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Sample records for rigid crystalline color

  1. Smeared gap equations in crystalline color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, M.

    2006-01-12

    In the framework of HDET, we discuss an averaging procedure of the NJL quark-quark interaction lagrangian, treated in the mean field approximation, for the two flavor LOFF phase of QCD. This procedure gives results which are valid in domains where Ginzburg-Landau results may be questionable. We compute and compare the free energy for different LOFF crystalline structures.

  2. Electrophoretic Deposition for Cholesteric Liquid-Crystalline Devices with Memory and Modulation of Reflection Colors.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shoichi; Itoh, Yoshimitsu; Yaguchi, Yuya; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo; Aida, Takuzo

    2016-06-01

    The first design strategy that allows both memorization and modulation of the liquid-crystalline reflection color is reported. Electrophoretic deposition of a tailored ionic chiral dopant is key to realizing this unprecedented function, which may pave the way for the development of full-color e-paper that can operate without the need of color filters. PMID:27027423

  3. Use of Rigid Liquid Crystalline Polypeptides as Alignment Matrices for Organic Nonlinear Optical Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarski, Zbigniew

    The orientation of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic molecules is crucial for the existence of high values for the macroscopic susceptibilities. The orientation and interaction of several smaller NLO active molecules with an easily alignable polypeptide host was investigated to determine which functional groups and molecular shapes would produce the largest orientation with the host material; these parameters included aromatic vs aliphatic, polar vs nonpolar, saturate vs unsaturated hydrocarbons and the length of the guest molecule. The host materials were either poly ( gamma-benzyl-l-glutamate) (PBLG) or poly ( gamma-ethyl-l-glutamate) (PELG) lyotropic liquid crystals. These host polymers formed pseudo-hexagonal crystalline structures with long rigid alpha -helical backbones. The interstitial alignment of the guest molecules was dictated by the overall alignment of the host polypeptide rigid rods. Within these films many of the guest molecules existed in a metastable state that delayed phase separation for several hours. The rate of phase separation was influenced by the concentration of the guest molecule and on the side chain moiety of the polypeptide. Guest phase separation to a solid or a liquid occurred at a faster rate in PELG films, due to the lack of the side chain induced hindrance, than in PBLG films. An indicator of the occurrence of phase separation was with the onset of opaqueness in the films. The thin polypeptide films containing the aligned guest molecules became optically opaque as the incompatibilities between the side chains of the polypeptides and the guest molecules increased. The nonlinear optical susceptibility measurements were hampered by either the low guest solubility or the low concentration level required to avoid the guest -host incompatibility. Electro-optic and degenerate two and four wave mixing were done and produced signals in solutions but not in the doped films. The semiflexible aromatic guest molecules, such as the derivatives

  4. Use of Crystalline Boron as a Burn Rate Retardant toward the Development of Green-Colored Handheld Signal Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Jesse J.; Poret, Jay C.; Broad, Russell N.

    2011-10-01

    The effect of using crystalline boron in green-colored handheld signal formulations is described. Due to its chemically inert nature, crystalline boron served to reduce the burn rates of the formulations. By adjusting crystalline boron percentages in the formulations, the pyrotechnic system could be tuned to meet burn time specifications.

  5. Design and characterization of an optimized simultaneous color and near-infrared fluorescence rigid endoscopic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vivek; Park, Minho; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Frangioni, John V.; Gangadharan, Sidhu P.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-12-01

    We report the design, characterization, and validation of an optimized simultaneous color and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence rigid endoscopic imaging system for minimally invasive surgery. This system is optimized for illumination and collection of NIR wavelengths allowing the simultaneous acquisition of both color and NIR fluorescence at frame rates higher than 6.8 fps with high sensitivity. The system employs a custom 10-mm diameter rigid endoscope optimized for NIR transmission. A dual-channel light source compatible with the constraints of an endoscope was built and includes a plasma source for white light illumination and NIR laser diodes for fluorescence excitation. A prism-based 2-CCD camera was customized for simultaneous color and NIR detection with a highly efficient filtration scheme for fluorescence imaging of both 700- and 800-nm emission dyes. The performance characterization studies indicate that the endoscope can efficiently detect fluorescence signal from both indocyanine green and methylene blue in dimethyl sulfoxide at the concentrations of 100 to 185 nM depending on the background optical properties. Finally, we performed the validation of this imaging system in vivo during a minimally invasive procedure for thoracic sentinel lymph node mapping in a porcine model.

  6. Design and characterization of an optimized simultaneous color and near-infrared fluorescence rigid endoscopic imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vivek; Park, Minho; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Frangioni, John V.; Gangadharan, Sidhu P.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We report the design, characterization, and validation of an optimized simultaneous color and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence rigid endoscopic imaging system for minimally invasive surgery. This system is optimized for illumination and collection of NIR wavelengths allowing the simultaneous acquisition of both color and NIR fluorescence at frame rates higher than 6.8 fps with high sensitivity. The system employs a custom 10-mm diameter rigid endoscope optimized for NIR transmission. A dual-channel light source compatible with the constraints of an endoscope was built and includes a plasma source for white light illumination and NIR laser diodes for fluorescence excitation. A prism-based 2-CCD camera was customized for simultaneous color and NIR detection with a highly efficient filtration scheme for fluorescence imaging of both 700- and 800-nm emission dyes. The performance characterization studies indicate that the endoscope can efficiently detect fluorescence signal from both indocyanine green and methylene blue in dimethyl sulfoxide at the concentrations of 100 to 185 nM depending on the background optical properties. Finally, we performed the validation of this imaging system in vivo during a minimally invasive procedure for thoracic sentinel lymph node mapping in a porcine model. PMID:24362927

  7. Constraining crystalline color superconducting quark matter with gravitational-wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lap-Ming

    2007-10-01

    We estimate the maximum equatorial ellipticity sustainable by compact stars composed of crystalline color-superconducting quark matter. For the theoretically allowed range of the gap parameter Δ, the maximum ellipticity could be as large as 10-2, which is about 4 orders of magnitude larger than the tightest upper limit obtained by the recent science runs of the LIGO and GEO600 gravitational-wave detectors based on the data from 78 radio pulsars. We point out that the current gravitational-wave strain upper limit already has some implications for the gap parameter. In particular, the upper limit for the Crab pulsar implies that Δ is less than O(20)MeV for a range of quark chemical potential accessible in compact stars, assuming that the pulsar has a mass 1.4M⊙, radius 10 km, breaking strain 10-3, and that it has the maximum quadrupole deformation it can sustain without fracturing.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and gelation and development of liquid crystalline order during isothermal cure of rigid rod epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seunghyun

    The liquid crystalline thermoset monomers 4,4'-diglycidyloxy-alpha-methylstilbene (DOMS) and D2A1 that resulted from reaction between DOMS and aniline were synthesized. The monomers were characterized with cross-polarized optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). DOMS showed monotropic liquid crystalline mesophase and D2A1 showed smectic phase even at room temperature and turned into nematic then cleared upon heating. DOMS was cured with sulfanilamide (SAA) and D2A1 was cured with catalytic curing agent, 1-methyl imidazole (MI). Thermal stability tests of DOMS-SAA, D2A1-MI and commercial nonliquid crystalline epoxy, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) SAA system via dynamic TGA shows that the factor that most influences thermal stability is the molecular structure of the material itself rather than liquid crystalline phases. The %conversion data were determined from dynamic DSC scan to examine the applicability of Flory's gelation theory. The results reveal that even though the amount of reaction that occurs in the liquid crystalline phase is different at different cure temperatures, the isoconversion theory of gelation fits quite well. The actual average value of the conversion at the gel point is 0.677, which is slightly higher than the calculated theoretical value of 0.577 because of the failed assumptions of this theory. That is, there might be reactivity differences among the same types of functional groups and intramolecular connections are possible. The phase transitions do not show isoconversion behavior in contrast to gelation. Instead, the conversion where phase changes from isotropic to a liquid crystalline phase tends to increase with temperature because the critical length of the molecules needed for the liquid crystallinity increases with temperature.

  9. Equilibrium sequences of nonrotating and rapidly rotating crystalline color-superconducting hybrid stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ippolito, Nicola D.; Ruggieri, Marco; Rischke, Dirk H.; Sedrakian, Armen; Weber, Fridolin

    2008-01-01

    The three-flavor crystalline color-superconducting (CCS) phase of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is a candidate phase for the ground state of cold matter at moderate densities above the density of the deconfinement phase transition. Apart from being a superfluid, the CCS phase has properties of a solid, such as a lattice structure and a shear modulus, and hence the ability to sustain multipolar deformations in gravitational equilibrium. We construct equilibrium configurations of hybrid stars composed of nuclear matter at low, and CCS quark matter at high, densities. Phase equilibrium between these phases is possible only for rather stiff equations of state of nuclear matter and large couplings in the effective Nambu—Jona-Lasinio Lagrangian describing the CCS state. We identify a new branch of stable CCS hybrid stars within a broad range of central densities which, depending on the details of the equations of state, either bifurcate from the nuclear sequence of stars when the central density exceeds that of the deconfinement phase transition or form a new family of configurations separated from the purely nuclear sequence by an instability region. The maximum masses of our nonrotating hybrid configurations are consistent with the presently available astronomical bounds. The sequences of hybrid configurations that rotate near the mass-shedding limit are found to be more compact and thus support substantially larger spins than their same mass nuclear counterparts.

  10. Testing the Ginzburg-Landau approximation for three-flavor crystalline color superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Rajagopal, Krishna; Sharma, Rishi

    2006-06-01

    It is an open challenge to analyze the crystalline color superconducting phases that may arise in cold dense, but not asymptotically dense, three-flavor quark matter. At present the only approximation within which it seems possible to compare the free energies of the myriad possible crystal structures is the Ginzburg-Landau approximation. Here, we test this approximation on a particularly simple “crystal” structure in which there are only two condensates ⟨us⟩˜Δexp⁡(iq2·r) and ⟨ud⟩˜Δexp⁡(iq3·r) whose position-space dependence is that of two plane waves with wave vectors q2 and q3 at arbitrary angles. For this case, we are able to solve the mean-field gap equation without making a Ginzburg-Landau approximation. We find that the Ginzburg-Landau approximation works in the Δ→0 limit as expected, find that it correctly predicts that Δ decreases with increasing angle between q2 and q3 meaning that the phase with q2∥q3 has the lowest free energy, and find that the Ginzburg-Landau approximation is conservative in the sense that it underestimates Δ at all values of the angle between q2 and q3.

  11. Human lens coloration and aging. Evidence for crystallin modification by the major ultraviolet filter, 3-hydroxy-kynurenine O-beta-D-glucoside.

    PubMed

    Hood, B D; Garner, B; Truscott, R J

    1999-11-12

    The human lens becomes increasingly yellow with age and thereby reduces our perception of blue light. This coloration is associated with lens proteins (crystallins), but its molecular basis was unknown. Here we show that the coloration occurs because of the interaction of crystallins with a UV filter compound, 3-hydroxykynurenine glucoside (3-OHKG). Crystallin modification results from deamination of the 3-OHKG amino acid side chain, yielding an unsaturated ketone that is susceptible to nucleophilic attack by cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues. This novel protein modification contributes to age-related lens coloration and may play a role in human nuclear cataractogenesis. PMID:10551806

  12. Ginzburg-Landau Free Energy of Crystalline Color Superconductors: A Matrix Formalism from Solid-State Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gao-Qing; He, Lian-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The Ginzburg-Landau (GL) free energy of crystalline color superconductors is important for understanding the nature of the phase transition to the normal quark matter and predicting the preferred crystal structure. So far the GL free energy at zero temperature has only been evaluated up to the sixth order in the condensate. To give quantitative reliable predictions we need to evaluate the higher-order terms. In this work, we present a new derivation of the GL free energy by using the discrete Bloch representation of the fermion field. This derivation introduces a simple matrix formalism without any momentum constraint, which may enable us to calculate the GL free energy to arbitrary order by using a computer. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11335005 and the Ministry of Science and Technology under Grant Nos. 2013CB922000 and 2014CB845400, and by the US Department of Energy Topical Collaboration “Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Matter”

  13. Mechanoresponsive change in photoluminescent color of rod-like liquid-crystalline compounds and control of molecular orientation on photoaligned layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Mizuho; Miura, Seiya; Okumoto, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Mayuko; Fukae, Ryohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we reported novel liquid-crystalline luminophore that switches its photoluminescent color by mechanically grinding. Mechanochromic luminescence (MCL) is expected for mechanical sensor, cellular imaging, detection of microenvironmental changes, and optical memory. In this work, we focused on liquid-crystalline MCL compounds on alignment layer. Controlling the molecular alignment of MCL compounds with photoalignment layer have potential to succeed in functional MCL film such as polarized micropatterned MCL and directional detection of mechanical stimuli. Herein, we prepared asymmetric rodlike MCL compounds containing cyano- and pyridyl molecular terminal and explored their photoluminescence behavior under mechanical stimulus. The cyano terminated compound showed a nematic phase and tuned its photoluminescent color from green to yellow upon grinding, while the pyridyl-terminated compounds that show no mesophase changed its photoluminescent color from blue to green and reverted to its initial color by heating above its melting point. The cyano-terminated MCL was aligned along the orientation direction of photoalignment layer and pyridyl-terminated MCL exhibited uniaxial alignment when it coated on photoaligned film containing carboxylic acid.

  14. The rigidity of three flavor quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rishi; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Cold three flavor quark matter at large (but not asymptotically large) densities may exist in a crystalline color superconducting phase. These phases are characterized by a gap parameter {Delta} that varies periodieally in space, forming a crystal structure. A Ginzburg-Landau expansion in {Delta} shows that two crystal structures based on cubic symetry are particularly favorable, and may be the ground state of matter at densities present in neutron star cores. We derive the effective action for the phonon fields that describe space-and time-dependent fluctuations of the crystal structure formed by {Delta}, and obtain the shear modulus from the coefficients of the spatial derivative terms. Within a Ginzburg-Landau approximation, we find shear moduli which are 20 to 1000 times larger than those of neutron star crusts. This phase ofmatter is thus more rigid than any known material in the universe, but at the same time the crystalline color superconducting phase is also superftuid. These properties raise the possibility that the presence of this phase within neutron stars may have distinct implications for their phenomenology. For example, (some) pulsar glitches may originate in crystalline superconducting neutron star cores.

  15. Effect of ionic surfactants on the iridescent color in lamellar liquid crystalline phase of a nonionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjiang; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Goh; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Ohtani, Bunsho; Tsujii, Kaoru

    2007-01-15

    A nonionic surfactant, n-dodecyl glyceryl itaconate (DGI), self-assembles into bilayer membranes in water having a spacing distance of sub-micrometer in the presence of small amounts of ionic surfactants, and shows beautiful iridescent color. Ionic surfactants have strong effects on this iridescent system. We have interestingly found that the iridescent color changes with time after mixing DGI and ionic surfactants and the color in equilibrium state changes greatly with concentration of the ionic surfactants. The time-dependent color change results from the transformation of DGI aggregate structure after being mixed with ionic surfactant. It is first found that the iridescent color of this nonionic system can be changed from red to deep blue by altering the concentration of ionic surfactants added even though the total concentration of surfactant is almost constant. Such large blue shift of the iridescent color in equilibrium state cannot be fully explained by the ordinary undulation theory applied so far for this phenomenon. The flat lamellar sheets tend to curve by increasing the concentration of ionic surfactants to form separated onion-like and/or myelin-like structures. These separated structures of lamellar system result in the decrease of spacing distance between bilayer membranes because some vacant spaces necessarily appear among these structures. PMID:17046012

  16. Configuration effects of H-bonded sites and rigid core lengths on h-bonded banana-shaped liquid crystalline supramolecules consisting of symmetric trimers and asymmetric heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Yung; Chiang, I-Hung; Yang, Po-Jen; Li, Wan-Sheung; Chao, I-To; Lin, Hong-Cheu

    2009-11-01

    Several series of novel banana-shaped H-bonded symmetric trimers (with two H-bonds) and asymmetric heterodimers (with one H-bond) were self-assembled by appropriate molar ratios of proton donors (H-donors) and acceptors (H-acceptors). The influences of H-bonded linking positions and aromatic ring numbers (4-8 aromatic rings in the rigid cores) as well as the chain lengths (n, m = 12 or 16, respectively, in the flexible parts) on the mesomorphism and the switching behavior of the bent-core supramolecules were evaluated and theoretically analyzed. Except for the supramolecular structures with longer rigid cores or shorter flexible chains possessing the rectangular columnar (Col(r) or B1) phase, the SmC(A)P(A) phase was revealed in most supramolecular asymmetric heterodimers and switched to the SmC(S)P(F) phase by applying electric fields. The polar smectic C phase was dominated for those with H-bonded sites apart from the core center. Interestingly, the SmA and nematic phases were observed in H-bonded asymmetric dimers with H-bonded sites close to the core center, which theoretically proved that the polar smectic C phase was disfavored due to an unfavorable bend angle (smaller than the lower limit of 110 degrees ) in the lowest-energy H-bonded conformer. Compared with the fully covalently bonded analogue, lower transition temperatures and lower threshold voltages were developed in the H-bonded asymmetric dimers with the polar smectic C phase. On the basis of the theoretical calculations of molecular modeling, the existence of polar switching behavior in the polar smectic C phase of asymmetric heterodimers was proven to be associated with their configurations with higher dipole moments and suitable bend angles. Furthermore, the lack of polar switching behavior in supramolecular symmetric trimers, which exhibited the regular SmC phase with weak electrical stabilities, was related to their configurations with smaller dipole moments and confirmed by theoretical

  17. Abdominal rigidity

    MedlinePlus

    Rigidity of the abdomen ... is a sore area inside the belly or abdomen, the pain will get worse when a hand ... Causes can include: Abscess inside the abdomen Appendicitis ... small intestine, large bowel, or gallbladder ( gastrointestinal ...

  18. Rigid molecular foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Aspen, P.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability, and processing. Rigid molecular foams or {open_quotes}organic zeolites{close_quotes} would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with dichloroxylene (DCX) as the pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and the crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6 {angstrom} to 2,000 {angstrom}.

  19. Rigid bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Machuzak, Michael S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction to rigid bronchoscopy (RB). We will briefly discuss its history, evolution, and resurgence while we highlight its versatility and usefulness for today's interventional pulmonologist and thoracic surgeon. Despite being one of the earliest pulmonary procedures described, RB is still an important technique. Advances in thoracic medicine have made this skill critical for a fully functional interventional pulmonary program. If the interventional pulmonologist of this century is to be successful, he or she should be facile in this technique. Despite the availability of RB for decades, the invention of flexible bronchoscopy in 1966 led to a significant downturn in its usage. The growth of the interventional pulmonology field brought RB back into the spot light. Apart from the historic role of RB in treatment of central airway lesions and mechanical debulking of endobronchial lesions, RB is the key instrument that can adapt modern therapeutic tools such as laser, argon plasma coagulation, electrocautery, cryotherapy, and stent deployment. Performing RB requires proper preprocedure preparation, exceptional understanding of upper airway anatomy, specific hand-eye coordination, and open communication between the bronchoscopist and the anesthesiologist. These skills can be primarily learned and maintained with repetition. This article will review information relevant to this technique and lay a foundation to be built upon for years to come. PMID:25463158

  20. Rigid plastic collars for marking geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballou, R.M.; Martin, F.W.

    1964-01-01

    Rigid plastic collars of one to three colors proved useful for recognition of individual Canada geese (Branta canadensis). The collars did not seem to affect the behavior of the geese, and there was little mortality caused by their use. In good light, bright colors are visible through a 20-power spotting scope for more than 1 mile. Retention of collars was about 90 percent for 1 year and more than 80 percent for 2 years.

