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Sample records for rigid nephroscopy sufficient

  1. Laparoscopic - assisted transpyelic rigid nephroscopy - simple alternative when flexible ureteroscopy is not available

    PubMed Central

    Tobias-Machado, Marcos; Hidaka, Alexandre Kiyoshi; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Chagas, Carlos Alberto; Leal, Leandro Correa; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: In special situations such as malrotated or ectopic kidneys and UPJ stenosis treatment of renal lithiasis can be challenging. In these rare cases laparoscopy can be indicated. Objective: Describe the Laparoscopic-assisted rigid nephroscopy performed via transpyelic approach and report the feasibility. Patients and methods: We present two cases of caliceal lithiasis. The first is a patient that ESWL and previous percutaneous lithotripsy have failed, with pelvic kidney where laparoscopic dissection of renal pelvis was carried out followed by nephroscopy utilizing the 30 Fr rigid nephroscope to remove the calculus. Ideal angle between the major axis of renal pelvis and the rigid nephroscope to allow success with this technique was 60-90 grades. In the second case, the kidney had a dilated infundibulum. Results: The operative time was 180 minutes for both procedures. No significant blood loss or perioperative complications occurred. The bladder catheter was removed in the postoperative day 1 and Penrose drain on day 2 when patients were discharged. The convalescence was completed after 3 weeks. Patients were stone free without symptons in one year of follow-up. Conclusions: Laparoscopic-assisted rigid nephroscopy performed via tranpyelic approach can be done safely with proper patient selection and adherence to standard laparoscopic surgical principles. This approach is an alternative in cases where flexible endoscope is not available and when standard procedure is unlikely to produce a stone-free status. PMID:27564304

  2. Laparoscopic Stone Surgery With the Aid of Flexible Nephroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hyun; Cho, Sung Yong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Jeong, Hyeon; Son, Hwancheol; Woo, Seung Hyo; Kim, Dae Kyung; Min, Sun-Ho; Oh, Seung-June; Kim, Hyeon-Hoe

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the outcome of laparoscopic pyelo- and ureterolithotomies with the aid of flexible nephroscopy. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in 71 patients with complex renal stones or large and impacted proximal ureteral stones. Patients underwent laparoscopic pyelo- or ureterolithotomies with or without the removal of small residual stones by use of flexible nephroscopy between July 2005 and July 2010. Operative success was defined as no residual stones in the intravenous pyelogram at 12 weeks postoperatively. Perioperative results and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results The patients' mean age was 54.7±13.7 years, and 53 males (74.6%) and 18 females (25.4%) were included. The mean maximal stone size was 19.4±9.4 mm. A total of 47 cases were complex renal stones and 24 cases were impacted ureteral stones. Mean operative time was 139.0±63.7 minutes. Stones were completely removed in 61 cases (85.9%), and no further ancillary treatment was needed for clinically insignificant residual fragments in 7 cases (9.9%). For complex renal stones, the complete stone-free rate and clinically significant stone-free rate were 80.9% and 93.6%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the use of flexible nephroscopy for complex renal stones can reduce the risk of residual stones. A major complication occurred in one case, in which open conversion was performed. Conclusions Laparoscopic stone surgery is a safe and minimally invasive procedure with a high success rate, especially with the aid of flexible nephroscopy, and is not associated with procedure-specific complications. PMID:25045447

  3. Standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy alone versus in combination with intraoperative anterograde flexible nephroscopy for staghorn stones: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Goktug, Goksel; Karakoyunlu, Nihat; Sener, Nevzat Can; Zengin, Kursad; Nalbant, Ismail; Karabacak, Osman; Ozturk, Ufuk; Imamoglu, Abdurrahim

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to compare the outcomes of standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) to PCNL with intraoperative antegrade flexible nephroscopy (IAFN) for treating stones of staghorn nature. We retrospectively analyzed patients treated using PCNL between January 2007 and July 2013. A total of 1250 patients were treated using PCNL, and 166 patients had staghorn stones. All patients had been subjected to a complete blood count, routine biochemical analyses, coagulation tests, a complete urine analysis, and urine cultures. Patients with a positive urine culture had been treated with appropriate antibiotics until the urine culture became negative. After purchasing a flexible renoscope in March 2012, we routinely used this tool to improve the stone-free (SF) rate. The 105 patients who underwent standard PCNL prior to March 2012 were classified as Group 1, and the 61 patients who underwent PCNL + IAFN after that date were classified as Group 2. The two groups had similar and homogeneous demographic data. The fluoroscopy and total operative times were significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p < 0.01). Additionally, the hospitalization time (p < 0.01) and the mean hematocrit decrease (p < 0.01) were significantly lower in Group 1. In both groups, the SF rates were higher than 85%, similar to those reported in the literature. Although Group 2 had a slightly better SF rates, this difference was not statistically significant. For staghorn calculi, PCNL combined with IAFN yields excellent outcomes. However, similar prospective studies on larger cohorts should be performed to support our findings. PMID:26678936

  4. Abdominal rigidity

    MedlinePlus

    Rigidity of the abdomen ... is a sore area inside the belly or abdomen, the pain will get worse when a hand ... Causes can include: Abscess inside the abdomen Appendicitis ... small intestine, large bowel, or gallbladder ( gastrointestinal ...

  5. Rotating rigid motion in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.P.; Pooe, C.A.

    1987-11-01

    Kinematic and dynamic expressions are derived for the Lie derivative of vorticity along a particle world line in a rigid motion. It is found that the evolution of vorticity in a rigid motion is governed by the electric part of the Weyl tensor. Necessary and sufficient kinematic and dynamic conditions are established for a rotating rigid motion to be isometric.

  6. Ex vivo pyelotomy, nephroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy of a staghorn stone in a donor kidney prior to renal transplant

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Dariusz; Bolanowska, Barbara; Jankowski, Paweł; Dorobisz, Tadeusz; Dorobisz, Karolina; Chabowski, Mariusz; Janczak, Dawid

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents the diagnostic and treatment procedures of stone removal from the kidney of a 67-year-old donor, the transplantation of the kidney to a 65-year-old recipient, and the postoperative course until the end of hospitalization. Computed tomography performed before collecting the organ showed a staghorn stone in the renal pelvis and lower calyces in the right donor kidney. The stones were removed ex-vivo using a rigid ureteroscope and a holmium laser prior to transplantation. Then the organ was transplanted to the left iliac fossa of a 65-year-old man with end-stage renal failure. The authors think there is a possibility of increasing the kidney pool, by using organs containing large calculi. In such cases stones should be removed before the operation and the patient should be monitored regularly, especially in the first months after the transplant. PMID:26240630

  7. Rigid bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Machuzak, Michael S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction to rigid bronchoscopy (RB). We will briefly discuss its history, evolution, and resurgence while we highlight its versatility and usefulness for today's interventional pulmonologist and thoracic surgeon. Despite being one of the earliest pulmonary procedures described, RB is still an important technique. Advances in thoracic medicine have made this skill critical for a fully functional interventional pulmonary program. If the interventional pulmonologist of this century is to be successful, he or she should be facile in this technique. Despite the availability of RB for decades, the invention of flexible bronchoscopy in 1966 led to a significant downturn in its usage. The growth of the interventional pulmonology field brought RB back into the spot light. Apart from the historic role of RB in treatment of central airway lesions and mechanical debulking of endobronchial lesions, RB is the key instrument that can adapt modern therapeutic tools such as laser, argon plasma coagulation, electrocautery, cryotherapy, and stent deployment. Performing RB requires proper preprocedure preparation, exceptional understanding of upper airway anatomy, specific hand-eye coordination, and open communication between the bronchoscopist and the anesthesiologist. These skills can be primarily learned and maintained with repetition. This article will review information relevant to this technique and lay a foundation to be built upon for years to come. PMID:25463158

  8. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  11. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... maintain sufficient penile rigidity for sexual intercourse. External penile rigidity devices include...

  12. Rigid particulate matter sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Matthew

    2011-02-22

    A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

  13. Pneumatically erected rigid habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salles, Bradley

    1992-01-01

    The pneumatically erected rigid habitat concept consists of a structure based on an overexpanded metal bellows. The basic concept incorporates the advantages of both inflatable and rigid structures. The design and erection detail are presented with viewgraphs.

  14. Necessary, but also Sufficient?

    PubMed

    Martens, Sascha

    2016-07-01

    Cell biologists are equipped with a plethora of techniques and approaches to unravel the fascinating inner working of the cell. Among these, biochemistry has the ability to define the machinery that is both necessary and sufficient for a given process and, therefore, to define its core mechanism. PMID:27142894

  15. When is Testing Sufficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda H.; Arthur, James D.; Stapko, Ruth K.; Davani, Darush

    1999-01-01

    The Software Assurance Technology Center (SATC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has been investigating how projects can determine when sufficient testing has been completed. For most projects, schedules are underestimated, and the last phase of the software development, testing, must be decreased. Two questions are frequently asked: "To what extent is the software error-free? " and "How much time and effort is required to detect and remove the remaining errors? " Clearly, neither question can be answered with absolute certainty. Nonetheless, the ability to answer these questions with some acceptable level of confidence is highly desirable. First, knowing the extent to which a product is error-free, we can judge when it is time to terminate testing. Secondly, if errors are judged to be present, we can perform a cost/benefit trade-off analysis to estimate when the software will be ready for use and at what cost. This paper explains the efforts of the SATC to help projects determine what is sufficient testing and when is the most cost-effective time to stop testing.

  16. Fracturing rigid materials.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhaosheng; Hong, Jeong-Mo; Teran, Joseph; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to fracturing (and denting) brittle materials. To avoid the computational burden imposed by the stringent time step restrictions of explicit methods or with solving nonlinear systems of equations for implicit methods, we treat the material as a fully rigid body in the limit of infinite stiffness. In addition to a triangulated surface mesh and level set volume for collisions, each rigid body is outfitted with a tetrahedral mesh upon which finite element analysis can be carried out to provide a stress map for fracture criteria. We demonstrate that the commonly used stress criteria can lead to arbitrary fracture (especially for stiff materials) and instead propose the notion of a time averaged stress directly into the FEM analysis. When objects fracture, the virtual node algorithm provides new triangle and tetrahedral meshes in a straightforward and robust fashion. Although each new rigid body can be rasterized to obtain a new level set, small shards can be difficult to accurately resolve. Therefore, we propose a novel collision handling technique for treating both rigid bodies and rigid body thin shells represented by only a triangle mesh. PMID:17218752

  17. Rigidity of melting DNA.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation. PMID:27300825

  18. Rigidity of melting DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation.

  19. Effective rigidity of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliti, L.

    1986-12-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations of shape (undulations) in reducing the effective rigidity of membranes is reviewed. The consequences of this effect on vesicle size distribution and on the structure of microemulsions, as well as on other physical phenomena, are sketched.

  20. Rigid molecular foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Aspen, P.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability, and processing. Rigid molecular foams or {open_quotes}organic zeolites{close_quotes} would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with dichloroxylene (DCX) as the pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and the crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6 {angstrom} to 2,000 {angstrom}.

  1. Electrostatics of Rigid Polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.C.L.

    2009-06-04

    The organization of rigid biological polyelectrolytes by multivalent ions and macroions are important for many fundamental problems in biology and biomedicine, such as cytoskeletal regulation and antimicrobial sequestration in cystic fibrosis. These polyelectrolytes have been used as model systems for understanding electrostatics in complex fluids. Here, we review some recent results in theory, simulations, and experiments.

  2. How rigid are viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartschuh, R. D.; Wargacki, S. P.; Xiong, H.; Neiswinger, J.; Kisliuk, A.; Sihn, S.; Ward, V.; Vaia, R. A.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2008-08-01

    Viruses have traditionally been studied as pathogens, but in recent years they have been adapted for applications ranging from drug delivery and gene therapy to nanotechnology, photonics, and electronics. Although the structures of many viruses are known, most of their biophysical properties remain largely unexplored. Using Brillouin light scattering, we analyzed the mechanical rigidity, intervirion coupling, and vibrational eigenmodes of Wiseana iridovirus (WIV). We identified phonon modes propagating through the viral assemblies as well as the localized vibrational eigenmode of individual viruses. The measurements indicate a Young’s modulus of ˜7GPa for single virus particles and their assemblies, surprisingly high for “soft” materials. Mechanical modeling confirms that the DNA core dominates the WIV rigidity. The results also indicate a peculiar mechanical coupling during self-assembly of WIV particles.

  3. Advanced Rigid Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate s (ESMD) Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project (TDP) and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate s (ARMD) Hypersonics Project are developing new advanced rigid ablators in an effort to substantially increase reliability, decrease mass, and reduce life cycle cost of rigid aeroshell-based entry systems for multiple missions. Advanced Rigid Ablators combine ablation resistant top layers capable of high heat flux entry and enable high-speed EDL with insulating mass-efficient bottom that, insulate the structure and lower the areal weight. These materials may benefit Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) vendors and may potentially enable new NASA missions for higher velocity returns (e.g. asteroid, Mars). The materials have been thermally tested to 400-450 W/sq cm at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Lab (LHMEL), Hypersonics Materials Evaluation Test System (HyMETS) and in arcjet facilities. Tested materials exhibit much lower backface temperatures and reduced recession over the baseline materials (PICA). Although the EDL project is ending in FY11, NASA in-house development of advanced ablators will continue with a focus on varying resin systems and fiber/resin interactions.

  4. Rigid porous filter

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  5. Working toward Self-Sufficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Nathan

    1985-01-01

    Upon arrival in the United States, the Southeast Asian "Boat People" faced a multitude of problems that would seem to have hindered their achieving economic self-sufficiency. Nonetheless, by the time of a 1982 research study which interviewed nearly 1,400 refugee households, 25 percent of all the households in the sample had achieved economic…

  6. Generalized flexibility-rigidity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc Duy; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Flexibility-rigidity index (FRI) has been developed as a robust, accurate, and efficient method for macromolecular thermal fluctuation analysis and B-factor prediction. The performance of FRI depends on its formulations of rigidity index and flexibility index. In this work, we introduce alternative rigidity and flexibility formulations. The structure of the classic Gaussian surface is utilized to construct a new type of rigidity index, which leads to a new class of rigidity densities with the classic Gaussian surface as a special case. Additionally, we introduce a new type of flexibility index based on the domain indicator property of normalized rigidity density. These generalized FRI (gFRI) methods have been extensively validated by the B-factor predictions of 364 proteins. Significantly outperforming the classic Gaussian network model, gFRI is a new generation of methodologies for accurate, robust, and efficient analysis of protein flexibility and fluctuation. Finally, gFRI based molecular surface generation and flexibility visualization are demonstrated.

  7. Repulsive Casimir force: Sufficient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, Luigi; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2010-09-15

    In this paper the Casimir energy of two parallel plates made by materials of different penetration depth and no medium in between is derived. We study the Casimir force density and derive analytical constraints on the two penetration depths which are sufficient conditions to ensure repulsion. Compared to other methods our approach needs no specific model for dielectric or magnetic material properties and constitutes a complementary analysis.

  8. Rigid substructure search

    PubMed Central

    Shirvanyants, David; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying the location of binding sites on proteins is of fundamental importance for a wide range of applications, including molecular docking, de novo drug design, structure identification and comparison of functional sites. Here we present Erebus, a web server that searches the entire Protein Data Bank for a given substructure defined by a set of atoms of interest, such as the binding scaffolds for small molecules. The identified substructure contains atoms having the same names, belonging to same amino acids and separated by the same distances (within a given tolerance) as the atoms of the query structure. The accuracy of a match is measured by the root-mean-square deviation or by the normal weight with a given variance. Tests show that our approach can reliably locate rigid binding scaffolds of drugs and metal ions. Availability and Implementation: We provide this service through a web server at http://erebus.dokhlab.org. Contact: dokh@unc.edu PMID:21460026

  9. Fractal rigidity in migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J.

    2004-04-01

    We study the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAfv) in humans using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). Scaling properties of time series of the axial flow velocity averaged over a cardiac beat interval may be characterized by two exponents. The short time scaling exponent (STSE) determines the statistical properties of fluctuations of blood flow velocities in short-time intervals while the Hurst exponent describes the long-term fractal properties. In many migraineurs the value of the STSE is significantly reduced and may approach that of the Hurst exponent. This change in dynamical properties reflects the significant loss of short-term adaptability and the overall hyperexcitability of the underlying cerebral blood flow control system. We call this effect fractal rigidity.

  10. Rigid collapsible dish structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, William B. (Inventor); Giebler, Martin M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A collapsible dish structure composed of a plurality of rows of rigid radial petal assemblies concentric with the axis of the dish. The petal assemblies consist of a center petal and two side petals, the center petal hinged on an axis tangent to a circle concentric with the axis of the dish and the side petals hinged to the center petal at their mating edge. The center petal is foldable inwardly and the side petals rotate about their hinges such that the collapsed dish structure occupies a much smaller volume than the deployed dish. Means of controlling the shape of the dish to compensate for differential expansion of the deployed dish are also provided.

  11. Puzzle geometry and rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smania, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    We describe a new and robust method to prove rigidity results in complex dynamics. The new ingredient is the geometry of the critical puzzle pieces: under control of geometry and ``complex bounds'', two generalized polynomial-like maps which admit a topological conjugacy, quasiconformal outside the filled-in Julia set, are indeed quasiconformally conjugate. The proof uses a new abstract removability-type result for quasiconformal maps, following ideas of Heinonen and Koskela and of Kallunki and Koskela, optimized for applications in complex dynamics. We prove, as the first application of this new method, that, for even criticalities distinct from two, the period two cycle of the Fibonacci renormalization operator is hyperbolic with 1 -dimensional unstable manifold.

  12. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  13. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  14. Origin of rigidity in athermal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sumantra

    Solids are distinguished from fluids by their ability to resist shear. In traditional solids, the resistance to shear is associated with the emergence of broken translational symmetry as exhibited by a non-uniform density pattern, which results from either minimizing the energy cost or maximizing the entropy or both. In this thesis, we focus on a special class of materials where this paradigm is challenged. We argue that the observation of rigidity in dry granular materials, a representative system, is a collective process controlled solely by few constraints, e.g., the boundary stresses, the constraint of force and torque balance, and the positivity of contact forces. We have shown that these constraints lead to a broken translational symmetry in a dual space of heights (loop forces) which leads to the observed rigidity (jamming) in such a system. We investigate the structure and behavior of the dual space through a geometrical construction as the system evolves towards the rigidity transition, commonly known as jamming. In that context, we explore the role of friction in jamming and establish the equivalence of real space and stress space description. We conclude that the role of real space geometry is negligible, and a stress only description is sufficient to understand the phenomenology of jamming. In the second half of the thesis, we develop a phenomenological model of the shear induced rigidity in athermal materials. Recent studies of athermal systems such as dry grains and dense, non-Brownian suspensions have shown that shear can lead to solidification through the process of shear jamming in grains and discontinuous shear thickening in suspensions. The similarities observed between these two distinct phenomena suggest that the physical processes leading to shear-induced rigidity in athermal materials are universal. We present a non-equilibrium statistical mechanics model, which exhibits the phenomenology of these shear-driven transitions: shear jamming and

  15. Energy Strategic Planning & Sufficiency Project

    SciTech Connect

    Retziaff, Greg

    2005-03-30

    This report provides information regarding options available, their advantages and disadvantages, and the costs for pursuing activities to advance Smith River Rancheria toward an energy program that reduces their energy costs, allows greater self-sufficiency and stimulates economic development and employment opportunities within and around the reservation. The primary subjects addressed in this report are as follows: (1) Baseline Assessment of Current Energy Costs--An evaluation of the historical energy costs for Smith River was conducted to identify the costs for each component of their energy supply to better assess changes that can be considered for energy cost reductions. (2) Research Viable Energy Options--This includes a general description of many power generation technologies and identification of their relative costs, advantages and disadvantages. Through this research the generation technology options that are most suited for this application were identified. (3) Project Development Considerations--The basic steps and associated challenges of developing a generation project utilizing the selected technologies are identified and discussed. This included items like selling to third parties, wheeling, electrical interconnections, fuel supply, permitting, standby power, and transmission studies. (4) Energy Conservation--The myriad of federal, state and utility programs offered for low-income weatherization and utility bill payment assistance are identified, their qualification requirements discussed, and the subsequent benefits outlined. (5) Establishing an Energy Organization--The report includes a high level discussion of formation of a utility to serve the Tribal membership. The value or advantages of such action is discussed along with some of the challenges. (6) Training--Training opportunities available to the Tribal membership are identified.

  16. Rigidity generation by nonthermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheshka, R.; Recho, P.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2016-05-01

    Active stabilization in systems with zero or negative stiffness is an essential element of a wide variety of biological processes. We study a prototypical example of this phenomenon and show how active rigidity, interpreted as a formation of a pseudowell in the effective energy landscape, can be generated in an overdamped stochastic system. We link the transition from negative to positive rigidity with time correlations in the additive noise, and we show that subtle differences in the out-of-equilibrium driving may compromise the emergence of a pseudowell.

  17. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE-PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ˜6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE-PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE-PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation.

  18. Comparative analysis of rigidity across protein families.

    PubMed

    Wells, S A; Jimenez-Roldan, J E; Römer, R A

    2009-01-01

    We present a comparative study in which 'pebble game' rigidity analysis is applied to multiple protein crystal structures, for each of six different protein families. We find that the main-chain rigidity of a protein structure at a given hydrogen bond energy cutoff is quite sensitive to small structural variations, and conclude that the hydrogen bond constraints in rigidity analysis should be chosen so as to form and test specific hypotheses about the rigidity of a particular protein. Our comparative approach highlights two different characteristic patterns ('sudden' or 'gradual') for protein rigidity loss as constraints are removed, in line with recent results on the rigidity transitions of glassy networks. PMID:19773604

  19. Signature of Thermal Rigidity Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Adrián

    2013-12-01

    To explore the role that temperature and percolation of rigidity play in determining the macroscopic properties, we propose a model that adds translational degrees of freedom to the spins of the well known Ising hamiltonian. In particular, the Ising model illustrate the longstanding idea that the growth of correlations on approach to a critical point could be describable in terms of the percolation of some sort of "physical cluster". For certain parameters of this model we observe two well defined peaks of CV, that suggest the existence of two kinds of "physical percolation", namely connectivity and rigidity percolation. Thermal fluctuations give rise to two different kinds of elementary excitations, i.e. droplets and configuron, as suggested by Angell in the framework of a bond lattice model approach. The later is reflected in the fluctuations of redundant constraints that gives stability to the structure and correlate with the order parameter.

  20. Associative memory through rigid origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Arvind; Brenner, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms such as Miura Ori have proven useful in diverse contexts since they have only one degree of freedom that is easily controlled. We combine the theory of rigid origami and associative memory in frustrated neural networks to create structures that can ``learn'' multiple generic folding mechanisms and yet can be robustly controlled. We show that such rigid origami structures can ``recall'' a specific learned mechanism when induced by a physical impulse that only need resemble the desired mechanism (i.e. robust recall through association). Such associative memory in matter, seen before in self-assembly, arises due to a balance between local promiscuity (i.e., many local degrees of freedom) and global frustration which minimizes interference between different learned behaviors. Origami with associative memory can lead to a new class of deployable structures and kinetic architectures with multiple context-dependent behaviors.

  1. Evaluating Whole Chemical Mixtures and Sufficient Similarity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation supports apresentation describing dose-response assessment for complex chemical mixtures including deriving reference doses for mixtures evaluating sufficient similarity among chemical mixtures.

  2. Some existence and sufficient conditions of optimality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assefi, T.

    1976-01-01

    The role of the existence and sufficiency conditions in the field of optimal control was briefly described. The existence theorems are discussed for general nonlinear systems. However, the sufficiency conditions pertain to "nearly" linear systems with integral convex costs. Moreover, a brief discussion of linear systems with multiple-cost functions is presented.

  3. Portable device for quantifying parkinsonian wrist rigidity.

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, M P

    1994-01-01

    The need for objectivity in the assessment of parkinsonism prompted the development of a portable transducer capable of quantifying muscular rigidity. This paper describes the development and use of a device for measuring wrist rigidity and reports the preliminary findings from 25 normal healthy controls and 29 patients, many of whom were undergoing antiparkinsonian treatment to alleviate rigidity or antipsychotic treatment, which produced parkinsonian rigidity. An objective rigidity score, representing the degree to which motor activity increases muscular stiffness in the wrist, correlates highly with clinical ratings of parkinsonian rigidity and demonstrates 89% specificity and 82% sensitivity. Unlike previous techniques for quantifying rigidity, this transducer offers greater portability and apparent face validity. PMID:7908119

  4. Rigid separator lead acid batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Cannone, A.G.; Salkind, A.J.; Stempin, J.L.; Wexell, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    Lead acid cells assembled with extruded separators displayed relatively uniform capacity and voltage parameters through 100{sup +} cycles of charge/discharge. This contrasts to failure of control cells with glass mat separators after 60 cycles. The mullite/alumina separators with 50, 60, and 70% porosity separators appear suitable for both flooded and sealed lead acid cell applications. The advantages of the rigid ceramic separators over fiber mat materials are in the uniformity of capacity and voltage, the ease of cell assembly, and the probability that firm stacking pressure on the active material will yield greater cycle life, especially at elevated temperatures.

  5. Ureteroscopes: flexible, rigid, and semirigid.

    PubMed

    Basillote, Jay B; Lee, David I; Eichel, Louis; Clayman, Ralph V

    2004-02-01

    Since its introduction, the ureteroscope has undergone significant improvements. Using the currently available rigid, semirigid, and flexible ureteroscopes and working instruments, urologists can diagnose and treat lesions throughout the upper urinary tract. Over the past 25 years, the ureteroscope in combination with shock wave lithotripsy has transformed the diagnosis and treatment of more than 90% of upper urinary tract pathology from an open to an endourologic procedure. With endoscope manufacturers continually incorporating new technology into their ureteroscopes, future models will undoubtedly provide better optics, increased durability, and improved capabilities, resulting in greater success when urologists perform endoscopic forays into the upper urinary tract. PMID:15040398

  6. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  7. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  8. Lubrication of rigid ellipsida solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of geometry on the isothermal hydrodynamic film separating two rigid solids was investigated. The minimum film thickness is derived for fully flooded conjunctions by using the Reynolds boundary conditions. It was found that the minimum film thickness had the same speed, viscosity, and load dependence as Kapitza' classical solution. However, the incorporation of Reynolds boundary conditions resulted in an additional geometry effect. Solutions using the parabolic film approximation are compared by using the exact expression for the film in the analysis. Contour plots are known that indicate in detail the pressure developed between the solids.

  9. Enhanced rigid-bond restraints

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Andrea; Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M.

    2012-07-01

    An extension is proposed to the rigid-bond description of atomic thermal motion in crystals. The rigid-bond model [Hirshfeld (1976 ▶). Acta Cryst. A32, 239–244] states that the mean-square displacements of two atoms are equal in the direction of the bond joining them. This criterion is widely used for verification (as intended by Hirshfeld) and also as a restraint in structure refinement as suggested by Rollett [Crystallographic Computing (1970 ▶), edited by F. R. Ahmed et al., pp. 167–181. Copenhagen: Munksgaard]. By reformulating this condition, so that the relative motion of the two atoms is required to be perpendicular to the bond, the number of restraints that can be applied per anisotropic atom is increased from about one to about three. Application of this condition to 1,3-distances in addition to the 1,2-distances means that on average just over six restraints can be applied to the six anisotropic displacement parameters of each atom. This concept is tested against very high resolution data of a small peptide and employed as a restraint for protein refinement at more modest resolution (e.g. 1.7 Å)

  10. Graph rigidity and localization of multi-robot formations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan

    2004-05-01

    This paper provides theoretical foundation for the problem of localization in multi-robot formations. Sufficient and necessary conditions for completely localizing a formation of mobile robots/vehicles in SE(2) based on distributed sensor networks and graph rigidity are proposed. A method for estimating the quality of localizations via a linearized weighted least-squares algorithm is presented, which considers incomplete and noisy sensory information. The approach in this paper had been implemented in a multi-robot system of five car-like robots equipped with omni-directional cameras and IEEE 802.11b wireless network. PMID:15083542

  11. Rigidity and flexibility of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Gáspár, Merse E; Csermely, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The network approach became a widely used tool to understand the behaviour of complex systems in the last decade. We start from a short description of structural rigidity theory. A detailed account on the combinatorial rigidity analysis of protein structures, as well as local flexibility measures of proteins and their applications in explaining allostery and thermostability is given. We also briefly discuss the network aspects of cytoskeletal tensegrity. Finally, we show the importance of the balance between functional flexibility and rigidity in protein-protein interaction, metabolic, gene regulatory and neuronal networks. Our summary raises the possibility that the concepts of flexibility and rigidity can be generalized to all networks. PMID:23165349

  12. Mooring and ground handling rigid airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The problems of mooring and ground handling rigid airships are discussed. A brief history of Mooring and Ground Handling Rigid Airships from July 2, 1900 through September 1, 1939 is included. Also a brief history of ground handling developments with large U. S. Navy nonrigid airships between September 1, 1939 and August 31, 1962 is included wherein developed equipment and techniques appear applicable to future large rigid airships. Finally recommendations are made pertaining to equipment and procedures which appear desirable and feasible for future rigid airship programs.

  13. Rigidity and retention of ceramic root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Purton, D G; Love, R M; Chandler, N P

    2000-01-01

    Ceramic root-canal posts offer potential advantages over other types with respect to aesthetics and biocompatibility. Any post must be sufficiently rigid and retentive to withstand functional forces. Ceraposts (1.2 mm coronal diameter, ceramic, tapering, smooth posts) and Paraposts (1.25 mm, stainless-steel, parallel, serrated posts) were tested for rigidity by means of a three-point bending test. To test retention in roots, ceramic posts were cemented using one of three protocols: (1) glass-ionomer cement, (2) silane coupling agent and resin cement, or (3) sandblasted post surface, silane coupling agent, and resin cement. Stainless-steel posts were cemented with resin. The tensile force required to dislodge the posts, following four weeks of storage in water, was recorded. Data were compared using Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U analysis. Ceraposts were significantly more rigid than Paraposts (p < 0.001). Paraposts cemented with resin were significantly more strongly retained than Ceraposts following any cementation protocol (p < 0.001). Retention of the ceramic posts was significantly greater with a silane coupling agent and resin cement than with glass-ionomer cement (p < 0.001). Sandblasting the ceramic posts produced variable results and needs further investigation before it could be recommended. PMID:11203820

  14. Semiparametric tests for sufficient cause interaction

    PubMed Central

    Vansteelandt, Stijn; VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Robins, James M.

    2014-01-01

    A sufficient cause interaction between two exposures signals the presence of individuals for whom the outcome would occur only under certain values of the two exposures. When the outcome is dichotomous and all exposures are categorical, then under certain no confounding assumptions, empirical conditions for sufficient cause interactions can be constructed based on the sign of linear contrasts of conditional outcome probabilities between differently exposed subgroups, given confounders. It is argued that logistic regression models are unsatisfactory for evaluating such contrasts, and that Bernoulli regression models with linear link are prone to misspecification. We therefore develop semiparametric tests for sufficient cause interactions under models which postulate probability contrasts in terms of a finite-dimensional parameter, but which are otherwise unspecified. Estimation is often not feasible in these models because it would require nonparametric estimation of auxiliary conditional expectations given high-dimensional variables. We therefore develop ‘multiply robust tests’ under a union model that assumes at least one of several working submodels holds. In the special case of a randomized experiment or a family-based genetic study in which the joint exposure distribution is known by design or Mendelian inheritance, the procedure leads to asymptotically distribution-free tests of the null hypothesis of no sufficient cause interaction. PMID:25558182

  15. Sufficiency, Intimacy and the Good Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Donald L.

    Our capacity to provide food and shelter is freeing us from the constant burden of keeping the wolf away from the door. We are increasingly able to give our attention to other values. This type of sufficiency provides time and circumstances for developing intimate relationships. Intimate relationships are characterized by revelation of one's…

  16. The Rigid Orthogonal Procrustes Rotation Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Berge, Jos M. F.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of rotating a matrix orthogonally to a best least squares fit with another matrix of the same order has a closed-form solution based on a singular value decomposition. The optimal rotation matrix is not necessarily rigid, but may also involve a reflection. In some applications, only rigid rotations are permitted. Gower (1976) has…

  17. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  18. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  19. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  20. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  1. 21 CFR 868.5540 - Rigid laryngoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid laryngoscope. 868.5540 Section 868.5540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5540 Rigid laryngoscope. (a) Identification....

  2. Rigid fibrous ceramics for entry systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, Ronald P.

    1993-01-01

    The topics addressed are: (1) high payoff areas with reusable surface insulation; (2) technology opportunities/gap; (3) coatings for rigid fibrous ceramics; (4) challenges for reusable rigid fibrous ceramics - Lunar/Mars aerobraking heatshield; (5) comparison of LI-900 and HTP properties; and (6) comparison of microstructures.

  3. Unbiased rigid registration using transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Dieter A.; Hornegger, Joachim; Bautz, Werner; Kuwert, Torsten; Roemer, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    The evaluation of tumor growth as regression under therapy is an important clinical issue. Rigid registration of sequentially acquired 3D-images has proven its value for this purpose. Existing approaches to rigid image registration use the whole volume for the estimation of the rigid transform. Non-rigid soft tissue deformation, however, will imply a bias to the registration result, because local deformations cannot be modeled by rigid transforms. Anatomical substructures, like bones or teeth, are not affected by these deformations, but follow a rigid transform. This important observation is incorporated in the proposed registration algorithm. The selection of anatomical substructure is done by manual interaction of medical experts adjusting the transfer function of the volume rendering software. The parameters of the transfer function are used to identify the voxels that are considered for registration. A rigid transform is estimated by a quaternion gradient descent algorithm based on the intensity values of the specified tissue classes. Commonly used voxel intensity measures are adjusted to the modified registration algorithm. The contribution describes the mathematical framework of the proposed registration method and its implementation in a commercial software package. The experimental evaluation includes the discussion of different similarity measures, the comparison of the proposed method to established rigid registration techniques and the evaluation of the efficiency of the new method. We conclude with the discussion of potential medical applications of the proposed registration algorithm.

  4. Aggregation dynamics of rigid polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Anvy Moly; Rajesh, R.; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Similarly charged polyelectrolytes are known to attract each other and aggregate into bundles when the charge density of the polymers exceeds a critical value that depends on the valency of the counterions. The dynamics of aggregation of such rigid polyelectrolytes are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the morphology of the aggregates depends on the value of the charge density of the polymers. For values close to the critical value, the shape of the aggregates is cylindrical with height equal to the length of a single polyelectrolyte chain. However, for larger values of charge, the linear extent of the aggregates increases as more and more polymers aggregate. In both the cases, we show that the number of aggregates decrease with time as power laws with exponents that are not numerically distinguishable from each other and are independent of charge density of the polymers, valency of the counterions, density, and length of the polyelectrolyte chain. We model the aggregation dynamics using the Smoluchowski coagulation equation with kernels determined from the molecular dynamics simulations and justify the numerically obtained value of the exponent. Our results suggest that once counterions condense, effective interactions between polyelectrolyte chains short-ranged and the aggregation of polyelectrolytes are diffusion-limited.

  5. Sufficient separability criteria and linear maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Chruściński, Dariusz; Rana, Swapan; Samsonowicz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    We study families of positive and completely positive maps acting on a bipartite system CM⊗CN (with M ≤N ). The maps have a property that, when applied to any state (of a given entanglement class), result in a separable state or, more generally, a state of another certain entanglement class (e.g., Schmidt number ≤k ). This allows us to derive useful families of sufficient separability criteria. Explicit examples of such criteria have been constructed for arbitrary M ,N , with a special emphasis on M =2 . Our results can be viewed as generalizations of the known facts that in the sufficiently close vicinity of the completely depolarized state (the normalized identity matrix), all states are separable (belong to "weakly" entangled classes). Alternatively, some of our results can be viewed as an entanglement classification for a certain family of states, corresponding to mixtures of the completely polarized state with pure states, partial transposes, and/or local transformations thereof.

  6. Length-dependence of flexural rigidity as a result of anisotropic elastic properties of microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Ru, C.Q. . E-mail: c.ru@ualberta.ca; Mioduchowski, A.

    2006-10-27

    Unexplained length-dependence of flexural rigidity and Young's modulus of microtubules is studied using an orthotropic elastic shell model. It is showed that vibration frequencies and buckling load predicted by the accurate orthotropic shell model are much lower than that given by the approximate isotropic beam model for shorter microtubules, although the two models give almost identical results for sufficiently long microtubules. It is this inaccuracy of the isotropic beam model used by all previous researchers that leads to reported lower flexural rigidity and Young's modulus for shorter microtubules. In particular, much lower shear modulus and circumferential Young's modulus, which only weaken flexural rigidity of shorter microtubules, are responsible for the observed length-dependence of the flexural rigidity. These results confirm that longitudinal Young's modulus of microtubules is length-independent, and the observed length-dependence of the flexural rigidity and Young's modulus is a result of strongly anisotropic elastic properties of microtubules which have a length-dependent weakening effect on flexural rigidity of shorter microtubules.

  7. Physical pendulum—a simple experiment can give comprehensive information about a rigid body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kladivová, Mária; Mucha, L'ubomír

    2014-03-01

    A simple experiment with a physical pendulum examining some aspects of rigid body motion is presented in this paper. The experiment consists of measuring the period of oscillation of a rod with non-homogeneous mass distribution used as a physical pendulum, dependent upon the position of the pivot axis. The obtained dependence provides sufficient information to calculate the position of the centre of mass, moment of inertia of the rigid body and local gravitational acceleration. This experiment is intended for secondary school and undergraduate students.

  8. Network Rigidity Calculations of Cold Denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Gregory; Jacobs, Donald

    2004-03-01

    Network rigidity is used to model polypeptide chains in solution that undergo a helix to coil transition. Cooperative interactions from hydrogen bonding and hydration are modeled using topological constraints. This novel methodology is used to properly account for the energetic and non-additive entropic contributions to the free energy. The network rigidity model parameters are compared to Lifson-Roig model parameters. Nucleation and propagation parameters are eliminated. Instead, nucleation is a consequence of network rigidity, which is modeled explicitly. An advantage of network rigidity is that parameters are transferable to proteins, unlike the nucleation and propagation parameters of previous helix-coil theories. Results of a transfer matrix method are presented, showing the thermodynamic conditions where a polypeptide chain in an alpha-helix state is subject to hot and cold denaturing. Calculated helix content is found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements on two different polypeptides of different length and solvent concentrations.

  9. Policy Capacity Is Necessary but Not Sufficient

    PubMed Central

    Gen, Sheldon; Wright, Amy Conley

    2015-01-01

    Policy capacity focuses on the managerial and organizational abilities to inform policy decisions with sound research and analysis, and facilitate policy implementation with operational efficiency. It stems from a view of the policy process that is rational and positivistic, in which optimal policy choices can be identified, selected, and implemented with objectivity. By itself, however, policy capacity neglects the political aspects of policy-making that can dominate the process, even in health policies. These technical capabilities are certainly needed to advance reforms in health policies, but they are not sufficient. Instead, they must be complemented with public engagement and policy advocacy to ensure support from the public that policies are meant to serve. PMID:26673469

  10. Metrology of Non-Rigid Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Smith, D W; Claudet, A A; Kasper, E P; Patterson, S R

    2002-01-01

    Dimensional characterization of non-rigid parts presents many challenges. For example, when a non-rigid part is mounted in an inspection apparatus the effects of fixturing constraints cause significant deformation of the part. If the part is not used in normal service with the same load conditions as during inspection, the dimensional characteristics in service will deviate from the reported values during inspection. Further, the solution of designing specialized fixturing to duplicate ''as-installed'' conditions does not fully resolve the problem because each inspection requires its own methodology. The goal of this project is to formulate the research problem and propose a method of assessing the dimensional characteristics of non-rigid parts. The measured dimension of a rigid component is traceable at some level of confidence to a single source (NIST in the USA). Hence the measurement of one component of an assembly can be related to the measurement of another component of that assembly. There is no generalized analog to this pedigreed process for dimensionally characterizing non-rigid bodies. For example, a measurement made on a sheet-metal automobile fender is heavily influenced by how it is held during the measurement making it difficult to determine how well that fender will assemble to the rest of the (non-rigid) car body. This problem is often overcome for specific manufacturing problems by constructing rigid fixtures that over-constrain the non-rigid parts to be assembled and then performing the dimensional measurement of the contour of each component to check whether each meets specification. Note that such inspection measurements will yield only an approximation to the assembled shape, which is a function of both the geometry and the compliance of the component parts of the assembly. As a result, non-rigid components are more difficult to specify and inspect and therefore are more difficult to purchase from outside vendors compared to rigid components

  11. Metrology of Non-Rigid Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K; Swift, D; Claudet, A; Kasper, E; Patterson, S

    2002-01-01

    Dimensional characterization of non-rigid parts presents many challenges. For example, when a non-rigid part is mounted in an inspection apparatus the effects of fixturing constraints are significant. If the part is not used in normal service with the same load conditions as during inspection, the dimensional characteristics will deviate from reported values. Further, the solution of designing specialized fixturing to duplicate ''as-installed'' conditions does not fully resolve the problem because each inspection requires its own methodology. The goal of this project is to formulate the research problem and propose a method of assessing the dimensional characteristics of non-rigid parts. The measured dimension of a rigid component is traceable at some level of confidence to a single source (NIST in the USA). Hence the measurement of one component of an assembly can be related to the measurement of another component of that assembly. There is no generalized analog to this pedigreed process for dimensionally characterizing non-rigid bodies. For example, a measurement made on a sheet-metal automobile fender is heavily influenced by how it is held during the measurement making it difficult to determine how well that fender will assemble to the rest of the (non-rigid) car body. This problem is often overcome for specific manufacturing problems by constructing rigid fixtures that over-constrain the non-rigid parts to be assembled and then performing the dimensional measurement of the contour of each component to check whether each meets specification. Note that such inspection measurements will yield only an approximation to the assembled shape, which is a function of both the geometry and the compliance of the component parts of the assembly. As a result, non-rigid components are more difficult to specify and inspect and therefore are more difficult to purchase from outside vendors compared to rigid components. The problems are compounded as the requirements come to

  12. Patient comfort during flexible and rigid cystourethroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojowy, Romuald; Wojciechowska, Joanna; Kościelska, Katarzyna; Dembowski, Janusz; Matuszewski, Michał; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Małkiewicz, Bartosz; Kołodziej, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cystourethroscopy (CS) is an endoscopic method used to visualize the urethra and the bladder. Aim In this study, we prospectively evaluated pain in men undergoing cyclic cystoscopic assessment with rigid and flexible instruments after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURB). Material and methods One hundred and twenty male patients who were under surveillance after a TURB procedure due to urothelial cell carcinoma and who had undergone at least one rigid cystourethroscopy in the past were enrolled in the trial. Patients were prospectively randomized to age-matched groups for flexible (group F) or rigid (group R) CS. Patient's comfort was evaluated on an 11-grade scale, ranging from 0 (free from pain) to 10 points (unbearable pain). Results The patients described the pain during the previous rigid CS as ranging from 4 to 10 (mean: 6.8) in group F and from 0 to 10 (mean: 5.8) in group R. Group R patients described the pain during the current rigid CS as ranging from 0 to 10 (mean: 5.7). No mean change in the grade was observed between the two pain descriptions (no change 11 patients, weaker pain 25 patients, stronger pain 24 patients, gamma 0.51, p < 0.0001). Group F described the pain as 1 to 5 (mean: 2.1). In the case of flexible CS the pain experience was greatly lowered compared to the previous rigid CS. All flexible CS patients reported lowered pain (by 1 to 9 grades). Patients’ age did not influence the comfort of the flexible CS or the change in pain level. Conclusions Flexible CS is better tolerated than rigid cystoscopy by male patients regardless of patients’ age. PMID:27458489

  13. Rigidity Dependence of Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    The various observed harmonics of the cosmic ray variation may be understood on a unified basis if the free space cosmic ray anisotropy is non-sinusoidal in form. The major objective of this paper is to study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-1990 for Deep River, Goose Bay and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for Deep River having low cutoff rigidity as compared to Tokyo neutron monitor having high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases in 1987 at Deep River and in 1986 at Tokyo during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction at both the stations having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station i.e. Deep River as compared to the high cut off rigidity station i.e. Tokyo on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The solar wind velocity significantly remains in the range 350 to 425 km/s i.e. being nearly average on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days are weakly dependent on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of low and high cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics.

