of the East European platform (Moscow syneclise and Voronezh Crystalline Massif) and the fault zones of the Balapan and Degelen mountain regions in Kazakhstan (the Degelen magmatic node in the Central Chingiz zone). The dependency of the rigidity of the fault zone on the fault's length is obtained. The rigidity of the tectonic structures is found to experience well-expressed temporal variations with periods of 13-15 days, 27-32 days, and about one year. In the different-order fault zones, the amplitudes of both normal k n and the shear k s rigidity for semimonthly, monthly, and annual variations can span a factor of 1.3, 1.5, and 2.5, respectively.

  19. Signature of Thermal Rigidity Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Adrián

    2013-12-01

    To explore the role that temperature and percolation of rigidity play in determining the macroscopic properties, we propose a model that adds translational degrees of freedom to the spins of the well known Ising hamiltonian. In particular, the Ising model illustrate the longstanding idea that the growth of correlations on approach to a critical point could be describable in terms of the percolation of some sort of "physical cluster". For certain parameters of this model we observe two well defined peaks of CV, that suggest the existence of two kinds of "physical percolation", namely connectivity and rigidity percolation. Thermal fluctuations give rise to two different kinds of elementary excitations, i.e. droplets and configuron, as suggested by Angell in the framework of a bond lattice model approach. The later is reflected in the fluctuations of redundant constraints that gives stability to the structure and correlate with the order parameter.

  20. Associative memory through rigid origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Arvind; Brenner, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms such as Miura Ori have proven useful in diverse contexts since they have only one degree of freedom that is easily controlled. We combine the theory of rigid origami and associative memory in frustrated neural networks to create structures that can ``learn'' multiple generic folding mechanisms and yet can be robustly controlled. We show that such rigid origami structures can ``recall'' a specific learned mechanism when induced by a physical impulse that only need resemble the desired mechanism (i.e. robust recall through association). Such associative memory in matter, seen before in self-assembly, arises due to a balance between local promiscuity (i.e., many local degrees of freedom) and global frustration which minimizes interference between different learned behaviors. Origami with associative memory can lead to a new class of deployable structures and kinetic architectures with multiple context-dependent behaviors.

  1. Rotating rigid motion in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.P.; Pooe, C.A.

    1987-11-01

    Kinematic and dynamic expressions are derived for the Lie derivative of vorticity along a particle world line in a rigid motion. It is found that the evolution of vorticity in a rigid motion is governed by the electric part of the Weyl tensor. Necessary and sufficient kinematic and dynamic conditions are established for a rotating rigid motion to be isometric.

  2. Thermally stable crystalline mesoporous metal oxides with substantially uniform pores

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, Ulrich; Orilall, Mahendra Christopher; Lee, Jinwoo; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J

    2015-01-27

    Highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composites, as precursors to thermally stable mesoporous metal oxides, are coated with a layer of amorphous carbon. Using a `one-pot` method, highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composites are converted to thermally stable mesoporous metal oxides, having highly crystalline mesopore walls, without causing the concomitant collapse of the mesostructure. The `one-pot` method uses block copolymers with an sp or sp 2 hybridized carbon containing hydrophobic block as structure directing agents which converts to a sturdy, amorphous carbon material under appropriate heating conditions, providing an in-situ rigid support which maintains the pores of the oxides intact while crystallizing at temperatures as high as 1000 deg C. A highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composite can be heated to produce a thermally stable mesoporous metal oxide consisting of a single polymorph.

  3. Portable device for quantifying parkinsonian wrist rigidity.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, M P

    1994-01-01

    The need for objectivity in the assessment of parkinsonism prompted the development of a portable transducer capable of quantifying muscular rigidity. This paper describes the development and use of a device for measuring wrist rigidity and reports the preliminary findings from 25 normal healthy controls and 29 patients, many of whom were undergoing antiparkinsonian treatment to alleviate rigidity or antipsychotic treatment, which produced parkinsonian rigidity. An objective rigidity score, representing the degree to which motor activity increases muscular stiffness in the wrist, correlates highly with clinical ratings of parkinsonian rigidity and demonstrates 89% specificity and 82% sensitivity. Unlike previous techniques for quantifying rigidity, this transducer offers greater portability and apparent face validity. PMID:7908119

  4. Rigid separator lead acid batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cannone, A.G.; Salkind, A.J.; Stempin, J.L.; Wexell, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    Lead acid cells assembled with extruded separators displayed relatively uniform capacity and voltage parameters through 100{sup +} cycles of charge/discharge. This contrasts to failure of control cells with glass mat separators after 60 cycles. The mullite/alumina separators with 50, 60, and 70% porosity separators appear suitable for both flooded and sealed lead acid cell applications. The advantages of the rigid ceramic separators over fiber mat materials are in the uniformity of capacity and voltage, the ease of cell assembly, and the probability that firm stacking pressure on the active material will yield greater cycle life, especially at elevated temperatures.

  5. Ureteroscopes: flexible, rigid, and semirigid.

    PubMed

    Basillote, Jay B; Lee, David I; Eichel, Louis; Clayman, Ralph V

    2004-02-01

    Since its introduction, the ureteroscope has undergone significant improvements. Using the currently available rigid, semirigid, and flexible ureteroscopes and working instruments, urologists can diagnose and treat lesions throughout the upper urinary tract. Over the past 25 years, the ureteroscope in combination with shock wave lithotripsy has transformed the diagnosis and treatment of more than 90% of upper urinary tract pathology from an open to an endourologic procedure. With endoscope manufacturers continually incorporating new technology into their ureteroscopes, future models will undoubtedly provide better optics, increased durability, and improved capabilities, resulting in greater success when urologists perform endoscopic forays into the upper urinary tract. PMID:15040398

  6. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  7. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  8. Lubrication of rigid ellipsida solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of geometry on the isothermal hydrodynamic film separating two rigid solids was investigated. The minimum film thickness is derived for fully flooded conjunctions by using the Reynolds boundary conditions. It was found that the minimum film thickness had the same speed, viscosity, and load dependence as Kapitza' classical solution. However, the incorporation of Reynolds boundary conditions resulted in an additional geometry effect. Solutions using the parabolic film approximation are compared by using the exact expression for the film in the analysis. Contour plots are known that indicate in detail the pressure developed between the solids.

  9. Enhanced rigid-bond restraints

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Andrea; Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M.

    2012-07-01

    An extension is proposed to the rigid-bond description of atomic thermal motion in crystals. The rigid-bond model [Hirshfeld (1976 ▶). Acta Cryst. A32, 239–244] states that the mean-square displacements of two atoms are equal in the direction of the bond joining them. This criterion is widely used for verification (as intended by Hirshfeld) and also as a restraint in structure refinement as suggested by Rollett [Crystallographic Computing (1970 ▶), edited by F. R. Ahmed et al., pp. 167–181. Copenhagen: Munksgaard]. By reformulating this condition, so that the relative motion of the two atoms is required to be perpendicular to the bond, the number of restraints that can be applied per anisotropic atom is increased from about one to about three. Application of this condition to 1,3-distances in addition to the 1,2-distances means that on average just over six restraints can be applied to the six anisotropic displacement parameters of each atom. This concept is tested against very high resolution data of a small peptide and employed as a restraint for protein refinement at more modest resolution (e.g. 1.7 Å)

  10. Color vision test

    MedlinePlus

    ... from birth) color vision problems: Achromatopsia -- complete color blindness , seeing only shades of gray Deuteranopia -- difficulty telling ... test -- color; Ishihara color vision test Images Color blindness tests References Adams AJ, Verdon WA, Spivey BE. ...

  11. Triamterene crystalline nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samih H; Milliner, Dawn S; Wooldridge, Thomas D; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    Medications can cause a tubulointerstitial insult leading to acute kidney injury through multiple mechanisms. Acute tubular injury, a dose-dependent process, occurs due to direct toxicity on tubular cells. Acute interstitial nephritis characterized by interstitial inflammation and tubulitis develops from drugs that incite an allergic reaction. Other less common mechanisms include osmotic nephrosis and crystalline nephropathy. The latter complication is rare but has been associated with several drugs, such as sulfadiazine, indinavir, methotrexate, and ciprofloxacin. Triamterene crystalline nephropathy has been reported only rarely, and its histologic characteristics are not well characterized. We report 2 cases of triamterene crystalline nephropathy, one of which initially was misdiagnosed as 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystalline nephropathy. PMID:23958399

  12. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  13. Crystalline Silica Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staff- Branch of Industrial Minerals

    1992-01-01

    substance and will present a nontechnical overview of the techniques used to measure crystalline silica. Because this primer is meant to be a starting point for anyone interested in learning more about crystalline silica, a list of selected readings and other resources is included. The detailed glossary, which defines many terms that are beyond the scope of this publication, is designed to help the reader move from this presentation to a more technical one, the inevitable next step.

  14. Color Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Heidi S. S.; Maki, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a study conducted by members of the WellU Academic Integration Subcommittee of The College of St. Scholastica's College's Healthy Campus Initiative plan whose purpose was to determine whether changing color in the classroom could have a measurable effect on students. One simple improvement a school can make in a classroom is…

  15. Colorful television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    What are the challenges and rewards for American men and women of color who chose to become scientists? The Public Broadcasting Service intends to show us through an upcoming 6-hour documentary series entitled “Breakthrough: The Changing Face of Science in America.”

  16. Colorful Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrick, C. Shane

    2006-01-01

    As instructors of accounting, we should take an abstract topic (at least to most students) and connect it to content known by students to help increase the effectiveness of our instruction. In a recent semester, ordinary items such as colors, a basketball, and baseball were used to relate the subject of accounting. The accounting topics of account…

  17. Rigidity and flexibility of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Gáspár, Merse E; Csermely, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The network approach became a widely used tool to understand the behaviour of complex systems in the last decade. We start from a short description of structural rigidity theory. A detailed account on the combinatorial rigidity analysis of protein structures, as well as local flexibility measures of proteins and their applications in explaining allostery and thermostability is given. We also briefly discuss the network aspects of cytoskeletal tensegrity. Finally, we show the importance of the balance between functional flexibility and rigidity in protein-protein interaction, metabolic, gene regulatory and neuronal networks. Our summary raises the possibility that the concepts of flexibility and rigidity can be generalized to all networks. PMID:23165349

  18. Mooring and ground handling rigid airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of mooring and ground handling rigid airships are discussed. A brief history of Mooring and Ground Handling Rigid Airships from July 2, 1900 through September 1, 1939 is included. Also a brief history of ground handling developments with large U. S. Navy nonrigid airships between September 1, 1939 and August 31, 1962 is included wherein developed equipment and techniques appear applicable to future large rigid airships. Finally recommendations are made pertaining to equipment and procedures which appear desirable and feasible for future rigid airship programs.

  19. Color measurements based on a color camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marszalec, Elzbieta A.; Pietikaeinen, Matti

    1997-08-01

    The domain of color camera applications is increasing all time due to recent progress in color machine vision research. Colorimetric measurement tasks are quite complex as the purpose of color measurement is to provide a quantitative evaluation of the phenomenon of colors as perceived by human vision. A proper colorimetric calibration of the color camera system is needed in order to make color a practical tool in machine vision. This paper discuses two approaches to color measurements based on a color camera and includes an overview of practical approaches to color camera calibration under unstable illumination conditions.

  20. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  1. Novel biaxial nematic phases of side-chain liquid crystalline polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2012-12-01

    We present a mean field theory to describe biaxial nematic phases of side-chain liquid crystalline polymers, in which rigid side-chains (mesogens) and rigid-backbone chains favor mutually perpendicular orientations. Taking into account both excluded volume and attractive interactions between rigid rods, novel biaxial nematic phases are theoretically predicted. We calculate uniaxial and biaxial orientational order parameters as a function of temperature and the length of backbone chains. We find a first-order biaxial-biaxial phase transition and a first (or second)-order uniaxial-biaxial one, depending on the length of mesogens and backbone chains.

  2. Infrared imaging enhances retinal crystals in Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Brar, Vikram S; Benson, William H

    2015-01-01

    Infrared imaging dramatically increased the number of crystalline deposits visualized compared with clinical examination, standard color fundus photography, and red free imaging in patients with Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy. We believe that this imaging modality significantly improves the sensitivity with which these lesions are detected, facilitating earlier diagnosis and may potentially serve as a prognostic indicator when examined over time. PMID:25931805

  3. Formation of Organic Molecular Nanocrystals under Rigid Confinement with Analysis by Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Ong, T. C.; Michaelis, V. K.; Heng, S.; Huang, J.; Griffin, R. G.; Myerson, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization in rigid confinement is a promising method to obtain organic molecular nanocrystals. However, the crystallization behavior and the related characterization methods are not well studied. Here we present a systematic study of the nucleation of organic molecular nanocrystals in rigid pores. Four different compounds were studied, ibuprofen, fenofibrate, griseofulvin, and indomethacin, which range from simple to complex molecules. Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was employed to analyse the structure of these compounds inside pores which are difficult to characterize by other analytical methods. We successfully demonstrated the production of nano-crystalline ibuprofen, fenofibrate and griseofulvin in porous silica particles with ~ 40 nm pores. These nanocrystals showed significant enhancement in dissolution rates. These results help advance the fundamental understanding of nucleation under rigid confinement and may lead to potential applications in developing new formulations in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25258590

  4. The Rigid Orthogonal Procrustes Rotation Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Berge, Jos M. F.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of rotating a matrix orthogonally to a best least squares fit with another matrix of the same order has a closed-form solution based on a singular value decomposition. The optimal rotation matrix is not necessarily rigid, but may also involve a reflection. In some applications, only rigid rotations are permitted. Gower (1976) has…

  5. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  9. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  10. Rigid fibrous ceramics for entry systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, Ronald P.

    1993-01-01

    The topics addressed are: (1) high payoff areas with reusable surface insulation; (2) technology opportunities/gap; (3) coatings for rigid fibrous ceramics; (4) challenges for reusable rigid fibrous ceramics - Lunar/Mars aerobraking heatshield; (5) comparison of LI-900 and HTP properties; and (6) comparison of microstructures.

  11. Unbiased rigid registration using transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Dieter A.; Hornegger, Joachim; Bautz, Werner; Kuwert, Torsten; Roemer, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    The evaluation of tumor growth as regression under therapy is an important clinical issue. Rigid registration of sequentially acquired 3D-images has proven its value for this purpose. Existing approaches to rigid image registration use the whole volume for the estimation of the rigid transform. Non-rigid soft tissue deformation, however, will imply a bias to the registration result, because local deformations cannot be modeled by rigid transforms. Anatomical substructures, like bones or teeth, are not affected by these deformations, but follow a rigid transform. This important observation is incorporated in the proposed registration algorithm. The selection of anatomical substructure is done by manual interaction of medical experts adjusting the transfer function of the volume rendering software. The parameters of the transfer function are used to identify the voxels that are considered for registration. A rigid transform is estimated by a quaternion gradient descent algorithm based on the intensity values of the specified tissue classes. Commonly used voxel intensity measures are adjusted to the modified registration algorithm. The contribution describes the mathematical framework of the proposed registration method and its implementation in a commercial software package. The experimental evaluation includes the discussion of different similarity measures, the comparison of the proposed method to established rigid registration techniques and the evaluation of the efficiency of the new method. We conclude with the discussion of potential medical applications of the proposed registration algorithm.

  12. P-Ink displays: flexible, low power, reflective color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Andre C.; Wang, Hai; Henderson, Eric; Kerins, Fergal; Kamp, Ulrich; Da Silva Bonifacio, Leonardo; Law, Pak Hin; Ozin, Geoffrey A.

    2013-03-01

    Opalux's P-Ink material represents a revolutionary step forward in display technology, offering the ability to reflect bright and vivid colors spanning the visible spectrum. By applying low power electric pulses, the color of this Photonic Color-based material can be selected at will, with the resulting electrically bi-stable color states requiring no power to maintain. It can be coated onto rigid and flexible substrates in scale, highlighting its potential to drive the development of bendable form factors for displays.

  13. Colorful drying.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with alpha-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were fluidized in fluid bed dryer to observe the progress of the heat flow in the material and to study the heat indicator properties of the indicator materials. A tristimulus colorimeter was used to measure CIELAB color values. Color indicator for heat detection can be utilized to test if the heat-sensitive API would go through physical changes during the pharmaceutical drying process. Both the prepared granules and pellets can be used as heat indicator in fluid bed drying process. The colored heat indicators give an opportunity to learn new aspects of the process at real time and could be exploded, for example, for scaling-up studies. PMID:20039220

  14. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  15. Aggregation dynamics of rigid polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Anvy Moly; Rajesh, R.; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Similarly charged polyelectrolytes are known to attract each other and aggregate into bundles when the charge density of the polymers exceeds a critical value that depends on the valency of the counterions. The dynamics of aggregation of such rigid polyelectrolytes are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the morphology of the aggregates depends on the value of the charge density of the polymers. For values close to the critical value, the shape of the aggregates is cylindrical with height equal to the length of a single polyelectrolyte chain. However, for larger values of charge, the linear extent of the aggregates increases as more and more polymers aggregate. In both the cases, we show that the number of aggregates decrease with time as power laws with exponents that are not numerically distinguishable from each other and are independent of charge density of the polymers, valency of the counterions, density, and length of the polyelectrolyte chain. We model the aggregation dynamics using the Smoluchowski coagulation equation with kernels determined from the molecular dynamics simulations and justify the numerically obtained value of the exponent. Our results suggest that once counterions condense, effective interactions between polyelectrolyte chains short-ranged and the aggregation of polyelectrolytes are diffusion-limited.

  16. Self-adjustable crystalline inorganic nanocoils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-peng; Yang, Yong; Zhuang, Jing; Wang, Xun

    2013-05-01

    Biomacromolecules such as proteins, although extremely complex in microstructure, can crystallize into macro-sized crystals after self-adjusting their shapes, based on which the structure of biology is built. Inorganic nanowires/nanoribbons with a similar one-dimensional topology but much simpler structures can hardly be as flexible as macromolecules when constructing superlattice structures because of their inherent rigidity. Here we report the synthesis of crystalline indium sulfide nanoribbon-based nanocoils that are formed by spontaneous self-coiling of ultrathin nanoribbons. The nanostructures are flexible and appear as relatively random coils because of their ultrathin ribbon structures (~0.9 nm in thickness) with high aspect ratios. Moreover, the nanocoils can self-adjust their shapes and assemble into two-dimensional superlattices and three-dimensional supercrystals in solution. The ultrathin nanocoils are expected to bring new insights into the use of flexible nanocrystals as building blocks for constructing superstructures. PMID:23611283

  17. Color space conversion for linear color grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dah-Jye

    2000-10-01

    Color grading is an important process for various industries such as food processing, fruit and vegetable grading, etc. Quality and price are often determined by the color of product. For example, darker red color for apples means higher price. In color machine vision applications, image is acquired with a color CCD camera that outputs color information in three channels, red, gree, and blue. When grading color, these three primary colors must be processed to determine the color level for separation. A very popular color space conversion technique for color image processing is RGB-to-HSI, where HSI represents hue, saturation, and intensity, respectively. However, the conversion result is still 3D information that makes determining color grades very difficult. A new color space conversion technique that can be implemented for high-speed real-time processing for color grading is introduced in this paper. Depending on the application, different color space conversion equations must be used. The result of this technique is a simple one-dimensional array that represents different color levels. This linear array makes linear color grading adjustment possible.

  18. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko; David J.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  19. Cognitive aspects of color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derefeldt, Gunilla A. M.; Menu, Jean-Pierre; Swartling, Tiina

    1995-04-01

    This report surveys cognitive aspects of color in terms of behavioral, neuropsychological, and neurophysiological data. Color is usually defined as psychophysical color or as perceived color. Behavioral data on categorical color perception, absolute judgement of colors, color coding, visual search, and visual awareness refer to the more cognitive aspects of color. These are of major importance in visual synthesis and spatial organization, as already shown by the Gestalt psychologists. Neuropsychological and neurophysiological findings provide evidence for an interrelation between cognitive color and spatial organization. Color also enhances planning strategies, as has been shown by studies on color and eye movements. Memory colors and the color- language connections in the brain also belong among the cognitive aspects of color.

  20. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  1. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1991-12-31

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  2. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  3. Network Rigidity Calculations of Cold Denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Gregory; Jacobs, Donald

    2004-03-01

    Network rigidity is used to model polypeptide chains in solution that undergo a helix to coil transition. Cooperative interactions from hydrogen bonding and hydration are modeled using topological constraints. This novel methodology is used to properly account for the energetic and non-additive entropic contributions to the free energy. The network rigidity model parameters are compared to Lifson-Roig model parameters. Nucleation and propagation parameters are eliminated. Instead, nucleation is a consequence of network rigidity, which is modeled explicitly. An advantage of network rigidity is that parameters are transferable to proteins, unlike the nucleation and propagation parameters of previous helix-coil theories. Results of a transfer matrix method are presented, showing the thermodynamic conditions where a polypeptide chain in an alpha-helix state is subject to hot and cold denaturing. Calculated helix content is found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements on two different polypeptides of different length and solvent concentrations.

  4. Crystalline-amorphous transition in silicate perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, M.; Chizmeshya, A.; Wolf, G.H.; Poole, P.H.; Shao, J.; Angell, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    CaSiO{sub 3} and MgSiO{sub 3} perovskites are known to undergo solid-state crystal to amorphous transitions near ambient pressure when decompressed from their high-pressure stability fields. In order to elucidate the mechanistic aspects of this transition we have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations and lattice-dynamical calculations on model silicate perovskite systems using empirical rigid-ion pair potentials. In the simulations at low temperatures, the model perovskite systems transform under tension to a low-density glass composed of corner shared chains of tetrahedral silicon. The amorphization is initiated by a thermally activated step involving a soft polar optic mode in the perovskite phase at the Brillouin zone center. Progression of the system along this reaction coordinate triggers, in succession, multiple barrierless modes of instability ultimately producing a catastrophic decohesion of the lattice. An important intermediary along the reaction path is a crystalline phase where silicon is in a five-coordinate site and the alkaline-earth metal atom is in eightfold coordination. At the onset pressure, this transitory phase is itself dynamically unstable to a number of additional vibrational modes, the most relevant being those which result in transformation to a variety of tetrahedral chain silicate motifs. These results support the conjecture that stress-induced amorphization arises from the near simultaneous accessibility of multiple modes of instability in the highly metastable parent crystalline phase.

  5. Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, F.

    1993-12-07

    Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric (LCP) compositions of matter are described. LCP backbones are combined with liquid crystalline (LC) side chains in a manner which maximizes molecular ordering through interdigitation of the side chains, thereby yielding materials which are predicted to have superior mechanical properties over existing LCPs. The theoretical design of LCPs having such characteristics includes consideration of the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and in the side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of the spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in sub-molecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone to which they are attached, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and the side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and the side chains for easy alignment. 27 figures.

  6. Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Flonnie

    1993-01-01

    Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric (LCP) compositions of matter. LCP backbones are combined with liquid crystalline (LC) side chains in a manner which maximizes molecular ordering through interdigitation of the side chains, thereby yielding materials which are predicted to have superior mechanical properties over existing LCPs. The theoretical design of LCPs having such characteristics includes consideration of the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and in the side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of the spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in sub-molecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone to which they are attached, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and the side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and the side chains for easy alignment.

  7. COLLIDING CRYSTALLINE BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    1998-06-26

    The understanding of crystalline beams has advanced to the point where one can now, with reasonable confidence, undertake an analysis of the luminosity of colliding crystalline beams. Such a study is reported here. It is necessary to observe the criteria, previously stated, for the creation and stability of crystalline beams. This requires, firstly, the proper design of a lattice. Secondly, a crystal must be formed, and this can usually be done at various densities. Thirdly, the crystals in a colliding-beam machine are brought into collision. We study all of these processes using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The work parallels what was done previously, but the new part is to study the crystal-crystal interaction in collision. We initially study the zero-temperature situation. If the beam-beam force (or equivalent tune shift) is too large then overlapping crystals can not be created (rather two spatially separated crystals are formed). However, if the beam-beam force is less than but comparable to that of the space-charge forces between the particles, we find that overlapping crystals can be formed and the beam-beam tune shift can be of the order of unity. Operating at low but non-zero temperature can increase the luminosity by several orders of magnitude over that of a usual collider. The construction of an appropriate lattice, and the development of adequately strong cooling, although theoretically achievable, is a challenge in practice.

  8. Colliding Crystalline Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie; Sessler, A.M.

    1998-06-01

    The understanding of crystalline beams has advanced to the point where one can now, with reasonable confidence, undertake an analysis of the luminosity of colliding crystalline beams. Such a study is reported here. It is necessary to observe the criteria, previously stated, for the creation and stability of crystalline beams. This requires, firstly, the proper design of a lattice. Secondly, a crystal must be formed, and this can usually be done at various densities. Thirdly, the crystals in a colliding-beam machine are brought into collision. We study all of these processes using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The work parallels what was done previously, but the new part is to study the crystal-crystal interaction in collision. We initially study the zero-temperature situation. If the beam-beam force (or equivalent tune shift) is too large then over-lapping crystals can not be created (rather two spatially separated crystals are formed). However, if the beam-beam force is less than but comparable to that of the space-charge forces between the particles, we find that overlapping crystals can be formed and the beam-beam tune shift can be of the order of unity. Operating at low but non-zero temperature can increase the luminosity by several orders of magnitude over that of a usual collider. The construction of an appropriate lattice, and the development of adequately strong coding, although theoretically achievable, is a challenge in practice.

  9. Using color management in color document processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehab, Smadar

    1995-04-01

    Color Management Systems have been used for several years in Desktop Publishing (DTP) environments. While this development hasn't matured yet, we are already experiencing the next generation of the color imaging revolution-Device Independent Color for the small office/home office (SOHO) environment. Though there are still open technical issues with device independent color matching, they are not the focal point of this paper. This paper discusses two new and crucial aspects in using color management in color document processing: the management of color objects and their associated color rendering methods; a proposal for a precedence order and handshaking protocol among the various software components involved in color document processing. As color peripherals become affordable to the SOHO market, color management also becomes a prerequisite for common document authoring applications such as word processors. The first color management solutions were oriented towards DTP environments whose requirements were largely different. For example, DTP documents are image-centric, as opposed to SOHO documents that are text and charts centric. To achieve optimal reproduction on low-cost SOHO peripherals, it is critical that different color rendering methods are used for the different document object types. The first challenge in using color management of color document processing is the association of rendering methods with object types. As a result of an evolutionary process, color matching solutions are now available as application software, as driver embedded software and as operating system extensions. Consequently, document processing faces a new challenge, the correct selection of the color matching solution while avoiding duplicate color corrections.

  10. Metrology of Non-Rigid Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Smith, D W; Claudet, A A; Kasper, E P; Patterson, S R

    2002-01-01

    Dimensional characterization of non-rigid parts presents many challenges. For example, when a non-rigid part is mounted in an inspection apparatus the effects of fixturing constraints cause significant deformation of the part. If the part is not used in normal service with the same load conditions as during inspection, the dimensional characteristics in service will deviate from the reported values during inspection. Further, the solution of designing specialized fixturing to duplicate ''as-installed'' conditions does not fully resolve the problem because each inspection requires its own methodology. The goal of this project is to formulate the research problem and propose a method of assessing the dimensional characteristics of non-rigid parts. The measured dimension of a rigid component is traceable at some level of confidence to a single source (NIST in the USA). Hence the measurement of one component of an assembly can be related to the measurement of another component of that assembly. There is no generalized analog to this pedigreed process for dimensionally characterizing non-rigid bodies. For example, a measurement made on a sheet-metal automobile fender is heavily influenced by how it is held during the measurement making it difficult to determine how well that fender will assemble to the rest of the (non-rigid) car body. This problem is often overcome for specific manufacturing problems by constructing rigid fixtures that over-constrain the non-rigid parts to be assembled and then performing the dimensional measurement of the contour of each component to check whether each meets specification. Note that such inspection measurements will yield only an approximation to the assembled shape, which is a function of both the geometry and the compliance of the component parts of the assembly. As a result, non-rigid components are more difficult to specify and inspect and therefore are more difficult to purchase from outside vendors compared to rigid components

  11. Metrology of Non-Rigid Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K; Swift, D; Claudet, A; Kasper, E; Patterson, S

    2002-01-01

    Dimensional characterization of non-rigid parts presents many challenges. For example, when a non-rigid part is mounted in an inspection apparatus the effects of fixturing constraints are significant. If the part is not used in normal service with the same load conditions as during inspection, the dimensional characteristics will deviate from reported values. Further, the solution of designing specialized fixturing to duplicate ''as-installed'' conditions does not fully resolve the problem because each inspection requires its own methodology. The goal of this project is to formulate the research problem and propose a method of assessing the dimensional characteristics of non-rigid parts. The measured dimension of a rigid component is traceable at some level of confidence to a single source (NIST in the USA). Hence the measurement of one component of an assembly can be related to the measurement of another component of that assembly. There is no generalized analog to this pedigreed process for dimensionally characterizing non-rigid bodies. For example, a measurement made on a sheet-metal automobile fender is heavily influenced by how it is held during the measurement making it difficult to determine how well that fender will assemble to the rest of the (non-rigid) car body. This problem is often overcome for specific manufacturing problems by constructing rigid fixtures that over-constrain the non-rigid parts to be assembled and then performing the dimensional measurement of the contour of each component to check whether each meets specification. Note that such inspection measurements will yield only an approximation to the assembled shape, which is a function of both the geometry and the compliance of the component parts of the assembly. As a result, non-rigid components are more difficult to specify and inspect and therefore are more difficult to purchase from outside vendors compared to rigid components. The problems are compounded as the requirements come to

  12. Patient comfort during flexible and rigid cystourethroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojowy, Romuald; Wojciechowska, Joanna; Kościelska, Katarzyna; Dembowski, Janusz; Matuszewski, Michał; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Małkiewicz, Bartosz; Kołodziej, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cystourethroscopy (CS) is an endoscopic method used to visualize the urethra and the bladder. Aim In this study, we prospectively evaluated pain in men undergoing cyclic cystoscopic assessment with rigid and flexible instruments after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURB). Material and methods One hundred and twenty male patients who were under surveillance after a TURB procedure due to urothelial cell carcinoma and who had undergone at least one rigid cystourethroscopy in the past were enrolled in the trial. Patients were prospectively randomized to age-matched groups for flexible (group F) or rigid (group R) CS. Patient's comfort was evaluated on an 11-grade scale, ranging from 0 (free from pain) to 10 points (unbearable pain). Results The patients described the pain during the previous rigid CS as ranging from 4 to 10 (mean: 6.8) in group F and from 0 to 10 (mean: 5.8) in group R. Group R patients described the pain during the current rigid CS as ranging from 0 to 10 (mean: 5.7). No mean change in the grade was observed between the two pain descriptions (no change 11 patients, weaker pain 25 patients, stronger pain 24 patients, gamma 0.51, p < 0.0001). Group F described the pain as 1 to 5 (mean: 2.1). In the case of flexible CS the pain experience was greatly lowered compared to the previous rigid CS. All flexible CS patients reported lowered pain (by 1 to 9 grades). Patients’ age did not influence the comfort of the flexible CS or the change in pain level. Conclusions Flexible CS is better tolerated than rigid cystoscopy by male patients regardless of patients’ age. PMID:27458489

  13. Rigidity Dependence of Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    The various observed harmonics of the cosmic ray variation may be understood on a unified basis if the free space cosmic ray anisotropy is non-sinusoidal in form. The major objective of this paper is to study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-1990 for Deep River, Goose Bay and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for Deep River having low cutoff rigidity as compared to Tokyo neutron monitor having high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases in 1987 at Deep River and in 1986 at Tokyo during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction at both the stations having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station i.e. Deep River as compared to the high cut off rigidity station i.e. Tokyo on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The solar wind velocity significantly remains in the range 350 to 425 km/s i.e. being nearly average on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days are weakly dependent on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of low and high cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics.

  14. LED Color Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Color quality is an important consideration when evaluating LED-based products for general illumination. This fact sheet reviews the basics regarding light and color and summarizes the most important color issues related to white-light LED systems.

  15. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  16. Color Blindness Simulations

    MedlinePlus

    ... many disables? The fastest growing segment? Myths of disability The Law The Rules Accessibility Resources Page Updates, additions Contact Us For assistance contact your NOAA Line Office Section 508 Coordinator Color blindness Simulations Normal Color Vision Deuteranopia Color blindness marked ...

  17. Flexible implementation of rigid solar cell technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, Andrew E.

    2010-08-01

    As a source of clean, remote energy, photovoltaic (PV) systems are an important area of research. The majority of solar cells are rigid materials with negligible flexibility. Flexible PV systems possess many advantages, such as being transportable and incorporable on diverse structures. Amorphous silicon and organic PV systems are flexible; however, they lack the efficiency and lifetime of rigid cells. There is also a need for PV systems that are light weight, especially in space and flight applications. We propose a solution to this problem by arranging rigid cells onto a flexible substrate creating efficient, light weight, and flexible devices. To date, we have created a working prototype of our design using the 1.1cm x 1cm Emcore cells. We have achieved a better power to weight ratio than commercially available PowerFilm{reg_sign}, which uses thin film silicon yielding .034W/gram. We have also tested our concept with other types of cells and verified that our methods are able to be adapted to any rigid solar cell technology. This allows us to use the highest efficiency devices despite their physical characteristics. Depending on the cell size we use, we can rival the curvature of most available flexible PV devices. We have shown how the benefits of rigid solar cells can be integrated into flexible applications, allowing performance that surpasses alternative technologies.

  18. Crystal structure prediction of rigid molecules.

    PubMed

    Elking, Dennis M; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Nichols, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    A non-polarizable force field based on atomic multipoles fit to reproduce experimental crystal properties and ab initio gas-phase dimers is described. The Ewald method is used to calculate both long-range electrostatic and 1/r(6) dispersion energies of crystals. The dispersion energy of a crystal calculated by a cutoff method is shown to converge slowly to the exact Ewald result. A method for constraining space-group symmetry during unit-cell optimization is derived. Results for locally optimizing 4427 unit cells including volume, cell parameters, unit-cell r.m.s.d. and CPU timings are given for both flexible and rigid molecule optimization. An algorithm for randomly generating rigid molecule crystals is described. Using the correct experimentally determined space group, the average and maximum number of random crystals needed to find the correct experimental structure is given for 2440 rigid single component crystals. The force field energy rank of the correct experimental structure is presented for the same set of 2440 rigid single component crystals assuming the correct space group. A complete crystal prediction is performed for two rigid molecules by searching over the 32 most probable space groups. PMID:27484371

  19. Generic Rigidity Percolation in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, M. F.; Jacobs, D. J.; Day, A. R.