  1. Rigid particulate matter sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Matthew

    2011-02-22

    A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

  2. Pneumatically erected rigid habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salles, Bradley

    1992-01-01

    The pneumatically erected rigid habitat concept consists of a structure based on an overexpanded metal bellows. The basic concept incorporates the advantages of both inflatable and rigid structures. The design and erection detail are presented with viewgraphs.

  3. An Electropolymerized Crystalline Film Incorporating Axially-Bound Metalloporphycenes: Remarkable Reversibility, Reproducibility, and Coloration Efficiency of Ruthenium(II/III)-Based Electrochromism.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masaaki; Futagawa, Hiroki; Ono, Toshikazu; Yamada, Teppei; Kimizuka, Nobuo; Hisaeda, Yoshio

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative electropolymeization of an axially bound, bithiophene-pyridine complex of ruthenium(III)-porphycene [Ru(TPrPc) (btp)2]PF6 (1) gives a submicrometer-thick, polymeric film on an ITO electrode with a crystalline morphology. The polymeric film, the first example of axially linked multimetalloporphycene coordination arrays, exhibits highly stable and reproducible electrochromic response with high electrochromic efficiency upon electrochemical control over the metal-centered electron transfer process (Ru(II)/Ru(III)). PMID:26569481

  4. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Stevenson, Paige; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers advantages of low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semi-rigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers.

  5. Fracturing rigid materials.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhaosheng; Hong, Jeong-Mo; Teran, Joseph; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to fracturing (and denting) brittle materials. To avoid the computational burden imposed by the stringent time step restrictions of explicit methods or with solving nonlinear systems of equations for implicit methods, we treat the material as a fully rigid body in the limit of infinite stiffness. In addition to a triangulated surface mesh and level set volume for collisions, each rigid body is outfitted with a tetrahedral mesh upon which finite element analysis can be carried out to provide a stress map for fracture criteria. We demonstrate that the commonly used stress criteria can lead to arbitrary fracture (especially for stiff materials) and instead propose the notion of a time averaged stress directly into the FEM analysis. When objects fracture, the virtual node algorithm provides new triangle and tetrahedral meshes in a straightforward and robust fashion. Although each new rigid body can be rasterized to obtain a new level set, small shards can be difficult to accurately resolve. Therefore, we propose a novel collision handling technique for treating both rigid bodies and rigid body thin shells represented by only a triangle mesh. PMID:17218752

  6. Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapatsis, Michael (Inventor); Lai, Zhiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    In certain aspects, the invention features methods for forming crystalline membranes (e.g., a membrane of a framework material, such as a zeolite) by inducing secondary growth in a layer of oriented seed crystals. The rate of growth of the seed crystals in the plane of the substrate is controlled to be comparable to the rate of growth out of the plane. As a result, a crystalline membrane can form a substantially continuous layer including grains of uniform crystallographic orientation that extend through the depth of the layer.

  7. Rigidity of melting DNA.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation. PMID:27300825

  8. Rigidity of melting DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation.

  9. Effective rigidity of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliti, L.

    1986-12-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations of shape (undulations) in reducing the effective rigidity of membranes is reviewed. The consequences of this effect on vesicle size distribution and on the structure of microemulsions, as well as on other physical phenomena, are sketched.

  10. Electrostatics of Rigid Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The organization of rigid biological polyelectrolytes by multivalent ions and macroions are important for many fundamental problems in biology and biomedicine, such as cytoskeletal regulation and antimicrobial sequestration in cystic fibrosis. These polyelectrolytes have been used as model systems for understanding electrostatics in complex fluids. Here, we review some recent results in theory, simulations, and experiments.

  11. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semirigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers. This paper will also highlight the interactions between academia and small businesses in developing new products and processes.

  12. Great apes select tools on the basis of their rigidity.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Héctor Marín; Gross, Alexandra Nam-Mi; Call, Josep

    2010-10-01

    Wild chimpanzees select tools according to their rigidity. However, little is known about whether choices are solely based on familiarity with the materials or knowledge about tool properties. Furthermore, it is unclear whether tool manipulation is required prior to selection or whether observation alone can suffice. We investigated whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) (n = 9), bonobos (Pan paniscus) (n = 4), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) (n = 6), and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) (n = 2) selected new tools on the basis of their rigidity. Subjects faced an out-of-reach reward and a choice of three tools differing in color, diameter, material, and rigidity. We used 10 different 3-tool sets (1 rigid, 2 flexible). Subjects were unfamiliar with the tools and needed to select and use the rigid tool to retrieve the reward. Experiment 1 showed that subjects chose the rigid tool from the first trial with a 90% success rate. Experiments 2a and 2b addressed the role of manipulation and observation in tool selection. Subjects performed equally well in conditions in which they could manipulate the tools themselves or saw the experimenter manipulate the tools but decreased their performance if they could only visually inspect the tools. Experiment 3 showed that subjects could select flexible tools (as opposed to rigid ones) to meet new task demands. We conclude that great apes spontaneously selected unfamiliar rigid or flexible tools even after gathering minimal observational information. PMID:20718558

  13. Color tunable and near white-light emission of two solvent-induced 2D lead(II) coordination networks based on a rigid ligand 1-tetrazole-4-imidazole-benzene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Zhi-Fa; Wang, Shuai-Hua; Xiao, Yu; Li, Rong; Xu, Jian-Gang; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Zheng, Fa-Kun; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2015-06-01

    Two new lead(II) coordination polymers, [Pb(NO3)(tzib)]n (1) and [Pb(tzib)2]n (2), were successfully synthesized from the reaction of a rigid ligand 1-tetrazole-4-imidazole-benzene (Htzib) and lead(II) nitrate in different solvents. The obtained polymers have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, which show that both polymers feature 2D layer structures. The inorganic anion nitrate in 1 shows a μ2-κO3:κO3 bridging mode to connect adjacent lead ions into a zigzag chain, and then the organic ligands tzib(-) join the neighboring chains into a 2D layer by a μ3-κN1:κN2:κN6 connection mode. In 2, there are two different bridging modes of the tzib(-) ligand: μ3-κN1:κN2:κN6 and μ3-κN1:κN6 to coordinate the lead ions into a 2D layer structure. Interestingly, both polymers displayed broadband emissions covering the entire visible spectra, which could be tunable to near white-light emission by varying excitation wavelengths. PMID:25952460

  14. How rigid are viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartschuh, R. D.; Wargacki, S. P.; Xiong, H.; Neiswinger, J.; Kisliuk, A.; Sihn, S.; Ward, V.; Vaia, R. A.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2008-08-01

    Viruses have traditionally been studied as pathogens, but in recent years they have been adapted for applications ranging from drug delivery and gene therapy to nanotechnology, photonics, and electronics. Although the structures of many viruses are known, most of their biophysical properties remain largely unexplored. Using Brillouin light scattering, we analyzed the mechanical rigidity, intervirion coupling, and vibrational eigenmodes of Wiseana iridovirus (WIV). We identified phonon modes propagating through the viral assemblies as well as the localized vibrational eigenmode of individual viruses. The measurements indicate a Young’s modulus of ˜7GPa for single virus particles and their assemblies, surprisingly high for “soft” materials. Mechanical modeling confirms that the DNA core dominates the WIV rigidity. The results also indicate a peculiar mechanical coupling during self-assembly of WIV particles.

  15. Liquid crystalline order in mucus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viney, C.; Huber, A. E.; Verdugo, P.

    1993-01-01

    Mucus plays an exceptionally wide range of important biological roles. It operates as a protective, exchange, and transport medium in the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems of humans and other vertebrates. Mucus is a polymer hydrogel. It is secreted as discrete packages (secretory granules) by specialized secretory cells. Mucus hydrogel is stored in a condensed state inside the secretory granules. Depending upon the architecture of their constituent macromolecules and on the composition of the solvent, polymer gels can form liquid crystalline microstructures, with orientational order being exhibited over optically resolvable distances. Individual mucin molecules consist of alternating rigid segments (heavily glycosylated; hydrophilic) and flexible segments (nonglycosylated; hydrophobic). Polymer molecules consisting of rigid units linked by flexible spacers are frequently associated with liquid crystalline behavior, which again raises the possibility that mucus could form anisotropic fluid phases. Suggestions that mucins may be self-associating in dilute solution have previously been challenged on the basis of sedimentation-equilibrium studies performed on mucus in which potential sites of association were competitively blocked with inhibitors. However, the formation of stable liquid crystalline phases does not depend on the existence of inter- or intramolecular associations; these phases can form on the basis of steric considerations alone.

  16. Advanced Rigid Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate s (ESMD) Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project (TDP) and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate s (ARMD) Hypersonics Project are developing new advanced rigid ablators in an effort to substantially increase reliability, decrease mass, and reduce life cycle cost of rigid aeroshell-based entry systems for multiple missions. Advanced Rigid Ablators combine ablation resistant top layers capable of high heat flux entry and enable high-speed EDL with insulating mass-efficient bottom that, insulate the structure and lower the areal weight. These materials may benefit Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) vendors and may potentially enable new NASA missions for higher velocity returns (e.g. asteroid, Mars). The materials have been thermally tested to 400-450 W/sq cm at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Lab (LHMEL), Hypersonics Materials Evaluation Test System (HyMETS) and in arcjet facilities. Tested materials exhibit much lower backface temperatures and reduced recession over the baseline materials (PICA). Although the EDL project is ending in FY11, NASA in-house development of advanced ablators will continue with a focus on varying resin systems and fiber/resin interactions.

  17. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... rose in full bloom. If you have a color vision defect, you may see these colors differently than most people. There are three main kinds of color vision defects. Red-green color vision defects are the ...

  18. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... rose in full bloom. If you have a color vision defect, you may see these colors differently than most people. There are three main kinds of color vision defects. Red-green color vision defects are the most ...

  19. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... three color cone cells to determine our color perception. Color blindness can occur when one or more ... Anyone who experiences a significant change in color perception should see an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.). Next ...

  20. Applying Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, David

    1984-01-01

    Most schools teach the triadic color system, utilizing red, blue, and yellow as primary colors. Other systems, such as additive and subtractive color systems, Munsell's Color Notation System, and the Hering Opponent Color Theory, can broaden children's concepts and free them to better choose color in their own work. (IS)

  1. Rigid porous filter

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  2. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed Central

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions. PMID:12223827

  3. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions. PMID:12223827

  4. Generalized flexibility-rigidity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc Duy; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) has been developed as a robust, accurate, and efficient method for macromolecular thermal fluctuation analysis and B-factor prediction. The performance of FRI depends on its formulations of rigidity index and flexibility index. In this work, we introduce alternative rigidity and flexibility formulations. The structure of the classic Gaussian surface is utilized to construct a new type of rigidity index, which leads to a new class of rigidity densities with the classic Gaussian surface as a special case. Additionally, we introduce a new type of flexibility index based on the domain indicator property of normalized rigidity density. These generalized FRI (gFRI) methods have been extensively validated by the B-factor predictions of 364 proteins. Significantly outperforming the classic Gaussian network model, gFRI is a new generation of methodologies for accurate, robust, and efficient analysis of protein flexibility and fluctuation. Finally, gFRI based molecular surface generation and flexibility visualization are demonstrated.

  5. Rigid substructure search

    PubMed Central

    Shirvanyants, David; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying the location of binding sites on proteins is of fundamental importance for a wide range of applications, including molecular docking, de novo drug design, structure identification and comparison of functional sites. Here we present Erebus, a web server that searches the entire Protein Data Bank for a given substructure defined by a set of atoms of interest, such as the binding scaffolds for small molecules. The identified substructure contains atoms having the same names, belonging to same amino acids and separated by the same distances (within a given tolerance) as the atoms of the query structure. The accuracy of a match is measured by the root-mean-square deviation or by the normal weight with a given variance. Tests show that our approach can reliably locate rigid binding scaffolds of drugs and metal ions. Availability and Implementation: We provide this service through a web server at http://erebus.dokhlab.org. Contact: dokh@unc.edu PMID:21460026

  6. Fractal rigidity in migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J.

    2004-04-01

    We study the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAfv) in humans using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). Scaling properties of time series of the axial flow velocity averaged over a cardiac beat interval may be characterized by two exponents. The short time scaling exponent (STSE) determines the statistical properties of fluctuations of blood flow velocities in short-time intervals while the Hurst exponent describes the long-term fractal properties. In many migraineurs the value of the STSE is significantly reduced and may approach that of the Hurst exponent. This change in dynamical properties reflects the significant loss of short-term adaptability and the overall hyperexcitability of the underlying cerebral blood flow control system. We call this effect fractal rigidity.

  7. Rigid collapsible dish structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, William B. (Inventor); Giebler, Martin M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A collapsible dish structure composed of a plurality of rows of rigid radial petal assemblies concentric with the axis of the dish. The petal assemblies consist of a center petal and two side petals, the center petal hinged on an axis tangent to a circle concentric with the axis of the dish and the side petals hinged to the center petal at their mating edge. The center petal is foldable inwardly and the side petals rotate about their hinges such that the collapsed dish structure occupies a much smaller volume than the deployed dish. Means of controlling the shape of the dish to compensate for differential expansion of the deployed dish are also provided.

  8. Puzzle geometry and rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smania, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    We describe a new and robust method to prove rigidity results in complex dynamics. The new ingredient is the geometry of the critical puzzle pieces: under control of geometry and ``complex bounds'', two generalized polynomial-like maps which admit a topological conjugacy, quasiconformal outside the filled-in Julia set, are indeed quasiconformally conjugate. The proof uses a new abstract removability-type result for quasiconformal maps, following ideas of Heinonen and Koskela and of Kallunki and Koskela, optimized for applications in complex dynamics. We prove, as the first application of this new method, that, for even criticalities distinct from two, the period two cycle of the Fibonacci renormalization operator is hyperbolic with 1 -dimensional unstable manifold.

  9. Color blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... have trouble telling the difference between red and green. This is the most common type of color ... color blindness often have problems seeing reds and greens, too. The most severe form of color blindness ...

  10. Color blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... care provider or eye specialist can check your color vision in several ways. Testing for color blindness is ... Adams AJ, Verdon WA, Spivey BE. Color vision. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. ... PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol. 2, chap ...

  11. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  12. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  13. Colorful Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    Described is an color-making activity where students use food coloring, eyedroppers, and water to make various colored solutions. Included are the needed materials and procedures. Students are asked to write up the formulas for making their favorite color. (KR)

  14. Switchable tackiness and wettability of a liquid crystalline polymer

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier G; Fabre; Corpart; Leibler

    1999-08-20

    The spreading velocity of liquids on the surface of a liquid crystalline polymer can be tremendously affected by a slight temperature change. Indeed, a bulk transition between a highly ordered smectic and an isotropic phase induces a sharp change from a rigid to a soft behavior, with consequent effects on the tack properties of the liquid crystalline polymer and on the dewetting dynamics of a liquid on its surface. PMID:10455047

  15. Mesogen-jacketed liquid crystalline polymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Fang; Shen, Zhihao; Wan, Xin-Hua; Fan, Xing-He; Chen, Er-Qiang; Ma, Yuguo; Zhou, Qi-Feng

    2010-08-01

    This critical review covers the recent progress in the research of mesogen-jacketed liquid crystalline polymers (MJLCPs), special side-on side-chain liquid crystalline polymers with very short spacers or without spacers. MJLCPs can self-organize into supramolecular columnar phases with the polymer chains aligned parallel to one another or smectic phases with the backbones embedded in the smectic layers. The semi-rigid rod-like MJLCP with a tunable rod shape in both length and diameter provides an excellent building block in designing novel rod-coil liquid crystalline block copolymers which can self-assemble into hierarchical supramolecular nanostructures depending on the competition between liquid crystal formation and microphase separation (229 references). PMID:20559597

  16. Uncalibrated color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroney, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Color calibration or the use of color measurement processes to characterize the color properties of a device or workflow is often expected or assumed for many color reproduction applications. However it is interesting to consider applications or situations in which color calibration is not as critical. In the first case it is possible to imagine an implicit color calibration resulting from a standardization or convergence of the colorant and substrate spectrum. In the second case it is possible to imagine cases where the device color variability is significantly less than the user color thresholds or expectations for color consistency. There are still general requirements for this form of pragmatic color but they are generally lower than for the higher end of digital color reproduction. Finally it is possible to imagine an implicit calibration that leverages in some way the highly accurate memory color for the hue of common objects. This scenario culminates with a challenge to create a natural capture calibration standard that does not require individual calibration, is spectrally diverse, is inexpensive and is environmentally friendly.

  17. Color realism and color science.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Alex; Hilbert, David R

    2003-02-01

    The target article is an attempt to make some progress on the problem of color realism. Are objects colored? And what is the nature of the color properties? We defend the view that physical objects (for instance, tomatoes, radishes, and rubies) are colored, and that colors are physical properties, specifically, types of reflectance. This is probably a minority opinion, at least among color scientists. Textbooks frequently claim that physical objects are not colored, and that the colors are "subjective" or "in the mind." The article has two other purposes: First, to introduce an interdisciplinary audience to some distinctively philosophical tools that are useful in tackling the problem of color realism and, second, to clarify the various positions and central arguments in the debate. The first part explains the problem of color realism and makes some useful distinctions. These distinctions are then used to expose various confusions that often prevent people from seeing that the issues are genuine and difficult, and that the problem of color realism ought to be of interest to anyone working in the field of color science. The second part explains the various leading answers to the problem of color realism, and (briefly) argues that all views other than our own have serious difficulties or are unmotivated. The third part explains and motivates our own view, that colors are types of reflectances and defends it against objections made in the recent literature that are often taken as fatal. PMID:14598439

  18. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Hari S.; Chu, Shaoping; Reimus, Paul William; Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Karra, Satish; Dittrich, Timothy M.