  14. Nonmagnetic rigid and flexible outer sheath with pneumatic interlocking mechanism for minimally invasive surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiromasa; Zuo, Siyang; Masamune, Ken; Liao, Hongen; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2009-01-01

    We developed a nonmagnetic rigid and flexible outer sheath with pneumatic interlocking mechanism using flexible toothed links and a wire-driven bending distal end. The outer sheath can be switched between rigid and flexible modes easily depending on surgical scenes, and the angle of its distal end can be controlled by three nylon wires. All components of flexible parts are made of MRI-compatible nonmagnetic plastics. We manufactured the device with 300-mm long, 16-mm outer diameter, 7-mm inner diameter and 90-mm bending distal end. Holding power of the device in rigid mode was maximum 3.6 N, which was sufficient for surgical tasks in body cavity. In vivo experiment using a swine, our device performed smooth insertion of a flexible endoscope and a biopsy forceps into reverse side of the liver, intestines and spleen with a curved path. In conclusion, our device shows availability of secure approach of surgical instruments into deep cavity. PMID:20426015

  15. Neurodegenerative Diseases: Neurotoxins as Sufficient Etiologic Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Christopher A.; Höglinger, Günter U.

    2008-01-01

    A dominant paradigm in neurological disease research is that the primary etiological factors for diseases such as Alzheimer’s (AD), Parkinson’s (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are genetic. Opposed to this perspective are the clear observations from epidemiology that purely genetic casual factors account for a relatively small fraction of all cases. Many who support a genetic etiology for neurological disease take the view that while the percentages may be relatively small, these numbers will rise in the future with the inevitable discoveries of additional genetic mutations. The follow up argument is that even if the last is not true, the events triggered by the aberrant genes identified so far will be shown to impact the same neuronal cell death pathways as those activated by environmental factors that trigger most sporadic disease cases. In this article we present a countervailing view that environmental neurotoxins may be the sole sufficient factor in at least three neurological disease clusters. For each, neurotoxins have been isolated and characterized that, at least in animal models, faithfully reproduce each disorder without the need for genetic co-factors. Based on these data, we will propose a set of principles that would enable any potential toxin to be evaluated as an etiological factor in a given neurodegenerative disease. Finally, we will attempt to put environmental toxins into the context of possible genetically-determined susceptibility. PMID:17985252

  16. Sufficient dimension reduction with additional information.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hung; Liu, Chih-Yen; Horng-Shing Lu, Henry

    2016-07-01

    Sufficient dimension reduction is widely applied to help model building between the response [Formula: see text] and covariate [Formula: see text] In some situations, we also collect additional covariate [Formula: see text] that has better performance in predicting [Formula: see text], but has a higher obtaining cost, than [Formula: see text] While constructing a predictive model for [Formula: see text] based on [Formula: see text] is straightforward, this strategy is not applicable since [Formula: see text] is not available for future observations in which the constructed model is to be applied. As a result, the aim of the study is to build a predictive model for [Formula: see text] based on [Formula: see text] only, where the available data is [Formula: see text] A naive method is to conduct analysis using [Formula: see text] directly, but ignoring [Formula: see text] can cause the problem of inefficiency. On the other hand, it is not trivial to utilize the information of [Formula: see text] to infer [Formula: see text], either. In this article, we propose a two-stage dimension reduction method for [Formula: see text] that is able to utilize the information of [Formula: see text] In the breast cancer data, the risk score constructed from the two-stage method can well separate patients with different survival experiences. In the Pima data, the two-stage method requires fewer components to infer the diabetes status, while achieving higher classification accuracy than the conventional method. PMID:26704765

  17. Organically Modified Nanoclay-Reinforced Rigid Polyurethane Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong Tae; Qian, Yuqiang; Lindsay, Chris; Stein, Andreas; Macosko, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    The nanodispersion of vermiculite in polyurethanes was investigated to produce organoclay-reinforced rigid gas barrier films. Reducing gas transport can improve the insulation performance of closed cell polyurethane foam. In a previous study, the dispersion of vermiculite in polyurethanes without organic modification was not sufficient due to the non-uniform dispersion morphology. When vermiculite was modified by cation exchange with long-chain quaternary ammonium cations, the dispersion in methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was significantly improved. Dispersion was improved by combining high intensity dispersive mixing with efficient distributive mixing. Polymerization conditions were also optimized in order to provide a high state of nanodispersion in the polyurethane nanocomposite. The dispersions were characterized using rheological, microscopic and scattering/diffraction techniques. The final nanocomposites showed enhancement of mechanical properties and reduction in permeability to carbon dioxide at low clay concentration (around 2 wt percent).

  18. Flexible implementation of rigid solar cell technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, Andrew E.

    2010-08-01

    As a source of clean, remote energy, photovoltaic (PV) systems are an important area of research. The majority of solar cells are rigid materials with negligible flexibility. Flexible PV systems possess many advantages, such as being transportable and incorporable on diverse structures. Amorphous silicon and organic PV systems are flexible; however, they lack the efficiency and lifetime of rigid cells. There is also a need for PV systems that are light weight, especially in space and flight applications. We propose a solution to this problem by arranging rigid cells onto a flexible substrate creating efficient, light weight, and flexible devices. To date, we have created a working prototype of our design using the 1.1cm x 1cm Emcore cells. We have achieved a better power to weight ratio than commercially available PowerFilm{reg_sign}, which uses thin film silicon yielding .034W/gram. We have also tested our concept with other types of cells and verified that our methods are able to be adapted to any rigid solar cell technology. This allows us to use the highest efficiency devices despite their physical characteristics. Depending on the cell size we use, we can rival the curvature of most available flexible PV devices. We have shown how the benefits of rigid solar cells can be integrated into flexible applications, allowing performance that surpasses alternative technologies.

  19. Crystal structure prediction of rigid molecules.

    PubMed

    Elking, Dennis M; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Nichols, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    A non-polarizable force field based on atomic multipoles fit to reproduce experimental crystal properties and ab initio gas-phase dimers is described. The Ewald method is used to calculate both long-range electrostatic and 1/r(6) dispersion energies of crystals. The dispersion energy of a crystal calculated by a cutoff method is shown to converge slowly to the exact Ewald result. A method for constraining space-group symmetry during unit-cell optimization is derived. Results for locally optimizing 4427 unit cells including volume, cell parameters, unit-cell r.m.s.d. and CPU timings are given for both flexible and rigid molecule optimization. An algorithm for randomly generating rigid molecule crystals is described. Using the correct experimentally determined space group, the average and maximum number of random crystals needed to find the correct experimental structure is given for 2440 rigid single component crystals. The force field energy rank of the correct experimental structure is presented for the same set of 2440 rigid single component crystals assuming the correct space group. A complete crystal prediction is performed for two rigid molecules by searching over the 32 most probable space groups. PMID:27484371

  20. Generic Rigidity Percolation in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, M. F.; Jacobs, D. J.; Day, A. R.

    1996-03-01

    We study rigidity percolation for random central-force networks, using the Pebble Game(D. J. Jacobs and M. F. Thorpe, Phys. Rev. Letts. 75), 4051 (1995) algorithm on the bond and site diluted generic triangular lattice. Here, each site location is randomly displaced from the perfect lattice, removing any special symmetries. The total number of floppy modes are counted exactly, and exhibit a cusp singularity in the second derivative of the number of floppy modes, at the transition from a rigid to a floppy structure. The critical thresholds for bond and site dilution are found to be 0.6602 ± 0.0003 and 0.6976 ± 0.0003 respectively. We find that the generic rigidity percolation transition is second order, but in a different universality class than connectivity percolation, with the exponents; α = -0.48 ± 0.05 , β = 0.175 ± 0.02 and ν = 1.21 ± 0.06 . The fractal dimension of the spanning rigid clusters and the spanning stressed regions at the critical threshold are found to be df = 1.86 ± 0.02 and d_BB = 1.80 ± 0.03 respectively. Some elastic properties of the rigid backbone will be discussed.

  1. Rigidity loss in disordered network materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Hagh, Varda F.; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, M. F.; van Hecke, Martin

    Weakly jammed sphere packings show a very peculiar elasticity, with a ratio of compression modulus to shear modulus that diverges as the number of contacts approaches the minimum required for rigidity. Creating artificial isotropic network materials with this property is a challenge: so far, the least elaborate way to generate them is to actually simulate weakly compressed repulsive spheres. The next steps in designing such networks hinge upon a solid understanding of what properties of the sphere-packing derived network are essential for its elasticity. We elucidate the topological aspects of this question by comparing the rigidity transition in these networks to that in other random spring network models, including the common bond-diluted triangular net and a self-stress-free variant of that. We use the pebble game algorithm for identifying rigid clusters in mechanical networks to demonstrate that the marginally rigid state in sphere packings is perfectly isostatic everywhere, and the addition or removal of a single bond creates a globally stressed or globally floppy network, respectively. By contrast, the other classes of random network random networks show a more localized response to addition and removal of bonds, and, correspondingly, a more gradual rigidity transition.

  2. Generic rigidity percolation in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, D. J.; Thorpe, M. F.

    1996-04-01

    We study rigidity percolation for random central-force networks on the bondand site-diluted generic triangular lattice. Here, each site location is randomly displaced from the perfect lattice, removing any special symmetries. Using the pebble game algorithm, the total number of floppy modes are counted exactly, and exhibit a cusp singularity in the second derivative at the transition from a rigid to a floppy structure. The critical thresholds for bond and site dilution are found to be 0.66020+/-0.0003 and 0.69755+/-0.0003, respectively. The network is decomposed into unique rigid clusters, and we apply the usual percolation scaling theory. From finite size scaling, we find that the generic rigidity percolation transition is second order, but in a different universality class from connectivity percolation, with the exponents α=-0.48+/-0.05, β=0.175+/-0.02, and ν=1.21+/-0.06. The fractal dimension of the spanning rigid clusters and the spanning stressed regions at the critical threshold are found to be df=1.86+/-0.02 and dBB=1.80+/-0.03, respectively.

  3. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  4. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  5. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  6. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant. (a) Identification. A penile rigidity implant is a device that consists of a pair of semi-rigid rods implanted in...

  7. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  8. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  9. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  10. 49 CFR 178.706 - Standards for rigid plastic IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. 178.706 Section... Performance-Oriented Standards § 178.706 Standards for rigid plastic IBCs. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic IBCs intended to contain solids or liquids. Rigid plastic IBC types...

  11. Energy Strategic Planning & Self-Sufficiency Project

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Retzlaff

    2005-03-30

    This report provides information regarding options available, their advantages and disadvantages, and the costs for pursuing activities to advance Smith River Rancheria toward an energy program that reduces their energy costs, allows greater self-sufficiency and stimulates economic development and employment opportunities within and around the reservation. The primary subjects addressed in this report are as follow: (1) Baseline Assessment of Current Energy Costs--An evaluation of the historical energy costs for Smith River was conducted to identify the costs for each component of their energy supply to better assess changes that can be considered for energy cost reductions. (2) Research Viable Energy Options--This includes a general description of many power generation technologies and identification of their relative costs, advantages and disadvantages. Through this research the generation technology options that are most suited for this application were identified. (3) Project Development Considerations--The basic steps and associated challenges of developing a generation project utilizing the selected technologies are identified and discussed. This included items like selling to third parties, wheeling, electrical interconnections, fuel supply, permitting, standby power, and transmission studies. (4) Energy Conservation--The myriad of federal, state and utility programs offered for low-income weatherization and utility bill payment assistance are identified, their qualification requirements discussed, and the subsequent benefits outlined. (5) Establishing an Energy Organization--The report includes a high level discussion of formation of a utility to serve the Tribal membership. The value or advantages of such action is discussed along with some of the challenges. (6) Training--Training opportunities available to the Tribal membership are identified.

  12. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-05-01

    We prove that C^r -smooth (r > 2 ) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not C^1+ɛ -rigid, for any ɛ > 0 . This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically C^1 -rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that C^r -smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically C^r-1-κ -rigid, for any κ > 0.

  13. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-06-01

    We prove that {C^r}-smooth ({r > 2}) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not {C^{1+\\varepsilon}}-rigid, for any {\\varepsilon > 0}. This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically {C^1}-rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that {C^r}-smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically {C^{r-1-κ}}-rigid, for any {κ > 0}.

  14. Quantum mechanics of a generalised rigid body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gripaios, Ben; Sutherland, Dave

    2016-05-01

    We consider the quantum version of Arnold’s generalisation of a rigid body in classical mechanics. Thus, we quantise the motion on an arbitrary Lie group manifold of a particle whose classical trajectories correspond to the geodesics of any one-sided-invariant metric. We show how the derivation of the spectrum of energy eigenstates can be simplified by making use of automorphisms of the Lie algebra and (for groups of type I) by methods of harmonic analysis. We show how the method can be extended to cosets, generalising the linear rigid rotor. As examples, we consider all connected and simply connected Lie groups up to dimension 3. This includes the universal cover of the archetypical rigid body, along with a number of new exactly solvable models. We also discuss a possible application to the topical problem of quantising a perfect fluid.

  15. Rigid polyurethane and kenaf core composite foams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rigid polyurethane foams are valuable in many construction applications. Kenaf is a bast fiber plant where the surface stem skin provides bast fibers whose strength-to-weight ratio competes with glass fiber. The higher volume product of the kenaf core is an under-investigated area in composite appli...

  16. Bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Kibi, M; Ono, T; Nokubi, T

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the bending profiles of composite resin coating cast clasps. The cobalt-chromium alloy cast clasps were made using tapered wax pattern. Silane coupling method (Silicoater MD, Kulzer Co.) was used to attach composite resin to metal surface. The breakage and the bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps were evaluated. Results were as follows: 1) After the repeated bending test to the tips of clasp arm at 10,000 times in 0.25 mm deflection, neither crack on composite resin surface nor separation at resin/metal interface was observed in any specimen. 2) There was no significant difference in the bending rigidity of clasp arms between before and after composite resin coating. From these results, it was demonstrated that the composite resin coating cast clasp was available in clinical cases and coating with composite resin had little influence on the bending rigidity of clasp arms. Therefore, it was suggested that our clasp designing and fabricating system to control the bending rigidity of clasp arms could be applied to composite resin coating clasps. PMID:8935086

  17. Adjustable Optical Mount Is More Rigid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Bill G.; Coombs, David S.; Jones, Irby W.; Moore, Alvah S., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Improved mount for lens or mirror in laser offers rigidity similar to that of nonadjustable optical mount. In comparison with older adjustable optical mounts, this one less susceptible to movements and distortions caused by vibrations and by thermal expansions and contractions. Mount contains neither adjustment rods (which grow or shrink as temperature varies) nor springs (which transmit vibrations to mounted optic).

  18. Phosphorescence and Energy Transfer in Rigid Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enciso, E.; Cabello, A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates the general aspects of intermolecular energy transfer between triplet states in rigid solutions of organic compounds solved in an ethanol-ether mixture. Measurements of quenching and energy transfer processes are made using the chemicals of benzophenone and naphthalene. (CS)

  19. Two exactly soluble models of rigidity percolation

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, M. F.; Stinchcombe, R. B.

    2014-01-01

    We summarize results for two exactly soluble classes of bond-diluted models for rigidity percolation, which can serve as a benchmark for numerical and approximate methods. For bond dilution problems involving rigidity, the number of floppy modes F plays the role of a free energy. Both models involve pathological lattices with two-dimensional vector displacements. The first model involves hierarchical lattices where renormalization group calculations can be used to give exact solutions. Algebraic scaling transformations produce a transition of the second order, with an unstable critical point and associated scaling laws at a mean coordination 〈r〉=4.41, which is above the ‘mean field’ value 〈r〉=4 predicted by Maxwell constraint counting. The order parameter exponent associated with the spanning rigid cluster geometry is β=0.0775 and that associated with the divergence of the correlation length and the anomalous lattice dimension d is dν=3.533. The second model involves Bethe lattices where the rigidity transition is massively first order by a mean coordination 〈r〉=3.94 slightly below that predicted by Maxwell constraint counting. We show how a Maxwell equal area construction can be used to locate the first-order transition and how this result agrees with simulation results on larger random-bond lattices using the pebble game algorithm. PMID:24379428

  20. Stabilization of a fluid-rigid body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Takéo; Tucsnak, Marius; Weiss, George

    2015-12-01

    We consider the mathematical model of a rigid ball moving in a viscous incompressible fluid occupying a bounded domain Ω, with an external force acting on the ball. We investigate in particular the case when the external force is what would be produced by a spring and a damper connecting the center of the ball h to a fixed point h1 ∈ Ω. If the initial fluid velocity is sufficiently small, and the initial h is sufficiently close to h1, then we prove the existence and uniqueness of global (in time) solutions for the model. Moreover, in this case, we show that h converges to h1, and all the velocities (of the fluid and of the ball) converge to zero. Based on this result, we derive a control law that will bring the ball asymptotically to the desired position h1 even if the initial value of h is far from h1, and the path leading to h1 is winding and complicated. Now, the idea is to use the force as described above, with one end of the spring and damper at h, while other end is jumping between a finite number of points in Ω, that depend on h (a switching feedback law).

  1. Rigid Cluster Decomposition Reveals Criticality in Frictional Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, Silke; Quint, David A.; Fily, Yaouen; Schwarz, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of the frictional jamming transition within the framework of rigidity percolation theory. Slowly sheared frictional packings are decomposed into rigid clusters and floppy regions with a generalization of the pebble game including frictional contacts. Our method suggests a second-order transition controlled by the emergence of a system-spanning rigid cluster accompanied by a critical cluster size distribution. Rigid clusters also correlate with common measures of rigidity. We contrast this result with frictionless jamming, where the rigid cluster size distribution is noncritical.

  2. Quasiclassical trajectory studies of rigid rotor--rigid surface scattering. II. Corrugated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.C.; Bowman, J.M.

    1984-03-01

    The quasiclassical trajectory method, previously applied to rigid rotor--rigid flat surface scattering (J. M. Bowman and S. C. Park, J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5441 (1982)) is applied to a rigid rotor--rigid corrugated surface, i.e., a N/sub 2/--LiF(001), system. The mechanisms for rotational excitation at low and high collision energies are studied as well as their dependence on initial beam orientation and corrugation strength. A significant correlation between long-lived trajectories and high rotational excitation is found for low energy collisions and rotational rainbows are clearly observed in the high energy regime, although these features are broadened relative to the flat surface reported previously.

  3. Sticky Particles: Modeling Rigid Aggregates in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, D. C.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2008-09-01

    We present progress on our study of planetary ring dynamics. We use local N-body simulations to examine small patches of dense rings in which self-gravity and mutual collisions dominate the dynamics of the ring material. We use the numerical code pkdgrav to model the motions of 105-7 ring particles, using a sliding patch model with modified periodic boundary conditions. The exact nature of planetary ring particles is not well understood. If covered in a frost-like layer, such irregular surfaces may allow for weak cohesion between colliding particles. Thus we have recently added new functionality to our model, allowing "sticky particles” to lock into rigid aggregates while in a rotating reference frame. This capability allows particles to adhere to one another, forming irregularly shaped aggregates that move as rigid bodies. (The bonds between particles can subsequently break, given sufficient stress.) These aggregates have greater strength than gravitationally bound "rubble piles,” and are thus able to grow larger and survive longer under similar stresses. This new functionality allows us to explore planetary ring properties and dynamics in a new way, by self-consistently forming (and destroying) non-spherical aggregates and moonlets via cohesive forces, while in a rotating frame, subjected to planetary tides. (We are not aware of any similar implementations in other existing models.) These improvements allow us to study the many effects that particle aggregation may have on the rings, such as overall ring structure; wake formation; equilibrium properties of non-spherical particles, like pitch angle, orientation, shape, size distribution, and spin; and the surface properties of the ring material. We present test cases and the latest results from this new model. This work is supported by a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  4. Development of Laser Ruler in Rigid Laryngoscope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Ok; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Choon; Lee, Byung-Joo; Wang, Soo-Geun; Ro, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Gye-Rok

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to develop a new device that provides a simple, noninvasive method of measuring accurate lesion size while using an endoscope. Methods We developed a rigid laryngoscope with a built-in laser-ruler using a one-light emitting diode and an acrylic plate. The invention incorporates a built-in laser diode that projects an auto-parallel beam into the optical path of the rigid laryngoscope to form two spots in the field of view. Results While the interspot distance remains consistent despite changes in focal plane, magnification, or viewing angle of the laryngoscope, projection to an uneven surface introduces certain variations in the shape, and size of the spots, and the distance between the two spots. Conclusion The device enables a laryngologist to easily measure the distance between landmarks, as well as the change in real size, and the progressive change of vocal fold lesions in an outpatient setting. PMID:22232716

  5. Rapid determination of RMSDs corresponding to macromolecular rigid body motions.

    PubMed

    Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    Finding the root mean sum of squared deviations (RMSDs) between two coordinate vectors that correspond to the rigid body motion of a macromolecule is an important problem in structural bioinformatics, computational chemistry, and molecular modeling. Standard algorithms compute the RMSD with time proportional to the number of atoms in the molecule. Here, we present RigidRMSD, a new algorithm that determines a set of RMSDs corresponding to a set of rigid body motions of a macromolecule in constant time with respect to the number of atoms in the molecule. Our algorithm is particularly useful for rigid body modeling applications, such as rigid body docking, and also for high-throughput analysis of rigid body modeling and simulation results. We also introduce a constant-time rotation RMSD as a similarity measure for rigid molecules. A C++ implementation of our algorithm is available at http://nano-d.inrialpes.fr/software/RigidRMSD. PMID:24615729

  6. Modular Habitats Comprising Rigid and Inflatable Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2010-01-01

    Modular, lightweight, fully equipped buildings comprising hybrids of rigid and inflatable structures can be assembled on Earth and then transported to and deployed on the Moon for use as habitats. Modified versions of these buildings could also prove useful on Earth as shelters that can be rapidly and easily erected in emergency situations and/or extreme environments: examples include shelters for hurricane relief and for Antarctic exploration.

  7. Rigid plastic collars for marking geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballou, R.M.; Martin, F.W.

    1964-01-01

    Rigid plastic collars of one to three colors proved useful for recognition of individual Canada geese (Branta canadensis). The collars did not seem to affect the behavior of the geese, and there was little mortality caused by their use. In good light, bright colors are visible through a 20-power spotting scope for more than 1 mile. Retention of collars was about 90 percent for 1 year and more than 80 percent for 2 years.

  8. Permeability of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marschall, J.; Milos, F. S.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Rigid fibrous refractory insulations (TPS tiles) are integral components of many spacecraft thermal protection systems. These materials are composed of refractory fibers With diameters on the order of 1 to 15 micrometers. They are lightweight and have an open, highly porous microstructure. Typical densities are less than 500 kilograms per cubic meters, and porosities generally exceed 0.8. Because of their open porosity, these materials are permeable to gas glow. There are numerous instances in which internal gas transport in a thermal protection system could be important; examples include the penetration of hot boundary-layer gases into the insulation, the flow of decomposition (pyrolysis) products from the interior, the use of convective flows to mitigate ice formation caused by cryopumping, and the design of refractory vents for pressure equilibration during atmospheric entry. Computational analysis of gas flow through porous media requires values of permeability which have not previously been available for the rigid fibrous insulations used in thermal protection systems. This paper will document measurements of permeability for a variety of insulations from NASA's LI, FRCI, and AETB families of lightweight ceramic ablators. The directional anisotropy of permeability and its dependence on gas pressure and material density will be presented. It will be shown that rarified-flow effects are significant in the flow through such materials. Connections will be drawn between the insulation microstructure and permeability. The paper will also include representative computations of flow through rigid fibrous insulations.

  9. 49 CFR 587.18 - Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. 587.18 Section 587.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Deformable Barrier § 587.18 Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. (a) The fixed rigid barrier has a mass of...

  10. 49 CFR 587.18 - Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. 587.18 Section 587.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Deformable Barrier § 587.18 Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. (a) The fixed rigid barrier has a mass of...

  11. A Cognitive Developmental Model of Rigidity in Senescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapsley, Daniel K.; Enright, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    The rigidity construct is reinterpreted in terms of the cognitive developmental approach. A review reveals both cognitive and developmental themes, with an emphasis on the structural and operational properties of rigidity. Notes weaknesses of previous approaches to rigidity and discusses implications and predictions from the proposed model.…

  12. Expandable and rigid endorectal coils for prostate MRI: impact on prostate distortion and rigid image registration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongbok; Hsu, I-Chow J; Pouliot, Jean; Noworolski, Susan Moyher; Vigneron, Daniel B; Kurhanewicz, John

    2005-12-01

    Endorectal coils (ERCs) are used for acquiring high spatial resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human prostate. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of an expandable versus a rigid ERC on changes in the location and deformation of the prostate gland and subsequently on registering prostate images acquired with and without an ERC. Sagittal and axial T2 weighted MR images were acquired from 25 patients receiving a combined MR imaging/MR spectroscopic imaging staging exam for prostate cancer. Within the same exam, images were acquired using an external pelvic phased array coil both alone and in combination with either an expandable ERC (MedRad, Pittsburgh, PA) or a rigid ERC (USA Instruments, Aurora, OH). Rotations, translations and deformations caused by the ERC were measured and compared. The ability to register images acquired with and without the ERC using a manual rigid-body registration was assessed using a similarity index (SI). Both ERCs caused the prostate to tilt anteriorly with an average tilt of 18.5 degrees (17.4 +/- 9.9 and 19.5 +/- 11.3 degrees, mean +/- standard deviation, for expandable and rigid ERC, respectively). However, the expandable coil caused a significantly larger distortion of the prostate as compared to the rigid coil; compressing the prostate in the anterior/posterior direction by 4.1 +/- 3.0 mm vs 1.2 +/- 2.2 mm (14.5% vs 4.8%) (p < 0.0001), and widening the prostate in the right/left direction by 3.8 +/- 3.7 mm vs 1.5 +/- 3.1 mm (8.3% vs 3.4%) (p = 0.004). Additionally, the ability to manually align prostate images acquired with and without ERC was significantly (p < 0.0001) better for the rigid coil (SI = 0.941 +/- 0.008 vs 0.899 +/- 0.033, for the rigid and expandable coils, respectively). In conclusion, the manual rigid-body alignment of prostate MR images acquired with and without the ERC can be improved through the use of a rigid ERC. PMID:16475755

  13. Rigid and non-rigid micro-plates: Philippines and Myanmar-Andaman case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Generally, tectonic plates are considered as rigid. Oblique plate convergence favors the development of micro-plates along the converging boundaries. The north-south-trending Philippines archipelago (here named Philippine Mobile Belt, PMB), a few hundreds kilometers wide, is one of such complex tectonic zones. We show here that it is composed of rigid rotating crustal blocks (here called platelets). In Myanmar, the northernmost tip of the Sumatra-Andaman subduction system is another complex zone made of various crustal blocks in-between convergent plates. Yet, contrary to PMB, it sustains internal deformation with platelet buckling, altogether indicative of a non-rigid behavior. Therefore, the two case studies, Philippine Mobile Belt and Myanmar-Andaman micro-plate (MAS), illustrate the complexity of micro-plate tectonics and kinematics at convergent plate boundaries.

  14. Understanding geological processes: Visualization of rigid and non-rigid transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, T. F.; Atit, K.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Resnick, I.; Tikoff, B.

    2012-12-01

    Visualizations are used in the geological sciences to support reasoning about structures and events. Research in cognitive sciences offers insights into the range of skills of different users, and ultimately how visualizations might support different users. To understand the range of skills needed to reason about earth processes we have developed a program of research that is grounded in the geosciences' careful description of the spatial and spatiotemporal patterns associated with earth processes. In particular, we are pursuing a research program that identifies specific spatial skills and investigates whether and how they are related to each other. For this study, we focus on a specific question: Is there an important distinction in the geosciences between rigid and non-rigid deformation? To study a general spatial thinking skill we employed displays with non-geological objects that had been altered by rigid change (rotation), and two types of non-rigid change ("brittle" (or discontinuous) and "ductile" (or continuous) deformation). Disciplinary scientists (geosciences and chemistry faculty), and novices (non-science faculty and undergraduate psychology students) answered questions that required them to visualize the appearance of the object before the change. In one study, geologists and chemists were found to be superior to non-science faculty in reasoning about rigid rotations (e.g., what an object would look like from a different perspective). Geologists were superior to chemists in reasoning about brittle deformations (e.g., what an object looked like before it was broken - here the object was a word cut into many fragments displaced in different directions). This finding is consistent with two hypotheses: 1) Experts are good at visualizing the types of changes required for their domain; and 2) Visualization of rigid and non-rigid changes are not the same skill. An additional important finding is that there was a broad range of skill in both rigid and non-rigid

  15. MASPROP- MASS PROPERTIES OF A RIGID STRUCTURE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program MASPROP was developed to rapidly calculate the mass properties of complex rigid structural systems. This program's basic premise is that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elementary structural shapes. Thirteen widely used basic structural shapes are available in this program. They are as follows: Discrete Mass, Cylinder, Truncated Cone, Torus, Beam (arbitrary cross section), Circular Rod (arbitrary cross section), Spherical Segment, Sphere, Hemisphere, Parallelepiped, Swept Trapezoidal Panel, Symmetric Trapezoidal Panels, and a Curved Rectangular Panel. MASPROP provides a designer with a simple technique that requires minimal input to calculate the mass properties of a complex rigid structure and should be useful in any situation where one needs to calculate the center of gravity and moments of inertia of a complex structure. Rigid body analysis is used to calculate mass properties. Mass properties are calculated about component axes that have been rotated to be parallel to the system coordinate axes. Then the system center of gravity is calculated and the mass properties are transferred to axes through the system center of gravity by using the parallel axis theorem. System weight, moments of inertia about the system origin, and the products of inertia about the system center of mass are calculated and printed. From the information about the system center of mass the principal axes of the system and the moments of inertia about them are calculated and printed. The only input required is simple geometric data describing the size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element. This program is written in FORTRAN for execution on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 62K (octal) of 60 bit words. The development of this program was completed in 1978.

  16. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies.

    PubMed

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-10-14

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales. PMID:26472363

  17. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-10-01

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales.

  18. Brownian dynamics of confined rigid bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Delong, Steven; Balboa Usabiaga, Florencio; Donev, Aleksandar

    2015-10-14

    We introduce numerical methods for simulating the diffusive motion of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape immersed in a viscous fluid. We parameterize the orientation of the bodies using normalized quaternions, which are numerically robust, space efficient, and easy to accumulate. We construct a system of overdamped Langevin equations in the quaternion representation that accounts for hydrodynamic effects, preserves the unit-norm constraint on the quaternion, and is time reversible with respect to the Gibbs-Boltzmann distribution at equilibrium. We introduce two schemes for temporal integration of the overdamped Langevin equations of motion, one based on the Fixman midpoint method and the other based on a random finite difference approach, both of which ensure that the correct stochastic drift term is captured in a computationally efficient way. We study several examples of rigid colloidal particles diffusing near a no-slip boundary and demonstrate the importance of the choice of tracking point on the measured translational mean square displacement (MSD). We examine the average short-time as well as the long-time quasi-two-dimensional diffusion coefficient of a rigid particle sedimented near a bottom wall due to gravity. For several particle shapes, we find a choice of tracking point that makes the MSD essentially linear with time, allowing us to estimate the long-time diffusion coefficient efficiently using a Monte Carlo method. However, in general, such a special choice of tracking point does not exist, and numerical techniques for simulating long trajectories, such as the ones we introduce here, are necessary to study diffusion on long time scales.

  19. Large-strain, rigid-to-rigid deformation of bistable electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhibin; Yuan, Wei; Brochu, Paul; Chen, Bin; Liu, Zhitian; Pei, Qibing

    2009-11-01

    Thermoplastic poly(tert-butyl acrylate) (PTBA) is reported as an electroactive polymer that is rigid at ambient conditions and turns into a dielectric elastomer above a transition temperature. In the rubbery state, a PTBA thin film can be electrically actuated to strains up to 335% in area expansion. The calculated actuation pressure is 3.2 MPa. The actuation is made bistable by cooling to below glass transition temperature. The PTBA represents the bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP) that can be actuated to various largely strained, rigid shapes. The application of the BSEP for refreshable Braille display, an active tactile display, is also demonstrated.

  20. The High Rigidity Spectrometer for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, T.

    2016-06-01

    The High Rigidity Spectrometer (HRS) is being developed to make optimum use of the fast rare-isotope beams that will be available at the Facility for Rare-Isotope Beams (FRIB) and will be the key experimental tool to study the most exotic, neutron-rich nuclei. The HRS will accommodate detector systems for charged particles, neutrons, and gamma rays. This will enable coincidence measurements of reaction products that stem from a variety of reactions such as knockout, breakup, charge exchange or Coulomb excitation. First-order ion optical studies are under way and this paper will offer some details on the current design ideas.

  1. Edge shape and comfort of rigid lenses.

    PubMed

    La Hood, D

    1988-08-01

    One of the main factors determining the comfort of a rigid contact lens is the shape of the edge. The comfort of four different contact lens edge shapes was assessed with four unadapted subjects in a randomized masked trial. Lenses with well rounded anterior edge profiles were found to be significantly more comfortable than lenses with square anterior edges. There was no significant difference in subjective comfort between a rounded and square posterior edge profile. The results suggest that the interaction of the edge with the eyelid is more important in determining comfort than edge effects on the cornea, when lenses are fitted according to a corneal alignment philosophy. PMID:3177585

  2. A rigid porous filter and filtration method

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas, Straub L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter comprising a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulate from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulate. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area- to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  3. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  4. Dynamical rigidity of transcendental meromorphic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorulski, Bartłomiej; Urbański, Mariusz

    2012-08-01

    We prove the form of dynamical rigidity of transcendental meromorphic functions which asserts that if two tame transcendental meromorphic functions restricted to their Julia sets are topologically conjugate via a locally bi-Lipschitz homeomorphism, then they, treated as functions defined on the entire complex plane { C} , are topologically conjugate via an affine map, i.e. a map from { C} to { C} of the form z ↦ az + b. As an intermediate step we show that no tame transcendental meromorphic function is essentially affine.

  5. Rigid-flexible printed wiring boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydow, E. V.

    1993-05-01

    Rigid-flexible printed wiring board materials, fabrication processes, product requirements, and reliability were established. Considerable effort was spent testing plated-through holes, analyzing plated-through hole failure mechanisms, and then incorporating materials, processes, and product requirements to provide adequate control and reduce failures. The principal processes developed were tooling concepts, process sequence, lamination, drilling, plasma etchback, copper electroplating, and solder coating. Product requirements and reliability were established with thermal shock, thermal stress, innerlayer adhesion, and fold flexibility tests. Plated-through hole failure mechanisms were analyzed with thermal mechanical and finite element analyses.

  6. Rigid and flexible OLEDs: prototypes to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monz, Stefan; Wolf, Konrad; Möbius, Hildegard; Blankenbach, Karlheinz

    2011-03-01

    Major achievements of this research project on rigid and flexible OLEDs are: lifetime enhancement by advanced constant luminance (L) operation, integration into textiles and furthermore, the prototype production on flexible PET/ITO substrates of polymer OLEDs. Our OLEDs were manufactured with spin-coating assisted by ink-jet printing. We introduced constant luminance operation (instead of the usual constant current) which was implemented in order to extend the overall lifetime of OLEDs. A threefold lifetime improvement was achieved by maintaining 50% luminance using an advanced microcontroller-based lifetime(LT) model. Various approaches to textile integration and evaluation of environmental issues in clothes (e.g. moisture) were investigated.

  7. Research on Necessary and Sufficient Condition for Hamilton Graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yan; Cui, Chao-Dong

    An important concept, "closed domain" is proposed in this paper. In the same time, necessary and sufficient lemma for closed domain, R, is proved on which necessary and sufficient theorem for judging whether a general graph G is a Hamilton graph is proposed and proved. All instances in this paper are judged by comparatively using the theorem proposed herein and the original necessary condition theorem and sufficient condition theorem to prove the correctness of the method proposed in this paper.

  8. Laminarization of Turbulent Boundary Layer on Flexible and Rigid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the control of turbulent boundary layer flow over flexible and rigid surfaces downstream of a concave-convex geometry has been made. The concave-convex curvature induces centrifugal forces and a pressure gradient on the growth of the turbulent boundary layer. The favorable gradient is not sufficient to overcome the unfavorable; thus, the net effect is a destabilizing, of the flow into Gortler instabilities. This study shows that control of the turbulent boundary layer and structural loading can be successfully achieved by using localized surface heating because the subsequent cooling and geometrical shaping downstream over a favorable pressure gradient is effective in laminarization of the turbulence. Wires embedded in a thermally insulated substrate provide surface heating. The laminarized velocity profile adjusts to a lower Reynolds number, and the structure responds to a lower loading. In the laminarization, the turbulent energy is dissipated by molecular transport by both viscous and conductivity mechanisms. Laminarization reduces spanwise vorticity because of the longitudinal cooling gradient of the sublayer profile. The results demonstrate that the curvature-induced mean pressure gradient enhances the receptivity of the flow to localized surface heating, a potentially viable mechanism to laminarize turbulent boundary layer flow; thus, the flow reduces the response of the flexible structure and the resultant sound radiation.

  9. Vibration and length-dependent flexural rigidity of protein microtubules using higher order shear deformation theory.

    PubMed

    Tounsi, Abdelouahed; Heireche, Houari; Benhassaini, Hachemi; Missouri, Miloud

    2010-09-21

    Microtubules are hollow cylindrical filaments of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton characterized by extremely low shear modulus. A remarkable controversy has occurred in the literature, regarding the length dependence of flexural rigidity of microtubules predicted by the classical elastic beam model. In this study, a higher order shear deformable beam model for microtubules is employed to study unexplained length-dependent flexural rigidity and Young's modulus of microtubules reported in the literature. The formulation allows for warping of the cross-section of the microtubule and eliminates the need for using arbitrary shear correction coefficients as in other theories. It is showed that vibration frequencies predicted by the present parabolic shear deformation theory (PSDT) are much lower than that given by the approximate isotropic beam model for shorter microtubules, although the two models give almost identical results for sufficiently long microtubules. It is confirmed that transverse shearing and the warping of the cross-section of microtubules are mainly responsible for the length-dependent flexural rigidity of an isolated microtubule reported in the literature, which cannot be explained by the widely used Euler-Bernoulli beam model. Indeed, the length-dependent flexural rigidity predicted by the present model is found to be in qualitative agreement with the existing experimental data (Kurachi et al., 1995; Pampaloni et al., 2006). These results recommend that the parabolic shear deformation-beam theory offers a unified simple 1D model, which can capture the length dependence of flexural rigidity and be applied to various static and dynamic problems of microtubule mechanics. PMID:20609368

  10. Quantification of rigidity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Behrooz; Esteki, Ali; Ebrahimi-Takamjani, Esmaeal; Shahidi, Golam-Ali; Khamseh, Fatemeh; Moinodin, Marzieh

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, a new method for quantification of rigidity in elbow joint of Parkinsonian patients is introduced. One of the most known syndromes in Parkinson's disease (PD) is increased passive stiffness in muscles, which leads to rigidity in joints. Clinical evaluation of stiffness in wrist and/or elbow, commonly used by clinicians, is based on Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating System (UPDRS). Subjective nature of this method may influence the accuracy and precision of evaluations. Hence, introducing an objective standard method based on quantitative measurements may be helpful. A test rig was designed and fabricated to measure range of motion and viscous and elastic components of passive stiffness in elbow joint. Measurements were done for 41 patients and 11 controls. Measures were extracted using Matlab-R14 software and statistic analyses were done by Spss-13. Relation between each computed measure and the level of illness were analyzed. Results showed a better correlation between viscous component of stiffness and UPDRS score compared to the elastic component. Results of this research may help to introduce a standard objective method for evaluation of PD. PMID:17909970

  11. Shear-induced rigidity in athermal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Bulbul; Sarkar, Sumantra

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we present a minimal model of rigidity and plastic failure in solids whose rigidity emerges directly as a result of applied stresses. Examples include shear-jamming (SJ) in dry grains and discontinuous shear thickening (DST) of dense non-Brownian suspensions. Both SJ and DST states are examples of non-equilibrium, self-assembled structures that have evolved to support the load that created them. These are strongly-interacting systems where the interactions arise primarily from the strict constraints of force and torque balance at the local and global scales. Our model is based on a reciprocal-space picture that strictly enforces the local and global constraints, and is, therefore, best suited to capturing the strong correlations in these non-equilibrium systems. The reciprocal space is a tiling whose edges represent contact forces, and whose faces represent grains. A separation of scale between force fluctuations and displacements of grains is used to represent the positional disorder as quenched randomness on variables in the reciprocal space. Comparing theoretical results to experiments, we will argue that the packing fraction controls the strength of the quenched disorder. Sumantra Sarkar et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 068301 (2013)

  12. A constitutive theory for rigid polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.; Krieg, R.D.; Schreyer, H.L.

    1992-12-31

    Rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam consists of interconnected polyurethane plates which form cells. When this foam is compressed, it exhibits an initial elastic regime which is followed by a plateau regime in which the load required to compress the foam remains nearly constant. In the plateau regime, cell walls are damaged and large permanent volume changes are generated. As additional load is applied, cell walls are compressed against neighboring cell walls, and the stiffness of the foam increases and approaches a value equal to that of solid polyurethane. When the foam is loaded in tension, the cell walls are damaged and the foam fractures. A constitutive theory for rigid polyurethane foam has been developed. This theory is based on a decomposition of the foam into two parts: a skeleton and a nonlinear elastic continuum in parallel. The skeleton accounts for the foam behavior in the elastic and plateau regimes and is described using a coupled plasticity with continuum damage theory. The nonlinear elastic continuum accounts for the lock-up of the foam due to internal gas pressure and cell wall interactions. This new constitutive theory has been implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes. Numerical simulations performed using the new constitutive theory are presented.

  13. Magnetic Control of Rigid Achiral Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U.; Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry; Kim, Minjun

    2013-11-01

    We report control of rigid achiral microswimmers in low Reynolds number environments. A rotating magnetic field was used to actuate the microswimmers wirelessly by rotating the microswimmers, which produces propulsion. Previous magnetically actuated microswimmers in bulk fluids have been designed with either flexibility or chiral geometry; we show that simpler geometries with neither flexibility nor chirality can produce propulsion. The microswimmer consists of three magnetic beads conjugated using avidin-biotin linkages into an arc formation. We designed a magnetic field generator consisting of electromagnetic coils arranged in an approximate Helmholtz configuration. A highspeed camera provided realtime imaging of the microswimmers' motion in a PDMS chamber. The rigidity of the microswimmer was characterized by tracking the position of the individual beads and calculating their relative distances. As a function of field strength and rotation frequency, we observed changes in the rotational axis of the microswimmers and the corresponding effects on their velocities. The achiral microswimmers exhibited active propulsion and were controllable in both speed and direction, which demonstrates the possibility for future biomedical applications such as drug delivery.

  14. 24 CFR 242.2 - Program financial self-sufficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program financial self-sufficiency... self-sufficiency and actuarial soundness; i.e., to avoid mortgage defaults and claims for insurance... AUTHORITIES MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS General Eligibility Requirements § 242.2 Program financial...

  15. 39 CFR 491.3 - Sufficient legal form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sufficient legal form. 491.3 Section 491.3 Postal... AND THE POSTAL RATE COMMISSION § 491.3 Sufficient legal form. No document purporting to garnish... or an authorized official pursuant to an order of such a court or pursuant to federal, state or...

  16. 39 CFR 491.3 - Sufficient legal form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sufficient legal form. 491.3 Section 491.3 Postal... AND THE POSTAL RATE COMMISSION § 491.3 Sufficient legal form. No document purporting to garnish... or an authorized official pursuant to an order of such a court or pursuant to federal, state or...

  17. 39 CFR 491.3 - Sufficient legal form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sufficient legal form. 491.3 Section 491.3 Postal... AND THE POSTAL RATE COMMISSION § 491.3 Sufficient legal form. No document purporting to garnish... or an authorized official pursuant to an order of such a court or pursuant to federal, state or...

  18. Southeast Asian Refugee Self-Sufficiency Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Nathan; And Others

    This study on the economic self-sufficiency of the Southeast Asian refugee household was conducted in order to gather information on the economic status of these refugees, the factors that contribute to self-sufficiency, and refugees' needs for services. A survey of 1,384 households of Vietnamese, Sino-Vietnamese, and Lao refugees who arrived in…

  19. 27 CFR 25.174 - Bond not sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bond not sufficient. 25.174 Section 25.174 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Tax on Beer Prepayment of Tax § 25.174 Bond not sufficient. When...

  20. 27 CFR 25.174 - Bond not sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bond not sufficient. 25.174 Section 25.174 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Prepayment of Tax § 25.174 Bond not sufficient. When...

  1. 27 CFR 25.174 - Bond not sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bond not sufficient. 25.174 Section 25.174 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Tax on Beer Prepayment of Tax § 25.174 Bond not sufficient. When...

  2. 27 CFR 25.174 - Bond not sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bond not sufficient. 25.174 Section 25.174 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Prepayment of Tax § 25.174 Bond not sufficient. When...

  3. 27 CFR 25.174 - Bond not sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bond not sufficient. 25.174 Section 25.174 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Prepayment of Tax § 25.174 Bond not sufficient. When...