    1996-03-01

    We study rigidity percolation for random central-force networks, using the Pebble Game(D. J. Jacobs and M. F. Thorpe, Phys. Rev. Letts. 75), 4051 (1995) algorithm on the bond and site diluted generic triangular lattice. Here, each site location is randomly displaced from the perfect lattice, removing any special symmetries. The total number of floppy modes are counted exactly, and exhibit a cusp singularity in the second derivative of the number of floppy modes, at the transition from a rigid to a floppy structure. The critical thresholds for bond and site dilution are found to be 0.6602 ± 0.0003 and 0.6976 ± 0.0003 respectively. We find that the generic rigidity percolation transition is second order, but in a different universality class than connectivity percolation, with the exponents; α = -0.48 ± 0.05 , β = 0.175 ± 0.02 and ν = 1.21 ± 0.06 . The fractal dimension of the spanning rigid clusters and the spanning stressed regions at the critical threshold are found to be df = 1.86 ± 0.02 and d_BB = 1.80 ± 0.03 respectively. Some elastic properties of the rigid backbone will be discussed.

  20. Rigidity loss in disordered network materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Hagh, Varda F.; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, M. F.; van Hecke, Martin

    Weakly jammed sphere packings show a very peculiar elasticity, with a ratio of compression modulus to shear modulus that diverges as the number of contacts approaches the minimum required for rigidity. Creating artificial isotropic network materials with this property is a challenge: so far, the least elaborate way to generate them is to actually simulate weakly compressed repulsive spheres. The next steps in designing such networks hinge upon a solid understanding of what properties of the sphere-packing derived network are essential for its elasticity. We elucidate the topological aspects of this question by comparing the rigidity transition in these networks to that in other random spring network models, including the common bond-diluted triangular net and a self-stress-free variant of that. We use the pebble game algorithm for identifying rigid clusters in mechanical networks to demonstrate that the marginally rigid state in sphere packings is perfectly isostatic everywhere, and the addition or removal of a single bond creates a globally stressed or globally floppy network, respectively. By contrast, the other classes of random network random networks show a more localized response to addition and removal of bonds, and, correspondingly, a more gradual rigidity transition.

  1. Generic rigidity percolation in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, D. J.; Thorpe, M. F.

    1996-04-01

    We study rigidity percolation for random central-force networks on the bondand site-diluted generic triangular lattice. Here, each site location is randomly displaced from the perfect lattice, removing any special symmetries. Using the pebble game algorithm, the total number of floppy modes are counted exactly, and exhibit a cusp singularity in the second derivative at the transition from a rigid to a floppy structure. The critical thresholds for bond and site dilution are found to be 0.66020+/-0.0003 and 0.69755+/-0.0003, respectively. The network is decomposed into unique rigid clusters, and we apply the usual percolation scaling theory. From finite size scaling, we find that the generic rigidity percolation transition is second order, but in a different universality class from connectivity percolation, with the exponents α=-0.48+/-0.05, β=0.175+/-0.02, and ν=1.21+/-0.06. The fractal dimension of the spanning rigid clusters and the spanning stressed regions at the critical threshold are found to be df=1.86+/-0.02 and dBB=1.80+/-0.03, respectively.

  2. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  3. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  4. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  5. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  6. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  7. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  8. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  9. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  10. Physicochemical and nanotechnological approaches to the design of 'rigid' spatial structures of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, Yu M.; Salyanov, V. I.; Skuridin, S. G.; Shtykova, E. V.; Khlebtsov, N. G.; Kats, E. I.

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on physicochemical and nanotechnological approaches to the design of 'rigid' particles based on double-stranded DNA molecules. The physicochemical methods imply cross-linking of adjacent DNA molecules ordered in quasinematic layers of liquid-crystalline dispersion particles by synthetic nanobridges consisting of alternating molecules of an antibiotic (daunomycin) and divalent copper ions, as well as cross-linking of these molecules as a result of their salting-out in quasinematic layers of liquid-crystalline dispersion particles under the action of lanthanide cations. The nanotechnological approach is based on the insertion of gold nanoparticles into the free space between double-stranded DNA molecules that form quasinematic layers of liquid-crystalline dispersion particles. This gives rise to extended clusters of gold nanoparticles and is accompanied by an enhancement of the interaction between the DNA molecules through gold nanoparticles and by a decrease in the solubility of dispersion particles. These approaches produce integrated 'rigid' DNA-containing spatial structures, which are incompatible with the initial aqueous polymeric solutions and have unique properties. The bibliography includes 116 references.

  11. Inkjet Color Printing by Interference Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Aleksandr V; Milichko, Valentin A; Vinogradov, Vladimir V; Vinogradov, Alexandr V

    2016-03-22

    Color printing technology is developing rapidly; in less than 40 years, it moved from dot matrix printers with an ink-soaked cloth ribbon to 3D printers used to make three-dimensional color objects. Nevertheless, what remained unchanged over this time is the fact that in each case, dye inks (CMYK or RGB color schemes) were exclusively used for coloring, which inevitably limits the technological possibilities and color reproduction. As a next step in printing color images and storing information, we propose the technology of producing optical nanostructures. In this paper, we report use of inkjet technology to create colored interference layers with high accuracy without the need for high-temperature fixing. This was made possible due to using titania-based colloidal ink yielding monolithic coatings with a high refractive index (2.00 ± 0.08 over the entire visible range) when naturally dried. By controlling the film thickness by using inkjet deposition, we produced images based on controlled interference and implementing color printing with one ink. The lack of dyes in the proposed method has good environmental prospects, because applied systems based on a crystalline anatase sol are nontoxic and biologically inert. The paper explains in detail the principle of producing interference images by the classical inkjet method and shows the advantages of this technique in depositing coatings with uniform thickness, which are required for large-scale interference color imaging even on unprepared polymer films. This article demonstrates the possibility of inkjet printing of nanostructures with a precision in thickness of up to 50 nm, we believe that the proposed approach will be the groundwork for developing interference color printing approach and allow to implement new methods of forming optical nano-objects by widely available techniques. PMID:26805775

  12. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-05-01

    We prove that C^r -smooth (r > 2 ) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not C^1+ɛ -rigid, for any ɛ > 0 . This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically C^1 -rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that C^r -smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically C^r-1-κ -rigid, for any κ > 0.

  13. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-06-01

    We prove that {C^r}-smooth ({r > 2}) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not {C^{1+\\varepsilon}}-rigid, for any {\\varepsilon > 0}. This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically {C^1}-rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that {C^r}-smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically {C^{r-1-κ}}-rigid, for any {κ > 0}.

  14. Quantum mechanics of a generalised rigid body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gripaios, Ben; Sutherland, Dave

    2016-05-01

    We consider the quantum version of Arnold’s generalisation of a rigid body in classical mechanics. Thus, we quantise the motion on an arbitrary Lie group manifold of a particle whose classical trajectories correspond to the geodesics of any one-sided-invariant metric. We show how the derivation of the spectrum of energy eigenstates can be simplified by making use of automorphisms of the Lie algebra and (for groups of type I) by methods of harmonic analysis. We show how the method can be extended to cosets, generalising the linear rigid rotor. As examples, we consider all connected and simply connected Lie groups up to dimension 3. This includes the universal cover of the archetypical rigid body, along with a number of new exactly solvable models. We also discuss a possible application to the topical problem of quantising a perfect fluid.

  15. Liquid Crystalline Microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Yueh; Petschek, Rolfe G.

    2000-03-01

    If an isotropic component of an emulsion is replaced by one having liquid crystalline (e.g. nematic) order the equilibrium behavior can change dramatically. There are long range enthalpic effects which can result in either repulsive or attractive interactions between the surfaces of an emulsion and entropic effects which generally result in an attractive interaction between these surfaces. We review briefly the possibility of stable blue-phase like microemulsions in mixtures of chiral nematics, appropriate surfactants and an incompatible isotropic solvent. We discuss the entropic effects in a lamellar phase, including the effects of changes in elastic constants and surface-nematic coupling. The effects of fluctuations on blue phases will be briefly discussed.

  16. Liquid crystalline polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties and thermal stability of fibers fabricated from liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) have led to the use of these materials in structural applications where weight savings are critical. Advances in processing of LCPs could permit the incorporation of these polymers into other than uniaxial designs and extend their utility into new areas such as nonlinear optical devices. However, the unique feature of LCPs (intrinsic orientation order) is itself problematic, and current understanding of processing with control of orientation falls short of allowing manipulation of macroscopic orientation (except for the case of uniaxial fibers). The current and desirable characteristics of LCPs are reviewed and specific problems are identified along with issues that must be addressed so that advances in the use of these unique polymers can be expedited.

  17. Nanocomposites with Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat

    2015-03-01

    The creation of ordered (layered) biomimetic materials typically follows a series of steps: first mix nanoparticles with water, organize the NPs by ice templating, evaporate the ice and then back fill with metal or polymer. We propose a simple method exploiting the in situ self-assembly of a crystalline polymer in the presence of nanoparticles to facilitate this process, and provide a completely new pathway for the synthesis of biomimetic materials. A suite of complementary experimental tools are used in this analysis. In parallel, we are developing theoretical tools to a priori predict the morphologies adopted by semicrystalline polymers. The convergence of these novel experimental and theoretical developments in the venerable field of semicrystalline polymers could lead to new applications for this largest class of commercially relevant polymeric materials. With Jacques Jestin, Brian Benicewicz, Dan Zhao, Longxi Zhao

  18. Single crystalline magnetite nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuqin; Zhang, Daihua; Han, Song; Li, Chao; Lei, Bo; Lu, Weigang; Fang, Jiye; Zhou, Chongwu

    2005-01-12

    We descried a method to synthesize single crystalline Fe3O4 nanotubes by wet-etching the MgO inner cores of MgO/Fe3O4 core-shell nanowires. Homogeneous Fe3O4 nanotubes with controllable length, diameter, and wall thickness have been obtained. Resistivity of the Fe3O4 nanotubes was estimated to be approximately 4 x 10-2 Omega cm at room temperature. Magnetoresistance of approximately 1% was observed at T = 77 K when a magnetic field of B = 0.7 T was applied. The synthetic strategy presented here may be extended to a variety of materials such as YBCO, PZT, and LCMO which should provide ideal candidates for fundamental studies of superconductivity, piezoelectricity, and ferromagnetism in nanoscale structures. PMID:15631421

  19. Doped Multilayer Polymer Cholesteric-Liquid-Crystal (PCLC) Flakes: A Novel Electro-Optical Medium for Highly Reflective Color Flexible Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, K.L.; Hasman, K.; Leitch, M.; Cox, G.; Kosc, T.Z.; Trajkovska-Petkoska, A.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2008-03-17

    Polymer cholesteric-liquid-crystal (PCLC) flake/fluid-host suspensions are a novel particle display technology for full-color reflective display applications on rigid or flexible substrates. These “polarizing pigments” require no polarizers or color filters, switch rapidly at very low voltages, and produce highly saturated colors with a reflection efficiency approaching 80%.

  20. Polymer Cholesteric-Liquid-Crystal (PCLC) Flake/Fluid Host Electro-Optical Suspensions and Their Applications in Color Flexible Reflective Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, K.L.; Trajkovska-Petkoska, A.; Hasman, K.; Leitch, M.; Cox, G.; Kosc, T.Z.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2008-03-13

    Polymer cholesteric-liquid-crystal (PCLC) flake/fluid-host suspensions are a novel particle display technology for full-color reflective display applications on rigid or flexible substrates. These “polarizing pigments” require no polarizers or color filters, switch rapidly at very low voltages, and produce highly saturated colors with a reflection efficiency approaching 80%.

  1. Color identification testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  2. Rigid polyurethane and kenaf core composite foams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rigid polyurethane foams are valuable in many construction applications. Kenaf is a bast fiber plant where the surface stem skin provides bast fibers whose strength-to-weight ratio competes with glass fiber. The higher volume product of the kenaf core is an under-investigated area in composite appli...

  3. Bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Kibi, M; Ono, T; Nokubi, T

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the bending profiles of composite resin coating cast clasps. The cobalt-chromium alloy cast clasps were made using tapered wax pattern. Silane coupling method (Silicoater MD, Kulzer Co.) was used to attach composite resin to metal surface. The breakage and the bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps were evaluated. Results were as follows: 1) After the repeated bending test to the tips of clasp arm at 10,000 times in 0.25 mm deflection, neither crack on composite resin surface nor separation at resin/metal interface was observed in any specimen. 2) There was no significant difference in the bending rigidity of clasp arms between before and after composite resin coating. From these results, it was demonstrated that the composite resin coating cast clasp was available in clinical cases and coating with composite resin had little influence on the bending rigidity of clasp arms. Therefore, it was suggested that our clasp designing and fabricating system to control the bending rigidity of clasp arms could be applied to composite resin coating clasps. PMID:8935086

  4. Adjustable Optical Mount Is More Rigid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Bill G.; Coombs, David S.; Jones, Irby W.; Moore, Alvah S., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Improved mount for lens or mirror in laser offers rigidity similar to that of nonadjustable optical mount. In comparison with older adjustable optical mounts, this one less susceptible to movements and distortions caused by vibrations and by thermal expansions and contractions. Mount contains neither adjustment rods (which grow or shrink as temperature varies) nor springs (which transmit vibrations to mounted optic).

  5. Phosphorescence and Energy Transfer in Rigid Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enciso, E.; Cabello, A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates the general aspects of intermolecular energy transfer between triplet states in rigid solutions of organic compounds solved in an ethanol-ether mixture. Measurements of quenching and energy transfer processes are made using the chemicals of benzophenone and naphthalene. (CS)

  6. Two exactly soluble models of rigidity percolation

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, M. F.; Stinchcombe, R. B.

    2014-01-01

    We summarize results for two exactly soluble classes of bond-diluted models for rigidity percolation, which can serve as a benchmark for numerical and approximate methods. For bond dilution problems involving rigidity, the number of floppy modes F plays the role of a free energy. Both models involve pathological lattices with two-dimensional vector displacements. The first model involves hierarchical lattices where renormalization group calculations can be used to give exact solutions. Algebraic scaling transformations produce a transition of the second order, with an unstable critical point and associated scaling laws at a mean coordination 〈r〉=4.41, which is above the ‘mean field’ value 〈r〉=4 predicted by Maxwell constraint counting. The order parameter exponent associated with the spanning rigid cluster geometry is β=0.0775 and that associated with the divergence of the correlation length and the anomalous lattice dimension d is dν=3.533. The second model involves Bethe lattices where the rigidity transition is massively first order by a mean coordination 〈r〉=3.94 slightly below that predicted by Maxwell constraint counting. We show how a Maxwell equal area construction can be used to locate the first-order transition and how this result agrees with simulation results on larger random-bond lattices using the pebble game algorithm. PMID:24379428

  7. Zinc oxide films chemically grown onto rigid and flexible substrates for TFT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchea, M.; Kornilios, N.; Koudoumas, E.

    2010-10-01

    This contribution presents some preliminary results regarding the use of a chemical route for the growth of good quality ZnO thin films that can be used for the fabrication of thin film transistors (TFTs). The films were grown at rather low temperature (60 °C) on glass and PET substrates using non-aqueous (zinc acetate dihydrate in methanol) precursor solution and their surface morphology, crystalline structure, optical transmittance and electrical characteristics were studied. The study indicated that good quality films with desirable ZnO structure onto rigid and flexible substrates can be obtained, using a simple, cheap, low temperature chemical growth method.

  8. Chips of many colors

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, M.W.; Dorie, L.A.

    1982-07-01

    A large number of available color display tools generally fall into three categories. Intelligent terminals offer a wide range of color grpahics capability but require extensive software for specific applications. Large turn-key graphics systems, with color display consoles controlled by software, were made for electronic design. In color CAD workstations, color graphics is under hardware control and offers specific features for IC design. The authors look at the various colour graphics systems, and their advantages in VLSI chip design.

  9. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of poly(ethylene terephthalate): Contributions from rigid and mobile amorphous fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Brian; Lin, Jun; Nazarenko, Sergei; Jamieson, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    Systematic divergences in the orthopositronium (o-Ps) annihilation lifetimes, τ_3, and intensities, I_3, are observed, when comparing melt-crystallized and cold-crystallized poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as a function of crystallinity. Following a previous analysis of corresponding deviations in oxygen permeability, the divergences in I3 and τ3 are traced to distinct characteristic values for the probability of o-Ps formation and o-Ps lifetime in the rigid amorphous phase (RAF) associated with the crystalline lamellae and the mobile amorphous regions (MAF) which are unperturbed by the presence of the crystal phase. Utilizing independent information on the volume fractions of RAF and MAF, a quantitative analysis of the o-Ps annihilation parameters is possible.

  10. Realizable Closure for the Orientation Tetrad for Rigid Rod Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yochan; Kini, Hemant; Petty, Charles; Mandal, Dilip; Benard, Andre

    2003-11-01

    The prediction of low-order statistical properties of suspensions and liquid crystalline polymers is often based on a moment equation for the orientation dyad that requires a closure model for the orientation tetrad. A new closure has been developed that retains the six-fold symmetry and projection properties of the exact orientation tetrad. (Petty et al., 1999; Nguyen et al., 2001; Kini et al., 2003). This presentation will summarize recent results obtained by applying the new microstructure theory to a class of rigid rod suspensions subjected to homogeneous shear. In the absence of deformation, the theory predicts the existence of multiple steady states for the microstructure as a consequence of a balance between Brownian motion and an excluded volume potential in orientation space. In the presence of homogeneous shear, the orientation director for relatively concentrated suspensions shows periodic behavior relative to the flow direction. For low strain rates, the orientation director executes a tumbling periodic motion. As the strain rate increases, a wagging periodic motion occurs and, at very high strain rates, a steady alignment of the orientation director relative to the flow direction is predicted.

  11. Rigid Cluster Decomposition Reveals Criticality in Frictional Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, Silke; Quint, David A.; Fily, Yaouen; Schwarz, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of the frictional jamming transition within the framework of rigidity percolation theory. Slowly sheared frictional packings are decomposed into rigid clusters and floppy regions with a generalization of the pebble game including frictional contacts. Our method suggests a second-order transition controlled by the emergence of a system-spanning rigid cluster accompanied by a critical cluster size distribution. Rigid clusters also correlate with common measures of rigidity. We contrast this result with frictionless jamming, where the rigid cluster size distribution is noncritical.

  12. Quasiclassical trajectory studies of rigid rotor--rigid surface scattering. II. Corrugated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.C.; Bowman, J.M.

    1984-03-01

    The quasiclassical trajectory method, previously applied to rigid rotor--rigid flat surface scattering (J. M. Bowman and S. C. Park, J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5441 (1982)) is applied to a rigid rotor--rigid corrugated surface, i.e., a N/sub 2/--LiF(001), system. The mechanisms for rotational excitation at low and high collision energies are studied as well as their dependence on initial beam orientation and corrugation strength. A significant correlation between long-lived trajectories and high rotational excitation is found for low energy collisions and rotational rainbows are clearly observed in the high energy regime, although these features are broadened relative to the flat surface reported previously.

  13. Topological Crystalline Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Topological crystalline insulators (TCI) are new phases of matter in which nontrivial band topology and crystal symmetry unite to protect metallic states on the boundary. Remarkably, TCIs have been predicted and observed in the conveniently simple rocksalt SnTe class of IV-VI semiconductors. Despite the simple crystal structure, the interplay between topology and crystal symmetry in these materials have led to a rich variety of new phenomena, including the coexistence of massless and massive Dirac fermions arising from ferroelectric distortion and strain-induced flat band superconductivity. These new physical mechanisms are not only of intrinsic interest but may also find application in new transistor devices. After discussing the topological nature and potential uses of IV-VI family TCIs, I will present recent predictions of TCIs in several anti-perovskite materials. The origin of TCI in this new class of materials is strikingly different and involves the band inversion of two J = 3/2 quartets of Dirac fermions, which together form a ``Dirac octet.'' As interactions play a significant role in many anti-perovskites, this prediction serves as first step toward realizing TCIs in strongly correlated systems. This work is supported by NSF Graduate Research Fellowship No. 0645960 and DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-SC0010526.

  14. Origin of rigidity in athermal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sumantra

    Solids are distinguished from fluids by their ability to resist shear. In traditional solids, the resistance to shear is associated with the emergence of broken translational symmetry as exhibited by a non-uniform density pattern, which results from either minimizing the energy cost or maximizing the entropy or both. In this thesis, we focus on a special class of materials where this paradigm is challenged. We argue that the observation of rigidity in dry granular materials, a representative system, is a collective process controlled solely by few constraints, e.g., the boundary stresses, the constraint of force and torque balance, and the positivity of contact forces. We have shown that these constraints lead to a broken translational symmetry in a dual space of heights (loop forces) which leads to the observed rigidity (jamming) in such a system. We investigate the structure and behavior of the dual space through a geometrical construction as the system evolves towards the rigidity transition, commonly known as jamming. In that context, we explore the role of friction in jamming and establish the equivalence of real space and stress space description. We conclude that the role of real space geometry is negligible, and a stress only description is sufficient to understand the phenomenology of jamming. In the second half of the thesis, we develop a phenomenological model of the shear induced rigidity in athermal materials. Recent studies of athermal systems such as dry grains and dense, non-Brownian suspensions have shown that shear can lead to solidification through the process of shear jamming in grains and discontinuous shear thickening in suspensions. The similarities observed between these two distinct phenomena suggest that the physical processes leading to shear-induced rigidity in athermal materials are universal. We present a non-equilibrium statistical mechanics model, which exhibits the phenomenology of these shear-driven transitions: shear jamming and

  15. What color is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbach, Reiner; Sharma, Gaurav; Unal, Gozde B.

    2005-01-01

    Color management allows the deterministic handling of color data from input to output. This, of course, assumes that the first digital representation of our data is the "correct" color. It assumes that we did not make any errors in the input definitions, did not use wrong color input profiles, captured the user's intent, or fell prey to a host of other potential problems. After we have made those assumptions, we now can deterministically transfer the color from one place to another. Note that there is a big difference between "reproducing" one color at a different location and "deterministically transferring one set of color data to another location". The deterministic transfer is limited to the small set of physical metrics we decided to call "color". All other components of color are ignored.

  16. What color is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbach, Reiner; Sharma, Gaurav; Unal, Gozde B.

    2004-12-01

    Color management allows the deterministic handling of color data from input to output. This, of course, assumes that the first digital representation of our data is the "correct" color. It assumes that we did not make any errors in the input definitions, did not use wrong color input profiles, captured the user's intent, or fell prey to a host of other potential problems. After we have made those assumptions, we now can deterministically transfer the color from one place to another. Note that there is a big difference between "reproducing" one color at a different location and "deterministically transferring one set of color data to another location". The deterministic transfer is limited to the small set of physical metrics we decided to call "color". All other components of color are ignored.

  17. A Computational Model for Suspended Large Rigid Bodies in 3D Unsteady Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng

    1999-11-01

    A 3D numerical model for computing large rigid objects suspended in fluid flow has been developed. Rather than calculating the surface pressure upon the solid body, we evaluate the net force and torque based on a volume force formulation. The total effective force is obtained by summing up the forces at the Eulerian grids occupied by the rigid body. The effects of the moving bodies are coupled to the fluid flow by imposing the velocity field of the bodies to the fluid. A Poisson equation is used to compute the pressure over the whole domain. The objects are identified by color functions and calculated by the PPM scheme and a tangent function transformation which scales the transition region of the computed interface to a compact thickness. The model is then implemented on a parallel computer of distributed memory and validated with Stokes and low Reynolds number flows.

  18. From A Physical Color Stimulus To A Psychological Color Percept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan G.; Tonnquist, Gunnar

    1989-08-01

    The paper discusses the complexity of color vision in humans, considering the main aspects involved: the physical aspect, the psychophysical aspect, the physiological aspect and the psychological aspect. The meanings of the term color associated to each such aspect (asfor example, color stimulus, color valence, neural color signal and color percept) are introduced. Some types of color defective vision, relevant for color display users, are indicated. The methods to generate color stimuli in modern display devices, employing different technologies, are compared.

  19. Crystalline Organic Cavitands As Microcavity Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Christopher Michael

    There has been much interest in inefficiently packed molecular materials and their applications in gas storage, separations, catalysis, etc. Such known materials include metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs), container molecule materials, etc. One way to design inefficiently packed materials is to construct them from compounds that are incapable of close-packing, that is rigid scaffolds with enforced cavities that cannot be filled by self-packing. Cavitand molecules, tetrameric macrocycles derived from calix[4]resorcinarene derivatives, are well known for their propensity to form crystalline inclusion compounds with small molecules; for example, of the 169 examples of calix[4]resorcinarene scaffolds found in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD), no guest-free forms exist. The guest-free forms of various cavitands, synthesized by literature methods, have been obtained as single crystals by sublimation. Gas inclusion compounds of these cavitands have also been isolated and studied by single crystal x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and 1 H NMR. Furthermore, some cavitand derivatives have shown promise as media for industrial separations (Kr vs. Xe, MeCl vs. DME, Propene vs. Propane).

  20. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  1. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  2. Trichromatic opponent color classification.

    PubMed

    Chichilnisky, E J; Wandell, B A

    1999-10-01

    Stimuli varying in intensity and chromaticity, presented on numerous backgrounds, were classified into red/green, blue/yellow and white/black opponent color categories. These measurements revealed the shapes of the boundaries that separate opponent colors in three-dimensional color space. Opponent color classification boundaries were generally not planar, but their shapes could be summarized by a piecewise linear model in which increment and decrement color signals are combined with different weights at two stages to produce opponent color sensations. The effect of background light on classification was largely explained by separate gain changes in increment and decrement cone signals. PMID:10615508

  3. Development of Laser Ruler in Rigid Laryngoscope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Ok; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Choon; Lee, Byung-Joo; Wang, Soo-Geun; Ro, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Gye-Rok

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to develop a new device that provides a simple, noninvasive method of measuring accurate lesion size while using an endoscope. Methods We developed a rigid laryngoscope with a built-in laser-ruler using a one-light emitting diode and an acrylic plate. The invention incorporates a built-in laser diode that projects an auto-parallel beam into the optical path of the rigid laryngoscope to form two spots in the field of view. Results While the interspot distance remains consistent despite changes in focal plane, magnification, or viewing angle of the laryngoscope, projection to an uneven surface introduces certain variations in the shape, and size of the spots, and the distance between the two spots. Conclusion The device enables a laryngologist to easily measure the distance between landmarks, as well as the change in real size, and the progressive change of vocal fold lesions in an outpatient setting. PMID:22232716

  4. Rapid determination of RMSDs corresponding to macromolecular rigid body motions.

    PubMed

    Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    Finding the root mean sum of squared deviations (RMSDs) between two coordinate vectors that correspond to the rigid body motion of a macromolecule is an important problem in structural bioinformatics, computational chemistry, and molecular modeling. Standard algorithms compute the RMSD with time proportional to the number of atoms in the molecule. Here, we present RigidRMSD, a new algorithm that determines a set of RMSDs corresponding to a set of rigid body motions of a macromolecule in constant time with respect to the number of atoms in the molecule. Our algorithm is particularly useful for rigid body modeling applications, such as rigid body docking, and also for high-throughput analysis of rigid body modeling and simulation results. We also introduce a constant-time rotation RMSD as a similarity measure for rigid molecules. A C++ implementation of our algorithm is available at http://nano-d.inrialpes.fr/software/RigidRMSD. PMID:24615729

  5. Modular Habitats Comprising Rigid and Inflatable Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2010-01-01

    Modular, lightweight, fully equipped buildings comprising hybrids of rigid and inflatable structures can be assembled on Earth and then transported to and deployed on the Moon for use as habitats. Modified versions of these buildings could also prove useful on Earth as shelters that can be rapidly and easily erected in emergency situations and/or extreme environments: examples include shelters for hurricane relief and for Antarctic exploration.

  6. Permeability of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marschall, J.; Milos, F. S.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Rigid fibrous refractory insulations (TPS tiles) are integral components of many spacecraft thermal protection systems. These materials are composed of refractory fibers With diameters on the order of 1 to 15 micrometers. They are lightweight and have an open, highly porous microstructure. Typical densities are less than 500 kilograms per cubic meters, and porosities generally exceed 0.8. Because of their open porosity, these materials are permeable to gas glow. There are numerous instances in which internal gas transport in a thermal protection system could be important; examples include the penetration of hot boundary-layer gases into the insulation, the flow of decomposition (pyrolysis) products from the interior, the use of convective flows to mitigate ice formation caused by cryopumping, and the design of refractory vents for pressure equilibration during atmospheric entry. Computational analysis of gas flow through porous media requires values of permeability which have not previously been available for the rigid fibrous insulations used in thermal protection systems. This paper will document measurements of permeability for a variety of insulations from NASA's LI, FRCI, and AETB families of lightweight ceramic ablators. The directional anisotropy of permeability and its dependence on gas pressure and material density will be presented. It will be shown that rarified-flow effects are significant in the flow through such materials. Connections will be drawn between the insulation microstructure and permeability. The paper will also include representative computations of flow through rigid fibrous insulations.

  7. Color and Streptomycetes1

    PubMed Central

    Pridham, Thomas G.

    1965-01-01

    A report summarizing the results of an international workshop on determination of color of streptomycetes is presented. The results suggest that the color systems which seem most practically appealing and effective to specialists on actinomycetes are those embracing a limited number of color names and groups. The broad groupings allow placement of isolates into reasonably well-defined categories based on color of aerial mycelium. Attempts to expand such systems (more color groups) lead to difficulties. It is common knowledge that many, if not all, of the individual groups would in these broad systems contain strains that differ in many other respects, e.g., spore-wall ornamentation, color of vegetative (substratal) mycelium, morphology of chains of spores, and numerous physiological criteria. Also, cultures of intermediate color can be found, which makes placement difficult. As it now stands, color as a criterion for characterization of streptomycetes and streptoverticillia is in questionable status. Although much useful color information can be obtained by an individual, the application of this information to that in the literature or its use in communication with other individuals leaves much to be desired. More objective methods of color determination are needed. At present, the most effective method that could be used internationally is the color-wheel system of Tresner and Backus. Furthermore, the significance of color in speciation of these organisms is an open question. Obviously, more critical work on the color problem is needed. PMID:14264847

  8. 49 CFR 587.18 - Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. 587.18 Section 587.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Deformable Barrier § 587.18 Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. (a) The fixed rigid barrier has a mass of...

  9. 49 CFR 587.18 - Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. 587.18 Section 587.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Deformable Barrier § 587.18 Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. (a) The fixed rigid barrier has a mass of...

  10. A Cognitive Developmental Model of Rigidity in Senescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapsley, Daniel K.; Enright, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    The rigidity construct is reinterpreted in terms of the cognitive developmental approach. A review reveals both cognitive and developmental themes, with an emphasis on the structural and operational properties of rigidity. Notes weaknesses of previous approaches to rigidity and discusses implications and predictions from the proposed model.…

  11. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  12. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  13. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  15. Light, Color, and Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiburzi, Brian; Tamborino, Laurie; Parker, Gordon A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exercise in which students can use flashlights, mirrors, and colored paper to discover scientific principles regarding optics. Addresses the concepts of angles of incidence and reflection, colored vs. white light, and mirror images. (WRM)

  16. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... things can cause tooth discoloration. The change in color may affect the entire tooth, or appear as spots or ... the tooth enamel. Your genes affect your tooth color. Other things ... include: Congenital diseases Environmental factors Infections ...

  17. Coloring with defect

    SciTech Connect

    Cowen, L.J.; Goddard, W.; Jesurum, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    An (ordinary vertex) coloring is a partition of the vertices of a graph into independent sets. The chromatic number is the minimum number of colors needed to produce such a partition. This paper considers a relaxation of coloring in which the color classes partition the vertices into subgraphs of degree at most d. d is called the defect of the coloring. A graph which admits a vertex coloring into k color classes, where each vertex is adjacent to at most d self-colored neighbors is said to be (k, d) colorable. We consider defective coloring on graphs of bounded degree, bounded genus, and bounded chromatic number, presenting complexity results and algorithms. For bounded degree graphs, a classic result of Lovasz yields a (k, [{Delta}/k]) coloring for graphs with E edges of maximum degree {Delta} in O({Delta}E) time. For graphs of bounded genus, (2, d), for d > 0 and (3,1)-coloring are proved NP-Complete, even for planar graphs. Results of easily can be transformed to (3,2) color any planar graph in linear time. We show that any toroidal graph is (3,2)- and (5, 1)-colorable, and quadratic-time algorithms are presented that find the colorings. For higher surfaces, we give a linear time algorithm to (3, {radical}12{gamma} + 6) color a graph of genus {gamma} > 2. It is also shown that any graph of genus {gamma} is ({radical}12{gamma}/(d + 1) + 6, d) colorable, and an O(d{radical}{gamma}E + V) algorithm is presented that finds the coloring. These bounds are within a constant factor of what is required for the maximum clique embeddable in the surface. Reductions from ordinary vertex coloring show that (k, d) coloring is NP-complete, and there exists an c > 0 such that no polynomial time algorithm can n{sup {epsilon}}-approximate the defective chromatic number unless P = NP. Most approximation algorithms to approximately color 3-colorable graphs can be extend to allow defects.