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  19. Seeing Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2005-01-01

    Colors are powerful tools for engaging children, from the youngest years onward. We hang brightly patterned mobiles above their cribs and help them learn the names of colors as they begin to record their own ideas in pictures and words. Colors can also open the door to an invisible world of electromagnetism, even when children can barely imagine…

  20. Color Categories and Color Appearance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Michael A.; Kay, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We examined categorical effects in color appearance in two tasks, which in part differed in the extent to which color naming was explicitly required for the response. In one, we measured the effects of color differences on perceptual grouping for hues that spanned the blue-green boundary, to test whether chromatic differences across the boundary…

  1. Color Terms and Color Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Jules

    2006-01-01

    In their lead articles, both Kowalski and Zimiles (2006) and O'Hanlon and Roberson (2006) declare a general relation between color term knowledge and the ability to conceptually represent color. Kowalski and Zimiles, in particular, argue for a priority for the conceptual representation in color term acquisition. The complexities of the interaction…

  2. Rigidity generation by nonthermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheshka, R.; Recho, P.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2016-05-01

    Active stabilization in systems with zero or negative stiffness is an essential element of a wide variety of biological processes. We study a prototypical example of this phenomenon and show how active rigidity, interpreted as a formation of a pseudowell in the effective energy landscape, can be generated in an overdamped stochastic system. We link the transition from negative to positive rigidity with time correlations in the additive noise, and we show that subtle differences in the out-of-equilibrium driving may compromise the emergence of a pseudowell.

  3. Broadband Dielectric Investigation of Amorphous and Semi-Crystalline Polylactides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchanasopa, Mantana; Runt, James

    2003-03-01

    Molecular dynamics of poly (L-lactide) and several L-lactide/meso-lactide random copolymers were investigated in the frequency domain using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. The dielectric relaxation spectra of fully amorphous and crystalline samples reveal the influence of crystalline content and microstructure on chain motion in the amorphous phase. Differences in relaxation strength of the segmental processes were observed in these samples. While the strength of the crystalline samples increases with temperature, that of the amorphous samples changes only very little or in the opposite direction with temperature. This behavior will be discussed in the context of a rigid amorphous phase. As expected, mean segmental relaxation time is longer and its distribution is broader (at lower frequencies) in samples with higher crystallinity. Differences in the details of the relaxation processes as a function of the crystallinity and morphology will be discussed.

  4. Color Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrolstad, Ronald E.; Smith, Daniel E.

    Color, flavor, and texture are the three principal quality attributes that determine food acceptance, and color has a far greater influence on our judgment than most of us appreciate. We use color to determine if a banana is at our preferred ripeness level, and a discolored meat product can warn us that the product may be spoiled. The marketing departments of our food corporations know that, for their customers, the color must be "right." The University of California Davis scorecard for wine quality designates four points out of 20, or 20% of the total score, for color and appearance (1). Food scientists who establish quality control specifications for their product are very aware of the importance of color and appearance. While subjective visual assessment and use of visual color standards are still used in the food industry, instrumental color measurements are extensively employed. Objective measurement of color is desirable for both research and industrial applications, and the ruggedness, stability, and ease of use of today's color measurement instruments have resulted in their widespread adoption.

  5. [Structural nucleic acid nanotechnology: liquid-crystalline approach].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The properties of the particles of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA molecules obtained as a result of phase exclusion of these molecules from water-salt polymer-containing solutions are briefly described. Physicochemical properties of quasinematic layers of dispersion particles and double-stranded DNA molecules in their content are taken into account in the course of developing fundamental background of the liquid-crystalline approach to the DNA structural nanotechnology. According to different versions of this approach, which is based on intraparticle gelation of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions, spatial structures (DNA nanoconstructions, "rigid" DNA particles) with unique properties, are created. By means of atomic force microscopy images of "rigid" DNA particles of different type are registered. Specific properties of metallic nanoparticles (in particular, gold nanoparticles) are considered while developing the other approach to DNA structural nanotechnology, which provides the basis for "metallized" DNA nanoconstructions. PMID:25508888

  6. [Structural nucleic acid nanotechnology: liquid-crystalline approach].

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Iu M; Salianov, V I; Kats, E I; Skuridin, S G

    2013-01-01

    The properties of the particles of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA molecules obtained as a result of phase exclusion of these molecules from water-salt polymer-containing solutions are briefly described. Physicochemical properties of quasinematic layers of dispersion particles and double-stranded DNA molecules in their content are taken into account in the course of developing fundamental background of the liquid-crystalline approach to the DNA structural nanotechnology. According to different versions of this approach, which is based on intraparticle gelation of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions, spatial structures (DNA nanoconstructions, "rigid" DNA particles) with unique properties, are created. By means of atomic force microscopy images of "rigid" DNA particles of different type are registered. Specific properties of metallic nanoparticles (in particular, gold nanoparticles) are considered while developing the other approach to DNA structural nanotechnology, which provides the basis for "metallized" DNA nanoconstructions. PMID:25486757

  7. Processing of Color Words Activates Color Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richter, Tobias; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether color representations are routinely activated when color words are processed. Congruency effects of colors and color words were observed in both directions. Lexical decisions on color words were faster when preceding colors matched the color named by the word. Color-discrimination responses…

  8. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE-PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ˜6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE-PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE-PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation.

  9. [Hair colorants].

    PubMed

    Urbanek-Karłowska, B; Luks, E; Jedra, M; Kiss, E; Malanowska, M

    1997-01-01

    The properties, mode of action and its duration of the preparations used for hair dyeing are described, together with their chemical components, and also preparations of herbal origin. The chemical reactions are described in detail which lead the development of a color polymer occurring during hair dyeing. The studies are presented which are used for toxicological assessment of the raw materials which are the components of the colorants, and the list is included of hair colorants permitted for use in Poland. PMID:9562811

  10. Polar Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 3 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on January 1, 2003 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Troughs.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79, Longitude 346 East (14 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  11. Quantum Color

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-16

    The idea of electric charges and electricity in general is a familiar one to the science savvy viewer. However, electromagnetism is but one of the four fundamental forces and not the strongest one. The strongest of the fundamental forces is called the strong nuclear force and it has its own associated charge. Physicists call this charge ?color? in analogy with the primary colors, although there is no real connection with actual color. In this video, Fermilab?s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why it is that we live in a colorful world.

  12. Investigation of the Rigid Amorphous Fraction in Nylon-6

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,H.; Cebe, P.

    2007-01-01

    A three-phase model, comprising crystalline, mobile amorphous, and rigid amorphous fractions (X{sub c}, X{sub MA}, X{sub rA}, respectively) has been applied in the study of semicrystalline Nylon-6. The samples studied were Nylon-6 alpha phase prepared by subsequent annealing of a parent sample slowly cooled from the melt. The treated samples were annealed at 110 C, then briefly heated to 136 C, then re-annealed at 110 C. Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) measurements allow the devitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction to be examined. We observe a lower endotherm, termed the 'annealing' peak in the non-reversing heat flow after annealing at 110 C. By brief heating above this lower endotherm and immediately quenching in LN{sub 2}-cooled glass beads, the glass transition temperature and X{sub RA} decrease substantially, X{sub MA} increases, and the annealing peak disappears. The annealing peak corresponds to the point at which partial de-vitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) occurs. Re-annealing at 110 C causes the glass transition and X{sub RA} to increase, and X{sub MA} to decrease. None of these treatments affected the measured degree of crystallinity, but it cannot be excluded that crystal reorganization or recrystallization may also occur at the annealing peak, contributing to the de-vitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction. Using a combined approach of thermal analysis with wide and small angle X-ray scattering, we analyze the location of the rigid amorphous and mobile amorphous fractions within the context of the Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Stack Models. Results show the homogeneous stack model is the correct one for Nylon-6. The cooperativity length ({var_epsilon}{sub A}) increases with a decrease of rigid amorphous fraction, or, increase of the mobile amorphous fraction. Devitrification of some of the RAF leads to the broadening of the glass transition region and shift of T{sub g}.

  13. Comparative analysis of rigidity across protein families.

    PubMed

    Wells, S A; Jimenez-Roldan, J E; Römer, R A

    2009-01-01

    We present a comparative study in which 'pebble game' rigidity analysis is applied to multiple protein crystal structures, for each of six different protein families. We find that the main-chain rigidity of a protein structure at a given hydrogen bond energy cutoff is quite sensitive to small structural variations, and conclude that the hydrogen bond constraints in rigidity analysis should be chosen so as to form and test specific hypotheses about the rigidity of a particular protein. Our comparative approach highlights two different characteristic patterns ('sudden' or 'gradual') for protein rigidity loss as constraints are removed, in line with recent results on the rigidity transitions of glassy networks. PMID:19773604

  14. Colored Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 7 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on May 30, 2002 during the Southern Fall season in Atlantis Chaos.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.5, Longitude 183.6 East (176.4 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of

  15. Color Metric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This booklet was designed to convey metric information in pictoral form. The use of pictures in the coloring book enables the more mature person to grasp the metric message instantly, whereas the younger person, while coloring the picture, will be exposed to the metric information long enough to make the proper associations. Sheets of the booklet…

  16. Color Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferry, John E.

    1980-01-01

    Elementary students were asked to find 12 colors and 5 sounds in their immediate natural environment and to describe in writing where they saw each color in relationship to themselves. The writings formed a type of poetry which expressed involvement with and observation of the environment. (CM)

  17. Liquid is More Rigid than Solid in a High-Frequency Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Naoki; Yuge, Tatsuro; Shimizu, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We compare rigidity of materials in two phases, liquid and solid phases. As a measure of the rigidity, we employ the one characterizing how firmly the material is fixed by low density of pinning centers, such as impurities and rough surfaces of walls, against a weak force. Although a solid is more rigid than a liquid against a low-frequency force, we find that against a high-frequency force the liquid becomes more rigid than the solid of the same material. Since this result is derived from universal properties of a response function, it is valid for wide classes of materials, including quantum and classical systems and crystalline and amorphous solids. An instructive example is studied using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the frequency region in which a solid is more flexible than a liquid is not purely determined by intrinsic properties of the solid. It depends also on extrinsic factors such as the density of pinning centers.

  18. Rigidity of the fault zones in the Earth's crust estimated from seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, A. A.

    2011-07-01

    Nonlinear effects in seismic wave propagation are analyzed to determine the mechanical rigidity of different-order faults that thread the tectonic structures in the central part of the East European platform (Moscow syneclise and Voronezh Crystalline Massif) and the fault zones of the Balapan and Degelen mountain regions in Kazakhstan (the Degelen magmatic node in the Central Chingiz zone). The dependency of the rigidity of the fault zone on the fault's length is obtained. The rigidity of the tectonic structures is found to experience well-expressed temporal variations with periods of 13-15 days, 27-32 days, and about one year. In the different-order fault zones, the amplitudes of both normal k n and the shear k s rigidity for semimonthly, monthly, and annual variations can span a factor of 1.3, 1.5, and 2.5, respectively.

  19. Associative memory through rigid origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Arvind; Brenner, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms such as Miura Ori have proven useful in diverse contexts since they have only one degree of freedom that is easily controlled. We combine the theory of rigid origami and associative memory in frustrated neural networks to create structures that can ``learn'' multiple generic folding mechanisms and yet can be robustly controlled. We show that such rigid origami structures can ``recall'' a specific learned mechanism when induced by a physical impulse that only need resemble the desired mechanism (i.e. robust recall through association). Such associative memory in matter, seen before in self-assembly, arises due to a balance between local promiscuity (i.e., many local degrees of freedom) and global frustration which minimizes interference between different learned behaviors. Origami with associative memory can lead to a new class of deployable structures and kinetic architectures with multiple context-dependent behaviors.

  20. Signature of Thermal Rigidity Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Adrián

    2013-12-01

    To explore the role that temperature and percolation of rigidity play in determining the macroscopic properties, we propose a model that adds translational degrees of freedom to the spins of the well known Ising hamiltonian. In particular, the Ising model illustrate the longstanding idea that the growth of correlations on approach to a critical point could be describable in terms of the percolation of some sort of "physical cluster". For certain parameters of this model we observe two well defined peaks of CV, that suggest the existence of two kinds of "physical percolation", namely connectivity and rigidity percolation. Thermal fluctuations give rise to two different kinds of elementary excitations, i.e. droplets and configuron, as suggested by Angell in the framework of a bond lattice model approach. The later is reflected in the fluctuations of redundant constraints that gives stability to the structure and correlate with the order parameter.

  1. Rotating rigid motion in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.P.; Pooe, C.A.

    1987-11-01

    Kinematic and dynamic expressions are derived for the Lie derivative of vorticity along a particle world line in a rigid motion. It is found that the evolution of vorticity in a rigid motion is governed by the electric part of the Weyl tensor. Necessary and sufficient kinematic and dynamic conditions are established for a rotating rigid motion to be isometric.

  2. Thermally stable crystalline mesoporous metal oxides with substantially uniform pores

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, Ulrich; Orilall, Mahendra Christopher; Lee, Jinwoo; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J

    2015-01-27

    Highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composites, as precursors to thermally stable mesoporous metal oxides, are coated with a layer of amorphous carbon. Using a `one-pot` method, highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composites are converted to thermally stable mesoporous metal oxides, having highly crystalline mesopore walls, without causing the concomitant collapse of the mesostructure. The `one-pot` method uses block copolymers with an sp or sp 2 hybridized carbon containing hydrophobic block as structure directing agents which converts to a sturdy, amorphous carbon material under appropriate heating conditions, providing an in-situ rigid support which maintains the pores of the oxides intact while crystallizing at temperatures as high as 1000 deg C. A highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composite can be heated to produce a thermally stable mesoporous metal oxide consisting of a single polymorph.

  3. Portable device for quantifying parkinsonian wrist rigidity.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, M P

    1994-01-01

    The need for objectivity in the assessment of parkinsonism prompted the development of a portable transducer capable of quantifying muscular rigidity. This paper describes the development and use of a device for measuring wrist rigidity and reports the preliminary findings from 25 normal healthy controls and 29 patients, many of whom were undergoing antiparkinsonian treatment to alleviate rigidity or antipsychotic treatment, which produced parkinsonian rigidity. An objective rigidity score, representing the degree to which motor activity increases muscular stiffness in the wrist, correlates highly with clinical ratings of parkinsonian rigidity and demonstrates 89% specificity and 82% sensitivity. Unlike previous techniques for quantifying rigidity, this transducer offers greater portability and apparent face validity. PMID:7908119

  4. Lubrication of rigid ellipsida solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of geometry on the isothermal hydrodynamic film separating two rigid solids was investigated. The minimum film thickness is derived for fully flooded conjunctions by using the Reynolds boundary conditions. It was found that the minimum film thickness had the same speed, viscosity, and load dependence as Kapitza' classical solution. However, the incorporation of Reynolds boundary conditions resulted in an additional geometry effect. Solutions using the parabolic film approximation are compared by using the exact expression for the film in the analysis. Contour plots are known that indicate in detail the pressure developed between the solids.

  5. Ureteroscopes: flexible, rigid, and semirigid.

    PubMed

    Basillote, Jay B; Lee, David I; Eichel, Louis; Clayman, Ralph V

    2004-02-01

    Since its introduction, the ureteroscope has undergone significant improvements. Using the currently available rigid, semirigid, and flexible ureteroscopes and working instruments, urologists can diagnose and treat lesions throughout the upper urinary tract. Over the past 25 years, the ureteroscope in combination with shock wave lithotripsy has transformed the diagnosis and treatment of more than 90% of upper urinary tract pathology from an open to an endourologic procedure. With endoscope manufacturers continually incorporating new technology into their ureteroscopes, future models will undoubtedly provide better optics, increased durability, and improved capabilities, resulting in greater success when urologists perform endoscopic forays into the upper urinary tract. PMID:15040398

  6. Rigid separator lead acid batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cannone, A.G.; Salkind, A.J.; Stempin, J.L.; Wexell, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    Lead acid cells assembled with extruded separators displayed relatively uniform capacity and voltage parameters through 100{sup +} cycles of charge/discharge. This contrasts to failure of control cells with glass mat separators after 60 cycles. The mullite/alumina separators with 50, 60, and 70% porosity separators appear suitable for both flooded and sealed lead acid cell applications. The advantages of the rigid ceramic separators over fiber mat materials are in the uniformity of capacity and voltage, the ease of cell assembly, and the probability that firm stacking pressure on the active material will yield greater cycle life, especially at elevated temperatures.

  7. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  8. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  9. Enhanced rigid-bond restraints

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Andrea; Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M.

    2012-07-01

    An extension is proposed to the rigid-bond description of atomic thermal motion in crystals. The rigid-bond model [Hirshfeld (1976 ▶). Acta Cryst. A32, 239–244] states that the mean-square displacements of two atoms are equal in the direction of the bond joining them. This criterion is widely used for verification (as intended by Hirshfeld) and also as a restraint in structure refinement as suggested by Rollett [Crystallographic Computing (1970 ▶), edited by F. R. Ahmed et al., pp. 167–181. Copenhagen: Munksgaard]. By reformulating this condition, so that the relative motion of the two atoms is required to be perpendicular to the bond, the number of restraints that can be applied per anisotropic atom is increased from about one to about three. Application of this condition to 1,3-distances in addition to the 1,2-distances means that on average just over six restraints can be applied to the six anisotropic displacement parameters of each atom. This concept is tested against very high resolution data of a small peptide and employed as a restraint for protein refinement at more modest resolution (e.g. 1.7 Å)

  10. Color vision test

    MedlinePlus

    ... from birth) color vision problems: Achromatopsia -- complete color blindness , seeing only shades of gray Deuteranopia -- difficulty telling ... test -- color; Ishihara color vision test Images Color blindness tests References Adams AJ, Verdon WA, Spivey BE. ...

  11. Triamterene crystalline nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samih H; Milliner, Dawn S; Wooldridge, Thomas D; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    Medications can cause a tubulointerstitial insult leading to acute kidney injury through multiple mechanisms. Acute tubular injury, a dose-dependent process, occurs due to direct toxicity on tubular cells. Acute interstitial nephritis characterized by interstitial inflammation and tubulitis develops from drugs that incite an allergic reaction. Other less common mechanisms include osmotic nephrosis and crystalline nephropathy. The latter complication is rare but has been associated with several drugs, such as sulfadiazine, indinavir, methotrexate, and ciprofloxacin. Triamterene crystalline nephropathy has been reported only rarely, and its histologic characteristics are not well characterized. We report 2 cases of triamterene crystalline nephropathy, one of which initially was misdiagnosed as 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystalline nephropathy. PMID:23958399

  12. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  13. Crystalline Silica Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staff- Branch of Industrial Minerals

    1992-01-01

    substance and will present a nontechnical overview of the techniques used to measure crystalline silica. Because this primer is meant to be a starting point for anyone interested in learning more about crystalline silica, a list of selected readings and other resources is included. The detailed glossary, which defines many terms that are beyond the scope of this publication, is designed to help the reader move from this presentation to a more technical one, the inevitable next step.

  14. Colorful television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    What are the challenges and rewards for American men and women of color who chose to become scientists? The Public Broadcasting Service intends to show us through an upcoming 6-hour documentary series entitled “Breakthrough: The Changing Face of Science in America.”