  4. 39 CFR 491.3 - Sufficient legal form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sufficient legal form. 491.3 Section 491.3 Postal... AND THE POSTAL RATE COMMISSION § 491.3 Sufficient legal form. No document purporting to garnish... is legal process in the nature of garnishment; that it is issued by a court of competent...

  5. 39 CFR 491.3 - Sufficient legal form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sufficient legal form. 491.3 Section 491.3 Postal... AND THE POSTAL RATE COMMISSION § 491.3 Sufficient legal form. No document purporting to garnish... is legal process in the nature of garnishment; that it is issued by a court of competent...

  6. Origin of rigidity in marginal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng

    Granular materials are seemingly simple — they are a collection of particles large enough to be seen by eye, yet they exhibit a large range of totally different behaviors: liquid, gas and solid. We study various interesting aspects of granular materials: (1)First, analysis of experimental data yields a completely new route in which a granular fluid becomes a solid. These new states, know as shear jammed(SJ) granular matter, are an addition to the jamming framework proposed over 10 years ago. (2)We then focus on the emergence of shear-rigidity in granular materials which have no energetically preferred density modulations. In contrast to traditional solids, the emergence of mechanical rigidity in these marginal granular solids is a collective process, which is controlled solely by boundary forces, the constraints of force and torque balance, and the positivity of the contact forces. We develop a theoretical framework and show that these solids have internal patterns that are most naturally represented in the space of gauge fields that impose the constraints. Broken translational invariance in gauge space is a necessary condition for rigidity in granular solids. We use this theoretical framework to understand the stress fluctuations and the ability to resist deformations in SJ states. (3)We generalize the stress ensemble framework to a full tensor representation. In this framework, the angoricity is an intensive quantity, which is conjugate to the stress rather than the energy. We compare the predictions of this framework in SJ states and explain stress fluctuations in SJ states.(4)We also construct a dynamical framework to model deformation and stress avalanches in a slowly driven granular matter. The model assumes small patches of the driven granular material undergoing a stochastic evolution in a stress landscape, elastic deformations are equivalent to tilting the landscape while rearrangements correspond to hopping between different metastable states in this

  7. Determination of Coherency and Rigidity Temperatures in Al-Cu Alloys Using In Situ Neutron Diffraction During Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drezet, Jean-Marie; Mireux, Bastien; Szaraz, Zoltan; Pirling, Thilo

    2014-08-01

    The rigidity temperature of a solidifying alloy is the temperature at which the solid phase is sufficiently coalesced to transmit tensile stress. It is a major input parameter in numerical modeling of solidification processes as it defines the point at which thermally induced deformations start to generate internal stresses in a casting. This temperature has been determined for an Al-13 wt.% Cu alloy using in situ neutron diffraction during casting in a dog-bone-shaped mold. This setup allows the sample to build up internal stress naturally as its contraction is not possible. The cooling on both sides of the mold induces a hot spot at the middle of the sample that is irradiated by neutrons. Diffraction patterns are recorded every 11 s using a large detector, and the very first change of diffraction angles allows for the determination of the rigidity temperature. We measured rigidity temperatures equal to 557°C and 548°C depending on the cooling rate for grain refined Al-13 wt.% Cu alloys. At a high cooling rate, rigidity is reached during the formation of the eutectic phase. In this case, the solid phase is not sufficiently coalesced to sustain tensile load and thus cannot avoid hot tear formation.

  8. Elastic image registration via rigid object motion induced deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaofen; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Hirsch, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we estimate the deformations induced on soft tissues by the rigid independent movements of hard objects and create an admixture of rigid and elastic adaptive image registration transformations. By automatically segmenting and independently estimating the movement of rigid objects in 3D images, we can maintain rigidity in bones and hard tissues while appropriately deforming soft tissues. We tested our algorithms on 20 pairs of 3D MRI datasets pertaining to a kinematic study of the flexibility of the ankle complex of normal feet as well as ankles affected by abnormalities in foot architecture and ligament injuries. The results show that elastic image registration via rigid object-induced deformation outperforms purely rigid and purely nonrigid approaches.

  9. Fluid-Structure Interactions with Flexible and Rigid Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, David Jesse

    Fluid structure interactions occur to some extent in nearly every type of fluid flow. Understanding how structures interact with fluids and visa-versa is of vital importance in many engineering applications. The purpose of this research is to explore how fluids interact with flexible and rigid structures. A computational model was used to model the fluid structure interactions of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. The model simulated the coupling of the fluid and solid domains using a fluid-structure interface boundary condition. The fluid domain used a slightly compressible flow solver to allow for the possibility of acoustic coupling with the subglottal geometry and vibration of the vocal fold model. As the subglottis lengthened, the frequency of vibration decreased until a new acoustic mode could form in the subglottis. Synthetic aperture particle image velocimetry (SAPIV) is a three-dimensional particle tracking technique. SAPIV was used to image the jet of air that emerges from vibrating human vocal folds (glottal jet) during phonation. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the glottal jet found faint evidence of flow characteristics seen in previous research, such as axis-switching, but did not have sufficient resolution to detect small features. SAPIV was further applied to reconstruct the smaller flow characteristics of the glottal jet of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. Two- and four-layer synthetic vocal fold models were used to determine how the glottal jet from the synthetic models compared to the glottal jet from excised human vocal folds. The two- and four-layer models clearly exhibited axis-switching which has been seen in other 3D analyses of the glottal jet. Cavitation in a quiescent fluid can break a rigid structure such as a glass bottle. A new cavitation number was derived to include acceleration and pressure head at cavitation onset. A cavitation stick was used to validate the cavitation number by filling it with different depths and hitting

  10. Rigidity Loss in Disordered Systems: Three Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Hagh, Varda F.; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, M. F.; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-04-01

    We reveal significant qualitative differences in the rigidity transition of three types of disordered network materials: randomly diluted spring networks, jammed sphere packings, and stress-relieved networks that are diluted using a protocol that avoids the appearance of floppy regions. The marginal state of jammed and stress-relieved networks are globally isostatic, while marginal randomly diluted networks show both overconstrained and underconstrained regions. When a single bond is added to or removed from these isostatic systems, jammed networks become globally overconstrained or floppy, whereas the effect on stress-relieved networks is more local and limited. These differences are also reflected in the linear elastic properties and point to the highly effective and unusual role of global self-organization in jammed sphere packings.

  11. Dynamic soil pressures on rigid vertical walls

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.

    1992-12-01

    A critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and the associated forces induced by ground shaking on a rigid, straight, vertical wall retaining a semi-infinite, uniform viscoelastic layer of constant thickness. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. Simple approximate expressions for the responses of the system are developed, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the effects and relative importance of the various parameters involved. These solutions are then compared with those obtained by use of a simple model proposed previously by Scott, and the accuracy of this model is assessed. Finally, two versions of an alternative model are proposed which better approximate the action of the system. In the first, the properties of the model are defined by frequency-dependent parameters, whereas in the second, which is particularly helpful in analyses of transient response, they are represented by frequency-independent, constant parameters.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF A RIGID BARRIER FILTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan

    2001-11-06

    A mathematical model is formulated to describe the dynamics of a rigid barrier filter system. Complete with filtration, regeneration and particle re-deposition, this model provides sizing information for new filter systems and diagnostic information for operating filter systems. To turn this model into a practical and smart filter system predictive model, monitoring devices for variables such as real-time particle concentration and size distribution are currently under laboratory development. The program goal is to introduce a smart filter system to supervise its operation and to assure its system reliability. Primarily, a smart filter system will update operating information, sound up malfunction alarms, and provide self-activated measures such as adjusting the cleaning frequency, intensity and back-pulse duration.

  13. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A. H.; Flores-Johnson, E. A.; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  14. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    SciTech Connect

    CHU,TZE YAO; ERICKSON,KENNETH L.; HOBBS,MICHAEL L.

    1999-11-01

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer. The bond-breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The chemical structure of the foam was determined from the preparation techniques and ingredients used to synthesize the foam. Scale-up effects were investigated by simulating the response of an incident heat flux of 25 W/cm{sup 2} on a partially confined 8.8-cm diameter by 15-cm long right circular cylinder of foam which contained an encapsulated component. Predictions of center, midradial, and component temperatures, as well as regression of the foam surface, were in agreement with measurements using thermocouples and X-ray imaging.

  15. Coherent distributions for the rigid rotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorescu, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Coherent solutions of the classical Liouville equation for the rigid rotator are presented as positive phase-space distributions localized on the Lagrangian submanifolds of Hamilton-Jacobi theory. These solutions become Wigner-type quasiprobability distributions by a formal discretization of the left-invariant vector fields from their Fourier transform in angular momentum. The results are consistent with the usual quantization of the anisotropic rotator, but the expected value of the Hamiltonian contains a finite "zero point" energy term. It is shown that during the time when a quasiprobability distribution evolves according to the Liouville equation, the related quantum wave function should satisfy the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  16. Long waves induced motions to rigid spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongkun; Hong, Lianjin

    2015-05-01

    Responses of unconstrained and rigid spheroidal bodies subjected to long sound waves are analyzed by means of approaching hydrodynamic method. It is shown that in the low-frequency approximation the amplitude of translational velocity is completely determined by the density as well as the acoustic added mass which is equal to hydrodynamic one associated with the body. The inconformity of responses to sound waves in virtue of geometric asymmetry is also presented. In addition, rotational movement engendered by acoustic oblique incidence is discussed, and it represents as the modulated angular oscillation similar to the beat-frequency vibration. All these analyses on acoustically induced motions provide a theoretical evidence for developing spheroidal inertial vector receivers.

  17. Management of severe and rigid idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Luis Eduardo Carelli; de Barros, Alderico Girão Campos; de Azevedo, Gustavo Borges Laurindo

    2015-07-01

    Frequently, severe idiopathic scoliosis patients are first seen in a spine centre after years of deformity evolution, presenting with large curves, severe rib hump, shoulder and trunk imbalance and cardiorespiratory complications related to neglected scoliosis. Severe rigid idiopathic scoliosis has <25% of correction on bending films and major curve over 90°. Adequate mobilization of this type of deformity is necessary to achieve maximal correction, often requiring more extensive surgical intervention, with care taken to avoid clinical and neurological complications. Halo traction, internal temporary distraction, releases, osteotomies and apical vertebral resection are often used in combination to achieve optimal results. Indications must be tailored by surgeons considering resources, deformity characteristics and patient's profile. Vertebral resection procedures may have potential neurological and clinical risks and should be one of the last treatment options performed by experienced surgical team. Neuromonitoring is essential during these procedures. PMID:26033753

  18. Hybrid Flexible and Rigid Ceramic Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for closing out the edges of a flexible ceramic insulation member including inner and outer mold line covering layers. A rigid, segmented, ceramic frame is placed round the edges of the insulation member and exposed edges of the inner and outer mold line covering layers are affixed to the ceramic frame. In one embodiment wherein the covering layers comprise fabrics, the outer fabric is bonded to the top surface and to grooved portion of the side surface of the frame. In another embodiment wherein the outer cover layer comprises a metallic foil, clips on the edges of the frame are used to engage foil extensions. The ceramic frame is coated with a high emittance densifier coating.

  19. Supramolecular Synthons: Will Giant Rigid Superspheres Do?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, the concept of supramolecular synthons was applied to giant rigid superspheres based on pentaphosphaferrocene [CpRFe(η5-P5)] (R = Me, Et) and Cu(I) halides, which reach 2.1–3.0 nm in diameter. Two supramolecular synthons, σ–π and π–π, are discovered based on halogen···CpR and Cp*···Cp* specific interactions, respectively. The geometry of the synthons is reproducible in a series of crystal structures of various supramolecules. The σ–π synthon alone is realized more frequently for Br-containing superspheres. A combination of the σ–π and π–π synthons is more typical for Cl-containing supramolecules. Each supramolecule can bear up to nine synthons to give mostly 2D and 3D architectures. PMID:27081373

  20. Rigid bodies for metal forming analysis with NIKE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Maker, B.N.

    1995-01-25

    Perhaps the most common approximation in engineering is that, relative to its neighbors, a system component is structurally rigid. This paper presents a development of the rigid assumption for use in nonlinear, implicit finite element codes. In this method, computational economy is gained by condensing the size of the associated linear system of equations, eliminating the processing of rigid elements, and reducing the overall nonlinearity of the problem.

  1. Ambiguous fluidity and rigidity and diamonds that ooze!

    PubMed

    Meyer, G E; Dougherty, T J

    1990-01-01

    If white hemicircles rotate over the edges of a black diamond, there occurs an ambiguity of rigidity and motion. As the hemicircles obscure the vertices of the diamond, the figure transforms from a diamond to a rotating, nonrigid cross made of a tar-like fluid. When the corners reappear, the stimulus again becomes a rigid, solid diamond. Visibility of the vertices implies rigidity. If white squares are rotated, fluidity is not perceived. If the diamond has sawtooth edges and the hemicircles are rotated, no fluidity is perceived. Similarly, if illusory contours suggest the amodal completion of the vertices, rigidity is maintained. PMID:2096367

  2. Quasiclassical trajectory studies of rigid rotor--rigid surface scattering. I. Flat surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.M.; Park, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    Rotationally inelastic transition intensities are calculated for a model N/sub 2/ rigid rotor--rigid flat surface at initial collision energies of 104 and 3800 meV and for many initial beam orientations. The interaction potential is a Morse function modulated by a term which depends on the rotor orientation angle. The calculations are based on the quasiclassical trajectory method and a distorted trajectory perturbation theory. At the low collision energy the rotational excitation is mediated by the attractive part of the potential and by the repulsive part at high energies. The collision dynamics is direct in both energy regimes, however, quite complicated in the former one. Rotational rainbows are clearly observed for the high energy collisions.

  3. A kidney deformation model for use in non-rigid registration during image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Rowena E.; Herrell, S. Duke, III; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    2008-03-01

    In order to facilitate the removal of tumors during partial nephrectomies, an image-guided surgery system may be useful. This system would require a registration of the physical kidney to a pre-operative image volume; however, it is unclear whether a rigid registration would be sufficient. One possible source of non-rigid deformation is the clamping of the renal artery during surgery and the subsequent loss of pressure as the kidney is punctured and blood loss occurs. To explore this issue, a model of kidney deformation due to loss of perfusion and pressure was developed based on Biot's consolidation model. The model was tested on two resected porcine kidneys in which the renal artery and vein were clamped. CT image volumes of the kidney were obtained before and after the deformation caused unclamping, and fiducial markers embedded on the kidney surface allowed the deformation to be tracked. The accuracy of the kidney model was accessed by calculating the model error at the fiducial locations and using image similarity measures. Preliminary results indicate that the model may be useful in a non-rigid registration scheme; however, further refinements to the model may be necessary to better simulate the deformation due to loss of perfusion and pressure.

  4. Structure-property relationship in rigid-rigid polymer-toughened polypropylene blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guangxue

    1999-11-01

    The rigid-rigid polymer toughening concept is used to toughen and strengthen isotactic polypropylene (iPP). The morphology and mechanical behavior of iPP and Noryl poly(phenylene oxide)/polystyrene blends (iPP/Noryl) are studied. It is found that the fracture toughness of iPP can be significantly improved by adding rigid Noryl particles without causing any reduction in modulus. Large Noryl particles (about 10--15 mum) are formed if no compatibilizers are utilized in the iPP/Noryl blend. An addition of a small amount of styrene-ethylene-propylene (SEP) compatibilizer causes a significant reduction in Noryl particle size. A noticeable improvement in particle-matrix interfacial adhesion is also observed. Also, the fracture energies required for both crack initiation and crack propagation of iPP are greatly increased. The results show that phase morphology has a great effect on the mechanical performance of these blends. The toughening mechanisms in blends of iPP/Noryl are studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Crazing is found to be the dominant toughening mechanism in iPP/Noryl blend. A detailed investigation of fracture mechanisms reveals that Noryl particles help trigger and stabilize massive crazes in the iPP matrix. Crazing and shear banding mechanisms are found to operate sequentially in iPP/Noryl/SEP blends. As a result, the toughness of PP is significantly improved.

  5. Perceptual, cognitive, and personality rigidity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Santos, Mirella; Cao, Bo; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Norton, Daniel J; Neargarder, Sandy; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with motor and non-motor rigidity symptoms (e.g., cognitive and personality). The question is raised as to whether rigidity in PD also extends to perception, and if so, whether perceptual, cognitive, and personality rigidities are correlated. Bistable stimuli were presented to 28 non-demented individuals with PD and 26 normal control adults (NC). Necker cube perception and binocular rivalry were examined during passive viewing, and the Necker cube was additionally used for two volitional-control conditions: Hold one percept in front, and Switch between the two percepts. Relative to passive viewing, PD were significantly less able than NC to reduce dominance durations in the Switch condition, indicating perceptual rigidity. Tests of cognitive flexibility and a personality questionnaire were administered to explore the association with perceptual rigidity. Cognitive flexibility was not correlated with perceptual rigidity for either group. Personality (novelty seeking) correlated with dominance durations on Necker passive viewing for PD but not NC. The results indicate the presence in mild-moderate PD of perceptual rigidity and suggest shared neural substrates with novelty seeking, but functional divergence from those supporting cognitive flexibility. The possibility is raised that perceptual rigidity may be a harbinger of cognitive inflexibility later in the disease course. PMID:25640973

  6. Decision-Making in Old Age: Cautiousness and Rigidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Richard E.; Hutchison, Sam L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Elderly participants (N=64) were classified as to high or low rigidity and completed the Choice Dilemmas Questionnaire. Previous findings were supported in that subjects preferred not to make decisions. Subjects were more cautious in making decisions applying to younger individuals and rigidity was related to risky decisions. (RC)

  7. Lift on Flexible and Rigid Cambered Wings at High Incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anya; Mancini, Peter; Granlund, Kenneth; Ol, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The effects of camber and camber change due to elastic deflection of a membrane wing were investigated for wings in rectilinear translation with parameter variations in wing incidence and acceleration. Direct force and moment measurements were performed on a rigid flat plate wing, rigid cambered wings, and a membrane wing. Features in the force histories were further examined via flow visualization by planar laser illumination of fluorescent dye. Below 10 degrees of incidence, Wagner's approximation accurately predicts the time-evolution of lift for the rigid wings. At higher incidence, flow separation results in force transients, and the effect of wing camber is no longer additive. Both the rigid flat plate and rigid cambered wings reach peak lift at a 35 degree angle of attack, whereas the flexible wing experiences stall delay and reaches peak lift at 50 degrees. Due to the aeroelasticity of the flexible membrane, flow over the suction surface remains attached for much higher incidence angles than for the rigid wings. For incidence angles less than 30 degrees, the peak lift of the flexible wing is lower than that of its rigid counterparts. Beyond 30 degrees, the flexible wing experiences an aeroelastically induced stall delay that allows lift to exceed the rigid analogs. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory under the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) program.

  8. Perceptual, Cognitive, and Personality Rigidity in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Santos, Mirella; Cao, Bo; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Norton, Daniel J.; Neargarder, Sandy; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with motor and non-motor rigidity symptoms (e.g., cognitive and personality). The question is raised as to whether rigidity in PD also extends to perception, and if so, whether perceptual, cognitive, and personality rigidities are correlated. Bistable stimuli were presented to 28 non-demented individuals with PD and 26 normal control adults (NC). Necker cube perception and binocular rivalry were examined during passive viewing, and the Necker cube was additionally used for two volitional-control conditions: Hold one percept in front, and Switch between the two percepts. Relative to passive viewing, PD were significantly less able than NC to reduce dominance durations in the Switch condition, indicating perceptual rigidity. Tests of cognitive flexibility and a personality questionnaire were administered to explore the association with perceptual rigidity. Cognitive flexibility was not correlated with perceptual rigidity for either group. Personality (novelty seeking) correlated with dominance durations on Necker passive viewing for PD but not NC. The results indicate the presence in mild-moderate PD of perceptual rigidity and suggest shared neural substrates with novelty seeking, but functional divergence from those supporting cognitive flexibility. The possibility is raised that perceptual rigidity may be a harbinger of cognitive inflexibility later in the disease course. PMID:25640973

  9. 21 CFR 876.3630 - Penile rigidity implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penile rigidity implant. 876.3630 Section 876.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 876.3630 Penile rigidity implant....

  10. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  11. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  12. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  13. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  14. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  15. Great apes select tools on the basis of their rigidity.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Héctor Marín; Gross, Alexandra Nam-Mi; Call, Josep

    2010-10-01

    Wild chimpanzees select tools according to their rigidity. However, little is known about whether choices are solely based on familiarity with the materials or knowledge about tool properties. Furthermore, it is unclear whether tool manipulation is required prior to selection or whether observation alone can suffice. We investigated whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) (n = 9), bonobos (Pan paniscus) (n = 4), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) (n = 6), and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) (n = 2) selected new tools on the basis of their rigidity. Subjects faced an out-of-reach reward and a choice of three tools differing in color, diameter, material, and rigidity. We used 10 different 3-tool sets (1 rigid, 2 flexible). Subjects were unfamiliar with the tools and needed to select and use the rigid tool to retrieve the reward. Experiment 1 showed that subjects chose the rigid tool from the first trial with a 90% success rate. Experiments 2a and 2b addressed the role of manipulation and observation in tool selection. Subjects performed equally well in conditions in which they could manipulate the tools themselves or saw the experimenter manipulate the tools but decreased their performance if they could only visually inspect the tools. Experiment 3 showed that subjects could select flexible tools (as opposed to rigid ones) to meet new task demands. We conclude that great apes spontaneously selected unfamiliar rigid or flexible tools even after gathering minimal observational information. PMID:20718558

  16. Rigid Body Motion in Stereo 3D Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the difficulties experienced by first-grade students studying rigid body motion at Sofia University. Most quantities describing the rigid body are in relations that the students find hard to visualize and understand. They also lose the notion of cause-result relations between vector quantities, such as the relation between…

  17. Variation in fracture zone rigidity by dynamic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, A. A.; Khazins, V. M.

    2013-03-01

    The coefficient of normal rigidity of different-order fault zones was evaluated from seismic data. The crust tectonic faults were shown to be dynamic systems and nonstatic. Specifically, this is manifested in the variability of their rigidity with time. The value of the rigidity of fault zones varies in time with periods of 13-15 days, 27-32 days, and around 1 year. Here, the coefficient of normal rigidity of different-order fault zones can vary by 1.3 (semimonthly variations) 1.5 (monthly variations), and 2.5 times (annual variations), respectively. These variations are most likely governed by the rate and intensity of the transformation of matter of fault zones and, as a consequence, the variations in their mechanical properties under tidal conditions. Dynamic effects like seismoexplosive waves lead to a reduction in the rigidity of fault zones by 5-50% depending on the amplitude of the compression wave.

  18. Rigidity-Preserving Team Partitions in Multiagent Networks.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Daniela; Williams, Ryan K; Gasparri, Andrea; Ulivi, Giovanni; Sukhatme, Gaurav S

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the strong influence network rigidity has on collaborative systems, in this paper, we consider the problem of partitioning a multiagent network into two sub-teams, a bipartition, such that the resulting sub-teams are topologically rigid. In this direction, we determine the existence conditions for rigidity-preserving bipartitions, and provide an iterative algorithm that identifies such partitions in polynomial time. In particular, the relationship between rigid graph partitions and the previously identified Z-link edge structure is given, yielding a feasible direction for graph search. Adapting a supergraph search mechanism, we then detail a methodology for discerning graphs cuts that represent valid rigid bipartitions. Next, we extend our methods to a decentralized context by exploiting leader election and an improved graph search to evaluate feasible cuts using only local agent-to-agent communication. Finally, full algorithm details and pseudocode are provided, together with simulation results that verify correctness and demonstrate complexity. PMID:25561600

  19. Inflatable Tubular Structures Rigidized with Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.; Schnell, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Inflatable tubular structures that have annular cross sections rigidized with foams, and the means of erecting such structures in the field, are undergoing development. Although the development effort has focused on lightweight structural booms to be transported in compact form and deployed in outer space, the principles of design and fabrication are also potentially applicable to terrestrial structures, including components of ultralightweight aircraft, lightweight storage buildings and shelters, lightweight insulation, and sales displays. The use of foams to deploy and harden inflatable structures was first proposed as early as the 1960s, and has been investigated in recent years by NASA, the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, industry, and academia. In cases of deployable booms, most of the investigation in recent years has focused on solid cross sections, because they can be constructed relatively easily. However, solid-section foam-filled booms can be much too heavy for some applications. In contrast, booms with annular cross sections according to the present innovation can be tailored to obtain desired combinations of stiffness and weight through choice of diameters, wall thicknesses, and foam densities. By far the most compelling advantage afforded by this innovation is the possibility of drastically reducing weights while retaining or increasing the stiffnesses, relative to comparable booms that have solid foamfilled cross sections. A typical boom according to this innovation includes inner and outer polyimide film sleeves to contain foam that is injected between them during deployment.

  20. Rigid multipodal platforms for metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Valášek, Michal; Lindner, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Summary In this review the recent progress in molecular platforms that form rigid and well-defined contact to a metal surface are discussed. Most of the presented examples have at least three anchoring units in order to control the spatial arrangement of the protruding molecular subunit. Another interesting feature is the lateral orientation of these foot structures which, depending on the particular application, is equally important as the spatial arrangement of the molecules. The numerous approaches towards assembling and organizing functional molecules into specific architectures on metal substrates are reviewed here. Particular attention is paid to variations of both, the core structures and the anchoring groups. Furthermore, the analytical methods enabling the investigation of individual molecules as well as monomolecular layers of ordered platform structures are summarized. The presented multipodal platforms bearing several anchoring groups form considerably more stable molecule–metal contacts than corresponding monopodal analogues and exhibit an enlarged separation of the functional molecules due to the increased footprint, as well as restrict tilting of the functional termini with respect to the metal surface. These platforms are thus ideally suited to tune important properties of the molecule–metal interface. On a single-molecule level, several of these platforms enable the control over the arrangement of the protruding rod-type molecular structures (e.g., molecular wires, switches, rotors, sensors) with respect to the surface of the substrate. PMID:27335731

  1. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schutzius, Thomas M; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces. PMID:26536959

  2. Rigid body cable for virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Servin, Martin; Lacoursière, Claude

    2008-01-01

    The present paper addresses real-time simulation of cables for virtual environments. A faithful physical model based on constrained rigid bodies is introduced and discretized. The performance and stability of the numerical method are analyzed in details and found to meet the requirements of interactive heavy hoisting simulations. The physical model is well behaved in the limit of infinite stiffness as well as in the elastic regime, and the tuning parameters correspond directly to conventional material constants. The integration scheme mixes the well known Störmer-Verlet method for the dynamics equations with the linearly implicit Euler method for the constraint equations and enables physical constraint relaxation and stabilization terms. The technique is shown to have superior numerical stability properties in comparison with either chain link systems, or spring and damper models. Experimental results are presented to show that the method results in stable, real-time simulations. Stability persists for moderately large fixed integration step of Delta t = 1/60 s, with hoisting loads of up to 10(5) times heavier than the elements of the cable. Further numerical experiments validating the physical model are also presented. PMID:18467754

  3. The rigidity of three flavor quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rishi; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Cold three flavor quark matter at large (but not asymptotically large) densities may exist in a crystalline color superconducting phase. These phases are characterized by a gap parameter {Delta} that varies periodieally in space, forming a crystal structure. A Ginzburg-Landau expansion in {Delta} shows that two crystal structures based on cubic symetry are particularly favorable, and may be the ground state of matter at densities present in neutron star cores. We derive the effective action for the phonon fields that describe space-and time-dependent fluctuations of the crystal structure formed by {Delta}, and obtain the shear modulus from the coefficients of the spatial derivative terms. Within a Ginzburg-Landau approximation, we find shear moduli which are 20 to 1000 times larger than those of neutron star crusts. This phase ofmatter is thus more rigid than any known material in the universe, but at the same time the crystalline color superconducting phase is also superftuid. These properties raise the possibility that the presence of this phase within neutron stars may have distinct implications for their phenomenology. For example, (some) pulsar glitches may originate in crystalline superconducting neutron star cores.

  4. Sextic potential for \\gamma -rigid prolate nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buganu, P.; Budaca, R.

    2015-10-01

    The equation of the Bohr-Mottelson Hamiltonian with a sextic oscillator potential is solved for γ -rigid prolate nuclei. The associated shape phase space is reduced to three variables which are exactly separated. The angular equation has the spherical harmonic functions as solutions, while the β equation is converted to the quasi-exactly solvable case of the sextic oscillator potential with a centrifugal barrier. The energies and the corresponding wave functions are given in closed form and depend, up to a scaling factor, on a single parameter. The {0}+ and {2}+ states are exactly determined, having an important role in the assignment of some ambiguous states for the experimental β bands. Due to the special properties of the sextic potential, the model can simulate, by varying the free parameter, a shape phase transition from a harmonic to an anharmonic prolate β -soft rotor crossing through a critical point. Numerical applications are performed for 39 nuclei: {}98-108Ru, {}{100,102}Mo, {}116-130Xe, {}{132,134}Ce, {}146-150Nd, {}{150,152}Sm, {}{152,154}Gd, {}{154,156}Dy, 172Os, {}180-196Pt, 190Hg and 222Ra. The best candidates for the critical point are found to be 104Ru and {}{120,126}Xe, followed closely by 128Xe, 172Os, 196Pt and 148Nd.

  5. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Mohammad K; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M

    2014-10-14

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  6. Dynamic soil pressures on rigid cylindrical vaults

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H )

    1993-02-01

    A critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and the associated forces induced by ground shaking on an upright, circular, rigid vault that is embedded in a uniform viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and infinite extent in the horizontal plane. Both the vault and the stratum are presumed to be supported on a non- deformable base undergoing a space-invariant, uniform horizontal motion. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. Simple approximate expressions for the responses of the system are formulated, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the underlying response mechanisms and the effects and relative importance of the various parameters involved. The parameters investigated include the height to radius ratio for the vault, the conditions at the vault-medium interface, and the material properties of the stratum. In addition to valuable insights into the response of the particular system being examined, the results presented provide a conceptual framework for the analysis and interpretation of solutions for more involved systems as well.

  7. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutzius, Thomas M.; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces.

  8. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  9. Flow past 2-D Hemispherical Rigid Canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel

    2013-11-01

    The flow past a 2-dimensional rigid hemispherical shape is investigated using PIV. Flow field measurements and images were generated with the use of a Thermoflow® apparatus. Results of this study are compared to prior work (APS DFD 2012 Session E9.00003) which employed CFD to investigate the flow in the near wake of hemispherical parachutes. The various sized gaps/open areas were positioned at distinct locations. The work presented here is part of a larger research project to investigate flow fields in deceleration devices and parachutes. Understanding the pitch-stability of parachutes is essential for accurate design and implementation of these deceleration devices but they present a difficult system to analyze. The flexibility of the parachute fabric results in large variations in the parachute geometry leading to complex fluid-structure interactions. Such flow, combined with flow through gaps and open areas, has been postulated to shed alternating vortices causing pitching/oscillations of the canopy. The results presented provide some insight into which geometric features affect vortex shedding and may enable the redesign of the baseline parachute to minimize instabilities.

  10. Rigid multipodal platforms for metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valášek, Michal; Lindner, Marcin; Mayor, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In this review the recent progress in molecular platforms that form rigid and well-defined contact to a metal surface are discussed. Most of the presented examples have at least three anchoring units in order to control the spatial arrangement of the protruding molecular subunit. Another interesting feature is the lateral orientation of these foot structures which, depending on the particular application, is equally important as the spatial arrangement of the molecules. The numerous approaches towards assembling and organizing functional molecules into specific architectures on metal substrates are reviewed here. Particular attention is paid to variations of both, the core structures and the anchoring groups. Furthermore, the analytical methods enabling the investigation of individual molecules as well as monomolecular layers of ordered platform structures are summarized. The presented multipodal platforms bearing several anchoring groups form considerably more stable molecule-metal contacts than corresponding monopodal analogues and exhibit an enlarged separation of the functional molecules due to the increased footprint, as well as restrict tilting of the functional termini with respect to the metal surface. These platforms are thus ideally suited to tune important properties of the molecule-metal interface. On a single-molecule level, several of these platforms enable the control over the arrangement of the protruding rod-type molecular structures (e.g., molecular wires, switches, rotors, sensors) with respect to the surface of the substrate. PMID:27335731

  11. Quantification is Neither Necessary Nor Sufficient for Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Luca; Maul, Andrew; Torres Irribarra, David; Wilson, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Being an infrastructural, widespread activity, measurement is laden with stereotypes. Some of these concern the role of measurement in the relation between quality and quantity. In particular, it is sometimes argued or assumed that quantification is necessary for measurement; it is also sometimes argued or assumed that quantification is sufficient for or synonymous with measurement. To assess the validity of these positions the concepts of measurement and quantitative evaluation should be independently defined and their relationship analyzed. We contend that the defining characteristic of measurement should be the structure of the process, not a feature of its results. Under this perspective, quantitative evaluation is neither sufficient nor necessary for measurement.

  12. Is the Supply of Mathematics and Science Teachers Sufficient?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Richard M.; Perda, David

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to empirically ground the debate over mathematics and science teacher shortages and evaluate the extent to which there is, or is not, sufficient supply of teachers in these fields. The authors' analyses of nationally representative data from multiple sources show that math and science are the fields most difficult to staff, but…

  13. Online Learning in Higher Education: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Cher Ping

    2005-01-01

    The spectacular development of information and communication technologies through the Internet has provided opportunities for students to explore the virtual world of information. In this article, the author discusses the necessary and sufficient conditions for successful online learning in educational institutions. The necessary conditions…

  14. Sufficient observables for large-scale structure in galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carron, J.; Szapudi, I.

    2014-03-01

    Beyond the linear regime, the power spectrum and higher order moments of the matter field no longer capture all cosmological information encoded in density fluctuations. While non-linear transforms have been proposed to extract this information lost to traditional methods, up to now, the way to generalize these techniques to discrete processes was unclear; ad hoc extensions had some success. We pointed out in Carron and Szapudi's paper that the logarithmic transform approximates extremely well the optimal `sufficient statistics', observables that extract all information from the (continuous) matter field. Building on these results, we generalize optimal transforms to discrete galaxy fields. We focus our calculations on the Poisson sampling of an underlying lognormal density field. We solve and test the one-point case in detail, and sketch out the sufficient observables for the multipoint case. Moreover, we present an accurate approximation to the sufficient observables in terms of the mean and spectrum of a non-linearly transformed field. We find that the corresponding optimal non-linear transformation is directly related to the maximum a posteriori Bayesian reconstruction of the underlying continuous field with a lognormal prior as put forward in the paper of Kitaura et al.. Thus, simple recipes for realizing the sufficient observables can be built on previously proposed algorithms that have been successfully implemented and tested in simulations.

  15. Housing Policy and Family Self-Sufficiency. Background Briefing Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, Rachel

    The relationship between housing and family well-being and self-sufficiency are explored in this paper's three major sections. The first section provides background information on the relationship between housing and the physical and social well-being of individuals and families and describes the major federal housing initiatives that have been…

  16. Leadership, the Logic of Sufficiency and the Sustainability of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottery, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The notion of sufficiency has not yet entered mainstream educational thinking, and it still has to make its mark upon educational leadership. However, a number of related concepts--particularly those of sustainability and complexity theory--are beginning to be noticed. This article examines these two concepts and uses them to critique the…

  17. Hawaii's energy self-sufficiency program from renewable energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    The need for public support for incentives to accelerate commercialization of renewable energy sources is discussed from the viewpoint of the Hawaiian program to use the state's wind, solar, geothermal, and OTEC resources to achieve energy self-sufficiency. The objectives and major events in the research, development and demonstration and implementation programs and related activities are described. (LEW)

  18. Intellectual Freedom and Economic Sufficiency as Educational Entitlements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Jane Fowler

    2001-01-01

    Using the theories of John Stuart Mill and Karl Marx, this article supports the educational entitlements of intellectual freedom and economic sufficiency. Explores these issues in reference to their implications for teaching, the teaching profession and its training. Concludes that ideas cannot be controlled by the interests of the dominant class.…

  19. The Indochinese in America: Progress Towards Self Sufficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finck, John

    Despite suspicion in some quarters that refugee resettlement has been unduly expensive, evidence indicates that the Indochinese have made steady progress toward self-sufficiency. The majority of Hmong refugees in Providence, Rhode Island, for example, which has been "heavily impacted" by the large number of Indochinese who have become its newest…

  20. Exploring Necessary and Sufficient Conditions in Dynamic Geometry Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Allen; Chan, Yip-Cheung

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a possible dragging experiment in a dynamic geometry environment (DGE) that explores a necessary and sufficient condition for cyclic quadrilateral. The dragging modalities identified by Arzarello, Olivero, Paola, and Robutti (2002) and the functions of variation realized in DGE discussed by Leung (2003) will be used as tools…

  1. Recent Widows' Kin Support and Orientations to Self-Sufficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Bryant, Shirley L.; Morgan, Leslie A.

    1990-01-01

    Data on recently widowed women suggest that many are quite self-sufficient; however, in areas where support is needed, they largely rely on children. Widows' past experiences and attitudes toward independence influenced amount of overall help they received, whereas income, number of children, and perceived willingness of children to help affected…

  2. Nematic order by elastic interactions and cellular rigidity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, B. M.; Safran, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    We predict spontaneous nematic order in an ensemble of active force generators with elastic interactions as a minimal model for early nematic alignment of short stress fibers in non-motile, adhered cells. Mean-field theory is formally equivalent to Maier-Saupe theory for a nematic liquid. However, the elastic interactions are long-ranged (and thus depend on cell shape and matrix elasticity) and originate in cell activity. Depending on the density of force generators, we find two regimes of cellular rigidity sensing for which orientational, nematic order of stress fibers depends on matrix rigidity either in a step-like manner or with a maximum at an optimal rigidity.

  3. Fabrication of rigid microstructures with thiol-ene-based soft lithography for continuous-flow cell lysis

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeffrey M.; Pandit, Kunal R.; Goertz, John P.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a method for the soft-lithography-based fabrication of rigid microstructures and a new, simple bonding technique for use as a continuous-flow cell lysis device. While on-chip cell lysis techniques have been reported previously, these techniques generally require a long on-chip residence time, and thus cannot be performed in a rapid, continuous-flow manner. Microstructured microfluidic devices can perform mechanical lysis of cells, enabling continuous-flow lysis; however, rigid silicon-based devices require complex and expensive fabrication of each device, while polydimethylsiloxane (PMDS), the most common material used for soft lithography fabrication, is not rigid and expands under the pressures required, resulting in poor lysis performance. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of microfluidic microstructures from off-stoichiometry thiol-ene (OSTE) polymer using soft-lithography replica molding combined with a post-assembly cure for easy bonding. With finite element simulations, we show that the rigid microstructures generate an energy dissipation rate of nearly 107, which is sufficient for continuous-flow cell lysis. Correspondingly, with the OSTE device we achieve lysis of highly deformable MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells at a rate of 85%, while a comparable PDMS device leads to a lysis rate of only 40%. PMID:25538814

  4. A stable fluid-structure-interaction solver for low-density rigid bodies using the immersed boundary projection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lācis, Uǧis; Taira, Kunihiko; Bagheri, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Dispersion of low-density rigid particles with complex geometries is ubiquitous in both natural and industrial environments. We show that while explicit methods for coupling the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and Newton's equations of motion are often sufficient to solve for the motion of cylindrical particles with low density ratios, for more complex particles - such as a body with a protrusion - they become unstable. We present an implicit formulation of the coupling between rigid body dynamics and fluid dynamics within the framework of the immersed boundary projection method. Similarly to previous work on this method, the resulting matrix equation in the present approach is solved using a block-LU decomposition. Each step of the block-LU decomposition is modified to incorporate the rigid body dynamics. We show that our method achieves second-order accuracy in space and first-order in time (third-order for practical settings), only with a small additional computational cost to the original method. Our implicit coupling yields stable solution for density ratios as low as 10-4. We also consider the influence of fictitious fluid located inside the rigid bodies on the accuracy and stability of our method.

  5. Comparative costs of flexible package cells and rigid cells for lithium-ionhybrid electric vehicle batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P. A.; Jansen, A. N.

    2006-11-28

    We conducted a design study to compare the manufacturing costs at a level of 100,000 hybrid vehicle batteries per year for flexible package (Flex) cells and for rigid aluminum container (Rigid) cells. Initially, the Rigid cells were considered to have welded closures and to be deep-drawn containers of about the same shape as the Flex cells. As the study progressed, the method of fabricating and sealing the Rigid cells was expanded to include lower cost options including double seaming and other mechanically fastened closures with polymer sealants. Both types of batteries were designed with positive electrodes containing Li(Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3})O{sub 2} and graphite negative electrodes. The use of a different combination of lithium-ion electrodes would have little effect on the difference in costs for the two types of cells. We found that 20-Ah cells could be designed with excellent performance and heat rejection capabilities for either type of cell. Many parts in the design of the Flex cells are identical or nearly identical to those of the Rigid Cell, so for these features there would be no difference in the cost of manufacturing the two types of batteries. We judged the performance, size and weight of the batteries to be sufficiently similar that the batteries would have the same value for their application. Some of the design features of the Flex cells were markedly different than those of the deep-drawn and welded Rigid cells and would result in significant cost savings. Fabrication and processing steps for which the Flex cells appear to have a cost advantage over these Rigid cells are (1) container fabrication and sealing, (2) terminal fabrication and sealing, and (3) intercell connections. The costs of providing cooling channels adjacent to the cells and for module and battery hardware appear to favor Rigid cell batteries slightly. Overall, Flex cell batteries appear to have an advantage of about $1.20-$3.70 per cell for a 25-kW Battery of 20

  6. The EINSTEIN-VARIĆAK Correspondence on Relativistic Rigid Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Tilman

    2008-09-01

    The historical significance of the problem of relativistic rigid rotation is reviewed in light of recently published correspondence between Einstein and the mathematician Vladimir Varićak from the years 1909 to 1913.

  7. 13. VIEW OF CAUSEWAY, LOOKING EAST, PROFILING DETAILS OF RIGID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF CAUSEWAY, LOOKING EAST, PROFILING DETAILS OF RIGID FRAME SPAN OVER CANAL STREET, AND SHOWING STEEL RIBS AND FLOOR BEANS ENCASED IN CONCRETE - Notre Dame Bridge, Spanning Merrimack River on Bridge Street, Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH

  8. Entrepreneurship by any other name: self-sufficiency versus innovation.

    PubMed

    Parker Harris, Sarah; Caldwell, Kate; Renko, Maija

    2014-01-01

    Entrepreneurship has been promoted as an innovative strategy to address the employment of people with disabilities. Research has predominantly focused on the self-sufficiency aspect without fully integrating entrepreneurship literature in the areas of theory, systems change, and demonstration projects. Subsequently there are gaps in services, policies, and research in this field that, in turn, have limited our understanding of the support needs and barriers or facilitators of entrepreneurs with disabilities. A thorough analysis of the literature in these areas led to the development of two core concepts that need to be addressed in integrating entrepreneurship into disability employment research and policy: clarity in operational definitions and better disability statistics and outcome measures. This article interrogates existing research and policy efforts in this regard to argue for a necessary shift in the field from focusing on entrepreneurship as self-sufficiency to understanding entrepreneurship as innovation. PMID:25225770

  9. Retinal flow is sufficient for steering during observer rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Warren, William H Jr

    2002-01-01

    How do people control locomotion while their eyes are simultaneously rotating? A previous study found that during simulated rotation, they can perceive a straight path of self-motion from the retinal flow pattern, despite conflicting extraretinal information, on the basis of dense motion parallax and reference objects. Here we report that the same information is sufficient for active control ofjoystick steering. Participants steered toward a target in displays that simulated a pursuit eye movement. Steering was highly inaccurate with a textured ground plane (motion parallax alone), but quite accurate when an array of posts was added (motion parallax plus reference objects). This result is consistent with the theory that instantaneous heading is determined from motion parallax, and the path of self-motion is determined by updating heading relative to environmental objects. Retinal flow is thus sufficient for both perceiving self-motion and controlling self-motion with a joystick; extraretinal and positional information can also contribute, but are not necessary.

  10. Efficiency, sufficiency, and recent change in Newfoundland subsistence horticulture

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, J.T.

    1986-09-01

    Traditional Newfoundland horticulture has been a subordinate and compensatory element of the subsistence sphere in a plural economy centered on fishing. Criticized as inefficient and ruinous to the land, this tuber-rootbrassica gardening has in fact been a valuable contribution to diet, is relatively efficient, and compensates for the inadequacies of land and weather. Field data from the Great Northern Peninsula, where some traditional practices persist, demonstrate that the practices conserve time and labor, and substitute massive applications of materials to assure a yield sufficient for household needs. The inefficiency in the tradition may be understood as a response to the constraints upon household labor and follows a kind of Leibig's law of the minimum. Recent changes in gardening practices reveal the dynamics of horticulture in the household's mixed economic strategy. As cash and land have become more common, they have been used to further reduce time while maintaining sufficiency.

  11. Energy and momentum conserving algorithms for rigid body contact

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M.A.; Zywicz, E.