  18. Color rendition engine.

    PubMed

    Zukauskas, Artūras; Vaicekauskas, Rimantas; Vitta, Pranciškus; Tuzikas, Arūnas; Petrulis, Andrius; Shur, Michael

    2012-02-27

    A source of white light with continuously tuned color rendition properties, such as color fidelity, as well as color saturating and color dulling ability has been developed. The source, which is composed of red (R), amber (A), green (G), and blue (B) light-emitting diodes, has a spectral power distribution varied as a weighted sum of "white" RGB and AGB blends. At the RGB and AGB end-points, the source has a highest color saturating and color dulling ability, respectively, as follows from the statistical analysis of the color-shift vectors for 1269 Munsell samples. The variation of the weight parameter allows for continuously traversing all possible metameric RAGB blends, including that with the highest color fidelity. The source was used in a psychophysical experiment on the estimation of the color appearance of familiar objects, such as vegetables, fruits, and soft-drink cans of common brands, at correlated color temperatures of 3000 K, 4500 K, and 6500 K. By continuously tuning the weight parameter, each of 100 subjects selected RAGB blends that, to their opinion, matched lighting characterized as "most saturating," "most dulling," "most natural," and "preferential". The end-point RGB and AGB blends have been almost unambiguously attributed to "most saturating" and "most dulling" lighting, respectively. RAGB blends that render a highest number of colors with high fidelity have, on average, been attributed to "most natural" lighting. The "preferential" color quality of lighting has, on average, been matched to RAGB blends that provide color rendition with fidelity somewhat reduced in favor of a higher saturation. Our results infer that tunable "color rendition engines" can validate color rendition metrics and provide lighting meeting specific needs and preferences to color quality. PMID:22418343

  19. Expandable and rigid endorectal coils for prostate MRI: impact on prostate distortion and rigid image registration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongbok; Hsu, I-Chow J; Pouliot, Jean; Noworolski, Susan Moyher; Vigneron, Daniel B; Kurhanewicz, John

    2005-12-01

    Endorectal coils (ERCs) are used for acquiring high spatial resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human prostate. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of an expandable versus a rigid ERC on changes in the location and deformation of the prostate gland and subsequently on registering prostate images acquired with and without an ERC. Sagittal and axial T2 weighted MR images were acquired from 25 patients receiving a combined MR imaging/MR spectroscopic imaging staging exam for prostate cancer. Within the same exam, images were acquired using an external pelvic phased array coil both alone and in combination with either an expandable ERC (MedRad, Pittsburgh, PA) or a rigid ERC (USA Instruments, Aurora, OH). Rotations, translations and deformations caused by the ERC were measured and compared. The ability to register images acquired with and without the ERC using a manual rigid-body registration was assessed using a similarity index (SI). Both ERCs caused the prostate to tilt anteriorly with an average tilt of 18.5 degrees (17.4 +/- 9.9 and 19.5 +/- 11.3 degrees, mean +/- standard deviation, for expandable and rigid ERC, respectively). However, the expandable coil caused a significantly larger distortion of the prostate as compared to the rigid coil; compressing the prostate in the anterior/posterior direction by 4.1 +/- 3.0 mm vs 1.2 +/- 2.2 mm (14.5% vs 4.8%) (p < 0.0001), and widening the prostate in the right/left direction by 3.8 +/- 3.7 mm vs 1.5 +/- 3.1 mm (8.3% vs 3.4%) (p = 0.004). Additionally, the ability to manually align prostate images acquired with and without ERC was significantly (p < 0.0001) better for the rigid coil (SI = 0.941 +/- 0.008 vs 0.899 +/- 0.033, for the rigid and expandable coils, respectively). In conclusion, the manual rigid-body alignment of prostate MR images acquired with and without the ERC can be improved through the use of a rigid ERC. PMID:16475755

  20. Alkali metal crystalline polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuhong; Gamble, Stephen; Ainsworth, David; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Andreev, Yuri G; Bruce, Peter G

    2009-07-01

    Polymer electrolytes have been studied extensively because uniquely they combine ionic conductivity with solid yet flexible mechanical properties, rendering them important for all-solid-state devices including batteries, electrochromic displays and smart windows. For some 30 years, ionic conductivity in polymers was considered to occur only in the amorphous state above Tg. Crystalline polymers were believed to be insulators. This changed with the discovery of Li(+) conductivity in crystalline poly(ethylene oxide)(6):LiAsF(6). However, new crystalline polymer electrolytes have proved elusive, questioning whether the 6:1 complex has particular structural features making it a unique exception to the rule that only amorphous polymers conduct. Here, we demonstrate that ionic conductivity in crystalline polymers is not unique to the 6:1 complex by reporting several new crystalline polymer electrolytes containing different alkali metal salts (Na(+), K(+) and Rb(+)), including the best conductor poly(ethylene oxide)(8):NaAsF(6) discovered so far, with a conductivity 1.5 orders of magnitude higher than poly(ethylene oxide)(6):LiAsF(6). These are the first crystalline polymer electrolytes with a different composition and structures to that of the 6:1 Li(+) complex. PMID:19543313

  1. Circumstellar Crystalline Silicates: Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartar, Josh; Speck, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most exciting developments in astronomy in the last 15 years was the discovery of crystalline silicate stardust by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board of ISO; discovery of the crystalline grains was indeed one of the biggest surprises of the ISO mission. Initially discovered around AGB stars (evolved stars in the range of 0.8 > M/M¤>8) at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths, crystalline silicates have since been seen in many astrophysical environments including young stellar objects (T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be), comets and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies. Low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) comprise 95% of the contributors to the ISM, so study of the formation of crystalline silicates is critical to our understanding of the ISM, which is thought to be primarily amorphous (one would expect an almost exact match between the composition of AGB dust shells and the dust in the ISM). Whether the crystalline dust is merely undetectable or amorphized remains a mystery. The FORCAST instrument on SOFIA as well as the PACS instrument on Herschel will provide exciting observing opportunities for the further study of crystalline silicates.

  2. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  3. Reimagining the Color Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Color wheels are a traditional project for many teachers. The author has used them in art appreciation classes for many years, but one problem she found when her pre-service art education students created colored wheels was that they were boring: simple circles, with pie-shaped pieces, which students either painted or colored in. This article…

  4. Sweetpotato Color Analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Color is an important attribute that contributes to the appearance of a sweetpotato genotype. A consumer uses color, along with geometric attributes (e.g., gloss, luster, sheen, texture, opaqueness, shape), to subjectively evaluate the appearance of a sweetpotato root. Color can be quantified by t...

  5. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  6. Color Discrimination Work Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's ability to see likenesses or differences in colors or shades, identifying or matching certain colors, and selecting colors that go together. Section 1 describes the assessment and lists related occupations and DOT codes. Instructions to the evaluator are provided in the…

  7. Rigid and non-rigid micro-plates: Philippines and Myanmar-Andaman case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Generally, tectonic plates are considered as rigid. Oblique plate convergence favors the development of micro-plates along the converging boundaries. The north-south-trending Philippines archipelago (here named Philippine Mobile Belt, PMB), a few hundreds kilometers wide, is one of such complex tectonic zones. We show here that it is composed of rigid rotating crustal blocks (here called platelets). In Myanmar, the northernmost tip of the Sumatra-Andaman subduction system is another complex zone made of various crustal blocks in-between convergent plates. Yet, contrary to PMB, it sustains internal deformation with platelet buckling, altogether indicative of a non-rigid behavior. Therefore, the two case studies, Philippine Mobile Belt and Myanmar-Andaman micro-plate (MAS), illustrate the complexity of micro-plate tectonics and kinematics at convergent plate boundaries.

  8. Understanding geological processes: Visualization of rigid and non-rigid transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, T. F.; Atit, K.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Resnick, I.; Tikoff, B.

    2012-12-01

    Visualizations are used in the geological sciences to support reasoning about structures and events. Research in cognitive sciences offers insights into the range of skills of different users, and ultimately how visualizations might support different users. To understand the range of skills needed to reason about earth processes we have developed a program of research that is grounded in the geosciences' careful description of the spatial and spatiotemporal patterns associated with earth processes. In particular, we are pursuing a research program that identifies specific spatial skills and investigates whether and how they are related to each other. For this study, we focus on a specific question: Is there an important distinction in the geosciences between rigid and non-rigid deformation? To study a general spatial thinking skill we employed displays with non-geological objects that had been altered by rigid change (rotation), and two types of non-rigid change ("brittle" (or discontinuous) and "ductile" (or continuous) deformation). Disciplinary scientists (geosciences and chemistry faculty), and novices (non-science faculty and undergraduate psychology students) answered questions that required them to visualize the appearance of the object before the change. In one study, geologists and chemists were found to be superior to non-science faculty in reasoning about rigid rotations (e.g., what an object would look like from a different perspective). Geologists were superior to chemists in reasoning about brittle deformations (e.g., what an object looked like before it was broken - here the object was a word cut into many fragments displaced in different directions). This finding is consistent with two hypotheses: 1) Experts are good at visualizing the types of changes required for their domain; and 2) Visualization of rigid and non-rigid changes are not the same skill. An additional important finding is that there was a broad range of skill in both rigid and non-rigid

  9. Combining color and shape information for content-based image retrieval on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diplaros, Aristeidis; Gevers, Theo; Patras, Ioannis

    2003-12-01

    We propose a new image feature that merges color and shape information. This global feature, which we call color shape context, is a histogram that combines the spatial (shape) and color information of the image in one compact representation. This histogram codes the locality of color transitions in an image. Illumination invariant derivatives are first computed and provide the edges of the image, which is the shape information of our feature. These edges are used to obtain similarity (rigid) invariant shape descriptors. The color transitions that take place on the edges are coded in an illumination invariant way and are used as the color information. The color and shape information are combined in one multidimensional vector. The matching function of this feature is a metric and allows for existing indexing methods such as R-trees to be used for fast and efficient retrieval.

  10. Industrial Color Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCamy, C. S.

    1986-10-01

    Color is a very important property of many products and an essential feature of some. The commercial value of color is evident in the fact that customers reject product that is satisfactory in every other way, but is not the right color. Color isrumerically specified, measured, and controlled just as length or weight are. It has three dimensions: Hue, Value, and Chroma, and may be represented in a three-dimensional space. Colors of objects depend on the illumination and pairs of colors may match in one light but not in another. Controlled illumination is required for color matching. Illuminants were standardized by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE). As a basis for color measurement, the CIE adopted three spectral sensitivity functions representing a standard observer. Color may be measured by instruments using standard illumination and simulating the standard observer. It is better to measure spectral reflectance or transmittance and compute colorimetric quantities. Color may be inspected on a production line and the data obtained can be used to control the process. When production cannot be controlled as precisely as required, product may be sorted by color.

  11. Watermarking spot colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alattar, Osama M.; Reed, Alastair M.

    2003-06-01

    Watermarking of printed materials has usually focused on process inks of cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK). In packaging, almost three out of four printed materials include spot colors. Spot colors are special premixed inks, which can be produced in a vibrant range of colors, often outside the CMYK color gamut. In embedding a watermark into printed material, a common approach is to modify the luminance value of each pixel in the image. In the case of process color work pieces, the luminance change can be scaled to the C, M, Y and K channels using a weighting function, to produce the desired change in luminance. In the case of spot color art designs, there is only one channel available and the luminance change is applied to this channel. In this paper we develop a weighting function to embed the watermark signal across the range of different spot colors. This weighting function normalizes visibility effect and signal robustness across a wide range of different spot colors. It normalizes the signal robustness level over the range of an individual spot color"s intensity levels. Further, it takes into account the sensitivity of the capturing device to the different spot colors.

  12. MASPROP- MASS PROPERTIES OF A RIGID STRUCTURE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program MASPROP was developed to rapidly calculate the mass properties of complex rigid structural systems. This program's basic premise is that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elementary structural shapes. Thirteen widely used basic structural shapes are available in this program. They are as follows: Discrete Mass, Cylinder, Truncated Cone, Torus, Beam (arbitrary cross section), Circular Rod (arbitrary cross section), Spherical Segment, Sphere, Hemisphere, Parallelepiped, Swept Trapezoidal Panel, Symmetric Trapezoidal Panels, and a Curved Rectangular Panel. MASPROP provides a designer with a simple technique that requires minimal input to calculate the mass properties of a complex rigid structure and should be useful in any situation where one needs to calculate the center of gravity and moments of inertia of a complex structure. Rigid body analysis is used to calculate mass properties. Mass properties are calculated about component axes that have been rotated to be parallel to the system coordinate axes. Then the system center of gravity is calculated and the mass properties are transferred to axes through the system center of gravity by using the parallel axis theorem. System weight, moments of inertia about the system origin, and the products of inertia about the system center of mass are calculated and printed. From the information about the system center of mass the principal axes of the system and the moments of inertia about them are calculated and printed. The only input required is simple geometric data describing the size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element. This program is written in FORTRAN for execution on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 62K (octal) of 60 bit words. The development of this program was completed in 1978.

  13. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies.

    PubMed

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-10-14

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales. PMID:26472363

  14. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-10-01

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales.

  15. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-10-14

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales.

  16. True Colors Shining Through

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image mosaic illustrates how scientists use the color calibration targets (upper left) located on both Mars Exploration Rovers to fine-tune the rovers' sense of color. In the center, spectra, or light signatures, acquired in the laboratory of the colored chips on the targets are shown as lines. Actual data from Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera is mapped on top of these lines as dots. The plot demonstrates that the observed colors of Mars match the colors of the chips, and thus approximate the red planet's true colors. This finding is further corroborated by the picture taken on Mars of the calibration target, which shows the colored chips as they would appear on Earth.

  17. Large-strain, rigid-to-rigid deformation of bistable electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhibin; Yuan, Wei; Brochu, Paul; Chen, Bin; Liu, Zhitian; Pei, Qibing

    2009-11-01

    Thermoplastic poly(tert-butyl acrylate) (PTBA) is reported as an electroactive polymer that is rigid at ambient conditions and turns into a dielectric elastomer above a transition temperature. In the rubbery state, a PTBA thin film can be electrically actuated to strains up to 335% in area expansion. The calculated actuation pressure is 3.2 MPa. The actuation is made bistable by cooling to below glass transition temperature. The PTBA represents the bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP) that can be actuated to various largely strained, rigid shapes. The application of the BSEP for refreshable Braille display, an active tactile display, is also demonstrated.

  18. The High Rigidity Spectrometer for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, T.

    2016-06-01

    The High Rigidity Spectrometer (HRS) is being developed to make optimum use of the fast rare-isotope beams that will be available at the Facility for Rare-Isotope Beams (FRIB) and will be the key experimental tool to study the most exotic, neutron-rich nuclei. The HRS will accommodate detector systems for charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays. This will enable coincidence measurements of reaction products that stem from a variety of reactions such as knockout, breakup, charge exchange or Coulomb excitation. First-order ion optical studies are under way and this paper will offer some details on the current design ideas.

  19. Edge shape and comfort of rigid lenses.

    PubMed

    La Hood, D

    1988-08-01

    One of the main factors determining the comfort of a rigid contact lens is the shape of the edge. The comfort of four different contact lens edge shapes was assessed with four unadapted subjects in a randomized masked trial. Lenses with well rounded anterior edge profiles were found to be significantly more comfortable than lenses with square anterior edges. There was no significant difference in subjective comfort between a rounded and square posterior edge profile. The results suggest that the interaction of the edge with the eyelid is more important in determining comfort than edge effects on the cornea, when lenses are fitted according to a corneal alignment philosophy. PMID:3177585

  20. A rigid porous filter and filtration method

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas, Straub L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter comprising a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulate from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulate. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area- to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  1. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  2. Dynamical rigidity of transcendental meromorphic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorulski, Bartłomiej; Urbański, Mariusz

    2012-08-01

    We prove the form of dynamical rigidity of transcendental meromorphic functions which asserts that if two tame transcendental meromorphic functions restricted to their Julia sets are topologically conjugate via a locally bi-Lipschitz homeomorphism, then they, treated as functions defined on the entire complex plane { C} , are topologically conjugate via an affine map, i.e. a map from { C} to { C} of the form z ↦ az + b. As an intermediate step we show that no tame transcendental meromorphic function is essentially affine.

  3. Rigid-flexible printed wiring boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydow, E. V.

    1993-05-01

    Rigid-flexible printed wiring board materials, fabrication processes, product requirements, and reliability were established. Considerable effort was spent testing plated-through holes, analyzing plated-through hole failure mechanisms, and then incorporating materials, processes, and product requirements to provide adequate control and reduce failures. The principal processes developed were tooling concepts, process sequence, lamination, drilling, plasma etchback, copper electroplating, and solder coating. Product requirements and reliability were established with thermal shock, thermal stress, innerlayer adhesion, and fold flexibility tests. Plated-through hole failure mechanisms were analyzed with thermal mechanical and finite element analyses.

  4. Rigid and flexible OLEDs: prototypes to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monz, Stefan; Wolf, Konrad; Möbius, Hildegard; Blankenbach, Karlheinz

    2011-03-01

    Major achievements of this research project on rigid and flexible OLEDs are: lifetime enhancement by advanced constant luminance (L) operation, integration into textiles and furthermore, the prototype production on flexible PET/ITO substrates of polymer OLEDs. Our OLEDs were manufactured with spin-coating assisted by ink-jet printing. We introduced constant luminance operation (instead of the usual constant current) which was implemented in order to extend the overall lifetime of OLEDs. A threefold lifetime improvement was achieved by maintaining 50% luminance using an advanced microcontroller-based lifetime(LT) model. Various approaches to textile integration and evaluation of environmental issues in clothes (e.g. moisture) were investigated.

  5. Relating color working memory and color perception.

    PubMed

    Allred, Sarah R; Flombaum, Jonathan I

    2014-11-01

    Color is the most frequently studied feature in visual working memory (VWM). Oddly, much of this work de-emphasizes perception, instead making simplifying assumptions about the inputs served to memory. We question these assumptions in light of perception research, and we identify important points of contact between perception and working memory in the case of color. Better characterization of its perceptual inputs will be crucial for elucidating the structure and function of VWM. PMID:25038028

  6. Crystalline-Amorphous-Crystalline Transformation in a Highly Brilliant Luminescent System with Trigonal-Planar Gold(I) Centers

    PubMed Central

    Igawa, Kosuke; Yoshinari, Nobuto; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Masaki; Konno, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescent compounds showing emission color changes in response to external stimuli have received considerable attention because of their wide range of applications. Here, we report the unique photoluminescence behavior of a digold(I) coordination system with trigonal-planar AuI centers, [Au2(dppm)3]2+ (dppm = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane). This system shows an extremely intense phosphorescence, with a quantum yield of >95% in the solid state. Both the emission color and thermal stability vary due to changing counter ions (Cl− vs. OTf−). Of particular note is the thermal crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transformation for the chloride salt, which is accompanied by drastic emission color changes. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffractions demonstrate that the two-step transformation is induced by the loss of water molecules of crystallization with the subsequent removal of a dppm ligand to form [Au2(dppm)2]2+, which is mechanically reverted back to [Au2(dppm)3]2+. PMID:27184365

  7. Crystalline-Amorphous-Crystalline Transformation in a Highly Brilliant Luminescent System with Trigonal-Planar Gold(I) Centers.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Kosuke; Yoshinari, Nobuto; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Masaki; Konno, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescent compounds showing emission color changes in response to external stimuli have received considerable attention because of their wide range of applications. Here, we report the unique photoluminescence behavior of a digold(I) coordination system with trigonal-planar Au(I) centers, [Au2(dppm)3](2+) (dppm = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane). This system shows an extremely intense phosphorescence, with a quantum yield of >95% in the solid state. Both the emission color and thermal stability vary due to changing counter ions (Cl(-) vs. OTf(-)). Of particular note is the thermal crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transformation for the chloride salt, which is accompanied by drastic emission color changes. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffractions demonstrate that the two-step transformation is induced by the loss of water molecules of crystallization with the subsequent removal of a dppm ligand to form [Au2(dppm)2](2+), which is mechanically reverted back to [Au2(dppm)3](2+). PMID:27184365

  8. Crystalline-Amorphous-Crystalline Transformation in a Highly Brilliant Luminescent System with Trigonal-Planar Gold(I) Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igawa, Kosuke; Yoshinari, Nobuto; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Masaki; Konno, Takumi

    2016-05-01

    Photoluminescent compounds showing emission color changes in response to external stimuli have received considerable attention because of their wide range of applications. Here, we report the unique photoluminescence behavior of a digold(I) coordination system with trigonal-planar AuI centers, [Au2(dppm)3]2+ (dppm = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane). This system shows an extremely intense phosphorescence, with a quantum yield of >95% in the solid state. Both the emission color and thermal stability vary due to changing counter ions (Cl‑ vs. OTf‑). Of particular note is the thermal crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transformation for the chloride salt, which is accompanied by drastic emission color changes. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffractions demonstrate that the two-step transformation is induced by the loss of water molecules of crystallization with the subsequent removal of a dppm ligand to form [Au2(dppm)2]2+, which is mechanically reverted back to [Au2(dppm)3]2+.

  9. ESR Measurement Of Crystallinity In Semicrystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Tsay, Fun-Dow

    1989-01-01

    Photogenerated free radicals decay at different rates in crystalline and amorphous phases. Degree of crystallinity in polymer having both crystalline and amorphous phases measured indirectly by technique based in part on electron-spin-resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Accuracy of crystallinity determined by new technique equals or exceeds similar determinations by differential scanning calorimetry, wide-angle x-ray scattering, or measurement of density.

  10. A gadolinium(iii) complex that shows room-temperature phosphorescence in the crystalline state.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Hidetaka; Kitagawa, Kazuhiro; Seo, Juncheol; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ogo, Seiji

    2016-07-19

    This paper presents a gadolinium(iii) complex that shows blue phosphorescence in the crystalline state at room temperature under air atmosphere; color of the crystals can be changed to pale-green from blue by doping of 1-naphthol. PMID:27221814

  11. Colors, colored overlays, and reading skills

    PubMed Central

    Uccula, Arcangelo; Enna, Mauro; Mulatti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we are concerned with the role of colors in reading written texts. It has been argued that colored overlays applied above written texts positively influence both reading fluency and reading speed. These effects would be particularly evident for those individuals affected by the so called Meares-Irlen syndrome, i.e., who experience eyestrain and/or visual distortions – e.g., color, shape, or movement illusions – while reading. This condition would interest the 12–14% of the general population and up to the 46% of the dyslexic population. Thus, colored overlays have been largely employed as a remedy for some aspects of the difficulties in reading experienced by dyslexic individuals, as fluency and speed. Despite the wide use of colored overlays, how they exert their effects has not been made clear yet. Also, according to some researchers, the results supporting the efficacy of colored overlays as a tool for helping readers are at least controversial. Furthermore, the very nature of the Meares-Irlen syndrome has been questioned. Here we provide a concise, critical review of the literature. PMID:25120525

  12. Color Reproduction with a Smartphone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoms, Lars-Jochen; Colicchia, Giuseppe; Girwidz, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    The world is full of colors. Most of the colors we see around us can be created on common digital displays simply by superposing light with three different wavelengths. However, no mixture of colors can produce a fully pure color identical to a spectral color. Using a smartphone, students can investigate the main features of primary color addition…

  13. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  14. Highly viscous liquid crystalline mixtures: the alternative to liquid crystalline elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibaev, Petr; Schlesier, Cristina; Newman, Leah; McDonald, Scott

    2012-02-01

    Novel highly viscous liquid crystalline materials based on mixtures of glass forming oligomers and low molar mass liquid crystals were recently designed [1, 2] and studied. In this communication the novel data are presented, the analysis and discussion are extended. It is shown that viscoelastic properties of the materials are due to the physical entanglements between cyclic oligomers and low molar mass mesogens, not due to the chemical crosslinks between molecular moities. However, the mechanical properties of these viscoelastic materials resemble those of chemically crosslinked elastomers (elasticity and reversibility of deformations). The properties of chiral and non-chiral materials loaded with ferromagnetic nanoparticles are discussed in detail. Cholesteric materials undergo gigantic color changes in the wide spectral range under the deformation that allows distant detection of deformation and determination the anisotropy of deformation and its type. The materials doped with laser dyes become mechanically tunable lasers themselves and emit coherent light while pumped by external laser. A simple model is suggested to account for the observed effects; physical properties of the novel materials and liquid crystalline elastomers are compared and discussed. [4pt] [1] P.V. Shibaev, C. Schlesier, R. Uhrlass, S. Woodward, E. Hanelt, Liquid Crystals, 37:12, 1601-1604 [0pt] [2] P.V. Shibaev, P. Riverra, D. Teter, S. Marsico, M. Sanzari, V. Ramakrishnan, E. Hanelt, Optics Express, 16, 2965 (2008)

  15. Quantification of rigidity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Behrooz; Esteki, Ali; Ebrahimi-Takamjani, Esmaeal; Shahidi, Golam-Ali; Khamseh, Fatemeh; Moinodin, Marzieh

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, a new method for quantification of rigidity in elbow joint of Parkinsonian patients is introduced. One of the most known syndromes in Parkinson's disease (PD) is increased passive stiffness in muscles, which leads to rigidity in joints. Clinical evaluation of stiffness in wrist and/or elbow, commonly used by clinicians, is based on Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating System (UPDRS). Subjective nature of this method may influence the accuracy and precision of evaluations. Hence, introducing an objective standard method based on quantitative measurements may be helpful. A test rig was designed and fabricated to measure range of motion and viscous and elastic components of passive stiffness in elbow joint. Measurements were done for 41 patients and 11 controls. Measures were extracted using Matlab-R14 software and statistic analyses were done by Spss-13. Relation between each computed measure and the level of illness were analyzed. Results showed a better correlation between viscous component of stiffness and UPDRS score compared to the elastic component. Results of this research may help to introduce a standard objective method for evaluation of PD. PMID:17909970

  16. Shear-induced rigidity in athermal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Bulbul; Sarkar, Sumantra

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we present a minimal model of rigidity and plastic failure in solids whose rigidity emerges directly as a result of applied stresses. Examples include shear-jamming (SJ) in dry grains and discontinuous shear thickening (DST) of dense non-Brownian suspensions. Both SJ and DST states are examples of non-equilibrium, self-assembled structures that have evolved to support the load that created them. These are strongly-interacting systems where the interactions arise primarily from the strict constraints of force and torque balance at the local and global scales. Our model is based on a reciprocal-space picture that strictly enforces the local and global constraints, and is, therefore, best suited to capturing the strong correlations in these non-equilibrium systems. The reciprocal space is a tiling whose edges represent contact forces, and whose faces represent grains. A separation of scale between force fluctuations and displacements of grains is used to represent the positional disorder as quenched randomness on variables in the reciprocal space. Comparing theoretical results to experiments, we will argue that the packing fraction controls the strength of the quenched disorder. Sumantra Sarkar et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 068301 (2013)

  17. A constitutive theory for rigid polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.; Krieg, R.D.; Schreyer, H.L.

    1992-12-31

    Rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam consists of interconnected polyurethane plates which form cells. When this foam is compressed, it exhibits an initial elastic regime which is followed by a plateau regime in which the load required to compress the foam remains nearly constant. In the plateau regime, cell walls are damaged and large permanent volume changes are generated. As additional load is applied, cell walls are compressed against neighboring cell walls, and the stiffness of the foam increases and approaches a value equal to that of solid polyurethane. When the foam is loaded in tension, the cell walls are damaged and the foam fractures. A constitutive theory for rigid polyurethane foam has been developed. This theory is based on a decomposition of the foam into two parts: a skeleton and a nonlinear elastic continuum in parallel. The skeleton accounts for the foam behavior in the elastic and plateau regimes and is described using a coupled plasticity with continuum damage theory. The nonlinear elastic continuum accounts for the lock-up of the foam due to internal gas pressure and cell wall interactions. This new constitutive theory has been implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes. Numerical simulations performed using the new constitutive theory are presented.

  18. Magnetic Control of Rigid Achiral Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U.; Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry; Kim, Minjun

    2013-11-01

    We report control of rigid achiral microswimmers in low Reynolds number environments. A rotating magnetic field was used to actuate the microswimmers wirelessly by rotating the microswimmers, which produces propulsion. Previous magnetically actuated microswimmers in bulk fluids have been designed with either flexibility or chiral geometry; we show that simpler geometries with neither flexibility nor chirality can produce propulsion. The microswimmer consists of three magnetic beads conjugated using avidin-biotin linkages into an arc formation. We designed a magnetic field generator consisting of electromagnetic coils arranged in an approximate Helmholtz configuration. A highspeed camera provided realtime imaging of the microswimmers' motion in a PDMS chamber. The rigidity of the microswimmer was characterized by tracking the position of the individual beads and calculating their relative distances. As a function of field strength and rotation frequency, we observed changes in the rotational axis of the microswimmers and the corresponding effects on their velocities. The achiral microswimmers exhibited active propulsion and were controllable in both speed and direction, which demonstrates the possibility for future biomedical applications such as drug delivery.

  19. The nature of colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Pos, Osvaldo

    2002-06-01

    Color is a visible aspect of objects and lights, and as such is an objective characteristic of our phenomenal world. Correspondingly also objects and lights are objective, although their subjectivity cannot be disregarded since they belong to our phenomenal world. The distinction between perception and sensation deals with colors seen either in complex displays or in isolation. Reality of colors is apparently challenged by virtual reality, while virtual reality is a good example of what colors are. It seems difficult to combine that aspect of reality colors have in our experience and the concept that colors represent something in the external environment: the distinction between stimulation and perceived object is crucial for understanding the relationships between phenomenal world and physical reality. A modern concept of isomorphism seems useful in interpreting the role of colors. The relationship between the psychological structure of colors and the physical stimulation is enlightened by the analysis of pseudocolors. The perceptual, subjective characteristics of colors go along with the subjectivity of scientific concepts. Colors, emotions, and concepts are all in some people's mind: none of them is independent of the subject mind. Nevertheless they can be communicated from person to person by an appropriate scientific terminology.

  20. Self-Consistent Interpretation of the 2D Structure of the Liquid Au82Si18 Surface: Bending Rigidity and the Debye-Waller Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechler, S.; Pershan, P. S.; Yahel, E.; Stoltz, S. E.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.; Sellner, S.

    2010-10-01

    The structural and mechanical properties of 2D crystalline surface phases that form at the surface of liquid eutectic Au82Si18 are studied using synchrotron x-ray scattering over a large temperature range. In the vicinity of the eutectic temperature the surface consists of a 2D atomic bilayer crystalline phase that transforms into a 2D monolayer crystalline phase during heating. The latter phase eventually melts into a liquidlike surface on further heating. We demonstrate that the short wavelength capillary wave fluctuations are suppressed due to the bending rigidity of 2D crystalline phases. The corresponding reduction in the Debye-Waller factor allows for measured reflectivity to be explained in terms of an electron density profile that is consistent with the 2D surface crystals.

  1. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  2. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  3. CRYSTALLINE BEAMS AT HIGH ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.; OKAMOTO, H.; YURI, Y.; SESSLER, A.; MACHIDA, S.

    2006-06-23

    Previously it was shown that by crystallizing each of the two counter-circulating beams, a much larger beam-beam tune shift can be tolerated during the beam-beam collisions; thus a higher luminosity can be reached for colliding beams [1]. On the other hand, crystalline beams can only be formed at energies below the transition energy ({gamma}{sub T}) of the accelerators [2]. In this paper, we investigate the formation of crystals in a high-{gamma}{sub T} lattice that also satisfies the maintenance condition for a crystalline beam [3].

  4. Colored Diffraction Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Klein, S.

    1996-03-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences.

  5. Color scene analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes a color scene analysis method for the object surfaces appearing in the noisy and imperfect images of natural scenes. It is developed based on the spatial and spectral grouping property of the human visual system. The uniformly colored surfaces are recognized by their monomodal 3-D color distributions and extracted in the spatial domain using the lightness and chromaticity network of the Munsell system. The textured image regions are identified by their irregular histogram distributions and isolated in the image plane using the Julesz connectivity detection rules. The method is applied to various color images corrupted by noise and degraded heavily by under-sampling and low color-contrast imperfections. The method was able to detect all the uniformly colored and heavily textured object areas in these images.

  6. Digital color representation

    DOEpatents

    White, James M.; Faber, Vance; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.

    1992-01-01

    An image population having a large number of attributes is processed to form a display population with a predetermined smaller number of attributes which represent the larger number of attributes. In a particular application, the color values in an image are compressed for storage in a discrete lookup table (LUT) where an 8-bit data signal is enabled to form a display of 24-bit color values. The LUT is formed in a sampling and averaging process from the image color values with no requirement to define discrete Voronoi regions for color compression. Image color values are assigned 8-bit pointers to their closest LUT value whereby data processing requires only the 8-bit pointer value to provide 24-bit color values from the LUT.

  7. Color image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrae, Kimberley A.; Ruck, Dennis W.; Rogers, Steven K.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1994-03-01

    The most difficult stage of automated target recognition is segmentation. Current segmentation problems include faces and tactical targets; previous efforts to segment these objects have used intensity and motion cues. This paper develops a color preprocessing scheme to be used with the other segmentation techniques. A neural network is trained to identify the color of a desired object, eliminating all but that color from the scene. Gabor correlations and 2D wavelet transformations will be performed on stationary images; and 3D wavelet transforms on multispectral data will incorporate color and motion detection into the machine visual system. The paper will demonstrate that color and motion cues can enhance a computer segmentation system. Results from segmenting faces both from the AFIT data base and from video taped television are presented; results from tactical targets such as tanks and airplanes are also given. Color preprocessing is shown to greatly improve the segmentation in most cases.

  8. Colored diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, M V; Klein, S

    1996-01-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:11607642

  9. Ghostscript color management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrhel, Michael J.; Johnston, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    This document introduces an updated color architecture that has been designed for Ghostscript. Ghostscript is a well known open source document rendering and conversion engine. Prior to this update, the handling of color in Ghostscript was based primarily upon PostScript color management. The new design results in a flexible ICC-based architecture that works well in Ghostscript's multi-threaded rendering environment.

  10. Origin of rigidity in marginal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng

    Granular materials are seemingly simple — they are a collection of particles large enough to be seen by eye, yet they exhibit a large range of totally different behaviors: liquid, gas and solid. We study various interesting aspects of granular materials: (1)First, analysis of experimental data yields a completely new route in which a granular fluid becomes a solid. These new states, know as shear jammed(SJ) granular matter, are an addition to the jamming framework proposed over 10 years ago. (2)We then focus on the emergence of shear-rigidity in granular materials which have no energetically preferred density modulations. In contrast to traditional solids, the emergence of mechanical rigidity in these marginal granular solids is a collective process, which is controlled solely by boundary forces, the constraints of force and torque balance, and the positivity of the contact forces. We develop a theoretical framework and show that these solids have internal patterns that are most naturally represented in the space of gauge fields that impose the constraints. Broken translational invariance in gauge space is a necessary condition for rigidity in granular solids. We use this theoretical framework to understand the stress fluctuations and the ability to resist deformations in SJ states. (3)We generalize the stress ensemble framework to a full tensor representation. In this framework, the angoricity is an intensive quantity, which is conjugate to the stress rather than the energy. We compare the predictions of this framework in SJ states and explain stress fluctuations in SJ states.(4)We also construct a dynamical framework to model deformation and stress avalanches in a slowly driven granular matter. The model assumes small patches of the driven granular material undergoing a stochastic evolution in a stress landscape, elastic deformations are equivalent to tilting the landscape while rearrangements correspond to hopping between different metastable states in this

  11. Fingers that change color

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions can cause fingers or toes to change color: Buerger disease Chilblains. Painful inflammation of small blood vessels. Cryoglobulinemia Frostbite Necrotizing vasculitis Peripheral artery disease ...