  15. Color Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Heidi S. S.; Maki, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a study conducted by members of the WellU Academic Integration Subcommittee of The College of St. Scholastica's College's Healthy Campus Initiative plan whose purpose was to determine whether changing color in the classroom could have a measurable effect on students. One simple improvement a school can make in a classroom is…

  16. Colorful Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrick, C. Shane

    2006-01-01

    As instructors of accounting, we should take an abstract topic (at least to most students) and connect it to content known by students to help increase the effectiveness of our instruction. In a recent semester, ordinary items such as colors, a basketball, and baseball were used to relate the subject of accounting. The accounting topics of account…

  17. Mooring and ground handling rigid airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of mooring and ground handling rigid airships are discussed. A brief history of Mooring and Ground Handling Rigid Airships from July 2, 1900 through September 1, 1939 is included. Also a brief history of ground handling developments with large U. S. Navy nonrigid airships between September 1, 1939 and August 31, 1962 is included wherein developed equipment and techniques appear applicable to future large rigid airships. Finally recommendations are made pertaining to equipment and procedures which appear desirable and feasible for future rigid airship programs.

  18. Rigidity and flexibility of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Gáspár, Merse E; Csermely, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The network approach became a widely used tool to understand the behaviour of complex systems in the last decade. We start from a short description of structural rigidity theory. A detailed account on the combinatorial rigidity analysis of protein structures, as well as local flexibility measures of proteins and their applications in explaining allostery and thermostability is given. We also briefly discuss the network aspects of cytoskeletal tensegrity. Finally, we show the importance of the balance between functional flexibility and rigidity in protein-protein interaction, metabolic, gene regulatory and neuronal networks. Our summary raises the possibility that the concepts of flexibility and rigidity can be generalized to all networks. PMID:23165349

  19. Color measurements based on a color camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marszalec, Elzbieta A.; Pietikaeinen, Matti

    1997-08-01

    The domain of color camera applications is increasing all time due to recent progress in color machine vision research. Colorimetric measurement tasks are quite complex as the purpose of color measurement is to provide a quantitative evaluation of the phenomenon of colors as perceived by human vision. A proper colorimetric calibration of the color camera system is needed in order to make color a practical tool in machine vision. This paper discuses two approaches to color measurements based on a color camera and includes an overview of practical approaches to color camera calibration under unstable illumination conditions.

  20. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  1. Novel biaxial nematic phases of side-chain liquid crystalline polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2012-12-01

    We present a mean field theory to describe biaxial nematic phases of side-chain liquid crystalline polymers, in which rigid side-chains (mesogens) and rigid-backbone chains favor mutually perpendicular orientations. Taking into account both excluded volume and attractive interactions between rigid rods, novel biaxial nematic phases are theoretically predicted. We calculate uniaxial and biaxial orientational order parameters as a function of temperature and the length of backbone chains. We find a first-order biaxial-biaxial phase transition and a first (or second)-order uniaxial-biaxial one, depending on the length of mesogens and backbone chains.

  2. Infrared imaging enhances retinal crystals in Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Brar, Vikram S; Benson, William H

    2015-01-01

    Infrared imaging dramatically increased the number of crystalline deposits visualized compared with clinical examination, standard color fundus photography, and red free imaging in patients with Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy. We believe that this imaging modality significantly improves the sensitivity with which these lesions are detected, facilitating earlier diagnosis and may potentially serve as a prognostic indicator when examined over time. PMID:25931805

  3. Formation of Organic Molecular Nanocrystals under Rigid Confinement with Analysis by Solid State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Ong, T. C.; Michaelis, V. K.; Heng, S.; Huang, J.; Griffin, R. G.; Myerson, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization in rigid confinement is a promising method to obtain organic molecular nanocrystals. However, the crystallization behavior and the related characterization methods are not well studied. Here we present a systematic study of the nucleation of organic molecular nanocrystals in rigid pores. Four different compounds were studied, ibuprofen, fenofibrate, griseofulvin, and indomethacin, which range from simple to complex molecules. Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was employed to analyse the structure of these compounds inside pores which are difficult to characterize by other analytical methods. We successfully demonstrated the production of nano-crystalline ibuprofen, fenofibrate and griseofulvin in porous silica particles with ~ 40 nm pores. These nanocrystals showed significant enhancement in dissolution rates. These results help advance the fundamental understanding of nucleation under rigid confinement and may lead to potential applications in developing new formulations in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25258590

  4. Unbiased rigid registration using transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Dieter A.; Hornegger, Joachim; Bautz, Werner; Kuwert, Torsten; Roemer, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    The evaluation of tumor growth as regression under therapy is an important clinical issue. Rigid registration of sequentially acquired 3D-images has proven its value for this purpose. Existing approaches to rigid image registration use the whole volume for the estimation of the rigid transform. Non-rigid soft tissue deformation, however, will imply a bias to the registration result, because local deformations cannot be modeled by rigid transforms. Anatomical substructures, like bones or teeth, are not affected by these deformations, but follow a rigid transform. This important observation is incorporated in the proposed registration algorithm. The selection of anatomical substructure is done by manual interaction of medical experts adjusting the transfer function of the volume rendering software. The parameters of the transfer function are used to identify the voxels that are considered for registration. A rigid transform is estimated by a quaternion gradient descent algorithm based on the intensity values of the specified tissue classes. Commonly used voxel intensity measures are adjusted to the modified registration algorithm. The contribution describes the mathematical framework of the proposed registration method and its implementation in a commercial software package. The experimental evaluation includes the discussion of different similarity measures, the comparison of the proposed method to established rigid registration techniques and the evaluation of the efficiency of the new method. We conclude with the discussion of potential medical applications of the proposed registration algorithm.

  5. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  9. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  10. The Rigid Orthogonal Procrustes Rotation Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Berge, Jos M. F.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of rotating a matrix orthogonally to a best least squares fit with another matrix of the same order has a closed-form solution based on a singular value decomposition. The optimal rotation matrix is not necessarily rigid, but may also involve a reflection. In some applications, only rigid rotations are permitted. Gower (1976) has…

  11. Rigid fibrous ceramics for entry systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, Ronald P.

    1993-01-01

    The topics addressed are: (1) high payoff areas with reusable surface insulation; (2) technology opportunities/gap; (3) coatings for rigid fibrous ceramics; (4) challenges for reusable rigid fibrous ceramics - Lunar/Mars aerobraking heatshield; (5) comparison of LI-900 and HTP properties; and (6) comparison of microstructures.

  12. P-Ink displays: flexible, low power, reflective color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Andre C.; Wang, Hai; Henderson, Eric; Kerins, Fergal; Kamp, Ulrich; Da Silva Bonifacio, Leonardo; Law, Pak Hin; Ozin, Geoffrey A.

    2013-03-01

    Opalux's P-Ink material represents a revolutionary step forward in display technology, offering the ability to reflect bright and vivid colors spanning the visible spectrum. By applying low power electric pulses, the color of this Photonic Color-based material can be selected at will, with the resulting electrically bi-stable color states requiring no power to maintain. It can be coated onto rigid and flexible substrates in scale, highlighting its potential to drive the development of bendable form factors for displays.

  13. Colorful drying.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with alpha-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were fluidized in fluid bed dryer to observe the progress of the heat flow in the material and to study the heat indicator properties of the indicator materials. A tristimulus colorimeter was used to measure CIELAB color values. Color indicator for heat detection can be utilized to test if the heat-sensitive API would go through physical changes during the pharmaceutical drying process. Both the prepared granules and pellets can be used as heat indicator in fluid bed drying process. The colored heat indicators give an opportunity to learn new aspects of the process at real time and could be exploded, for example, for scaling-up studies. PMID:20039220

  14. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  15. Aggregation dynamics of rigid polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Anvy Moly; Rajesh, R.; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Similarly charged polyelectrolytes are known to attract each other and aggregate into bundles when the charge density of the polymers exceeds a critical value that depends on the valency of the counterions. The dynamics of aggregation of such rigid polyelectrolytes are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the morphology of the aggregates depends on the value of the charge density of the polymers. For values close to the critical value, the shape of the aggregates is cylindrical with height equal to the length of a single polyelectrolyte chain. However, for larger values of charge, the linear extent of the aggregates increases as more and more polymers aggregate. In both the cases, we show that the number of aggregates decrease with time as power laws with exponents that are not numerically distinguishable from each other and are independent of charge density of the polymers, valency of the counterions, density, and length of the polyelectrolyte chain. We model the aggregation dynamics using the Smoluchowski coagulation equation with kernels determined from the molecular dynamics simulations and justify the numerically obtained value of the exponent. Our results suggest that once counterions condense, effective interactions between polyelectrolyte chains short-ranged and the aggregation of polyelectrolytes are diffusion-limited.

  16. Self-adjustable crystalline inorganic nanocoils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-peng; Yang, Yong; Zhuang, Jing; Wang, Xun

    2013-05-01

    Biomacromolecules such as proteins, although extremely complex in microstructure, can crystallize into macro-sized crystals after self-adjusting their shapes, based on which the structure of biology is built. Inorganic nanowires/nanoribbons with a similar one-dimensional topology but much simpler structures can hardly be as flexible as macromolecules when constructing superlattice structures because of their inherent rigidity. Here we report the synthesis of crystalline indium sulfide nanoribbon-based nanocoils that are formed by spontaneous self-coiling of ultrathin nanoribbons. The nanostructures are flexible and appear as relatively random coils because of their ultrathin ribbon structures (~0.9 nm in thickness) with high aspect ratios. Moreover, the nanocoils can self-adjust their shapes and assemble into two-dimensional superlattices and three-dimensional supercrystals in solution. The ultrathin nanocoils are expected to bring new insights into the use of flexible nanocrystals as building blocks for constructing superstructures. PMID:23611283

  17. Color space conversion for linear color grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dah-Jye

    2000-10-01

    Color grading is an important process for various industries such as food processing, fruit and vegetable grading, etc. Quality and price are often determined by the color of product. For example, darker red color for apples means higher price. In color machine vision applications, image is acquired with a color CCD camera that outputs color information in three channels, red, gree, and blue. When grading color, these three primary colors must be processed to determine the color level for separation. A very popular color space conversion technique for color image processing is RGB-to-HSI, where HSI represents hue, saturation, and intensity, respectively. However, the conversion result is still 3D information that makes determining color grades very difficult. A new color space conversion technique that can be implemented for high-speed real-time processing for color grading is introduced in this paper. Depending on the application, different color space conversion equations must be used. The result of this technique is a simple one-dimensional array that represents different color levels. This linear array makes linear color grading adjustment possible.

  18. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko; David J.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  19. Cognitive aspects of color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derefeldt, Gunilla A. M.; Menu, Jean-Pierre; Swartling, Tiina

    1995-04-01

    This report surveys cognitive aspects of color in terms of behavioral, neuropsychological, and neurophysiological data. Color is usually defined as psychophysical color or as perceived color. Behavioral data on categorical color perception, absolute judgement of colors, color coding, visual search, and visual awareness refer to the more cognitive aspects of color. These are of major importance in visual synthesis and spatial organization, as already shown by the Gestalt psychologists. Neuropsychological and neurophysiological findings provide evidence for an interrelation between cognitive color and spatial organization. Color also enhances planning strategies, as has been shown by studies on color and eye movements. Memory colors and the color- language connections in the brain also belong among the cognitive aspects of color.

  20. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  1. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1991-12-31

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  2. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  3. Network Rigidity Calculations of Cold Denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Gregory; Jacobs, Donald

    2004-03-01

    Network rigidity is used to model polypeptide chains in solution that undergo a helix to coil transition. Cooperative interactions from hydrogen bonding and hydration are modeled using topological constraints. This novel methodology is used to properly account for the energetic and non-additive entropic contributions to the free energy. The network rigidity model parameters are compared to Lifson-Roig model parameters. Nucleation and propagation parameters are eliminated. Instead, nucleation is a consequence of network rigidity, which is modeled explicitly. An advantage of network rigidity is that parameters are transferable to proteins, unlike the nucleation and propagation parameters of previous helix-coil theories. Results of a transfer matrix method are presented, showing the thermodynamic conditions where a polypeptide chain in an alpha-helix state is subject to hot and cold denaturing. Calculated helix content is found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements on two different polypeptides of different length and solvent concentrations.

  4. Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, F.

    1993-12-07

    Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric (LCP) compositions of matter are described. LCP backbones are combined with liquid crystalline (LC) side chains in a manner which maximizes molecular ordering through interdigitation of the side chains, thereby yielding materials which are predicted to have superior mechanical properties over existing LCPs. The theoretical design of LCPs having such characteristics includes consideration of the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and in the side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of the spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in sub-molecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone to which they are attached, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and the side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and the side chains for easy alignment. 27 figures.

  5. Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Flonnie

    1993-01-01

    Strong liquid-crystalline polymeric (LCP) compositions of matter. LCP backbones are combined with liquid crystalline (LC) side chains in a manner which maximizes molecular ordering through interdigitation of the side chains, thereby yielding materials which are predicted to have superior mechanical properties over existing LCPs. The theoretical design of LCPs having such characteristics includes consideration of the spacing distance between side chains along the backbone, the need for rigid sections in the backbone and in the side chains, the degree of polymerization, the length of the side chains, the regularity of the spacing of the side chains along the backbone, the interdigitation of side chains in sub-molecular strips, the packing of the side chains on one or two sides of the backbone to which they are attached, the symmetry of the side chains, the points of attachment of the side chains to the backbone, the flexibility and size of the chemical group connecting each side chain to the backbone, the effect of semiflexible sections in the backbone and the side chains, and the choice of types of dipolar and/or hydrogen bonding forces in the backbones and the side chains for easy alignment.

  6. Crystalline-amorphous transition in silicate perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, M.; Chizmeshya, A.; Wolf, G.H.; Poole, P.H.; Shao, J.; Angell, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    CaSiO{sub 3} and MgSiO{sub 3} perovskites are known to undergo solid-state crystal to amorphous transitions near ambient pressure when decompressed from their high-pressure stability fields. In order to elucidate the mechanistic aspects of this transition we have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations and lattice-dynamical calculations on model silicate perovskite systems using empirical rigid-ion pair potentials. In the simulations at low temperatures, the model perovskite systems transform under tension to a low-density glass composed of corner shared chains of tetrahedral silicon. The amorphization is initiated by a thermally activated step involving a soft polar optic mode in the perovskite phase at the Brillouin zone center. Progression of the system along this reaction coordinate triggers, in succession, multiple barrierless modes of instability ultimately producing a catastrophic decohesion of the lattice. An important intermediary along the reaction path is a crystalline phase where silicon is in a five-coordinate site and the alkaline-earth metal atom is in eightfold coordination. At the onset pressure, this transitory phase is itself dynamically unstable to a number of additional vibrational modes, the most relevant being those which result in transformation to a variety of tetrahedral chain silicate motifs. These results support the conjecture that stress-induced amorphization arises from the near simultaneous accessibility of multiple modes of instability in the highly metastable parent crystalline phase.

  7. Colliding Crystalline Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie; Sessler, A.M.

    1998-06-01

    The understanding of crystalline beams has advanced to the point where one can now, with reasonable confidence, undertake an analysis of the luminosity of colliding crystalline beams. Such a study is reported here. It is necessary to observe the criteria, previously stated, for the creation and stability of crystalline beams. This requires, firstly, the proper design of a lattice. Secondly, a crystal must be formed, and this can usually be done at various densities. Thirdly, the crystals in a colliding-beam machine are brought into collision. We study all of these processes using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The work parallels what was done previously, but the new part is to study the crystal-crystal interaction in collision. We initially study the zero-temperature situation. If the beam-beam force (or equivalent tune shift) is too large then over-lapping crystals can not be created (rather two spatially separated crystals are formed). However, if the beam-beam force is less than but comparable to that of the space-charge forces between the particles, we find that overlapping crystals can be formed and the beam-beam tune shift can be of the order of unity. Operating at low but non-zero temperature can increase the luminosity by several orders of magnitude over that of a usual collider. The construction of an appropriate lattice, and the development of adequately strong coding, although theoretically achievable, is a challenge in practice.

  8. COLLIDING CRYSTALLINE BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    1998-06-26

    The understanding of crystalline beams has advanced to the point where one can now, with reasonable confidence, undertake an analysis of the luminosity of colliding crystalline beams. Such a study is reported here. It is necessary to observe the criteria, previously stated, for the creation and stability of crystalline beams. This requires, firstly, the proper design of a lattice. Secondly, a crystal must be formed, and this can usually be done at various densities. Thirdly, the crystals in a colliding-beam machine are brought into collision. We study all of these processes using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The work parallels what was done previously, but the new part is to study the crystal-crystal interaction in collision. We initially study the zero-temperature situation. If the beam-beam force (or equivalent tune shift) is too large then overlapping crystals can not be created (rather two spatially separated crystals are formed). However, if the beam-beam force is less than but comparable to that of the space-charge forces between the particles, we find that overlapping crystals can be formed and the beam-beam tune shift can be of the order of unity. Operating at low but non-zero temperature can increase the luminosity by several orders of magnitude over that of a usual collider. The construction of an appropriate lattice, and the development of adequately strong cooling, although theoretically achievable, is a challenge in practice.

  9. Using color management in color document processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehab, Smadar

    1995-04-01

    Color Management Systems have been used for several years in Desktop Publishing (DTP) environments. While this development hasn't matured yet, we are already experiencing the next generation of the color imaging revolution-Device Independent Color for the small office/home office (SOHO) environment. Though there are still open technical issues with device independent color matching, they are not the focal point of this paper. This paper discusses two new and crucial aspects in using color management in color document processing: the management of color objects and their associated color rendering methods; a proposal for a precedence order and handshaking protocol among the various software components involved in color document processing. As color peripherals become affordable to the SOHO market, color management also becomes a prerequisite for common document authoring applications such as word processors. The first color management solutions were oriented towards DTP environments whose requirements were largely different. For example, DTP documents are image-centric, as opposed to SOHO documents that are text and charts centric. To achieve optimal reproduction on low-cost SOHO peripherals, it is critical that different color rendering methods are used for the different document object types. The first challenge in using color management of color document processing is the association of rendering methods with object types. As a result of an evolutionary process, color matching solutions are now available as application software, as driver embedded software and as operating system extensions. Consequently, document processing faces a new challenge, the correct selection of the color matching solution while avoiding duplicate color corrections.