    1998-04-09

    Energy-momentum conserving methods are developed for rigid body dynamics with contact. Because these methods are unconditionally stable, they are not time step dependent and, hence, are well suited for incorporation into structural mechanics finite element codes. Both penalty and Lagrange multiplier methods are developed herein and are the extension of the energy-momentum conserving integration schemes for rigid bodies given by Simo and Wong [1].

  12. Extracting DNA Twist Rigidity from Experimental Supercoiling Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirch, Sébastien

    2004-11-01

    We use an elastic rod model with contact to study the extension versus rotation diagrams of single supercoiled DNA molecules. We reproduce quantitatively the supercoiling response of overtwisted DNA and, using experimental data, we obtain an estimate of the effective supercoiling radius and of the twist rigidity of B-DNA. We find that the twist rigidity of DNA seems to vary widely with the nature and concentration of the salt buffer in which it is immersed.

  13. Predictive sufficiency and the use of stored internal state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musliner, David J.; Durfee, Edmund H.; Shin, Kang G.

    1994-01-01

    In all embedded computing systems, some delay exists between sensing and acting. By choosing an action based on sensed data, a system is essentially predicting that there will be no significant changes in the world during this delay. However, the dynamic and uncertain nature of the real world can make these predictions incorrect, and thus, a system may execute inappropriate actions. Making systems more reactive by decreasing the gap between sensing and action leaves less time for predictions to err, but still provides no principled assurance that they will be correct. Using the concept of predictive sufficiency described in this paper, a system can prove that its predictions are valid, and that it will never execute inappropriate actions. In the context of our CIRCA system, we also show how predictive sufficiency allows a system to guarantee worst-case response times to changes in its environment. Using predictive sufficiency, CIRCA is able to build real-time reactive control plans which provide a sound basis for performance guarantees that are unavailable with other reactive systems.

  14. Design requirements for rigid printed wiring boards and assemblies. NASA Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The NASA requirements for assuring reliable rigid printed wiring board design are prescribed. Basic considerations necessary to assure reliable rigid printed wiring board design are described and incorporated.

  15. On the inertial motions of liquid-filled rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzone, Giusy; Galdi, Giovanni; Zunino, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    We consider a rigid body with a cavity completely filled by a viscous liquid and study the inertial motions of the system liquid-filled rigid body S . The equations governing the motion of this coupled system are given by the Navier-Stokes equations and the equations of the balance of the total angular momentum of S in absence of external forces and torques. Given any initial motion to the coupled system, characterized by an initial relative velocity of the fluid and an initial total angular momentum, we give a complete description of the behavior that the system liquid-filled rigid body will show at large times. From both analytical and numerical viewpoints, we are able to prove a longstanding conjecture stated by Zhukovskii, namely that S will eventually reach a steady state which is a rigid body permanent rotation. In other words, the liquid goes to rest with respect to the rigid body and the coupled system will rotate as a whole rigid body, with a constant angular velocity that is directed along one of the principal axes of inertia of the system.

  16. Rigidity of various fixation methods used as dental splints.

    PubMed

    Oikarinen, K; Andreasen, J O; Andreasen, F M

    1992-06-01

    Horizontal and vertical rigidity of teeth fixed with seven types of dental splints were evaluated by two tooth mobility measuring devices. Altogether 21 dissected sheep mandibles including soft tissues were used for the experiments in which Fermit, flexible wire-composite, Kevlar, Fiber, Protemp, rigid wire-composite and Triad Gel splints were applied to four incisors. The mean rigidity of the central incisors within the splint was measured by means of Mühlemann periodontometer (horizontal mobility) and Periotest (horizontal and vertical mobilities). Mobility values of teeth before splinting were used as covariants and the values with the splints were illustrated as adjusted mobility. Statistical significance between the rigidity of various splints was analyzed by an unpaired t-test. It was shown that the most rigid splints both in horizontal and vertical directions were Triad Gel, rigid wire-composite and Fermit splints. Kevlar and Fiber splint allowed more horizontal movement than other splints. Protemp and flexible wire-composite splints proved to produce adequate lateral support for the fixed teeth and allowed vertical flexibility which is experimentally known to improve periodontal healing of luxated teeth. PMID:1289069

  17. The coupling VIV analysis of SCRs with rigid swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Huang, Weiping

    2015-08-01

    With the development of deepwater oil and gas exploration, Steel Catenary Risers (SCRs) become preferred risers for resource production, import and export. Vortex induced vibration (VIV) is the key problem encountered in the design of SCRs. In this study, a new model, the rigid swing model, is proposed based on the consideration of large curvature of SCRs. The sag bend of SCRs is assumed as a rigid swing system around the axis from the hanging point to the touch down point (TDP) in the model. The torque, produced by the lift force and the swing vector, provides the driving torque for the swing system, and the weight of SCRs provides the restoring torque. The simulated response of rigid swing is coupled with bending vibration, and then the coupling VIV model of SCRs is studied in consideration of bending vibration and rigid motion. The calculated results indicate that the rigid swing has a magnitude equal to that of bending vibration, and the rigid motion affects the dynamic response of SCRs and can not be neglected in the VIV analysis.

  18. Technology for human self-sufficiency in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    A proposed Pathfinder program would determine the critical human and technology requirements for human self-sufficiency and productivity on manned and long-duration missions to the moon and Mars. Human health would require countermeasures against weightlessness, protection from space radiation and habitats conducive to psychological well-being. Life support systems would need regeneration of expendable resources, power systems for plant life support and processing; and microbial contaminant control. Operational performance requirements include extravehicular activities suit, interactive systems for shared control between humans and computers, and human-centered semi-autonomous systems.

  19. Is recurrent processing necessary and/or sufficient for consciousness?

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; van Boxtel, Jeroen J A

    2010-09-01

    Abstract Abstract While we agree with Lamme's general framework, we are not so convinced by his mapping between psychological concepts with their underlying neuronal mechanisms. Specifically, we doubt if recurrent processing is either necessary or sufficient for consciousness. A gist of a scene may be consciously perceived by purely feedforward, without recurrent, processing. Neurophysiological studies of perceptual suppression show recurrent processing in visual cortex for consciously invisible objects. While the neuronal correlates of attention and consciousness remain to be clarified, we agree with Lamme that these two processes are independent, evinced by our recent demonstration of opposing effects of attention and consciousness. PMID:24168345

  20. Vitamin D sufficiency and Staphylococcus aureus infection in children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jeffrey W; Hogan, Patrick G; Hunstad, David A; Fritz, Stephanie A

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D promotes epithelial immunity by upregulating antimicrobial peptides, including LL-37, which have bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus. We found that children with vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D <30 ng/mL] were more likely to present with recurrent, rather than primary, S. aureus skin or soft tissue infection. Vitamin D sufficiency may be one of a myriad of host and environmental factors that can be directly impacted to reduce the frequency of S. aureus skin and soft tissue infection. PMID:25860535

  1. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed Central

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions. PMID:12223827

  2. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions. PMID:12223827

  3. Assessment of sagittal split ramus osteotomy rigid internal fixation techniques using a finite element method.

    PubMed

    Albougha, S; Darwich, K; Darwich, M A; Albogha, M H

    2015-07-01

    In this study, finite element analysis (FEA) was used to evaluate nine rigid internal fixation techniques for sagittal split ramus osteotomy. To achieve this, a computed tomography (CT) scan of a healthy patient was obtained and used to generate the geometry of a half-mandible. The geometries of bicortical screws, miniplates, and monocortical screws were designed and combined with the mandible in nine models simulating various techniques. Four models used bicortical screws in various arrangements and four used miniplates of various designs. One model represented a hybrid technique. A load of 500 N was applied to the posterior teeth and FEA was applied. The most stable techniques were the hybrid technique and a single straight miniplate, presenting the least displacement among all models. Bicortical screws, while presenting reasonable stability, showed high strain areas near the anterior ramus ridge, superoposterior to the screws, implying a risk of bone fracture in this area. On the other hand, the T-shaped and double Y-shaped miniplates were associated with high von Mises stresses that would impair their rigidity, especially where angles appeared in their designs. We recommend the use of a single straight miniplate because it provides sufficient stable fixation with minimal risks or disadvantages. PMID:25766461

  4. SHED: A program for three-dimensional, rigid body, shroud ejection dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, D.J.

    1988-03-01

    The computer program SHED (for SHroud Ejection Dynamics) which calculates the exoatmospheric trajectory of a missile shroud is described. This rigid body dynamics program follows the motion of the shroud as its motors accelerate it ahead and away form the missile. Of particular interest is the ability of SHED to accommodate the forces produced by the motors which are ''fixed'' to the body in the sense that they both translate and rotate along with the body. The code as written has the following capabilities: The resulting program can accommodate an arbitrary number of motors, arranged in an arbitrary manner on the shroud, and each imposing an arbitrary schedule of thrust; The shroud may have any arbitrary shape; and Guides can be accommodated which protect the payload by preventing shroud rotation or lateral motion until the shroud has passed over the guide. Limitations are that all bodies are assumed to be rigid and aerodynamic loads are not included. SHED has proven itself sufficiently robust and versatile to permit a critical comparison of a large range of shroud separation strategies in selecting a separation strategy for the Strategic TARgeting System (STARS) funded by the Army SDI Office. 8 refs., 9 figs.

  5. NON-RIGID IMAGE REGISTRATION BASED STRAIN ESTIMATOR FOR INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND ELASTOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Michael S.; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound elastography (IVUSe) could improve the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease by revealing vulnerable plaques through their mechanical tissue properties. To improve the performance of IVUSe, we developed and implemented a non-rigid image-registration method to visualize the radial and circumferential component of strain within vascular tissues. We evaluated the algorithm’s performance with four initialization schemes using simulated and experimentally acquired ultrasound images. Applying the registration method to radio-frequency (RF) echo frames improved the accuracy of displacements compared to when B-mode images were employed. However, strain elastograms measured from RF echo frames produce erroneous results when both the zero-initialization method and the mesh-refinement scheme were employed. For most strain levels, the cross-correlation-initialization method produced the best performance. The simulation study predicted that elastograms obtained from vessels with average strains in the range of 3%–5% should have high elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe)–on the order of 4.5 and 7.5 for the radial and circumferential components of strain, respectively. The preliminary in vivo validation study (phantom and an atherosclerotic rabbit) demonstrated that the non-rigid registration method could produce useful radial and circumferential strain elastograms under realistic physiologic conditions. The results of this investigation were sufficiently encouraging to warrant a more comprehensive in vivo validation. PMID:23245827

  6. Photon underproduction crisis: Are QSOs sufficient to resolve it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaire, Vikram; Srianand, Raghunathan

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the recent claim of `photon underproduction crisis' by Kollmeier et al. which suggests that the known sources of ultraviolet (UV) radiation may not be sufficient to generate the inferred H I photoionization rate (Γ _{H I}) in the low-redshift intergalactic medium. Using the updated QSO emissivities from the recent studies and our cosmological radiative transfer code developed to estimate the UV background, we show that the QSO contributions to Γ _{H I} is higher by a factor ˜2 as compared to the previous estimates. Using self-consistently computed combinations of star formation rate density and dust attenuation, we show that a typical UV escape fraction of 4 per cent from star-forming galaxies should be sufficient to explain the inferred Γ _{H I} by Kollmeier et al. Interestingly, we find that the contribution from QSOs alone can explain the recently inferred Γ _{H I} by Shull et al. which used the same observational data but different simulation. Therefore, we conclude that the crisis is not as severe as it was perceived before and there seems no need to look for alternate explanations such as low luminosity hidden QSOs or decaying dark matter particles.

  7. A theoretical evaluation of rigid baffles in suppression of combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, M. R.; Mitchell, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical technique for the prediction of the effects of rigid baffles on the stability of liquid propellant combustors is presented. A three dimensional combustor model characterized by a concentrated combustion source at the chamber injector and a constant Mach number nozzle is used. The linearized partial differential equations describing the unsteady flow field are solved by an eigenfunction matching method. Boundary layer corrections to this unsteady flow are used to evaluate viscous and turbulence effects within the flow. An integral stability relationship is then employed to predict the decay rate of the oscillations. Results show that sufficient dissipation exists to indicate that the proper mechanism of baffle damping is a fluid dynamic loss. The response of the dissipation model to varying baffle blade length, mean flow Mach number and oscillation amplitude is examined.

  8. Theoretical evaluation of rigid baffles in the suppression of combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, M. R.; Mitchell, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical technique for the prediction of the effects of rigid baffles on the stability of liquid propellant combustors is presented. This analysis employs both two and three dimensional combustor models characterized by concentrated combustion sources at the chamber injector and a constant Mach number nozzle. An eigenfunction-matching method is used to solve the linearized partial differential equations describing the unsteady flow field for both models. Boundary layer corrections to this unsteady flow are in a mechanical energy dissipation model to evaluate viscous and turbulence effects within the flow. An integral instability relationship is then employed to predict the decay rate of the oscillations. Results of this analysis agree qualitatively with experimental observations and show that sufficient dissipation exists to indicate that the proper mechanism of baffle damping is a fluid dynamic loss. The response of the dissipation model to varying baffle blade length, mean flow Mach number, oscillation amplitude, baffle configuration, and oscillation mode is examined.

  9. Method of preparing porous, rigid ceramic separators for an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Bandyopadhyay, Gautam; Dusek, Joseph T.

    1981-01-01

    Porous, rigid separators for electrochemical cells are prepared by first calcining particles of ceramic material at temperatures above about 1200.degree. C. for a sufficient period of time to reduce the sinterability of the particles. A ceramic powder that has not been calcined is blended with the original powder to control the porosity of the completed separator. The ceramic blend is then pressed into a sheet of the desired shape and sintered at a temperature somewhat lower than the calcination temperature. Separator sheets of about 1 to 2.5 mm thickness and 30 to 70% porosity can be prepared by this technique. Ceramics such as yttria, magnesium oxide and magnesium-aluminum oxide have advantageously been used to form separators by this method.

  10. Sound scattering by rigid oblate spheroids, with implication to pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.; Seiner, J.; Norum, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The frequency limit below which sound scattering by a microphone body is sufficiently small to permit accurate pressure gradient measurements was determined. The sound pressure was measured at various points on the surface of a rigid oblate spheroid illuminated by spherical waves generated by a point source at a large distance from the spheroid, insuring an essentially plane sound field. The measurements were made with small pressure microphones flush mounted from the inside of the spheroid model. Numerical solutions were obtained for a variety of spheroid shapes, including that of the experimental model. Very good agreement was achieved between the experimental and theoretical results. It was found that scattering effects are insignificant if the ratio of the major circumference of the spheroid to the wavelength of the incident sound is less than about 0.7, this number being dependent upon the shape of the spheroid. This finding can be utilized in the design of pressure gradient microphones.

  11. Method of preparing porous, rigid ceramic separators for an electrochemical cell. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Bandyopadhyay, G.; Dusek, J.T.

    Porous, rigid separators for electrochemical cells are prepared by first calcining particles of ceramic material at temperatures above about 1200/sup 0/C for a sufficient period of time to reduce the sinterability of the particles. A ceramic powder that has not been calcined is blended with the original powder to control the porosity of the completed separator. The ceramic blend is then pressed into a sheet of the desired shape and sintered at a temperature somewhat lower than the calcination temperature. Separator sheets of about 1 to 2.5 mm thickness and 30 to 70% porosity can be prepared by this technique. Ceramics such as yttria, magnesium oxide, and magnesium-aluminium oxide have advantageously been used to form separators by this method.

  12. Hybrid rigid/soft and biologic/synthetic materials: polymers grafted onto cellulose microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Harrisson, Simon; Drisko, Glenna L; Malmström, Eva; Hult, Anders; Wooley, Karen L

    2011-04-11

    Rigid nanoscale polymer rods were prepared by grafting preformed amine-terminated poly(styrene) and poly(tert-butyl acrylate) onto oxidized cellulose microcrystals. Low polydispersity polymers, grown using atom transfer radical polymerization, were characterized and purified prior to cellulose attachment. Oxidation of the cellulose microcrystal led to the formation of carboxylic acids on the surface of the microcrystals. Covalent attachment of the polymers onto the cellulose microcrystals was achieved via a carbodiimide-mediated amidation reaction. The length and diameter of the polymer-cellulose composites increased upon surface modification. Typically, polymer-cellulose composites are synthesized by a grafting-from method because it can be difficult to obtain sufficient graft density using a grafting-to preparation. However, the composites reported here comprised 60-64% grafted polymer by mass. This degree of grafting-to allowed the composite to form stable suspensions in organic solvents. PMID:21381766

  13. Rigid levitation and suspension of high-temperature superconductors by magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, E.H. )

    1990-01-01

    A high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductor floating freely above a magnet of low symmetry remains rigidly suspended in the air in almost any position and orientation as if stuck in an invisible heap of sand. This striking effect is due to pinning of the magnetic flux lines inside the superconductor and is often overlooked, since usually magnets with rotational symmetry are used for levitation. Magnets with rotational symmetry allow for nearly undamped orbiting and rotation of the superconductor about the magnet's symmetry axis. But even in this geometry, flux-line pinning can be seen, since it forces the orbiting superconductor to turn the same face toward the axis. Superconductors with sufficiently strong pinning may even be suspended below a magnet.

  14. Barriers to cooperation aid ideological rigidity and threaten societal collapse.

    PubMed

    Jusup, Marko; Matsuo, Tadasu; Iwasa, Yoh

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the factors that promote, disrupt, or shape the nature of cooperation is one of the main tasks of evolutionary biology. Here, we focus on attitudes and beliefs supportive of in-group favoritism and strict adherence to moral consensus, collectively known as ideological rigidity, that have been linked with both ends of the political spectrum. The presence among the political right and the left is likely to make ideological rigidity a major determinant of the political discourse with an important social function. To better understand this function, we equip the indirect reciprocity framework--widely used to explain evaluation-mediated social cooperation--with multiple stylized value systems, each corresponding to the different degree of ideological rigidity. By running game theoretical simulations, we observe the competitive evolution of these systems, map conditions that lead to more ideologically rigid societies, and identify potentially disastrous outcomes. In particular, we uncover that barriers to cooperation aid ideological rigidity. The society may even polarize to the extent where social parasites overrun the population and cause the complete collapse of the social structure. These results have implications for lawmakers globally, warning against restrictive or protectionist policies. PMID:24809975

  15. Barriers to Cooperation Aid Ideological Rigidity and Threaten Societal Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Jusup, Marko; Matsuo, Tadasu; Iwasa, Yoh

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the factors that promote, disrupt, or shape the nature of cooperation is one of the main tasks of evolutionary biology. Here, we focus on attitudes and beliefs supportive of in-group favoritism and strict adherence to moral consensus, collectively known as ideological rigidity, that have been linked with both ends of the political spectrum. The presence among the political right and the left is likely to make ideological rigidity a major determinant of the political discourse with an important social function. To better understand this function, we equip the indirect reciprocity framework – widely used to explain evaluation-mediated social cooperation – with multiple stylized value systems, each corresponding to the different degree of ideological rigidity. By running game theoretical simulations, we observe the competitive evolution of these systems, map conditions that lead to more ideologically rigid societies, and identify potentially disastrous outcomes. In particular, we uncover that barriers to cooperation aid ideological rigidity. The society may even polarize to the extent where social parasites overrun the population and cause the complete collapse of the social structure. These results have implications for lawmakers globally, warning against restrictive or protectionist policies. PMID:24809975

  16. Packing density of rigid aggregates is independent of scale

    PubMed Central

    Zangmeister, Christopher D.; Radney, James G.; Dockery, Lance T.; Young, Jessica T.; Ma, Xiaofei; You, Rian; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Large planetary seedlings, comets, microscale pharmaceuticals, and nanoscale soot particles are made from rigid, aggregated subunits that are compacted under low compression into larger structures spanning over 10 orders of magnitude in dimensional space. Here, we demonstrate that the packing density (θf) of compacted rigid aggregates is independent of spatial scale for systems under weak compaction. The θf of rigid aggregated structures across six orders of magnitude were measured using nanoscale spherical soot aerosol composed of aggregates with ∼17-nm monomeric subunits and aggregates made from uniform monomeric 6-mm spherical subunits at the macroscale. We find θf = 0.36 ± 0.02 at both dimensions. These values are remarkably similar to θf observed for comet nuclei and measured values of other rigid aggregated systems across a wide variety of spatial and formative conditions. We present a packing model that incorporates the aggregate morphology and show that θf is independent of both monomer and aggregate size. These observations suggest that the θf of rigid aggregates subject to weak compaction forces is independent of spatial dimension across varied formative conditions. PMID:24927577

  17. Maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Peng; Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2012-10-01

    An algorithm is presented to maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. After each unconstrained MD step, the coordinates of selected particles are corrected to maintain rigid structures through an iterative procedure of rotation matrix computation. This algorithm, named as SHAPE and implemented in CHARMM program suite, avoids the calculations of Lagrange multipliers, so that the complexity of computation does not increase with the number of particles in a rigid structure. The implementation of this algorithm does not require significant modification of propagation integrator, and can be plugged into any Cartesian based MD integration scheme. A unique feature of the SHAPE method is that it is interchangeable with SHAKE for any object that can be constrained as a rigid structure using multiple SHAKE constraints. Unlike SHAKE, the SHAPE method can be applied to large linear (with three or more centers) and planar (with four or more centers) rigid bodies. Numerical tests with four model systems including two proteins demonstrate that the accuracy and reliability of the SHAPE method are comparable to the SHAKE method, but with much more applicability and efficiency.

  18. Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) Model for Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Lu, Wei-Yang; Scherzinger, William M.; Hinnerichs, Terry D.; Lo, Chi S.

    2015-06-01

    Numerous experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of several different rigid polyurethane foams (FR3712, PMDI10, PMDI20, and TufFoam35) to large deformation. In these experiments, the effects of load path, loading rate, and temperature were investigated. Results from these experiments indicated that rigid polyurethane foams exhibit significant volumetric and deviatoric plasticity when they are compressed. Rigid polyurethane foams were also found to be very strain-rate and temperature dependent. These foams are also rather brittle and crack when loaded to small strains in tension or to larger strains in compression. Thus, a new Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) model was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Foam Damage to describe the mechanical response of these foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments and experimental findings. Next, development of a UCPD model for rigid, polyurethane foams is described. Selection of material parameters for a variety of rigid polyurethane foams is then discussed and finite element simulations with the new UCPD model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this model.

  19. Non-rigid alignment in electron tomography in materials science.

    PubMed

    Printemps, Tony; Bernier, Nicolas; Bleuet, Pierre; Mula, Guido; Hervé, Lionel

    2016-09-01

    Electron tomography is a key technique that enables the visualization of an object in three dimensions with a resolution of about a nanometre. High-quality 3D reconstruction is possible thanks to the latest compressed sensing algorithms and/or better alignment and preprocessing of the 2D projections. Rigid alignment of 2D projections is routine in electron tomography. However, it cannot correct misalignments induced by (i) deformations of the sample due to radiation damage or (ii) drifting of the sample during the acquisition of an image in scanning transmission electron microscope mode. In both cases, those misalignments can give rise to artefacts in the reconstruction. We propose a simple-to-implement non-rigid alignment technique to correct those artefacts. This technique is particularly suited for needle-shaped samples in materials science. It is initiated by a rigid alignment of the projections and it is then followed by several rigid alignments of different parts of the projections. Piecewise linear deformations are applied to each projection to force them to simultaneously satisfy the rigid alignments of the different parts. The efficiency of this technique is demonstrated on three samples, an intermetallic sample with deformation misalignments due to a high electron dose typical to spectroscopic electron tomography, a porous silicon sample with an extremely thin end particularly sensitive to electron beam and another porous silicon sample that was drifting during image acquisitions. PMID:27018779

  20. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Khoshnood, Atefeh; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for the majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as α -helices and β -sheets have different structural rigidities. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations under thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch, which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semiflexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters, while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional triangular structure, we calculate the lipid density around protein clusters and find that the difference in lipid distribution around rigid and semiflexible proteins determines the one- or two-dimensional nature of aggregates. It is found that lipids move faster around semiflexible proteins than rigid ones. The aggregation mechanism suggested in this paper can be tested by current state-of-the-art experimental facilities.

  1. Non-rigid, but not rigid, motion interferes with the processing of structural face information in developmental prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Maguinness, Corrina; Newell, Fiona N

    2015-04-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that facial motion is an important cue for face recognition. However, it is poorly understood whether motion is integrated with facial form information or whether it provides an independent cue to identity. To provide further insight into this issue, we compared the effect of motion on face perception in two developmental prosopagnosics and age-matched controls. Participants first learned faces presented dynamically (video), or in a sequence of static images, in which rigid (viewpoint) or non-rigid (expression) changes occurred. Immediately following learning, participants were required to match a static face image to the learned face. Test face images varied by viewpoint (Experiment 1) or expression (Experiment 2) and were learned or novel face images. We found similar performance across prosopagnosics and controls in matching facial identity across changes in viewpoint when the learned face was shown moving in a rigid manner. However, non-rigid motion interfered with face matching across changes in expression in both individuals with prosopagnosia compared to the performance of control participants. In contrast, non-rigid motion did not differentially affect the matching of facial expressions across changes in identity for either prosopagnosics (Experiment 3). Our results suggest that whilst the processing of rigid motion information of a face may be preserved in developmental prosopagnosia, non-rigid motion can specifically interfere with the representation of structural face information. Taken together, these results suggest that both form and motion cues are important in face perception and that these cues are likely integrated in the representation of facial identity. PMID:25737056

  2. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  3. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  4. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  5. 21 CFR 886.5918 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens care products... contact lens care products. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens care product is a... rigid gas permeable contact lens. This includes all solutions and tablets used together with rigid...

  6. Variational necessary and sufficient stability conditions for inviscid shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, M.; Morrison, P. J.; Hattori, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A necessary and sufficient condition for linear stability of inviscid parallel shear flow is formulated by developing a novel variational principle, where the velocity profile is assumed to be monotonic and analytic. It is shown that unstable eigenvalues of Rayleigh's equation (which is a non-self-adjoint eigenvalue problem) can be associated with positive eigenvalues of a certain self-adjoint operator. The stability is therefore determined by maximizing a quadratic form, which is theoretically and numerically more tractable than directly solving Rayleigh's equation. This variational stability criterion is based on the understanding of Kreĭn signature for continuous spectra and is applicable to other stability problems of infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. PMID:25484600

  7. Geothermal resource requirements for an energy self-sufficient spaceport

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, P.; Fioravanti, M.; Duchane, D.; Vaughan, A.

    1997-01-01

    Geothermal resources in the southwestern United States provide an opportunity for development of isolated spaceports with local energy self-sufficiency. Geothermal resources can provide both thermal energy and electrical energy for the spaceport facility infrastructure and production of hydrogen fuel for the space vehicles. In contrast to hydrothermal resources by which electric power is generated for sale to utilities, hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resources are more wide-spread and can be more readily developed at desired spaceport locations. This paper reviews a dynamic model used to quantify the HDR resources requirements for a generic spaceport and estimate the necessary reservoir size and heat extraction rate. The paper reviews the distribution of HDR resources in southern California and southern New Mexico, two regions where a first developmental spaceport is likely to be located. Finally, the paper discusses the design of a HDR facility for the generic spaceport and estimates the cost of the locally produced power.

  8. [Vitamin-antioxidant sufficiency of winter sports athletes].

    PubMed

    Beketova, N A; Kosheleva, O V; Pereverzeva, O G; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Kodentsova, V M; Solntseva, T N; Khanfer'ian, R A

    2013-01-01

    The sufficiency of 169 athletes (six disciplines: bullet shooting, biathlon, bobsleigh, skeleton, freestyle skiing, snowboarding) with vitamins A, E, C, B2, and beta-carotene has been investigated in April-September 2013. All athletes (102 juniors, mean age--18.5 +/- 0.3 years, and 67 adult high-performance athletes, mean age--26.8 +/- 0.7 years) were sufficiently supplied with vitamin A (70.7 +/- 1.7 mcg/dl). Mean blood serum retinol level was 15% higher the upper limit of the norm (80 mcg/dl) in biathletes while median reached 90.9 mcg/dl. Blood serum level of tocopherols (1.22 +/- 0.03 mg/dl), ascorbic acid (1.06 +/- 0.03 mg/dl), riboflavin (7.1 +/- 0.4 ng/ml), and beta-carotene (25.1 +/- 1.7 mcg/dl) was in within normal range, but the incidence of insufficiency of vitamins E, C, B2, and carotenoid among athletes varied in the range of 0-25, 0-17, 15-67 and 42-75%, respectively. 95% of adults and 80% of younger athletes were sufficiently provided with vitamin E. Vitamin E level in blood serum of juniors involved in skeleton and biathlon was lower by 51 and 72% (p < 0.05), than this parameter in adult athletes. Vitamin A, C and B2, and beta-carotene blood serum level did not significantly differ in junior and adult athletes. Women were better supplied with vitamins C, B2, and beta-carotene: a reduced blood serum level of these micronutrients in women was detected 2-3 fold rare (p < 0.10) than among men. Blood serum concentration of vitamin C (1.20 +/- 0.05 mg/dl) and beta-carotene (32.0 +/- 3.9 mcg/dl) in women was greater by 15 and 54% (p < 0.05) than in men. In general, the biathletes were better provided with vitamins compared with other athletes. The vast majority (80%) were optimally provided by all three antioxidants (beta-carotene and vitamins E and C). In other sports, the relative quantity of athletes sufficiently supplied with these essential nutrients did not exceed 56%. The quota of supplied with all antioxidants among bullet shooters (31.1%) and

  9. Nonpetroleum mobility fuels and military-energy self-sufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Freiwald, D.A.; Barattino, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Nonpetroleum hydrocarbon fuels will likely serve as transition fuels for a few decades after petroleum sources become scarce. But nonpetroleum hydrocarbon fuels are ultimately either nonrenewable (e.g., coal and oil shale synfuels) or are inefficient to produce. Nuclear sources (supplemented by solar, geothermal, etc., as available) for electric power generation and hydrogen production provide a combination that can be used for military energy needs including mobility fuels, namely liquid hydrogen. This approach can give the military energy self-sufficiency for stationary needs as well as ground vehicles, ships, and aircraft. System integration concepts are discussed, and concepts for a methodology to evaluate source-to-use pathways for different classes of military bases are outlined.

  10. Authoritarianism, cognitive rigidity, and the processing of ambiguous visual information.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Lauren E; Peterson, Bill E

    2014-01-01

    Intolerance of ambiguity and cognitive rigidity are unifying aspects of authoritarianism as defined by Adorno, Frenkel-Brunswik, Levinson, and Sanford (1982/1950), who hypothesized that authoritarians view the world in absolute terms (e.g., good or evil). Past studies have documented the relationship between authoritarianism and intolerance of ambiguity and rigidity. Frenkel-Brunswik (1949) hypothesized that this desire for absolutism was rooted in perceptual processes. We present a study with three samples that directly tests the relationship between right wing authoritarianism (RWA) and the processing of ideologically neutral but ambiguous visual stimuli. As hypothesized, in all three samples we found that RWA was related to the slower processing of visual information that required participants to recategorize objects. In a fourth sample, RWA was unrelated to speed of processing visual information that did not require recategorization. Overall, results suggest a relationship between RWA and rigidity in categorization. PMID:25280165

  11. Magnetic rigid rotor in the quantum regime: Theoretical toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Cosimo C.; Romero-Isart, Oriol

    2016-02-01

    We describe the quantum dynamics of a magnetic rigid rotor in the mesoscopic scale where the Einstein-De Haas effect is predominant. In particular, we consider a single-domain magnetic nanoparticle with uniaxial anisotropy in a magnetic trap. Starting from the basic Hamiltonian of the system under the macrospin approximation, we derive a bosonized Hamiltonian describing the center-of-mass motion, the total angular momentum, and the macrospin degrees of freedom of the particle treated as a rigid body. This bosonized Hamiltonian can be approximated by a simple quadratic Hamiltonian that captures the rich physics of a nanomagnet tightly confined in position, nearly not spinning, and with its macrospin antialigned to the magnetic field. The theoretical tools derived and used here can be applied to other quantum mechanical rigid rotors.

  12. Method to estimate center of rigidity using vibration recordings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Celebi, Mehmet

    1990-01-01

    A method to estimate the center of rigidity of buildings by using vibration recordings is presented. The method is based on the criterion that the coherence of translational motions with the rotational motion is minimum at the center of rigidity. Since the coherence is a function of frequency, a gross but frequency-independent measure of the coherency is defined as the integral of the coherence function over the frequency. The center of rigidity is determined by minimizing this integral. The formulation is given for two-dimensional motions. Two examples are presented for the method; a rectangular building with ambient-vibration recordings, and a triangular building with earthquake-vibration recordings. Although the examples given are for buildings, the method can be applied to any structure with two-dimensional motions.

  13. Matrix rigidity optimizes the polarization of stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemel, Assaf; Rehfeldt, Florian; Brown, Andre; Discher, Dennis; Safran, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    We present a theoretical model and experiments to explain the non-monotonic dependence of stress-fiber polarization in stem cells on matrix rigidity. The theory generalizes the treatment of elastic inclusions to ``living'' inclusions (cells) whose active polarizability, unlike non-living matter, depends on the feedback of cellular forces that develop in response to matrix stresses. We demonstrate experimentally that the stress fibers in adult mesenchymal stem cells, generally orient parallel to the long axis of the cells, with an anisotropy that depends non-monotonically on substrate stiffness. Consistent with these experiments, our theory predicts that the magnitude of the cellular force increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity while the polarization anisotropy shows a maximum that depends on the cell shape and the elastic modulus of the medium. These findings offer a mechanical correlate for the observation that stem cell differentiation optimizes in a range of matrix rigidities that depends on the tissue type.

  14. Fire and ecotoxicological aspects of polyurethane rigid foam.

    PubMed

    Wittbecker, F W; Giersig, M

    2001-01-01

    The main characteristics of fire effluents from polyurethane (PUR) foams are comparable to those from natural materials like wood, cork, or wool. This similarity has been demonstrated by comparative data from analytical and toxicological studies. It is therefore presumed that effluents of these materials present similar hazards to human beings and the environment. In almost all fires, dioxins can be found in the smoke and residues. In fires involving PURs, relevant quantities of halogenated dioxins or furans are not to be expected; this has been confirmed by investigations under controlled laboratory conditions. The insulation properties of rigid PUR foam contribute significantly to environmental protection and the conservation of resources. A number of methods for reusing and recycling PUR rigid foam waste have been developed and realized in practise. The possibilities range from reusing the material itself, generating liquid raw materials, and thermal recycling, even for (H)CFC-containing PUR rigid foams, by cocombustion in suitable plants. PMID:11370381

  15. Sufficient and necessary condition of separability for generalized Werner states

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Dongling; Chen Jingling

    2009-02-15

    In a celebrated paper [Optics Communications 179, 447, 2000], A.O. Pittenger and M.H. Rubin presented for the first time a sufficient and necessary condition of separability for the generalized Werner states. Inspired by their ideas, we generalized their method to a more general case. We obtain a sufficient and necessary condition for the separability of a specific class of N d-dimensional system (qudits) states, namely special generalized Werner state (SGWS): W{sup [d{sup N}]}(v)=(1-v)(I{sup (N)})/(d{sup N}) +v|{psi}{sub d}{sup N}><{psi}{sub d}{sup N}|, where |{psi}{sub d}{sup N}>={sigma}{sub i=0}{sup d-1}{alpha}{sub i}|i...i> is an entangled pure state of N qudits system and {alpha}{sub i} satisfies two restrictions: (i) {sigma}{sub i=0}{sup d-1}{alpha}{sub i}{alpha}{sub i}*=1; (ii) Matrix 1/d (I{sup (1)}+T{sigma}{sub i{ne}}{sub j}{alpha}{sub i}|i>

  16. Using scientifically and statistically sufficient statistics in comparing image segmentations.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yueh-Yun; Muller, Keith E

    2010-01-01

    Automatic computer segmentation in three dimensions creates opportunity to reduce the cost of three-dimensional treatment planning of radiotherapy for cancer treatment. Comparisons between human and computer accuracy in segmenting kidneys in CT scans generate distance values far larger in number than the number of CT scans. Such high dimension, low sample size (HDLSS) data present a grand challenge to statisticians: how do we find good estimates and make credible inference? We recommend discovering and using scientifically and statistically sufficient statistics as an additional strategy for overcoming the curse of dimensionality. First, we reduced the three-dimensional array of distances for each image comparison to a histogram to be modeled individually. Second, we used non-parametric kernel density estimation to explore distributional patterns and assess multi-modality. Third, a systematic exploratory search for parametric distributions and truncated variations led to choosing a Gaussian form as approximating the distribution of a cube root transformation of distance. Fourth, representing each histogram by an individually estimated distribution eliminated the HDLSS problem by reducing on average 26,000 distances per histogram to just 2 parameter estimates. In the fifth and final step we used classical statistical methods to demonstrate that the two human observers disagreed significantly less with each other than with the computer segmentation. Nevertheless, the size of all disagreements was clinically unimportant relative to the size of a kidney. The hierarchal modeling approach to object-oriented data created response variables deemed sufficient by both the scientists and statisticians. We believe the same strategy provides a useful addition to the imaging toolkit and will succeed with many other high throughput technologies in genetics, metabolomics and chemical analysis. PMID:24967000

  17. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review for Rigid Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    Rigid Foam is a chemical delay foam used to completely encapsulate an object or to block access to an area. Prior studies have indicated that the final foam product is essentially non-toxic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and summarize the current chemical and toxicological data available on the components of Rigid Foam and to update the information available on the toxicity of the final Rigid Foam product. Since the possibility exists for a partial deployment of Rigid Foam where only one of the components is released, this study also examined the toxicity of its chemical constituents. Rigid Foam is composed of an {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} Component. The {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} component is primarily a polymeric isocyanate and the {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} component is a mixture of polyols. In addition to the primary constituents, dichlorodifluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane are present as blowing agents along with catalysts and silicone surfactants necessary for foaming. The pre-deployed {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} components are stored in separate vessels and are brought together in static mixing nozzles for dispersal. The results of this evaluation indicate that a completely deployed Rigid Foam under normal conditions is essentially non-toxic as determined previously. However, in the event of a partial deployment or deployment of an individual component directly at an unprotected individual, the degree of hazard is increased due to the toxic and corrosive nature of the individual constituents. The health hazard would depend on the properties of the material to which the person was exposed.

  18. Earth boring bit with pressure compensating rigid face seal

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, B. H.

    1985-05-14

    An earth boring bit having a cantilevered bearing shaft and a compensator system to equalize the pressure of the lubricant with the hydrostatic pressure of the drilling fluid surrounding the bit. A rigid face seal assembly, positioned between the cutter and bearing shaft of the bit, moves axially in response to, and to compensate for, dynamic pressure changes in the lubricant adjacent the seal. This is accomplished by the positioning and sizing of resilient energizer rings in relationship to the geometries of the mating grooves between the cutter and shaft and the rigid sealing rings of the face seal assembly.

  19. Shear-induced rigidity in spider silk glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Kristie J.; McKiernan, Keri; Akhenblit, Paul; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-09-01

    We measure the elastic stiffnesses of the concentrated viscous protein solution of the dehydrated Nephila clavipes major ampullate gland with Brillouin light scattering. The glandular material shows no rigidity but possesses a tensile stiffness similar to that of spider silk. We show, however, that with application of a simple static shear, the mechanical properties of the spider gland protein mixture can be altered irreversibly, lowering symmetry and enabling shear waves to be supported, thus, giving rise to rigidity and yielding elastic properties similar to those of the naturally spun (i.e., dynamically sheared) silk.

  20. [Relative rigidity of standardized gutta-percha points].

    PubMed

    Weiger, R; Dick, M; Löst, C

    1991-12-01

    Gutta-percha points often crack off when inserted in small and curved root canals before they have reached the full length of the canal. The goal of this investigation was to determine the relative rigidity of standardized gutta-percha points from different producers. It seems that not only significant differences between gutta-percha points of various producers, but also distinct variations between gutta-percha points from the same producer were detected. Several reasons for the differing rigidity of gutta-percha points are discussed. PMID:1817889

  1. Shape optimization of rigid inclusions for elastic plates with cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Viktor

    2016-06-01

    In the paper, we consider an optimal control problem of finding the most safe rigid inclusion shapes in elastic plates with cracks from the viewpoint of the Griffith rupture criterion. We make use of a general Kirchhoff-Love plate model with both vertical and horizontal displacements, and nonpenetration conditions are fulfilled on the crack faces. The dependence of the first derivative of the energy functional with respect to the crack length on regular shape perturbations of the rigid inclusion is analyzed. It is shown that there exists a solution of the optimal control problem.

  2. Bacterial Flagella as a Model Rigid Rod of Tunable Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Walter; Yardimci, Sevim; Gibaud, Thomas; Snow, Henry; Urbach, Jeff; Dogic, Zvonimir

    In this research, we study the physical properties of suspensions of bacterial flagella from Salmonella typhimurium prepared in a variety of rigid polymorphic shapes. Flagella act as a rigid colloidal particle that can exhibit non-trivial geometry including helices of varying dimensions, straight rods, or a combination of the two in the same filament. By controlling the conditions in which flagella are prepared, the polymorphic shape assumed by the filament can be controlled. Utilizing different polymorphic shapes, we combine results from optical microscopy observations of single filaments with bulk rheological measurements to help understand the role that constituent colloidal geometry plays in complex bulk behavior.

  3. Tracking Non-rigid Structures in Computer Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gezahegne, A; Kamath, C

    2008-01-10

    A key challenge in tracking moving objects is the correspondence problem, that is, the correct propagation of object labels from one time step to another. This is especially true when the objects are non-rigid structures, changing shape, and merging and splitting over time. In this work, we describe a general approach to tracking thousands of non-rigid structures in an image sequence. We show how we can minimize memory requirements and generate accurate results while working with only two frames of the sequence at a time. We demonstrate our results using data from computer simulations of a fluimix problem.

  4. Drag reduction characteristics of small amplitude rigid surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cary, A. M., Jr.; Weinstein, L. M.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of reducing drag by using rigid, wavy surfaces is investigated both analytically and experimentally. Although pressure drag for rigid sine-wave surfaces can be predicted empirically, viscous drag for even shallow waves was poorly predicted by state-of-the-art turbulent boundary layer calculation procedures. Calculations for the effects of geometric and fluid variables on total wave drag are presented under the philosophy that trends will be nearly correct even though levels are probably incorrect. Experiments by the present authors indicate that a total drag reduction with wavy walls is possible.

  5. The Rigid-Flexible System Dynamics Model of Highline Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Daoqi; Li, Nan; Zhang, Shiyun

    The paper researches rigid flexible system dynamics model of the rope, and used it to simulate sealift Highline based on the multi-body dynamics theory. Meanwhile the paper simulated to the sea dry cargo replenishment of transverse process, then gain the conclusion that the rigid flexible dynamic model get in the paper is more close to the Caucasus, and the dynamic calculation results closer to the actual situation, through the analysis of simulation results, and combined with the actual situation in the Caucasus the structure of overhead cable.

  6. Topology-Preserving Rigid Transformation of 2D Digital Images.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Phuc; Passat, Nicolas; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Talbot, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    We provide conditions under which 2D digital images preserve their topological properties under rigid transformations. We consider the two most common digital topology models, namely dual adjacency and well-composedness. This paper leads to the proposal of optimal preprocessing strategies that ensure the topological invariance of images under arbitrary rigid transformations. These results and methods are proved to be valid for various kinds of images (binary, gray-level, label), thus providing generic and efficient tools, which can be used in particular in the context of image registration and warping. PMID:26270925

  7. New generalizations of the integrable problems in rigid body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehia, H. M.

    1997-10-01

    We consider the general problem of motion of a rigid body about a fixed point under the action of an axisymmetric combination of potential and gyroscopic forces. We introduce six cases of this problem which are completely integrable for arbitrary initial conditions. The new cases generalize by several parameters all, but one, of the known results in the subject of rigid body dynamics. Namely, we generalize all the results due to Euler, Lagrange, Clebsch, Kovalevskaya, Brun and Lyapunov and also their subsequent generalizations by Rubanovsky and the present author.