  12. The Colors of 'Endurance'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image shows visible mineral changes between the materials that make up the rim of the impact crater known as 'Endurance.' The image was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity using all 13 color filters. The cyan blue color denotes basalts, whereas the dark green color denotes a mixture of iron oxide and basaltic materials. Reds and yellows indicate dusty material containing sulfates. Scientists are very interested in exploring the interior and exterior material around the crater's rim for clues to the processes that formed the crater, as well as the rocks and textures that define the crater.

  13. Crater Floor in Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 5 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on November 18, 2003 during the Southern Summer season in Terra Cimmeria.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -23.7, Longitude 135.6 East (224.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  14. Color mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Steven J.

    1992-05-01

    In black-and-white printing the page image can be represented within a computer as an array of binary values indicating whether or not pixels should be inked. The Boolean operators of AND, OR, and EXCLUSIVE-OR are often used when adding new objects to the image array. For color printing the page may be represented as an array of continuous tone color values, and the generalization of these logic functions to gray-scale or full-color images is, in general, not defined or understood. When incrementally composing a page image new colors can replace old in an image buffer, or new colors and old can be combined according to some mixing function to form a composite color which is stored. This paper examines the properties of the Boolean operations and suggests full-color mixing functions which preserve the desired properties. These functions can be used to combine colored images, giving various transparency effects. The relationships between the mixing functions and physical models of color mixing are also discussed.

  15. Polarization encoded color camera.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Möller, Guðfríður; Di Caprio, Giuseppe

    2014-03-15

    Digital cameras would be colorblind if they did not have pixelated color filters integrated into their image sensors. Integration of conventional fixed filters, however, comes at the expense of an inability to modify the camera's spectral properties. Instead, we demonstrate a micropolarizer-based camera that can reconfigure its spectral response. Color is encoded into a linear polarization state by a chiral dispersive element and then read out in a single exposure. The polarization encoded color camera is capable of capturing three-color images at wavelengths spanning the visible to the near infrared. PMID:24690806

  16. Visual color image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Guoping; Schaefer, Gerald

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a color image processing method by combining modern signal processing technique with knowledge about the properties of the human color vision system. Color signals are processed differently according to their visual importance. The emphasis of the technique is on the preservation of total visual quality of the image and simultaneously taking into account computational efficiency. A specific color image enhancement technique, termed Hybrid Vector Median Filtering is presented. Computer simulations have been performed to demonstrate that the new approach is technically sound and results are comparable to or better than traditional methods.

  17. Elastic image registration via rigid object motion induced deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaofen; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Hirsch, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we estimate the deformations induced on soft tissues by the rigid independent movements of hard objects and create an admixture of rigid and elastic adaptive image registration transformations. By automatically segmenting and independently estimating the movement of rigid objects in 3D images, we can maintain rigidity in bones and hard tissues while appropriately deforming soft tissues. We tested our algorithms on 20 pairs of 3D MRI datasets pertaining to a kinematic study of the flexibility of the ankle complex of normal feet as well as ankles affected by abnormalities in foot architecture and ligament injuries. The results show that elastic image registration via rigid object-induced deformation outperforms purely rigid and purely nonrigid approaches.

  18. Color reproduction with a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoms, Lars-Jochen; Colicchia, Giuseppe; Girwidz, Raimund

    2013-10-01

    The world is full of colors. Most of the colors we see around us can be created on common digital displays simply by superposing light with three different wavelengths. However, no mixture of colors can produce a fully pure color identical to a spectral color. Using a smartphone, students can investigate the main features of primary color addition and understand how colors are made on digital displays.

  19. Rigidity Loss in Disordered Systems: Three Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Hagh, Varda F.; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, M. F.; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-04-01

    We reveal significant qualitative differences in the rigidity transition of three types of disordered network materials: randomly diluted spring networks, jammed sphere packings, and stress-relieved networks that are diluted using a protocol that avoids the appearance of floppy regions. The marginal state of jammed and stress-relieved networks are globally isostatic, while marginal randomly diluted networks show both overconstrained and underconstrained regions. When a single bond is added to or removed from these isostatic systems, jammed networks become globally overconstrained or floppy, whereas the effect on stress-relieved networks is more local and limited. These differences are also reflected in the linear elastic properties and point to the highly effective and unusual role of global self-organization in jammed sphere packings.

  20. Dynamic soil pressures on rigid vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.

    1992-12-01

    A critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and the associated forces induced by ground shaking on a rigid, straight, vertical wall retaining a semi-infinite, uniform viscoelastic layer of constant thickness. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. Simple approximate expressions for the responses of the system are developed, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the effects and relative importance of the various parameters involved. These solutions are then compared with those obtained by use of a simple model proposed previously by Scott, and the accuracy of this model is assessed. Finally, two versions of an alternative model are proposed which better approximate the action of the system. In the first, the properties of the model are defined by frequency-dependent parameters, whereas in the second, which is particularly helpful in analyses of transient response, they are represented by frequency-independent, constant parameters.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF A RIGID BARRIER FILTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan

    2001-11-06

    A mathematical model is formulated to describe the dynamics of a rigid barrier filter system. Complete with filtration, regeneration and particle re-deposition, this model provides sizing information for new filter systems and diagnostic information for operating filter systems. To turn this model into a practical and smart filter system predictive model, monitoring devices for variables such as real-time particle concentration and size distribution are currently under laboratory development. The program goal is to introduce a smart filter system to supervise its operation and to assure its system reliability. Primarily, a smart filter system will update operating information, sound up malfunction alarms, and provide self-activated measures such as adjusting the cleaning frequency, intensity and back-pulse duration.

  2. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A. H.; Flores-Johnson, E. A.; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  3. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    SciTech Connect

    CHU,TZE YAO; ERICKSON,KENNETH L.; HOBBS,MICHAEL L.

    1999-11-01

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer. The bond-breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The chemical structure of the foam was determined from the preparation techniques and ingredients used to synthesize the foam. Scale-up effects were investigated by simulating the response of an incident heat flux of 25 W/cm{sup 2} on a partially confined 8.8-cm diameter by 15-cm long right circular cylinder of foam which contained an encapsulated component. Predictions of center, midradial, and component temperatures, as well as regression of the foam surface, were in agreement with measurements using thermocouples and X-ray imaging.

  4. Coherent distributions for the rigid rotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorescu, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Coherent solutions of the classical Liouville equation for the rigid rotator are presented as positive phase-space distributions localized on the Lagrangian submanifolds of Hamilton-Jacobi theory. These solutions become Wigner-type quasiprobability distributions by a formal discretization of the left-invariant vector fields from their Fourier transform in angular momentum. The results are consistent with the usual quantization of the anisotropic rotator, but the expected value of the Hamiltonian contains a finite "zero point" energy term. It is shown that during the time when a quasiprobability distribution evolves according to the Liouville equation, the related quantum wave function should satisfy the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  5. Long waves induced motions to rigid spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongkun; Hong, Lianjin

    2015-05-01

    Responses of unconstrained and rigid spheroidal bodies subjected to long sound waves are analyzed by means of approaching hydrodynamic method. It is shown that in the low-frequency approximation the amplitude of translational velocity is completely determined by the density as well as the acoustic added mass which is equal to hydrodynamic one associated with the body. The inconformity of responses to sound waves in virtue of geometric asymmetry is also presented. In addition, rotational movement engendered by acoustic oblique incidence is discussed, and it represents as the modulated angular oscillation similar to the beat-frequency vibration. All these analyses on acoustically induced motions provide a theoretical evidence for developing spheroidal inertial vector receivers.

  6. Management of severe and rigid idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Luis Eduardo Carelli; de Barros, Alderico Girão Campos; de Azevedo, Gustavo Borges Laurindo

    2015-07-01

    Frequently, severe idiopathic scoliosis patients are first seen in a spine centre after years of deformity evolution, presenting with large curves, severe rib hump, shoulder and trunk imbalance and cardiorespiratory complications related to neglected scoliosis. Severe rigid idiopathic scoliosis has <25% of correction on bending films and major curve over 90°. Adequate mobilization of this type of deformity is necessary to achieve maximal correction, often requiring more extensive surgical intervention, with care taken to avoid clinical and neurological complications. Halo traction, internal temporary distraction, releases, osteotomies and apical vertebral resection are often used in combination to achieve optimal results. Indications must be tailored by surgeons considering resources, deformity characteristics and patient's profile. Vertebral resection procedures may have potential neurological and clinical risks and should be one of the last treatment options performed by experienced surgical team. Neuromonitoring is essential during these procedures. PMID:26033753

  7. Hybrid Flexible and Rigid Ceramic Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for closing out the edges of a flexible ceramic insulation member including inner and outer mold line covering layers. A rigid, segmented, ceramic frame is placed round the edges of the insulation member and exposed edges of the inner and outer mold line covering layers are affixed to the ceramic frame. In one embodiment wherein the covering layers comprise fabrics, the outer fabric is bonded to the top surface and to grooved portion of the side surface of the frame. In another embodiment wherein the outer cover layer comprises a metallic foil, clips on the edges of the frame are used to engage foil extensions. The ceramic frame is coated with a high emittance densifier coating.

  8. Supramolecular Synthons: Will Giant Rigid Superspheres Do?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, the concept of supramolecular synthons was applied to giant rigid superspheres based on pentaphosphaferrocene [CpRFe(η5-P5)] (R = Me, Et) and Cu(I) halides, which reach 2.1–3.0 nm in diameter. Two supramolecular synthons, σ–π and π–π, are discovered based on halogen···CpR and Cp*···Cp* specific interactions, respectively. The geometry of the synthons is reproducible in a series of crystal structures of various supramolecules. The σ–π synthon alone is realized more frequently for Br-containing superspheres. A combination of the σ–π and π–π synthons is more typical for Cl-containing supramolecules. Each supramolecule can bear up to nine synthons to give mostly 2D and 3D architectures. PMID:27081373

  9. Ductile crystalline-amorphous nanolaminates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V; Barbee, Troy W

    2007-07-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper-zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline-amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 +/- 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 +/- 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline-crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous-crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  10. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/ reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated.

  11. Lens Aging: Effects of Crystallins

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, K. Krishna; Santhoshkumar, Puttur

    2009-01-01

    The primary function of the eye lens is to focus light on the retina. The major proteins in the lens—a, b, and g-crystallins—are constantly subjected to age-related changes such as oxidation, deamidation, truncation, glycation, and methylation. Such age-related modifications are cumulative and affect crystallin structure and function. With time, the modified crystallins aggregate, causing the lens to increasingly scatter light on the retina instead of focusing light on it and causing the lens to lose its transparency gradually and become opaque. Age-related lens opacity, or cataract, is the major cause of blindness worldwide. We review deamidation, and glycation that occur in the lenses during aging keeping in mind the structural and functional changes that these modifications bring about in the proteins. In addition, we review proteolysis and discuss recent observations on how crystallin fragments generated in vivo, through their anti-chaperone activity may cause crystallin aggregation in aging lenses. We also review hyperbaric oxygen treatment induced guinea pig and ‘humanized’ ascorbate transporting mouse models as suitable options for studies on age-related changes in lens proteins. PMID:19463898

  12. Rigid bodies for metal forming analysis with NIKE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Maker, B.N.

    1995-01-25

    Perhaps the most common approximation in engineering is that, relative to its neighbors, a system component is structurally rigid. This paper presents a development of the rigid assumption for use in nonlinear, implicit finite element codes. In this method, computational economy is gained by condensing the size of the associated linear system of equations, eliminating the processing of rigid elements, and reducing the overall nonlinearity of the problem.

  13. Redox-Active Corannulene Buckybowls in a Crystalline Hybrid Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Fellows, W Brett; Rice, Allison M; Williams, Derek E; Dolgopolova, Ekaterina A; Vannucci, Aaron K; Pellechia, Perry J; Smith, Mark D; Krause, Jeanette A; Shustova, Natalia B

    2016-02-01

    A porous crystalline corannulene-containing scaffold, which combines the periodicity, dimensionality, and structural modularity of hybrid frameworks with the intrinsic properties of redox-active π-bowls, has been prepared. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, ab initio density functional theory computations, gas sorption analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry were employed to study the properties of the novel corannulene derivatives and the buckybowl-based hybrid materials. X-ray diffraction studies revealed the preservation of the corannulene bowl inside the prepared rigid matrix, which offers the unique opportunity to extend the scaffold dimensionality through the buckybowl curvature. Merging the inherent properties of hybrid frameworks with the intrinsic properties of π-bowls opens a new avenue for preparing redox-active materials and potentially improving charge transport in the scaffold. PMID:26694541

  14. Optical and topographic changes in water-responsive patterned cholesteric liquid crystalline polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpel, Jelle E.; Broer, Dirk J.; Bastiaansen, Cees W. M.; Schenning, Albert P. H. J.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we present patterned water-responsive coatings, which alter both their topological and optical properties. The polymer coatings are based on a hydrogen-bonded cholesteric liquid crystalline polymer network. A two-step photopolymerization procedure leads to a patterned coating with repeating liquid crystalline and isotropic areas. The cholesteric liquid crystalline areas reflect green light, whilst the isotropic areas are transparent for visible light. Treatment with alkaline solution results in a hygroscopic polymer salt coating. When placed in demineralized water, the polymer films swells, leading to an enhancement of the surface topography structure in which the liquid crystalline areas swell more. Moreover, the pitch of the helical organization in the cholesteric areas increases due to this swelling leading to a color change from green to red.

  15. Polar Cap Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on June 6, 2003 during the Southern Spring season near the South Polar Cap Edge.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -77.8, Longitude 195 East (165 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  16. Ambiguous fluidity and rigidity and diamonds that ooze!

    PubMed

    Meyer, G E; Dougherty, T J

    1990-01-01

    If white hemicircles rotate over the edges of a black diamond, there occurs an ambiguity of rigidity and motion. As the hemicircles obscure the vertices of the diamond, the figure transforms from a diamond to a rotating, nonrigid cross made of a tar-like fluid. When the corners reappear, the stimulus again becomes a rigid, solid diamond. Visibility of the vertices implies rigidity. If white squares are rotated, fluidity is not perceived. If the diamond has sawtooth edges and the hemicircles are rotated, no fluidity is perceived. Similarly, if illusory contours suggest the amodal completion of the vertices, rigidity is maintained. PMID:2096367

  17. Navigation lights color study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Jose G.; Alberg, Matthew T.

    2015-05-01

    The chromaticity of navigation lights are defined by areas on the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) 1931 chromaticity diagram. The corner coordinates for these areas are specified in the International Regulations for Prevention of Collisions at Sea, 1972 (72 COLREGS). The navigation light's color of white, red, green, and yellow are bounded by these areas. The chromaticity values specified by the COLREGS for navigation lights were intended for the human visual system (HVS). The HVS can determine the colors of these lights easily under various conditions. For digital color camera imaging systems the colors of these lights are dependent on the camera's color spectral sensitivity, settings, and color correction. At night the color of these lights are used to quickly determine the relative course of vessels. If these lights are incorrectly identified or there is a delay in identifying them this could be a potential safety of ship concern. Vessels that use camera imaging systems exclusively for sight, at night, need to detect, identify, and discriminate navigation lights for navigation and collision avoidance. The introduction of light emitting diode (LED) lights and lights with different spectral signatures have the potential to be imaged very differently with an RGB color filter array (CFA) color camera than with the human eye. It has been found that some green navigation lights' images appear blue verse green. This has an impact on vessels that use camera imaging systems exclusively for navigation. This paper will characterize color cameras ability to properly reproducing navigation lights' color and survey a set of navigation light to determine if they conform to the COLREGS.

  18. Sulfate Recognition by Persistent Crystalline Capsules with Rigidified Hydrogen Bonding Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Remy, Priscilla; Jiang, Deen; Bonnesen, Peter V; Moyer, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    electivity is a fundamental property of pervasive importance in chemistry and biology as reflected in phenomena as diverse as membrane transport, catalysis, sensing, adsorption, complexation, and crystallization. Although the key principles of complementarity and preorganization governing the binding interactions underlying such phenomena were delineated long ago, truly profound selectivity has proven elusive by design in part because synthetic molecular architectures are neither maximally complementary for binding target species nor sufficiently rigid. Even if a host molecule possesses a high degree of complementarity for a guest species, it all too often can distort its structure or even rearrange its conformation altogether to accommodate competing guests. One approach taken by researchers to overcome this challenge has been to devise extremely rigid molecules that bind species within complementary cavities. Although examples have been reported to demonstrate the principle, such cases are not generally of practical utility, because of inefficient synthesis and often poor kinetics. Alternatively, flexible building blocks can be employed, but then the challenge becomes one of locking them in place. Taking a cue from natural binding agents that derive their rigidity from a network of molecular interactions, especially hydrogen bonding, we present herein an example of a crystalline, self-assembled capsule that binds sulfate by a highly complementary array of rigidified hydrogen bonds (H-bonds). Although covalent or self-assembled capsules have been previously employed as anion hosts, they typically lack the strict combination of complementarity and rigidity required for high selectivity. Furthermore, the available structural data for these systems is either restricted to a limited number of anions of similar size and shape, or varies significantly from one anion to another, which hampers the rationalization of the observed selectivity. We have been employing

  19. Colorful Underwater Sea Creatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project wherein students created colorful underwater sea creatures. This project began with a discussion about underwater sea creatures and how they live. The first step was making the multi-colored tissue paper that would become sea creatures and seaweed. Once students had the shapes of their sea creatures…

  20. Equivalent Colorings with "Maple"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecil, David R.; Wang, Rongdong

    2005-01-01

    Many counting problems can be modeled as "colorings" and solved by considering symmetries and Polya's cycle index polynomial. This paper presents a "Maple 7" program link http://users.tamuk.edu/kfdrc00/ that, given Polya's cycle index polynomial, determines all possible associated colorings and their partitioning into equivalence classes. These…

  1. 3-D Color Wheels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The blending of information from an academic class with projects from art class can do nothing but strengthen the learning power of the student. Creating three-dimensional color wheels provides the perfect opportunity to combine basic geometry knowledge with color theory. In this article, the author describes how her seventh-grade painting…

  2. Color names, color categories, and color-cued visual search: Sometimes, color perception is not categorical

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela M; Lindsey, Delwin T; Guckes, Kevin M

    2011-01-01

    The relation between colors and their names is a classic case-study for investigating the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis that categorical perception is imposed on perception by language. Here, we investigate the Sapir-Whorf prediction that visual search for a green target presented among blue distractors (or vice versa) should be faster than search for a green target presented among distractors of a different color of green (or for a blue target among different blue distractors). Gilbert, Regier, Kay & Ivry (2006) reported that this Sapir-Whorf effect is restricted to the right visual field (RVF), because the major brain language centers are in the left cerebral hemisphere. We found no categorical effect at the Green|Blue color boundary, and no categorical effect restricted to the RVF. Scaling of perceived color differences by Maximum Likelihood Difference Scaling (MLDS) also showed no categorical effect, including no effect specific to the RVF. Two models fit the data: a color difference model based on MLDS and a standard opponent-colors model of color discrimination based on the spectral sensitivities of the cones. Neither of these models, nor any of our data, suggested categorical perception of colors at the Green|Blue boundary, in either visual field. PMID:21980188

  3. Peripheral Color Demo

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A set of structured demonstrations of the vividness of peripheral color vision is provided by arrays of multicolored disks scaled with eccentricity. These demonstrations are designed to correct the widespread misconception that peripheral color vision is weak or nonexistent. PMID:27551354

  4. Dynamic egg color mimicry.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Daniel; Šulc, Michal; Brennan, Patricia L R; Hauber, Mark E; Grim, Tomáš; Honza, Marcel

    2016-06-01

    Evolutionary hypotheses regarding the function of eggshell phenotypes, from solar protection through mimicry, have implicitly assumed that eggshell appearance remains static throughout the laying and incubation periods. However, recent research demonstrates that egg coloration changes over relatively short, biologically relevant timescales. Here, we provide the first evidence that such changes impact brood parasite-host eggshell color mimicry during the incubation stage. First, we use long-term data to establish how rapidly the Acrocephalus arundinaceus Linnaeus (great reed warbler) responded to natural parasitic eggs laid by the Cuculus canorus Linnaeus (common cuckoo). Most hosts rejected parasitic eggs just prior to clutch completion, but the host response period extended well into incubation (~10 days after clutch completion). Using reflectance spectrometry and visual modeling, we demonstrate that eggshell coloration in the great reed warbler and its brood parasite, the common cuckoo, changes rapidly, and the extent of eggshell color mimicry shifts dynamically over the host response period. Specifically, 4 days after being laid, the host should notice achromatic color changes to both cuckoo and warbler eggs, while chromatic color changes would be noticeable after 8 days. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the perceived match between host and cuckoo eggshell color worsened over the incubation period. These findings have important implications for parasite-host coevolution dynamics, because host egg discrimination may be aided by disparate temporal color changes in host and parasite eggs. PMID:27516874

  5. Language and Color Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Earl R.

    1977-01-01

    Suggests discussion and a writing assignment on the ways color terms have changed from Old English and Indo-European roots; urges a study of Black-White polarity that goes beyond racial connotations of those terms. Provides informative materials on many specific color terms. (TJ)

  6. Planar Flow Casting: Crystalline and Non-crystalline Ribbon Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, Joseph; Theisen, Eric; Steen, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Planar flow casting (PFC) is a single-stage continuous casting process used in the production of thin metallic sheets. Molten metal is ejected from a reservoir and forced through a small gap to freeze against a translating substrate. The process is typically `feed limited' which means that an imposed pressure drop determines the flow rate of metal to the solidification front, and thus the ultimate thickness of the solid sheet. Depending on the molten alloy, the substrate heat sink can provide sufficient cooling rates to produce a glassy (amorphous) metal. Otherwise, a crystalline solid is the result. In this talk, by relating ribbon thickness to residence time for both amorphous and crystalline products, we address the question: to what extent is processing `blind' to the solidification mechanism? Support from National Science Foundation (Awards 1400964 and 0966045); Metglas Inc.

  7. Quasiclassical trajectory studies of rigid rotor--rigid surface scattering. I. Flat surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.M.; Park, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    Rotationally inelastic transition intensities are calculated for a model N/sub 2/ rigid rotor--rigid flat surface at initial collision energies of 104 and 3800 meV and for many initial beam orientations. The interaction potential is a Morse function modulated by a term which depends on the rotor orientation angle. The calculations are based on the quasiclassical trajectory method and a distorted trajectory perturbation theory. At the low collision energy the rotational excitation is mediated by the attractive part of the potential and by the repulsive part at high energies. The collision dynamics is direct in both energy regimes, however, quite complicated in the former one. Rotational rainbows are clearly observed for the high energy collisions.

  8. Liquid Crystalline Properties of Amyloid Protein Fibers in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Jung, Jin-Mi

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the liquid crystalline features of two colloidal systems consisting of food protein amyloid fibrils in water, obtained by heat-denaturation and aggregation of β-lactoglobulin, a globular dairy protein. The resulting fibrils, have a monodisperse cross section of about 4 nm and two groups of polydisperse contour lengths: (i) fibrils 1-10 μm long, showing semiflexible polyeletrolyte-like behaviour and (ii) rigid rods 100-200 nm long. In both systems, the fibers are highly charged (+5 e/nm) and stable in water at low ionic strength (0.01 M) and low pH (pH 2). The physical properties of these systems are studied using a polymer physics approach and phase diagrams of these two systems are obtained by changing concentration and pH. Both systems exhibit rich phase behaviours. Interestingly, the experimentally measured isotropic-nematic phase transition was found to occur at concentrations more than one order of magnitude lower than what expected based on Onsager theory. Experimental results are revisited in terms of the Flory theory developed for rigid polymers in solvent of varying conditions.

  9. Color spaces for color-gamut mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John J.

    1999-10-01

    Before doing extensive color gamut experiments, we wanted to test the uniformity of CIE L*a*b*. This paper shows surprisingly large discrepancies between CIE L*a*b* and isotropic observation-based color spaces, such as Munsell: (1) L*a*b* chroma exaggerate yellows and underestimate blues. (2) The average discrepancy between L*a*b* and ideal is 27%. (3) Chips with identical L*a*b* hue angles are not the same color. L*a*b* introduces errors larger than many gamut mapping corrections. We have isotropic data in the Munsell Book. Computers allow 3D lookup tables to convert instantly any measured L*a*b* to interpolated Munsell Book values. We call this space ML, Ma, and Mb in honor of Munsell. LUTs have been developed for both LabtoMLab and MLabtoLab. With this zero-error, isotropic space we can return our attention to the original problem of color-gamut image processing.

  10. Image color reduction method for color-defective observers using a color palette composed of 20 particular colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a color enhancement method that uses a color palette especially designed for protan and deutan defects, commonly known as red-green color blindness. The proposed color reduction method is based on a simple color mapping. Complicated computation and image processing are not required by using the proposed method, and the method can replace protan and deutan confusion (p/d-confusion) colors with protan and deutan safe (p/d-safe) colors. Color palettes for protan and deutan defects proposed by previous studies are composed of few p/d-safe colors. Thus, the colors contained in these palettes are insufficient for replacing colors in photographs. Recently, Ito et al. proposed a p/dsafe color palette composed of 20 particular colors. The author demonstrated that their p/d-safe color palette could be applied to image color reduction in photographs as a means to replace p/d-confusion colors. This study describes the results of the proposed color reduction in photographs that include typical p/d-confusion colors, which can be replaced. After the reduction process is completed, color-defective observers can distinguish these confusion colors.

  11. Structure-property relationship in rigid-rigid polymer-toughened polypropylene blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guangxue

    1999-11-01

    The rigid-rigid polymer toughening concept is used to toughen and strengthen isotactic polypropylene (iPP). The morphology and mechanical behavior of iPP and Noryl poly(phenylene oxide)/polystyrene blends (iPP/Noryl) are studied. It is found that the fracture toughness of iPP can be significantly improved by adding rigid Noryl particles without causing any reduction in modulus. Large Noryl particles (about 10--15 mum) are formed if no compatibilizers are utilized in the iPP/Noryl blend. An addition of a small amount of styrene-ethylene-propylene (SEP) compatibilizer causes a significant reduction in Noryl particle size. A noticeable improvement in particle-matrix interfacial adhesion is also observed. Also, the fracture energies required for both crack initiation and crack propagation of iPP are greatly increased. The results show that phase morphology has a great effect on the mechanical performance of these blends. The toughening mechanisms in blends of iPP/Noryl are studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Crazing is found to be the dominant toughening mechanism in iPP/Noryl blend. A detailed investigation of fracture mechanisms reveals that Noryl particles help trigger and stabilize massive crazes in the iPP matrix. Crazing and shear banding mechanisms are found to operate sequentially in iPP/Noryl/SEP blends. As a result, the toughness of PP is significantly improved.

  12. Optical Behaviors of Cholesteric Liquid-Crystalline Polyester Composites with Various Chiral Photochromic Dopants.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chih-Chieh; Liu, Jui-Hsiang

    2015-12-15

    New developments in the field of chiral nematic liquid crystals, such as color displays, are now being widely proposed. This article describes the tunable incident reflection band based on composite materials of low-molecular-weight chiroptical dopants and polymeric networks. These materials have advantages including easily manageable color according to a change in the helical pitch of the cholesteric liquid crystal upon exposure to light. A series of novel chiral dopants of isosorbide derivatives containing photochromic groups and three new main-chain liquid crystalline polyesters were synthesized and identified using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and elemental analyses. The phase-transition temperatures and the liquid-crystal phase determination of the synthesized polymers were estimated using DSC, WAXD, and POM analyses. The influence of the dopant concentrations and the solubility in a liquid crystalline polymer blend were also studied. The reflection band of the cholesteric liquid crystalline composites could be adjusted and tuned with a wide range of color variation across the entire visible region. A real image recording of the chiral photochromic liquid crystalline polymer blend was achieved by exposing it to UV light through a mask. PMID:26636344

  13. The elusive thermotropic biaxial nematic phase in rigid bent-core molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Primak, Andrew; Dingemans, Theo J.; Samulski, Edward T.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2003-08-01

    The biaxial nematic liquid crystalline phase was predicted several decades ago. Several vigorous attempts to find it in various systems resulted in mis-identifications. The results of X-ray diffraction and optical texture studies of the phases exhibited by rigid bent-core molecules derived from 2,5-bis-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole reveal that the biaxial nematic phase is formed by three compounds of this type. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the nematic phase of these compounds has the achiral symmetry D2h, in which the overall long axes of the molecules are oriented parallel to each other to define the major axis of the biaxial phase. The apex of the bent-cores de- fines the minor axis of this phase along which the planes containing the bent-cores of neighboring molecules are oriented parallel to each other.

  14. Perceptual, cognitive, and personality rigidity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Santos, Mirella; Cao, Bo; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Norton, Daniel J; Neargarder, Sandy; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with motor and non-motor rigidity symptoms (e.g., cognitive and personality). The question is raised as to whether rigidity in PD also extends to perception, and if so, whether perceptual, cognitive, and personality rigidities are correlated. Bistable stimuli were presented to 28 non-demented individuals with PD and 26 normal control adults (NC). Necker cube perception and binocular rivalry were examined during passive viewing, and the Necker cube was additionally used for two volitional-control conditions: Hold one percept in front, and Switch between the two percepts. Relative to passive viewing, PD were significantly less able than NC to reduce dominance durations in the Switch condition, indicating perceptual rigidity. Tests of cognitive flexibility and a personality questionnaire were administered to explore the association with perceptual rigidity. Cognitive flexibility was not correlated with perceptual rigidity for either group. Personality (novelty seeking) correlated with dominance durations on Necker passive viewing for PD but not NC. The results indicate the presence in mild-moderate PD of perceptual rigidity and suggest shared neural substrates with novelty seeking, but functional divergence from those supporting cognitive flexibility. The possibility is raised that perceptual rigidity may be a harbinger of cognitive inflexibility later in the disease course. PMID:25640973

  15. Decision-Making in Old Age: Cautiousness and Rigidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Richard E.; Hutchison, Sam L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Elderly participants (N=64) were classified as to high or low rigidity and completed the Choice Dilemmas Questionnaire. Previous findings were supported in that subjects preferred not to make decisions. Subjects were more cautious in making decisions applying to younger individuals and rigidity was related to risky decisions. (RC)

  16. Lift on Flexible and Rigid Cambered Wings at High Incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anya; Mancini, Peter; Granlund, Kenneth; Ol, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The effects of camber and camber change due to elastic deflection of a membrane wing were investigated for wings in rectilinear translation with parameter variations in wing incidence and acceleration. Direct force and moment measurements were performed on a rigid flat plate wing, rigid cambered wings, and a membrane wing. Features in the force histories were further examined via flow visualization by planar laser illumination of fluorescent dye. Below 10 degrees of incidence, Wagner's approximation accurately predicts the time-evolution of lift for the rigid wings. At higher incidence, flow separation results in force transients, and the effect of wing camber is no longer additive. Both the rigid flat plate and rigid cambered wings reach peak lift at a 35 degree angle of attack, whereas the flexible wing experiences stall delay and reaches peak lift at 50 degrees. Due to the aeroelasticity of the flexible membrane, flow over the suction surface remains attached for much higher incidence angles than for the rigid wings. For incidence angles less than 30 degrees, the peak lift of the flexible wing is lower than that of its rigid counterparts. Beyond 30 degrees, the flexible wing experiences an aeroelastically induced stall delay that allows lift to exceed the rigid analogs. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory under the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) program.

  17. Perceptual, Cognitive, and Personality Rigidity in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Santos, Mirella; Cao, Bo; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Norton, Daniel J.; Neargarder, Sandy; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with motor and non-motor rigidity symptoms (e.g., cognitive and personality). The question is raised as to whether rigidity in PD also extends to perception, and if so, whether perceptual, cognitive, and personality rigidities are correlated. Bistable stimuli were presented to 28 non-demented individuals with PD and 26 normal control adults (NC). Necker cube perception and binocular rivalry were examined during passive viewing, and the Necker cube was additionally used for two volitional-control conditions: Hold one percept in front, and Switch between the two percepts. Relative to passive viewing, PD were significantly less able than NC to reduce dominance durations in the Switch condition, indicating perceptual rigidity. Tests of cognitive flexibility and a personality questionnaire were administered to explore the association with perceptual rigidity. Cognitive flexibility was not correlated with perceptual rigidity for either group. Personality (novelty seeking) correlated with dominance durations on Necker passive viewing for PD but not NC. The results indicate the presence in mild-moderate PD of perceptual rigidity and suggest shared neural substrates with novelty seeking, but functional divergence from those supporting cognitive flexibility. The possibility is raised that perceptual rigidity may be a harbinger of cognitive inflexibility later in the disease course. PMID:25640973

  18. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant....

  19. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  20. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  1. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  2. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  3. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  4. Rigid Body Motion in Stereo 3D Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the difficulties experienced by first-grade students studying rigid body motion at Sofia University. Most quantities describing the rigid body are in relations that the students find hard to visualize and understand. They also lose the notion of cause-result relations between vector quantities, such as the relation between…

  5. Interference Colors in Thin Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, H. L.

    1979-01-01

    Explains interference colors in thin films as being due to the removal, or considerable reduction, of a certain color by destructive inteference that results in the complementary color being seen. (GA)

  6. Soliton structure in crystalline acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilbeck, J. C.; Lomdahl, P. S.; Scott, A. C.

    1984-10-01

    The theory of self-trapping of amide I vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide is studied in detail. A spectrum of stationary, self-trapped (soliton) solutions is determined and tested for dynamic stability. Only those solutions for which the amide I energy is concentrated near a single molecule were found to be stable. Exciton modes were found to be unstable to decay into solitons.

  7. Soliton structure in crystalline acetanilide

    SciTech Connect

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-10-15

    The theory of self-trapping of amide I vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide is studied in detail. A spectrum of stationary, self-trapped (soliton) solutions is determined and tested for dynamic stability. Only those solutions for which the amide I energy is concentrated near a single molecule were found to be stable. Exciton modes were found to be unstable to decay into solitons.