  10. Metrology of Non-Rigid Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Smith, D W; Claudet, A A; Kasper, E P; Patterson, S R

    2002-01-01

    Dimensional characterization of non-rigid parts presents many challenges. For example, when a non-rigid part is mounted in an inspection apparatus the effects of fixturing constraints cause significant deformation of the part. If the part is not used in normal service with the same load conditions as during inspection, the dimensional characteristics in service will deviate from the reported values during inspection. Further, the solution of designing specialized fixturing to duplicate ''as-installed'' conditions does not fully resolve the problem because each inspection requires its own methodology. The goal of this project is to formulate the research problem and propose a method of assessing the dimensional characteristics of non-rigid parts. The measured dimension of a rigid component is traceable at some level of confidence to a single source (NIST in the USA). Hence the measurement of one component of an assembly can be related to the measurement of another component of that assembly. There is no generalized analog to this pedigreed process for dimensionally characterizing non-rigid bodies. For example, a measurement made on a sheet-metal automobile fender is heavily influenced by how it is held during the measurement making it difficult to determine how well that fender will assemble to the rest of the (non-rigid) car body. This problem is often overcome for specific manufacturing problems by constructing rigid fixtures that over-constrain the non-rigid parts to be assembled and then performing the dimensional measurement of the contour of each component to check whether each meets specification. Note that such inspection measurements will yield only an approximation to the assembled shape, which is a function of both the geometry and the compliance of the component parts of the assembly. As a result, non-rigid components are more difficult to specify and inspect and therefore are more difficult to purchase from outside vendors compared to rigid components

  11. Metrology of Non-Rigid Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K; Swift, D; Claudet, A; Kasper, E; Patterson, S

    2002-01-01

    Dimensional characterization of non-rigid parts presents many challenges. For example, when a non-rigid part is mounted in an inspection apparatus the effects of fixturing constraints are significant. If the part is not used in normal service with the same load conditions as during inspection, the dimensional characteristics will deviate from reported values. Further, the solution of designing specialized fixturing to duplicate ''as-installed'' conditions does not fully resolve the problem because each inspection requires its own methodology. The goal of this project is to formulate the research problem and propose a method of assessing the dimensional characteristics of non-rigid parts. The measured dimension of a rigid component is traceable at some level of confidence to a single source (NIST in the USA). Hence the measurement of one component of an assembly can be related to the measurement of another component of that assembly. There is no generalized analog to this pedigreed process for dimensionally characterizing non-rigid bodies. For example, a measurement made on a sheet-metal automobile fender is heavily influenced by how it is held during the measurement making it difficult to determine how well that fender will assemble to the rest of the (non-rigid) car body. This problem is often overcome for specific manufacturing problems by constructing rigid fixtures that over-constrain the non-rigid parts to be assembled and then performing the dimensional measurement of the contour of each component to check whether each meets specification. Note that such inspection measurements will yield only an approximation to the assembled shape, which is a function of both the geometry and the compliance of the component parts of the assembly. As a result, non-rigid components are more difficult to specify and inspect and therefore are more difficult to purchase from outside vendors compared to rigid components. The problems are compounded as the requirements come to

  12. Patient comfort during flexible and rigid cystourethroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojowy, Romuald; Wojciechowska, Joanna; Kościelska, Katarzyna; Dembowski, Janusz; Matuszewski, Michał; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Małkiewicz, Bartosz; Kołodziej, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cystourethroscopy (CS) is an endoscopic method used to visualize the urethra and the bladder. Aim In this study, we prospectively evaluated pain in men undergoing cyclic cystoscopic assessment with rigid and flexible instruments after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURB). Material and methods One hundred and twenty male patients who were under surveillance after a TURB procedure due to urothelial cell carcinoma and who had undergone at least one rigid cystourethroscopy in the past were enrolled in the trial. Patients were prospectively randomized to age-matched groups for flexible (group F) or rigid (group R) CS. Patient's comfort was evaluated on an 11-grade scale, ranging from 0 (free from pain) to 10 points (unbearable pain). Results The patients described the pain during the previous rigid CS as ranging from 4 to 10 (mean: 6.8) in group F and from 0 to 10 (mean: 5.8) in group R. Group R patients described the pain during the current rigid CS as ranging from 0 to 10 (mean: 5.7). No mean change in the grade was observed between the two pain descriptions (no change 11 patients, weaker pain 25 patients, stronger pain 24 patients, gamma 0.51, p < 0.0001). Group F described the pain as 1 to 5 (mean: 2.1). In the case of flexible CS the pain experience was greatly lowered compared to the previous rigid CS. All flexible CS patients reported lowered pain (by 1 to 9 grades). Patients’ age did not influence the comfort of the flexible CS or the change in pain level. Conclusions Flexible CS is better tolerated than rigid cystoscopy by male patients regardless of patients’ age. PMID:27458489

  13. Rigidity Dependence of Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    The various observed harmonics of the cosmic ray variation may be understood on a unified basis if the free space cosmic ray anisotropy is non-sinusoidal in form. The major objective of this paper is to study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-1990 for Deep River, Goose Bay and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for Deep River having low cutoff rigidity as compared to Tokyo neutron monitor having high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases in 1987 at Deep River and in 1986 at Tokyo during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction at both the stations having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station i.e. Deep River as compared to the high cut off rigidity station i.e. Tokyo on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The solar wind velocity significantly remains in the range 350 to 425 km/s i.e. being nearly average on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days are weakly dependent on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of low and high cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics.

  14. Color Blindness Simulations

    MedlinePlus

    ... many disables? The fastest growing segment? Myths of disability The Law The Rules Accessibility Resources Page Updates, additions Contact Us For assistance contact your NOAA Line Office Section 508 Coordinator Color blindness Simulations Normal Color Vision Deuteranopia Color blindness marked ...

  15. LED Color Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Color quality is an important consideration when evaluating LED-based products for general illumination. This fact sheet reviews the basics regarding light and color and summarizes the most important color issues related to white-light LED systems.

  16. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  17. Generic Rigidity Percolation in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, M. F.; Jacobs, D. J.; Day, A. R.

    1996-03-01

    We study rigidity percolation for random central-force networks, using the Pebble Game(D. J. Jacobs and M. F. Thorpe, Phys. Rev. Letts. 75), 4051 (1995) algorithm on the bond and site diluted generic triangular lattice. Here, each site location is randomly displaced from the perfect lattice, removing any special symmetries. The total number of floppy modes are counted exactly, and exhibit a cusp singularity in the second derivative of the number of floppy modes, at the transition from a rigid to a floppy structure. The critical thresholds for bond and site dilution are found to be 0.6602 ± 0.0003 and 0.6976 ± 0.0003 respectively. We find that the generic rigidity percolation transition is second order, but in a different universality class than connectivity percolation, with the exponents; α = -0.48 ± 0.05 , β = 0.175 ± 0.02 and ν = 1.21 ± 0.06 . The fractal dimension of the spanning rigid clusters and the spanning stressed regions at the critical threshold are found to be df = 1.86 ± 0.02 and d_BB = 1.80 ± 0.03 respectively. Some elastic properties of the rigid backbone will be discussed.

  18. Rigidity loss in disordered network materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Hagh, Varda F.; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, M. F.; van Hecke, Martin

    Weakly jammed sphere packings show a very peculiar elasticity, with a ratio of compression modulus to shear modulus that diverges as the number of contacts approaches the minimum required for rigidity. Creating artificial isotropic network materials with this property is a challenge: so far, the least elaborate way to generate them is to actually simulate weakly compressed repulsive spheres. The next steps in designing such networks hinge upon a solid understanding of what properties of the sphere-packing derived network are essential for its elasticity. We elucidate the topological aspects of this question by comparing the rigidity transition in these networks to that in other random spring network models, including the common bond-diluted triangular net and a self-stress-free variant of that. We use the pebble game algorithm for identifying rigid clusters in mechanical networks to demonstrate that the marginally rigid state in sphere packings is perfectly isostatic everywhere, and the addition or removal of a single bond creates a globally stressed or globally floppy network, respectively. By contrast, the other classes of random network random networks show a more localized response to addition and removal of bonds, and, correspondingly, a more gradual rigidity transition.

  19. Generic rigidity percolation in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, D. J.; Thorpe, M. F.

    1996-04-01

    We study rigidity percolation for random central-force networks on the bondand site-diluted generic triangular lattice. Here, each site location is randomly displaced from the perfect lattice, removing any special symmetries. Using the pebble game algorithm, the total number of floppy modes are counted exactly, and exhibit a cusp singularity in the second derivative at the transition from a rigid to a floppy structure. The critical thresholds for bond and site dilution are found to be 0.66020+/-0.0003 and 0.69755+/-0.0003, respectively. The network is decomposed into unique rigid clusters, and we apply the usual percolation scaling theory. From finite size scaling, we find that the generic rigidity percolation transition is second order, but in a different universality class from connectivity percolation, with the exponents α=-0.48+/-0.05, β=0.175+/-0.02, and ν=1.21+/-0.06. The fractal dimension of the spanning rigid clusters and the spanning stressed regions at the critical threshold are found to be df=1.86+/-0.02 and dBB=1.80+/-0.03, respectively.

  20. Flexible implementation of rigid solar cell technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, Andrew E.

    2010-08-01

    As a source of clean, remote energy, photovoltaic (PV) systems are an important area of research. The majority of solar cells are rigid materials with negligible flexibility. Flexible PV systems possess many advantages, such as being transportable and incorporable on diverse structures. Amorphous silicon and organic PV systems are flexible; however, they lack the efficiency and lifetime of rigid cells. There is also a need for PV systems that are light weight, especially in space and flight applications. We propose a solution to this problem by arranging rigid cells onto a flexible substrate creating efficient, light weight, and flexible devices. To date, we have created a working prototype of our design using the 1.1cm x 1cm Emcore cells. We have achieved a better power to weight ratio than commercially available PowerFilm{reg_sign}, which uses thin film silicon yielding .034W/gram. We have also tested our concept with other types of cells and verified that our methods are able to be adapted to any rigid solar cell technology. This allows us to use the highest efficiency devices despite their physical characteristics. Depending on the cell size we use, we can rival the curvature of most available flexible PV devices. We have shown how the benefits of rigid solar cells can be integrated into flexible applications, allowing performance that surpasses alternative technologies.

  1. Crystal structure prediction of rigid molecules.

    PubMed

    Elking, Dennis M; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Nichols, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    A non-polarizable force field based on atomic multipoles fit to reproduce experimental crystal properties and ab initio gas-phase dimers is described. The Ewald method is used to calculate both long-range electrostatic and 1/r(6) dispersion energies of crystals. The dispersion energy of a crystal calculated by a cutoff method is shown to converge slowly to the exact Ewald result. A method for constraining space-group symmetry during unit-cell optimization is derived. Results for locally optimizing 4427 unit cells including volume, cell parameters, unit-cell r.m.s.d. and CPU timings are given for both flexible and rigid molecule optimization. An algorithm for randomly generating rigid molecule crystals is described. Using the correct experimentally determined space group, the average and maximum number of random crystals needed to find the correct experimental structure is given for 2440 rigid single component crystals. The force field energy rank of the correct experimental structure is presented for the same set of 2440 rigid single component crystals assuming the correct space group. A complete crystal prediction is performed for two rigid molecules by searching over the 32 most probable space groups. PMID:27484371

  2. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  3. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  4. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  5. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  6. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  7. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  8. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  9. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  10. Physicochemical and nanotechnological approaches to the design of 'rigid' spatial structures of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevdokimov, Yu M.; Salyanov, V. I.; Skuridin, S. G.; Shtykova, E. V.; Khlebtsov, N. G.; Kats, E. I.

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on physicochemical and nanotechnological approaches to the design of 'rigid' particles based on double-stranded DNA molecules. The physicochemical methods imply cross-linking of adjacent DNA molecules ordered in quasinematic layers of liquid-crystalline dispersion particles by synthetic nanobridges consisting of alternating molecules of an antibiotic (daunomycin) and divalent copper ions, as well as cross-linking of these molecules as a result of their salting-out in quasinematic layers of liquid-crystalline dispersion particles under the action of lanthanide cations. The nanotechnological approach is based on the insertion of gold nanoparticles into the free space between double-stranded DNA molecules that form quasinematic layers of liquid-crystalline dispersion particles. This gives rise to extended clusters of gold nanoparticles and is accompanied by an enhancement of the interaction between the DNA molecules through gold nanoparticles and by a decrease in the solubility of dispersion particles. These approaches produce integrated 'rigid' DNA-containing spatial structures, which are incompatible with the initial aqueous polymeric solutions and have unique properties. The bibliography includes 116 references.

  11. Inkjet Color Printing by Interference Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Aleksandr V; Milichko, Valentin A; Vinogradov, Vladimir V; Vinogradov, Alexandr V

    2016-03-22

    Color printing technology is developing rapidly; in less than 40 years, it moved from dot matrix printers with an ink-soaked cloth ribbon to 3D printers used to make three-dimensional color objects. Nevertheless, what remained unchanged over this time is the fact that in each case, dye inks (CMYK or RGB color schemes) were exclusively used for coloring, which inevitably limits the technological possibilities and color reproduction. As a next step in printing color images and storing information, we propose the technology of producing optical nanostructures. In this paper, we report use of inkjet technology to create colored interference layers with high accuracy without the need for high-temperature fixing. This was made possible due to using titania-based colloidal ink yielding monolithic coatings with a high refractive index (2.00 ± 0.08 over the entire visible range) when naturally dried. By controlling the film thickness by using inkjet deposition, we produced images based on controlled interference and implementing color printing with one ink. The lack of dyes in the proposed method has good environmental prospects, because applied systems based on a crystalline anatase sol are nontoxic and biologically inert. The paper explains in detail the principle of producing interference images by the classical inkjet method and shows the advantages of this technique in depositing coatings with uniform thickness, which are required for large-scale interference color imaging even on unprepared polymer films. This article demonstrates the possibility of inkjet printing of nanostructures with a precision in thickness of up to 50 nm, we believe that the proposed approach will be the groundwork for developing interference color printing approach and allow to implement new methods of forming optical nano-objects by widely available techniques. PMID:26805775

  12. Quantum mechanics of a generalised rigid body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gripaios, Ben; Sutherland, Dave

    2016-05-01

    We consider the quantum version of Arnold’s generalisation of a rigid body in classical mechanics. Thus, we quantise the motion on an arbitrary Lie group manifold of a particle whose classical trajectories correspond to the geodesics of any one-sided-invariant metric. We show how the derivation of the spectrum of energy eigenstates can be simplified by making use of automorphisms of the Lie algebra and (for groups of type I) by methods of harmonic analysis. We show how the method can be extended to cosets, generalising the linear rigid rotor. As examples, we consider all connected and simply connected Lie groups up to dimension 3. This includes the universal cover of the archetypical rigid body, along with a number of new exactly solvable models. We also discuss a possible application to the topical problem of quantising a perfect fluid.

  13. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-06-01

    We prove that {C^r}-smooth ({r > 2}) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not {C^{1+\\varepsilon}}-rigid, for any {\\varepsilon > 0}. This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically {C^1}-rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that {C^r}-smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically {C^{r-1-κ}}-rigid, for any {κ > 0}.

  14. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-05-01

    We prove that C^r -smooth (r > 2 ) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not C^1+ɛ -rigid, for any ɛ > 0 . This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically C^1 -rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that C^r -smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically C^r-1-κ -rigid, for any κ > 0.

  15. Liquid crystalline polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties and thermal stability of fibers fabricated from liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) have led to the use of these materials in structural applications where weight savings are critical. Advances in processing of LCPs could permit the incorporation of these polymers into other than uniaxial designs and extend their utility into new areas such as nonlinear optical devices. However, the unique feature of LCPs (intrinsic orientation order) is itself problematic, and current understanding of processing with control of orientation falls short of allowing manipulation of macroscopic orientation (except for the case of uniaxial fibers). The current and desirable characteristics of LCPs are reviewed and specific problems are identified along with issues that must be addressed so that advances in the use of these unique polymers can be expedited.

  16. Nanocomposites with Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat

    2015-03-01

    The creation of ordered (layered) biomimetic materials typically follows a series of steps: first mix nanoparticles with water, organize the NPs by ice templating, evaporate the ice and then back fill with metal or polymer. We propose a simple method exploiting the in situ self-assembly of a crystalline polymer in the presence of nanoparticles to facilitate this process, and provide a completely new pathway for the synthesis of biomimetic materials. A suite of complementary experimental tools are used in this analysis. In parallel, we are developing theoretical tools to a priori predict the morphologies adopted by semicrystalline polymers. The convergence of these novel experimental and theoretical developments in the venerable field of semicrystalline polymers could lead to new applications for this largest class of commercially relevant polymeric materials. With Jacques Jestin, Brian Benicewicz, Dan Zhao, Longxi Zhao

  17. Liquid Crystalline Microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Yueh; Petschek, Rolfe G.

    2000-03-01

    If an isotropic component of an emulsion is replaced by one having liquid crystalline (e.g. nematic) order the equilibrium behavior can change dramatically. There are long range enthalpic effects which can result in either repulsive or attractive interactions between the surfaces of an emulsion and entropic effects which generally result in an attractive interaction between these surfaces. We review briefly the possibility of stable blue-phase like microemulsions in mixtures of chiral nematics, appropriate surfactants and an incompatible isotropic solvent. We discuss the entropic effects in a lamellar phase, including the effects of changes in elastic constants and surface-nematic coupling. The effects of fluctuations on blue phases will be briefly discussed.

  18. Single crystalline magnetite nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuqin; Zhang, Daihua; Han, Song; Li, Chao; Lei, Bo; Lu, Weigang; Fang, Jiye; Zhou, Chongwu

    2005-01-12

    We descried a method to synthesize single crystalline Fe3O4 nanotubes by wet-etching the MgO inner cores of MgO/Fe3O4 core-shell nanowires. Homogeneous Fe3O4 nanotubes with controllable length, diameter, and wall thickness have been obtained. Resistivity of the Fe3O4 nanotubes was estimated to be approximately 4 x 10-2 Omega cm at room temperature. Magnetoresistance of approximately 1% was observed at T = 77 K when a magnetic field of B = 0.7 T was applied. The synthetic strategy presented here may be extended to a variety of materials such as YBCO, PZT, and LCMO which should provide ideal candidates for fundamental studies of superconductivity, piezoelectricity, and ferromagnetism in nanoscale structures. PMID:15631421

  19. Doped Multilayer Polymer Cholesteric-Liquid-Crystal (PCLC) Flakes: A Novel Electro-Optical Medium for Highly Reflective Color Flexible Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, K.L.; Hasman, K.; Leitch, M.; Cox, G.; Kosc, T.Z.; Trajkovska-Petkoska, A.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2008-03-17

    Polymer cholesteric-liquid-crystal (PCLC) flake/fluid-host suspensions are a novel particle display technology for full-color reflective display applications on rigid or flexible substrates. These “polarizing pigments” require no polarizers or color filters, switch rapidly at very low voltages, and produce highly saturated colors with a reflection efficiency approaching 80%.

  20. Polymer Cholesteric-Liquid-Crystal (PCLC) Flake/Fluid Host Electro-Optical Suspensions and Their Applications in Color Flexible Reflective Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, K.L.; Trajkovska-Petkoska, A.; Hasman, K.; Leitch, M.; Cox, G.; Kosc, T.Z.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2008-03-13

    Polymer cholesteric-liquid-crystal (PCLC) flake/fluid-host suspensions are a novel particle display technology for full-color reflective display applications on rigid or flexible substrates. These “polarizing pigments” require no polarizers or color filters, switch rapidly at very low voltages, and produce highly saturated colors with a reflection efficiency approaching 80%.

  1. Color identification testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  2. Rigid polyurethane and kenaf core composite foams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rigid polyurethane foams are valuable in many construction applications. Kenaf is a bast fiber plant where the surface stem skin provides bast fibers whose strength-to-weight ratio competes with glass fiber. The higher volume product of the kenaf core is an under-investigated area in composite appli...