  8. On the rigidity of polynorbornenes with dipolar pendant groups.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Murugesh, Modachur G; Sudhakar, Sundarraj; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Tai, Hwan-Ching; Chang, Chia-Seng; Liu, Yi-Hung; Wang, Yu; Chen, I-Wen Peter; Chen, Chun-Hsien; Luh, Tien-Yau

    2005-12-16

    A range of polynorbornenes (PNBs) with fused dipolar pendant groups at C-5,6 positions was synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization catalyzed by a ruthenium carbene complex (Grubbs I). Photophysical studies, EFISH measurements, and atomic force microscopy images have been used to investigate the structures and morphology of these polymers. These results suggest that the polymers may adopt rigid rod-like structures. The presence of the double bonds in PNBs appeared to be indispensable for the rigidity of the polymers. Interaction between unsaturated pendant groups may result in coherent alignment leading to a rod-like structure. PMID:16278915

  9. Spinal internuncial neurones in progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, D A; Lees, A J; Toghill, P J

    1979-01-01

    The clinical and pathological features of a fourth patient with progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity are reported and compared with those previously described. It is suggested that the muscular rigidity, abnormal postures, painful muscular spasms, and myoclonus are a product of excessive and abnormal discharges of alpha motor neurones caused by their release from control by spinal internuncial neurones. A count of neuronal perikarya in the ventral horns confirmed that the disease selectively destroyed small and medium sized neurones, most of which were spinal internuncial neurones. Experimental, clinical, and pathological evidence concerning spinal internuncial neurones is reviewed and found to conform to this theory. The pathogenesis of opsoclonus may be similar. Images PMID:501376

  10. Conditions for the existence of the asymptotically pendulum motions of a rigid body with the center of mass on the main axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varkhalev, Iu. P.

    1988-07-01

    The first Liapunov method is used to investigate sufficient conditions for the existence of asymptotically pendulum motions of a rigid body with a single fixed point. A region of permissible values of the parameters characterizing the body mass corresponding to the asymptotically pendulum motions is defined. The existence of such motions in the case of the Kovalevskii solution and their absence in the Goriachev-Chapolygin solution are demonstrated.

  11. High Resolution Quantification of Cellular Forces for Rigidity Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuaimin

    This thesis describes a comprehensive study of understanding the mechanism of rigidity sensing by quantitative analysis using submicron pillar array substrates. From mechanobiology perspective, we explore and study molecular pathways involved in rigidity and force sensing at cell-matrix adhesions with regard to cancer, regeneration, and development by quantification methods. In Chapter 2 and 3, we developed fabrication and imaging techniques to enhance the performance of a submicron pillar device in terms of spatial and temporal measurement ability, and we discovered a correlation of rigidity sensing forces and corresponding proteins involved in the early rigidity sensing events. In Chapter 2, we introduced optical effect arising from submicron structure imaging, and we described a technique to identify the correct focal plane of pillar tip by fabricating a substrate with designed-offset pillars. From calibration result, we identified the correct focal plane that was previously overlooked, and verified our findings by other imaging techniques. In Chapter 3, we described several techniques to selectively functionalize elastomeric pillars top and compared these techniques in terms of purposes and fabrication complexity. Techniques introduced in this chapter included direct labeling, such as stamping of fluorescent substances (organic dye, nano-diamond, q-dot) to pillars top, as well as indirect labeling that selectively modify the surface of molds with either metal or fluorescent substances. In Chapter 4, we examined the characteristics of local contractility forces and identified the components formed a sarcomere like contractile unit (CU) that cells use to sense rigidity. CUs were found to be assembled at cell edge, contain myosin II, alpha-actinin, tropomodulin and tropomyosin (Tm), and resemble sarcomeres in size (˜2 mum) and function. Then we performed quantitative analysis of CUs to evaluate rigidity sensing activity over ˜8 hours time course and found that

  12. India's baseline plan for nuclear energy self-sufficiency.

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, R .G.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-01-01

    India's nuclear energy strategy has traditionally strived for energy self-sufficiency, driven largely by necessity following trade restrictions imposed by the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) following India's 'peaceful nuclear explosion' of 1974. On September 6, 2008, the NSG agreed to create an exception opening nuclear trade with India, which may create opportunities for India to modify its baseline strategy. The purpose of this document is to describe India's 'baseline plan,' which was developed under constrained trade conditions, as a basis for understanding changes in India's path as a result of the opening of nuclear commerce. Note that this treatise is based upon publicly available information. No attempt is made to judge whether India can meet specified goals either in scope or schedule. In fact, the reader is warned a priori that India's delivery of stated goals has often fallen short or taken a significantly longer period to accomplish. It has been evident since the early days of nuclear power that India's natural resources would determine the direction of its civil nuclear power program. It's modest uranium but vast thorium reserves dictated that the country's primary objective would be thorium utilization. Estimates of India's natural deposits vary appreciably, but its uranium reserves are known to be extremely limited, totaling approximately 80,000 tons, on the order of 1% of the world's deposits; and nominally one-third of this ore is of very low uranium concentration. However, India's roughly 300,000 tons of thorium reserves account for approximately 30% of the world's total. Confronted with this reality, the future of India's nuclear power industry is strongly dependent on the development of a thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle as the only way to insure a stable, sustainable, and autonomous program. The path to India's nuclear energy self-sufficiency was first outlined in a seminal paper by Drs. H. J. Bhabha and N. B. Prasad presented at the Second

  13. On necessity and sufficiency in counseling and psychotherapy (revisited).

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Arnold A

    2007-09-01

    It seems to me that Carl Rogers (see record 2007-14639-002) was far too ambitious in trying to specify general conditions of necessity and sufficiency that would be relevant to the entire spectrum of problems and the diverse expectancies and personalities of the people who seek our help. Rogers' position and orientation almost totally overlook the array of problems under the rubric of "response deficits" that stem from misinformation and missing information and call for active correction, training, and retraining. Rogers also paid scant attention to problems with significant biological determinants. Nevertheless, as exemplified by his seminal 1957 article and many other articles and books, Rogers made major contributions within the domain of the therapeutic alliance. Today, the scientific emphasis looks at accountability, the need to establish various treatments of choice, and the need to understand their presumed mechanisms. Treatment efficacy and generalizability across different methodologies are now considered key issues. The efficacy narrowing and clinically self-limiting consequences of adhering to one particular school of thought are now self-evident to most. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122247

  14. The Generalized Asymptotic Equipartition Property: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Matthew T.

    2011-01-01

    Suppose a string X1n=(X1,X2,…,Xn) generated by a memoryless source (Xn)n≥1 with distribution P is to be compressed with distortion no greater than D ≥ 0, using a memoryless random codebook with distribution Q. The compression performance is determined by the “generalized asymptotic equipartition property” (AEP), which states that the probability of finding a D-close match between X1n and any given codeword Y1n, is approximately 2−nR(P, Q, D), where the rate function R(P, Q, D) can be expressed as an infimum of relative entropies. The main purpose here is to remove various restrictive assumptions on the validity of this result that have appeared in the recent literature. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the generalized AEP are provided in the general setting of abstract alphabets and unbounded distortion measures. All possible distortion levels D ≥ 0 are considered; the source (Xn)n≥1 can be stationary and ergodic; and the codebook distribution can have memory. Moreover, the behavior of the matching probability is precisely characterized, even when the generalized AEP is not valid. Natural characterizations of the rate function R(P, Q, D) are established under equally general conditions. PMID:21614133

  15. Manual curation is not sufficient for annotation of genomic databases

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, William A.; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Fox, Lynne M.; Acquaah-Mensah, George; Hunter, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Motivation Knowledge base construction has been an area of intense activity and great importance in the growth of computational biology. However, there is little or no history of work on the subject of evaluation of knowledge bases, either with respect to their contents or with respect to the processes by which they are constructed. This article proposes the application of a metric from software engineering known as the found/fixed graph to the problem of evaluating the processes by which genomic knowledge bases are built, as well as the completeness of their contents. Results Well-understood patterns of change in the found/fixed graph are found to occur in two large publicly available knowledge bases. These patterns suggest that the current manual curation processes will take far too long to complete the annotations of even just the most important model organisms, and that at their current rate of production, they will never be sufficient for completing the annotation of all currently available proteomes. Contact larry.hunter@uchsc.edu PMID:17646325

  16. Rigidity, sensitivity and quality of attachment: the role of maternal rigidity in the early socio-emotional development of premature infants.

    PubMed

    Butcher, P R; Kalverboer, A F; Minderaa, R B; van Doormaal, E F; ten Wolde, Y

    1993-01-01

    The associations between a mother's rigidity, her sensitivity in early (3 month) interaction and the quality of her premature infant's attachment at 13 months were investigated. Rigidity as a personality characteristic was not found to be significantly associated with sensitivity or quality of attachment. Rigid attitudes to child rearing were related to sensitivity and to the responsivity of the infant. Rigid attitudes were not related to security of attachment. Infants who were rated less responsive at 3 months, however, tended to be less securely attached, and high Attitude Rigidity in the mother increased their chances of an insecure attachment. PMID:8154297

  17. Acoustic propagation in rigid three-dimensional waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.

    1980-01-01

    The linear acoustic propagation in finite rigid three-dimensional waveguides is determined analytically using an eigenfunction expansion of the Helmholtz equation. The geometry considered consists of straight and circular bends of rectangular cross section with continuous interfaces (branches and sharp corners are excluded). The phenomena of resonance shift and relocation are explained for a bend-straight duct combination.

  18. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis. 890.3610 Section 890.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3610...

  19. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis. 890.3610 Section 890.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3610...

  20. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis. 890.3610 Section 890.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3610...

  1. Accuracy limit of rigid 3-point water models.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Saeed; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2016-08-21

    Classical 3-point rigid water models are most widely used due to their computational efficiency. Recently, we introduced a new approach to constructing classical rigid water models [S. Izadi et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 5, 3863 (2014)], which permits a virtually exhaustive search for globally optimal model parameters in the sub-space that is most relevant to the electrostatic properties of the water molecule in liquid phase. Here we apply the approach to develop a 3-point Optimal Point Charge (OPC3) water model. OPC3 is significantly more accurate than the commonly used water models of same class (TIP3P and SPCE) in reproducing a comprehensive set of liquid bulk properties, over a wide range of temperatures. Beyond bulk properties, we show that OPC3 predicts the intrinsic charge hydration asymmetry (CHA) of water - a characteristic dependence of hydration free energy on the sign of the solute charge - in very close agreement with experiment. Two other recent 3-point rigid water models, TIP3PFB and H2ODC, each developed by its own, completely different optimization method, approach the global accuracy optimum represented by OPC3 in both the parameter space and accuracy of bulk properties. Thus, we argue that an accuracy limit of practical 3-point rigid non-polarizable models has effectively been reached; remaining accuracy issues are discussed. PMID:27544113

  2. Review of Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy for Spastic and Rigidity Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obringer, S. John; Coffey, Kenneth M.

    2002-01-01

    Intrathecal baclofen therapy, a treatment for cerebral palsy and other spastic and rigidity disorders, is showing promise as an effective intervention. This article synthesizes both the medical and rehabilitation conceptual literature to update educators and related service providers as to the efficacy of this intervention. Implications for…

  3. Rigid indented cylindrical cathode for X-ray tube

    DOEpatents

    Hudgens, Claude R.

    1985-01-01

    A cathode assembly for a vacuum tube includes a wire filament, a straight bular anode parallel to and surrounding the wire filament, and insulating spacers for rigidly fastening the filament with respect to the anode, and with one side of the anode indented or flattened such that only one portion of the anode is heated to emitting temperatures by the filament.

  4. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... paraplegics walk. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... distribution before May 28, 1976. Any other rigid pneumatic structure orthosis shall have an approved PMA or...

  5. 21 CFR 890.3610 - Rigid pneumatic structure orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... paraplegics walk. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food... distribution before May 28, 1976. Any other rigid pneumatic structure orthosis shall have an approved PMA or...

  6. Design of the new rigid endoscope distortion measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiaohao; Liu, Xiaohua; Liu, Ming; Hui, Mei; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Wang, Yakun; Li, Yonghui; Zhou, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic imaging quality affects industrial safety and medical security. Rigid endoscope distortion is of great signification as one of optical parameters to evaluate the imaging quality. This paper introduces a new method of rigid endoscope distortion measurement, which is different from the common methods with low accuracy and fussy operation. It contains a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) to display the target, a CCD to obtain the images with distortion, and a computer to process the images. The LCD is employed instead of common white screen. The autonomous control system of LCD makes it showing the test target designed for distortion, and its parameter is known. LCD control system can change the test target to satisfy the different demand for accuracy, which avoids replacing target frequently. The test system also contains a CCD to acquire images in the exit pupil position of rigid endoscope. Rigid endoscope distortion is regarded as centrosymmetric, and the MATLAB software automatically measures it by processing the images from CCD. The MATLAB software compares target images with that without distortion on LCD and calculates the results. Relative distortion is obtained at different field of view (FOV) radius. The computer plots the curve of relative distortion, abscissa means radius of FOV, ordinate means relative distortion. The industry standard shows that, the distortion at 70% field of view is pointed on the curve, which can be taken as an evaluation standard. This new measuring method achieves advantages of high precision, high degree of intelligence, excellent repeatability and gets calculation results quickly.

  7. 21 CFR 876.5020 - External penile rigidity devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External penile rigidity devices. 876.5020 Section 876.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5020 External...

  8. “Mind the Trap”: Mindfulness Practice Reduces Cognitive Rigidity

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jonathan; Reiner, Keren; Meiran, Nachshon

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined the relation between mindfulness practice and cognitive rigidity by using a variation of the Einstellung water jar task. Participants were required to use three hypothetical jars to obtain a specific amount of water. Initial problems were solvable by the same complex formula, but in later problems (“critical” or “trap” problems) solving was possible by an additional much simpler formula. A rigidity score was compiled through perseverance of the complex formula. In Experiment 1, experienced mindfulness meditators received significantly lower rigidity scores than non-meditators who had registered for their first meditation retreat. Similar results were obtained in randomized controlled Experiment 2 comparing non-meditators who underwent an eight meeting mindfulness program with a waiting list group. The authors conclude that mindfulness meditation reduces cognitive rigidity via the tendency to be “blinded” by experience. Results are discussed in light of the benefits of mindfulness practice regarding a reduced tendency to overlook novel and adaptive ways of responding due to past experience, both in and out of the clinical setting. PMID:22615758

  9. Nonlinear optical properties of rigid-rod polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimmer, Mark S.; Wang, Ying

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to integrate enhanced third order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties, especially high x(exp (3)) (greater than 10(exp -8) esu), into Maxdem's novel conjugated rigid-rod polymers while retaining their desirable processing, mechanical, and thermal properties. This work primarily involved synthetic approaches to optimized materials.

  10. Method for making one-container rigid foam

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.

    2005-04-12

    A method of making a one-container foam by dissolving a polymer in liquified gas at a pressure greater than the vapor pressure of the liquified gas and than rapidly decreasing the pressure within approximately 60 seconds to foam a foam. The foam can be rigid and also have adhesive properties. The liquified gas used is CF₃ l or mixtures thereof.

  11. Rigidity versus flexibility: the dilemma of understanding protein thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Karshikoff, Andrey; Nilsson, Lennart; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2015-10-01

    The role of fluctuations in protein thermostability has recently received considerable attention. In the current literature a dualistic picture can be found: thermostability seems to be associated with enhanced rigidity of the protein scaffold in parallel with the reduction of flexible parts of the structure. In contradiction to such arguments it has been shown by experimental studies and computer simulation that thermal tolerance of a protein is not necessarily correlated with the suppression of internal fluctuations and mobility. Both concepts, rigidity and flexibility, are derived from mechanical engineering and represent temporally insensitive features describing static properties, neglecting that relative motion at certain time scales is possible in structurally stable regions of a protein. This suggests that a strict separation of rigid and flexible parts of a protein molecule does not describe the reality correctly. In this work the concepts of mobility/flexibility versus rigidity will be critically reconsidered by taking into account molecular dynamics calculations of heat capacity and conformational entropy, salt bridge networks, electrostatic interactions in folded and unfolded states, and the emerging picture of protein thermostability in view of recently developed network theories. Last, but not least, the influence of high temperature on the active site and activity of enzymes will be considered. PMID:26074325

  12. 49 CFR 587.18 - Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. 587.18 Section 587.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFORMABLE BARRIERS...

  13. 49 CFR 587.18 - Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. 587.18 Section 587.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFORMABLE BARRIERS...

  14. 49 CFR 587.18 - Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. 587.18 Section 587.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFORMABLE BARRIERS...

  15. Knowledge-In-Action: An Example with Rigid Body Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Da Costa, Sayonara Salvador Cabral; Moreira, Marco Antonio

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the analysis of the resolution of a paper-and-pencil problem, by eight undergraduate students majoring in engineering (six) and physics (two) at the Pontifcia Universidade Catlica do Rio Grande do Sul, in Porto Alegre, Brazil. The problem concerns kinetics of a rigid body, and the analysis was done in the light of Johnson-Lairds…

  16. Deformable registration of multi-modal data including rigid structures

    SciTech Connect

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Klein, Gregory J.; Kimdon, Joey A.; Kuo, Chaincy; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2003-05-02

    Multi-modality imaging studies are becoming more widely utilized in the analysis of medical data. Anatomical data from CT and MRI are useful for analyzing or further processing functional data from techniques such as PET and SPECT. When data are not acquired simultaneously, even when these data are acquired on a dual-imaging device using the same bed, motion can occur that requires registration between the reconstructed image volumes. As the human torso can allow non-rigid motion, this type of motion should be estimated and corrected. We report a deformation registration technique that utilizes rigid registration for bony structures, while allowing elastic transformation of soft tissue to more accurately register the entire image volume. The technique is applied to the registration of CT and MR images of the lumbar spine. First a global rigid registration is performed to approximately align features. Bony structures are then segmented from the CT data using semi-automated process, and bounding boxes for each vertebra are established. Each CT subvolume is then individually registered to the MRI data using a piece-wise rigid registration algorithm and a mutual information image similarity measure. The resulting set of rigid transformations allows for accurate registration of the parts of the CT and MRI data representing the vertebrae, but not the adjacent soft tissue. To align the soft tissue, a smoothly-varying deformation is computed using a thin platespline(TPS) algorithm. The TPS technique requires a sparse set of landmarks that are to be brought into correspondence. These landmarks are automatically obtained from the segmented data using simple edge-detection techniques and random sampling from the edge candidates. A smoothness parameter is also included in the TPS formulation for characterization of the stiffness of the soft tissue. Estimation of an appropriate stiffness factor is obtained iteratively by using the mutual information cost function on the result

  17. [Effect of vitamin sufficiency on adaptation syndrome in growing rats].

    PubMed

    Sidorova, Iu S; Beketova, N A; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Kodentsova, V M; Kosheleva, O V; Zorin, S N; Selifanov, A V; Mazo, V K

    2014-01-01

    The influence of vitamin supply of growing male -Wistar rats (n=21) with an initial body weight 53,5±0,9 g on their resistance to a single distress induced by the electric shock has been investigated. Control rats within 21 days received a complete semisynthetic diet,providingadequate amounts of vitamins. Combined vitamin deficiency in experimental rats was caused by 5-fold decrease of vitamin mixture amount in the feed and the total vitamin E exclusion from the mixture. On the 21st day, one day before the end of the experiment, both groups of rats were subjected to stress impact (electrocutaneous irritation on paws, 0,4 mA for 8 sec) and then animals were placed in metabolic cages to collect urine. By the end of the experiment, the animals with the combined vitamin deficiency lag behind in growth. Vitamin B2, A, B1 and E liver content decreased in experimental rats by 1,6, 2,3, 4,4 and 15 fold accordingly. Retinol plasma concentration was significantly reduced by 18%, α-tocopherol level - by 5 fold, urinary excretionof riboflavin and 4-pyridoxic acid (vitamin B6 metabolite) was significantly reduced by 6,5 and 2,46 times accordingly. MDA blood plasma concentration and the urinary ratio of oxidized and not oxidized form of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxy-guanosine did not differ in both groups of rats. Urinary excretion of stress biomarker corticosterone in rats with combined vitamin deficit was 2,5-fold higher than in control rats. Thus, reducing of vitamins supply resulted in an increase of urine corticosterone in stressed rats, that characterized the intensity of general adaptation syndrome. This fact shows the importance of optimal sufficiency with vitamins in nonspecific (general) resistance to stress. PMID:25816622

  18. Greater learnability is not sufficient to produce cultural universals.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Anna N; Griffiths, Thomas L; Ettlinger, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Looking across human societies reveals regularities in the languages that people speak and the concepts that they use. One explanation that has been proposed for these "cultural universals" is differences in the ease with which people learn particular languages and concepts. A difference in learnability means that languages and concepts possessing a particular property are more likely to be accurately transmitted from one generation of learners to the next. Intuitively, this difference could allow languages and concepts that are more learnable to become more prevalent after multiple generations of cultural transmission. If this is the case, the prevalence of languages and concepts with particular properties can be explained simply by demonstrating empirically that they are more learnable. We evaluate this argument using mathematical analysis and behavioral experiments. Specifically, we provide two counter-examples that show how greater learnability need not result in a property becoming prevalent. First, more learnable languages and concepts can nonetheless be less likely to be produced spontaneously as a result of transmission failures. We simulated cultural transmission in the laboratory to show that this can occur for memory of distinctive items: these items are more likely to be remembered, but not generated spontaneously once they have been forgotten. Second, when there are many languages or concepts that lack the more learnable property, sheer numbers can swamp the benefit produced by greater learnability. We demonstrate this using a second series of experiments involving artificial language learning. Both of these counter-examples show that simply finding a learnability bias experimentally is not sufficient to explain why a particular property is prevalent in the languages or concepts used in human societies: explanations for cultural universals based on cultural transmission need to consider the full set of hypotheses a learner could entertain and all of

  19. Digital Correction of Motion Artifacts in Microscopy Image Sequences Collected from Living Animals Using Rigid and Non-Rigid Registration

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kevin S.; Salama, Paul; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Delp, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital image analysis is a fundamental component of quantitative microscopy. However, intravital microscopy presents many challenges for digital image analysis. In general, microscopy volumes are inherently anisotropic, suffer from decreasing contrast with tissue depth, lack object edge detail, and characteristically have low signal levels. Intravital microscopy introduces the additional problem of motion artifacts, resulting from respiratory motion and heartbeat from specimens imaged in vivo. This paper describes an image registration technique for use with sequences of intravital microscopy images collected in time-series or in 3D volumes. Our registration method involves both rigid and non-rigid components. The rigid registration component corrects global image translations, while the non-rigid component manipulates a uniform grid of control points defined by B-splines. Each control point is optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of two parts: a term to define image similarity, and a term to ensure deformation grid smoothness. Experimental results indicate that this approach is promising based on the analysis of several image volumes collected from the kidney, lung, and salivary gland of living rodents. PMID:22092443

  20. Investigation of the Rigid Amorphous Fraction in Nylon-6

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,H.; Cebe, P.

    2007-01-01

    A three-phase model, comprising crystalline, mobile amorphous, and rigid amorphous fractions (X{sub c}, X{sub MA}, X{sub rA}, respectively) has been applied in the study of semicrystalline Nylon-6. The samples studied were Nylon-6 alpha phase prepared by subsequent annealing of a parent sample slowly cooled from the melt. The treated samples were annealed at 110 C, then briefly heated to 136 C, then re-annealed at 110 C. Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) measurements allow the devitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction to be examined. We observe a lower endotherm, termed the 'annealing' peak in the non-reversing heat flow after annealing at 110 C. By brief heating above this lower endotherm and immediately quenching in LN{sub 2}-cooled glass beads, the glass transition temperature and X{sub RA} decrease substantially, X{sub MA} increases, and the annealing peak disappears. The annealing peak corresponds to the point at which partial de-vitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) occurs. Re-annealing at 110 C causes the glass transition and X{sub RA} to increase, and X{sub MA} to decrease. None of these treatments affected the measured degree of crystallinity, but it cannot be excluded that crystal reorganization or recrystallization may also occur at the annealing peak, contributing to the de-vitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction. Using a combined approach of thermal analysis with wide and small angle X-ray scattering, we analyze the location of the rigid amorphous and mobile amorphous fractions within the context of the Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Stack Models. Results show the homogeneous stack model is the correct one for Nylon-6. The cooperativity length ({var_epsilon}{sub A}) increases with a decrease of rigid amorphous fraction, or, increase of the mobile amorphous fraction. Devitrification of some of the RAF leads to the broadening of the glass transition region and shift of T{sub g}.

  1. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; Walsum, Theo van

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  2. Minimum time attitude slewing maneuvers of a rigid spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feiyue; Bainum, Peter M.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum time attitude slewing motion of a rigid spacecraft with its controls provided by torques and forces, which have their upper and lower limits prescribed, is considered. The two-point boundary-value problem is derived by applying the Pontriagin's Maximum Principle to the system and solved by using a quasi-linearization algorithm. The nominal solutions to the problem as well as the starting values of the total slewing time and the unknown initial costates for this algorithm are generated by using Euler's eigenaxis rotation theorem. It is pointed out that one of the four initial costates associated with the quaternions can be arbitrarily selected without affecting the optimal controls and, thus, simplifying the computation. The minimum slewing time is determined by shortening the total slewing time until at least one of the controls becomes a bang-bang type. Several numerical tests for the rigidized SCOLE model are presented to show the applications of the methods.

  3. Parkinsonian Rigidity Depends on the Velocity of Passive Joint Movement

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Takuyuki; Yoshikawa, Naoya; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Sakoda, Saburo

    2015-01-01

    Background. It has been long believed that Parkinsonian rigidity is not velocity-dependent based on the neurological examination. However, this has not been verified scientifically. Methods. The elbow joints of 20 Parkinson's disease patients were passively flexed and extended, and two characteristic values, the elastic coefficient (elasticity) and the difference in bias (difference in torque measurements for extension and flexion), were identified from a plot of the angle and torque characteristics. Flexion and extension were done at two different velocities, 60°/s and 120°/s, and a statistical analysis was performed to determine whether the changes in these characteristic values were velocity-dependent. Results. The elastic coefficient was not velocity-dependent, but the difference in bias increased in a velocity-dependent manner (P = 0.0017). Conclusions. The features of rigidity may differ from the conventional definition, which states that they are not dependent on the velocity of joint movement. PMID:26788403

  4. New toughening concepts for ceramic composites from rigid natural materials.

    PubMed

    Mayer, George

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying the toughening in rigid natural composites exhibited by the concentric cylindrical composites of spicules of hexactinellid sponges, and by the nacre (brick-and-mortar) structure of mollusks such as Haliotis rufescens (red abalone), as well as the crossed-lamellar structure of Strombus gigas (queen conch) show commonalities in the manner in which toughening takes place. It is proposed that crack diversion, a new kind of crack bridging, resulting in retardation of delamination, creation of new surface areas, and other energy-dissipating mechanisms occur in both natural systems. However, these are generally different from the toughening mechanisms that are utilized for other classes of structural materials. Complementary to those mechanisms found in rigid natural ceramic/organic composites, special architectures and thin viscoelastic organic layers have been found to play controlling roles in energy dissipation in these structures. PMID:21565715

  5. Surface growth by random deposition of rigid and wetting clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabella, D. A.; Aldao, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    Surface grown by the deposition of rigid and wetting clusters has been investigated using Monte Carlo simulations in 1 + 1 dimensions. Dynamic scaling exponents were determined using the time evolution of the roughness, the local width, the height-height correlation function, and the power spectrum. The values obtained for the roughness exponent clearly reflect the growth mechanism adopted for deposition. In the case of wetting clusters, the roughness exponent corresponds to that of random deposition, but a correlation appears for low window size, with a crossover that is related to the average cluster size and cluster size distribution. On the other hand, rigid cluster deposition belongs to the KPZ universality class. However, determined scaling exponents converge very slowly to those corresponding to KPZ.

  6. A density-independent rigidity transition in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng; Lopez, J. H.; Schwarz, J. M.; Manning, M. Lisa

    2015-12-01

    Cell migration is important in many biological processes, including embryonic development, cancer metastasis and wound healing. In these tissues, a cell’s motion is often strongly constrained by its neighbours, leading to glassy dynamics. Although self-propelled particle models exhibit a density-driven glass transition, this does not explain liquid-to-solid transitions in confluent tissues, where there are no gaps between cells and therefore the density is constant. Here we demonstrate the existence of a new type of rigidity transition that occurs in the well-studied vertex model for confluent tissue monolayers at constant density. We find that the onset of rigidity is governed by a model parameter that encodes single-cell properties such as cell-cell adhesion and cortical tension, providing an explanation for liquid-to-solid transitions in confluent tissues and making testable predictions about how these transitions differ from those in particulate matter.

  7. Microfluidic synthesis of rigid nanovesicles for hydrophilic reagents delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Feng, Qiang; Wang, Jiuling; Sun, Jiashu; Shi, Xinghua; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-03-23

    We present a hollow-structured rigid nanovesicle (RNV) fabricated by a multi-stage microfluidic chip in one step, to effectively entrap various hydrophilic reagents inside, without complicated synthesis, extensive use of emulsifiers and stabilizers, and laborious purification procedures. The RNV contains a hollow water core, a rigid poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) shell, and an outermost lipid layer. The formation mechanism of the RNV is investigated by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The entrapment efficiency of hydrophilic reagents such as calcein, rhodamine B and siRNA inside the hollow water core of RNV is ≈90 %. In comparison with the combination of free Dox and siRNA, RNV that co-encapsulate siRNA and doxorubicin (Dox) reveals a significantly enhanced anti-tumor effect for a multi-drug resistant tumor model. PMID:25704675

  8. Extracellular rigidity sensing by talin isoform-specific mechanical linkages.

    PubMed

    Austen, Katharina; Ringer, Pia; Mehlich, Alexander; Chrostek-Grashoff, Anna; Kluger, Carleen; Klingner, Christoph; Sabass, Benedikt; Zent, Roy; Rief, Matthias; Grashoff, Carsten

    2015-12-01

    The ability of cells to adhere and sense differences in tissue stiffness is crucial for organ development and function. The central mechanisms by which adherent cells detect extracellular matrix compliance, however, are still unknown. Using two single-molecule-calibrated biosensors that allow the analysis of a previously inaccessible but physiologically highly relevant force regime in cells, we demonstrate that the integrin activator talin establishes mechanical linkages following cell adhesion, which are indispensable for cells to probe tissue stiffness. Talin linkages are exposed to a range of piconewton forces and bear, on average, 7-10 pN during cell adhesion depending on their association with F-actin and vinculin. Disruption of talin's mechanical engagement does not impair integrin activation and initial cell adhesion but prevents focal adhesion reinforcement and thus extracellular rigidity sensing. Intriguingly, talin mechanics are isoform specific so that expression of either talin-1 or talin-2 modulates extracellular rigidity sensing. PMID:26523364

  9. An algorithm for studying rigidity in disordered 3D networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubynsky, M. V.; Thorpe, M. F.

    2004-03-01

    Some physical systems, such as covalent glasses and proteins, can be modeled as elastic networks, by dividing the interactions between particles into strong and weak, representing the former as constraints and neglecting the latter. For low enough connectivities, motions maintaining the constraints and thus having zero energy cost are possible. The goal of rigidity analysis is finding the number of such zero energy modes, the rigid clusters and flexible joints between them, as well as stressed bonds. For a certain class of networks there is a very fast graph-theoretical algorithm (the Pebble Game) for doing this analysis, but for more general networks, there are known counterexamples. While generalizing the Pebble Game is the ultimate goal, we propose a slower algorithm capable of doing all the same analyses as the Pebble Game but applicable to any networks. We discuss the applications of this algorithm to specific examples of 3D networks, such as diluted central force lattices, colloidal glasses and proteins.

  10. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as bilateral rigid auricles: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stiff ears appear to be a warning sign for adrenal insufficiency. This remarkable and rare sign has not been described to present in adrenal insufficiency in the setting of critical care. Case presentation We present the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male who underwent a thymoma resection and suffered from preoperative weight loss and lack of strength. The perioperative phase was characterised by hypotension and sputum stasis due to muscle weakness, which caused two readmissions to the intensive care unit. His physical examination showed two fully rigid auricles. In retrospect, our patient suffered from secondary adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism. Conclusions The bilateral rigid auricles appeared to be a warning sign for adrenal insufficiency. This remarkable sign is easily checked, and should prompt a higher index of suspicion towards adrenal insufficiency and other hormonal deficiencies. PMID:25209544

  11. Properties of rigid films made of PVC nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obloj-Muzaj, Maria; Abramowicz, Agnieszka; Kumosinski, Marcin; Zielecka, Maria; Kozakiewicz, Janusz; Gorska, Agnieszka

    2016-05-01

    PVC nanocomposites containing 0.5 wt. %/VCM of either nanosilica or hybrid core/shell type nanofiller were produced in-situ in suspension polymerisation and rigid films were prepared. The composites obtained were applied in the blends for rigid films. The properties of them were checked and showed advantageous differences in tear resistance and tensile impact properties. It appeared the composites properties let reduce the amount of impact modifiers in the blends at least 40 %. The PVC/SiO2 composite shows the best properties. Even for the blend containing 0.7 part of standard amount of impact modifier (suitable for this formulation) all the properties (except tensile impact strength crosswise) are significantly better than those of PVC blend with full amount of impact modifier.

  12. Flexural rigidity of biaxially loaded reinforced concrete rectangular column sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resheidat, M.; Ghanma, M.; Sutton, C.; Chen, Wai-Fah

    1995-05-01

    An exact analysis is carried out utilizing the parabola-rectangle stress-strain curve for concrete and a typical idealized stress-strain curve for steel to develop the moment-curvature relationship for biaxially loaded reinforced concrete rectangular column sections. Based on that, the flexural rigidity EI of the section is determined at the yield curvature. A computer program is written by FORTRAN 77 to handle the required computations. The influence of material properties, the effect of steel ratios, and the impact of axial loads on the EI estimation were investigated. This study leads to the development of a new equation to estimate the flexural rigidity EI of reinforced concrete biaxially loaded rectangular columns in which these factors were considered. It is shown that the new equation stems from the actual behavior of the column. Therefore, it is recommended for general use in the design of slender columns.

  13. Tunable Thermoresponsiveness of Resilin via Coassembly with Rigid Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Jasmin L; Dutta, Naba K; Knott, Robert; McPhee, Gordon; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Elvin, Chris; Hill, Anita; Choudhury, Namita Roy

    2015-08-18

    The ability to tune the thermoresponsiveness of recombinant resilin protein, Rec1-resilin, through a facile coassembly system was investigated in this study. The effects of change in conformation and morphology with time and the responsive behavior of Rec1-resilin in solution were studied in response to the addition of a rigid model polypeptide (poly-l-proline) or a hydrophobic rigid protein (Bombyx mori silk fibroin). It was observed that by inducing more ordered conformations and increasing the hydrophobicity the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the system was tuned to lower values. Time and temperature were found to be critical parameters in controlling the coassembly behavior of Rec1-resilin in both the model polypeptide and more complex protein systems. Such unique properties are useful for a wide range of applications, including drug delivery and soft tissue engineering applications. PMID:26177160

  14. Time-optimal maneuvering control of a rigid spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Li-Chun; Yang, Chi-Ching; Wu, Chia-Ju

    2007-05-01

    The time-optimal rest-to-rest maneuvering control problem of a rigid spacecraft is studied in this paper. By utilizing an iterative procedure, this problem is formulated and solved as a constrained nonlinear programming (NLP) one. In this novel method, the count of control steps is fixed initially and the sampling period is treated as a variable in the optimization process. The optimization object is to minimize the sampling period below a specific minimum value, which is set in advance considering the accuracy of discretization. To generate initial feasible solutions of the NLP problem, a genetic-algorithm-based is also proposed such that the optimization process can be started from many different points to find the globally optimal solution. With the proposed method, one can find a time-optimal rest-to-rest maneuver of the rigid spacecraft between two attitudes. To show the feasibility of the proposed method, simulation results are included for illustration.

  15. Microfluidic Synthesis of Rigid Nanovesicles for Hydrophilic Reagents Delivery**

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Feng, Qiang; Wang, Jiuling; Sun, Jiashu; Shi, Xinghua; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    We present a hollow-structured rigid nanovesicle (RNV) fabricated by a multi-stage microfluidic chip in one step, to effectively entrap various hydrophilic reagents inside, without complicated synthesis, extensive use of emulsifiers and stabilizers, and laborious purification procedures. The RNV contains a hollow water core, a rigid poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) shell, and an outermost lipid layer. The formation mechanism of the RNV is investigated by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The entrapment efficiency of hydrophilic reagents such as calcein, rhodamine B and siRNA inside the hollow water core of RNV is ≈90 %. In comparison with the combination of free Dox and siRNA, RNV that co-encapsulate siRNA and doxorubicin (Dox) reveals a significantly enhanced anti-tumor effect for a multi-drug resistant tumor model. PMID:25704675

  16. The ‘twin paradox’ in relativistic rigid motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Ya’acov, Uri

    2016-09-01

    Relativistic rigid motion suggests a new version for the so-called ‘twin paradox’, comparing the ages of two astronauts on a very long spaceship. Although there is always an instantaneous inertial frame in which the whole spaceship, being rigid, is simultaneously at rest, the twins’ ages, measured as the proper-times along their individual world lines, are different when they are located at remote parts of the spaceship. The age, or proper-time, difference depends on the distance at rest between the astronauts and the rapidity difference between start to end. The relation of the age difference with the relative Doppler shift of light signals transmitted between the astronauts and implications for the possibility to assign a common age (proper-time) to complex, spatially extended, relativistic systems are also discussed.

  17. Rigidity percolation in dispersions with a structured viscoelastic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbrink, M. W. L.; Michels, M. A. J.; Vellinga, W. P.; Meijer, H. E. H.

    2005-03-01

    This paper deals with rigidity percolation in composite materials consisting of a dispersion of mineral particles in a microstructured viscoelastic matrix. The viscoelastic matrix in this specific case is a hydrocarbon refinery residue. In a set of model random composites the mean interparticle surface-to-surface distance was controlled, changing particle volume fraction φ and particle number density independently. This was achieved by mixing two sets of monodisperse particles with widely differing radii ( 0.35μm and 17.5μm ) with the matrix. A scaling exponent of 3.9±0.6 for the storage modulus G' vs φ-φc was observed above a threshold φc , in good agreement with theoretical values for rigidity percolation. It is found that at the rigidity-percolation threshold the pore structure, as characterized by the mean surface-to-surface distance for the filler, rather than the filler volume fraction, is similar for different types of composites. This behavior is explained from the internal structure of the viscoelastic matrix, which consists of fractal solid aggregates dissolved in a viscous medium; the effective radius of these aggregates and the mean surface-to-surface distance together determine whether or not the aggregates are capable of providing rigidity to the composite. The explanation is further supported by a qualitative comparison with effective-medium calculations. These indicate that the observed breakdown of time-temperature superposition near φc is due to the appearance of a time scale characteristic for the mechanical interplay between the viscous binder phase and the purely elastic solid particles.

  18. Magnetron sputtering in rigid optical solar reflectors production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asainov, O. Kh; Bainov, D. D.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Sidelev, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetron sputtering was applied to meet the growing need for glass optical solar reflectors. This plasma method provided more uniform deposition of the silver based coating on glass substrates resulted in decrease of defective reflectors fraction down to 5%. For instance, such parameter of resistive evaporation was of 30%. Silver film adhesion to glass substrate was enhanced with indium tin oxide sublayer. Sunlight absorption coefficient of these rigid reflectors was 0.081-0.083.

  19. Stability characterizations of fixtured rigid bodies with Coulomb friction

    SciTech Connect

    PANG,J.S.; TRINKLE,JEFFREY C.

    2000-02-15

    This paper formally introduces several stability characterizations of fixtured three-dimensional rigid bodies initially at rest and in unilateral contact with Coulomb friction. These characterizations, weak stability and strong stability, arise naturally from the dynamic model of the system, formulated as a complementarity problem. Using the tools of complementarity theory, these characterizations are studied in detail to understand their properties and to develop techniques to identify the stability classifications of general systems subjected to known external loads.

  20. Geomagnetic Cutoff Rigidity Computer Program: Theory, Software Description and Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, D. F.; Shea, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The access of charged particles to the earth from space through the geomagnetic field has been of interest since the discovery of the cosmic radiation. The early cosmic ray measurements found that cosmic ray intensity was ordered by the magnetic latitude and the concept of cutoff rigidity was developed. The pioneering work of Stoermer resulted in the theory of particle motion in the geomagnetic field, but the fundamental mathematical equations developed have 'no solution in closed form'. This difficulty has forced researchers to use the 'brute force' technique of numerical integration of individual trajectories to ascertain the behavior of trajectory families or groups. This requires that many of the trajectories must be traced in order to determine what energy (or rigidity) a charged particle must have to penetrate the magnetic field and arrive at a specified position. It turned out the cutoff rigidity was not a simple quantity but had many unanticipated complexities that required many hundreds if not thousands of individual trajectory calculations to solve. The accurate calculation of particle trajectories in the earth's magnetic field is a fundamental problem that limited the efficient utilization of cosmic ray measurements during the early years of cosmic ray research. As the power of computers has improved over the decades, the numerical integration procedure has grown more tractable, and magnetic field models of increasing accuracy and complexity have been utilized. This report is documentation of a general FORTRAN computer program to trace the trajectory of a charged particle of a specified rigidity from a specified position and direction through a model of the geomagnetic field.

  1. Direct inversion of rigid-body rotational dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, Ralph; Paielli, Russell

    1990-01-01

    The global linearization (inversion) of rigid-body rotational dynamics is reviewed and representations in terms of quaternions and direction cosines are compared. Certain properties common to quaternions and direction cosines that make their use preferable to Euler angles and that simplify the inversion procedure are described. Applications of the inversion procedure for state estimation and attitude control are discussed. To avoid complexities caused by aerodynamics, an example of direct inversion for linear feedback control of spacecraft attitude is given.

  2. Potentials of Mean Force Between Rigid Solvated Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    FRINK, LAURA J.D.; SALINGER, ANDREW G.

    1999-09-29

    In this letter we discusses the first application of 3-dimensional nonlocal density functional calculations to the interactions of solvated rigid polymers. The three cases considered are cylindrical polymers, bead-chain polymers, and periodic polymers. We calculate potentials of mean force, and show that polymer surface structure plays a critical role in determining the solvation energy landscape which in turn controls routes to assembly of the macromolecules.

  3. Two-beam interferometer for fourier spectroscopy with rigid pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, P.

    1983-05-17

    A two-beam interferometer for fourier spectroscopy includes a rigid pendulum structure mounting at least one of the movable retroreflectors in a fully compensated optical system immune to tilt and lateral movement distortions. The swing of the rotatably journaled pendulum accurately confines the retroreflector(s) to movement in a single plane during scanning and, due to the low heat generated in the pendulum bearings, the simple and compact structure is well adapted to be housed in a cryostat aboard a spacecraft.

  4. Stabilization of the permanent rotations of a rigid body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biiarov, T.; Krementulo, V. V.; Tazhekov, A.

    1991-08-01

    The problem of stabilization of the equilibrium and permanent rotations of a heavy rigid body with a fixed point is solved in the classical cases of Euler, Lagrange, and Kovalevskaya using methods of analytical control theory. In the above cases, the control moments obtained in explicit form provide for the asymptotic stability of the permanent rotation on the whole. The control moments are selected in the form of linear functions with respect to perturbations.

  5. Scale-dependent rigidity of polymer-ornamented membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, T.; Marques, C. M.

    2002-11-01

    We study the fluctuation spectrum of fluid membranes carrying grafted polymers. Contrary to usual descriptions, we find that the modifications induced by the polymers cannot be reduced to the renormalization of the membrane bending rigidity. Instead we show that the ornamented membrane exhibits a scale-dependent elastic modulus that we evaluate. In ornamented lamellar stacks, we further compute the polymer contribution to the Caillé parameter characterizing the power law singularities of the Bragg peaks.

  6. Theory of rigid-plane phonon modes in layered crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, K. H.; Verberck, B.

    2012-03-01

    The lattice dynamics of low-frequency rigid-plane modes in metallic (graphene multilayers, GML) and in insulating (hexagonal boron-nitride multilayers, BNML) layered crystals is investigated. The frequencies of shearing and compression (stretching) modes depend on the layer number N and are presented in the form of fan diagrams. The results for GML and BNML are very similar. In both cases, only the interactions (van der Waals and Coulomb) between nearest-neighbor planes are effective, while the interactions between more distant planes are screened. A comparison with recent Raman scattering results on low-frequency shear modes in GML [Tan , Nat. Mater., in press, doi:10.1038/nmat3245, (2012)] is made. Relations with the low-lying rigid-plane phonon dispersions in the bulk materials are established. Master curves, which connect the fan diagram frequencies for any given N, are derived. Static and dynamic thermal correlation functions for rigid-layer shear and compression modes are calculated. The results might be of use for the interpretation of friction force experiments on multilayer crystals.

  7. Rigid facial motion influences featural, but not holistic, face processing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Naiqi G; Quinn, Paul C; Ge, Liezhong; Lee, Kang

    2012-03-15

    We report three experiments in which we investigated the effect of rigid facial motion on face processing. Specifically, we used the face composite effect to examine whether rigid facial motion influences primarily featural or holistic processing of faces. In Experiments 1-3, participants were first familiarized with dynamic displays in which a target face turned from one side to another; then at test, participants judged whether the top half of a composite face (the top half of the target/foil face aligned or misaligned with the bottom half of a foil face) belonged to the target face. We compared performance in the dynamic condition to various static control conditions in Experiments 1-3, which differed from each other in terms of the display order of the multiple static images or the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) between the images. We found that the size of the face composite effect in the dynamic condition was significantly smaller than that in the static conditions. In other words, the dynamic face display influenced participants to process the target faces in a part-based manner and consequently their recognition of the upper portion of the composite face at test became less interfered with by the aligned lower part of the foil face. The findings from the present experiments provide the strongest evidence to date to suggest that the rigid facial motion mainly influences facial featural, but not holistic, processing. PMID:22342561

  8. Representing plants as rigid cylinders in experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Luna, Andrés; Crosato, Alessandra; Calvani, Giulio; Uijttewaal, Wim S. J.