  8. The crystalline sponge method updated

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Manabu; Khutia, Anupam; Xing, Hongzhu; Inokuma, Yasuhide; Fujita, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline sponges are porous metal complexes that can absorb and orient common organic molecules in their pores and make them observable by conventional X-ray structure analysis (crystalline sponge method). In this study, all of the steps in the crystalline sponge method, including sponge crystal preparation, pore–solvent exchange, guest soaking, data collection and crystallographic analysis, are carefully examined and thoroughly optimized to provide reliable and meaningful chemical information as chemical crystallography. Major improvements in the method have been made in the guest-soaking and data-collection steps. In the soaking step, obtaining a high site occupancy of the guest is particularly important, and dominant parameters for guest soaking (e.g. temperature, time, concentration, solvents) therefore have to be optimized for every sample compound. When standard conditions do not work, a high-throughput method is useful for efficiently optimizing the soaking conditions. The X-ray experiments are also carefully re-examined. Significant improvement of the guest data quality is achieved by complete data collection at high angle regions. The appropriate disorder treatment of the most flexible ZnI2 portions of the host framework and refinement of the solvents filling the remaining void are also particularly important for obtaining better data quality. A benchmark test for the crystalline sponge method toward an achiral molecule is proposed with a guaiazulene guest, in which the guest structure (with ∼ 100% site occupancy) is refined without applying any restraints or constraints. The obtained data quality with R int = 0.0279 and R 1 = 0.0379 is comparable with that of current conventional crystallographic analysis for small molecules. Another benchmark test for this method toward a chiral molecule is also proposed with a santonin guest. The crystallographic data obtained [R int = 0.0421, R 1 = 0.0312, Flack (Parsons) = −0.0071 (11)] represents the

  9. EELS from organic crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydson, R.; Eddleston, M. D.; Jones, W.; Seabourne, C. R.; Hondow, N.

    2014-06-01

    We report the use of the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for providing light element chemical composition information from organic, crystalline pharmaceutical materials including theophylline and paracetamol and discuss how this type of data can complement transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and electron diffraction when investigating polymorphism. We also discuss the potential for the extraction of bonding information using electron loss near-edge structure (ELNES).

  10. The crystalline sponge method updated.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Manabu; Khutia, Anupam; Xing, Hongzhu; Inokuma, Yasuhide; Fujita, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Crystalline sponges are porous metal complexes that can absorb and orient common organic molecules in their pores and make them observable by conventional X-ray structure analysis (crystalline sponge method). In this study, all of the steps in the crystalline sponge method, including sponge crystal preparation, pore-solvent exchange, guest soaking, data collection and crystallographic analysis, are carefully examined and thoroughly optimized to provide reliable and meaningful chemical information as chemical crystallography. Major improvements in the method have been made in the guest-soaking and data-collection steps. In the soaking step, obtaining a high site occupancy of the guest is particularly important, and dominant parameters for guest soaking (e.g. temperature, time, concentration, solvents) therefore have to be optimized for every sample compound. When standard conditions do not work, a high-throughput method is useful for efficiently optimizing the soaking conditions. The X-ray experiments are also carefully re-examined. Significant improvement of the guest data quality is achieved by complete data collection at high angle regions. The appropriate disorder treatment of the most flexible ZnI2 portions of the host framework and refinement of the solvents filling the remaining void are also particularly important for obtaining better data quality. A benchmark test for the crystalline sponge method toward an achiral molecule is proposed with a guaiazulene guest, in which the guest structure (with ∼ 100% site occupancy) is refined without applying any restraints or constraints. The obtained data quality with R int = 0.0279 and R 1 = 0.0379 is comparable with that of current conventional crystallographic analysis for small molecules. Another benchmark test for this method toward a chiral molecule is also proposed with a santonin guest. The crystallographic data obtained [R int = 0.0421, R 1 = 0.0312, Flack (Parsons) = -0.0071 (11)] represents the

  11. Iridescence color of shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan

    2002-06-01

    Some shells from both salt water and fresh water show the phenomenon of iridescence color. Pearls and mother-of-pearls also display this phenomenon. In the past, the cause of the iridescence color was attributed to interference. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to study the surface structure of the shell of the mollusk Pinctada Margaritifera. There is a groove structure of reflection grating on the surface area in where the iridescence color appears. An optic experiment with a laser obtained a diffraction pattern produced by the reflection grating structure of the shell. The study led to a conclusion that the iridescence color of the shell is caused by diffraction. A SEM image of the shells of an abalone Haliotis Rufescens (red abalone) showed a statistically regularly arranged tile structure that serves as a two-dimensional grating. This grating structure causes the iridescence color of the shell of red abalone. The dominant color of the iridescence of shells is caused by the uneven grating efficiency in the visible wavelength range when a shell functions as a reflection grating. The wavelength of the dominant color should be at or near the wavelength of the maximum efficiency of the grating.

  12. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells. PMID:23088559

  13. Viewing angle compensation of various LCD modes by using a liquid crystalline polymer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Nishimura, Suzushi

    2013-09-01

    The authors have developed liquid crystalline retardation films to improve certain aspects of LCD image quality such as viewing angle performance and coloration. We have successfully created several types of optical retardation films using a rod-like liquid crystalline polymer. The resulting liquid crystalline polymer films have several advantages over conventional uni- or biaxially stretched retardation films. Precisely controlled structures such as twisted nematic, homogeneous nematic, hybrid nematic and homeotropic structures can provide ideal compensation of various LCD types, such as STN, TN, ECB, VA and IPS-LCDs. Twisted nematic film effectively prevents coloration of STN-LCDs, which is a critical flaw affecting color representation. Short pitch cholesteric film, which utilizes said rod-like liquid crystalline polymer and is the optical equivalent of a negative C-plate, can expand the viewing angle of VA-LCDs. Hybrid nematic film is quite unique in that the film functions not only as a wave plate but also as a viewing angle compensator for TN and ECB-LCDs. Homeotropic film, which acts as a positive-C plate, greatly improves the viewing angle performance of IPS and CPVA-LCDs. Our homeotropically aligned liquid crystalline film, called "NV film", is the world's thinnest retardation film. The thickness of the liquid crystalline layer is a mere 1 micrometer. Homeotropic film can be used to expand the viewing angle not only of LCDs but also OLED displays. And NV film, when used in in combination with a quarter wavelength plate, can expand the viewing angles of the circular polarizers used to prevent reflection in OLED displays.

  14. Variation in fracture zone rigidity by dynamic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, A. A.; Khazins, V. M.

    2013-03-01

    The coefficient of normal rigidity of different-order fault zones was evaluated from seismic data. The crust tectonic faults were shown to be dynamic systems and nonstatic. Specifically, this is manifested in the variability of their rigidity with time. The value of the rigidity of fault zones varies in time with periods of 13-15 days, 27-32 days, and around 1 year. Here, the coefficient of normal rigidity of different-order fault zones can vary by 1.3 (semimonthly variations) 1.5 (monthly variations), and 2.5 times (annual variations), respectively. These variations are most likely governed by the rate and intensity of the transformation of matter of fault zones and, as a consequence, the variations in their mechanical properties under tidal conditions. Dynamic effects like seismoexplosive waves lead to a reduction in the rigidity of fault zones by 5-50% depending on the amplitude of the compression wave.

  15. Rigidity-Preserving Team Partitions in Multiagent Networks.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Daniela; Williams, Ryan K; Gasparri, Andrea; Ulivi, Giovanni; Sukhatme, Gaurav S

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the strong influence network rigidity has on collaborative systems, in this paper, we consider the problem of partitioning a multiagent network into two sub-teams, a bipartition, such that the resulting sub-teams are topologically rigid. In this direction, we determine the existence conditions for rigidity-preserving bipartitions, and provide an iterative algorithm that identifies such partitions in polynomial time. In particular, the relationship between rigid graph partitions and the previously identified Z-link edge structure is given, yielding a feasible direction for graph search. Adapting a supergraph search mechanism, we then detail a methodology for discerning graphs cuts that represent valid rigid bipartitions. Next, we extend our methods to a decentralized context by exploiting leader election and an improved graph search to evaluate feasible cuts using only local agent-to-agent communication. Finally, full algorithm details and pseudocode are provided, together with simulation results that verify correctness and demonstrate complexity. PMID:25561600

  16. Theoretical aspects of color vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolbarsht, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    The three color receptors of Young-Helmholtz and the opponent colors type of information processing postulated by Hering are both present in the human visual system. This mixture accounts for both the phenomena of color matching or hue discrimination and such perceptual qualities of color as the division of the spectrum into color bands. The functioning of the cells in the visual system, especially within the retina, and the relation of this function to color perception are discussed.

  17. Inflatable Tubular Structures Rigidized with Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.; Schnell, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Inflatable tubular structures that have annular cross sections rigidized with foams, and the means of erecting such structures in the field, are undergoing development. Although the development effort has focused on lightweight structural booms to be transported in compact form and deployed in outer space, the principles of design and fabrication are also potentially applicable to terrestrial structures, including components of ultralightweight aircraft, lightweight storage buildings and shelters, lightweight insulation, and sales displays. The use of foams to deploy and harden inflatable structures was first proposed as early as the 1960s, and has been investigated in recent years by NASA, the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, industry, and academia. In cases of deployable booms, most of the investigation in recent years has focused on solid cross sections, because they can be constructed relatively easily. However, solid-section foam-filled booms can be much too heavy for some applications. In contrast, booms with annular cross sections according to the present innovation can be tailored to obtain desired combinations of stiffness and weight through choice of diameters, wall thicknesses, and foam densities. By far the most compelling advantage afforded by this innovation is the possibility of drastically reducing weights while retaining or increasing the stiffnesses, relative to comparable booms that have solid foamfilled cross sections. A typical boom according to this innovation includes inner and outer polyimide film sleeves to contain foam that is injected between them during deployment.

  18. Rigid multipodal platforms for metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Valášek, Michal; Lindner, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Summary In this review the recent progress in molecular platforms that form rigid and well-defined contact to a metal surface are discussed. Most of the presented examples have at least three anchoring units in order to control the spatial arrangement of the protruding molecular subunit. Another interesting feature is the lateral orientation of these foot structures which, depending on the particular application, is equally important as the spatial arrangement of the molecules. The numerous approaches towards assembling and organizing functional molecules into specific architectures on metal substrates are reviewed here. Particular attention is paid to variations of both, the core structures and the anchoring groups. Furthermore, the analytical methods enabling the investigation of individual molecules as well as monomolecular layers of ordered platform structures are summarized. The presented multipodal platforms bearing several anchoring groups form considerably more stable molecule–metal contacts than corresponding monopodal analogues and exhibit an enlarged separation of the functional molecules due to the increased footprint, as well as restrict tilting of the functional termini with respect to the metal surface. These platforms are thus ideally suited to tune important properties of the molecule–metal interface. On a single-molecule level, several of these platforms enable the control over the arrangement of the protruding rod-type molecular structures (e.g., molecular wires, switches, rotors, sensors) with respect to the surface of the substrate. PMID:27335731

  19. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schutzius, Thomas M; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces. PMID:26536959

  20. Rigid body cable for virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Servin, Martin; Lacoursière, Claude

    2008-01-01

    The present paper addresses real-time simulation of cables for virtual environments. A faithful physical model based on constrained rigid bodies is introduced and discretized. The performance and stability of the numerical method are analyzed in details and found to meet the requirements of interactive heavy hoisting simulations. The physical model is well behaved in the limit of infinite stiffness as well as in the elastic regime, and the tuning parameters correspond directly to conventional material constants. The integration scheme mixes the well known Störmer-Verlet method for the dynamics equations with the linearly implicit Euler method for the constraint equations and enables physical constraint relaxation and stabilization terms. The technique is shown to have superior numerical stability properties in comparison with either chain link systems, or spring and damper models. Experimental results are presented to show that the method results in stable, real-time simulations. Stability persists for moderately large fixed integration step of Delta t = 1/60 s, with hoisting loads of up to 10(5) times heavier than the elements of the cable. Further numerical experiments validating the physical model are also presented. PMID:18467754

  1. Sextic potential for \\gamma -rigid prolate nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buganu, P.; Budaca, R.

    2015-10-01

    The equation of the Bohr-Mottelson Hamiltonian with a sextic oscillator potential is solved for γ -rigid prolate nuclei. The associated shape phase space is reduced to three variables which are exactly separated. The angular equation has the spherical harmonic functions as solutions, while the β equation is converted to the quasi-exactly solvable case of the sextic oscillator potential with a centrifugal barrier. The energies and the corresponding wave functions are given in closed form and depend, up to a scaling factor, on a single parameter. The {0}+ and {2}+ states are exactly determined, having an important role in the assignment of some ambiguous states for the experimental β bands. Due to the special properties of the sextic potential, the model can simulate, by varying the free parameter, a shape phase transition from a harmonic to an anharmonic prolate β -soft rotor crossing through a critical point. Numerical applications are performed for 39 nuclei: {}98-108Ru, {}{100,102}Mo, {}116-130Xe, {}{132,134}Ce, {}146-150Nd, {}{150,152}Sm, {}{152,154}Gd, {}{154,156}Dy, 172Os, {}180-196Pt, 190Hg and 222Ra. The best candidates for the critical point are found to be 104Ru and {}{120,126}Xe, followed closely by 128Xe, 172Os, 196Pt and 148Nd.

  2. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Mohammad K; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M

    2014-10-14

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  3. Dynamic soil pressures on rigid cylindrical vaults

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H )

    1993-02-01

    A critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and the associated forces induced by ground shaking on an upright, circular, rigid vault that is embedded in a uniform viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and infinite extent in the horizontal plane. Both the vault and the stratum are presumed to be supported on a non- deformable base undergoing a space-invariant, uniform horizontal motion. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. Simple approximate expressions for the responses of the system are formulated, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the underlying response mechanisms and the effects and relative importance of the various parameters involved. The parameters investigated include the height to radius ratio for the vault, the conditions at the vault-medium interface, and the material properties of the stratum. In addition to valuable insights into the response of the particular system being examined, the results presented provide a conceptual framework for the analysis and interpretation of solutions for more involved systems as well.

  4. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutzius, Thomas M.; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces.

  5. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  6. Flow past 2-D Hemispherical Rigid Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel

    2013-11-01

    The flow past a 2-dimensional rigid hemispherical shape is investigated using PIV. Flow field measurements and images were generated with the use of a Thermoflow® apparatus. Results of this study are compared to prior work (APS DFD 2012 Session E9.00003) which employed CFD to investigate the flow in the near wake of hemispherical parachutes. The various sized gaps/open areas were positioned at distinct locations. The work presented here is part of a larger research project to investigate flow fields in deceleration devices and parachutes. Understanding the pitch-stability of parachutes is essential for accurate design and implementation of these deceleration devices but they present a difficult system to analyze. The flexibility of the parachute fabric results in large variations in the parachute geometry leading to complex fluid-structure interactions. Such flow, combined with flow through gaps and open areas, has been postulated to shed alternating vortices causing pitching/oscillations of the canopy. The results presented provide some insight into which geometric features affect vortex shedding and may enable the redesign of the baseline parachute to minimize instabilities.

  7. Rigid multipodal platforms for metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valášek, Michal; Lindner, Marcin; Mayor, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In this review the recent progress in molecular platforms that form rigid and well-defined contact to a metal surface are discussed. Most of the presented examples have at least three anchoring units in order to control the spatial arrangement of the protruding molecular subunit. Another interesting feature is the lateral orientation of these foot structures which, depending on the particular application, is equally important as the spatial arrangement of the molecules. The numerous approaches towards assembling and organizing functional molecules into specific architectures on metal substrates are reviewed here. Particular attention is paid to variations of both, the core structures and the anchoring groups. Furthermore, the analytical methods enabling the investigation of individual molecules as well as monomolecular layers of ordered platform structures are summarized. The presented multipodal platforms bearing several anchoring groups form considerably more stable molecule-metal contacts than corresponding monopodal analogues and exhibit an enlarged separation of the functional molecules due to the increased footprint, as well as restrict tilting of the functional termini with respect to the metal surface. These platforms are thus ideally suited to tune important properties of the molecule-metal interface. On a single-molecule level, several of these platforms enable the control over the arrangement of the protruding rod-type molecular structures (e.g., molecular wires, switches, rotors, sensors) with respect to the surface of the substrate. PMID:27335731

  8. Colors and contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Foti, Caterina; Romita, Paolo; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of skin diseases relies on several clinical signs, among which color is of paramount importance. In this review, we consider certain clinical presentations of both eczematous and noneczematous contact dermatitis in which color plays a peculiar role orientating toward the right diagnosis. The conditions that will be discussed include specific clinical-morphologic subtypes of eczematous contact dermatitis, primary melanocytic, and nonmelanocytic contact hyperchromia, black dermographism, contact chemical leukoderma, and others. Based on the physical, chemical, and biologic factors underlying a healthy skin color, the various skin shades drawing a disease picture are thoroughly debated, stressing their etiopathogenic origins and histopathologic aspects. PMID:25000236

  9. Coloring random graphs.

    PubMed

    Mulet, R; Pagnani, A; Weigt, M; Zecchina, R

    2002-12-23

    We study the graph coloring problem over random graphs of finite average connectivity c. Given a number q of available colors, we find that graphs with low connectivity admit almost always a proper coloring, whereas graphs with high connectivity are uncolorable. Depending on q, we find the precise value of the critical average connectivity c(q). Moreover, we show that below c(q) there exists a clustering phase c in [c(d),c(q)] in which ground states spontaneously divide into an exponential number of clusters and where the proliferation of metastable states is responsible for the onset of complexity in local search algorithms. PMID:12484862

  10. Color universal design: analysis of color category dependency on color vision type (3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Natsuki; Ichihara, Yasuyo G.; Ikeda, Tomohiro; Kamachi, Miyuki G.; Ito, Kei

    2012-01-01

    We report on the results of a study investigating the color perception characteristics of people with red-green color confusion. We believe that this is an important step towards achieving Color Universal Design. In Japan, approximately 5% of men and 0.2% of women have red-green confusion. The percentage for men is higher in Europe and the United States; up to 8% in some countries. Red-green confusion involves a perception of colors different from normal color vision. Colors are used as a means of disseminating clear information to people; however, it may be difficult to convey the correct information to people who have red-green confusion. Consequently, colors should be chosen that minimize accidents and that promote more effective communication. In a previous survey, we investigated color categories common to each color vision type, trichromat (C-type color vision), protan (P-type color vision) and deuteran (D-type color vision). In the present study, first, we conducted experiments in order to verify a previous survey of C-type color vision and P-type color vision. Next, we investigated color difference levels within "CIE 1976 L*a*b*" (the CIELAB uniform color space), where neither C-type nor P-type color vision causes accidents under certain conditions (rain maps/contour line levels and graph color legend levels). As a result, we propose a common chromaticity of colors that the two color vision types are able to categorize by means of color names common to C-type color vision. We also offer a proposal to explain perception characteristics of color differences with normal color vision and red-green confusion using the CIELAB uniform color space. This report is a follow-up to SPIE-IS & T / Vol. 7528 7528051-8 and SPIE-IS & T /vol. 7866 78660J-1-8.

  11. Smart align -- A new tool for robust non-rigid registration of scanning microscope data

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Lewys; Yang, Hao; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Van Aert, Sandra; Browning, Nigel D.; Castell, Martin R.; Nellist, Peter D.

    2015-07-10

    Many microscopic investigations of materials may benefit from the recording of multiple successive images. This can include techniques common to several types of microscopy such as frame averaging to improve signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) or time series to study dynamic processes or more specific applications. In the scanning transmission electron microscope, this might include focal series for optical sectioning or aberration measurement, beam damage studies or camera-length series to study the effects of strain; whilst in the scanning tunnelling microscope, this might include bias voltage series to probe local electronic structure. Whatever the application, such investigations must begin with the careful alignment of these data stacks, an operation that is not always trivial. In addition, the presence of low-frequency scanning distortions can introduce intra-image shifts to the data. Here, we describe an improved automated method of performing non-rigid registration customised for the challenges unique to scanned microscope data specifically addressing the issues of low-SNR data, images containing a large proportion of crystalline material and/or local features of interest such as dislocations or edges. Careful attention has been paid to artefact testing of the non-rigid registration method used, and the importance of this registration for the quantitative interpretation of feature intensities and positions is evaluated.

  12. Smart align -- A new tool for robust non-rigid registration of scanning microscope data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jones, Lewys; Yang, Hao; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Van Aert, Sandra; Browning, Nigel D.; Castell, Martin R.; Nellist, Peter D.

    2015-07-10

    Many microscopic investigations of materials may benefit from the recording of multiple successive images. This can include techniques common to several types of microscopy such as frame averaging to improve signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) or time series to study dynamic processes or more specific applications. In the scanning transmission electron microscope, this might include focal series for optical sectioning or aberration measurement, beam damage studies or camera-length series to study the effects of strain; whilst in the scanning tunnelling microscope, this might include bias voltage series to probe local electronic structure. Whatever the application, such investigations must begin with the carefulmore » alignment of these data stacks, an operation that is not always trivial. In addition, the presence of low-frequency scanning distortions can introduce intra-image shifts to the data. Here, we describe an improved automated method of performing non-rigid registration customised for the challenges unique to scanned microscope data specifically addressing the issues of low-SNR data, images containing a large proportion of crystalline material and/or local features of interest such as dislocations or edges. Careful attention has been paid to artefact testing of the non-rigid registration method used, and the importance of this registration for the quantitative interpretation of feature intensities and positions is evaluated.« less

  13. Copying and Coloring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohl, Herb

    1977-01-01

    Investigates what appeals to students in using coloring books and whether they use them in imaginative ways. The intent was to use the information to develop creative book activities that interest and challenge students. (Author/RK)

  14. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be caused by: Beets, blackberries, or certain food colorings Hemolytic anemia Injury to the kidneys or urinary tract Medicine Porphyria Urinary tract disorders that cause ... or drugs Bilirubin Medicines, including methylene blue Urinary ...

  15. Color Video Petrography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagle, Frederick

    1981-01-01

    Describes the production and use of color videocassettes with an inexpensive, conventional TV camera and an ordinary petrographic microscope. The videocassettes are used in optical mineralogy and petrology courses. (Author/WB)

  16. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact Lenses Without a Prescription Sep. 26, 2013 It ... she first put in a pair of colored contact lenses, Laura Butler of Parkersburg, W.Va., had " ...

  17. Hypergraph coloring complexes.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Felix; Dall, Aaron; Kubitzke, Martina

    2012-08-28

    The aim of this paper is to generalize the notion of the coloring complex of a graph to hypergraphs. We present three different interpretations of those complexes-a purely combinatorial one and two geometric ones. It is shown, that most of the properties, which are known to be true for coloring complexes of graphs, break down in this more general setting, e.g., Cohen-Macaulayness and partitionability. Nevertheless, we are able to provide bounds for the [Formula: see text]- and [Formula: see text]-vectors of those complexes which yield new bounds on chromatic polynomials of hypergraphs. Moreover, though it is proven that the coloring complex of a hypergraph has a wedge decomposition, we provide an example showing that in general this decomposition is not homotopy equivalent to a wedge of spheres. In addition, we can completely characterize those hypergraphs whose coloring complex is connected. PMID:23483700

  18. Colors of the Sky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.; Fraser, Alistair B.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the physical principles which result in various colors of the sky. Topics addressed include: blueness, mystical properties of water vapor, ozone, fluctuation theory of scattering, variation of purity and brightness, and red sunsets and sunrises. (DH)

  19. Color Associations of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrnes, Deborah A.

    1983-01-01

    Free color associations were collected from a total of 337 children in the fourth through sixth grades to 12 concepts: hope, anger, sadness, honesty, fear, happiness, pain, love, death, strength, school, and life. (Author/RH)

  20. Phoenix Color Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These images of three Phoenix color targets were taken on sols 1 and 2 by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on board the Phoenix lander. The bottom target was imaged in approximate color (SSI's red, green, and blue filters: 600, 530, and 480 nanometers), while the others were imaged with an infrared filter (750 nanometers). All of them will be imaged many times over the mission to monitor the color calibration of the camera. The two at the top show grains 2 to 3 millimeters in size that were likely lifted to the Phoenix deck during landing. Each of the large color chips on each target contains a strong magnet to protect the interior material from Mars' magnetic dust.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Color harmonization for images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhen; Miao, Zhenjiang; Wan, Yanli; Wang, Zhifei

    2011-04-01

    Color harmonization is an artistic technique to adjust a set of colors in order to enhance their visual harmony so that they are aesthetically pleasing in terms of human visual perception. We present a new color harmonization method that treats the harmonization as a function optimization. For a given image, we derive a cost function based on the observation that pixels in a small window that have similar unharmonic hues should be harmonized with similar harmonic hues. By minimizing the cost function, we get a harmonized image in which the spatial coherence is preserved. A new matching function is proposed to select the best matching harmonic schemes, and a new component-based preharmonization strategy is proposed to preserve the hue distribution of the harmonized images. Our approach overcomes several shortcomings of the existing color harmonization methods. We test our algorithm with a variety of images to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  2. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... appear as spots or lines in the tooth enamel. Your genes affect your tooth color. Other things ... Infections Inherited diseases may affect the thickness of enamel or the calcium or protein content of the ...

  3. Chemistry, Color, and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orna, Mary Virginia

    2001-01-01

    Describes pigments and artists' colors from a chronological perspective. Explains how chemical analysis can be used to distinguish the differences between artists' palettes, identify the evolution of art, and lead to restoration of an art work. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  4. Color Doppler flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Foley, W D; Erickson, S J

    1991-01-01

    The performance requirements and operational parameters of a color Doppler system are outlined. The ability of an operator to recognize normal and abnormal variations in physiologic flow and artifacts caused by noise and aliasing is emphasized. The use of color Doppler flow imaging is described for the vessels of the neck and extremities, upper abdomen and abdominal transplants, obstetrics and gynecology, dialysis fistulas, and testicular and penile flow imaging. PMID:1898567

  5. Physics of structural colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, S.; Yoshioka, S.; Miyazaki, J.

    2008-07-01

    In recent years, structural colors have attracted great attention in a wide variety of research fields. This is because they are originated from complex interaction between light and sophisticated nanostructures generated in the natural world. In addition, their inherent regular structures are one of the most conspicuous examples of non-equilibrium order formation. Structural colors are deeply connected with recent rapidly growing fields of photonics and have been extensively studied to clarify their peculiar optical phenomena. Their mechanisms are, in principle, of a purely physical origin, which differs considerably from the ordinary coloration mechanisms such as in pigments, dyes and metals, where the colors are produced by virtue of the energy consumption of light. It is generally recognized that structural colors are mainly based on several elementary optical processes including thin-layer interference, diffraction grating, light scattering, photonic crystals and so on. However, in nature, these processes are somehow mixed together to produce complex optical phenomena. In many cases, they are combined with the irregularity of the structure to produce the diffusive nature of the reflected light, while in some cases they are accompanied by large-scale structures to generate the macroscopic effect on the coloration. Further, it is well known that structural colors cooperate with pigmentary colors to enhance or to reduce the brilliancy and to produce special effects. Thus, structure-based optical phenomena in nature appear to be quite multi-functional, the variety of which is far beyond our understanding. In this article, we overview these phenomena appearing particularly in the diversity of the animal world, to shed light on this rapidly developing research field.

  6. Color measurement and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Theories of color measurement attempt to provide a quantative means for predicting whether two lights will be discriminable to an average observer. All color measurement theories can be characterized as follows: suppose lights a and b evoke responses from three color channels characterized as vectors, v(a) and v(b); the vector difference v(a) - v(b) corresponds to a set of channel responses that would be generated by some real light, call it *. According to theory a and b will be discriminable when * is detectable. A detailed development and test of the classic color measurement approach are reported. In the absence of a luminance component in the test stimuli, a and b, the theory holds well. In the presence of a luminance component, the theory is clearly false. When a luminance component is present discrimination judgements depend largely on whether the lights being discriminated fall in separate, categorical regions of color space. The results suggest that sensory estimation of surface color uses different methods, and the choice of method depends upon properties of the image. When there is significant luminance variation a categorical method is used, while in the absence of significant luminance variation judgments are continuous and consistant with the measurement approach.

  7. Color planner for designers based on color emotions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ka-Man; Xin, John H.; Taylor, Gail

    2002-06-01

    During the color perception process, an associated feeling or emotion is induced in our brains, and this kind of emotion is termed as 'color emotion.' The researchers in the field of color emotions have put many efforts in quantifying color emotions with the standard color specifications and evaluating the influence of hue, lightness and chroma to the color emotions of human beings. In this study, a color planner was derived according to these findings so that the correlation of color emotions and standard color specifications was clearly indicated. Since people of different nationalities usually have different color emotions as different cultural and traditional backgrounds, the subjects in this study were all native Hong Kong Chinese and the color emotion words were all written in Chinese language in the visual assessments. Through the color planner, the designers from different areas, no matter fashion, graphic, interior or web site etc., can select suitable colors for inducing target color emotions to the customers or product-users since different colors convey different meanings to them. In addition, the designers can enhance the functionality and increase the attractiveness of their designed products by selecting suitable colors.

  8. Color-Blindness Study: Color Discrimination on the TICCIT System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asay, Calvin S.; Schneider, Edward W.

    The question studied whether the specific seven TICCIT system colors used within color coding schemes can be a source of confusion, or not seen at all, by the color-blind segment of target populations. Subjects were 11 color-blind and three normally sighted students at Brigham Young University. After a preliminary training exercise to acquaint the…

  9. FEASIBILITY of “TRACEABLE” COLOR STANDARDS for COTTON COLOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton color is measured on the Uster® High Volume Instrument (HVI) for Rd (diffuse reflectance) and +b (yellowness). Rd and +b are cotton-specific color parameters, and they are not as well known as other globally recognized color systems (e.g., L*a*b*). Further, the standards used for HVI color...

  10. Color image segmentation considering human sensitivity for color pattern variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kuk-Jin; Kweon, In-So

    2001-10-01

    Color image segmentation plays an important role in the computer vision and image processing area. In this paper, we propose a novel color image segmentation algorithm in consideration of human visual sensitivity for color pattern variations by generalizing K-means clustering. Human visual system has different color perception sensitivity according to the spatial color pattern variation. To reflect this effect, we define the CCM (Color Complexity Measure) by calculating the absolute deviation with Gaussian weighting within the local mask and assign weight value to each color vector using the CCM values.

  11. Freely Suspended Liquid Crystalline Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonin, A. A.

    2003-05-01

    Freely Suspended Liquid Crystalline Films Andrei A. Sonin Centre d'Etudes Atomiques de Saclay, France and Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences with a Foreword by Professor Noel Clark University of Colorado, USA This book provides a brief introduction to the physics of liquid crystals and to macroscopic physical parameters characterising freely suspended liquid crystalline (FSLC) films, and then reviews the experimental techniques for preparing these films, measuring their thicknesses, and investigating their physical properties and structural aspects. Molecular structures and defects of FSLC films and the problems of film stability, thinning and rupture are discussed in later chapters. Physical phenomena, such as orientational and phase transitions, Frederick's and flexoelectric effects, hydroelectrodynamics, etc., are also analysed. Finally, some applications of FSLC films in industry and in various branches of science are discussed. Specialists working in the physics of liquid crystals and in surface physics will find this book of interest. Industrial firms and their research centres investigating liquid crystals, biological membranes, detergent/surfactant/biomedical areas; and graduates and postgraduates in solid state physics and crystallography will also benefit from this book. The book has an easy-to-read style with just the minimum amount of mathematics necessary to explain important concepts. This is the first book dedicated exclusively to the physics of FSLC in almost a century since their discovery and last twenty years of their active studies. Andrei Sonin, a scientist in the area of FSLC and author of many articles on surface phenomena in liquid crystals, the properties and behaviour of thin liquid crystalline and surfactant films, has a long standing reputation in liquid crystals and surfactant systems and has been particularly active in issues involving surface interactions.

  12. Crystalline state photochromism of 3-furylfulgides: impact of size and bond flexibility of the non-aromatic alkylidene group.

    PubMed

    Hettiarachchi, Champika V; Weerasekara, Roshan K; Uekusa, Hidehiro

    2015-10-01

    3-Furylfulgides are photochromic compounds showing high thermal stability in their closed forms. However, their photochromic properties in the solid state should be improved further to fabricate molecular devices. Understanding how the size and the flexibility of the non-aromatic alkylidene moiety alter the crystalline state photochromic properties is also important here, as the alkylidene group is directly involved in the photochromic ring closing and opening reactions. The synthesis of four 3-furylfulgides composed of different alkylidene groups (rigid isopropyl, flexible 2-butyl, rigid cyclopentyl and flexible cyclohexyl), their crystal structures and structure-photochromic property correlation in the crystalline state are reported here. Crystallographic data along with reaction cavity volumes calculated using the program CAVITY [Ohashi et al. (1981), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 103, 5805-5812] disclosed that fulgides with flexible groups at the ring closing site have more free volume around the reactive area in the crystal lattice, which can provide more space for the atomic movements in the reaction and flexibility can reduce the strain built up in the closed C-isomers by making conformations. According to UV-vis spectroscopic data, a higher yield of C-isomers and a better fatigue resistance were obtained for the 3-furylfulgide with the largest and flexible cyclohexyl group showing greater photochromic properties in the crystalline state than the fulgide containing the smallest and rigid isopropyl group. PMID:26428403

  13. Nematic order by elastic interactions and cellular rigidity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, B. M.; Safran, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    We predict spontaneous nematic order in an ensemble of active force generators with elastic interactions as a minimal model for early nematic alignment of short stress fibers in non-motile, adhered cells. Mean-field theory is formally equivalent to Maier-Saupe theory for a nematic liquid. However, the elastic interactions are long-ranged (and thus depend on cell shape and matrix elasticity) and originate in cell activity. Depending on the density of force generators, we find two regimes of cellular rigidity sensing for which orientational, nematic order of stress fibers depends on matrix rigidity either in a step-like manner or with a maximum at an optimal rigidity.