  3. Bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Kibi, M; Ono, T; Nokubi, T

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the bending profiles of composite resin coating cast clasps. The cobalt-chromium alloy cast clasps were made using tapered wax pattern. Silane coupling method (Silicoater MD, Kulzer Co.) was used to attach composite resin to metal surface. The breakage and the bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps were evaluated. Results were as follows: 1) After the repeated bending test to the tips of clasp arm at 10,000 times in 0.25 mm deflection, neither crack on composite resin surface nor separation at resin/metal interface was observed in any specimen. 2) There was no significant difference in the bending rigidity of clasp arms between before and after composite resin coating. From these results, it was demonstrated that the composite resin coating cast clasp was available in clinical cases and coating with composite resin had little influence on the bending rigidity of clasp arms. Therefore, it was suggested that our clasp designing and fabricating system to control the bending rigidity of clasp arms could be applied to composite resin coating clasps. PMID:8935086

  4. Adjustable Optical Mount Is More Rigid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Bill G.; Coombs, David S.; Jones, Irby W.; Moore, Alvah S., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Improved mount for lens or mirror in laser offers rigidity similar to that of nonadjustable optical mount. In comparison with older adjustable optical mounts, this one less susceptible to movements and distortions caused by vibrations and by thermal expansions and contractions. Mount contains neither adjustment rods (which grow or shrink as temperature varies) nor springs (which transmit vibrations to mounted optic).

  5. Phosphorescence and Energy Transfer in Rigid Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enciso, E.; Cabello, A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates the general aspects of intermolecular energy transfer between triplet states in rigid solutions of organic compounds solved in an ethanol-ether mixture. Measurements of quenching and energy transfer processes are made using the chemicals of benzophenone and naphthalene. (CS)

  6. Two exactly soluble models of rigidity percolation

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, M. F.; Stinchcombe, R. B.

    2014-01-01

    We summarize results for two exactly soluble classes of bond-diluted models for rigidity percolation, which can serve as a benchmark for numerical and approximate methods. For bond dilution problems involving rigidity, the number of floppy modes F plays the role of a free energy. Both models involve pathological lattices with two-dimensional vector displacements. The first model involves hierarchical lattices where renormalization group calculations can be used to give exact solutions. Algebraic scaling transformations produce a transition of the second order, with an unstable critical point and associated scaling laws at a mean coordination 〈r〉=4.41, which is above the ‘mean field’ value 〈r〉=4 predicted by Maxwell constraint counting. The order parameter exponent associated with the spanning rigid cluster geometry is β=0.0775 and that associated with the divergence of the correlation length and the anomalous lattice dimension d is dν=3.533. The second model involves Bethe lattices where the rigidity transition is massively first order by a mean coordination 〈r〉=3.94 slightly below that predicted by Maxwell constraint counting. We show how a Maxwell equal area construction can be used to locate the first-order transition and how this result agrees with simulation results on larger random-bond lattices using the pebble game algorithm. PMID:24379428

  7. Zinc oxide films chemically grown onto rigid and flexible substrates for TFT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchea, M.; Kornilios, N.; Koudoumas, E.

    2010-10-01

    This contribution presents some preliminary results regarding the use of a chemical route for the growth of good quality ZnO thin films that can be used for the fabrication of thin film transistors (TFTs). The films were grown at rather low temperature (60 °C) on glass and PET substrates using non-aqueous (zinc acetate dihydrate in methanol) precursor solution and their surface morphology, crystalline structure, optical transmittance and electrical characteristics were studied. The study indicated that good quality films with desirable ZnO structure onto rigid and flexible substrates can be obtained, using a simple, cheap, low temperature chemical growth method.

  8. Chips of many colors

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, M.W.; Dorie, L.A.

    1982-07-01

    A large number of available color display tools generally fall into three categories. Intelligent terminals offer a wide range of color grpahics capability but require extensive software for specific applications. Large turn-key graphics systems, with color display consoles controlled by software, were made for electronic design. In color CAD workstations, color graphics is under hardware control and offers specific features for IC design. The authors look at the various colour graphics systems, and their advantages in VLSI chip design.

  9. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of poly(ethylene terephthalate): Contributions from rigid and mobile amorphous fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Brian; Lin, Jun; Nazarenko, Sergei; Jamieson, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    Systematic divergences in the orthopositronium (o-Ps) annihilation lifetimes, τ_3, and intensities, I_3, are observed, when comparing melt-crystallized and cold-crystallized poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as a function of crystallinity. Following a previous analysis of corresponding deviations in oxygen permeability, the divergences in I3 and τ3 are traced to distinct characteristic values for the probability of o-Ps formation and o-Ps lifetime in the rigid amorphous phase (RAF) associated with the crystalline lamellae and the mobile amorphous regions (MAF) which are unperturbed by the presence of the crystal phase. Utilizing independent information on the volume fractions of RAF and MAF, a quantitative analysis of the o-Ps annihilation parameters is possible.

  10. Realizable Closure for the Orientation Tetrad for Rigid Rod Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yochan; Kini, Hemant; Petty, Charles; Mandal, Dilip; Benard, Andre

    2003-11-01

    The prediction of low-order statistical properties of suspensions and liquid crystalline polymers is often based on a moment equation for the orientation dyad that requires a closure model for the orientation tetrad. A new closure has been developed that retains the six-fold symmetry and projection properties of the exact orientation tetrad. (Petty et al., 1999; Nguyen et al., 2001; Kini et al., 2003). This presentation will summarize recent results obtained by applying the new microstructure theory to a class of rigid rod suspensions subjected to homogeneous shear. In the absence of deformation, the theory predicts the existence of multiple steady states for the microstructure as a consequence of a balance between Brownian motion and an excluded volume potential in orientation space. In the presence of homogeneous shear, the orientation director for relatively concentrated suspensions shows periodic behavior relative to the flow direction. For low strain rates, the orientation director executes a tumbling periodic motion. As the strain rate increases, a wagging periodic motion occurs and, at very high strain rates, a steady alignment of the orientation director relative to the flow direction is predicted.

  11. Rigid Cluster Decomposition Reveals Criticality in Frictional Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, Silke; Quint, David A.; Fily, Yaouen; Schwarz, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of the frictional jamming transition within the framework of rigidity percolation theory. Slowly sheared frictional packings are decomposed into rigid clusters and floppy regions with a generalization of the pebble game including frictional contacts. Our method suggests a second-order transition controlled by the emergence of a system-spanning rigid cluster accompanied by a critical cluster size distribution. Rigid clusters also correlate with common measures of rigidity. We contrast this result with frictionless jamming, where the rigid cluster size distribution is noncritical.

  12. Quasiclassical trajectory studies of rigid rotor--rigid surface scattering. II. Corrugated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.C.; Bowman, J.M.

    1984-03-01

    The quasiclassical trajectory method, previously applied to rigid rotor--rigid flat surface scattering (J. M. Bowman and S. C. Park, J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5441 (1982)) is applied to a rigid rotor--rigid corrugated surface, i.e., a N/sub 2/--LiF(001), system. The mechanisms for rotational excitation at low and high collision energies are studied as well as their dependence on initial beam orientation and corrugation strength. A significant correlation between long-lived trajectories and high rotational excitation is found for low energy collisions and rotational rainbows are clearly observed in the high energy regime, although these features are broadened relative to the flat surface reported previously.

  13. Topological Crystalline Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Topological crystalline insulators (TCI) are new phases of matter in which nontrivial band topology and crystal symmetry unite to protect metallic states on the boundary. Remarkably, TCIs have been predicted and observed in the conveniently simple rocksalt SnTe class of IV-VI semiconductors. Despite the simple crystal structure, the interplay between topology and crystal symmetry in these materials have led to a rich variety of new phenomena, including the coexistence of massless and massive Dirac fermions arising from ferroelectric distortion and strain-induced flat band superconductivity. These new physical mechanisms are not only of intrinsic interest but may also find application in new transistor devices. After discussing the topological nature and potential uses of IV-VI family TCIs, I will present recent predictions of TCIs in several anti-perovskite materials. The origin of TCI in this new class of materials is strikingly different and involves the band inversion of two J = 3/2 quartets of Dirac fermions, which together form a ``Dirac octet.'' As interactions play a significant role in many anti-perovskites, this prediction serves as first step toward realizing TCIs in strongly correlated systems. This work is supported by NSF Graduate Research Fellowship No. 0645960 and DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-SC0010526.

  14. What color is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbach, Reiner; Sharma, Gaurav; Unal, Gozde B.

    2005-01-01

    Color management allows the deterministic handling of color data from input to output. This, of course, assumes that the first digital representation of our data is the "correct" color. It assumes that we did not make any errors in the input definitions, did not use wrong color input profiles, captured the user's intent, or fell prey to a host of other potential problems. After we have made those assumptions, we now can deterministically transfer the color from one place to another. Note that there is a big difference between "reproducing" one color at a different location and "deterministically transferring one set of color data to another location". The deterministic transfer is limited to the small set of physical metrics we decided to call "color". All other components of color are ignored.

  15. What color is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbach, Reiner; Sharma, Gaurav; Unal, Gozde B.

    2004-12-01

    Color management allows the deterministic handling of color data from input to output. This, of course, assumes that the first digital representation of our data is the "correct" color. It assumes that we did not make any errors in the input definitions, did not use wrong color input profiles, captured the user's intent, or fell prey to a host of other potential problems. After we have made those assumptions, we now can deterministically transfer the color from one place to another. Note that there is a big difference between "reproducing" one color at a different location and "deterministically transferring one set of color data to another location". The deterministic transfer is limited to the small set of physical metrics we decided to call "color". All other components of color are ignored.

  16. Origin of rigidity in athermal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sumantra

    Solids are distinguished from fluids by their ability to resist shear. In traditional solids, the resistance to shear is associated with the emergence of broken translational symmetry as exhibited by a non-uniform density pattern, which results from either minimizing the energy cost or maximizing the entropy or both. In this thesis, we focus on a special class of materials where this paradigm is challenged. We argue that the observation of rigidity in dry granular materials, a representative system, is a collective process controlled solely by few constraints, e.g., the boundary stresses, the constraint of force and torque balance, and the positivity of contact forces. We have shown that these constraints lead to a broken translational symmetry in a dual space of heights (loop forces) which leads to the observed rigidity (jamming) in such a system. We investigate the structure and behavior of the dual space through a geometrical construction as the system evolves towards the rigidity transition, commonly known as jamming. In that context, we explore the role of friction in jamming and establish the equivalence of real space and stress space description. We conclude that the role of real space geometry is negligible, and a stress only description is sufficient to understand the phenomenology of jamming. In the second half of the thesis, we develop a phenomenological model of the shear induced rigidity in athermal materials. Recent studies of athermal systems such as dry grains and dense, non-Brownian suspensions have shown that shear can lead to solidification through the process of shear jamming in grains and discontinuous shear thickening in suspensions. The similarities observed between these two distinct phenomena suggest that the physical processes leading to shear-induced rigidity in athermal materials are universal. We present a non-equilibrium statistical mechanics model, which exhibits the phenomenology of these shear-driven transitions: shear jamming and

  17. A Computational Model for Suspended Large Rigid Bodies in 3D Unsteady Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng

    1999-11-01

    A 3D numerical model for computing large rigid objects suspended in fluid flow has been developed. Rather than calculating the surface pressure upon the solid body, we evaluate the net force and torque based on a volume force formulation. The total effective force is obtained by summing up the forces at the Eulerian grids occupied by the rigid body. The effects of the moving bodies are coupled to the fluid flow by imposing the velocity field of the bodies to the fluid. A Poisson equation is used to compute the pressure over the whole domain. The objects are identified by color functions and calculated by the PPM scheme and a tangent function transformation which scales the transition region of the computed interface to a compact thickness. The model is then implemented on a parallel computer of distributed memory and validated with Stokes and low Reynolds number flows.

  18. From A Physical Color Stimulus To A Psychological Color Percept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan G.; Tonnquist, Gunnar

    1989-08-01

    The paper discusses the complexity of color vision in humans, considering the main aspects involved: the physical aspect, the psychophysical aspect, the physiological aspect and the psychological aspect. The meanings of the term color associated to each such aspect (asfor example, color stimulus, color valence, neural color signal and color percept) are introduced. Some types of color defective vision, relevant for color display users, are indicated. The methods to generate color stimuli in modern display devices, employing different technologies, are compared.

  19. Crystalline Organic Cavitands As Microcavity Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Christopher Michael

    There has been much interest in inefficiently packed molecular materials and their applications in gas storage, separations, catalysis, etc. Such known materials include metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs), container molecule materials, etc. One way to design inefficiently packed materials is to construct them from compounds that are incapable of close-packing, that is rigid scaffolds with enforced cavities that cannot be filled by self-packing. Cavitand molecules, tetrameric macrocycles derived from calix[4]resorcinarene derivatives, are well known for their propensity to form crystalline inclusion compounds with small molecules; for example, of the 169 examples of calix[4]resorcinarene scaffolds found in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD), no guest-free forms exist. The guest-free forms of various cavitands, synthesized by literature methods, have been obtained as single crystals by sublimation. Gas inclusion compounds of these cavitands have also been isolated and studied by single crystal x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and 1 H NMR. Furthermore, some cavitand derivatives have shown promise as media for industrial separations (Kr vs. Xe, MeCl vs. DME, Propene vs. Propane).

  20. Trichromatic opponent color classification.

    PubMed

    Chichilnisky, E J; Wandell, B A

    1999-10-01

    Stimuli varying in intensity and chromaticity, presented on numerous backgrounds, were classified into red/green, blue/yellow and white/black opponent color categories. These measurements revealed the shapes of the boundaries that separate opponent colors in three-dimensional color space. Opponent color classification boundaries were generally not planar, but their shapes could be summarized by a piecewise linear model in which increment and decrement color signals are combined with different weights at two stages to produce opponent color sensations. The effect of background light on classification was largely explained by separate gain changes in increment and decrement cone signals. PMID:10615508

  1. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  2. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  3. Development of Laser Ruler in Rigid Laryngoscope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Ok; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Choon; Lee, Byung-Joo; Wang, Soo-Geun; Ro, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Gye-Rok

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to develop a new device that provides a simple, noninvasive method of measuring accurate lesion size while using an endoscope. Methods We developed a rigid laryngoscope with a built-in laser-ruler using a one-light emitting diode and an acrylic plate. The invention incorporates a built-in laser diode that projects an auto-parallel beam into the optical path of the rigid laryngoscope to form two spots in the field of view. Results While the interspot distance remains consistent despite changes in focal plane, magnification, or viewing angle of the laryngoscope, projection to an uneven surface introduces certain variations in the shape, and size of the spots, and the distance between the two spots. Conclusion The device enables a laryngologist to easily measure the distance between landmarks, as well as the change in real size, and the progressive change of vocal fold lesions in an outpatient setting. PMID:22232716

  4. Rapid determination of RMSDs corresponding to macromolecular rigid body motions.

    PubMed

    Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    Finding the root mean sum of squared deviations (RMSDs) between two coordinate vectors that correspond to the rigid body motion of a macromolecule is an important problem in structural bioinformatics, computational chemistry, and molecular modeling. Standard algorithms compute the RMSD with time proportional to the number of atoms in the molecule. Here, we present RigidRMSD, a new algorithm that determines a set of RMSDs corresponding to a set of rigid body motions of a macromolecule in constant time with respect to the number of atoms in the molecule. Our algorithm is particularly useful for rigid body modeling applications, such as rigid body docking, and also for high-throughput analysis of rigid body modeling and simulation results. We also introduce a constant-time rotation RMSD as a similarity measure for rigid molecules. A C++ implementation of our algorithm is available at http://nano-d.inrialpes.fr/software/RigidRMSD. PMID:24615729

  5. Modular Habitats Comprising Rigid and Inflatable Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2010-01-01

    Modular, lightweight, fully equipped buildings comprising hybrids of rigid and inflatable structures can be assembled on Earth and then transported to and deployed on the Moon for use as habitats. Modified versions of these buildings could also prove useful on Earth as shelters that can be rapidly and easily erected in emergency situations and/or extreme environments: examples include shelters for hurricane relief and for Antarctic exploration.

  6. Color and Streptomycetes1

    PubMed Central

    Pridham, Thomas G.

    1965-01-01

    A report summarizing the results of an international workshop on determination of color of streptomycetes is presented. The results suggest that the color systems which seem most practically appealing and effective to specialists on actinomycetes are those embracing a limited number of color names and groups. The broad groupings allow placement of isolates into reasonably well-defined categories based on color of aerial mycelium. Attempts to expand such systems (more color groups) lead to difficulties. It is common knowledge that many, if not all, of the individual groups would in these broad systems contain strains that differ in many other respects, e.g., spore-wall ornamentation, color of vegetative (substratal) mycelium, morphology of chains of spores, and numerous physiological criteria. Also, cultures of intermediate color can be found, which makes placement difficult. As it now stands, color as a criterion for characterization of streptomycetes and streptoverticillia is in questionable status. Although much useful color information can be obtained by an individual, the application of this information to that in the literature or its use in communication with other individuals leaves much to be desired. More objective methods of color determination are needed. At present, the most effective method that could be used internationally is the color-wheel system of Tresner and Backus. Furthermore, the significance of color in speciation of these organisms is an open question. Obviously, more critical work on the color problem is needed. PMID:14264847

  7. Permeability of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marschall, J.; Milos, F. S.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Rigid fibrous refractory insulations (TPS tiles) are integral components of many spacecraft thermal protection systems. These materials are composed of refractory fibers With diameters on the order of 1 to 15 micrometers. They are lightweight and have an open, highly porous microstructure. Typical densities are less than 500 kilograms per cubic meters, and porosities generally exceed 0.8. Because of their open porosity, these materials are permeable to gas glow. There are numerous instances in which internal gas transport in a thermal protection system could be important; examples include the penetration of hot boundary-layer gases into the insulation, the flow of decomposition (pyrolysis) products from the interior, the use of convective flows to mitigate ice formation caused by cryopumping, and the design of refractory vents for pressure equilibration during atmospheric entry. Computational analysis of gas flow through porous media requires values of permeability which have not previously been available for the rigid fibrous insulations used in thermal protection systems. This paper will document measurements of permeability for a variety of insulations from NASA's LI, FRCI, and AETB families of lightweight ceramic ablators. The directional anisotropy of permeability and its dependence on gas pressure and material density will be presented. It will be shown that rarified-flow effects are significant in the flow through such materials. Connections will be drawn between the insulation microstructure and permeability. The paper will also include representative computations of flow through rigid fibrous insulations.

  8. 49 CFR 587.18 - Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. 587.18 Section 587.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Deformable Barrier § 587.18 Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. (a) The fixed rigid barrier has a mass of...

  9. 49 CFR 587.18 - Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. 587.18 Section 587.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Deformable Barrier § 587.18 Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. (a) The fixed rigid barrier has a mass of...