    2016-07-01

    Simulating the morphological adaptation of water systems often requires including the effects of plants on water and sediment dynamics. Physical and numerical models need representing vegetation in a schematic easily-quantifiable way despite the variety of sizes, shapes and flexibility of real plants. Common approaches represent plants as rigid cylinders, but the ability of these schematizations to reproduce the effects of vegetation on morphodynamic processes has never been analyzed systematically. This work focuses on the consequences of representing plants as rigid cylinders in laboratory tests and numerical simulations. New experiments show that the flow resistance decreases for increasing element Reynolds numbers for both plants and rigid cylinders. Cylinders on river banks can qualitatively reproduce vegetation effects on channel width and bank-related processes. A comparative review of numerical simulations shows that Baptist's method that sums the contribution of bed shear stress and vegetation drag, underestimates bed erosion within sparse vegetation in real rivers and overestimates the mean flow velocity in laboratory experiments. This is due to assuming uniform flow among plants and to an overestimation of the role of the submergence ratio.

  9. New Langevin and gradient thermostats for rigid body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidchack, R. L.; Ouldridge, T. E.; Tretyakov, M. V.

    2015-04-01

    We introduce two new thermostats, one of Langevin type and one of gradient (Brownian) type, for rigid body dynamics. We formulate rotation using the quaternion representation of angular coordinates; both thermostats preserve the unit length of quaternions. The Langevin thermostat also ensures that the conjugate angular momenta stay within the tangent space of the quaternion coordinates, as required by the Hamiltonian dynamics of rigid bodies. We have constructed three geometric numerical integrators for the Langevin thermostat and one for the gradient thermostat. The numerical integrators reflect key properties of the thermostats themselves. Namely, they all preserve the unit length of quaternions, automatically, without the need of a projection onto the unit sphere. The Langevin integrators also ensure that the angular momenta remain within the tangent space of the quaternion coordinates. The Langevin integrators are quasi-symplectic and of weak order two. The numerical method for the gradient thermostat is of weak order one. Its construction exploits ideas of Lie-group type integrators for differential equations on manifolds. We numerically compare the discretization errors of the Langevin integrators, as well as the efficiency of the gradient integrator compared to the Langevin ones when used in the simulation of rigid TIP4P water model with smoothly truncated electrostatic interactions. We observe that the gradient integrator is computationally less efficient than the Langevin integrators. We also compare the relative accuracy of the Langevin integrators in evaluating various static quantities and give recommendations as to the choice of an appropriate integrator.

  10. New Langevin and gradient thermostats for rigid body dynamics.

    PubMed

    Davidchack, R L; Ouldridge, T E; Tretyakov, M V

    2015-04-14

    We introduce two new thermostats, one of Langevin type and one of gradient (Brownian) type, for rigid body dynamics. We formulate rotation using the quaternion representation of angular coordinates; both thermostats preserve the unit length of quaternions. The Langevin thermostat also ensures that the conjugate angular momenta stay within the tangent space of the quaternion coordinates, as required by the Hamiltonian dynamics of rigid bodies. We have constructed three geometric numerical integrators for the Langevin thermostat and one for the gradient thermostat. The numerical integrators reflect key properties of the thermostats themselves. Namely, they all preserve the unit length of quaternions, automatically, without the need of a projection onto the unit sphere. The Langevin integrators also ensure that the angular momenta remain within the tangent space of the quaternion coordinates. The Langevin integrators are quasi-symplectic and of weak order two. The numerical method for the gradient thermostat is of weak order one. Its construction exploits ideas of Lie-group type integrators for differential equations on manifolds. We numerically compare the discretization errors of the Langevin integrators, as well as the efficiency of the gradient integrator compared to the Langevin ones when used in the simulation of rigid TIP4P water model with smoothly truncated electrostatic interactions. We observe that the gradient integrator is computationally less efficient than the Langevin integrators. We also compare the relative accuracy of the Langevin integrators in evaluating various static quantities and give recommendations as to the choice of an appropriate integrator. PMID:25877569

  11. Sequential Non-Rigid Structure from Motion Using Physical Priors.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Antonio; Moreno-Noguer, Francesc; Calvo, Begona; Montiel, Jose M Martinez

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new approach to simultaneously recover camera pose and 3D shape of non-rigid and potentially extensible surfaces from a monocular image sequence. For this purpose, we make use of the Extended Kalman Filter based Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (EKF-SLAM) formulation, a Bayesian optimization framework traditionally used in mobile robotics for estimating camera pose and reconstructing rigid scenarios. In order to extend the problem to a deformable domain we represent the object's surface mechanics by means of Navier's equations, which are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM). With these main ingredients, we can further model the material's stretching, allowing us to go a step further than most of current techniques, typically constrained to surfaces undergoing isometric deformations. We extensively validate our approach in both real and synthetic experiments, and demonstrate its advantages with respect to competing methods. More specifically, we show that besides simultaneously retrieving camera pose and non-rigid shape, our approach is adequate for both isometric and extensible surfaces, does not require neither batch processing all the frames nor tracking points over the whole sequence and runs at several frames per second. PMID:27046840

  12. Considerations concerning the non-rigid Earth nutation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V.; Arias, F.; Bizouard, Ch.; Bretagnon, P.; Brzezinski, A.; Buffett, B.; Capitaine, N.; Defraigne, P.; de Viron, O.; Feissel, M.; Fliegel, H.; Forte, A.; Gambis, D.; Getino, J.; Gross, R.; Herring, T.; Kinoshita, H.; Klioner, S.; Mathews, P. M.; McCarthy, D.; Moisson, X.; Petrov, S.; Ponte, R. M.; Roosbeek, F.; Salstein, D.; Schuh, H.; Seidelmann, K.; Soffel, M.; Souchay, J.; Vondrak, J.; Wahr, J. M.; Wallace, P.; Weber, R.; Williams, J.; Yatskiv, Y.; Zharov, V.; Zhu, S. Y.

    This paper presents the reflections of the Working Group of which the tasks were to examine the non-rigid Earth nutation theory. To this aim, six different levels have been identified: Level 1 concerns the input model (giving profiles of the Earth's density and theological properties) for the calculation of the Earth's transfer function of Level 2; Level 2 concerns the integration inside the Earth in order to obtain the Earth's transfer function for the nutations at different frequencies; Level 3 concerns the rigid Earth nutations; Level 4 examines the convolution (products in the frequency domain) between the Earth's nutation transfer function obtained in Level 2, and the rigid Earth nutation (obtained in Level 3). This is for an Earth without ocean and atmosphere; Level 5 concerns the effects of the atmosphere and the oceans on the precession, obliquity rate, and nutations; Level 6 concerns the comparison with the VLBI observations, of the theoretical results obtained in Level 4, corrected for the effects obtained in Level 5. Each level is discussed at the state of the art of the developments.

  13. Measuring membrane rigidity and viscosity: New methods, and new insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Lipid membranes are remarkable materials: flexible, two-dimensional fluids whose physical properties guide cellular function. Bending rigidity and viscosity are two of the key mechanical parameters that characterize membranes. Both, however, are challenging to measure. I describe improvements in experimental techniques to quantify the bending modulus and the two-dimensional viscosity of lipid membranes. First, I show that using selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM, also known as light sheet fluorescence microscopy) to image the thermal fluctuations of freely suspended giant lipid vesicles enables straightforward measurements of membrane rigidity, and also provides insights into changes in rigidity induced by cargo trafficking proteins. Second, I show that tracking both the rotational and translational diffusion of membrane-anchored tracer particles allows quantification of membrane viscosity, measurement of the effective radii of the tracers, and assessment of theoretical models of membrane hydrodynamics. Surprisingly, we find a wide distribution of effective tracer sizes, due presumably to a wide variety of couplings to the membrane. I also provide an example of protein-mediated changes in lipid viscosity.

  14. Dielectric elastomer bending tube actuators with rigid electrode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrheim, F.; Schlaak, H. F.; Meyer, J.-U.

    2010-04-01

    The common approach for dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) is based on the assumption that compliant electrodes are a fundamental design requirement. For tube-like applications compliant electrodes cause a change of the actuator diameter during actuation and would require additional support-structures. Focused on thinwalled actuator-tube geometries room consumption and radial stabilityr epresent crucial criteria. Following the ambition of maximum functional integration, the concept of using a rigid electrode structure arises. This structure realizes both, actuation and support characteristics. The intended rigid electrode structure is based on a stacked DEA with a non-compressible dielectric. Byactu ation, the displaced dielectric causes an overlap. This overlap serves as an indicator for geometrical limitations and has been used to extract design rules regarding the electrode size, electrode distance and maximum electrode travel. Bycons idering the strain in anydir ection, the mechanical efficiencyhas been used to define further design aspects. To verifyt he theoretic analysis, a test for determination of the compressive stress-strain-characteristics has been applied for different electrode setups. As result the geometrydep ending elastic pressure module has been formulated by implementation of a shape factor. The presented investigations consider exclusive the static behavior of a DEA-setup with rigid electrodes.

  15. Rigid endoscopy in globus pharyngeus: how valuable is it?

    PubMed

    Takwoingi, Y M; Kale, U S; Morgan, D W

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of rigid endoscopy in patients presenting with globus symptoms. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 250 patients who underwent rigid endoscopy for globus symptoms over a 12-month period. In 217 patients (86.8 per cent) the examination of the larynx, pharynx and upper oesophagus was entirely normal. Abnormal findings included cricopharyngeal spasm in 12 patients (4.8 per cent), reflux in 11 (4.4 per cent), pharyngitis in two (0.8 per cent), web in two (0.8 per cent), and retention cyst in three (1.2 per cent). The 95 per cent confidence interval (CI) for the mean number of persons with malignancy based on the Poisson distribution is 0 and 3.7 (0 and 14.8 as rates per 1000). The relationship between the clinical diagnosis and endoscopic findings was examined using the chi-square test, with a p value of 0.0001. These results suggest that patients presenting with globus sensation are unlikely to harbour neoplastic lesions and therefore rigid endoscopy may well be an inappropriate investigation in this group. The risks, costs and discomfort associated with this intervention can often be avoided. PMID:16359156

  16. Cell movement is guided by the rigidity of the substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. M.; Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Wang, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    Directional cell locomotion is critical in many physiological processes, including morphogenesis, the immune response, and wound healing. It is well known that in these processes cell movements can be guided by gradients of various chemical signals. In this study, we demonstrate that cell movement can also be guided by purely physical interactions at the cell-substrate interface. We cultured National Institutes of Health 3T3 fibroblasts on flexible polyacrylamide sheets coated with type I collagen. A transition in rigidity was introduced in the central region of the sheet by a discontinuity in the concentration of the bis-acrylamide cross-linker. Cells approaching the transition region from the soft side could easily migrate across the boundary, with a concurrent increase in spreading area and traction forces. In contrast, cells migrating from the stiff side turned around or retracted as they reached the boundary. We call this apparent preference for a stiff substrate "durotaxis." In addition to substrate rigidity, we discovered that cell movement could also be guided by manipulating the flexible substrate to produce mechanical strains in the front or rear of a polarized cell. We conclude that changes in tissue rigidity and strain could play an important controlling role in a number of normal and pathological processes involving cell locomotion.

  17. Force Coefficients on Surging Rigid and Flexible Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Peter; Jones, Anya; Granlund, Kenneth; Ol, Michael

    2013-11-01

    This study considers an aspect ratio 4 rigid flat plate and an aspect ratio 4.5 flexible wing, undergoing rectilinear motion in a water tunnel over several chord lengths at a Reynolds number of 20,000. Varying incidence angle, Reynolds number, and acceleration profile led to an extensive parameter study for both wings. Acceleration regions were linear with time and varied with distances of 0.25 to 6.0 chord-lengths. Measurements include lift and drag histories along with flow visualization of leading and trailing edge vortices throughout the entire motion by fluorescent dye injection illuminated by a laser sheet. A non-circulatory bump in lift coefficient at the end of the acceleration region was observed for each rigid wing case. The rigid wing also experienced a significant decrease in lift shortly after the wing reached its terminal velocity. This dip was followed by a second peak in lift around 6 chords traveled for every case, although the magnitudes differed among the acceleration profiles. Conversely, the flexible wing exhibited little to no non-circulatory peak at the end of acceleration and did not experience this dip and rise in lift. This study explores the influence of planform and chordwise flexibility on leading edge vortex formation, retention, and shedding.

  18. Rigidity based formation tracking for multi-agent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lu; Chen, Fei; Lan, Wei-Yao

    2015-09-01

    This paper considers the formation tracking problem under a rigidity framework, where the target formation is specified as a minimally and infinitesimally rigid formation and the desired velocity of the group is available to only a subset of the agents. The following two cases are considered: the desired velocity is constant, and the desired velocity is time-varying. In the first case, a distributed linear estimator is constructed for each agent to estimate the desired velocity. The velocity estimation and a formation acquisition term are employed to design the control inputs for the agents, where the rigidity matrix plays a central role. In the second case, a distributed non-smooth estimator is constructed to estimate the time-varying velocity, which is shown to converge in a finite time. Theoretical analysis shows that the formation tracking problem can be solved under the proposed control algorithms and estimators. Simulation results are also provided to show the validity of the derived results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61473240).

  19. Service life evaluation of rigid explosive transfer lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Kayser, E. G.; Schimmel, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a joint Army/NASA-sponsored research program on the service life evaluation of rigid explosive transfer lines. These transfer lines are used to initiate emergency crew escape functions on a wide variety of military and NASA aircraft. The purpose of this program was to determine quantitatively the effects of service, age, and degradation on rigid explosive transfer lines to allow responsible, conservative, service life determination. More than 800 transfer lines were removed from the U.S. Army AH-1G and AH-1S, the U.S. Air Force B-1 and F-111, and the U.S. Navy F-14 aircraft for testing. The results indicated that the lines were not adversely affected by age, service, or a repeat of the thermal qualification tests on full-service lines. Extension of the service life of rigid explosive transfer lines should be considered, since considerable cost savings could be realized with no measurable decrease in system reliability.

  20. 49 CFR 178.925 - Standards for rigid plastic Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic Large Packagings. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Large Packagings Standards § 178.925 Standards for rigid plastic Large Packagings. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic Large Packagings intended to contain liquids...

  1. 49 CFR 178.925 - Standards for rigid plastic Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic Large Packagings. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Large Packagings Standards § 178.925 Standards for rigid plastic Large Packagings. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic Large Packagings intended to contain liquids...

  2. 49 CFR 178.925 - Standards for rigid plastic Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for rigid plastic Large Packagings. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Large Packagings Standards § 178.925 Standards for rigid plastic Large Packagings. (a) The provisions in this section apply to rigid plastic Large Packagings intended to contain liquids...

  3. Lie-Poisson integrators for rigid body dynamics in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touma, J.; Wisdom, J.

    1994-03-01

    The n-body mapping method of Wisdom & Holman (1991) is generalized to encompass rotational dynamics. The Lie-Poisson structure of rigid body dynamics is discussed. Integrators which preserve that structure are derived for the motion of a free rigid body and for the motion of rigid bodies interacting gravitationally with mass points.

  4. 49 CFR 178.925 - Standards for rigid plastic Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... solids. Rigid plastic Large Packaging types are designated: (1) 50H rigid plastics. (2) (b) A rigid plastic Large Packaging must be manufactured from plastic material of known specifications and be of a... additives must be compatible with the contents and remain effective throughout the life of the plastic...

  5. Multiscale multiphysics and multidomain models—Flexibility and rigidity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kelin; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    The emerging complexity of large macromolecules has led to challenges in their full scale theoretical description and computer simulation. Multiscale multiphysics and multidomain models have been introduced to reduce the number of degrees of freedom while maintaining modeling accuracy and achieving computational efficiency. A total energy functional is constructed to put energies for polar and nonpolar solvation, chemical potential, fluid flow, molecular mechanics, and elastic dynamics on an equal footing. The variational principle is utilized to derive coupled governing equations for the above mentioned multiphysical descriptions. Among these governing equations is the Poisson-Boltzmann equation which describes continuum electrostatics with atomic charges. The present work introduces the theory of continuum elasticity with atomic rigidity (CEWAR). The essence of CEWAR is to formulate the shear modulus as a continuous function of atomic rigidity. As a result, the dynamics complexity of a macromolecular system is separated from its static complexity so that the more time-consuming dynamics is handled with continuum elasticity theory, while the less time-consuming static analysis is pursued with atomic approaches. We propose a simple method, flexibility-rigidity index (FRI), to analyze macromolecular flexibility and rigidity in atomic detail. The construction of FRI relies on the fundamental assumption that protein functions, such as flexibility, rigidity, and energy, are entirely determined by the structure of the protein and its environment, although the structure is in turn determined by all the interactions. As such, the FRI measures the topological connectivity of protein atoms or residues and characterizes the geometric compactness of the protein structure. As a consequence, the FRI does not resort to the interaction Hamiltonian and bypasses matrix diagonalization, which underpins most other flexibility analysis methods. FRI's computational complexity is of

  6. Propagation of sound in the vicinity of rigid porous interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Hongdan

    Propagation of sound in the vicinity of rigid porous interfaces is investigated systematically to facilitate the acoustical characterization of sound absorption materials for noise reduction applications. Various rigid porous interfaces are considered: (1) a semi-infinite porous layer; (2) a porous hard-backed surface; and (3) a porous impedance-backed layer. A closed-form solution and numerical methods are derived with respect to each rigid porous interface condition. A modified saddle-point method is exploited to investigate the sound field emanating from a monopole source above and below a rigid porous interface. The solutions can be expressed in a form that resembles the classical Weyl-Van der Pol formula. A heuristic method is then proposed to remove the singularity within the asymptotic solution via application of the double saddle-point method. Its relative simplicity and accuracy demonstrates the advantage of the double saddle-point method whenever the approximation is valid. Following this, the sound field within a hard-backed rigid porous medium due to an airborne source is examined. The accuracy of the proposed asymptotic solutions has been confirmed by comparison with benchmark numerical solutions and through indoor sound propagation experiments. Measurement data and theoretical predictions suggest that when the receiver is positioned near the top surface of the hard-backed layer, the ground reflection of the refracted wave contributes greatly to the total sound field. Taking into account source characteristics, an asymptotic formula is derived for predicting the sound field from a dipole source above and below an extended reaction ground. The directional effect of the dipole source on each term within the asymptotic solutions is interpreted. Further analysis shows that an accurate asymptotic solution can provide a good starter field for the Parabolic Equation--Finite Element Method (PE/FEM). The PE/FEM marching schemes are derived based on linear and

  7. Multiscale multiphysics and multidomain models—Flexibility and rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Kelin; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-11-21

    The emerging complexity of large macromolecules has led to challenges in their full scale theoretical description and computer simulation. Multiscale multiphysics and multidomain models have been introduced to reduce the number of degrees of freedom while maintaining modeling accuracy and achieving computational efficiency. A total energy functional is constructed to put energies for polar and nonpolar solvation, chemical potential, fluid flow, molecular mechanics, and elastic dynamics on an equal footing. The variational principle is utilized to derive coupled governing equations for the above mentioned multiphysical descriptions. Among these governing equations is the Poisson-Boltzmann equation which describes continuum electrostatics with atomic charges. The present work introduces the theory of continuum elasticity with atomic rigidity (CEWAR). The essence of CEWAR is to formulate the shear modulus as a continuous function of atomic rigidity. As a result, the dynamics complexity of a macromolecular system is separated from its static complexity so that the more time-consuming dynamics is handled with continuum elasticity theory, while the less time-consuming static analysis is pursued with atomic approaches. We propose a simple method, flexibility-rigidity index (FRI), to analyze macromolecular flexibility and rigidity in atomic detail. The construction of FRI relies on the fundamental assumption that protein functions, such as flexibility, rigidity, and energy, are entirely determined by the structure of the protein and its environment, although the structure is in turn determined by all the interactions. As such, the FRI measures the topological connectivity of protein atoms or residues and characterizes the geometric compactness of the protein structure. As a consequence, the FRI does not resort to the interaction Hamiltonian and bypasses matrix diagonalization, which underpins most other flexibility analysis methods. FRI's computational complexity is of O

  8. Direct numerical simulation of rigid bodies in multiphase flow within an Eulerian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenberger, P.; Weigand, B.

    2015-06-01

    A new method is presented to simulate rigid body motion in the Volume-of-Fluid based multiphase code Free Surface 3D. The specific feature of the new method is that it works within an Eulerian framework without the need for a Lagrangian representation of rigid bodies. Several test cases are shown to prove the validity of the numerical scheme. The technique is able to conserve the shape of arbitrarily shaped rigid bodies and predict terminal velocities of rigid spheres. The instability of a falling ellipsoid is captured. Multiple rigid bodies including collisions may be considered using only one Volume-of-Fluid variable which allows to simulate the drafting, kissing and tumbling phenomena of two rigid spheres. The method can easily be extended to rigid bodies undergoing phase change processes.

  9. Method for identification of rigid domains and hinge residues in proteins based on exhaustive enumeration.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Many proteins undergo large-scale motions where relatively rigid domains move against each other. The identification of rigid domains, as well as the hinge residues important for their relative movements, is important for various applications including flexible docking simulations. In this work, we develop a method for protein rigid domain identification based on an exhaustive enumeration of maximal rigid domains, the rigid domains not fully contained within other domains. The computation is performed by mapping the problem to that of finding maximal cliques in a graph. A minimal set of rigid domains are then selected, which cover most of the protein with minimal overlap. In contrast to the results of existing methods that partition a protein into non-overlapping domains using approximate algorithms, the rigid domains obtained from exact enumeration naturally contain overlapping regions, which correspond to the hinges of the inter-domain bending motion. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on several proteins. PMID:25820699

  10. Semi-rigid ureteroscopy: Proximal versus distal ureteral stones

    PubMed Central

    Alameddine, Mahmoud; Azab, Mohamad M.; Nassir, Anmar A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of semi-rigid ureteroscopy in proximal and distal ureteral stones, and to compare the operative and perioperative characteristics between the two stone groups. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent semi-rigid ureteroscopy for management of ureteral stones at the International Medical Center between June 2007 and September 2012. All stones were fragmented using Holmium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser lithotripter. Stones located above the pelvic brim are considered proximal and below it are distal. Results: One hundred and ninety-one patients were included. One hundred and three patients (54%) underwent ureteroscopy for proximal stones and 88 (46%) for distal stones. The stone size in the proximal group was 10 mm (±5.5) versus 8.6 mm (±5) in the distal group. The initial stone-free rate for proximal and distal calculi were 89–98.2%, respectively. The perioperative complication rate was higher in the proximal group 10% compared to the distal group which is 1.5% (P = 0.06). Both groups have the same average of hospital stay 1.2 days. Conclusion: Although there is a clinical difference between proximal and distal calculi groups in terms of complication and stone-free rates, this difference remained statistically insignificant (P = 0.06). Using a smaller caliber semi-rigid ureteroscopy combined with Holmium-YAG laser can be carried out as a day care procedure and showed a slightly higher risk in patients with proximal ureteral calculi which should be explained to the patient PMID:26834409

  11. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, Sergey A.; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  12. 76 FR 39115 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Transformation Initiative Family Self-Sufficiency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... Family Self-Sufficiency Demonstration Small Grants. Description of the need for information and proposed... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Transformation Initiative Family Self-Sufficiency Demonstration Small Grants AGENCY: Office of Policy Development and Research, HUD. ACTION:...

  13. Adiabatic invariants, diffusion and acceleration in rigid body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alexey V.; Mamaev, Ivan S.

    2016-03-01

    The onset of adiabatic chaos in rigid body dynamics is considered. A comparison of the analytically calculated diffusion coefficient describing probabilistic effects in the zone of chaos with a numerical experiment is made. An analysis of the splitting of asymptotic surfaces is performed and uncertainty curves are constructed in the Poincaré-Zhukovsky problem. The application of Hamiltonian methods to nonholonomic systems is discussed. New problem statements are given which are related to the destruction of an adiabatic invariant and to the acceleration of the system (Fermi's acceleration).

  14. A rigid lamb syndrome in sheep in Rhodesia.

    PubMed

    Rudert, C P; Lawrence, J A; Foggin, C; Barlow, R M

    1978-04-29

    A syndrome characterised by the birth of lambs with varying degrees of rigidity of the limbs and spine has been encountered on several occasions in Rhodesia. Outbreaks have occurred in autumn-born lambs from Dorper ewes grazing heavily fertilised Star grass cv No 2 (Cynodon aethiopicus) pastures. The condition appears to be exacerbated by the application of sulphur to the pasture and is partly prevented by the administration of selenium and vitamin E to the ewes before lambing. The aetiology is unknown. PMID:565556

  15. Masseter muscle rigidity: Atypical malignant hyperthermia presentation or isolated event?

    PubMed Central

    Onyeka, Tonia C. U.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a case of masseter muscle rigidity encountered at the start of an elective gynaecological procedure. At preoperative assessment, the patient, a 41-year old woman with a previous non-eventful surgical and anesthetic history was given a Mallampati score of 3. Following suxamethonium administration, full mouth opening proved difficult. Laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation were not possible leading to the eventual use of a laryngeal mask airway and resulting in a successful anaesthetic outcome. A number of possibilities that may account for this situation as well as viable options for airway access in such cases are discussed below. PMID:21189861

  16. A novel parametric method for non-rigid image registration.

    PubMed

    Cuzol, Anne; Hellier, Pierre; Mémin, Etienne

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel non-rigid registration method. The main contribution of the method is the modeling of the vorticity (respectively divergence) of the deformation field using vortex (respectively sink and source) particles. Two parameters are associated with a particle: the vorticity (or divergence) strength and the influence domain. This leads to a very compact representation of vorticity and divergence fields. In addition, the optimal position of these particles is determined using a mean shift process. 2D experiments of this method are presented and demonstrate its ability to recover evolving phenomena (MS lesions) so as to register images from 20 patients. PMID:17354717

  17. Control of the rigid body and dynamics with symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lum, Kai-Yew

    This dissertation explores various problems in the control of the rigid body and related dynamical systems with symmetry, utilizing various modeling approaches and control techniques. We first derive a control law that asymptotically stabilizes an unbalanced top to the sleeping motion. We rewrite the classical Euler-Poisson equations by projecting the phase space onto IRsp5. The control law is based on the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman theory with zero dynamics and partial stability. Lyapunov techniques are used in the analysis. Next, the control of rotor imbalance with magnetic bearings is considered in the adaptive virtual autobalancing and adaptive autocentering approaches. We derive single-plane and two-plane balancing control algorithms that provide asymptotic estimates of the rotor imbalance, and that guarantee consistent performance under varying spin rate. These algorithms are based on emulation of the mechanical autobalancer. We discuss the theory based on linear analysis, and simulation and experimental results. We go on to investigate symmetry properties associated with mechanical control systems and certain nonlinear control systems. First, we generalize the classical Serret-Andoyer transformation for the free rigid body to left-invariant, hyperregular Hamiltonian systems on Tsp*SO(3), employing the notion of symplectic (Marsden-Weinstein) reduction. We then apply this result to the controlled rigid body, and show that for Hamiltonian controls that preserve the rigid body structure, the generalized Serret-Andoyer transformation yields a two dimensional representation of the closed-loop motion in canonical form. Applications to the stability analysis of relative equilibria and numerical integration are also discussed. Finally, we apply the concept of reduction to certain regulation problems on smooth manifolds. Following the works of Van der Schaft (1981) and Grizzle and Marcus (1985), we show that an output feedback regulation problem possessing certain

  18. Nonlinear complex dynamics and Keynesian rigidity: A short introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovero, Edgardo

    2005-09-01

    The topic of this paper is to show that the greater acceptance and intense use of complex nonlinear dynamics in macroeconomics makes sense only within the neoKeynesian tradition. An example is presented regarding the behavior of an open-economy two-sector growth model endowed with Keynesian rigidity. The Keynesian view that structural instability globally exists in the aggregate economy is put forward, and therefore the need arises for policy to alleviate this instability in the form of dampened fluctuations is presented as an alternative view for macroeconomic theorizing.

  19. Ball Semi-Rigid Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendrick, Stephen; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The AMSD Program is to design, fabricate, and test a 1.4-m point-to-point hexagon mirror system. The Ball semi-rigid approach will be described and its current status presented, The mirror system includes a lightweighted beryllium mirror that is attached through flexures and actuators to a composite reaction structure enabling optical performance at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and allowing changes of curvature to be imposed via actuation. This program is administered through NASA MSFC and is jointly funded by NASA, the USAF, and the NRO.

  20. The market for large rigid haul trucks in surface mining

    SciTech Connect

    Gilewicz, P.

    2002-04-15

    Originally published in 2001 this updated report provides a definition of the market for large rigid haulers in surface mining. The analysis covers changes to the mining market segments buying these machines including the gains made by coal producers, retrenchment in copper mining, the consolidation taking place among gold mining companies, and the expansion of iron ore producers in Australia and Brazil. It includes a detailed accounting of 2001 truck shipments, and an analysis of trends in the Ultra-truck segment. It concludes with a revised forecast for shipments through 2006. 12 charts, 56 tabs., 2 apps.

  1. Roof-crush strength improvement using rigid polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, K.; Mani, A.

    1998-08-01

    Recent bending tests show the effectiveness of rigid, polyurethane foam in improving the strength of automotive body structures. By using foam, it is possible to reduce pillar sections, and to reduce thicknesses or eliminate reinforcements inside the pillars, and thereby offset the mass increase due to the foam filling. Further tests showed that utilizing the foam filling in a B-pillar to reduce section size can save ~20 mm that could be utilized to add energy absorbing structures in order to meet the new interior head impact requirements specified by the federal motor vehicle safety standards (FMVSS) 201 Head Impact Protection upgrade.

  2. a Failure Analysis of Intramuscular Rigid Implants for Muscle Contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ho; Loeb, Gerald E.; Peck, Raymond A.; Singh, Jasspreet; Deshpande, Sudeep; Baker, Lucinda L.; Bryant, J. Timothy

    Several studies have been made to develop different versions of new leadless, permanently implanted small electronic devices that allow to be injected into muscles (BIONs™). Their circuitry should be protected from body fluids by thin-walled hermetic capsules of rigid and brittle materials such as glass or ceramic to include feed through for their electrodes. These packages experience repetitive stresses due to the muscle contraction from their excitations. This study provides a worst-case analysis of such stresses and methods to test and validate devices intended for such usage, along with the failure analysis and remediation strategy for a design that experienced unanticipated failures in vivo.

  3. ``Meta''-rigid motions and frames of reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, Lluís; Llosa, Josep

    1995-10-01

    We define the “meta”-rigid motions as particular classes of time-like congruences which are solutions of intrinsically defined partial differential equations that generalize Born's conditions. We consider in particular two hierarchies of such congruences. The first one is a geometrically motivated direct generalization of the symmetry concept inherent in Born congruences. The second one is an indirect generalization based on the conditions which guarantee the existence of a particular class of adapted coordinates of space, named quo-harmonic coordinates, whose definition is akin to the definition of harmonic coordinates but which differs from it in an essential point.

  4. 24 CFR 960.255 - Self-sufficiency incentives-Disallowance of increase in annual income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-sufficiency incentives... and Reexamination § 960.255 Self-sufficiency incentives—Disallowance of increase in annual income. (a... participation in any economic self-sufficiency or other job training program; or (iii) Whose annual...

  5. Sufficiency of Longitudinal Moment of Inertia for Haptic Cylinder Length Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabe, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies invoke moment of inertia (I[subscript ii]) as necessary and sufficient information to perceive cylinder length via wielding, yet some assert that I[subscript ii] is neither necessary (weight, "m", or static moment, M, are sufficient) nor sufficient for length judgments ("m" or M is necessary). Mathematical expressions for I[subscript…

  6. Energetic Particle Anisotropies at the Heliospheric Boundary. II. Transient Features and Rigidity Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florinski, V.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; le Roux, J. A.

    2015-04-01

    In the preceding paper, we showed that large second-order anisotropies of heliospheric ions measured by the Voyager 1 space probe during the August 2012 boundary crossing event could be explained by a magnetic shear across the heliopause preventing particles streaming along the magnetic field from escaping the inner heliosheath. According to Stone et al., the penetration distance of heliospheric ions into the outer heliosheath had a strong dependence on the particle’s Larmor radius. By comparing hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions with the same energy per nucleon, these authors argued that this effect must be attributed to larger cyclotron radii of heavier species rather than differences in velocity. We propose that gradient drift in a nonuniform magnetic field was the cause of both the large second-order anisotropies and the spatial differentiation based on the ion’s rigidity. A latitudinal gradient of magnetic field strength of about 10% per AU between 2012.7 and 2012.9 could have provided drift motion sufficient to match both LECP and CRS Voyager 1 observations. We explain the transient intensity dropout observed prior to the heliocliff using flux tube structures embedded in the heliosheath and magnetically connected to interstellar space. Finally, this paper reports a new indirect measurement of the plasma radial velocity at the heliopause on the basis of the time difference between two cosmic-ray telescopes measuring the same intensity dropout.

  7. Hydrodynamic lubrication of rigid nonconformal contacts in combined rolling and normal motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Hamrock, B. J.; Brewe, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical solution to the problem of hydrodynamic lubrication of rigid point contacts with an isoviscous, incompressible lubricant was obtained. The hydrodynamic load-carrying capacity under unsteady (or dynamic) conditions arising from the combined effects of squeeze motion superposed upon the entraining motion was determined for both normal approach and separation. Superposed normal motion considerably increases net load-carrying capacity during normal approach and substantially reduces net load-carrying capacity during separation. Geometry was also found to have a significant influence on the dynamic load-carrying capacity. The ratio of dynamic to steady state load-carrying capacity increases with increasing geometry parameter for normal approach and decreases during separation. The cavitation (film rupture) boundary is also influenced significantly by the normal motion, moving downstream during approach and upstream during separation. For sufficiently high normal separation velocity the rupture boundary may even move upstream of the minimum-film-thickness position. Sixty-three cases were used to derive a functional relationship for the ratio of the dynamic to steady state load-carrying capacity in terms of the dimensionless normal velocity parameter (incorporating normal velocity, entraining velocity, and film thickness) and the geometry parameter.

  8. Inertial Motions of a Rigid Body with a Cavity Filled with a Viscous Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disser, Karoline; Galdi, Giovanni P.; Mazzone, Giusy; Zunino, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    We study inertial motions of the coupled system, {S}, constituted by a rigid body containing a cavity entirely filled with a viscous liquid. We show that for arbitrary initial data having only finite kinetic energy, every corresponding weak solution (à la Leray-Hopf) converges, as time goes to infinity, to a uniform rotation, unless two central moments of inertia of {S} coincide and are strictly greater than the third one. This corroborates a famous "conjecture" of N.Ye. Zhukovskii in several physically relevant cases. Moreover, we show that, in a known range of initial data, this rotation may only occur along the central axis of inertia of {S} with the larger moment of inertia. We also provide necessary and sufficient conditions for the rigorous nonlinear stability of permanent rotations, which improve and/or generalize results previously given by other authors under different types of approximation. Finally, we present results obtained by a targeted numerical simulation that, on the one hand, complement the analytical findings, whereas, on the other hand, point out new features that the analysis is yet not able to catch, and, as such, lay the foundation for interesting and challenging future investigation.

  9. Techniques for measurement of dipole endfields with a rigid integrating coil

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, H.D.

    1993-07-01

    The endfield is often one of the most critical regions in conventional accelerator magnets. While the magnetic field structure of dipole ends can be complicated, it can be well described by a few parameters which include the effective magnetic length, L{sub eff}, and the integrated harmonics. Both of these parameters can be measured using a rigid coil which measures {integral} Bdl in the endfield region as a function of insertion depth z and transverse displacement x. We employ a data analysis technique which uses these measurements to remove body field contributions to the end field integral, resulting in the effective integrated endfield shape. A least squares polynomial fit is then used to estimate the harmonic coefficients up to decapole. We also present the technique for measuring L{sub eff} as a function of magnet current. These measurement techniques were successfully used in a study to finalize the design of the endpacks for the Fermilab Main Injector Dipole. The techniques are sufficiently general to be useful for other applications, such as the testing of the SSC Medium Energy Booster endpacks.

  10. Polymer glass transition occurs at the marginal rigidity point with connectivity z* = 4.

    PubMed

    Lappala, Anna; Zaccone, Alessio; Terentjev, Eugene M

    2016-09-21

    We re-examine the physical origin of the polymer glass transition from the point of view of marginal rigidity, which is achieved at a certain average number of mechanically active intermolecular contacts per monomer. In the case of polymer chains in a melt/poor solvent, each monomer has two neighbors bound by covalent bonds and also a number of central-force contacts modelled by the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. We find that when the average number of contacts per monomer (covalent and non-covalent) exceeds the critical value z* ≈ 4, the system becomes solid and the dynamics arrested - a state that we declare the glass. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations show that at sufficient strength of LJ attraction (which effectively represents the depth of quenching, or the quality of solvent) the polymer globule indeed crosses the threshold of z*, and becomes a glass with a finite zero-frequency shear modulus, G∝ (z-z*). We verify this by showing the distinction between the 'liquid' polymer droplet at z < z*, which changes shape and adopts the spherical conformation in equilibrium, and the glassy 'solid' droplet at z > z*, which retains its shape frozen at the moment of z* crossover. These results provide a robust microscopic criterion to tell the liquid apart from the glass for the linear polymers. PMID:27517325

  11. Comment on ``Effect of polydispersity on the ordering transition of adsorbed self-assembled rigid rods''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, L. G.; Linares, D. H.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2012-05-01

    The critical behavior of self-assembled rigid rods on a square lattice was recently reinvestigated by Almarza [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.82.061117 82, 061117 (2010)]. Based on the Binder cumulants and the value of the critical exponent of the correlation length, the authors found that the isotropic-nematic phase transition occurring in the system is in the two-dimensional Ising universality class. This conclusion contrasts with that of a previous study [López , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.040105 80, 040105(R) (2009)] which indicates that the transition at intermediate density belongs to the q=1 Potts universality class. Almarza attributed the discrepancy to the use of the density as the control parameter by López The present work shows that this suggestion is not sufficient, and that the discrepancy arises solely from the use of different statistical ensembles. Finally, the necessity of making corrections to the scaling functions in the canonical ensemble is discussed.

  12. Using "Rebar" to Stabilize Rigid Chest Wall Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lary A; Grubbs, Deanna M

    2016-04-01

    After major chest wall resection, reconstruction of the bony defect with a rigid prosthesis is mandatory to protect the underlying thoracic organs, and to prevent flail chest physiology. Although many methods have been described for chest wall reconstruction, a commonly used technique employs a composite Marlex (polypropylene) mesh with methyl-methacrylate cement sandwiched between two layers of mesh (MMS), which is tailored to the defect size and shape. In building construction, steel "rebar" is used to strengthen and reinforce masonry structures. To avoid the initial residual motion of the rigid prosthesis used to reconstruct very large defects, particularly the sternum, we devised a simple technique of adding one or more Steinmann steel pins as "rebar" to strengthen and immediately stabilize the prosthesis to the surrounding ribs and sternum. For the very large defects, particularly over the heart and great vessels, titanium mesh may also be readily added into the sandwich construction for increased strength and to prevent late prosthetic fractures. Short- and long-term results of this inexpensive modification of the MMS reconstruction technique are excellent. This modified MMS tailor-made prosthesis is only one-third the cost of the recently popular prosthetic titanium systems, takes much less operative time to create and implant, and avoids the well-described complications of late titanium bar fracture and erosion/infection as well as loosening of screws and/or titanium bars. PMID:25602843

  13. Extracellular rigidity sensing by talin isoform–specific mechanical linkages

    PubMed Central

    Austen, Katharina; Ringer, Pia; Mehlich, Alexander; Chrostek-Grashoff, Anna; Kluger, Carleen; Klingner, Christoph; Sabass, Benedikt; Zent, Roy; Rief, Matthias; Grashoff, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to adhere and sense differences in tissue stiffness is crucial for organ development and function. The central mechanisms by which adherent cells detect extracellular matrix compliance, however, are still unknown. Using two single-molecule–calibrated biosensors that allow the analysis of a previously inaccessible but physiologically highly relevant force regime in cells, we demonstrate that the integrin activator talin establishes mechanical linkages upon cell adhesion, which are indispensable for cells to probe tissue stiffness. Talin linkages are exposed to a range of piconewton (pN) forces and bear, on average, 7–10 pN during cell adhesion depending on their association with f-actin and vinculin. Disruption of talin’s mechanical engagement does not impair integrin activation and initial cell adhesion but prevents focal adhesion reinforcement and thus extracellular rigidity sensing. Intriguingly, talin mechanics are isoform-specific so that expression of either talin-1 or talin-2 modulates extracellular rigidity sensing. PMID:26523364

  14. Heat Transfer Modeling for Rigid High-Temperature Fibrous Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Cunnington, George R.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Combined radiation and conduction heat transfer through a high-temperature, high-porosity, rigid multiple-fiber fibrous insulation was modeled using a thermal model previously used to model heat transfer in flexible single-fiber fibrous insulation. The rigid insulation studied was alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) at densities between 130 and 260 kilograms per cubic meter. The model consists of using the diffusion approximation for radiation heat transfer, a semi-empirical solid conduction model, and a standard gas conduction model. The relevant parameters needed for the heat transfer model were estimated from steady-state thermal measurements in nitrogen gas at various temperatures and environmental pressures. The heat transfer modeling methodology was evaluated by comparison with standard thermal conductivity measurements, and steady-state thermal measurements in helium and carbon dioxide gases. The heat transfer model is applicable over the temperature range of 300 to 1360 K, pressure range of 0.133 to 101.3 x 10(exp 3) Pa, and over the insulation density range of 130 to 260 kilograms per cubic meter in various gaseous environments.

  15. Rigid Cooperation of Per1 and Per2 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Sumito; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Period circadian clock (Per) genes Per1 and Per2 have essential roles in circadian oscillation. In this study, we identified a new role of Per1-Per2 cooperation, and its mechanism, using our new experimental methods. Under constant light conditions, the period length of Per1 and Per2 knockout mice depended on the copy number ratio of Per1:Per2. We then established a light-emitting diode-based lighting system that can generate any pattern of light intensity. Under gradually changing light in the absence of phase shift with different periods, both Per1(−/−) and Per2(−/−) mice were entrained to a broader range of period length than wild-type mice. To analyse Per1-Per2 cooperative roles at the cell culture level, we established a Per2 knockout-rescue system, which can detect period shortening in a familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (FASPS) mutant. Upon introduction of the Per1 coding region in this system, we saw period shortening. In conclusion, short period-associated protein Per1 and long period-associated Per2 cooperated to rigidly confine the circadian period to “circa” 24-h. These results suggest that the rigid circadian rhythm maintained through the cooperation of Per1-Per2 could negatively impact modern society, in which the use of artificial lighting is ubiquitous, and result in circadian disorders, including delirium. PMID:27609640

  16. Rigidity transition in polymer melts with van der Waals interaction.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Matthew L; Joós, Béla; Plischke, Michael

    2004-10-01

    We study the onset of rigidity near the glass transition (GT) in a short-chain polymer melt modelled by a bead-spring model, where all beads interact with Lennard-Jones potentials. The properties of the system are examined above and below the GT. In order to minimize high-cooling-rate effects and computational times, equilibrium configurations are reached via isothermal compression. We monitor quantities such as the heat capacity CP, the short-time diffusion constants D, the viscosity eta , and the shear modulus; the time-dependent shear modulus Gt is compared with the shear modulus mu obtained from an externally applied instantaneous shear. We give a detailed analysis of the effects of such shearing on the system, both locally and globally. It is found that the polymeric glass displays long-time rigid behavior only below a temperature T1 , where T1 < TG. Furthermore, the linear and nonlinear relaxation regimes under applied shear are discussed. PMID:15600413

  17. Origami-Inspired Folding of Thick, Rigid Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trease, Brian P.; Thomson, Mark W.; Sigel, Deborah A.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Zirbel, Shannon; Howell, Larry; Lang, Robert

    2014-01-01

    To achieve power of 250 kW or greater, a large compression ratio of stowed-to-deployed area is needed. Origami folding patterns were used to inspire the folding of a solar array to achieve synchronous deployment; however, origami models are generally created for near-zero-thickness material. Panel thickness is one of the main challenges of origami-inspired design. Three origami-inspired folding techniques (flasher, square twist, and map fold) were created with rigid panels and hinges. Hinge components are added to the model to enable folding of thick, rigid materials. Origami models are created assuming zero (or near zero) thickness. When a material with finite thickness is used, the panels are required to bend around an increasingly thick fold as they move away from the center of the model. The two approaches for dealing with material thickness are to use membrane hinges to connect the panels, or to add panel hinges, or hinges of the same thickness, at an appropriate width to enable folding.