  14. Identification of Colors for Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    A demonstration of how colors may be specified for use by all those trades and professions involved in building science. This is of vital importance in furthering the use of color, not only in structures but in every other aspect of our daily usage. Free enterprise requires a color language in order to expand the use of color, and to allow for…

  15. Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Based Reflex Color Reflective Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asad

    2012-02-01

    Bistable color cholesteric liquid crystal displays are unique LCDs that exhibit high reflectivity, good contrast, extremely low power operation, and are amenable to versatile roll-to-roll manufacturing. The display technology, now branded as Reflex has been in commercialized products since 1996. It has been the subject of extensive research and development globally by a variety of parties in both academic and industrial settings. Today, the display technology is in volume production for applications such as dedicated eWriters (Boogie Board), full color electronic skins (eSkin), and displays for smart cards. The flexibility comes from polymerization induced phase separation using unique materials unparalleled in any other display technology. The blend of monomers, polymers, cross linkers, and other components along with nematic liquid crystals and chiral dopants is created and processed in such ways so as to enable highly efficient manufactrable displays using ultra thin plastic substrates -- often as thin as 50μm. Other significant aspects include full color by stacking or spatial separation, night vision capability, ultra high resolution, as well as active matrix capabilities. Of particular note is the stacking approach of Reflex based displays to show full color. This approach for reflective color displays is unique to this technology. Owing to high transparency in wavelength bands outside the selective reflection band, three primarily color layers can be stacked on top of each other and reflect without interfering with other layers. This highly surprising architecture enables the highest reflectivity of any other reflective electronic color display technology. The optics, architecture, electro-topics, and process techniques will be discussed. This presentation will focus on the physics of the core technology and color, it's evolution from rigid glass based displays to flexible displays, development of products from the paradigm shifting concepts to consumer

  16. Color in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    2002-05-01

    The vocabulary of astronomy is riddled with color terms. Stars are referred to as red or blue - even brown -- though rarely green. Astronomers say light from a star can be "blueshifted" or that it can be "reddened". Color, however, is not a simple one-dimensional physical parameter equal to wavelength or frequency. It is a complex, psychophysical phenomenon involving at least three degrees of freedom - hue, saturation and brightness -- as well as observational context. Nonetheless, many astronomers treat hue alone or hue plus saturation as the same thing as color. A recent report on "the color of the universe" is a case in point (Baldry and Glazebrook, Bull. Am. As. Soc., 34, No. 1, 571, 2002). Even discounting the authors' initial and (possibly) subsequent errors in arriving at a "color" associated with the composite spectrum derived from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (first reported as "pale turquoise", then "beige"), the method of viewing the light was left vague, and context is important. For example, consider the question "What color is the Moon?" When viewed from Earth, the Moon appears white against the black sky. Place a piece of "average" lunar material in a lighted room, and it will appear dark gray. To most human observers, the 2000 or so naked eye stars observable from the northern hemisphere all appear white, with the few exceptions which look reddish/orange such as Betelgeuse, Arcturus, Aldeberan, Antares and Pollux. Yet the dimmer double star companion to Alberio can appear bluish when viewed beside its much brighter yellowish/orange neighbor if both are viewed by eye through a small aperture, slightly defocused telescope. This presentation will explore several visual phenomena that can help clarify the concept of color in astronomy. Supported in part by NSF grant # DUE-9950551 for "Project LITE: Light Inquiry Through Experiments".

  17. Color rendering of color camera data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, Brian A.

    1986-01-01

    Conditions under which a computational procedure can be applied to arbitrary camera sensors to permit estimation of the human photoreceptor response are considered. The adopted procedures recover the effective surface reflectance at the time of measurement, and the reflectance estimates depend not only on the surface, but upon the viewing geometry. The present method for color rendering assumes that the observer's state of adaptation at the time of viewing the original and the rendered images is the same. The analysis aids in specifying which classes of surfaces are required to be accurately rendered, and for which surfaces some error can be tolerated.

  18. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  19. Genetics of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Danny S C; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by crystalline deposits in the retina, followed by progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and photoreceptors. CYP4V2 has been identified as the causative gene for BCD. The CYP4V2 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily and encodes for fatty acid ω-hydroxylase of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The CYP4V2 protein is localized most abundantly within the endoplasmic reticulum in the RPE and is postulated to play a role in the physiological lipid recycling system between the RPE and photoreceptors to maintain visual function. Electroretinographic assessments have revealed progressive dysfunction of rod and cone photoreceptors in patients with BCD. Several genotypes have been associated with more severe phenotypes based on clinical and electrophysiological findings. With the advent of multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, more precise delineation of BCD severity and progression is now possible, allowing for the potential future development of targets for gene therapy. PMID:27228076

  20. Particle motion in crystalline beams

    SciTech Connect

    Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1994-04-20

    Studying the possibility of storing a low emittance (or ``cooled``) beam of charged particles in a storage ring, the authors are faced with the effect of space charge by which particles are repelled and influence each others` motion. The correct evaluation of the space-charge effects is important to determine the attainment and properties of Crystalline Beams, a phase transition which intense beams of ions can undergo when cooling is applied. In this report they derive the equations of motion of a particle moving under the action of external resorting forces generated by the magnets of the storage ring, and of the electromagnetic fields generated by the other particles. The motion in every direction is investigated: in the longitudinal, as well as vertical and horizontal direction. The external forces are assumed to be linear with the particle displacement from the reference orbit. The space-charge forces are comparable in magnitude to the external focusing forces. The equations of motion so derived are then used to determine confinement and stability conditions for the attainment of Crystalline Beams, using transfer matrices.

  1. 7 CFR 51.1829 - Well colored.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Well colored. Well colored means that a good yellow or better ground color predominates over the green color on the entire fruit surface with no distinct green color present, and that some portion of...

  2. Flashing anomalous color contrast.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2004-01-01

    A new visual phenomenon that we call flashing anomalous color contrast is described. This phenomenon arises from the interaction between a gray central disk and a chromatic annulus surrounded by black radial lines. In an array of such figures, the central gray disk no longer appears gray, but assumes a color complementary to that of the surrounding annulus. The induced color appears: (1) vivid and saturated; (2) self-luminous, not a surface property; (3) flashing with eye or stimulus movement; (4) floating out of its confines; and (5) stronger in extrafoveal than in foveal vision. The strength of the effect depends on the number, length, width, and luminance contrast of the radial lines. The results suggest that the chromatic ring bounding the inner tips of the black radial lines induces simultaneous color contrast, whereas the radial lines elicit, in conjunction with the gray disk and the ring, the flashing, vividness, and high saturation of the effect. The stimulus properties inducing the illusion suggest that flashing anomalous color contrast may be based on asynchronous interactions among multiple visual pathways. PMID:15518215

  3. Simulating coronas in color.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, Stanley D; Lock, James A

    2003-01-20

    Coronas are simulated in color by use of the Mie scattering theory of light by small droplets through clouds of finite optical thickness embedded in a Rayleigh scattering atmosphere. The primary factors that affect color, visibility, and number of rings of coronas are droplet size, width of the size distribution, and cloud optical thickness. The color sequence of coronas and iridescence varies when the droplet radius is smaller than approximately 6-microm. As radius increases to approximately 3.5 microm, new color bands appear at the center of the corona and fade as they move outward. As the radius continues to increase to approximately 6 microm, successively more inner rings become fixed in the manner described by classical diffraction theory, while outer rings continue their outward migration. Wave clouds or rippled cloud segments produce the brightest and most vivid multiple ringed coronas and iridescence because their integrated dropsize distributions along sunbeams are much narrower than in convective or stratiform clouds. The visibility of coronas and the appearance of the background sky vary with cloud optical depth tau. First the corona becomes visible as a white aureole in a blue sky when tau approximately 0.001. Color purity then rapidly increases to an almost flat maximum in the range 0.05 < or = tau < or = 0.5 and then decreases, so coronas are almost completely washed out by a bright gray background when tau > or = 4. PMID:12570272

  4. Crystalline and amorphous H2O on Charon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Grundy, Will M.; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B.; Stern, S. Alan; Young, Leslie A.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2015-11-01

    Charon, the largest satellite of Pluto, is a gray-colored icy world covered mostly in H2O ice, with spectral evidence for NH3, as previously reported (Cook et al. 2007, Astrophys. J. 663, 1406-1419 Merlin, et al. 2010, Icarus, 210, 930; Cook, et al. 2014, AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts, 46, #401.04). Images from the New Horizons spacecraft reveal a surface with terrains of widely different ages and a moderate degree of localized coloration. The presence of H2O ice in its crystalline form (Brown & Calvin 2000 Science 287, 107-109; Buie & Grundy 2000 Icarus 148, 324-339; Merlin et al, 2010) along with NH3 is consistent with a fresh surface.The phase of H2O ice is a key tracer of variations in temperature and physical conditions on the surface of outer Solar System objects. At Charon’s surface temperature H2O is expected to be amorphous, but ground-based observations (e.g., Merlin et al. 2010) show a clearly crystalline signature. From laboratory experiments it is known that amorphous H2O ice becomes crystalline at temperatures of ~130 K. Other mechanisms that can change the phase of the ice from amorphous to crystalline include micro-meteoritic bombardment (Porter et al. 2010, Icarus, 208, 492) or resurfacing processes such as cryovolcanism.New Horizons observed Charon with the LEISA imaging spectrometer, part of the Ralph instrument (Reuter, D.C., Stern, S.A., Scherrer, J., et al. 2008, Space Science Reviews, 140, 129). Making use of high spatial resolution (better than 10 km/px) and spectral resolving power of 240 in the wavelength range 1.25-2.5 µm, and 560 in the range 2.1-2.25 µm, we report on an analysis of the phase of H2O ice on parts of Charon’s surface with a view to investigate the recent history and evolution of this small but intriguing object.This work was supported by NASA’s New Horizons project.

  5. The EINSTEIN-VARIĆAK Correspondence on Relativistic Rigid Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Tilman

    2008-09-01

    The historical significance of the problem of relativistic rigid rotation is reviewed in light of recently published correspondence between Einstein and the mathematician Vladimir Varićak from the years 1909 to 1913.

  6. 13. VIEW OF CAUSEWAY, LOOKING EAST, PROFILING DETAILS OF RIGID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF CAUSEWAY, LOOKING EAST, PROFILING DETAILS OF RIGID FRAME SPAN OVER CANAL STREET, AND SHOWING STEEL RIBS AND FLOOR BEANS ENCASED IN CONCRETE - Notre Dame Bridge, Spanning Merrimack River on Bridge Street, Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH

  7. STEM Education for Girls of Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Kam H.

    Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields struggle to increase recruitment and retention of girls of color. The dominant framework in STEM education is the pipeline which assumes girls in general lack motivation and interest to persist in STEM fields. Recent public discourse shifts to address institutionalized discrimination and systemic barriers in STEM culture that filter out underrepresented populations. Informal education or complementary learning STEM programs offer alternative opportunities for students to explore outside of rigid school academic and social systems. Few articles look specifically at STEM complementary learning programs, and even fewer focus on the effects on girls of color. This research is a quantitative study to categorize existing mission statements and training behind organizations that provide STEM programs. The results will provide a better understanding of the relationship between practices of STEM education organizations and the programs they create. Diversity training and inclusive language in mission statements had weak correlations with increased cultural responsiveness in the program offerings. The results suggest organizations must be more intentional and explicit when implementing diversity goals.

  8. Biomedical applications of a real-time terahertz color scanner.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Markus; Fujio, Makoto; Minami, Masaaki; Miura, Jiro; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    A real-time THz color scanner has the potential to further expand the application scope of THz spectral imaging based on its rapid image acquisition rate. We demonstrated three possible applications of a THz color scanner in the biomedical field: imaging of pharmaceutical tablets, human teeth, and human hair. The first application showed the scanner's potential in total inspection for rapid quality control of pharmaceutical tablets moving on a conveyor belt. The second application demonstrated that the scanner can be used to identify a potential indicator for crystallinity of dental tissue. In the third application, the scanner was successfully used to visualize the drying process of wet hairs. These demonstrations indicated the high potential of the THz color scanner for practical applications in the biomedical field. PMID:21258472

  9. Precision of Synesthetic Color Matching Resembles That for Recollected Colors Rather than Physical Colors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Derek H.; Wegener, Signy V.; Brown, Francesca; Mattingley, Jason B.

    2012-01-01

    Grapheme-color synesthesia is an atypical condition in which individuals experience sensations of color when reading printed graphemes such as letters and digits. For some grapheme-color synesthetes, seeing a printed grapheme triggers a sensation of color, but "hearing" the name of a grapheme does not. This dissociation allowed us to compare the…

  10. Color Memory of University Students: Influence of Color Experience and Color Characteristic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bynum, Carlisle; Epps, Helen H.; Kaya, Naz

    2006-01-01

    The ability to select a previously viewed color specimen from an array of specimens that differ in hue, value, or chroma varies among individuals, and may be related to one's basic color discrimination ability or to prior experience with color. This study investigated short-term color memory of 40 college students, 20 of whom were interior design…

  11. Prediction and Observation of Sustained Oscillations in a Sheared Liquid Crystalline Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosso, M.; Crescitelli, S.; Somma, E.; Vermant, J.; Moldenaers, P.; Maffettone, P. L.

    2003-03-01

    Experimental observations of sustained oscillations of both shear stress and first normal stress differences are reported in flowing liquid crystalline polymers in a limited range of shear rates. The results can be described by considering the response of a rigid-rod model. Depending on the initial conditions, the frequency spectrum of the stress signal contains either one or two characteristic frequencies. This can be explained by the occurrence of either pure “wagging” or the coexistence of wagging and “log-rolling” behavior of the director.

  12. Color preferences revealed by statistical color rendition metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Anqing; Tuzikas, ArÅ«nas; Žukauskas, ArtÅ«ras; Vaicekauskas, Rimantas; Vitta, Pranciškus; Shur, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The color rendition engine based on the statistical metric allows us to uniquely quantify the characteristics of color quality of illumination and assess the color rendition preferences. We now report on using the color rendition engine for revealing individual and cultural differences in color quality preferences of 205 American and Chinese subjects. Our study demonstrated that the majority of individuals preferred the color blend with the same statistical figures of merit on the average but with a much larger spread of blends for Americans. For both groups, the color rendition preferences depended on the object being illuminated. This was demonstrated by illuminating a set of common colored objects and three different paintings. We conclude that the color quality of lighting can be optimized and enhanced using the feedback to change the spectral power distribution of the illuminating source depending on the object being illuminated and on the preferences of an individual observer and a cultural group.

  13. Energy and momentum conserving algorithms for rigid body contact

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M.A.; Zywicz, E.

    1998-04-09

    Energy-momentum conserving methods are developed for rigid body dynamics with contact. Because these methods are unconditionally stable, they are not time step dependent and, hence, are well suited for incorporation into structural mechanics finite element codes. Both penalty and Lagrange multiplier methods are developed herein and are the extension of the energy-momentum conserving integration schemes for rigid bodies given by Simo and Wong [1].

  14. Extracting DNA Twist Rigidity from Experimental Supercoiling Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirch, Sébastien

    2004-11-01

    We use an elastic rod model with contact to study the extension versus rotation diagrams of single supercoiled DNA molecules. We reproduce quantitatively the supercoiling response of overtwisted DNA and, using experimental data, we obtain an estimate of the effective supercoiling radius and of the twist rigidity of B-DNA. We find that the twist rigidity of DNA seems to vary widely with the nature and concentration of the salt buffer in which it is immersed.

  15. Color universal design: analysis of color category dependency on color vision type (4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tomohiro; Ichihara, Yasuyo G.; Kojima, Natsuki; Tanaka, Hisaya; Ito, Kei

    2013-02-01

    This report is af ollow-up to SPIE-IS+T / Vol. 7528 7528051-8, SPIE-IS+T / Vol. 7866 78660J-1-8 and SPIE-IS+T / Vol. 8292 829206-1-8. Colors are used to communicate information in various situations, not just for design and apparel. However, visual information given only by color may be perceived differently by individuals with different color vision types. Human color vision is non-uniform and the variation in most cases is genetically linked to L-cones and M-cones. Therefore, color appearance is not the same for all color vision types. Color Universal Design is an easy-to-understand system that was created to convey color-coded information accurately to most people, taking color vision types into consideration. In the present research, we studied trichromat (C-type), prolan (P-type), and deutan (D-type) forms of color vision. We here report the result of two experiments. The first was the validation of the confusion colors using the color chart on CIELAB uniform color space. We made an experimental color chart (total of color cells is 622, the color difference between color cells is 2.5) for fhis experiment, and subjects have P-type or D-type color vision. From the data we were able to determine "the limits with high probability of confusion" and "the limits with possible confusion" around various basing points. The direction of the former matched with the theoretical confusion locus, but the range did not extend across the entire a* range. The latter formed a belt-like zone above and below the theoretical confusion locus. This way we re-analyzed a part of the theoretical confusion locus suggested by Pitt-Judd. The second was an experiment in color classification of the subjects with C-type, P-type, or D-type color vision. The color caps of fhe 100 Hue Test were classified into seven categories for each color vision type. The common and different points of color sensation were compared for each color vision type, and we were able to find a group of color caps

  16. Design requirements for rigid printed wiring boards and assemblies. NASA Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The NASA requirements for assuring reliable rigid printed wiring board design are prescribed. Basic considerations necessary to assure reliable rigid printed wiring board design are described and incorporated.

  17. 'Bonneville in Color'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The rim and interior of a crater nicknamed 'Bonneville' dominate this 180-degree, false-color mosaic of images taken by the panoramic camera of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Spirit recorded this view on the rover's 68th sol, March 12, 2004, one sol after reaching this location. The rover remaining here in part to get this very high-resolution, color mosaic, from which scientists can gain insight about the depth of the surface material at Bonneville and make future observation plans. On sol 71, Spirit was instructed to drive approximately 15 meters (49 feet) along the crater rim to a new vantage point. The image is a false-color composite made from frames taken with the camera's L2, L5 and L6 filters.

  18. Memnonia Fossae (Enhanced Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Tharsis-centered volcanic and tectonic activity resulted in the formation of radial grabens of Memnonia Fossae, which cut materials of the ancient cratered highlands and the relatively young, highland-embaying lava flows from the Tharsis volcanoes. Center of picture is at latitude 16 degrees S., longitude 142 degrees W. The enhanced color version (following decorrelation stretch) reveals a diversity of subtle color variations; many of the color variations may be due to different lava flow units and variable amounts of weathering, possible alteration by water, and eolian redistributions. Viking Orbiter Picture Numbers 41B52 (green) 41B54 (red), and 41B56 (blue) at 198 m/pixel resolution. Picture width is 206 km. North is 119 degrees counter-clockwise from top.

  19. PROCESS FOR COLORING DIAMONDS

    DOEpatents

    Dugdale, R.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for coloring substantially colorless diamonds in the blue to blue-green range and comprises the steps of irradiating the colorless diamonds with electrons having an energy within the range 0.5 to 2 Mev to obtain an integrated electron flux of between 1 and 2 x 10/sup 18/ thc diamonds may be irradiated 1 hr when they take on a blue color with a slight green tint: After being heated at about 500 deg C for half an hour they become pure blue. Electrons within this energy range contam sufficient energy to displace the diamond atoms from their normal lattice sites into interstitial sites, thereby causing the color changes.

  20. On the inertial motions of liquid-filled rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzone, Giusy; Galdi, Giovanni; Zunino, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    We consider a rigid body with a cavity completely filled by a viscous liquid and study the inertial motions of the system liquid-filled rigid body S . The equations governing the motion of this coupled system are given by the Navier-Stokes equations and the equations of the balance of the total angular momentum of S in absence of external forces and torques. Given any initial motion to the coupled system, characterized by an initial relative velocity of the fluid and an initial total angular momentum, we give a complete description of the behavior that the system liquid-filled rigid body will show at large times. From both analytical and numerical viewpoints, we are able to prove a longstanding conjecture stated by Zhukovskii, namely that S will eventually reach a steady state which is a rigid body permanent rotation. In other words, the liquid goes to rest with respect to the rigid body and the coupled system will rotate as a whole rigid body, with a constant angular velocity that is directed along one of the principal axes of inertia of the system.

  1. Rigidity of various fixation methods used as dental splints.

    PubMed

    Oikarinen, K; Andreasen, J O; Andreasen, F M

    1992-06-01

    Horizontal and vertical rigidity of teeth fixed with seven types of dental splints were evaluated by two tooth mobility measuring devices. Altogether 21 dissected sheep mandibles including soft tissues were used for the experiments in which Fermit, flexible wire-composite, Kevlar, Fiber, Protemp, rigid wire-composite and Triad Gel splints were applied to four incisors. The mean rigidity of the central incisors within the splint was measured by means of Mühlemann periodontometer (horizontal mobility) and Periotest (horizontal and vertical mobilities). Mobility values of teeth before splinting were used as covariants and the values with the splints were illustrated as adjusted mobility. Statistical significance between the rigidity of various splints was analyzed by an unpaired t-test. It was shown that the most rigid splints both in horizontal and vertical directions were Triad Gel, rigid wire-composite and Fermit splints. Kevlar and Fiber splint allowed more horizontal movement than other splints. Protemp and flexible wire-composite splints proved to produce adequate lateral support for the fixed teeth and allowed vertical flexibility which is experimentally known to improve periodontal healing of luxated teeth. PMID:1289069

  2. The coupling VIV analysis of SCRs with rigid swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Huang, Weiping

    2015-08-01

    With the development of deepwater oil and gas exploration, Steel Catenary Risers (SCRs) become preferred risers for resource production, import and export. Vortex induced vibration (VIV) is the key problem encountered in the design of SCRs. In this study, a new model, the rigid swing model, is proposed based on the consideration of large curvature of SCRs. The sag bend of SCRs is assumed as a rigid swing system around the axis from the hanging point to the touch down point (TDP) in the model. The torque, produced by the lift force and the swing vector, provides the driving torque for the swing system, and the weight of SCRs provides the restoring torque. The simulated response of rigid swing is coupled with bending vibration, and then the coupling VIV model of SCRs is studied in consideration of bending vibration and rigid motion. The calculated results indicate that the rigid swing has a magnitude equal to that of bending vibration, and the rigid motion affects the dynamic response of SCRs and can not be neglected in the VIV analysis.

  3. Thermodynamics of rock forming crystalline solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, S. K.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of phase diagrams and cation distributions within crystalline solutions as means of obtaining thermodynamic data on rock forming crystalline solutions is discussed along with some aspects of partitioning of elements in coexisting phases. Crystalline solutions, components in a silicate mineral, and chemical potentials of these components were defined. Examples were given for calculating thermodynamic mixing functions in the CaW04-SrW04, olivine-chloride solution, and orthopyroxene systems.

  4. Association of actin with alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Boyle, D.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The alpha crystallins are cytosolic proteins that co-localize and co-purify with actin-containing microfilaments. Affinity column chromatography employing both covalently-coupled actin or alpha crystallin was used to demonstrate specific and saturable binding of actin with alpha crystallin. This conclusion was confirmed by direct visualization of alpha aggregates bound to actin polymerized in vitro. The significance of this interaction in relation to the functional properties of these two polypeptides will be discussed.

  5. The Colors of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVogel, Kayla; Chanover, Nancy; Thelen, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Very little is known about the coloring agents, or chromophores, that color the clouds of Saturn’s belts and zones. Although the clouds of Saturn are more muted in their coloration and do not exhibit the more striking variations seen among Jupiter’s belts, zones, and cyclonic storm features, the physical processes that render Saturn’s clouds a yellowish hue are likely similar to those at work on Jupiter. Thus, a comprehensive color study that includes both Jupiter and Saturn is warranted to advance our understanding of chromophores in the giant planet atmospheres. Here we report on our efforts to characterize the colors of Saturn’s clouds.This study involves the analysis of two imaging data sets: those from Cassini’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST data were acquired in 1994, 1998, 2002 and 2004 using eleven different filters spanning 255-973 nm. After the images were photometrically and geometrically calibrated, we used them to create low resolution spectra for six different latitude regions: the Equatorial Zone, the Equatorial Belt, the South Equatorial Belt, the South Temperate Zone, the South Temperate Belt and the South South Temperate Belt. The Cassini ISS images were acquired in 2004 and 2011 using twelve different filters spanning 258-938 nm, and corresponding low resolution spectra of the same latitude regions were generated using the ISS images. We compare these low resolution spectra to Saturn’s full-disk spectrum (Karkoschka, E., 1994, Icarus 111, 174) to examine colors of discrete latitudes versus the full-disk spectrum of Saturn. The extensive temporal coverage afforded by the combination of the HST and ISS images will enable us to explore possible seasonal variations in Saturn’s cloud colors. Finally, we examine the color evolution of the major 2011 storm on Saturn using the ISS data.This work was supported by the Discovery Scholars Program in

  6. Crystalline imide/arylene ether copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Bass, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Crystalline imide/arylene ether block copolymers are prepared by reacting anhydride terminated poly(amic acids) with amine terminated poly)arylene ethers) in polar aprotic solvents and chemically or thermally cyclodehydrating the resulting intermediate poly(amic acids). The block copolymers of the invention have one glass transition temperature or two, depending on the particular structure and/or the compatibility of the block units. Most of these crystalline block copolymers for tough, solvent resistant films with high tensile properties. While all of the copolymers produced by the present invention are crystalline, testing reveals that copolymers with longer imide blocks or higher imide content have increased crystallinity.

  7. Birefringence measurements on crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Christoph; Heinert, Daniel; Khalaidovski, Alexander; Steinlechner, Jessica; Nawrodt, Ronny; Schnabel, Roman; Lück, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline silicon has been proposed as a new test mass material in third generation gravitational wave detectors such as the Einstein telescope (ET). Birefringence can reduce the interferometric contrast and can produce dynamical disturbances in interferometers. In this work we use the method of polarization-dependent resonance-frequency analysis of Fabry-Perot-cavities containing silicon as a birefringent medium. Our measurements show a birefringence of silicon along the (111) axis of the order of {{Δ }} n≈ {10}-7 at a laser wavelength of 1550 nm and room temperature. A model is presented that explains the results of different settings of our measurements as a superposition of elastic strains caused by external stresses in the sample and plastic strains possibly generated during the production process. An application of our theory on the proposed ET test mass geometry suggests no critical effect on birefringence due to elastic strains.

  8. Crystalline silica: risks and policy.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, T S; Weill, H

    1995-01-01

    Since the International Agency for Research on Cancer labeled crystalline silica a probable carcinogen in 1988, government regulations have required sand and other products to contain warning labels and researchers have attempted to quantitatively assess low-exposure risks. The uncertainties are unlikely to diminish any time soon, and little value exists in calculating such risks, as low exposures to this ubiquitous mineral are commonplace in both urban and rural areas due to many uncontrollable activities. What is certain is that regulatory resources targeted at continuing high-level occupational exposures would be much more likely to have beneficial public health consequences than continued attempts to assess low-exposure risks quantitatively. Images p152-a PMID:7737062

  9. Digestion of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST)

    SciTech Connect

    DARREL, WALKER

    2004-11-04

    Researchers tested methods for chemically dissolving crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as a substitute for mechanical grinding to reduce particle size before vitrification. Testing used the commercially available form of CST, UOP IONSIV(R) IE-911. Reduction of the particle size to a range similar to that of the glass frit used by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) could reduce problems with coupling cesium ion exchange to the vitrification process. This study found that IONSIV(R) IE-911 dissolves completely using a combination of acid, hydrogen peroxide, and fluoride ion. Neutralization of the resulting acidic solution precipitates components of the IONSIV(R) IE-911. Digestion requires extremely corrosive conditions. Also, large particles may reform during neutralization, and the initiation and rate of gas generation are unpredictable. Therefore, the method is not recommended as a substitute for mechanical grinding.

  10. Structural defects in crystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirtl, E.

    1985-01-01

    The basic photovoltaic properties of a given crystalline silicon specimen seem to be governed by density and nature of two to three dimensional lattice defects. These are mainly generated by primary growth conditions as grain boundaries of more or less intrinsic character or second phase precipitates from supersaturated solutions of carbon or oxygen. Considerably high values of both solubility and diffusivity in connection with their abundance in common refractory material systems account for the predominance of the two particular elements. Unsaturated dislocations of different types very often can be seen as a consequence of the existence of more dimensional defects as described initially. The final performance of a solar cell is dependent of the concentration and distribution of recombination active centers in the different regions of this device. Typical representatives are fast diffusing transition metals in form of either single atoms or simple complexes. Their avoidance, annihilation, or removal is of great concern in different fields of electronic materials development.

  11. Elasticity of crystalline molecular explosives

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hooks, Daniel E.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, C. A.; Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2015-04-14

    Crystalline molecular explosives are key components of engineered explosive formulations. In precision applications a high degree of consistency and predictability is desired under a range of conditions to a variety of stimuli. Prediction of behaviors from mechanical response and failure to detonation initiation and detonation performance of the material is linked to accurate knowledge of the material structure and first stage of deformation: elasticity. The elastic response of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), including aspects of material and measurement variability, and computational methods are described in detail. Experimental determinations of elastic tensors are compared, andmore » an evaluation of sources of error is presented. Furthermore, computed elastic constants are also compared for these materials and for triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), for which there are no measurements.« less

  12. Elasticity of crystalline molecular explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Daniel E.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, C. A.; Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2015-04-14

    Crystalline molecular explosives are key components of engineered explosive formulations. In precision applications a high degree of consistency and predictability is desired under a range of conditions to a variety of stimuli. Prediction of behaviors from mechanical response and failure to detonation initiation and detonation performance of the material is linked to accurate knowledge of the material structure and first stage of deformation: elasticity. The elastic response of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), including aspects of material and measurement variability, and computational methods are described in detail. Experimental determinations of elastic tensors are compared, and an evaluation of sources of error is presented. Furthermore, computed elastic constants are also compared for these materials and for triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), for which there are no measurements.

  13. Color constancy in Japanese animation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Yasuyo G.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we measure the colors used in a Japanese Animations. The result can be seen on CIE-xy color spaces. It clearly shows that the color system is not a natural appearance system but an imagined and artistic appearance system. Color constancy of human vision can tell the difference in skin and hair colors between under moonlight and day light. Human brain generates a match to the memorized color of an object from daylight viewing conditions to the color of the object in different viewing conditions. For example, Japanese people always perceive the color of the Rising Sun in the Japanese flag as red even in a different viewing condition such as under moonlight. Color images captured by a camera cannot present those human perceptions. However, Japanese colorists in Animation succeeded in painting the effects of color constancy not only under moonlight but also added the memory matching colors. They aim to create a greater impact on viewer's perceptions by using the effect of the memory matching colors. In this paper, we propose the Imagined Japanese Animation Color System. This system in art is currently a subject of research in Japan. Its importance is that it could also provide an explanation on how human brain perceives the same color under different viewing conditions.

  14. Progress in color night vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toet, Alexander; Hogervorst, Maarten A.

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of our recent progress and the current state-of-the-art techniques of color image fusion for night vision applications. Inspired by previously developed color opponent fusing schemes, we initially developed a simple pixel-based false color-mapping scheme that yielded fused false color images with large color contrast and preserved the identity of the input signals. This method has been successfully deployed in different areas of research. However, since this color mapping did not produce realistic colors, we continued to develop a statistical color-mapping procedure that would transfer the color distribution of a given example image to a multiband nighttime image. This procedure yields a realistic color rendering. However, it is computationally expensive and achieves no color constancy since the mapping depends on the relative amounts of the different materials in the scene. By applying the statistical mapping approach in a color look-up-table framework, we finally achieved both color constancy and computational simplicity. This sample-based color transfer method is specific for different types of materials in a scene and can be easily adapted for the intended operating theatre and the task at hand. The method can be implemented as a look-up-table transform and is highly suitable for real-time implementations.

  15. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  16. Perfect Color Registration Realized.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovedahl, Gerald G.

    1979-01-01

    Describes apparatus and procedures to design and construct a "printing box" as a graphic arts project to make color prints on T-shirts using photography, indirect and direct photo screen methods, and other types of stencils. Step-by-step photographs illustrate the process. (MF)

  17. Spas color camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toffales, C.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures to be followed in assessing the performance of the MOS color camera are defined. Aspects considered include: horizontal and vertical resolution; value of the video signal; gray scale rendition; environmental (vibration and temperature) tests; signal to noise ratios; and white balance correction.

  18. Color Us American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Virginia; Hodges, Ethel

    A coloring book containing drawings and information on eight different countries is designed to help children obtain cultural understanding of themselves and other persons as individuals and as members of groups within our society. The countries presented are Poland/Germany, the Navajo Nation (Native American), China, Nigeria (Africa), Mexico,…

  19. Colored facial cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Z D

    2000-10-01

    Colored cosmetics are an important part of the dermatologic armamentarium. They can camouflage contour and pigment abnormalities, provide moisturization, enhance oil control, add sun protection, deliver barrier-enhancing agents, increase acne treatment, and create a sense of personal well-being. Familiarity with these products allows the dermatologist to provide better patient care. PMID:11059370

  20. Structural Colors of Birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Cecilia; Dushkina, Natalia

    2016-03-01

    Structural colors create iridescent colors in bird feathers. The goal is to understand why structural colors act the way they do in certain situations. The research conducted over the course of the fall semester was to understand the optical phenomenon producing colors in individual barbules. Through the use of a polarizing optical microscope, certain hypotheses were built to explain certain phenomenon. Using a dark field illumination involving light acting at wide angles in microscopy, the barbules were not affected by polarization. So it can be suggested that the barbules have certain characteristics, possibly internal, which prevents wide-angle polarization. More recently, it was found that the barbules, when stacked upon one another, create a discoloration at the cross over point. It can be suggested that the barbules act as thin films and create a situation of thin film interference. More data will be taken using the Scanning Electron Microscope as well as getting cross sectional data to help understand the internal characteristics of the barbules. From the support of the Neimeyer-Hodgson Grant, Chris Stull, and Millersville University of Pennsylvania.

  1. SATURN, IN NATURAL COLORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided images of Saturn in many colors, from black-and-white, to orange, to blue, green, and red. But in this picture, image processing specialists have worked to provide a crisp, extremely accurate view of Saturn, which highlights the planet's pastel colors. Bands of subtle color - yellows, browns, grays - distinguish differences in the clouds over Saturn, the second largest planet in the solar system. Saturn's high-altitude clouds are made of colorless ammonia ice. Above these clouds is a layer of haze or smog, produced when ultraviolet light from the sun shines on methane gas. The smog contributes to the planet's subtle color variations. One of Saturn's moons, Enceladus, is seen casting a shadow on the giant planet as it passes just above the ring system. The flattened disk swirling around Saturn is the planet's most recognizable feature, and this image displays it in sharp detail. This is the planet's ring system, consisting mostly of chunks of water ice. Although it appears as if the disk is composed of only a few rings, it actually consists of tens of thousands of thin 'ringlets.' This picture also shows the two classic divisions in the ring system. The narrow Encke Gap is nearest to the disk's outer edge; the Cassini division, is the wide gap near the center. Scientists study Saturn and its ring system to gain insight into the birth of our solar system. Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA)

  2. Color appearance in stereoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadia, Davide; Rizzi, Alessandro; Bonanomi, Cristian; Marini, Daniele; Galmonte, Alessandra; Agostini, Tiziano

    2011-03-01

    The relationship between color and lightness appearance and the perception of depth has been studied since a while in the field of perceptual psychology and psycho-physiology. It has been found that depth perception affects the final object color and lightness appearance. In the stereoscopy research field, many studies have been proposed on human physiological effects, considering e.g. geometry, motion sickness, etc., but few has been done considering lightness and color information. Goal of this paper is to realize some preliminar experiments in Virtual Reality in order to determine the effects of depth perception on object color and lightness appearance. We have created a virtual test scene with a simple 3D simultaneous contrast configuration. We have created three different versions of this scene, each with different choices of relative positions and apparent size of the objects. We have collected the perceptual responses of several users after the observation of the test scene in the Virtual Theater of the University of Milan, a VR immersive installation characterized by a semi-cylindrical screen that covers 120° of horizontal field of view from an observation distance of 3.5 m. We present a description of the experiments setup and procedure, and we discuss the obtained results.