  10. A Cognitive Developmental Model of Rigidity in Senescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapsley, Daniel K.; Enright, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    The rigidity construct is reinterpreted in terms of the cognitive developmental approach. A review reveals both cognitive and developmental themes, with an emphasis on the structural and operational properties of rigidity. Notes weaknesses of previous approaches to rigidity and discusses implications and predictions from the proposed model.…

  11. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  12. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  13. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  15. Light, Color, and Mirrors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiburzi, Brian; Tamborino, Laurie; Parker, Gordon A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exercise in which students can use flashlights, mirrors, and colored paper to discover scientific principles regarding optics. Addresses the concepts of angles of incidence and reflection, colored vs. white light, and mirror images. (WRM)

  16. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... things can cause tooth discoloration. The change in color may affect the entire tooth, or appear as spots or ... the tooth enamel. Your genes affect your tooth color. Other things ... include: Congenital diseases Environmental factors Infections ...

  17. Coloring with defect

    SciTech Connect

    Cowen, L.J.; Goddard, W.; Jesurum, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    An (ordinary vertex) coloring is a partition of the vertices of a graph into independent sets. The chromatic number is the minimum number of colors needed to produce such a partition. This paper considers a relaxation of coloring in which the color classes partition the vertices into subgraphs of degree at most d. d is called the defect of the coloring. A graph which admits a vertex coloring into k color classes, where each vertex is adjacent to at most d self-colored neighbors is said to be (k, d) colorable. We consider defective coloring on graphs of bounded degree, bounded genus, and bounded chromatic number, presenting complexity results and algorithms. For bounded degree graphs, a classic result of Lovasz yields a (k, [{Delta}/k]) coloring for graphs with E edges of maximum degree {Delta} in O({Delta}E) time. For graphs of bounded genus, (2, d), for d > 0 and (3,1)-coloring are proved NP-Complete, even for planar graphs. Results of easily can be transformed to (3,2) color any planar graph in linear time. We show that any toroidal graph is (3,2)- and (5, 1)-colorable, and quadratic-time algorithms are presented that find the colorings. For higher surfaces, we give a linear time algorithm to (3, {radical}12{gamma} + 6) color a graph of genus {gamma} > 2. It is also shown that any graph of genus {gamma} is ({radical}12{gamma}/(d + 1) + 6, d) colorable, and an O(d{radical}{gamma}E + V) algorithm is presented that finds the coloring. These bounds are within a constant factor of what is required for the maximum clique embeddable in the surface. Reductions from ordinary vertex coloring show that (k, d) coloring is NP-complete, and there exists an c > 0 such that no polynomial time algorithm can n{sup {epsilon}}-approximate the defective chromatic number unless P = NP. Most approximation algorithms to approximately color 3-colorable graphs can be extend to allow defects.

  18. Color rendition engine.

    PubMed

    Zukauskas, Artūras; Vaicekauskas, Rimantas; Vitta, Pranciškus; Tuzikas, Arūnas; Petrulis, Andrius; Shur, Michael

    2012-02-27

    A source of white light with continuously tuned color rendition properties, such as color fidelity, as well as color saturating and color dulling ability has been developed. The source, which is composed of red (R), amber (A), green (G), and blue (B) light-emitting diodes, has a spectral power distribution varied as a weighted sum of "white" RGB and AGB blends. At the RGB and AGB end-points, the source has a highest color saturating and color dulling ability, respectively, as follows from the statistical analysis of the color-shift vectors for 1269 Munsell samples. The variation of the weight parameter allows for continuously traversing all possible metameric RAGB blends, including that with the highest color fidelity. The source was used in a psychophysical experiment on the estimation of the color appearance of familiar objects, such as vegetables, fruits, and soft-drink cans of common brands, at correlated color temperatures of 3000 K, 4500 K, and 6500 K. By continuously tuning the weight parameter, each of 100 subjects selected RAGB blends that, to their opinion, matched lighting characterized as "most saturating," "most dulling," "most natural," and "preferential". The end-point RGB and AGB blends have been almost unambiguously attributed to "most saturating" and "most dulling" lighting, respectively. RAGB blends that render a highest number of colors with high fidelity have, on average, been attributed to "most natural" lighting. The "preferential" color quality of lighting has, on average, been matched to RAGB blends that provide color rendition with fidelity somewhat reduced in favor of a higher saturation. Our results infer that tunable "color rendition engines" can validate color rendition metrics and provide lighting meeting specific needs and preferences to color quality. PMID:22418343

  19. Expandable and rigid endorectal coils for prostate MRI: impact on prostate distortion and rigid image registration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongbok; Hsu, I-Chow J; Pouliot, Jean; Noworolski, Susan Moyher; Vigneron, Daniel B; Kurhanewicz, John

    2005-12-01

    Endorectal coils (ERCs) are used for acquiring high spatial resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human prostate. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of an expandable versus a rigid ERC on changes in the location and deformation of the prostate gland and subsequently on registering prostate images acquired with and without an ERC. Sagittal and axial T2 weighted MR images were acquired from 25 patients receiving a combined MR imaging/MR spectroscopic imaging staging exam for prostate cancer. Within the same exam, images were acquired using an external pelvic phased array coil both alone and in combination with either an expandable ERC (MedRad, Pittsburgh, PA) or a rigid ERC (USA Instruments, Aurora, OH). Rotations, translations and deformations caused by the ERC were measured and compared. The ability to register images acquired with and without the ERC using a manual rigid-body registration was assessed using a similarity index (SI). Both ERCs caused the prostate to tilt anteriorly with an average tilt of 18.5 degrees (17.4 +/- 9.9 and 19.5 +/- 11.3 degrees, mean +/- standard deviation, for expandable and rigid ERC, respectively). However, the expandable coil caused a significantly larger distortion of the prostate as compared to the rigid coil; compressing the prostate in the anterior/posterior direction by 4.1 +/- 3.0 mm vs 1.2 +/- 2.2 mm (14.5% vs 4.8%) (p < 0.0001), and widening the prostate in the right/left direction by 3.8 +/- 3.7 mm vs 1.5 +/- 3.1 mm (8.3% vs 3.4%) (p = 0.004). Additionally, the ability to manually align prostate images acquired with and without ERC was significantly (p < 0.0001) better for the rigid coil (SI = 0.941 +/- 0.008 vs 0.899 +/- 0.033, for the rigid and expandable coils, respectively). In conclusion, the manual rigid-body alignment of prostate MR images acquired with and without the ERC can be improved through the use of a rigid ERC. PMID:16475755

  20. Circumstellar Crystalline Silicates: Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartar, Josh; Speck, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most exciting developments in astronomy in the last 15 years was the discovery of crystalline silicate stardust by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board of ISO; discovery of the crystalline grains was indeed one of the biggest surprises of the ISO mission. Initially discovered around AGB stars (evolved stars in the range of 0.8 > M/M¤>8) at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths, crystalline silicates have since been seen in many astrophysical environments including young stellar objects (T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be), comets and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies. Low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) comprise 95% of the contributors to the ISM, so study of the formation of crystalline silicates is critical to our understanding of the ISM, which is thought to be primarily amorphous (one would expect an almost exact match between the composition of AGB dust shells and the dust in the ISM). Whether the crystalline dust is merely undetectable or amorphized remains a mystery. The FORCAST instrument on SOFIA as well as the PACS instrument on Herschel will provide exciting observing opportunities for the further study of crystalline silicates.

  1. Alkali metal crystalline polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuhong; Gamble, Stephen; Ainsworth, David; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Andreev, Yuri G; Bruce, Peter G

    2009-07-01

    Polymer electrolytes have been studied extensively because uniquely they combine ionic conductivity with solid yet flexible mechanical properties, rendering them important for all-solid-state devices including batteries, electrochromic displays and smart windows. For some 30 years, ionic conductivity in polymers was considered to occur only in the amorphous state above Tg. Crystalline polymers were believed to be insulators. This changed with the discovery of Li(+) conductivity in crystalline poly(ethylene oxide)(6):LiAsF(6). However, new crystalline polymer electrolytes have proved elusive, questioning whether the 6:1 complex has particular structural features making it a unique exception to the rule that only amorphous polymers conduct. Here, we demonstrate that ionic conductivity in crystalline polymers is not unique to the 6:1 complex by reporting several new crystalline polymer electrolytes containing different alkali metal salts (Na(+), K(+) and Rb(+)), including the best conductor poly(ethylene oxide)(8):NaAsF(6) discovered so far, with a conductivity 1.5 orders of magnitude higher than poly(ethylene oxide)(6):LiAsF(6). These are the first crystalline polymer electrolytes with a different composition and structures to that of the 6:1 Li(+) complex. PMID:19543313

  2. Color Discrimination Work Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's ability to see likenesses or differences in colors or shades, identifying or matching certain colors, and selecting colors that go together. Section 1 describes the assessment and lists related occupations and DOT codes. Instructions to the evaluator are provided in the…

  3. Sweetpotato Color Analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Color is an important attribute that contributes to the appearance of a sweetpotato genotype. A consumer uses color, along with geometric attributes (e.g., gloss, luster, sheen, texture, opaqueness, shape), to subjectively evaluate the appearance of a sweetpotato root. Color can be quantified by t...

  4. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  5. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  6. Reimagining the Color Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Color wheels are a traditional project for many teachers. The author has used them in art appreciation classes for many years, but one problem she found when her pre-service art education students created colored wheels was that they were boring: simple circles, with pie-shaped pieces, which students either painted or colored in. This article…

  7. Understanding geological processes: Visualization of rigid and non-rigid transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, T. F.; Atit, K.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Resnick, I.; Tikoff, B.

    2012-12-01

    Visualizations are used in the geological sciences to support reasoning about structures and events. Research in cognitive sciences offers insights into the range of skills of different users, and ultimately how visualizations might support different users. To understand the range of skills needed to reason about earth processes we have developed a program of research that is grounded in the geosciences' careful description of the spatial and spatiotemporal patterns associated with earth processes. In particular, we are pursuing a research program that identifies specific spatial skills and investigates whether and how they are related to each other. For this study, we focus on a specific question: Is there an important distinction in the geosciences between rigid and non-rigid deformation? To study a general spatial thinking skill we employed displays with non-geological objects that had been altered by rigid change (rotation), and two types of non-rigid change ("brittle" (or discontinuous) and "ductile" (or continuous) deformation). Disciplinary scientists (geosciences and chemistry faculty), and novices (non-science faculty and undergraduate psychology students) answered questions that required them to visualize the appearance of the object before the change. In one study, geologists and chemists were found to be superior to non-science faculty in reasoning about rigid rotations (e.g., what an object would look like from a different perspective). Geologists were superior to chemists in reasoning about brittle deformations (e.g., what an object looked like before it was broken - here the object was a word cut into many fragments displaced in different directions). This finding is consistent with two hypotheses: 1) Experts are good at visualizing the types of changes required for their domain; and 2) Visualization of rigid and non-rigid changes are not the same skill. An additional important finding is that there was a broad range of skill in both rigid and non-rigid

  8. Rigid and non-rigid micro-plates: Philippines and Myanmar-Andaman case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Generally, tectonic plates are considered as rigid. Oblique plate convergence favors the development of micro-plates along the converging boundaries. The north-south-trending Philippines archipelago (here named Philippine Mobile Belt, PMB), a few hundreds kilometers wide, is one of such complex tectonic zones. We show here that it is composed of rigid rotating crustal blocks (here called platelets). In Myanmar, the northernmost tip of the Sumatra-Andaman subduction system is another complex zone made of various crustal blocks in-between convergent plates. Yet, contrary to PMB, it sustains internal deformation with platelet buckling, altogether indicative of a non-rigid behavior. Therefore, the two case studies, Philippine Mobile Belt and Myanmar-Andaman micro-plate (MAS), illustrate the complexity of micro-plate tectonics and kinematics at convergent plate boundaries.

  9. Combining color and shape information for content-based image retrieval on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diplaros, Aristeidis; Gevers, Theo; Patras, Ioannis

    2003-12-01

    We propose a new image feature that merges color and shape information. This global feature, which we call color shape context, is a histogram that combines the spatial (shape) and color information of the image in one compact representation. This histogram codes the locality of color transitions in an image. Illumination invariant derivatives are first computed and provide the edges of the image, which is the shape information of our feature. These edges are used to obtain similarity (rigid) invariant shape descriptors. The color transitions that take place on the edges are coded in an illumination invariant way and are used as the color information. The color and shape information are combined in one multidimensional vector. The matching function of this feature is a metric and allows for existing indexing methods such as R-trees to be used for fast and efficient retrieval.

  10. Watermarking spot colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alattar, Osama M.; Reed, Alastair M.

    2003-06-01

    Watermarking of printed materials has usually focused on process inks of cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK). In packaging, almost three out of four printed materials include spot colors. Spot colors are special premixed inks, which can be produced in a vibrant range of colors, often outside the CMYK color gamut. In embedding a watermark into printed material, a common approach is to modify the luminance value of each pixel in the image. In the case of process color work pieces, the luminance change can be scaled to the C, M, Y and K channels using a weighting function, to produce the desired change in luminance. In the case of spot color art designs, there is only one channel available and the luminance change is applied to this channel. In this paper we develop a weighting function to embed the watermark signal across the range of different spot colors. This weighting function normalizes visibility effect and signal robustness across a wide range of different spot colors. It normalizes the signal robustness level over the range of an individual spot color"s intensity levels. Further, it takes into account the sensitivity of the capturing device to the different spot colors.

  11. Industrial Color Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCamy, C. S.

    1986-10-01

    Color is a very important property of many products and an essential feature of some. The commercial value of color is evident in the fact that customers reject product that is satisfactory in every other way, but is not the right color. Color isrumerically specified, measured, and controlled just as length or weight are. It has three dimensions: Hue, Value, and Chroma, and may be represented in a three-dimensional space. Colors of objects depend on the illumination and pairs of colors may match in one light but not in another. Controlled illumination is required for color matching. Illuminants were standardized by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE). As a basis for color measurement, the CIE adopted three spectral sensitivity functions representing a standard observer. Color may be measured by instruments using standard illumination and simulating the standard observer. It is better to measure spectral reflectance or transmittance and compute colorimetric quantities. Color may be inspected on a production line and the data obtained can be used to control the process. When production cannot be controlled as precisely as required, product may be sorted by color.

  12. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-10-14

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales.

  13. MASPROP- MASS PROPERTIES OF A RIGID STRUCTURE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program MASPROP was developed to rapidly calculate the mass properties of complex rigid structural systems. This program's basic premise is that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elementary structural shapes. Thirteen widely used basic structural shapes are available in this program. They are as follows: Discrete Mass, Cylinder, Truncated Cone, Torus, Beam (arbitrary cross section), Circular Rod (arbitrary cross section), Spherical Segment, Sphere, Hemisphere, Parallelepiped, Swept Trapezoidal Panel, Symmetric Trapezoidal Panels, and a Curved Rectangular Panel. MASPROP provides a designer with a simple technique that requires minimal input to calculate the mass properties of a complex rigid structure and should be useful in any situation where one needs to calculate the center of gravity and moments of inertia of a complex structure. Rigid body analysis is used to calculate mass properties. Mass properties are calculated about component axes that have been rotated to be parallel to the system coordinate axes. Then the system center of gravity is calculated and the mass properties are transferred to axes through the system center of gravity by using the parallel axis theorem. System weight, moments of inertia about the system origin, and the products of inertia about the system center of mass are calculated and printed. From the information about the system center of mass the principal axes of the system and the moments of inertia about them are calculated and printed. The only input required is simple geometric data describing the size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element. This program is written in FORTRAN for execution on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 62K (octal) of 60 bit words. The development of this program was completed in 1978.

  14. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies.

    PubMed

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-10-14

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales. PMID:26472363

  15. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-10-01

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales.

  16. True Colors Shining Through

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image mosaic illustrates how scientists use the color calibration targets (upper left) located on both Mars Exploration Rovers to fine-tune the rovers' sense of color. In the center, spectra, or light signatures, acquired in the laboratory of the colored chips on the targets are shown as lines. Actual data from Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera is mapped on top of these lines as dots. The plot demonstrates that the observed colors of Mars match the colors of the chips, and thus approximate the red planet's true colors. This finding is further corroborated by the picture taken on Mars of the calibration target, which shows the colored chips as they would appear on Earth.

  17. Large-strain, rigid-to-rigid deformation of bistable electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhibin; Yuan, Wei; Brochu, Paul; Chen, Bin; Liu, Zhitian; Pei, Qibing

    2009-11-01

    Thermoplastic poly(tert-butyl acrylate) (PTBA) is reported as an electroactive polymer that is rigid at ambient conditions and turns into a dielectric elastomer above a transition temperature. In the rubbery state, a PTBA thin film can be electrically actuated to strains up to 335% in area expansion. The calculated actuation pressure is 3.2 MPa. The actuation is made bistable by cooling to below glass transition temperature. The PTBA represents the bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP) that can be actuated to various largely strained, rigid shapes. The application of the BSEP for refreshable Braille display, an active tactile display, is also demonstrated.

  18. Dynamical rigidity of transcendental meromorphic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorulski, Bartłomiej; Urbański, Mariusz

    2012-08-01

    We prove the form of dynamical rigidity of transcendental meromorphic functions which asserts that if two tame transcendental meromorphic functions restricted to their Julia sets are topologically conjugate via a locally bi-Lipschitz homeomorphism, then they, treated as functions defined on the entire complex plane { C} , are topologically conjugate via an affine map, i.e. a map from { C} to { C} of the form z ↦ az + b. As an intermediate step we show that no tame transcendental meromorphic function is essentially affine.

  19. The High Rigidity Spectrometer for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, T.

    2016-06-01

    The High Rigidity Spectrometer (HRS) is being developed to make optimum use of the fast rare-isotope beams that will be available at the Facility for Rare-Isotope Beams (FRIB) and will be the key experimental tool to study the most exotic, neutron-rich nuclei. The HRS will accommodate detector systems for charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays. This will enable coincidence measurements of reaction products that stem from a variety of reactions such as knockout, breakup, charge exchange or Coulomb excitation. First-order ion optical studies are under way and this paper will offer some details on the current design ideas.

  20. Edge shape and comfort of rigid lenses.

    PubMed

    La Hood, D

    1988-08-01

    One of the main factors determining the comfort of a rigid contact lens is the shape of the edge. The comfort of four different contact lens edge shapes was assessed with four unadapted subjects in a randomized masked trial. Lenses with well rounded anterior edge profiles were found to be significantly more comfortable than lenses with square anterior edges. There was no significant difference in subjective comfort between a rounded and square posterior edge profile. The results suggest that the interaction of the edge with the eyelid is more important in determining comfort than edge effects on the cornea, when lenses are fitted according to a corneal alignment philosophy. PMID:3177585

  1. A rigid porous filter and filtration method

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas, Straub L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter comprising a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulate from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulate. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area- to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  2. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  3. Rigid and flexible OLEDs: prototypes to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monz, Stefan; Wolf, Konrad; Möbius, Hildegard; Blankenbach, Karlheinz

    2011-03-01

    Major achievements of this research project on rigid and flexible OLEDs are: lifetime enhancement by advanced constant luminance (L) operation, integration into textiles and furthermore, the prototype production on flexible PET/ITO substrates of polymer OLEDs. Our OLEDs were manufactured with spin-coating assisted by ink-jet printing. We introduced constant luminance operation (instead of the usual constant current) which was implemented in order to extend the overall lifetime of OLEDs. A threefold lifetime improvement was achieved by maintaining 50% luminance using an advanced microcontroller-based lifetime(LT) model. Various approaches to textile integration and evaluation of environmental issues in clothes (e.g. moisture) were investigated.