  18. Graph rigidity, cyclic belief propagation, and point pattern matching.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Julian J; Caetano, Tibério S; Barbosa, Marconi S

    2008-11-01

    A recent paper [1] proposed a provably optimal polynomial time method for performing near-isometric point pattern matching by means of exact probabilistic inference in a chordal graphical model. Its fundamental result is that the chordal graph in question is shown to be globally rigid, implying that exact inference provides the same matching solution as exact inference in a complete graphical model. This implies that the algorithm is optimal when there is no noise in the point patterns. In this paper, we present a new graph that is also globally rigid but has an advantage over the graph proposed in [1]: Its maximal clique size is smaller, rendering inference significantly more efficient. However, this graph is not chordal, and thus, standard Junction Tree algorithms cannot be directly applied. Nevertheless, we show that loopy belief propagation in such a graph converges to the optimal solution. This allows us to retain the optimality guarantee in the noiseless case, while substantially reducing both memory requirements and processing time. Our experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed solution is indistinguishable from that in [1] when there is noise in the point patterns. PMID:18787251

  19. Efficacy of multipurpose solutions for rigid gas permeable lenses.

    PubMed

    Boost, Maureen; Cho, Pauline; Lai, Sindy

    2006-09-01

    The use of multipurpose solutions for cleaning and disinfecting rigid gas permeable lenses has replaced single purpose solutions, but there are no reports of the efficacy of these multipurpose solutions, or of the effects of storage conditions on their disinfecting capacities. This study investigated activity against four bacterial and two fungal species, and the effects of storage in a refrigerator, at room temperature, at elevated temperature in both dry and humid conditions and with exposure to sunlight. The disinfecting solutions were challenged with the micro-organisms initially upon opening and then at 2-weekly intervals up to 12 weeks after being stored under the different conditions. Solutions were opened daily to simulate use. One solution failed to meet Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria to reduce numbers of bacteria by three log dilutions and of fungi by one log dilution. Storage reduced activity of all solutions over the 12-week period, but not below the requirements of the FDA. Storage in the refrigerator tended to reduce disinfecting capacity more quickly. Multipurpose solutions for rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses lose activity over the 3 months recommended time of use but remain satisfactory for use over this time in the conditions tested. Practitioners need to remind patients to replace their solutions regularly and should advise against storage in the refrigerator. Multipurpose solutions for RGP lenses have simplified cleaning and disinfecting processes and the current formulations have improved disinfecting capacity compared to former disinfecting solutions, which is particularly important for wearers of orthokeratology lenses. PMID:16918771

  20. Plane stress problems using hysteretic rigid body spring network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christos, Sofianos D.; Vlasis, Koumousis K.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a discrete numerical scheme is presented capable of modeling the hysteretic behavior of 2D structures. Rigid Body Spring Network (RBSN) models that were first proposed by Kawai (Nucl Eng Des 48(1):29-207, 1978) are extended to account for hysteretic elastoplastic behavior. Discretization is based on Voronoi tessellation, as proposed specifically for RBSN models to ensure uniformity. As a result, the structure is discretized into convex polygons that form the discrete rigid bodies of the model. These are connected with three zero length, i.e., single-node springs in the middle of their common facets. The springs follow the smooth hysteretic Bouc-Wen model which efficiently incorporates classical plasticity with no direct reference to a yield surface. Numerical results for both static and dynamic loadings are presented, which validate the proposed simplified spring-mass formulation. In addition, they verify the model's applicability on determining primarily the displacement field and plastic zones compared to the standard elastoplastic finite element method.

  1. Propulsion of flexible helical flagella near a rigid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawed, Mohammad; Reis, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    We study the locomotion of uni-flagellar bacteria in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number near a rigid boundary, through a combination of computer simulations and experiments. In our analogue model experiments, we exploit the prominence of geometry of this class of problems to rescale the original micron-scale system onto the desktop-scale. We manufacture elastomeric filaments with fully customizable geometric and material properties, and rotate them in a glycerin bath at a finite distance away from a rigid boundary. The experimental results are compared against numerical simulations that employ the Discrete Elastic Rods method in conjunction with Lighthill Slender Body Theory. The non-slip boundary condition on the wall is implemented by the method of images. We first show that the filament buckles above a critical rotation frequency due to fluid loading, and then quantify the dependence of this critical threshold on the distance from the boundary, both experimentally and numerically. Excellent agreement is found between the two, with no fitting parameters. We then make use of our numerics to systematically investigate the change in the generated propulsion due to presence of a nearby boundary. We find that the propulsion depends strongly on the location of the boundary.

  2. Captides: Rigid Junctions between Beta Sheets and Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kier, Brandon L.; Andersen, Niels H.

    2014-01-01

    An extensive series of covalently linked small molecule-peptide adducts based on a terminally capped beta hairpin motif is reported. The constructs can be prepared by standard solid-phase fmoc chemistry with 1 to 4 peptide chains linked to small molecule hubs bearing carboxylic acid moieties. The key feature of interest is the precise, buried environment of the small molecule, and its rigid orientation relative to one or more short, but fully structured peptide chain(s). Most of this study employs a minimalist 9 residue “captide”, a capped β-turn, but we illustrate general applicability to peptides which can terminate in a beta strand. The non-peptide portion of these adducts can include nearly any molecule bearing one or more carboxylic acid groups. Fold-dependent rigidity sets this strategy apart from currently available bioconjugation methods, which typically engender significant flexibility between peptide and tag. Applications to catalyst enhancement, drug design, higher-order assembly, and FRET calibration rulers are discussed. PMID:24909552

  3. Rigid Cooperation of Per1 and Per2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Sumito; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Period circadian clock (Per) genes Per1 and Per2 have essential roles in circadian oscillation. In this study, we identified a new role of Per1-Per2 cooperation, and its mechanism, using our new experimental methods. Under constant light conditions, the period length of Per1 and Per2 knockout mice depended on the copy number ratio of Per1:Per2. We then established a light-emitting diode-based lighting system that can generate any pattern of light intensity. Under gradually changing light in the absence of phase shift with different periods, both Per1((-/-)) and Per2((-/-)) mice were entrained to a broader range of period length than wild-type mice. To analyse Per1-Per2 cooperative roles at the cell culture level, we established a Per2 knockout-rescue system, which can detect period shortening in a familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (FASPS) mutant. Upon introduction of the Per1 coding region in this system, we saw period shortening. In conclusion, short period-associated protein Per1 and long period-associated Per2 cooperated to rigidly confine the circadian period to "circa" 24-h. These results suggest that the rigid circadian rhythm maintained through the cooperation of Per1-Per2 could negatively impact modern society, in which the use of artificial lighting is ubiquitous, and result in circadian disorders, including delirium. PMID:27609640

  4. Awake craniotomy using electromagnetic navigation technology without rigid pin fixation.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Ahmed A; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2015-11-01

    We report our institutional experience using an electromagnetic navigation system, without rigid head fixation, for awake craniotomy patients. The StealthStation® S7 AxiEM™ navigation system (Medtronic, Inc.) was used for this technique. Detailed preoperative clinical and neuropsychological evaluations, patient education and contrast-enhanced MRI (thickness 1.5mm) were performed for each patient. The AxiEM Mobile Emitter was typically placed in a holder, which was mounted to the operating room table, and a non-invasive patient tracker was used as the patient reference device. A monitored conscious sedation technique was used in all awake craniotomy patients, and the AxiEM Navigation Pointer was used for navigation during the procedure. This offers the same accuracy as optical navigation, but without head pin fixation or interference with intraoperative neurophysiological techniques and surgical instruments. The application of the electromagnetic neuronavigation technology without rigid head fixation during an awake craniotomy is accurate, and offers superior patient comfort. It is recommended as an effective adjunctive technique for the conduct of awake surgery. PMID:26249245

  5. A method for measuring the inertia properties of rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, M.; Mastinu, G.; Previati, G.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the inertia properties of rigid bodies is presented. Given a rigid body and its mass, the method allows to measure (identify) the centre of gravity location and the inertia tensor during a single test. The proposed technique is based on the analysis of the free motion of a multi-cable pendulum to which the body under consideration is connected. The motion of the pendulum and the forces acting on the system are recorded and the inertia properties are identified by means of a proper mathematical procedure based on a least square estimation. After the body is positioned on the test rig, the full identification procedure takes less than 10 min. The natural frequencies of the pendulum and the accelerations involved are quite low, making this method suitable for many practical applications. In this paper, the proposed method is described and two test rigs are presented: the first is developed for bodies up to 3500 kg and the second for bodies up to 400 kg. A validation of the measurement method is performed with satisfactory results. The test rig holds a third part quality certificate according to an ISO 9001 standard and could be scaled up to measure the inertia properties of huge bodies, such as trucks, airplanes or even ships.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Demonstration of Rigid Bodies in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarena, Ernesto; Vu, Bruce T.

    2011-01-01

    The Design Analysis Branch (NE-Ml) at the Kennedy Space Center has not had the ability to accurately couple Rigid Body Dynamics (RBD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). OVERFLOW-D is a flow solver that has been developed by NASA to have the capability to analyze and simulate dynamic motions with up to six Degrees of Freedom (6-DOF). Two simulations were prepared over the course of the internship to demonstrate 6DOF motion of rigid bodies under aerodynamic loading. The geometries in the simulations were based on a conceptual Space Launch System (SLS). The first simulation that was prepared and computed was the motion of a Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) as it separates from its core stage. To reduce computational time during the development of the simulation, only half of the physical domain with respect to the symmetry plane was simulated. Then a full solution was prepared and computed. The second simulation was a model of the SLS as it departs from a launch pad under a 20 knot crosswind. This simulation was reduced to Two Dimensions (2D) to reduce both preparation and computation time. By allowing 2-DOF for translations and 1-DOF for rotation, the simulation predicted unrealistic rotation. The simulation was then constrained to only allow translations.

  7. Metrics and connections for rigid-body kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Zefran, M.; Kumar, V.; Croke, C.

    1999-02-01

    The set of rigid-body motions forms a Lie group called SE(3), the special Euclidean group in three dimensions. In this paper, the authors investigate possible choices of Riemannian metrics and affine connections on SE(3) for applications to kinematic analysis and robot-trajectory planning. In the first part of the paper, they study metrics whose geodesics are screw motions. They prove that no Riemannian metric can have such geodesics, and they show that the metrics whose geodesics are screw motions from a two-parameter family of semi-Riemannian metrics. In the second part of the paper, they investigate affine connections which through the covariant derivative give the correct expression for the acceleration of a rigid body. They prove that there is a unique symmetric connection with this property. Furthermore, they show that there is a family of Riemannian metrics that are compatible with such a connection. These metrics are products of the bi-invariant metric on the group of rotations and a positive-definite constant metric on the group of translations.

  8. Normalized inverse characterization of sound absorbing rigid porous media.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Tomasz G

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the inverse characterization of sound absorbing rigid porous media, based on standard measurements of the surface acoustic impedance of a porous sample. The model parameters need to be normalized to have a robust identification procedure which fits the model-predicted impedance curves with the measured ones. Such a normalization provides a substitute set of dimensionless (normalized) parameters unambiguously related to the original model parameters. Moreover, two scaling frequencies are introduced, however, they are not additional parameters and for different, yet reasonable, assumptions of their values, the identification procedure should eventually lead to the same solution. The proposed identification technique uses measured and computed impedance curves for a porous sample not only in the standard configuration, that is, set to the rigid termination piston in an impedance tube, but also with air gaps of known thicknesses between the sample and the piston. Therefore, all necessary analytical formulas for sound propagation in double-layered media are provided. The methodology is illustrated by one numerical test and by two examples based on the experimental measurements of the acoustic impedance and absorption of porous ceramic samples of different thicknesses and a sample of polyurethane foam. PMID:26093413

  9. Numerical Simulation of Cellular Blood Flow through a Rigid Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasor, Daniel; Clausen, Jonathan; Aidun, Cyrus

    2009-11-01

    In blood flow, red blood cells (RBCs), the most numerous constituent of blood, influence continuum-level measures by altering the suspension at microscopic scales. The presence of RBCs alters the stress and diffusion individual cells experience, which can influence cardiovascular diseases by affecting other cells present in blood like platelets and white blood cells. Simulations of blood at a cellular level provide a tool that allows exploration of both the rheology and the stress and diffusion of individual suspended cells. In this work, a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann/finite element method is used to simulate suspension flows characteristic of blood with deformable RBCs at realistic hematocrit values. We have shown the ability to simulate thousands deformable suspensions capturing non-Newtonian flow characteristics such as shear thinning, and the results agree well with experimental observations. Simulations through rigid arteries have been deformed with as many as 2500 RBCs. This work outlines results obtained for pressure-gradient driven blood flow through a rigid artery with 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% hematocrit values. Results include the effect these deformable RBCs have on mean velocity, flow rate, radial variation of RBC concentration, and the effective viscosity for simulations at moderate to low cell capillary numbers, Ca <=0.08.

  10. Minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure on a separable Hilbert space

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramochi, Yui

    2015-10-15

    We introduce a concept of a minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure (POVM), which is the least redundant POVM among the POVMs that have the equivalent information about the measured quantum system. Assuming the system Hilbert space to be separable, we show that for a given POVM, a sufficient statistic called a Lehmann-Scheffé-Bahadur statistic induces a minimal sufficient POVM. We also show that every POVM has an equivalent minimal sufficient POVM and that such a minimal sufficient POVM is unique up to relabeling neglecting null sets. We apply these results to discrete POVMs and information conservation conditions proposed by the author.

  11. Rigid unit modes in s p -s p2 hybridized carbon systems: Origin of negative thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Woon; Kang, Seoung-Hun; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2015-12-01

    Using density functional theory combined with quasiharmonic approximation, we investigate the thermal expansion behaviors of three different types (α ,β , and γ ) of graphyne, which is a two-dimensional carbon allotrope composed of s p and s p2 bonds. For each type of graphyne, we obtain the temperature dependent area variation by minimizing its free energy calculated by considering all the phonon modes in the whole Brillouin zone. We find that all three types of graphyne exhibit negative in-plane thermal expansion up to T ≲1000 K. The observed in-plane thermal contraction can be attributed partially to the ripple effect, similarly in graphene. The ripple effect itself, however, is not sufficient to explain the anomalously larger thermal contraction found in graphyne than in graphene. Our deliberate analysis on the phonon modes observed in graphyne enables us to reveal another source causing such thermal expansion anomaly. We find that there are particular phonon modes with frequencies of around a few hundreds of cm-1 existing exclusively in graphyne that may fill empty spaces resulting in area reduction. These modes are identified as "rigid unit modes" corresponding to the libration of each rigid unit composed of s p2 bonds.

  12. Rigid body dynamics approach to Stokesian dynamics simulations of nonspherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutteh, Ramzi

    2010-05-01

    We describe an algorithm for performing Stokesian dynamics (SD) simulations of suspensions of arbitrary shape rigid particles with hydrodynamic interactions, modeled as rigid groups of spheres, the hydrodynamic mobility matrix of which is accurately computable by several established schemes for spheres. The algorithm is based on Stokesian rigid body equations of translational and rotational motion, which we have derived by an approach formally analogous to that of Newtonian rigid body dynamics. Particle orientation is represented in terms of Euler parameters (quaternion of rotation). This rigid body SD algorithm (RBSDA) complements recently described constraint SD algorithms [R. Kutteh, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 9280 (2003); R. Kutteh, Phys. Rev. E 69, 011406 (2004)], over which it offers the same computational advantages in imposing total rigidity that the basic rigid body molecular dynamics (MD) algorithm offers over constraint MD algorithms. We show that SD simulation results generated with the RBSDA, in bounded and unbounded geometries, agree very well with those from experiment and other SD and non-SD methods, and are numerically identical to those from a constraint SD algorithm, HSHAKE. Finally, for completeness we also describe a third (additional to the constraint SD and rigid body SD approaches) more traditional approach for SD simulations of arbitrary shape rigid particles modeled as rigid groups of spheres.

  13. Rigid body dynamics approach to Stokesian dynamics simulations of nonspherical particles.

    PubMed

    Kutteh, Ramzi

    2010-05-01

    We describe an algorithm for performing Stokesian dynamics (SD) simulations of suspensions of arbitrary shape rigid particles with hydrodynamic interactions, modeled as rigid groups of spheres, the hydrodynamic mobility matrix of which is accurately computable by several established schemes for spheres. The algorithm is based on Stokesian rigid body equations of translational and rotational motion, which we have derived by an approach formally analogous to that of Newtonian rigid body dynamics. Particle orientation is represented in terms of Euler parameters (quaternion of rotation). This rigid body SD algorithm (RBSDA) complements recently described constraint SD algorithms [R. Kutteh, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 9280 (2003); R. Kutteh, Phys. Rev. E 69, 011406 (2004)], over which it offers the same computational advantages in imposing total rigidity that the basic rigid body molecular dynamics (MD) algorithm offers over constraint MD algorithms. We show that SD simulation results generated with the RBSDA, in bounded and unbounded geometries, agree very well with those from experiment and other SD and non-SD methods, and are numerically identical to those from a constraint SD algorithm, HSHAKE. Finally, for completeness we also describe a third (additional to the constraint SD and rigid body SD approaches) more traditional approach for SD simulations of arbitrary shape rigid particles modeled as rigid groups of spheres. PMID:20459156

  14. Effects of STN DBS on Rigidity in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Mark B.; Vaillancourt, David E.; Sturman, Molly M.; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Bakay, Roy A. E.; Corcos, Daniel M.

    2008-01-01

    We quantified the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and medication on Parkinsonian rigidity using an objective measure of work about the elbow joint during a complete cycle of imposed 1-Hz sinusoidal oscillations. Resting and activated rigidity were analyzed in four experimental conditions: 1) off treatment; 2) on DBS; 3) on medication; and 4) on DBS plus medication. Rigidity at the elbow joint was also assessed using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). We tested ten patients who received STN DBS and ten age-matched neurologically healthy control subjects. The activated rigidity condition increased work in both Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients and control subjects. In PD patients, STN DBS reduced both resting and activated rigidity as indicated by work and the UPDRS rigidity score. This is the first demonstration that STN stimulation reduces rigidity using an objective measure such as work. In contrast, the presurgery dose of antiparkinsonian medication did not significantly improve the UPDRS rigidity score and reduced work only in the activated rigidity condition. Our results suggest that STN DBS may be more effective in alleviating rigidity in the upper limb of PD patients than medications administered at presurgery dosage level. PMID:17601186

  15. Parkinson’s Disease Rigidity: Relation to Brain Connectivity and Motor Performance

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Nazanin; Tan, Sun Nee; Liu, Aiping; Ashoori, Ahmad; Palmer, Samantha J.; Wang, Z. Jane; Oishi, Meeko M.K.; McKeown, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: (1) To determine the brain connectivity pattern associated with clinical rigidity scores in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and (2) to determine the relation between clinically assessed rigidity and quantitative metrics of motor performance. Background: Rigidity, the resistance to passive movement, is exacerbated in PD by asking the subject to move the contralateral limb, implying that rigidity involves a distributed brain network. Rigidity mainly affects subjects when they attempt to move; yet the relation between clinical rigidity scores and quantitative aspects of motor performance are unknown. Methods: Ten clinically diagnosed PD patients (off-medication) and 10 controls were recruited to perform an fMRI squeeze-bulb tracking task that included both visually guided and internally guided features. The direct functional connectivity between anatomically defined regions of interest was assessed with Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs). Tracking performance was assessed by fitting Linear Dynamical System (LDS) models to the motor performance, and was compared to the clinical rigidity scores. A cross-validated Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) regression method was used to determine the brain connectivity network that best predicted clinical rigidity scores. Results: The damping ratio of the LDS models significantly correlated with clinical rigidity scores (p = 0.014). An fMRI connectivity network in subcortical and primary and premotor cortical regions accurately predicted clinical rigidity scores (p < 10−5). Conclusion: A widely distributed cortical/subcortical network is associated with rigidity observed in PD patients, which reinforces the importance of altered functional connectivity in the pathophysiology of PD. PD subjects with higher rigidity scores tend to have less overshoot in their tracking performance, and damping ratio may represent a robust, quantitative marker of the motoric effects of increasing rigidity. PMID

  16. Experimental method for determination of bending and torsional rigidities of advanced composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Takenori

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental method for the determination of the bending and torsional rigidities of advanced fiber composite laminates with the aid of laser holographic interferometry. The proposed method consists of a four-point bending test and a resonance test. The bending rigidity ratio (D{sub 12}/D{sub 22}) can be determined from the fringe patterns of the four-point bending test. The bending rigidities (D{sub 11} and D{sub 22}) and the torsional rigidity (D{sub 66}) are calculated from the natural frequencies of cantilever plates of the resonance test. The test specimens are carbon/epoxy cross-ply laminates. The adequacy of the experimental method is confirmed by comparing the measured rigidities with the theoretical values obtained from classical lamination theory (CLT) by using the measured tensile properties. The results show that the present method can be used to evaluate the rigidities of orthotropic laminates with reasonably good accuracy.

  17. Recommendations to resolve inconsistent guidelines for the reprocessing of sheathed and unsheathed rigid laryngoscopes.

    PubMed

    Muscarella, Lawrence F

    2007-04-01

    Neither a consensus statement nor a formal set of step-by-step guidelines for reprocessing rigid laryngoscopes have been published or endorsed by professional organizations. Several published guidelines, standards, and clinical reports were reviewed to evaluate the risk of nosocomial infection associated with the use of rigid laryngoscopes, to determine their minimum reprocessing requirements. This review found that the recommendations of some guidelines and standards for reprocessing rigid laryngoscopes are incomplete, inadequate, and inconsistent with one another, and that current practices for reprocessing rigid laryngoscopes are reported to be inadequate and lack standardization. It is recommended that a consensus statement be developed that standardizes the reprocessing of rigid laryngoscopes and requires cleaning followed by high-level disinfection (or sterilization) and drying of the rigid laryngoscope's blade and handle to prevent nosocomial infection, regardless of whether a protective barrier or sheath is used during the procedure. PMID:17385163

  18. Earth boring bit with improved rigid face seal assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, B.H.

    1987-05-19

    An earth boring bit is described with an improved pressure compensating face seal assembly having one rigid ring and sealing face carried by a bearing shaft and an opposed sealing face carried by the cutter. The bit comprises: a body; a cantilevered bearing shaft having a generally cylindrical journal bearing and positioned to extend obliquely inwardly and downwardly from the body; a cutter having a generally cylindrical bearing formed internally therein, secured for rotation about the journal bearing of the shaft; a lubrication system in the body, including a hydrostatic pressure compensator to lubricate the bearings; and a cutter seal groove formed near the outermost region of the cylindrical bearing in the cutter to have a circumferential, generally cylindrical wall.

  19. Debris flow impact estimation on a rigid barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagnon, Federico; Segalini, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse debris flow impact against rigid and undrained barrier in order to propose a new formulation for the estimation of acting force after the flow impact to safe design protection structures. For this reason, this work concentrates on the flow impact, by performing a series of small scale tests in a specifically created flume. Flow characteristics (flow height and velocity) and applied loads (dynamic and static) on barrier were measured using four ultrasonic devices, four load cells and a contact surface pressure gauge. The results obtained were compared with main existing models and a new equation is proposed. Furthermore, a brief review of the small scale theory was provided to analyse the scale effects that can affect the results.

  20. Diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of rigid water models.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Sami; Boţan, Alexandru; Salanne, Mathieu; Marry, Virginie; Turq, Pierre; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2012-07-18

    We report the diffusion coefficient and viscosity of popular rigid water models: two non-polarizable ones (SPC/E with three sites, and TIP4P/2005 with four sites) and a polarizable one (Dang-Chang, four sites). We exploit the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the system size (Yeh and Hummer 2004 J. Phys. Chem. B 108 15873) to obtain the size-independent value. This also provides an estimate of the viscosity of all water models, which we compare to the Green-Kubo result. In all cases, a good agreement is found. The TIP4P/2005 model is in better agreement with the experimental data for both diffusion and viscosity. The SPC/E and Dang-Chang models overestimate the diffusion coefficient and underestimate the viscosity. PMID:22739097

  1. Fibrillar Organic Phases And Their Roles In Rigid Biological Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Arey, Bruce W.; Park, John J.; Mayer, George

    2015-06-01

    This study focused on determining the presence of organic phases in the siliceous components of rigid marine composites ("glass" sponge spicules), and thereby to clarify how those composites dissipate significant mechanical energy. Through the use of imaging by helium ion microscopy in the examination of the spicules, the organic phase that is present between the layers of hydrated silica was also detected within the silica cylinders of the composite, indicating the existence therein of a network, scaffolding, or other pattern that has not yet been determined. It was concluded that the presence of an interpenetrating network of some kind, and tenacious fibrillar interfaces are responsible for the large energy dissipation in these siliceous composites by viscoelastic processes. This discovery means that future mechanics analyses of such composites, extending to large deformations must consider such interpenetrating phases.

  2. Squeezed-state source using radiation-pressure-induced rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Corbitt, Thomas; Ottaway, David; Mavalvala, Nergis; Chen Yanbei; Khalili, Farid; Vyatchanin, Sergey; Whitcomb, Stan

    2006-02-15

    We propose an experiment to extract ponderomotive squeezing from an interferometer with high circulating power and low mass mirrors. In this interferometer, optical resonances of the arm cavities are detuned from the laser frequency, creating a mechanical rigidity that dramatically suppresses displacement noises. After taking into account imperfection of optical elements, laser noise, and other technical noise consistent with existing laser and optical technologies and typical laboratory environments, we expect the output light from the interferometer to have measurable squeezing of 5 dB, with a frequency-independent squeeze angle for frequencies below 1 kHz. This squeeze source is well suited for injection into a gravitational-wave interferometer, leading to improved sensitivity from reduction in the quantum noise. Furthermore, this design provides an experimental test of quantum-limited radiation pressure effects, which have not previously been tested.

  3. Rigid Conjugated Twisted Truxene Dimers and Trimers as Electron Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Lami, Vincent; Rominger, Frank; Vaynzof, Yana; Mastalerz, Michael

    2016-03-14

    A new class of rigid twisted truxenone oligomers with an enlarged π backbone has been established by oxidative dimerization reactions. The resulting extended conjugated systems have large extinction coefficients and low-lying LUMO levels and show good solubility in common organic solvents, thus making them attractive compounds as new electron acceptors in organic electronics. Their suitability as electron acceptors has been demonstrated in bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells with poly({4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl}{3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl}) (PTB7) as the donor material. PMID:26891096

  4. Characterizing the movement of a falling rigid rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Tejedor, José A.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a simple experimental set-up to study the fall of a rigid rod, which can freely rotate around an articulated joint at the lowest point. The experimental set-up permits preparation of a laboratory session for physics or engineering students. The analysis of the data is oriented at several degrees of difficulty, in such a way that the same experimental set-up can be used with students on different courses. The experimental data obtained with an electro-optical sensor are fitted to the theoretical equation of motion, obtaining a very good agreement between experiment and theory. In addition, direct measurement of the parameters involved in the equations was carried out, showing a very good agreement with the calculated parameters.

  5. Rigid-drift magnetohydrodynamic equilibria for cylindrical screw pinches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, L.

    1979-01-01

    The rigid-drift equations of MHD equilibria in cylindrical geometry are solved analytically in terms of an infinite series of hypergeometric functions for the case where the pressure is proportional to the square of number density and the current density is arbitrarily pitched. Solutions are obtained for a pure Z pinch, a pure theta pinch, and a general screw pinch. It is found that the shapes of the pressure and magnetic-field profiles are completely determined by the model once two parameters are specified: the local plasma beta on the axis and a quantity related to the pitch of the current density. A set of profiles that resemble those observed experimentally in reversed-field pinches is presented. The results also indicate that hollow pressure profiles and reversed Bz profiles can occur either simultaneously or independently and that the pressure always falls to zero at a finite value of the radius.

  6. Large scale rigidity-based flexibility analysis of biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Streinu, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    KINematics And RIgidity (KINARI) is an on-going project for in silico flexibility analysis of proteins. The new version of the software, Kinari-2, extends the functionality of our free web server KinariWeb, incorporates advanced web technologies, emphasizes the reproducibility of its experiments, and makes substantially improved tools available to the user. It is designed specifically for large scale experiments, in particular, for (a) very large molecules, including bioassemblies with high degree of symmetry such as viruses and crystals, (b) large collections of related biomolecules, such as those obtained through simulated dilutions, mutations, or conformational changes from various types of dynamics simulations, and (c) is intended to work as seemlessly as possible on the large, idiosyncratic, publicly available repository of biomolecules, the Protein Data Bank. We describe the system design, along with the main data processing, computational, mathematical, and validation challenges underlying this phase of the KINARI project. PMID:26958583

  7. Emergent Behavior in the Macro World: Rigidity of Granular Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2015-03-01

    Diversity in the natural world emerges from the collective behavior of large numbers of interacting objects. The origin of collectively organized structures over the vast range of length scales from the subatomic to colloidal is the competition between energy and entropy. Thermal motion provides the mechanism for organization by allowing particles to explore the space of configurations. This well-established paradigm of emergent behavior breaks down for collections of macroscopic objects ranging from grains of sand to asteroids. In this macro-world of particulate systems, thermal motion is absent, and mechanical forces are all important. We lack understanding of the basic, unifying principles that underlie the emergence of order in this world. In this talk, I will explore the origin of rigidity of granular solids, and present a new paradigm for emergence of order in these athermal systems. This work has been supported by NSF-DMR 1409093 and by the W. M. Keck foundation

  8. Geometry-Induced Rigidity in Nonspherical Pressurized Elastic Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, A.; Florijn, H. C. B.; Reis, P. M.

    2012-10-01

    We present results from an experimental investigation of the indentation of nonspherical pressurized elastic shells with a positive Gauss curvature. A predictive framework is proposed that rationalizes the dependence of the local rigidity of an indented shell on the curvature in the neighborhood of the locus of indentation, the in-out pressure differential, and the material properties. In our approach, we combine classic theory for spherical shells with recent analytical developments for the pressurized case, and proceed, for the most part, by analogy, guided by our own experiments. By way of example, our results elucidate why an eggshell is significantly stiffer when compressed along its major axis, as compared to doing so along its minor axis. The prominence of geometry in this class of problems points to the relevance and applicability of our findings over a wide range of length scales.

  9. Analysis of a finite composite plate with smooth rigid pin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naidu, A. C. B.; Dattaguru, B.; Ramamurthy, T. S.; Mangalgiri, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    An elastic continuum method of analysis developed for a smooth rigid pin in a finite composite plate by using complex potentials that satisfy the governing orthotropic differential equation is presented. The plate is subjected to uniaxial loading and the nonlinear problems of partial contact in the pin-plate are studied. Three types of pin fits are examined: interference, push, and clearance. The problems of stresses due to pure interference, load contact behavior, and stresses variations are addressed. The effects of the rectangular geometry and the orthotropic property of the plate are demonstrated through numerical results. It is found that the use of large hole diameter/plate width ratios have deleterious effects and the use of interference has beneficial effects. The solutions obtained will help in the development of special finite elements for fastener joints. Finally, the boundary conditions on the finite outer boundaries are found to be satisfied by a successive integration technique.

  10. Origin of the Low Rigidity of the Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belonoshko, A. B.; Skorodumova, N. V.; Davis, S.; Osiptsov, A. N.; Rosengren, A.; Johansson, B.

    2007-12-01

    The solid iron Earth's inner core has a low rigidity which manifests itself in the anomalously low velocities of shear waves as compared to those in iron alloys. Normally, when estimating elastic properties of a polycrystal one calculates an average over different orientations of a single crystal. This approach does not take into account the grain boundaries and defects likely to be abundant at high temperatures relevant for the inner core conditions. We show, by molecular dynamics simulations that if defects are considered, the calculated shear modulus and shear wave velocity decrease dramatically compared to the averaged single crystal values. Thus, the low shear wave velocity in the inner core receives its explanation (Science 316, 1603 (2007)).

  11. Complexity management theory: motivation for ideological rigidity and social conflict.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jordan B; Flanders, Joseph L

    2002-06-01

    We are doomed to formulate conceptual structures that are much simpler than the complex phenomena they are attempting to account for. These simple conceptual structures shield us, pragmatically, from real-world complexity, but also fail, frequently, as some aspect of what we did not take into consideration makes itself manifest. The failure of our concepts dysregulates our emotions and generates anxiety, necessarily, as the unconstrained world is challenging and dangerous. Such dysregulation can turn us into rigid, totalitarian dogmatists, as we strive to maintain the structure of our no longer valid beliefs. Alternatively, we can face the underlying complexity of experience, voluntarily, gather new information, and recast and reconfigure the structures that underly our habitable worlds. PMID:12146676

  12. Wake structure of rigid pitching panels with biologically inspired geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Melissa; Smits, Alexander

    2007-11-01

    Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV), planar laser induced florescence (PLIF), and white light flow visualization were used to investigate the wakes of three rigid pitching panels, with trapezoidal panel geometry chosen to idealize fish caudal fins. The panel geometries are determined by sweep angle and have a fixed surface area. Experiments were performed for a range Strouhal numbers from 0.23 to 0.65. A classic reverse von Karman vortex street pattern was observed along the mid-span of the near wake, but the complexity and three-dimensionality of the wake increases away from the mid-span as streamwise vortices interact with the swept edges of the panel. There exists a critical Strouhal number to sweep angle ratio above which streamwise vortices flow freely around the spanwise edge. Below this critical ratio, the streamwise structures become trapped one one side of the panel and interact strongly with the vortices shed by the trailing edge.

  13. Exploratory rigid laparoscopy in an African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Sweet, Julia; Hendrickson, Dean A; Stetter, Mark; Neiffer, Donald L

    2014-12-01

    In March 2009, a 25-yr-old captive female African elephant (Loxodonta africana) underwent an exploratory laparoscopy after several weeks of diarrhea, submandibular and ventral edema, and swelling on medial and lateral aspects of all feet. Although there have been recent advances in laparoscopic vasectomies in free-ranging African elephants in South Africa utilizing specially designed rigid laparoscopes and insufflation devices, this was the first attempt at using these same techniques for an exploratory purpose. The elephant was sedated in a static restraint chute and remained standing for the duration of the procedure. Laparoscopy provided visibility of the dorsal abdomen, enabled collection of reproductive tract biopsies and peritoneal fluid samples, and allowed for instillation of antibiotics and crystalloid fluids directly into the abdominal cavity. Abdominal exploration, collection of tissue samples, and local therapy is possible via standing laparoscopy in megavertebrates. PMID:25632688

  14. Hurricane Balls: A rigid-body-motion project for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David P.; Mertens, David; Pearson, Brett J.

    2015-11-01

    We discuss a project on rigid-body motion that is appropriate for students in an upper-division course in classical mechanics. We analyze the motion of Hurricane Balls, two spheres that are welded (or glued) together so they act as a single object that can be spun like a top. The steady-state motion consists of purely rotational motion about the center of mass, such that only one ball is in contact with the table as it rolls without slipping. We give a qualitative explanation for why one ball rises into the air, and we theoretically analyze the system using multiple approaches. We also perform a high-speed video analysis to obtain experimental data on how the orientation depends on the spin rate, and find agreement within a few percent of the theory.

  15. Rigid ultralight primary mirror segments for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2000-10-01

    The development of ultra-light fibrous substrate mirrors allows serious contemplation of large multi-mirror space telescopes using rigid segments. Mirrors made of silica and alumina fibers have a small coefficient of thermal expansion and a density competitive with inflatable structures. Furthermore, they are without the imagery problems caused by non parabolic figures, gaseous expansion and contraction, tidal distortion of large gas filled structures, leaks, and long lived transient mirror perturbations caused by intentional pointing and tracking movements, micrometeor and space debris impacts, and mechanical vibrations. Fibrous substrate primary mirrors also have logistical advantages, since segments can be fabricated in orbit from small amounts of dense raw materials. One space shuttle flight, lifting about half its payload capacity, is adequate to transport all the material necessary to fabricate substrates for a one hundred meter telescope whose primary mirror consists of 12,086 hexagonal segments, each having a diameter of 1 meter and an area of 0.6495 square meters.

  16. Comparing turbulence models for flow through a rigid glottal model.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jungsoo; Frankel, Steven H

    2008-03-01

    Flow through a rigid model of the human vocal tract featuring a divergent glottis was numerically modeled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach. A number of different turbulence models, available in a widely used commercial computational fluid dynamics code, were tested to determine their ability to capture various flow features recently observed in laboratory experiments and large eddy simulation studies. The study reveals that results from unsteady simulations employing the k-omega shear stress transport model were in much better agreement with previous measurements and predictions with regard to the ability to predict glottal jet skewing due to the Coanda effect and the intraglottal pressure distribution or related skin friction coefficient, than either steady or unsteady simulations using the Spalart-Allmaras model or any other two-equation turbulence model investigated in this study. PMID:18345812

  17. Cenozoic Eurasia is not a single rigid plate: Paleomagnetic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogné, Jean-Pascal

    2013-11-01

    The widely distributed Cenozoic paleomagnetic inclination anomaly in Asia is usually attributed to either a widespread error of magnetic field recording due to an inclination flattening mechanism in sediments, or to the persistence of an anomalous non-dipolar component of the geomagnetic field throughout the Tertiary. Based on an analysis of the Asian paleomagnetic database for Meso-Cenozoic times, we suggest that instead this puzzling anomaly results from an overlooked global plate tectonics cause where the wide so-called Eurasian plate would have suffered from previously undetected transpressive north-south relative movements between its western and eastern ends since the Cretaceous. These relative movements are most probably accommodated by a component of right-lateral shear movement distributed in the Tornquist-Tesseyre zone, and a localized left-lateral shear movement in the Ural Mountain chain during the Tertiary. Therefore, Eurasia was not the single rigid plate that Cenozoic plate reconstructions have accepted.

  18. Osseous adaptation to continuous loading of rigid endosseous implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. E.; Smith, R. K.; Mozsary, P. G.; Zilberman, Y.; Smith, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of loading on etched Ti implants in the femurs of young (3 mo) and adult (6 mo) rabbits is investigated experimentally. The results are presented in photographs, fluorescence and polarization micrographs, radiographs, and drawings and discussed. Implantation is followed by formation of coarse woven bone within 3 d and mature lamellar bone by 6 wks, with nonspecific subperiosteal bony hypertrophy in the young rabbits only. Spring loading at 100 g produces spontaneous spiral-type fractures when applied immediately, but the implants remain rigid when loads are applied after 6-12 wks of healing. The mechanisms of bone formation involved are examined, and the potential of endosseous implants as anchors in orthodontics or dentofacial-orthopedics is confirmed.

  19. Absolute and relative choreographies in rigid body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. V.; Kilin, A. A.; Mamaev, I. S.

    2008-06-01

    For the classical problem of motion of a rigid body about a fixed point with zero area integral, we present a family of solutions that are periodic in the absolute space. Such solutions are known as choreographies. The family includes the well-known Delone solutions (for the Kovalevskaya case), some particular solutions for the Goryachev-Chaplygin case, and the Steklov solution. The “genealogy” of solutions of the family naturally appearing from the energy continuation and their connection with the Staude rotations are considered. It is shown that if the integral of areas is zero, the solutions are periodic with respect to a coordinate frame that rotates uniformly about the vertical (relative choreographies).

  20. Glycolysis recycling of rigid waste polyurethane foam from refrigerators.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Cao, Z B; Chen, Y; Zhang, X J; Qian, G R; Chu, Y L; Zhou, M

    2014-01-01

    Rapid growth of rigid waste polyurethane (WPUR) foam from refrigerators attracts the attention all over the world. In this study, glycolysis was chosen to treat WPUR from scrapped refrigerators collected in Shanghai, China. Glycolysis reagents and catalysts were selected. The results indicated that the glycolysis efficiency of ethylene glycol (EG) was higher than that of diethylene glycol, and the catalytic efficiency of alkali metal salts (NaOH) was more excellent than that of triethanolamine and organic salts of alkali metal (NaAc). When EG was 100%WPUR as a glycolysis reagent and NaOH was 1%WPUR as a catalyst at a constant temperature of 197.85°C for 2 h, the glycolysis product had the highest glycolysis conversion rate. In order to maximize the recycling of WPUR, regenerative Polyurethane was performed by adding 10% distilled mixed polyol, which conformed to the QB/T 26689-2011 requirements. PMID:25176301

  1. Oblique Perforation of Thick Metallic Plates by Rigid Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Qingming; Fan, Saucheong

    2006-08-01

    Oblique perforation of thick metallic plates by rigid projectiles with various nose shapes is studied in this paper. Two perforation mechanisms, i.e., the hole enlargement for a sharp projectile nose and the plugging formation for a blunt projectile nose, are considered in the proposed analytical model. It is shown that the perforation of a thick plate is dominated by several non-dimensional numbers, i.e., the impact function, the geometry function of projectile, the non-dimensional thickness of target and the impact obliquity. Explicit formulae are obtained to predict the ballistic limit, residual velocity and directional change for the oblique perforation of thick metallic plates. The proposed model is able to predict the critical condition for the occurrence of ricochet. The proposed model is validated by comparing the predictions with other existing models and independent experimental data.

  2. Computer program for determining mass properties of a rigid structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A.; Gilbert, J. L.; Klich, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program was developed for the rapid computation of the mass properties of complex structural systems. The program uses rigid body analyses and permits differences in structural material throughout the total system. It is based on the premise that complex systems can be adequately described by a combination of basic elemental shapes. Simple geometric data describing size and location of each element and the respective material density or weight of each element were the only required input data. From this minimum input, the program yields system weight, center of gravity, moments of inertia and products of inertia with respect to mutually perpendicular axes through the system center of gravity. The program also yields mass properties of the individual shapes relative to component axes.

  3. Stability diagrams for a rigid gyrostat in a circular orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. C.; Golla, D. F.

    1984-05-01

    The dynamics of a rigid gyrostat travelling in a circular orbit are reviewed. The two torques to be balanced are the gyroscopic torque associated with the once per orbit precession of the in plane angular momentum vector, and the gravitational torque that results from the principal inertial axes not being aligned with the orbiting axes. Different methods of balancing these two torques lead to different classes of relative equilibria, viz., the cylindrical case, the conical case, the hyperbolic case, and the general case. The principal contribution is to present a large number of stability diagrams for the many different cases and subcases that arise. A large number of equilbria are, in fact, unstable. However, as shown here, they can usually be stabilized by adding a momentum wheel aligned with the pitch axis.

  4. Tumbling of a rigid rod in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, J. M. J.; Blöte, H. W. J.

    2014-09-01

    The tumbling of a rigid rod in a shear flow is analyzed in the high viscosity limit. Following Burgers, the Master Equation is derived for the probability distribution of the orientation of the rod. The equation contains one dimensionless number, the Weissenberg number, which is the ratio of the shear rate and the orientational diffusion constant. The equation is solved for the stationary state distribution for arbitrary Weissenberg numbers, in particular for the limit of high Weissenberg numbers. The stationary state gives an interesting flow pattern for the orientation of the rod, showing the interplay between flow due to the driving shear force and diffusion due to the random thermal forces of the fluid. The average tumbling time and tumbling frequency is calculated as a function of the Weissenberg number. A simple crossover function is proposed which covers the whole regime from small to large Weissenberg numbers.

  5. Rigid Calabi-Yau threefolds, Picard Eisenstein series and instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Nilsson, B. E. W.; Persson, D.; Pioline, B.

    2013-12-01

    Type IIA string theory compactified on a rigid Calabi-Yau threefold gives rise to a classical moduli space that carries an isometric action of U(2, 1). Various quantum corrections break this continuous isometry to a discrete subgroup. Focussing on the case where the intermediate Jacobian of the Calabi-Yau admits complex multiplication by the ring of quadratic imaginary integers d, we argue that the remaining quantum duality group is an arithmetic Picard modular group PU(2, 1; d). Based on this proposal we construct an Eisenstein series invariant under this duality group and study its non-Abelian Fourier expansion. This allows the prediction of non-perturbative effects, notably the contribution of D2- and NS5-brane instantons. The present work extends our previous analysis in 0909.4299 which was restricted to the special case of the Gaussian integers 1 = Bbb Z[i].

  6. Calcium-mediated rigidity in PIP2 lipid domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbroek, Wouter G.; Liu, Andrea J.

    2011-03-01

    In lipid mixtures containing the highly negatively charged lipid PIP2 (a crucial component in cell membrane mechanics) multivalent ions such as calcium can drive the formation of PIP2-rich domains by mediating attractions between the lipids. Although the existence of ion-mediated attractions is well known in macromolecular systems, their form is poorly understood because they result from strong correlations between the charged molecules and ions. Within a numerical model of a lipid monolayer, we analyze the mechanics of PIP2-rich domains. We show that they are liquid-like at moderate values of the PIP2-charge but rigid at higher PIP2-charge. We use a recently introduced method to extract the effective pair interaction between the charged lipids in the many-body system, in which the calcium ions and remaining lipids are integrated out.