  3. DVCS via color dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B.; Schmidt, I.; Siddikov, M.

    2009-03-23

    We study the DVCS amplitude within the color dipole approach employing a nonperturbative wave function for the real photon. We found that the model is able to decribe the absolute value of the cross section and the t-slope, but predicts too steep Q{sup 2}-dependence in comparison with H1 data.

  4. Color Channels, Not Color Appearance or Color Categories, Guide Visual Search for Desaturated Color Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Delwin T.; Brown, Angela M.; Reijnen, Ester; Rich, Anina N.; Kuzmova, Yoana I.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report that in visual search, desaturated reddish targets are much easier to find than other desaturated targets, even when perceptual differences between targets and distractors are carefully equated. Observers searched for desaturated targets among mixtures of white and saturated distractors. Reaction times were hundreds of milliseconds faster for the most effective (reddish) targets than for the least effective (purplish) targets. The advantage for desaturated reds did not reflect an advantage for the lexical category “pink,” because reaction times did not follow named color categories. Many pink stimuli were not found quickly, and many quickly found stimuli were not labeled “pink.” Other possible explanations (e.g., linear-separability effects) also failed. Instead, we propose that guidance of visual search for desaturated colors is based on a combination of low-level color-opponent signals that is different from the combinations that produce perceived color. We speculate that this guidance might reflect a specialization for human skin. PMID:20713637

  5. "Color-Blind" Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Leslie G.

    Examining race relations in the United States from a historical perspective, this book explains how the constitution is racist and how color blindness is actually a racist ideology. It is argued that Justice Harlan, in his dissenting opinion in Plessy v. Ferguson, meant that the constitution and the law must remain blind to the existence of race…

  6. Color Wheel Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a painting and drawing lesson which was inspired by the beautiful circular windows found in cathedrals and churches (also known as "rose windows"). This two-week lesson would reinforce both the concept of symmetry and students' understanding of the color wheel. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  7. Laser beam color separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Multiwavelength laser beam is separated into series of parallel color beams using prism and retroreflector. Setup is inexpensive and needs no critical adjustments. It can incorporate several prisms to increase dispersion and reduce overall size. Transmission grating can be used instead of prism with sacrifice in efficiency. Spatial filter can remove unwanted beams.

  8. Hupa Nature Coloring Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; And Others

    Animals familiar to the northwest region of California where Hupa Indians reside are depicted in this coloring book which belongs to a series of materials developed to promote the use of the Hupa language. Each page contains a bold pen and ink drawing of an animal and the animal's name in the Unifon alphabet used for writing the Hupa language.…

  9. COLOR YES; CANCER NO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dyes based on known carcinogens such as benzidine and beta naphthylamine can no longer be manufactured in the United States. n addition, numerous colorants have been banned from use by the food and cosmetic industries. hese limitations have led to the examination of structure-act...

  10. Meridiani Planum in Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This color image shows the martian landscape at Meridiani Planum, where the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity successfully landed at 9:05 p.m. PST on Saturday. This is one of the first images beamed back to Earth from the rover shortly after it touched down. The image was captured by the rover's panoramic camera.

  11. Pluto and Charon: Surface Colors and Compositions - A Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The surface of Pluto displays an array of colors ranging from yellow to red to brown, while the surface of Charon is largely gray with a north polar zone of red color similar to regions on Pluto. Pluto's surface shows layers of intensely colored material in tilted and transported blocks, and fractured geo-graphical units. This arrangement suggests episodes of formation or deposition of that material interspersed with episodes of emplacement of ices having little or no color. The ices identified on the surfaces of these two bodies (N2, CH4, CO, C2H6, H2O on Pluto, and H2O and NH3 on Charon) are colorless, as are nearly all ices in a powdery state. The colors on Pluto probably arise from the in situ formation of a macro-molecular carbonaceous material generated by energetic processing of the ices on the surface. Laboratory experiments producing refractory tholins particularly relevant to Pluto explored the chemistry of both UV and low-energy electron bombardment of a mix of Pluto ices (N2:CH4:CO = 100:1:1). We can term this Pluto ice tholin PIT. Water ice in the crystalline state characterizes Charon's surface, and while most of Charon's surface is neutral in color, with geometric albedo approximately 0.38, the polar zone and a light cover of fainter but similar reddish color over some surface regions suggest a common origin with the colored material on Pluto. NH3 or NH3 x nH2O was identified from disk-integrated Earth-based spectra, and a few concentrated NH3 exposures have been found in the New Horizons spectral images.

  12. Color naming: color scientists do it between Munsell sheets of color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Giordano B.; Moroney, Nathan M.

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of high dynamic range imaging and wide gamut color spaces, gamut mapping algorithms have to nudge image colors much more drastically to constrain them within a rendering device's gamut. Classical colorimetry is concerned with color matching and the developed color difference metrics are for small distances. For larger distances, categorization becomes a more useful concept. In the gamut mapping case, lexical distance induced by color names is a more useful metric, which translates to the condition that a nudged color may not cross a name boundary. The new problem is to find these color name boundaries. We compare the experimental procedures used for color naming by linguists, ethnologists, and color scientists and propose a methodology that leads to robust repeatable experiments.

  13. Understanding colors in nature.

    PubMed

    Bohren, C F

    1988-01-01

    There are two ways in which white light is transformed into colored light by interaction with matter: absorption and scattering. Absorption transforms light into other forms of energy, whereas scattering redirects it. Reflection, refraction, and diffraction are not distinct from scattering but rather are manifestations of it. There is a hierarchy of theories for describing any color phenomenon. For example, many features of rainbows--but not all--can be described satisfactorily by geometrical optics. More accurate descriptions require more exact theories. What one observes when matter is illuminated depends on its disposition. A microscope slide scatters light mostly in two directions. When smashed to bits, it scatters in all directions. Yet its chemical composition has not changed. Glass particles, unlike those in smoke, are usually too large to give colors upon scattering. The colors one sees when smoke is illuminated depend on whether one observes light that has or has not been scattered. Moreover, particle size is crucial in determining what colors are observed. As with scattering, there is a hierarchy of theories of absorption. One can content oneself with an empirical description of absorption or seek a fuller understanding by appealing to microscopic theories. Yet it is sometimes difficult to associate a definite microscopic mechanism with a given absorption feature. Ice is intrinsically blue, yet this cannot be attributed readily to a specific mechanism. Beer has no yellow absorption feature; absorption by it is least in the red and rises steadily toward the blue. Over short paths, beer is yellow; over long paths, it is reddish. Selective scattering by molecules causes the blue of the sky.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3070522

  14. How to identify up to 30 colors without training: color concept retrieval by free color naming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derefeldt, Gunilla A. M.; Swartling, Tiina

    1994-05-01

    Used as a redundant code, color is shown to be advantageous in visual search tasks. It enhances attention, detection, and recall of information. Neuropsychological and neurophysiological findings have shown color and spatial perception to be interrelated functions. Studies on eye movements show that colored symbols are easier to detect and that eye fixations are more correctly directed to color-coded symbols. Usually between 5 and 15 colors have been found useful in classification tasks, but this umber can be increased to between 20 to 30 by careful selection of colors, and by a subject's practice with the identification task and familiarity with the particular colors. Recent neurophysiological findings concerning the language-concept connection in color suggest that color concept retrieval would be enhanced by free color naming or by the use of natural associations between color concepts and color words. To test this hypothesis, we had subjects give their own free associations to a set of 35 colors presented on a display. They were able to identify as many as 30 colors without training.

  15. Foreign Language Experience and Color Word Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisson, Cyrus R.

    If various color names are printed in various color inks, an observer has great difficulty in rapidly naming the ink colors (Stroop Color Word Test) unless the color names and the ink colors are mutually reinforcing, or the color names are unknown to the observer. The latter suggests a partial measure of second-language fluency, the feasibility of…

  16. Human preference for individual colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stephen E.; Schloss, Karen B.

    2010-02-01

    Color preference is an important aspect of human behavior, but little is known about why people like some colors more than others. Recent results from the Berkeley Color Project (BCP) provide detailed measurements of preferences among 32 chromatic colors as well as other relevant aspects of color perception. We describe the fit of several color preference models, including ones based on cone outputs, color-emotion associations, and Palmer and Schloss's ecological valence theory. The ecological valence theory postulates that color serves an adaptive "steering' function, analogous to taste preferences, biasing organisms to approach advantageous objects and avoid disadvantageous ones. It predicts that people will tend to like colors to the extent that they like the objects that are characteristically that color, averaged over all such objects. The ecological valence theory predicts 80% of the variance in average color preference ratings from the Weighted Affective Valence Estimates (WAVEs) of correspondingly colored objects, much more variance than any of the other models. We also describe how hue preferences for single colors differ as a function of gender, expertise, culture, social institutions, and perceptual experience.

  17. The Luscher Color Test: sex differences in color preference.

    PubMed

    Seefeldt, F M

    1979-06-01

    Sex differences in color preference on the Luscher Color Test were investigated for the green and the yellow chips. 50 male and 79 female majors in education rated and ranked each color on the popular form of the test. Females ranked and rated yellow significantly higher than did the males. Implications regarding test validity for females are discussed. PMID:482042

  18. Reducing Color/Brightness Interaction in Color Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchman, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed digitally sampled scan-conversion scheme for color television reduces unwanted interactions between chrominance and luminance signals. New scheme reduces luminance and chrominance bandwidth to increase frequency separation between signals. To avoid proportionally reducing horizontal brightness resolution and horizontal color resolution, horizontal interlace of luminance signal and two color-difference signals used.

  19. At-line cotton color measurements by portable color spectrophotometers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a result of reports of cotton bales that had significant color changes from their initial Uster® High Volume Instrument (HVI™) color measurements, a program was implemented to measure cotton fiber color (Rd, +b) at-line in remote locations (warehouse, mill, etc.). The measurement of cotton fiber...

  20. Crystalline mesophases: Structure, mobility, and pharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Shalaev, Evgenyi; Wu, Ke; Shamblin, Sheri; Krzyzaniak, Joseph F; Descamps, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Crystalline mesophases, which are commonly classified according to their translational, orientational, and conformational order as liquid crystals, plastic crystals, and conformationally disordered crystals, represent a common state of condensed matter. As an intermediate state between crystalline and amorphous materials, crystalline mesophases resemble amorphous materials in relation to their molecular mobility, with the glass transition being their common property, and at the same time possessing a certain degree of translational periodicity (with the exception of nematic phase), with corresponding narrow peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns. For example, plastic crystals, which can be formed both by near-spherical molecules and molecules of lower symmetry, such as planar or chain molecules, can have both extremely sharp X-ray diffraction lines and exhibit glass transition. Fundamentals of structural arrangements in mesophases are compared with several types of disorder in crystalline materials, as well as with short-range ordering in amorphous solids. Main features of the molecular mobility in crystalline mesophases are found to be generally similar to amorphous materials, although some important differences do exist, depending on a particular type of mobility modes involved in relaxation processes. In several case studies reviewed, chemical stability appears to follow the extent of disorder, with the stability of crystalline mesophase found to be intermediate between amorphous (least stable) and crystalline (most stable) materials. Finally, detection of crystalline mesophases during manufacturing of two different types of dosage forms is discussed. PMID:27067607

  1. Stability and cytotoxicity of crystallin amyloid nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manmeet; Healy, Jackie; Vasudevamurthy, Madhusudan; Lassé, Moritz; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tobin, Mark J; Valery, Celine; Gerrard, Juliet A; Sasso, Luigi

    2014-11-01

    Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils. PMID:25255060

  2. Testing Children for Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / News Testing Children for Color Blindness Written by: Shirley Dang Apr. 03, 2014 New ... shows that kids can be tested for color blindness as soon as age 4, finds Caucasian boys ...

  3. Barriers to cooperation aid ideological rigidity and threaten societal collapse.

    PubMed

    Jusup, Marko; Matsuo, Tadasu; Iwasa, Yoh

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the factors that promote, disrupt, or shape the nature of cooperation is one of the main tasks of evolutionary biology. Here, we focus on attitudes and beliefs supportive of in-group favoritism and strict adherence to moral consensus, collectively known as ideological rigidity, that have been linked with both ends of the political spectrum. The presence among the political right and the left is likely to make ideological rigidity a major determinant of the political discourse with an important social function. To better understand this function, we equip the indirect reciprocity framework--widely used to explain evaluation-mediated social cooperation--with multiple stylized value systems, each corresponding to the different degree of ideological rigidity. By running game theoretical simulations, we observe the competitive evolution of these systems, map conditions that lead to more ideologically rigid societies, and identify potentially disastrous outcomes. In particular, we uncover that barriers to cooperation aid ideological rigidity. The society may even polarize to the extent where social parasites overrun the population and cause the complete collapse of the social structure. These results have implications for lawmakers globally, warning against restrictive or protectionist policies. PMID:24809975

  4. Barriers to Cooperation Aid Ideological Rigidity and Threaten Societal Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Jusup, Marko; Matsuo, Tadasu; Iwasa, Yoh

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the factors that promote, disrupt, or shape the nature of cooperation is one of the main tasks of evolutionary biology. Here, we focus on attitudes and beliefs supportive of in-group favoritism and strict adherence to moral consensus, collectively known as ideological rigidity, that have been linked with both ends of the political spectrum. The presence among the political right and the left is likely to make ideological rigidity a major determinant of the political discourse with an important social function. To better understand this function, we equip the indirect reciprocity framework – widely used to explain evaluation-mediated social cooperation – with multiple stylized value systems, each corresponding to the different degree of ideological rigidity. By running game theoretical simulations, we observe the competitive evolution of these systems, map conditions that lead to more ideologically rigid societies, and identify potentially disastrous outcomes. In particular, we uncover that barriers to cooperation aid ideological rigidity. The society may even polarize to the extent where social parasites overrun the population and cause the complete collapse of the social structure. These results have implications for lawmakers globally, warning against restrictive or protectionist policies. PMID:24809975

  5. Packing density of rigid aggregates is independent of scale

    PubMed Central

    Zangmeister, Christopher D.; Radney, James G.; Dockery, Lance T.; Young, Jessica T.; Ma, Xiaofei; You, Rian; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Large planetary seedlings, comets, microscale pharmaceuticals, and nanoscale soot particles are made from rigid, aggregated subunits that are compacted under low compression into larger structures spanning over 10 orders of magnitude in dimensional space. Here, we demonstrate that the packing density (θf) of compacted rigid aggregates is independent of spatial scale for systems under weak compaction. The θf of rigid aggregated structures across six orders of magnitude were measured using nanoscale spherical soot aerosol composed of aggregates with ∼17-nm monomeric subunits and aggregates made from uniform monomeric 6-mm spherical subunits at the macroscale. We find θf = 0.36 ± 0.02 at both dimensions. These values are remarkably similar to θf observed for comet nuclei and measured values of other rigid aggregated systems across a wide variety of spatial and formative conditions. We present a packing model that incorporates the aggregate morphology and show that θf is independent of both monomer and aggregate size. These observations suggest that the θf of rigid aggregates subject to weak compaction forces is independent of spatial dimension across varied formative conditions. PMID:24927577

  6. Maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Peng; Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2012-10-01

    An algorithm is presented to maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. After each unconstrained MD step, the coordinates of selected particles are corrected to maintain rigid structures through an iterative procedure of rotation matrix computation. This algorithm, named as SHAPE and implemented in CHARMM program suite, avoids the calculations of Lagrange multipliers, so that the complexity of computation does not increase with the number of particles in a rigid structure. The implementation of this algorithm does not require significant modification of propagation integrator, and can be plugged into any Cartesian based MD integration scheme. A unique feature of the SHAPE method is that it is interchangeable with SHAKE for any object that can be constrained as a rigid structure using multiple SHAKE constraints. Unlike SHAKE, the SHAPE method can be applied to large linear (with three or more centers) and planar (with four or more centers) rigid bodies. Numerical tests with four model systems including two proteins demonstrate that the accuracy and reliability of the SHAPE method are comparable to the SHAKE method, but with much more applicability and efficiency.

  7. Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) Model for Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Lu, Wei-Yang; Scherzinger, William M.; Hinnerichs, Terry D.; Lo, Chi S.

    2015-06-01

    Numerous experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of several different rigid polyurethane foams (FR3712, PMDI10, PMDI20, and TufFoam35) to large deformation. In these experiments, the effects of load path, loading rate, and temperature were investigated. Results from these experiments indicated that rigid polyurethane foams exhibit significant volumetric and deviatoric plasticity when they are compressed. Rigid polyurethane foams were also found to be very strain-rate and temperature dependent. These foams are also rather brittle and crack when loaded to small strains in tension or to larger strains in compression. Thus, a new Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) model was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Foam Damage to describe the mechanical response of these foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments and experimental findings. Next, development of a UCPD model for rigid, polyurethane foams is described. Selection of material parameters for a variety of rigid polyurethane foams is then discussed and finite element simulations with the new UCPD model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this model.

  8. Non-rigid alignment in electron tomography in materials science.

    PubMed

    Printemps, Tony; Bernier, Nicolas; Bleuet, Pierre; Mula, Guido; Hervé, Lionel

    2016-09-01

    Electron tomography is a key technique that enables the visualization of an object in three dimensions with a resolution of about a nanometre. High-quality 3D reconstruction is possible thanks to the latest compressed sensing algorithms and/or better alignment and preprocessing of the 2D projections. Rigid alignment of 2D projections is routine in electron tomography. However, it cannot correct misalignments induced by (i) deformations of the sample due to radiation damage or (ii) drifting of the sample during the acquisition of an image in scanning transmission electron microscope mode. In both cases, those misalignments can give rise to artefacts in the reconstruction. We propose a simple-to-implement non-rigid alignment technique to correct those artefacts. This technique is particularly suited for needle-shaped samples in materials science. It is initiated by a rigid alignment of the projections and it is then followed by several rigid alignments of different parts of the projections. Piecewise linear deformations are applied to each projection to force them to simultaneously satisfy the rigid alignments of the different parts. The efficiency of this technique is demonstrated on three samples, an intermetallic sample with deformation misalignments due to a high electron dose typical to spectroscopic electron tomography, a porous silicon sample with an extremely thin end particularly sensitive to electron beam and another porous silicon sample that was drifting during image acquisitions. PMID:27018779

  9. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Khoshnood, Atefeh; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for the majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as α -helices and β -sheets have different structural rigidities. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations under thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch, which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semiflexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters, while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional triangular structure, we calculate the lipid density around protein clusters and find that the difference in lipid distribution around rigid and semiflexible proteins determines the one- or two-dimensional nature of aggregates. It is found that lipids move faster around semiflexible proteins than rigid ones. The aggregation mechanism suggested in this paper can be tested by current state-of-the-art experimental facilities.

  10. Is Nubia plate rigid? A geodetic study of the relative motion of different cratonic areas within Africa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njoroge, M. W.; Malservisi, R.; Hugentobler, U.; Mokhtari, M.; Voytenko, D.

    2014-12-01

    Plate rigidity is one of the main paradigms of plate tectonics and a fundamental assumption in the definition of a global reference frame as ITRF. Although still far for optimal, the increased GPS instrumentation of the African region can allow us to understand how rigid one of the major plate can be. The presence of diffused band of seismicity, the Cameroon volcanic line, Pan African Kalahari orogenic belt and East Africa Rift suggest the possibility of relative motion among the different regions within the Nubia. The study focuses on the rigidity of Nubia plate. We divide the plate into three regions: Western (West Africa craton plus Nigeria), Central (approximately the region of the Congo craton) and Southern (Kalahari craton plus South Africa) and we utilize Euler Vector formulation to study internal rigidity and eventual relative motion. Developing five different reference frames with different combinations of the 3 regions, we try to understand the presence of the relative motion between the 3 cratons thus the stability of the Nubia plate as a whole. All available GPS stations from the regions are used separately or combined in creation of the reference frames. We utilize continuous stations with at least 2.5 years of data between 1994 and 2014. Given the small relative velocity, it is important to eliminate eventual biases in the analysis and to have a good estimation in the uncertainties of the observed velocities. For this reason we perform our analysis using both Bernese and Gipsy-oasis codes to generate time series for each station. Velocities and relative uncertainties are analyzed using the Allan variance of rate technique, taking in account for colored noise. An analysis of the color of the noise as function of latitude and climatic region is also performed to each time series. Preliminary results indicate a slight counter clockwise motion of West Africa craton with respect to South Africa Kalahari, and South Africa Kalahari-Congo Cratons. In addition

  11. Non-rigid, but not rigid, motion interferes with the processing of structural face information in developmental prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Maguinness, Corrina; Newell, Fiona N

    2015-04-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that facial motion is an important cue for face recognition. However, it is poorly understood whether motion is integrated with facial form information or whether it provides an independent cue to identity. To provide further insight into this issue, we compared the effect of motion on face perception in two developmental prosopagnosics and age-matched controls. Participants first learned faces presented dynamically (video), or in a sequence of static images, in which rigid (viewpoint) or non-rigid (expression) changes occurred. Immediately following learning, participants were required to match a static face image to the learned face. Test face images varied by viewpoint (Experiment 1) or expression (Experiment 2) and were learned or novel face images. We found similar performance across prosopagnosics and controls in matching facial identity across changes in viewpoint when the learned face was shown moving in a rigid manner. However, non-rigid motion interfered with face matching across changes in expression in both individuals with prosopagnosia compared to the performance of control participants. In contrast, non-rigid motion did not differentially affect the matching of facial expressions across changes in identity for either prosopagnosics (Experiment 3). Our results suggest that whilst the processing of rigid motion information of a face may be preserved in developmental prosopagnosia, non-rigid motion can specifically interfere with the representation of structural face information. Taken together, these results suggest that both form and motion cues are important in face perception and that these cues are likely integrated in the representation of facial identity. PMID:25737056

  12. Wetting in Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Ian Bruce

    Colorimetric litmus tests such as pH paper have enjoyed wide commercial success due to their inexpensive production and exceptional ease of use. However, expansion of colorimetry to new sensing paradigms is challenging because macroscopic color changes are seldom coupled to arbitrary differences in the physical/chemical properties of a system. In this thesis I present in detail the development of Wetting in Color Technology, focusing primarily on its application as an inexpensive and highly selective colorimetric indicator for organic liquids. The technology exploits chemically-encoded inverse-opal photonic crystals to control the infiltration of fluids to liquid-specific spatial patterns, projecting minute differences in liquids' wettability to macroscopically distinct, easy-to-visualize structural color patterns. It is shown experimentally and corroborated with theoretical modeling using percolation theory that the high selectivity of wetting, upon-which the sensitivity of the indicator relies, is caused by the highly symmetric structure of our large-area, defect-free SiO2 inverse-opals. The regular structure also produces a bright iridescent color, which disappears when infiltrated with liquid - naturally coupling the optical and fluidic responses. Surface modification protocols are developed, requiring only silanization and selective oxidation, to facilitate the deterministic design of an indicator that differentiates a broad range of liquids. The resulting tunable, built-in horizontal and vertical chemistry gradients allow the wettability threshold to be tailored to specific liquids across a continuous range, and make the readout rely only on countable color differences. As wetting is a generic fluidic phenomenon, Wetting in Color technology could be suitable for applications in authentication or identification of unknown liquids across a broad range of industries. However, the generic nature of the response also ensures chemical non-specificity. It is shown

  13. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  14. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  15. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  16. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  17. Color correction using color-flow eigenspace model in color face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, JaeYoung; Ro, Yong Man

    2009-02-01

    We propose a new color correction approach which, as opposed to existing methods, take advantages of a given pair of two color face images (probe and gallery) in the color face recognition (FR) framework. In the proposed color correction method, the color-flow vector and color-flow eigenspace model are developed to generate color corrected probe images. The main contribution of this paper is threefold: 1) the proposed method can reliably compensate the non-linear photic variations imposed on probe face images comparing to traditional color correction techniques; 2) to the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we conduct extensive experiment studies to compare the effectiveness of various color correction methods to deal with photometrical distortions in probe images; 3) the proposed method can significantly enhance the recognition performance degraded by severely illuminant probe face images. Two standard face databases CMU PIE and XM2VTSDB were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed color correction method. The usefulness of the proposed method in the color FR is shown in terms of both absolute and comparative recognition performances against four traditional color correction solutions of White balance, Gray-world, Retinex, and Color-by-correlation.

  18. Unlocking the Color of White

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabiston, Duane

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes that teaching students how to unlock the color of white is his passion. Like so many other art teachers, he struggled for years teaching color wheels and making value scales, only to be frustrated when students produced colorful charts and then made colorless paintings. He was teaching students how to mix…

  19. Image indexing using color correlograms

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Jing; Kumar, Shanmugasundaram Ravi; Mitra, Mandar; Zhu, Wei-Jing

    2001-01-01

    A color correlogram is a three-dimensional table indexed by color and distance between pixels which expresses how the spatial correlation of color changes with distance in a stored image. The color correlogram may be used to distinguish an image from other images in a database. To create a color correlogram, the colors in the image are quantized into m color values, c.sub.i . . . c.sub.m. Also, the distance values k.epsilon.[d] to be used in the correlogram are determined where [d] is the set of distances between pixels in the image, and where dmax is the maximum distance measurement between pixels in the image. Each entry (i, j, k) in the table is the probability of finding a pixel of color c.sub.i at a selected distance k from a pixel of color c.sub.i. A color autocorrelogram, which is a restricted version of the color correlogram that considers color pairs of the form (i,i) only, may also be used to identify an image.

  20. Violating expectations of color order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burling, Bil; Bender, Walter R.

    1996-04-01

    An exploration of emotion in color communication is presented in this paper. It begins with an outline of a proposed theory of emotion and a hypothesis of how color may induce emotion. A discussion follows that details what is essential in a color message to predict emotional responses. Experiments are described that might assist in validating the theory put forth in this paper.

  1. Tinkertoy Color-Addition Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joe L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple home-built device, using an overhead projector, for use in demonstrations of the addition of various combinations of red, green, and blue light. Useful in connection with discussions of color, color vision, or color television. (JRH)

  2. Commanding Color and Versatile Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project for high school students that combines a still-life drawing with 12 colors of tempera paint colors to teach students about the color wheel. Discusses the process of creating the paintings and the assessment of students. Includes a list of the materials needed. (CMK)

  3. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  4. Astronomy with the Color Blind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Donald A.; Melrose, Justyn

    2014-01-01

    The standard method to create dramatic color images in astrophotography is to record multiple black and white images, each with a different color filter in the optical path, and then tint each frame with a color appropriate to the corresponding filter. When combined, the resulting image conveys information about the sources of emission in the…

  5. Crystalline silicotitanate gate review analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schlahta, S.N.; Carreon, R.; Gentilucci, J.A.

    1997-11-01

    Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) is an ion-exchange method for removing radioactive cesium from tank waste to allow the separation of the waste into high- and low-level fractions. The CST, originally developed Sandia National Laboratories personnel in association with Union Oil Products Corporation, has both a high affinity and selectivity for sorbing cesium-137 from highly alkaline or acidic solutions. For several years now, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded work to investigate applying CST to large-scale removal of cesium-137 from radioactive tank wastes. In January 1997, an expert panel sponsored by the Tanks Focus Area met to review the current state of the technology and to determine whether it was ready for routine use. The review also sought to identify any technical issues that must be resolved or additional CST development that must occur before full implementation by end-users. The CST Gate Review Group concluded that sufficient work has been done to close developmental work on CST and turn the remaining site-specific tasks over to the users. This report documents the review group`s findings, issues, concerns, and recommendations as well as responses from the Tanks Focus Area expert staff to specific pretreatment and immobilization issues.

  6. Radiolysis of crystalline nickel oxalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basahel, S. N.; Diefallah, El-H. M.; El-Fass, M. M.; Al-Sabban, E. A.

    Radiolysis of crystalline K 2Ni(C 2O 4) 2);6H 2O, K 2Ni(C 2O 4) 2 and Ni(C 2O 4));2H 2O has been investigated. The results showed that in K 2Ni(C 2O 4) 2);6H 2O, the initial G(Ni 3+) has a value of 3.75 and drops to about 1.27 when the dose approaches 1.2 × 10 22 eV g -1. The decrease in G(Ni 3+) with increasing radiation dose is accompanied with an increase in G(Ni 2+). In the irradiated anhydrated complex, the results however show an increase in G(Ni 3+) and a decrease in G(Ni 2+) with increasing radiation dose. The radiolysis of Ni(C 2O 4)·2H 2O showed an increase in G(Ni 3+) with increasing radiation dose. A mechanism has been suggested to explain the observed results.

  7. Spectral diversity crystalline fluoride lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jenssen, H.P.; Gabbe, D.R.; Linz, A.; Naiman, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Within the realm of crystalline laser materials, the class of fluorides distinguishes itself mostly by the wide variety of laser wavelengths displayed. Laser operation has now been reported from 3.9 micrometers in the infrared to 286 nm in the ultraviolet. Many are operated flash-lamp pumped, while others have shown high utility as linear down conversion lasers and rare earth ion, while others are sensitized by other co-dopants which absorb the pump energy and transfer it to the active laser ions. The potential of large spectral diversity for laser operation is due both to the wide window of transparency that fluorides possess and the lower rates of nonradiative decay. The high band gap in the ultraviolet also leads to low linear absorption, low nonlinear refractive indices and multiphoton absorption. Additionally, the good chemical stability displayed by high-purity stoichiometric fluoride compounds allows their use with ultraviolet pump sources at high energies, without incurring UV-induced damage. The most recent research associated with such materials, particularly the host crystal, lithium yttrium fluoride, LiYF4 (YLF) is reviewed.

  8. Hybridization of a flexible cyclooctatetraene core and rigid aceneimide wings for multiluminescent flapping π systems.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chunxue; Saito, Shohei; Camacho, Cristopher; Kowalczyk, Tim; Irle, Stephan; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2014-02-17

    The hybridization of flexible and rigid π-conjugated frameworks is a potent concept for producing new functional materials. In this article, a series of multifluorescent flapping π systems that combine a flexible cyclooctatetraene (COT) core and rigid aceneimide wings with various π-conjugation lengths has been designed and synthesized, and their structure/properties relationships have been investigated. Whereas these molecules have a V-shaped bent conformation in the ground state, the bent structure changes to a planar conformation in the lowest excited singlet (S1 ) state irrespective of the lengths of the aceneimide wings. However, the fluorescence behavior in solution is distinct between the naphthaleneimide system and the anthraceneimide system. The former has a nonemissive S1 state owing to the significant contribution of the antiaromatic character of the planar COT frontier molecular orbitals, thereby resulting in complete fluorescence quenching in solution. In contrast, the latter anthraceneimide system shows an intense emission, which is ascribed to the planar but distorted S1 state that shows the allowed transition between the π-molecular orbitals delocalized over the COT core and the acene wings. The other characteristic of these π systems is the significantly redshifted fluorescence in the crystalline state relative to their monomer fluorescence. The relationship between the packing structures and the fluorescence properties was investigated by preparing a series of hybrid π systems with different sizes of substituents on the imide moieties, which revealed the effect of the twofold π-stacked structure of the V-shaped molecules on the large bathochromic shift in emission. PMID:24458337

  9. Investigation of crystalline morphology in poly (ether ether ketone) using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalika, D.S.; Krishnaswamy, R.K.

    1993-12-31

    The relaxation behavior of poly (ether ether ketone) [PEEK] has been investigated using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy; the glass-rubber ({alpha}) relaxation and a sub-glass ({beta}) relaxation were examined for the amorphous material and both cold-crystallized and melt-crystallized specimens. Analysis of the data using the Cole-Cole modification of the Debye equation allowed determination of the dielectric relaxation strength and relaxation broadening parameter for both transitions as a function of material crystallization history. The crystallized specimens displayed a positive offset in isochronal loss temperature for both the {alpha} and {beta} relaxations, with the {alpha} relaxation broadened significantly. The measured dipolar response was interpreted using a three-phase morphological model encompassing a crystalline phase, a mobile amorphous phase, and a rigid amorphous phase. Determination of phase fractions based on dipolar mobilization across the glass-rubber relaxation revealed a finite rigid amorphous phase fraction for both the cold-crystallized specimens which was relatively insensitive to thermal history and degree of crystallinity (W{sub RAP}40.20).

  10. Color View of Ceres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope color image of Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt.

    Astronomers enhanced the sharpness in these Advanced Camera for Surveys images to bring out features on Ceres' surface, including brighter and darker regions that could be asteroid impact features. The observations were made in visible and ultraviolet light between December 2003 and January 2004.

    The colors represent the differences between relatively red and blue regions. These differences may simply be due to variation on the surface among different types of material.

    Ceres' round shape suggests that its interior is layered like those of terrestrial planets such as Earth. Ceres may have a rocky inner core, an icy mantle, and a thin, dusty outer crust inferred from its density and rotation rate of 9 hours. Ceres is approximately 590 miles (950 kilometers) across and was first discovered in 1801.

  11. 'Fram' in Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for 'Fram' in Color (QTVR)

    This view in approximately true color reveals details in an impact crater informally named 'Fram' in the Meridian Planum region of Mars. The picture is a mosaic of frames taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 88th martian day on Mars, on April 23, 2004. The crater spans about 8 meters (26 feet) in diameter. Opportunity paused beside it while traveling from the rover's landing site toward a larger crater farther east. This view combines images taken using three of the camera's filters for different wavelengths of light: 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers and 430 nanometers.