  4. Rigid-flexible printed wiring boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydow, E. V.

    1993-05-01

    Rigid-flexible printed wiring board materials, fabrication processes, product requirements, and reliability were established. Considerable effort was spent testing plated-through holes, analyzing plated-through hole failure mechanisms, and then incorporating materials, processes, and product requirements to provide adequate control and reduce failures. The principal processes developed were tooling concepts, process sequence, lamination, drilling, plasma etchback, copper electroplating, and solder coating. Product requirements and reliability were established with thermal shock, thermal stress, innerlayer adhesion, and fold flexibility tests. Plated-through hole failure mechanisms were analyzed with thermal mechanical and finite element analyses.

  5. Relating color working memory and color perception.

    PubMed

    Allred, Sarah R; Flombaum, Jonathan I

    2014-11-01

    Color is the most frequently studied feature in visual working memory (VWM). Oddly, much of this work de-emphasizes perception, instead making simplifying assumptions about the inputs served to memory. We question these assumptions in light of perception research, and we identify important points of contact between perception and working memory in the case of color. Better characterization of its perceptual inputs will be crucial for elucidating the structure and function of VWM. PMID:25038028

  6. Crystalline-Amorphous-Crystalline Transformation in a Highly Brilliant Luminescent System with Trigonal-Planar Gold(I) Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igawa, Kosuke; Yoshinari, Nobuto; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Masaki; Konno, Takumi

    2016-05-01

    Photoluminescent compounds showing emission color changes in response to external stimuli have received considerable attention because of their wide range of applications. Here, we report the unique photoluminescence behavior of a digold(I) coordination system with trigonal-planar AuI centers, [Au2(dppm)3]2+ (dppm = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane). This system shows an extremely intense phosphorescence, with a quantum yield of >95% in the solid state. Both the emission color and thermal stability vary due to changing counter ions (Cl‑ vs. OTf‑). Of particular note is the thermal crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transformation for the chloride salt, which is accompanied by drastic emission color changes. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffractions demonstrate that the two-step transformation is induced by the loss of water molecules of crystallization with the subsequent removal of a dppm ligand to form [Au2(dppm)2]2+, which is mechanically reverted back to [Au2(dppm)3]2+.

  7. Crystalline-Amorphous-Crystalline Transformation in a Highly Brilliant Luminescent System with Trigonal-Planar Gold(I) Centers

    PubMed Central

    Igawa, Kosuke; Yoshinari, Nobuto; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Masaki; Konno, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescent compounds showing emission color changes in response to external stimuli have received considerable attention because of their wide range of applications. Here, we report the unique photoluminescence behavior of a digold(I) coordination system with trigonal-planar AuI centers, [Au2(dppm)3]2+ (dppm = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane). This system shows an extremely intense phosphorescence, with a quantum yield of >95% in the solid state. Both the emission color and thermal stability vary due to changing counter ions (Cl− vs. OTf−). Of particular note is the thermal crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transformation for the chloride salt, which is accompanied by drastic emission color changes. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffractions demonstrate that the two-step transformation is induced by the loss of water molecules of crystallization with the subsequent removal of a dppm ligand to form [Au2(dppm)2]2+, which is mechanically reverted back to [Au2(dppm)3]2+. PMID:27184365

  8. Crystalline-Amorphous-Crystalline Transformation in a Highly Brilliant Luminescent System with Trigonal-Planar Gold(I) Centers.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Kosuke; Yoshinari, Nobuto; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Masaki; Konno, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescent compounds showing emission color changes in response to external stimuli have received considerable attention because of their wide range of applications. Here, we report the unique photoluminescence behavior of a digold(I) coordination system with trigonal-planar Au(I) centers, [Au2(dppm)3](2+) (dppm = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane). This system shows an extremely intense phosphorescence, with a quantum yield of >95% in the solid state. Both the emission color and thermal stability vary due to changing counter ions (Cl(-) vs. OTf(-)). Of particular note is the thermal crystalline-amorphous-crystalline transformation for the chloride salt, which is accompanied by drastic emission color changes. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffractions demonstrate that the two-step transformation is induced by the loss of water molecules of crystallization with the subsequent removal of a dppm ligand to form [Au2(dppm)2](2+), which is mechanically reverted back to [Au2(dppm)3](2+). PMID:27184365

  9. A gadolinium(iii) complex that shows room-temperature phosphorescence in the crystalline state.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Hidetaka; Kitagawa, Kazuhiro; Seo, Juncheol; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ogo, Seiji

    2016-07-19

    This paper presents a gadolinium(iii) complex that shows blue phosphorescence in the crystalline state at room temperature under air atmosphere; color of the crystals can be changed to pale-green from blue by doping of 1-naphthol. PMID:27221814

  10. ESR Measurement Of Crystallinity In Semicrystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Tsay, Fun-Dow

    1989-01-01

    Photogenerated free radicals decay at different rates in crystalline and amorphous phases. Degree of crystallinity in polymer having both crystalline and amorphous phases measured indirectly by technique based in part on electron-spin-resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Accuracy of crystallinity determined by new technique equals or exceeds similar determinations by differential scanning calorimetry, wide-angle x-ray scattering, or measurement of density.

  11. Colors, colored overlays, and reading skills

    PubMed Central

    Uccula, Arcangelo; Enna, Mauro; Mulatti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we are concerned with the role of colors in reading written texts. It has been argued that colored overlays applied above written texts positively influence both reading fluency and reading speed. These effects would be particularly evident for those individuals affected by the so called Meares-Irlen syndrome, i.e., who experience eyestrain and/or visual distortions – e.g., color, shape, or movement illusions – while reading. This condition would interest the 12–14% of the general population and up to the 46% of the dyslexic population. Thus, colored overlays have been largely employed as a remedy for some aspects of the difficulties in reading experienced by dyslexic individuals, as fluency and speed. Despite the wide use of colored overlays, how they exert their effects has not been made clear yet. Also, according to some researchers, the results supporting the efficacy of colored overlays as a tool for helping readers are at least controversial. Furthermore, the very nature of the Meares-Irlen syndrome has been questioned. Here we provide a concise, critical review of the literature. PMID:25120525

  12. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  13. Color Reproduction with a Smartphone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoms, Lars-Jochen; Colicchia, Giuseppe; Girwidz, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    The world is full of colors. Most of the colors we see around us can be created on common digital displays simply by superposing light with three different wavelengths. However, no mixture of colors can produce a fully pure color identical to a spectral color. Using a smartphone, students can investigate the main features of primary color addition…

  14. Highly viscous liquid crystalline mixtures: the alternative to liquid crystalline elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibaev, Petr; Schlesier, Cristina; Newman, Leah; McDonald, Scott

    2012-02-01

    Novel highly viscous liquid crystalline materials based on mixtures of glass forming oligomers and low molar mass liquid crystals were recently designed [1, 2] and studied. In this communication the novel data are presented, the analysis and discussion are extended. It is shown that viscoelastic properties of the materials are due to the physical entanglements between cyclic oligomers and low molar mass mesogens, not due to the chemical crosslinks between molecular moities. However, the mechanical properties of these viscoelastic materials resemble those of chemically crosslinked elastomers (elasticity and reversibility of deformations). The properties of chiral and non-chiral materials loaded with ferromagnetic nanoparticles are discussed in detail. Cholesteric materials undergo gigantic color changes in the wide spectral range under the deformation that allows distant detection of deformation and determination the anisotropy of deformation and its type. The materials doped with laser dyes become mechanically tunable lasers themselves and emit coherent light while pumped by external laser. A simple model is suggested to account for the observed effects; physical properties of the novel materials and liquid crystalline elastomers are compared and discussed. [4pt] [1] P.V. Shibaev, C. Schlesier, R. Uhrlass, S. Woodward, E. Hanelt, Liquid Crystals, 37:12, 1601-1604 [0pt] [2] P.V. Shibaev, P. Riverra, D. Teter, S. Marsico, M. Sanzari, V. Ramakrishnan, E. Hanelt, Optics Express, 16, 2965 (2008)

  15. Magnetic Control of Rigid Achiral Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U.; Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry; Kim, Minjun

    2013-11-01

    We report control of rigid achiral microswimmers in low Reynolds number environments. A rotating magnetic field was used to actuate the microswimmers wirelessly by rotating the microswimmers, which produces propulsion. Previous magnetically actuated microswimmers in bulk fluids have been designed with either flexibility or chiral geometry; we show that simpler geometries with neither flexibility nor chirality can produce propulsion. The microswimmer consists of three magnetic beads conjugated using avidin-biotin linkages into an arc formation. We designed a magnetic field generator consisting of electromagnetic coils arranged in an approximate Helmholtz configuration. A highspeed camera provided realtime imaging of the microswimmers' motion in a PDMS chamber. The rigidity of the microswimmer was characterized by tracking the position of the individual beads and calculating their relative distances. As a function of field strength and rotation frequency, we observed changes in the rotational axis of the microswimmers and the corresponding effects on their velocities. The achiral microswimmers exhibited active propulsion and were controllable in both speed and direction, which demonstrates the possibility for future biomedical applications such as drug delivery.

  16. A constitutive theory for rigid polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.; Krieg, R.D.; Schreyer, H.L.

    1992-12-31

    Rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam consists of interconnected polyurethane plates which form cells. When this foam is compressed, it exhibits an initial elastic regime which is followed by a plateau regime in which the load required to compress the foam remains nearly constant. In the plateau regime, cell walls are damaged and large permanent volume changes are generated. As additional load is applied, cell walls are compressed against neighboring cell walls, and the stiffness of the foam increases and approaches a value equal to that of solid polyurethane. When the foam is loaded in tension, the cell walls are damaged and the foam fractures. A constitutive theory for rigid polyurethane foam has been developed. This theory is based on a decomposition of the foam into two parts: a skeleton and a nonlinear elastic continuum in parallel. The skeleton accounts for the foam behavior in the elastic and plateau regimes and is described using a coupled plasticity with continuum damage theory. The nonlinear elastic continuum accounts for the lock-up of the foam due to internal gas pressure and cell wall interactions. This new constitutive theory has been implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes. Numerical simulations performed using the new constitutive theory are presented.

  17. Quantification of rigidity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Behrooz; Esteki, Ali; Ebrahimi-Takamjani, Esmaeal; Shahidi, Golam-Ali; Khamseh, Fatemeh; Moinodin, Marzieh

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, a new method for quantification of rigidity in elbow joint of Parkinsonian patients is introduced. One of the most known syndromes in Parkinson's disease (PD) is increased passive stiffness in muscles, which leads to rigidity in joints. Clinical evaluation of stiffness in wrist and/or elbow, commonly used by clinicians, is based on Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating System (UPDRS). Subjective nature of this method may influence the accuracy and precision of evaluations. Hence, introducing an objective standard method based on quantitative measurements may be helpful. A test rig was designed and fabricated to measure range of motion and viscous and elastic components of passive stiffness in elbow joint. Measurements were done for 41 patients and 11 controls. Measures were extracted using Matlab-R14 software and statistic analyses were done by Spss-13. Relation between each computed measure and the level of illness were analyzed. Results showed a better correlation between viscous component of stiffness and UPDRS score compared to the elastic component. Results of this research may help to introduce a standard objective method for evaluation of PD. PMID:17909970

  18. Shear-induced rigidity in athermal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Bulbul; Sarkar, Sumantra

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we present a minimal model of rigidity and plastic failure in solids whose rigidity emerges directly as a result of applied stresses. Examples include shear-jamming (SJ) in dry grains and discontinuous shear thickening (DST) of dense non-Brownian suspensions. Both SJ and DST states are examples of non-equilibrium, self-assembled structures that have evolved to support the load that created them. These are strongly-interacting systems where the interactions arise primarily from the strict constraints of force and torque balance at the local and global scales. Our model is based on a reciprocal-space picture that strictly enforces the local and global constraints, and is, therefore, best suited to capturing the strong correlations in these non-equilibrium systems. The reciprocal space is a tiling whose edges represent contact forces, and whose faces represent grains. A separation of scale between force fluctuations and displacements of grains is used to represent the positional disorder as quenched randomness on variables in the reciprocal space. Comparing theoretical results to experiments, we will argue that the packing fraction controls the strength of the quenched disorder. Sumantra Sarkar et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 068301 (2013)

  19. The nature of colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Pos, Osvaldo

    2002-06-01

    Color is a visible aspect of objects and lights, and as such is an objective characteristic of our phenomenal world. Correspondingly also objects and lights are objective, although their subjectivity cannot be disregarded since they belong to our phenomenal world. The distinction between perception and sensation deals with colors seen either in complex displays or in isolation. Reality of colors is apparently challenged by virtual reality, while virtual reality is a good example of what colors are. It seems difficult to combine that aspect of reality colors have in our experience and the concept that colors represent something in the external environment: the distinction between stimulation and perceived object is crucial for understanding the relationships between phenomenal world and physical reality. A modern concept of isomorphism seems useful in interpreting the role of colors. The relationship between the psychological structure of colors and the physical stimulation is enlightened by the analysis of pseudocolors. The perceptual, subjective characteristics of colors go along with the subjectivity of scientific concepts. Colors, emotions, and concepts are all in some people's mind: none of them is independent of the subject mind. Nevertheless they can be communicated from person to person by an appropriate scientific terminology.

  20. Self-Consistent Interpretation of the 2D Structure of the Liquid Au82Si18 Surface: Bending Rigidity and the Debye-Waller Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechler, S.; Pershan, P. S.; Yahel, E.; Stoltz, S. E.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.; Sellner, S.

    2010-10-01

    The structural and mechanical properties of 2D crystalline surface phases that form at the surface of liquid eutectic Au82Si18 are studied using synchrotron x-ray scattering over a large temperature range. In the vicinity of the eutectic temperature the surface consists of a 2D atomic bilayer crystalline phase that transforms into a 2D monolayer crystalline phase during heating. The latter phase eventually melts into a liquidlike surface on further heating. We demonstrate that the short wavelength capillary wave fluctuations are suppressed due to the bending rigidity of 2D crystalline phases. The corresponding reduction in the Debye-Waller factor allows for measured reflectivity to be explained in terms of an electron density profile that is consistent with the 2D surface crystals.

  1. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  2. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  3. CRYSTALLINE BEAMS AT HIGH ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.; OKAMOTO, H.; YURI, Y.; SESSLER, A.; MACHIDA, S.

    2006-06-23

    Previously it was shown that by crystallizing each of the two counter-circulating beams, a much larger beam-beam tune shift can be tolerated during the beam-beam collisions; thus a higher luminosity can be reached for colliding beams [1]. On the other hand, crystalline beams can only be formed at energies below the transition energy ({gamma}{sub T}) of the accelerators [2]. In this paper, we investigate the formation of crystals in a high-{gamma}{sub T} lattice that also satisfies the maintenance condition for a crystalline beam [3].

  4. Color image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrae, Kimberley A.; Ruck, Dennis W.; Rogers, Steven K.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1994-03-01

    The most difficult stage of automated target recognition is segmentation. Current segmentation problems include faces and tactical targets; previous efforts to segment these objects have used intensity and motion cues. This paper develops a color preprocessing scheme to be used with the other segmentation techniques. A neural network is trained to identify the color of a desired object, eliminating all but that color from the scene. Gabor correlations and 2D wavelet transformations will be performed on stationary images; and 3D wavelet transforms on multispectral data will incorporate color and motion detection into the machine visual system. The paper will demonstrate that color and motion cues can enhance a computer segmentation system. Results from segmenting faces both from the AFIT data base and from video taped television are presented; results from tactical targets such as tanks and airplanes are also given. Color preprocessing is shown to greatly improve the segmentation in most cases.

  5. Colored Diffraction Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Klein, S.

    1996-03-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences.

  6. Color scene analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes a color scene analysis method for the object surfaces appearing in the noisy and imperfect images of natural scenes. It is developed based on the spatial and spectral grouping property of the human visual system. The uniformly colored surfaces are recognized by their monomodal 3-D color distributions and extracted in the spatial domain using the lightness and chromaticity network of the Munsell system. The textured image regions are identified by their irregular histogram distributions and isolated in the image plane using the Julesz connectivity detection rules. The method is applied to various color images corrupted by noise and degraded heavily by under-sampling and low color-contrast imperfections. The method was able to detect all the uniformly colored and heavily textured object areas in these images.

  7. Digital color representation

    DOEpatents

    White, James M.; Faber, Vance; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.

    1992-01-01

    An image population having a large number of attributes is processed to form a display population with a predetermined smaller number of attributes which represent the larger number of attributes. In a particular application, the color values in an image are compressed for storage in a discrete lookup table (LUT) where an 8-bit data signal is enabled to form a display of 24-bit color values. The LUT is formed in a sampling and averaging process from the image color values with no requirement to define discrete Voronoi regions for color compression. Image color values are assigned 8-bit pointers to their closest LUT value whereby data processing requires only the 8-bit pointer value to provide 24-bit color values from the LUT.

  8. Colored diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, M V; Klein, S

    1996-01-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:11607642

  9. Ghostscript color management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrhel, Michael J.; Johnston, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    This document introduces an updated color architecture that has been designed for Ghostscript. Ghostscript is a well known open source document rendering and conversion engine. Prior to this update, the handling of color in Ghostscript was based primarily upon PostScript color management. The new design results in a flexible ICC-based architecture that works well in Ghostscript's multi-threaded rendering environment.

  10. Origin of rigidity in marginal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng

    Granular materials are seemingly simple — they are a collection of particles large enough to be seen by eye, yet they exhibit a large range of totally different behaviors: liquid, gas and solid. We study various interesting aspects of granular materials: (1)First, analysis of experimental data yields a completely new route in which a granular fluid becomes a solid. These new states, know as shear jammed(SJ) granular matter, are an addition to the jamming framework proposed over 10 years ago. (2)We then focus on the emergence of shear-rigidity in granular materials which have no energetically preferred density modulations. In contrast to traditional solids, the emergence of mechanical rigidity in these marginal granular solids is a collective process, which is controlled solely by boundary forces, the constraints of force and torque balance, and the positivity of the contact forces. We develop a theoretical framework and show that these solids have internal patterns that are most naturally represented in the space of gauge fields that impose the constraints. Broken translational invariance in gauge space is a necessary condition for rigidity in granular solids. We use this theoretical framework to understand the stress fluctuations and the ability to resist deformations in SJ states. (3)We generalize the stress ensemble framework to a full tensor representation. In this framework, the angoricity is an intensive quantity, which is conjugate to the stress rather than the energy. We compare the predictions of this framework in SJ states and explain stress fluctuations in SJ states.(4)We also construct a dynamical framework to model deformation and stress avalanches in a slowly driven granular matter. The model assumes small patches of the driven granular material undergoing a stochastic evolution in a stress landscape, elastic deformations are equivalent to tilting the landscape while rearrangements correspond to hopping between different metastable states in this