  12. Structural color in Myxomycetes.

    PubMed

    Inchaussandague, Marina; Skigin, Diana; Carmaran, Cecilia; Rosenfeldt, Sonia

    2010-07-19

    In this paper we report evidence of structural color in Myxomycetes, a group of eukaryotic microorganisms with an uncertain taxonomic position. We investigated the Diachea leucopoda, which belongs to the Physarales order, Myxomycetes class, and found that its peridium -protective layer that encloses the mass of spores- is basically a corrugated layer of a transparent material, which produces a multicolored pointillistic effect, characteristic of this species. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy techniques have been employed to characterize the samples. A simple optical model of a planar slab is proposed to calculate the reflectance. The chromaticity coordinates are obtained, and the results confirm that the color observed is a result of an interference effect. PMID:20720990

  13. Hitchhiking women's hair color.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas; Lamy, Lubomir

    2009-12-01

    To test the effect of women's hair color on the frequency of offering help, male (n = 1,508) and female (n = 892) French motorists were tested in a hitchhiking situation. Five 20- to 22- yr.-old female confederates wore a wig with blonde, brown, or black hair. Each confederate was instructed to stand by the side of a road frequented by hitchhikers and hold out her thumb to catch a ride. Blonde hair, compared with brown hair or black hair, was associated with a small but significantly larger number of male drivers who stopped to offer a ride (18 vs 14%). No difference was found for those with brown and black hair (14 and 13%, respectively). No effect of hair color was found for female drivers who stopped. The greater attractiveness associated with blonde hair for women appears to explain these data. PMID:20178293

  14. Callisto False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This false color picture of Callisto was taken by Voyager 2 on July 7, 1979 at a range of 1,094,666 kilometers (677,000 miles) and is centered on 11 degrees N and 171 degrees W. This rendition uses an ultraviolet image for the blue component. Because the surface displays regional contrast in UV, variations in surface materials are apparent. Notice in particular the dark blue haloes which surround bright craters in the eastern hemisphere. The surface of Callisto is the most heavily cratered of the Galilean satellites and resembles ancient heavily cratered terrains on the moon, Mercury and Mars. The bright areas are ejecta thrown out by relatively young impact craters. A large ringed structure, probably an impact basin, is shown in the upper left part of the picture. The color version of this picture was constructed by compositing black and white images taken through the ultraviolet, clear and orange filters.

  15. Authoritarianism, cognitive rigidity, and the processing of ambiguous visual information.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Lauren E; Peterson, Bill E

    2014-01-01

    Intolerance of ambiguity and cognitive rigidity are unifying aspects of authoritarianism as defined by Adorno, Frenkel-Brunswik, Levinson, and Sanford (1982/1950), who hypothesized that authoritarians view the world in absolute terms (e.g., good or evil). Past studies have documented the relationship between authoritarianism and intolerance of ambiguity and rigidity. Frenkel-Brunswik (1949) hypothesized that this desire for absolutism was rooted in perceptual processes. We present a study with three samples that directly tests the relationship between right wing authoritarianism (RWA) and the processing of ideologically neutral but ambiguous visual stimuli. As hypothesized, in all three samples we found that RWA was related to the slower processing of visual information that required participants to recategorize objects. In a fourth sample, RWA was unrelated to speed of processing visual information that did not require recategorization. Overall, results suggest a relationship between RWA and rigidity in categorization. PMID:25280165

  16. Magnetic rigid rotor in the quantum regime: Theoretical toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Cosimo C.; Romero-Isart, Oriol

    2016-02-01

    We describe the quantum dynamics of a magnetic rigid rotor in the mesoscopic scale where the Einstein-De Haas effect is predominant. In particular, we consider a single-domain magnetic nanoparticle with uniaxial anisotropy in a magnetic trap. Starting from the basic Hamiltonian of the system under the macrospin approximation, we derive a bosonized Hamiltonian describing the center-of-mass motion, the total angular momentum, and the macrospin degrees of freedom of the particle treated as a rigid body. This bosonized Hamiltonian can be approximated by a simple quadratic Hamiltonian that captures the rich physics of a nanomagnet tightly confined in position, nearly not spinning, and with its macrospin antialigned to the magnetic field. The theoretical tools derived and used here can be applied to other quantum mechanical rigid rotors.

  17. Method to estimate center of rigidity using vibration recordings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Celebi, Mehmet

    1990-01-01

    A method to estimate the center of rigidity of buildings by using vibration recordings is presented. The method is based on the criterion that the coherence of translational motions with the rotational motion is minimum at the center of rigidity. Since the coherence is a function of frequency, a gross but frequency-independent measure of the coherency is defined as the integral of the coherence function over the frequency. The center of rigidity is determined by minimizing this integral. The formulation is given for two-dimensional motions. Two examples are presented for the method; a rectangular building with ambient-vibration recordings, and a triangular building with earthquake-vibration recordings. Although the examples given are for buildings, the method can be applied to any structure with two-dimensional motions.

  18. Matrix rigidity optimizes the polarization of stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemel, Assaf; Rehfeldt, Florian; Brown, Andre; Discher, Dennis; Safran, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    We present a theoretical model and experiments to explain the non-monotonic dependence of stress-fiber polarization in stem cells on matrix rigidity. The theory generalizes the treatment of elastic inclusions to ``living'' inclusions (cells) whose active polarizability, unlike non-living matter, depends on the feedback of cellular forces that develop in response to matrix stresses. We demonstrate experimentally that the stress fibers in adult mesenchymal stem cells, generally orient parallel to the long axis of the cells, with an anisotropy that depends non-monotonically on substrate stiffness. Consistent with these experiments, our theory predicts that the magnitude of the cellular force increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity while the polarization anisotropy shows a maximum that depends on the cell shape and the elastic modulus of the medium. These findings offer a mechanical correlate for the observation that stem cell differentiation optimizes in a range of matrix rigidities that depends on the tissue type.

  19. Fire and ecotoxicological aspects of polyurethane rigid foam.

    PubMed

    Wittbecker, F W; Giersig, M

    2001-01-01

    The main characteristics of fire effluents from polyurethane (PUR) foams are comparable to those from natural materials like wood, cork, or wool. This similarity has been demonstrated by comparative data from analytical and toxicological studies. It is therefore presumed that effluents of these materials present similar hazards to human beings and the environment. In almost all fires, dioxins can be found in the smoke and residues. In fires involving PURs, relevant quantities of halogenated dioxins or furans are not to be expected; this has been confirmed by investigations under controlled laboratory conditions. The insulation properties of rigid PUR foam contribute significantly to environmental protection and the conservation of resources. A number of methods for reusing and recycling PUR rigid foam waste have been developed and realized in practise. The possibilities range from reusing the material itself, generating liquid raw materials, and thermal recycling, even for (H)CFC-containing PUR rigid foams, by cocombustion in suitable plants. PMID:11370381

  20. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review for Rigid Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    Rigid Foam is a chemical delay foam used to completely encapsulate an object or to block access to an area. Prior studies have indicated that the final foam product is essentially non-toxic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and summarize the current chemical and toxicological data available on the components of Rigid Foam and to update the information available on the toxicity of the final Rigid Foam product. Since the possibility exists for a partial deployment of Rigid Foam where only one of the components is released, this study also examined the toxicity of its chemical constituents. Rigid Foam is composed of an {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} Component. The {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} component is primarily a polymeric isocyanate and the {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} component is a mixture of polyols. In addition to the primary constituents, dichlorodifluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane are present as blowing agents along with catalysts and silicone surfactants necessary for foaming. The pre-deployed {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} components are stored in separate vessels and are brought together in static mixing nozzles for dispersal. The results of this evaluation indicate that a completely deployed Rigid Foam under normal conditions is essentially non-toxic as determined previously. However, in the event of a partial deployment or deployment of an individual component directly at an unprotected individual, the degree of hazard is increased due to the toxic and corrosive nature of the individual constituents. The health hazard would depend on the properties of the material to which the person was exposed.

  1. Ganymede Color Global

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Natural color view of Ganymede from the Galileo spacecraft during its first encounter with the satellite. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the right. The dark areas are the older, more heavily cratered regions and the light areas are younger, tectonically deformed regions. The brownish-gray color is due to mixtures of rocky materials and ice. Bright spots are geologically recent impact craters and their ejecta. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 13.4 kilometers across. The images which combine for this color image were taken beginning at Universal Time 8:46:04 UT on June 26, 1996.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  2. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  3. Color on emergency mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lili; Qi, Qingwen; Zhang, An

    2007-06-01

    There are so many emergency issues in our daily life. Such as typhoons, tsunamis, earthquake, fires, floods, epidemics, etc. These emergencies made people lose their lives and their belongings. Every day, every hour, even every minute people probably face the emergency, so how to handle it and how to decrease its hurt are the matters people care most. If we can map it exactly before or after the emergencies; it will be helpful to the emergency researchers and people who live in the emergency place. So , through the emergency map, before emergency is occurring we can predict the situation, such as when and where the emergency will be happen; where people can refuge, etc. After disaster, we can also easily assess the lost, discuss the cause and make the lost less. The primary effect of mapping is offering information to the people who care about the emergency and the researcher who want to study it. Mapping allows the viewers to get a spatial sense of hazard. It can also provide the clues to study the relationship of the phenomenon in emergency. Color, as the basic element of the map, it can simplify and clarify the phenomenon. Color can also affects the general perceptibility of the map, and elicits subjective reactions to the map. It is to say, structure, readability, and the reader's psychological reactions can be affected by the use of color.

  4. Colored Traveling Salesman Problem.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, MengChu; Sun, Qirui; Dai, Xianzhong; Yu, Xiaolong

    2015-11-01

    The multiple traveling salesman problem (MTSP) is an important combinatorial optimization problem. It has been widely and successfully applied to the practical cases in which multiple traveling individuals (salesmen) share the common workspace (city set). However, it cannot represent some application problems where multiple traveling individuals not only have their own exclusive tasks but also share a group of tasks with each other. This work proposes a new MTSP called colored traveling salesman problem (CTSP) for handling such cases. Two types of city groups are defined, i.e., each group of exclusive cities of a single color for a salesman to visit and a group of shared cities of multiple colors allowing all salesmen to visit. Evidences show that CTSP is NP-hard and a multidepot MTSP and multiple single traveling salesman problems are its special cases. We present a genetic algorithm (GA) with dual-chromosome coding for CTSP and analyze the corresponding solution space. Then, GA is improved by incorporating greedy, hill-climbing (HC), and simulated annealing (SA) operations to achieve better performance. By experiments, the limitation of the exact solution method is revealed and the performance of the presented GAs is compared. The results suggest that SAGA can achieve the best quality of solutions and HCGA should be the choice making good tradeoff between the solution quality and computing time. PMID:25494521

  5. Moon - False Color Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This false-color photograph is a composite of 15 images of the Moon taken through three color filters by Galileo's solid-state imaging system during the spacecraft's passage through the Earth-Moon system on December 8, 1992. When this view was obtained, the spacecraft was 425,000 kilometers (262,000 miles) from the Moon and 69,000 kilometers (43,000 miles) from Earth. The false-color processing used to create this lunar image is helpful for interpreting the surface soil composition. Areas appearing red generally correspond to the lunar highlands, while blue to orange shades indicate the ancient volcanic lava flow of a mare, or lunar sea. Bluer mare areas contain more titanium than do the orange regions. Mare Tranquillitatis, seen as a deep blue patch on the right, is richer in titanium than Mare Serenitatis, a slightly smaller circular area immediately adjacent to the upper left of Mare Tranquillitatis. Blue and orange areas covering much of the left side of the Moon in this view represent many separate lava flows in Oceanus Procellarum. The small purple areas found near the center are pyroclastic deposits formed by explosive volcanic eruptions. The fresh crater Tycho, with a diameter of 85 kilometers (53 miles), is prominent at the bottom of the photograph, where part of the Moon's disk is missing.

  6. Auditory color constancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluender, Keith R.; Kiefte, Michael

    2003-10-01

    It is both true and efficient that sensorineural systems respond to change and little else. Perceptual systems do not record absolute level be it loudness, pitch, brightness, or color. This fact has been demonstrated in every sensory domain. For example, the visual system is remarkable at maintaining color constancy over widely varying illumination such as sunlight and varieties of artificial light (incandescent, fluorescent, etc.) for which spectra reflected from objects differ dramatically. Results will be reported for a series of experiments demonstrating how auditory systems similarly compensate for reliable characteristics of spectral shape in acoustic signals. Specifically, listeners' perception of vowel sounds, characterized by both local (e.g., formants) and broad (e.g., tilt) spectral composition, changes radically depending upon reliable spectral composition of precursor signals. These experiments have been conducted using a variety of precursor signals consisting of meaningful and time-reversed vocoded sentences, as well as novel nonspeech precursors consisting of multiple filter poles modulating sinusoidally across a source spectrum with specific local and broad spectral characteristics. Constancy across widely varying spectral compositions shares much in common with visual color constancy. However, auditory spectral constancy appears to be more effective than visual constancy in compensating for local spectral fluctuations. [Work supported by NIDCD DC-04072.

  7. Training synesthetic letter-color associations by reading in color.

    PubMed

    Colizoli, Olympia; Murre, Jaap M J; Rouw, Romke

    2014-01-01

    Synesthesia is a rare condition in which a stimulus from one modality automatically and consistently triggers unusual sensations in the same and/or other modalities. A relatively common and well-studied type is grapheme-color synesthesia, defined as the consistent experience of color when viewing, hearing and thinking about letters, words and numbers. We describe our method for investigating to what extent synesthetic associations between letters and colors can be learned by reading in color in nonsynesthetes. Reading in color is a special method for training associations in the sense that the associations are learned implicitly while the reader reads text as he or she normally would and it does not require explicit computer-directed training methods. In this protocol, participants are given specially prepared books to read in which four high-frequency letters are paired with four high-frequency colors. Participants receive unique sets of letter-color pairs based on their pre-existing preferences for colored letters. A modified Stroop task is administered before and after reading in order to test for learned letter-color associations and changes in brain activation. In addition to objective testing, a reading experience questionnaire is administered that is designed to probe for differences in subjective experience. A subset of questions may predict how well an individual learned the associations from reading in color. Importantly, we are not claiming that this method will cause each individual to develop grapheme-color synesthesia, only that it is possible for certain individuals to form letter-color associations by reading in color and these associations are similar in some aspects to those seen in developmental grapheme-color synesthetes. The method is quite flexible and can be used to investigate different aspects and outcomes of training synesthetic associations, including learning-induced changes in brain function and structure. PMID:24638033

  8. Earth boring bit with pressure compensating rigid face seal

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, B. H.

    1985-05-14

    An earth boring bit having a cantilevered bearing shaft and a compensator system to equalize the pressure of the lubricant with the hydrostatic pressure of the drilling fluid surrounding the bit. A rigid face seal assembly, positioned between the cutter and bearing shaft of the bit, moves axially in response to, and to compensate for, dynamic pressure changes in the lubricant adjacent the seal. This is accomplished by the positioning and sizing of resilient energizer rings in relationship to the geometries of the mating grooves between the cutter and shaft and the rigid sealing rings of the face seal assembly.

  9. Shear-induced rigidity in spider silk glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Kristie J.; McKiernan, Keri; Akhenblit, Paul; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-09-01

    We measure the elastic stiffnesses of the concentrated viscous protein solution of the dehydrated Nephila clavipes major ampullate gland with Brillouin light scattering. The glandular material shows no rigidity but possesses a tensile stiffness similar to that of spider silk. We show, however, that with application of a simple static shear, the mechanical properties of the spider gland protein mixture can be altered irreversibly, lowering symmetry and enabling shear waves to be supported, thus, giving rise to rigidity and yielding elastic properties similar to those of the naturally spun (i.e., dynamically sheared) silk.

  10. [Relative rigidity of standardized gutta-percha points].

    PubMed

    Weiger, R; Dick, M; Löst, C

    1991-12-01

    Gutta-percha points often crack off when inserted in small and curved root canals before they have reached the full length of the canal. The goal of this investigation was to determine the relative rigidity of standardized gutta-percha points from different producers. It seems that not only significant differences between gutta-percha points of various producers, but also distinct variations between gutta-percha points from the same producer were detected. Several reasons for the differing rigidity of gutta-percha points are discussed. PMID:1817889

  11. Shape optimization of rigid inclusions for elastic plates with cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Viktor

    2016-06-01

    In the paper, we consider an optimal control problem of finding the most safe rigid inclusion shapes in elastic plates with cracks from the viewpoint of the Griffith rupture criterion. We make use of a general Kirchhoff-Love plate model with both vertical and horizontal displacements, and nonpenetration conditions are fulfilled on the crack faces. The dependence of the first derivative of the energy functional with respect to the crack length on regular shape perturbations of the rigid inclusion is analyzed. It is shown that there exists a solution of the optimal control problem.

  12. Bacterial Flagella as a Model Rigid Rod of Tunable Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Walter; Yardimci, Sevim; Gibaud, Thomas; Snow, Henry; Urbach, Jeff; Dogic, Zvonimir

    In this research, we study the physical properties of suspensions of bacterial flagella from Salmonella typhimurium prepared in a variety of rigid polymorphic shapes. Flagella act as a rigid colloidal particle that can exhibit non-trivial geometry including helices of varying dimensions, straight rods, or a combination of the two in the same filament. By controlling the conditions in which flagella are prepared, the polymorphic shape assumed by the filament can be controlled. Utilizing different polymorphic shapes, we combine results from optical microscopy observations of single filaments with bulk rheological measurements to help understand the role that constituent colloidal geometry plays in complex bulk behavior.

  13. Tracking Non-rigid Structures in Computer Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gezahegne, A; Kamath, C

    2008-01-10

    A key challenge in tracking moving objects is the correspondence problem, that is, the correct propagation of object labels from one time step to another. This is especially true when the objects are non-rigid structures, changing shape, and merging and splitting over time. In this work, we describe a general approach to tracking thousands of non-rigid structures in an image sequence. We show how we can minimize memory requirements and generate accurate results while working with only two frames of the sequence at a time. We demonstrate our results using data from computer simulations of a fluimix problem.

  14. Drag reduction characteristics of small amplitude rigid surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cary, A. M., Jr.; Weinstein, L. M.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of reducing drag by using rigid, wavy surfaces is investigated both analytically and experimentally. Although pressure drag for rigid sine-wave surfaces can be predicted empirically, viscous drag for even shallow waves was poorly predicted by state-of-the-art turbulent boundary layer calculation procedures. Calculations for the effects of geometric and fluid variables on total wave drag are presented under the philosophy that trends will be nearly correct even though levels are probably incorrect. Experiments by the present authors indicate that a total drag reduction with wavy walls is possible.

  15. The Rigid-Flexible System Dynamics Model of Highline Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Daoqi; Li, Nan; Zhang, Shiyun

    The paper researches rigid flexible system dynamics model of the rope, and used it to simulate sealift Highline based on the multi-body dynamics theory. Meanwhile the paper simulated to the sea dry cargo replenishment of transverse process, then gain the conclusion that the rigid flexible dynamic model get in the paper is more close to the Caucasus, and the dynamic calculation results closer to the actual situation, through the analysis of simulation results, and combined with the actual situation in the Caucasus the structure of overhead cable.

  16. Topology-Preserving Rigid Transformation of 2D Digital Images.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Phuc; Passat, Nicolas; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Talbot, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    We provide conditions under which 2D digital images preserve their topological properties under rigid transformations. We consider the two most common digital topology models, namely dual adjacency and well-composedness. This paper leads to the proposal of optimal preprocessing strategies that ensure the topological invariance of images under arbitrary rigid transformations. These results and methods are proved to be valid for various kinds of images (binary, gray-level, label), thus providing generic and efficient tools, which can be used in particular in the context of image registration and warping. PMID:26270925

  17. New generalizations of the integrable problems in rigid body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehia, H. M.

    1997-10-01

    We consider the general problem of motion of a rigid body about a fixed point under the action of an axisymmetric combination of potential and gyroscopic forces. We introduce six cases of this problem which are completely integrable for arbitrary initial conditions. The new cases generalize by several parameters all, but one, of the known results in the subject of rigid body dynamics. Namely, we generalize all the results due to Euler, Lagrange, Clebsch, Kovalevskaya, Brun and Lyapunov and also their subsequent generalizations by Rubanovsky and the present author.

  18. On the rigidity of polynorbornenes with dipolar pendant groups.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Murugesh, Modachur G; Sudhakar, Sundarraj; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Tai, Hwan-Ching; Chang, Chia-Seng; Liu, Yi-Hung; Wang, Yu; Chen, I-Wen Peter; Chen, Chun-Hsien; Luh, Tien-Yau

    2005-12-16

    A range of polynorbornenes (PNBs) with fused dipolar pendant groups at C-5,6 positions was synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization catalyzed by a ruthenium carbene complex (Grubbs I). Photophysical studies, EFISH measurements, and atomic force microscopy images have been used to investigate the structures and morphology of these polymers. These results suggest that the polymers may adopt rigid rod-like structures. The presence of the double bonds in PNBs appeared to be indispensable for the rigidity of the polymers. Interaction between unsaturated pendant groups may result in coherent alignment leading to a rod-like structure. PMID:16278915

  19. Spinal internuncial neurones in progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, D A; Lees, A J; Toghill, P J

    1979-01-01

    The clinical and pathological features of a fourth patient with progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity are reported and compared with those previously described. It is suggested that the muscular rigidity, abnormal postures, painful muscular spasms, and myoclonus are a product of excessive and abnormal discharges of alpha motor neurones caused by their release from control by spinal internuncial neurones. A count of neuronal perikarya in the ventral horns confirmed that the disease selectively destroyed small and medium sized neurones, most of which were spinal internuncial neurones. Experimental, clinical, and pathological evidence concerning spinal internuncial neurones is reviewed and found to conform to this theory. The pathogenesis of opsoclonus may be similar. Images PMID:501376

  20. Conduit for high temperature transfer of molten semiconductor crystalline material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiegl, George (Inventor); Torbet, Walter (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A conduit for high temperature transfer of molten semiconductor crystalline material consists of a composite structure incorporating a quartz transfer tube as the innermost member, with an outer thermally insulating layer designed to serve the dual purposes of minimizing heat losses from the quartz tube and maintaining mechanical strength and rigidity of the conduit at the elevated temperatures encountered. The composite structure ensures that the molten semiconductor material only comes in contact with a material (quartz) with which it is compatible, while the outer layer structure reinforces the quartz tube, which becomes somewhat soft at molten semiconductor temperatures. To further aid in preventing cooling of the molten semiconductor, a distributed, electric resistance heater is in contact with the surface of the quartz tube over most of its length. The quartz tube has short end portions which extend through the surface of the semiconductor melt and which are lef bare of the thermal insulation. The heater is designed to provide an increased heat input per unit area in the region adjacent these end portions.

  1. Transfer Printed Crystalline Nanomembrane for Versatile Electronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung-Hun

    Flexible electronics have traditionally been addressed low-frequency applications, since the materials for the traditional flexible electronics, such as polymer and non-crystalline inorganic semiconductors, have poor electronic properties. Fast flexible electronics that operate at radio frequencies (RF), particularly at microwave frequencies, could lead to a number of novel RF applications where rigid chip-based solid-state electronics cannot easily fulfill. Single-crystal semiconductor nanomembranes (NM) that can be released from a number of wafer sources are mechanically very flexible yet exhibit outstanding electronic properties that are equivalent to their bulky counterparts. These thin flexible single-crystal materials can furthermore be placed, via transfer printing techniques, to nearly any substrate, including flexible polymers, thus creating the opportunity to realize RF flexible electronics. In this thesis, various RF transistors made of semiconductor NMs on plastic substrates will be discussed. In addition, as a photonic application, the demonstration of large-area Si NM surface normal ultra-compact photonic crystal reflectors fabricated using the laser interference lithography technique (LIL) will be discussed. Particularly, the mechanism of LIL and NM transfer without using an adhesive layer will be introduced and their optical performance will be addressed. Lastly, the realization of selective substitutional boron doping, using heavily doped Si NM as a doping source, will be discussed. A detailed mechanism using computational modeling and experimental analyses will be provided. The fabrication of high voltage diamond p-i diodes and their performance will be discussed.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: color vision deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... represents a group of conditions that affect the perception of color. Red-green color vision defects are ... two forms of color vision deficiency disrupt color perception but do not affect the sharpness of vision ( ...

  3. Ionic motion in crystalline cryolite.

    PubMed

    Foy, Lindsay; Madden, Paul A

    2006-08-10

    The character of the ion dynamics in crystalline cryolite, Na(3)AlF(6), a model double perovskite-structured mineral, has been examined in computer simulations using a polarizable ionic potential obtained by force-fitting to ab initio electronic structure calculations. NMR studies, and conductivity measurements, have indicated a high degree of mobility, in both Na(+) ion diffusion and reorientation of the AlF(6) octahedral units. The simulations reproduce the low-temperature (tilted) crystal structure and the existence of a transition to a cubic structure at elevated temperatures, in agreement with diffraction measurements, though the calculated transition temperature is too low. The reorientational dynamics of the AlF(6) octahedra is shown to consist of a hopping motion between the various tilted positions of the low-temperature form, even above the transition temperature. The rate of reorientation estimated by extrapolation to the temperature régime of the NMR measurements is consistent with the experimental data. In addition, we report a novel cooperative "tilt-swapping" motion of the differently tilted sublattices, just below the transition temperature. The perfect crystals show no Na(+) diffusion, in apparent disagreement with observation. We argue, following previous analyses of the cryolite phase diagram, that the diffusion observed in the experimental studies is a consequence of defects that are intrinsic to the thermodynamically stable form of cryolite. By introducing defects into the simulation cell, we obtain diffusion rates that are consistent with the NMR and conductivity measurements. Finally, we demonstrate a link between diffusion of the Na(+) ions and the reorientation of AlF(6) units, though the correlation between the two is not very strong. PMID:16884249

  4. Binding of actin to lens alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Actin has been coupled to a cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column, then tested for binding to alpha, beta, and gamma crystallin preparations from the bovine lens. Alpha, but not beta or gamma, crystallins bound to the actin affinity column in a time dependent and saturable manner. Subfractionation of the alpha crystallin preparation into the alpha-A and alpha-B species, followed by incubation with the affinity column, demonstrated that both species bound approximately the same. Together, these studies demonstrate a specific and saturable binding of lens alpha-A and alpha-B with actin.

  5. High Resolution Quantification of Cellular Forces for Rigidity Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuaimin

    This thesis describes a comprehensive study of understanding the mechanism of rigidity sensing by quantitative analysis using submicron pillar array substrates. From mechanobiology perspective, we explore and study molecular pathways involved in rigidity and force sensing at cell-matrix adhesions with regard to cancer, regeneration, and development by quantification methods. In Chapter 2 and 3, we developed fabrication and imaging techniques to enhance the performance of a submicron pillar device in terms of spatial and temporal measurement ability, and we discovered a correlation of rigidity sensing forces and corresponding proteins involved in the early rigidity sensing events. In Chapter 2, we introduced optical effect arising from submicron structure imaging, and we described a technique to identify the correct focal plane of pillar tip by fabricating a substrate with designed-offset pillars. From calibration result, we identified the correct focal plane that was previously overlooked, and verified our findings by other imaging techniques. In Chapter 3, we described several techniques to selectively functionalize elastomeric pillars top and compared these techniques in terms of purposes and fabrication complexity. Techniques introduced in this chapter included direct labeling, such as stamping of fluorescent substances (organic dye, nano-diamond, q-dot) to pillars top, as well as indirect labeling that selectively modify the surface of molds with either metal or fluorescent substances. In Chapter 4, we examined the characteristics of local contractility forces and identified the components formed a sarcomere like contractile unit (CU) that cells use to sense rigidity. CUs were found to be assembled at cell edge, contain myosin II, alpha-actinin, tropomodulin and tropomyosin (Tm), and resemble sarcomeres in size (˜2 mum) and function. Then we performed quantitative analysis of CUs to evaluate rigidity sensing activity over ˜8 hours time course and found that

  6. Reasoning about color in Prolog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Bruce G.; Whelan, Paul F.

    1994-10-01

    The use of color as a basis for segmenting images is attractive for a wide variety of industrial inspection applications, especially in the manufacturing of domestic goods, food, pharmaceuticals, toiletries and electronics. Human beings define colors, not formulae, or computer programs. Moreover, no two people have an identical view of what a color set, such as 'canary yellow' is. The article argues that teaching by showing is more relevant than the accepted methods of Color Science, in the design of factory-floor vision systems. Fast hardware for color recognition has been available for several years but has not yet received universal acceptance. This article explains how this equipment can be used in conjunction with symbolic processing software, based on the Artificial Intelligence language Prolog. Using this hardware-software system, a programmer is able to express ideas about colors in a natural way. The concepts of color set union, intersection, generalization and interpolation are all discussed.

  7. Color stabilizes textbook visual processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeglis, Roberts; Orlovska, Madara; Bluss, Kristaps

    2011-05-01

    We report that pages with color illustrations elicit more homogeneous duration of fixations in 12 elementary school children. For six first graders, we compared the reading of the color cover and a greyscale illustrated text page of an abcbook. For six second grade pupils, we demonstrated a color and a greyscale fairytale book page. The fixations we recorded are concordant with the duration for preschoolers reported elsewhere. Average duration of fixations on a page with color elements are shorter than on greyscale ones, 425 (SE=13.4) and 461 (18.3) ms, respectively. The correlation analysis lends support that a color page is processed differently than its greyscale version. Fixation duration for color and greyscale condition was correlated neither for text (r=.567, p=.241) nor for images (r=.517, p=.294) for the second graders. Our research suggests that color elements on textbook pages encourage emergent readers to perform better in acquisition.

  8. Determination of CRT color gamut boundaries in perceptual color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Xu, Haisong

    2005-02-01

    CRT color gamut boundaries can be determined by two steps workflow. Firstly, the display should be calibrated with the method recommended by CIE to characterize the relationship between CIE tristimulus values and DAC values. The nonlinear relationship of each electronic channel between the color of the radiant output of CRT displays and the digital DAC values can be characterized accurately with GOG model using parameters of gain, offset, and gamma. Secondly, color gamut boundary can be determined using a fast and accurate algorithm. Generally, in a color space, any chosen degree of lightness will reduce that space to a plane. The color gamut on this equal-lightness plane can be transformed into RGB DAC value space. Since locations on the edges and surfaces of RGB DAC value space will correspond colors with relatively high saturation, the boundary of the curved surface in RGB DAC value space can be quickly computed for certain lightness. The accurate color gamut is obtained by mapping this boundary over to such a perceptual color space as CIELAB or CIELUV uniform color space. The key issue of this algorithm is to compute the equal-lightness curved surface in RGB DAC value space. The resolution of device gamut description depends on the number of segments that the lightness axis is separated into in the perceptual color space.

  9. 7 CFR 52.3760 - Color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... color of ripe type is determined by comparison with a spinning disc of variations in percentages of the... to the colors produced by the spinning discs. (d) Color appearance of green-ripe type. Normal color... purple or black olives. (e) The USDA spinning color discs and the USDA composite color standards cited...

  10. The State of Students of Color, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandal, Bruce A.

    This report reviews the educational experiences of students of color in Minnesota schools, colleges, and universities, highlighting students and communities of color; students of color K-12 enrollments; students of color K-12 achievement; students of color college success; early college awareness; and redefining success for students of color. The…

  11. Rigidity, sensitivity and quality of attachment: the role of maternal rigidity in the early socio-emotional development of premature infants.

    PubMed

    Butcher, P R; Kalverboer, A F; Minderaa, R B; van Doormaal, E F; ten Wolde, Y

    1993-01-01

    The associations between a mother's rigidity, her sensitivity in early (3 month) interaction and the quality of her premature infant's attachment at 13 months were investigated. Rigidity as a personality characteristic was not found to be significantly associated with sensitivity or quality of attachment. Rigid attitudes to child rearing were related to sensitivity and to the responsivity of the infant. Rigid attitudes were not related to security of attachment. Infants who were rated less responsive at 3 months, however, tended to be less securely attached, and high Attitude Rigidity in the mother increased their chances of an insecure attachment. PMID:8154297

  12. Acoustic propagation in rigid three-dimensional waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.

    1980-01-01

    The linear acoustic propagation in finite rigid three-dimensional waveguides is determined analytically using an eigenfunction expansion of the Helmholtz equation. The geometry considered consists of straight and circular bends of rectangular cross section with continuous interfaces (branches and sharp corners are excluded). The phenomena of resonance shift and relocation are explained for a bend-straight duct combination.

  13. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis. 890.3610 Section 890.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3610...

  14. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis. 890.3610 Section 890.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3610...

  15. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis. 890.3610 Section 890.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3610...

  16. Accuracy limit of rigid 3-point water models.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Saeed; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2016-08-21

    Classical 3-point rigid water models are most widely used due to their computational efficiency. Recently, we introduced a new approach to constructing classical rigid water models [S. Izadi et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 5, 3863 (2014)], which permits a virtually exhaustive search for globally optimal model parameters in the sub-space that is most relevant to the electrostatic properties of the water molecule in liquid phase. Here we apply the approach to develop a 3-point Optimal Point Charge (OPC3) water model. OPC3 is significantly more accurate than the commonly used water models of same class (TIP3P and SPCE) in reproducing a comprehensive set of liquid bulk properties, over a wide range of temperatures. Beyond bulk properties, we show that OPC3 predicts the intrinsic charge hydration asymmetry (CHA) of water - a characteristic dependence of hydration free energy on the sign of the solute charge - in very close agreement with experiment. Two other recent 3-point rigid water models, TIP3PFB and H2ODC, each developed by its own, completely different optimization method, approach the global accuracy optimum represented by OPC3 in both the parameter space and accuracy of bulk properties. Thus, we argue that an accuracy limit of practical 3-point rigid non-polarizable models has effectively been reached; remaining accuracy issues are discussed. PMID:27544113

  17. Review of Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy for Spastic and Rigidity Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obringer, S. John; Coffey, Kenneth M.

    2002-01-01

    Intrathecal baclofen therapy, a treatment for cerebral palsy and other spastic and rigidity disorders, is showing promise as an effective intervention. This article synthesizes both the medical and rehabilitation conceptual literature to update educators and related service providers as to the efficacy of this intervention. Implications for…

  18. Rigid indented cylindrical cathode for X-ray tube

    DOEpatents

    Hudgens, Claude R.

    1985-01-01

    A cathode assembly for a vacuum tube includes a wire filament, a straight bular anode parallel to and surrounding the wire filament, and insulating spacers for rigidly fastening the filament with respect to the anode, and with one side of the anode indented or flattened such that only one portion of the anode is heated to emitting temperatures by the filament.

  19. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... paraplegics walk. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... distribution before May 28, 1976. Any other rigid pneumatic structure orthosis shall have an approved PMA or...

  20. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... paraplegics walk. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... distribution before May 28, 1976. Any other rigid pneumatic structure orthosis shall have an approved PMA or...