  7. Percepts of rigid motion within and across apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiffrar, Maggie; Pavel, M.

    1991-01-01

    Humans consistently err in their percepts of rotational motion viewed through an aperture. Such errors provide insight into the constraints observers use to interpret retinal images. In the first of two experiments, the subjects consistently perceived the fixed center of rotation for an unmarked line viewed through an aperture as located on the line, regardless of its actual location. Accuracy greatly improved with visible line endings. This finding was extended to explain why a square appears nonrigid when it rotates behind a partial occluder. This illusion is theorized to result from observers misperceiving the center of rotation of the unmarked square sides. In this situation, the subjects seemed unable to apply an object rigidity constraint across apertures. These findings support a conceptualization of the visual system in which consistent local information must be clearly present before prior knowledge can be used to interpret retinal stimulation.

  8. Percepts of rigid motion within and across apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiffrar, Maggie; Pavel, M.

    1991-01-01

    Humans consistently err in their percepts of rotational motion viewed through an aperture. Such errors provide insight into the constraints observers use to interpret retinal images. In the first of two experiments, Ss consistently perceived the fixed center of rotation for an unmarked line viewed through an aperture as located on the line, regardless of its actual location. Accuracy greatly improved with visible line endings. This finding was extended to explain why a square appears nonrigid when it rotates behind a partial occluder. This illusion may result from observers misperceiving the center of rotation of the unmarked square sides. In this situation, Ss seemed unable to apply an object rigidity constraint across apertures. These findings support a conceptualization of the visual system in which consistent local information must be clearly present before prior knowledge can be used to interpret retinal stimulation.

  9. Underwater sound of rigid-hulled inflatable boats.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Christine; Liong, Syafrin; Koessler, Matthew Walter; Duncan, Alec J; Gourlay, Tim

    2016-06-01

    Underwater sound of rigid-hulled inflatable boats was recorded 142 times in total, over 3 sites: 2 in southern British Columbia, Canada, and 1 off Western Australia. Underwater sound peaked between 70 and 400 Hz, exhibiting strong tones in this frequency range related to engine and propeller rotation. Sound propagation models were applied to compute monopole source levels, with the source assumed 1 m below the sea surface. Broadband source levels (10-48 000 Hz) increased from 134 to 171 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m with speed from 3 to 16 m/s (10-56 km/h). Source power spectral density percentile levels and 1/3 octave band levels are given for use in predictive modeling of underwater sound of these boats as part of environmental impact assessments. PMID:27369176

  10. Investigation of Drag Coefficient for Rigid Ballute-like Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnasciali, Maria-Isabel; Mastromarino, Anthony

    2014-11-01

    One common method of decelerating an object during atmospheric entry, descent, and landing is the use of parachutes. Another deceleration technology is the ballute - a combination of balloon and parachute. A CFD study was conducted using commercially available software to investigate the flow-field and the coefficient of drag for various rigid ballute-like shapes at varying Reynolds numbers. The impact of size and placement of the burble-fence as well as number, size, and shape of inlets was considered. Recent experimental measurements conducted during NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator program revealed a much higher coefficient of drag (Cd) for ballutes than previously encountered. Using atmospheric drag to slow down and land reduces the need for heavy fuel and rocket engines and thus, high values of drag are desired. Funding for this work, in part, provided by the CT Space Grant Consortium.

  11. Use of beam probes for rigidity calibration of the A1900 fragment separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginter, T. N.; Farinon, F.; Baumann, T.; Hausmann, M.; Kwan, E.; Naviliat Cuncic, O.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Stetson, J.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Villari, A. C. C.; Williams, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    Use of a beam-based approach is presented for establishing a rigidity calibration for the A1900 fragment separator located at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. Also presented is why an alternative approach to the rigidity calibration - using detailed field maps of individual magnetic components - is not a feasible basis for deriving an accurate calibration. The level of accuracy achieved for the rigidity calibration is ±0.1%.

  12. A rigid motion correction method for helical computed tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nuyts, J.; Kyme, A.; Kuncic, Z.; Fulton, R.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a method to compensate for six degree-of-freedom rigid motion in helical CT of the head. The method is demonstrated in simulations and in helical scans performed on a 16-slice CT scanner. Scans of a Hoffman brain phantom were acquired while an optical motion tracking system recorded the motion of the bed and the phantom. Motion correction was performed by restoring projection consistency using data from the motion tracking system, and reconstructing with an iterative fully 3D algorithm. Motion correction accuracy was evaluated by comparing reconstructed images with a stationary reference scan. We also investigated the effects on accuracy of tracker sampling rate, measurement jitter, interpolation of tracker measurements, and the synchronization of motion data and CT projections. After optimization of these aspects, motion corrected images corresponded remarkably closely to images of the stationary phantom with correlation and similarity coefficients both above 0.9. We performed a simulation study using volunteer head motion and found similarly that our method is capable of compensating effectively for realistic human head movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first practical demonstration of generalized rigid motion correction in helical CT. Its clinical value, which we have yet to explore, may be significant. For example it could reduce the necessity for repeat scans and resource-intensive anesthetic and sedation procedures in patient groups prone to motion, such as young children. It is not only applicable to dedicated CT imaging, but also to hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT, where it could also ensure an accurate CT image for lesion localization and attenuation correction of the functional image data.

  13. Inertial modes of rigidly rotating neutron stars in Cowling approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kastaun, Wolfgang

    2008-06-15

    In this article, we investigate inertial modes of rigidly rotating neutron stars, i.e. modes for which the Coriolis force is dominant. This is done using the assumption of a fixed spacetime (Cowling approximation). We present frequencies and eigenfunctions for a sequence of stars with a polytropic equation of state, covering a broad range of rotation rates. The modes were obtained with a nonlinear general relativistic hydrodynamic evolution code. We further show that the eigenequations for the oscillation modes can be written in a particularly simple form for the case of arbitrary fast but rigid rotation. Using these equations, we investigate some general characteristics of inertial modes, which are then compared to the numerically obtained eigenfunctions. In particular, we derive a rough analytical estimate for the frequency as a function of the number of nodes of the eigenfunction, and find that a similar empirical relation matches the numerical results with unexpected accuracy. We investigate the slow rotation limit of the eigenequations, obtaining two different sets of equations describing pressure and inertial modes. For the numerical computations we only considered axisymmetric modes, while the analytic part also covers nonaxisymmetric modes. The eigenfunctions suggest that the classification of inertial modes by the quantum numbers of the leading term of a spherical harmonic decomposition is artificial in the sense that the largest term is not strongly dominant, even in the slow rotation limit. The reason for the different structure of pressure and inertial modes is that the Coriolis force remains important in the slow rotation limit only for inertial modes. Accordingly, the scalar eigenequation we obtain in that limit is spherically symmetric for pressure modes, but not for inertial modes.

  14. Eigenvector synchronization, graph rigidity and the molecule problem.

    PubMed

    Cucuringu, Mihai; Singer, Amit; Cowburn, David

    2012-12-01

    The graph realization problem has received a great deal of attention in recent years, due to its importance in applications such as wireless sensor networks and structural biology. In this paper, we extend the previous work and propose the 3D-As-Synchronized-As-Possible (3D-ASAP) algorithm, for the graph realization problem in ℝ(3), given a sparse and noisy set of distance measurements. 3D-ASAP is a divide and conquer, non-incremental and non-iterative algorithm, which integrates local distance information into a global structure determination. Our approach starts with identifying, for every node, a subgraph of its 1-hop neighborhood graph, which can be accurately embedded in its own coordinate system. In the noise-free case, the computed coordinates of the sensors in each patch must agree with their global positioning up to some unknown rigid motion, that is, up to translation, rotation and possibly reflection. In other words, to every patch, there corresponds an element of the Euclidean group, Euc(3), of rigid transformations in ℝ(3), and the goal was to estimate the group elements that will properly align all the patches in a globally consistent way. Furthermore, 3D-ASAP successfully incorporates information specific to the molecule problem in structural biology, in particular information on known substructures and their orientation. In addition, we also propose 3D-spectral-partitioning (SP)-ASAP, a faster version of 3D-ASAP, which uses a spectral partitioning algorithm as a pre-processing step for dividing the initial graph into smaller subgraphs. Our extensive numerical simulations show that 3D-ASAP and 3D-SP-ASAP are very robust to high levels of noise in the measured distances and to sparse connectivity in the measurement graph, and compare favorably with similar state-of-the-art localization algorithms. PMID:24432187

  15. Non-rigid multi-modal registration on the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Christoph; Guetter, Christoph; Xu, Chenyang; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2007-03-01

    Non-rigid multi-modal registration of images/volumes is becoming increasingly necessary in many medical settings. While efficient registration algorithms have been published, the speed of the solutions is a problem in clinical applications. Harnessing the computational power of graphics processing unit (GPU) for general purpose computations has become increasingly popular in order to speed up algorithms further, but the algorithms have to be adapted to the data-parallel, streaming model of the GPU. This paper describes the implementation of a non-rigid, multi-modal registration using mutual information and the Kullback-Leibler divergence between observed and learned joint intensity distributions. The entire registration process is implemented on the GPU, including a GPU-friendly computation of two-dimensional histograms using vertex texture fetches as well as an implementation of recursive Gaussian filtering on the GPU. Since the computation is performed on the GPU, interactive visualization of the registration process can be done without bus transfer between main memory and video memory. This allows the user to observe the registration process and to evaluate the result more easily. Two hybrid approaches distributing the computation between the GPU and CPU are discussed. The first approach uses the CPU for lower resolutions and the GPU for higher resolutions, the second approach uses the GPU to compute a first approximation to the registration that is used as starting point for registration on the CPU using double-precision. The results of the CPU implementation are compared to the different approaches using the GPU regarding speed as well as image quality. The GPU performs up to 5 times faster per iteration than the CPU implementation.

  16. Rigidity and Fluidity in Living and Nonliving Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Jorge H.

    Many of the standard equilibrium statistical mechanics techniques do not readily apply to non-equilibrium phase transitions such as the fluid-to-disordered solid transition found in repulsive particulate systems. Examples of repulsive particulate systems are sand grains and colloids. The first part of this thesis contributes to methods beyond equilibrium statistical mechanics to ultimately understand the nature of the fluid-to-disordered solid transition, or jamming, from a microscopic basis. In Chapter 2 we revisit the concept of minimal rigidity as applied to frictionless, repulsive soft sphere packings in two dimensions with the introduction of the jamming graph. Minimal rigidity is a purely combinatorial property encoded via Laman's theorem in two dimensions. It constrains the global, average coordination number of the graph, for instance. Minimal rigidity, however, does not address the geometry of local mechanical stability. The jamming graph contains both properties of global mechanical stability at the onset of jamming and local mechanical stability. We demonstrate how jamming graphs can be constructed using local rules via the Henneberg construction such that these graphs are of the constraint percolation type, where percolation is the study of connected structures in disordered networks. We then probe how jamming graphs destabilize, or become fluid-like, by deleting an edge/contact in the graph and computing the resulting rigid cluster distribution. We also uncover a new potentially diverging lengthscale associated with the random deletion of contacts. In Chapter 3 we study several constraint percolation models, such as k-core percolation and counter-balance percolation, on hyperbolic lattices to better understand the role of loops in such models. The constraints in these percolation models incorporate aspects of local mechanical rigidity found in jammed systems. The expectation is that since these models are indeed easier to analyze than the more

  17. Rigid and non-rigid geometrical transformations of a marker-cluster and their impact on bone-pose estimation.

    PubMed

    Bonci, T; Camomilla, V; Dumas, R; Chèze, L; Cappozzo, A

    2015-11-26

    When stereophotogrammetry and skin-markers are used, bone-pose estimation is jeopardised by the soft tissue artefact (STA). At marker-cluster level, this can be represented using a modal series of rigid (RT; translation and rotation) and non-rigid (NRT; homothety and scaling) geometrical transformations. The NRT has been found to be smaller than the RT and claimed to have a limited impact on bone-pose estimation. This study aims to investigate this matter and comparatively assessing the propagation of both STA components to bone-pose estimate, using different numbers of markers. Twelve skin-markers distributed over the anterior aspect of a thigh were considered and STA time functions were generated for each of them, as plausibly occurs during walking, using an ad hoc model and represented through the geometrical transformations. Using marker-clusters made of four to 12 markers affected by these STAs, and a Procrustes superimposition approach, bone-pose and the relevant accuracy were estimated. This was done also for a selected four marker-cluster affected by STAs randomly simulated by modifying the original STA NRT component, so that its energy fell in the range 30-90% of total STA energy. The pose error, which slightly decreased while increasing the number of markers in the marker-cluster, was independent from the NRT amplitude, and was always null when the RT component was removed. It was thus demonstrated that only the RT component impacts pose estimation accuracy and should thus be accounted for when designing algorithms aimed at compensating for STA. PMID:26555716

  18. Knowledge of Native Protein-Protein Interfaces Is Sufficient To Construct Predictive Models for the Selection of Binding Candidates.

    PubMed

    Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2015-10-26

    Selection of putative binding poses is a challenging part of virtual screening for protein-protein interactions. Predictive models to filter out binding candidates with the highest binding affinities comprise scoring functions that assign a score to each binding pose. Existing scoring functions are typically deduced by collecting statistical information about interfaces of native conformations of protein complexes along with interfaces of a large generated set of non-native conformations. However, the obtained scoring functions become biased toward the method used to generate the non-native conformations, i.e., they may not recognize near-native interfaces generated with a different method. The present study demonstrates that knowledge of only native protein-protein interfaces is sufficient to construct well-discriminative predictive models for the selection of binding candidates. Here we introduce a new scoring method that comprises a knowledge-based potential called KSENIA deduced from structural information about the native interfaces of 844 crystallographic protein-protein complexes. We derive KSENIA using convex optimization with a training set composed of native protein complexes and their near-native conformations obtained using deformations along the low-frequency normal modes. As a result, our knowledge-based potential has only marginal bias toward a method used to generate putative binding poses. Furthermore, KSENIA is smooth by construction, which allows it to be used along with rigid-body optimization to refine the binding poses. Using several test benchmarks, we demonstrate that our method discriminates well native and near-native conformations of protein complexes from non-native ones. Our methodology can be easily adapted to the recognition of other types of molecular interactions, such as protein-ligand, protein-RNA, etc. KSENIA will be made publicly available as a part of the SAMSON software platform at https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software . PMID

  19. Development of a sixth-generation down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor using rigid sponge media for post-treatment of UASB treating municipal sewage.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Takashi; Tandukar, Madan; Sugiyana, Doni; Uemura, Shigeki; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Harada, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    A sixth-generation down-flow hanging sponge reactor (DHS-G6), using rigid sponge media, was developed as a novel aerobic post-treatment unit for upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) treating municipal sewage. The rigid sponge media were manufactured by copolymerizing polyurethane with epoxy resin. The UASB and DHS system had a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10.6 h (8.6 h for UASB and 2 h for DHS) when operated at 10-28 °C. The system gave reasonable organic and nitrogen removal efficiencies. The final effluent had a total biochemical oxygen demand of only 12 mg/L and a total Kjeldahl nitrogen content of 6 mg/L. The DHS reactor gave particularly good nitrification performance, which was attributed to the new rigid sponge media. The sponge media helped to provide a sufficient HRT, and retained a high biomass concentration, extending the solids retention time. The DHS reactor maintained a high dissolved oxygen concentration under natural ventilation. PMID:24291312

  20. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  1. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  2. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  3. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  4. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  5. Dorsal Hippocampal CREB Is Both Necessary and Sufficient for Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekeres, Melanie J.; Neve, Rachael L.; Frankland, Paul W.; Josselyn, Sheena A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the transcription factor CREB has been widely implicated in memory, whether it is sufficient to produce spatial memory under conditions that do not normally support memory formation in mammals is unknown. We found that locally and acutely increasing CREB levels in the dorsal hippocampus using viral vectors is sufficient to induce robust…

  6. Sufficiency and Conditional Estimation of Person Parameters in the Polytomous Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David

    2010-01-01

    Rasch models are characterised by sufficient statistics for all parameters. In the Rasch unidimensional model for two ordered categories, the parameterisation of the person and item is symmetrical and it is readily established that the total scores of a person and item are sufficient statistics for their respective parameters. In contrast, in the…

  7. Material characterization of rigid foam insulation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, Matthew

    There is a continuing need for improved rigid foam insulation, particularly for cryogenic storage aboard aerospace vehicles. The present work is a material characterization of spray-on foam insulation used on the Space Shuttle External Tank. The characterization includes imaging and measurements of thermal conductivity, ultimate tensile strength, and moisture absorption. Thermal conductivity measurements are the main focus of the present work, as it is the most relevant property to insulation performance. A novel apparatus was developed to measure the thermal conductivity of rigid foam at temperatures ranging from 20 K to 300 K with a DeltaT of 10 K between the sides of the foam sample. The effective thermal conductivity of three samples of NCFI 24-124 foam insulation was measured over the full temperature range. Additionally, the effects of different residual gases and moisture absorption on the thermal conductivity of the foam were studied. The data were compared to data from the literature and to mathematical models developed to predict the thermal conductivity. The data show that gas condensation can play a significant role in the thermal conductivity of the foam at low temperature. Moisture absorption can occur in the foam in application when cryogenic fuel is filled into a tank which sits in a warm, humid environment. An apparatus was developed to subject foam samples to these conditions. The moisture content in the samples was then measured. The samples were then imaged using the 900 MHz NMR magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory to determine the location of the water within the foam. Samples conditioned for 9 hours exhibited a 50% weight increase, and samples conditioned for 69 hours exhibited a 284% weight increase. The NMR images showed that the moisture collects first near the warm side of the foam, and permeates through the foam over time. However, the moisture appears to not collect near the knit lines (areas between sprayed layers of

  8. An engineering analysis of polymer film adhesion to rigid substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymans, Luc J.

    An important source of interface fracture contributing to adhesive failure in a bimaterial sandwich, consisting of a rigid substrate and a viscoelastic encapsulant material, arises from residual stresses. The encapsulant is often deposited on the substrate above its glass transition temperature region but used below this temperature range. In order to determine the magnitude of the residual stresses a viscoelastic stress analysis of a bimaterial sandwich is carried out, taking into account the time-dependent material properties of the polymeric layer and the environmental "loading" conditions. The theoretical analysis is paralleled by an experimental examination of the time-dependent out-of-plane deformation of thin, circular sandwiches.Polyvinyl acetate was chosen as a model material exhibiting significant viscoelastic effects under room test conditions. Therefore the pertinent physical and mechanical properties of PYAC are determined; these include the thermal coefficient of expansion, the shear creep compliance and the relaxation modulus. In the experimental work BK-7 glass is taken as the "rigid" substrate. The measurements connected to the stress analysis are monitored with laser interferometry (Newton's rings). A comparison between theory and experiment completes the viscoelastic stress analysis.In the second part of this study time dependent adhesive failure of rubbery materials is investigated. Polymeric materials are being used increasingly for a wide variety of applications. Some of these materials are applied as protective layers to isolate their substrates from a hostile environment. Others achieve remarkable structural bond strengths thereby displacing the traditional mechanical fasteners like bolts and rivets. If one wants to investigate the long time integrity of a layer assembly the time dependence of the material properties of the adhesives needs to be carefully analyzed. This time dependence is also reflected in the energy required to create new

  9. Accurate modelling of flow induced stresses in rigid colloidal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanni, Marco

    2015-07-01

    A method has been developed to estimate the motion and the internal stresses induced by a fluid flow on a rigid aggregate. The approach couples Stokesian dynamics and structural mechanics in order to take into account accurately the effect of the complex geometry of the aggregates on hydrodynamic forces and the internal redistribution of stresses. The intrinsic error of the method, due to the low-order truncation of the multipole expansion of the Stokes solution, has been assessed by comparison with the analytical solution for the case of a doublet in a shear flow. In addition, it has been shown that the error becomes smaller as the number of primary particles in the aggregate increases and hence it is expected to be negligible for realistic reproductions of large aggregates. The evaluation of internal forces is performed by an adaptation of the matrix methods of structural mechanics to the geometric features of the aggregates and to the particular stress-strain relationship that occurs at intermonomer contacts. A preliminary investigation on the stress distribution in rigid aggregates and their mode of breakup has been performed by studying the response to an elongational flow of both realistic reproductions of colloidal aggregates (made of several hundreds monomers) and highly simplified structures. A very different behaviour has been evidenced between low-density aggregates with isostatic or weakly hyperstatic structures and compact aggregates with highly hyperstatic configuration. In low-density clusters breakup is caused directly by the failure of the most stressed intermonomer contact, which is typically located in the inner region of the aggregate and hence originates the birth of fragments of similar size. On the contrary, breakup of compact and highly cross-linked clusters is seldom caused by the failure of a single bond. When this happens, it proceeds through the removal of a tiny fragment from the external part of the structure. More commonly, however

  10. Decaying two-dimensional turbulence with circular rigid walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuojun

    Most theoretical and computational studies of turbulence in Navier-Stokes fluids and/or guiding-center plasmas have been carried out in the presence of spatially periodic boundary conditions. In view of the frequently- reproduced result that two-dimensional and/or MHD decaying turbulence leads to structures comparable in length scale to a box dimension, it is natural to ask if periodic boundary conditions are an adequate representation of any physical situation. Here, we study, computationally, the decay of two-dimensional turbulence in a Navier-Stokes fluid or guiding-center plasma in the presence of circular rigid walls with either no-slip or stress-free boundary conditions. The method is wholly spectral, and relies on a Galerkin approximation by a set of functions which obey two boundary conditions at the wall radius (closely related to 'Stokes eigenfunctions' of the slow flow equation, and analogues of the Chandrasekhar-Reid functions). It is possible to explore Reynolds numbers up to the order of 1250, based on an rms velocity and a box radius. It is found that decaying turbulence is altered significantly by the rigid boundaries. First, strong boundary layers serve as sources of vorticity and enstrophy and enhance the early- time energy decay rate, for a given Reynolds number, well above the periodic boundary condition values. More importantly, in the no-slip case angular momentum turns out to be an even more slowly decaying ideal invariant than energy, and to a considerable extent governs the dynamics of the decay. Angular momentum must be taken into account, for example, in order to achieve quantitative agreement with the prediction of maximum entropy, or 'most probable,' states. These are predictions of conditions that are established after several eddy turnover times but before the energy has decayed away. Angular momentum will cascade to lower azimuthal mode numbers, even if absent there initially, and the angular momentum modal spectrum is eventually

  11. Failed fibreoptic intubation: 70° rigid nasendoscope and Frova introducer to the rescue

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Stalin; Prakash, MVS Satya; Kundra, Pankaj; Gopalakrishnan, Surianarayana

    2016-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation was successfully accomplished with 70° rigid nasendoscope under video guidance in two patients in whom repeated attempts to secure airway with flexible fibreoptic bronchoscope were unsuccessful. Both patients had compromised airway (laryngeal papillomatosis and a huge thyroid swelling) and were uncooperative. Frova intubating introducer was used along with 70° rigid nasendoscope to accomplish tracheal intubation under video guidance. PMID:27512168

  12. A technique for calculating particle systems containing rigid and soft parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Ziaei-Rad, Saeed

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a method was proposed that can simulate the systems containing both rigid and soft parts with rigid body constraints. The idea was to consider the characteristics of rigid parts in their center of mass with three rotational degrees of freedom. In order to compute the systems containing both flexible and rigid parts, standard techniques in molecular dynamics were utilized for flexible parts. However, special procedures were proposed and formulated for rigid parts. Some details on the implementation of the proposed algorithm on GPU were also presented. Next, two case studies were solved. In the first example, a ball mill with the rigid particle of different shapes was considered and the performance of the proposed algorithm was checked and compared with the results obtained from others. In the second example, different self-assembly phases of a mixed rigid and non-rigid polymer molecule with Lennard-Jones pairwise interaction were studied. It was shown that the obtained self-assembly phases were identical to those reported by other researchers.

  13. 30 CFR 7.28 - Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation... and Ventilation Tubing § 7.28 Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing. (a) Test... inside of the tubing. Keep the burner in contact with the material for 60 seconds. If melting...

  14. 30 CFR 7.28 - Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation... and Ventilation Tubing § 7.28 Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing. (a) Test... inside of the tubing. Keep the burner in contact with the material for 60 seconds. If melting...

  15. 30 CFR 7.28 - Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation... and Ventilation Tubing § 7.28 Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing. (a) Test... inside of the tubing. Keep the burner in contact with the material for 60 seconds. If melting...

  16. 30 CFR 7.28 - Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation... and Ventilation Tubing § 7.28 Test for flame resistance of rigid ventilation tubing. (a) Test... inside of the tubing. Keep the burner in contact with the material for 60 seconds. If melting...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1010 - Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid... Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid. Semirigid and rigid acrylic and modified acrylic plastics may be safely used as articles intended for use in contact with food, in accordance...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1010 - Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid... Acrylic and modified acrylic plastics, semirigid and rigid. Semirigid and rigid acrylic and modified acrylic plastics may be safely used as articles intended for use in contact with food, in accordance...

  19. Reassessment of the risk of healthcare-acquired infection during rigid laryngoscopy.

    PubMed

    Muscarella, L F

    2008-02-01

    Inadequate reprocessing of rigid laryngoscopes has been linked to nosocomial outbreaks with associated morbidity and mortality. Last year an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a neonatal intensive care unit was responsible for multiple infections and colonisations, and at least two infant deaths. An investigation of this outbreak identified contaminated rigid laryngoscopes as its source, demonstrating that inadequate reprocessing of rigid laryngoscopes remains a current public health concern. This article revisits and reassesses the risk of healthcare-acquired infection during rigid laryngoscopy and establishes the minimum reprocessing requirements for blades and handles of rigid laryngoscopes. Several potential risk factors for microbial transmission are identified and discussed, including the publication of inconsistent reprocessing guidelines for rigid laryngoscopes. Concern about guidelines that recommend low-level or intermediate-level disinfection of rigid laryngoscopes is expressed. The use of a sterile disposable sheath to cover the rigid laryngoscope and minimise the risk of contamination is also discussed. Regardless of whether a sheath is used during the procedure, thorough cleaning followed by high-level disinfection and drying of the instrument is recommended to prevent microbial transmission. PMID:18226421

  20. 21 CFR 178.3790 - Polymer modifiers in semirigid and rigid vinyl chloride plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polymer modifiers in semirigid and rigid vinyl...: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3790 Polymer modifiers in semirigid and rigid vinyl chloride plastics. The polymers identified in paragraph (a) of...

  1. Single-cycle coherent terahertz-pulse propagation in rigid-rotor molecular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marskar, Robert; Ã-sterberg, Ulf L.

    2015-08-01

    We theoretically analyze linear and nonlinear coherent propagation of linearly polarized, plane-wave, resonant single-cycle terahertz pulses through spatially extended rigid-rotor molecular media. Our model incorporates mixed state medium preparation, nonperturbative nonlinearities, saturation, coherence, memory effects, and propagation, but ignores the effects of damping. Explicit solutions are reported in the linear propagation regime. These solutions are the multilevel superposition of linear, single-cycle 0 π pulses, and appear as temporal beats in the time domain. For media initially in thermal equilibrium, the pulse and molecular beats are dispersive and broaden temporally with increased propagation distance. In the simplified limit of equal rotational line strength (an idealized situation), the emitted impulses are exact temporal copies of the input pulse. An efficient, scalable computational method for solving the reduced multilevel Maxwell-Bloch equations for molecular media is reported. This method is based on a standard differential method for the propagation equation together with an operator splitting method for the Bloch equations. It invokes neither the slowly varying envelope (SVEA) or rotating wave approximations (RWA), and incorporates a large number of possible energy eigenstates (we solve for 7744 levels). Case studies of nonlinear single-cycle pulse propagation are then provided by means of computer solutions. In the nonlinear regime, we observe strong molecular orientations and suppression of the pulse and orientational revivals predicted by linear theory. For sufficiently strong pulses, coherent bleaching effects lead to increased transmission of the driving pulse, which also bears signs of self-modulation and carrier-shock formation.

  2. Matrix rigidity differentially regulates invadopodia activity through ROCK1 and ROCK2.

    PubMed

    Jerrell, Rachel J; Parekh, Aron

    2016-04-01

    ROCK activity increases due to ECM rigidity in the tumor microenvironment and promotes a malignant phenotype via actomyosin contractility. Invasive migration is facilitated by actin-rich adhesive protrusions known as invadopodia that degrade the ECM. Invadopodia activity is dependent on matrix rigidity and contractile forces suggesting that mechanical factors may regulate these subcellular structures through ROCK-dependent actomyosin contractility. However, emerging evidence indicates that the ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms perform different functions in cells suggesting that alternative mechanisms may potentially regulate rigidity-dependent invadopodia activity. In this study, we found that matrix rigidity drives ROCK signaling in cancer cells but that ROCK1 and ROCK2 differentially regulate invadopodia activity through separate signaling pathways via contractile (NM II) and non-contractile (LIMK) mechanisms. These data suggest that the mechanical rigidity of the tumor microenvironment may drive ROCK signaling through distinct pathways to enhance the invasive migration required for cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:26826790

  3. H infinity controller design to a rigid-flexible satellite with two vibration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, A. G.; de Souza, L. C. G.

    2015-10-01

    The satellite attitude control system (ACS) design becomes more complex when the satellite structure has components like, flexible solar panels, antennas and mechanical manipulators. These flexible structures can interact with the satellite rigid parts during translational and/or rotational manoeuvre damaging the ACS pointing accuracy. Although, a well-designed controller can suppress such disturbances quickly, the controller error pointing may be limited by the minimum time necessary to suppress such disturbances thus affecting the satellite attitude acquisition. This paper deals with the rigid-flexible satellite ACS design using the H infinity method. The rigid-flexible satellite is represented by a beam connected to a central rigid hub at one end and free at the other one. The equations of motions are obtained considering small flexible deformations and the Euler-Bernoulli hypothesis. The results of the simulations have shown that the H-infinity controller was able to control the rigid motion and suppress the vibrations.

  4. An incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the motion of rigid bodies in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofighi, N.; Ozbulut, M.; Rahmat, A.; Feng, J. J.; Yildiz, M.

    2015-09-01

    A two-dimensional incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics scheme is presented for simulation of rigid bodies moving through Newtonian fluids. The scheme relies on combined usage of the rigidity constraints and the viscous penalty method to simulate rigid body motion. Different viscosity ratios and interpolation schemes are tested by simulating a rigid disc descending in quiescent medium. A viscosity ratio of 100 coupled with weighted harmonic averaging scheme has been found to provide satisfactory results. The performance of the resulting scheme is systematically tested for cases with linear motion, rotational motion and their combination. The test cases include sedimentation of a single and a pair of circular discs, sedimentation of an elliptic disc and migration and rotation of a circular disc in linear shear flow. Comparison with previous results at various Reynolds numbers indicates that the proposed method captures the motion of rigid bodies driven by flow or external body forces accurately.

  5. Reversible rigid coupling apparatus and method for borehole seismic transducers

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.; Parra, Jorge O.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method of high resolution reverse vertical seismic profile (VSP) measurements is shown. By encapsulating the seismic detector and heaters in a meltable substance (such as wax), the seismic detector can be removably secured in a borehole in a manner capable of measuring high resolution signals in the 100 to 1000 hertz range and higher. The meltable substance is selected to match the overall density of the detector package with the underground formation, yet still have relatively low melting point and rigid enough to transmit vibrations to accelerometers in the seismic detector. To minimize voids in the meltable substance upon solidification, the meltable substance is selected for minimum shrinkage, yet still having the other desirable characteristics. Heaters are arranged in the meltable substance in such a manner to allow the lowermost portion of the meltable substance to cool and solidify first. Solidification continues upwards from bottom-to-top until the top of the meltable substance is solidified and the seismic detector is ready for use. To remove, the heaters melt the meltable substance and the detector package is pulled from the borehole.

  6. Homogenization models for thin rigid structured surfaces and films.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Jean-Jacques; Maurel, Agnès

    2016-07-01

    A homogenization method for thin microstructured surfaces and films is presented. In both cases, sound hard materials are considered, associated with Neumann boundary conditions and the wave equation in the time domain is examined. For a structured surface, a boundary condition is obtained on an equivalent flat wall, which links the acoustic velocity to its normal and tangential derivatives (of the Myers type). For a structured film, jump conditions are obtained for the acoustic pressure and the normal velocity across an equivalent interface (of the Ventcels type). This interface homogenization is based on a matched asymptotic expansion technique, and differs slightly from the classical homogenization, which is known to fail for small structuration thicknesses. In order to get insight into what causes this failure, a two-step homogenization is proposed, mixing classical homogenization and matched asymptotic expansion. Results of the two homogenizations are analyzed in light of the associated elementary problems, which correspond to problems of fluid mechanics, namely, potential flows around rigid obstacles. PMID:27475151

  7. Automatic outlier suppression for rigid coherent point drift algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songlin; Tu, Ruibin; Niu, Zhaodong; Li, Na; Chen, Zengping

    2014-10-01

    Point pattern matching (PPM) including the hard assignment and soft assignment approaches has attracted much attention. The typical probability based method is Coherent Point Drift (CPD) algorithm, which treats one point set(named model point set) as centroids of Gaussian mixture model, and then fits it to the other(named target point set). It uses the expectation maximization (EM) framework, where the point correspondences and transformation parameters are updated alternately. But the anti-outlier performance of CPD is not robust enough as outliers have always been involved in operation until CPD converges. So we proposed an automatic outlier suppression mechanism (AOS) to overcome the shortages of CPD. Firstly, inliers or outliers are judged by converting matching probability matrix into doubly stochastic matrix. Then, transformation parameters are fitted using accurate matching point sets. Finally, the model point set is forced to move coherently to target point set by this transformation model. The transformed model point set is imported into EM iteration again and the cycle repeats itself. The iteration finishes when matching probability matrix converges or the cardinality of accurate matching point set reaches maximum. Besides, the covariance should be updated by the newest position error before re-entering EM algorithm. The experimental results based on both synthetic and real data indicate that compared with other algorithms, AOS-CPD is more robust and efficient. It offers a good practicability and accuracy in rigid PPM applications.

  8. Rigid and high NA multiphoton fluorescence GRIN-endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkl, Selma; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan; Stark, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Kaatz, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton autofluorescence imaging offers minimal-invasive examination of cells without the need of staining and complicated confocal detection systems. Therefore, it is especially interesting for non-invasive clinical diagnostics. To extend this sophisticated technique from superficial regions to deep lying cell layers, internal body parts and specimens difficult of access, the bulky optics need to be reduced in diameter. This is done by tiny GRIN-optics, based on a radial gradient in the reflective index. Of especial interest for multi-photon applications is the newly developed GRIN-lens assembly with increased numerical aperture. High resolution images of plant tissue, hair and cells show the improved image quality,compared to classical GRIN-lenses. The rigid GRIN-endoscopes are already applied in wound healing studies. Here, the GRIN-lenses with diameters smaller than 3 mm enter small skin depressions. They reproduce the focus of a conventional laser scanning tomograph tens of mm apart in the specimen under study. We present first clinical measurements of elastin and SHG of collagen of in-vivo human skin of venous ulcers (ulcer curis).

  9. Perception of shape and space across rigid transformations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Filipp; Spröte, Patrick; Fleming, Roland W

    2016-09-01

    Objects in our environment are subject to manifold transformations, either of the physical objects themselves or of the object images on the retina. Despite drastic effects on the objects' physical appearances, we are often able to identify stable objects across transformations and have strong subjective impressions of the transformations themselves. This suggests the brain is equipped with sophisticated mechanisms for inferring both object constancy, and objects' causal history. We employed a dot-matching task to study in geometrical detail the effects of rigid transformations on representations of shape and space. We presented an untransformed 'base shape' on the left side of the screen and its transformed counterpart on the right (rotated, scaled, or both). On each trial, a dot was superimposed at a given location on the contour (Experiment 1) or within and around the shape (Experiment 2). The participant's task was to place a dot at the corresponding location on the right side of the screen. By analyzing correspondence between responses and physical transformations, we tested for object constancy, causal history, and transformation of space. We find that shape representations are remarkably robust against rotation and scaling. Performance is modulated by the type and amount of transformation, as well as by contour saliency. We also find that the representation of space within and around a shape is transformed in line with the shape transformation, as if shape features establish an object-centered reference frame. These findings suggest robust mechanisms for the inference of shape, space and correspondence across transformations. PMID:25937375

  10. Realizable Closure for the Orientation Tetrad for Rigid Rod Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yochan; Kini, Hemant; Petty, Charles; Mandal, Dilip; Benard, Andre

    2003-11-01

    The prediction of low-order statistical properties of suspensions and liquid crystalline polymers is often based on a moment equation for the orientation dyad that requires a closure model for the orientation tetrad. A new closure has been developed that retains the six-fold symmetry and projection properties of the exact orientation tetrad. (Petty et al., 1999; Nguyen et al., 2001; Kini et al., 2003). This presentation will summarize recent results obtained by applying the new microstructure theory to a class of rigid rod suspensions subjected to homogeneous shear. In the absence of deformation, the theory predicts the existence of multiple steady states for the microstructure as a consequence of a balance between Brownian motion and an excluded volume potential in orientation space. In the presence of homogeneous shear, the orientation director for relatively concentrated suspensions shows periodic behavior relative to the flow direction. For low strain rates, the orientation director executes a tumbling periodic motion. As the strain rate increases, a wagging periodic motion occurs and, at very high strain rates, a steady alignment of the orientation director relative to the flow direction is predicted.

  11. Weak hydrogen bonding yields rigid, tough, and elastic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; Hu, Xiaobo; Vatankhah-Varnosfaderani, Mohammad; Zhou, Jing; Li, Qiaoxi; Dobrynin, Andrey

    Unlike living tissues, synthetic hydrogels are inherently soft and brittle, particularly when built of hydrogen bonds. It remains challenging to design hydrogels that combine high rigidity, strength at break, extensibility, high elasticity. Through free-radical copolymerization of N , N -dimethylacrylamide and methacrylic acid, we have designed a network system based on tunable composition of covalent bonds (permanent cross-links) and hydrogen bonds (sacrificial and recoverable crosslinks) with the following rationale: 1) Maintain a high total number of cross-links to ensure high modulus; 2) Introduce a high fraction of H-bonding to ensure high energy dissipation; and 3) Incorporate a small fraction of permanent cross-links to ensure shape control. By tuning the chemical composition and microstructure we have obtained materials with superb mechanical properties. The hydrogels contain 70 wt% water (similar to living cartilage, skin, and ligaments), while display modulus of 28 MPa, strength of 2 MPa, fracture energy of 9300 J .m-2, extensibility of 800%, excellent fatigue-resistance, and great elasticity allowing for complete and fast strain recovery. The results agreed with theoretical predictions for modulus relaxation of dual networks with dynamic and permanent crosslinks. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation (DMR 1122483, DMR 1407645, and DMR 1436201).

  12. Active elastic dimers: cells moving on rigid tracks.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J H; Das, Moumita; Schwarz, J M

    2014-09-01

    Experiments suggest that the migration of some cells in the three-dimensional extracellular matrix bears strong resemblance to one-dimensional cell migration. Motivated by this observation, we construct and study a minimal one-dimensional model cell made of two beads and an active spring moving along a rigid track. The active spring models the stress fibers with their myosin-driven contractility and α-actinin-driven extendability, while the friction coefficients of the two beads describe the catch and slip-bond behaviors of the integrins in focal adhesions. In the absence of active noise, net motion arises from an interplay between active contractility (and passive extendability) of the stress fibers and an asymmetry between the front and back of the cell due to catch-bond behavior of integrins at the front of the cell and slip-bond behavior of integrins at the back. We obtain reasonable cell speeds with independently estimated parameters. We also study the effects of hysteresis in the active spring, due to catch-bond behavior and the dynamics of cross linking, and the addition of active noise on the motion of the cell. Our model highlights the role of α-actinin in three-dimensional cell motility and does not require Arp2/3 actin filament nucleation for net motion. PMID:25314473

  13. Active elastic dimers: Cells moving on rigid tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, J. H.; Das, Moumita; Schwarz, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    Experiments suggest that the migration of some cells in the three-dimensional extracellular matrix bears strong resemblance to one-dimensional cell migration. Motivated by this observation, we construct and study a minimal one-dimensional model cell made of two beads and an active spring moving along a rigid track. The active spring models the stress fibers with their myosin-driven contractility and α-actinin-driven extendability, while the friction coefficients of the two beads describe the catch and slip-bond behaviors of the integrins in focal adhesions. In the absence of active noise, net motion arises from an interplay between active contractility (and passive extendability) of the stress fibers and an asymmetry between the front and back of the cell due to catch-bond behavior of integrins at the front of the cell and slip-bond behavior of integrins at the back. We obtain reasonable cell speeds with independently estimated parameters. We also study the effects of hysteresis in the active spring, due to catch-bond behavior and the dynamics of cross linking, and the addition of active noise on the motion of the cell. Our model highlights the role of α-actinin in three-dimensional cell motility and does not require Arp2/3 actin filament nucleation for net motion.

  14. The shape of a drop between two rigid fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Duprat, Camille; Stone, Howard A.

    2012-11-01

    Wetting of fibrous media is observed in many engineered systems, e.g. filters, textiles, paper etc. and may also be found in Nature (e.g. hair or feathers). To understand the basic response of such material when interacting with a liquid we study the model system of a finite volume of liquid on two parallel rigid fibers. A liquid wetting the fibers can adopt two distinct equilibrium shapes: a compact hemispherical drop shape or a long liquid column of constant cross-section. These two morphologies depend on the inter-fiber distance, the liquid volume, the fiber radius and the liquid-fiber contact angle. We study the transitions between a drop shape and a column by incrementally varying the inter-fiber distance and find that the transition depends on the global geometry of the system as well as on the volume of liquid. More surprisingly we find that these two morphological states may coexist for certain parameter values. These switches in morphologies may be used to manipulate or transport liquid at a small scale.

  15. Modeling rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers: Rotation axes, bistability, and controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry Chien

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically actuated microswimmers have recently attracted attention due to many possible biomedical applications. In this study we investigate the dynamics of rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers with permanent magnetic dipoles. Our approach uses a boundary element method to calculate a mobility matrix, accurate for arbitrary geometries, which is then used to identify the steady periodically rotating orbits in a co-rotating body-fixed frame. We evaluate the stability of each of these orbits. We map the magnetoviscous behavior as a function of dimensionless Mason number and as a function of the angle that the magnetic field makes with its rotation axis. We describe the wobbling motion of these swimmers by investigating how the rotation axis changes as a function of experimental parameters. We show that for a given magnetic field strength and rotation frequency, swimmers can have more than one stable periodic orbit with different rotation axes. Finally, we demonstrate that one can improve the controllability of these types of microswimmers by adjusting the relative angle between the magnetic field and its axis of rotation.

  16. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme. PMID:27354533

  17. Rigid-body molecular dynamics of DNA inside a nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Fathizadeh, Arman; Berdy Besya, Azim; Reza Ejtehadi, Mohammad; Schiessel, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    The majority of eukaryotic DNA, about three quarter, is wrapped around histone proteins forming so-called nucleosomes. To study nucleosomal DNA we introduce a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model based on sequence-dependent harmonic rigid base pair step parameters of DNA and nucleosomal binding sites. Mixed parametrization based on all-atom molecular dynamics and crystallographic data of protein-DNA structures is used for the base pair step parameters. The binding site parameters are adjusted by experimental B-factor values of the nucleosome crystal structure. The model is then used to determine the energy cost for placing a twist defect into the nucleosomal DNA which allows us to use Kramers theory to calculate nucleosome sliding caused by such defects. It is shown that the twist defect scenario together with the sequence-dependent elasticity of DNA can explain the slow time scales observed for nucleosome mobility along DNA. With this method we also show how the twist defect mechanism leads to a higher mobility of DNA in the presence of sin mutations near the dyad axis. Finally, by performing simulations on 5s rDNA, 601, and telomeric base pair sequences, it is demonstrated that the current model is a powerful tool to predict nucleosome positioning. PMID:23475204

  18. [The development of gender identity beyond rigid dichotomy].

    PubMed

    Quindeau, Ilka

    2014-01-01

    The conflicts individuals with ambiguous sexual characteristics suffer from are not the result of genetic features but of the rigid and dichotomous gender order, which is currently undergoing a renaissance. This also applies to individuals with an uncertain gender identity. In the best interests of the child a concept of gender seems necessary, that goes beyond a binary separation and allows gender-specific intermediary stages in the personal development of identity. Such a gender concept can be developed following psychoanalytic theories. The present discourse contains a scale of connecting factors for a differentiated and less normative conceptualization of gender development. Starting from Freud's concept of constitutional bisexuality, Robert Stoller's theory, which has been firmly rooted in the mainstream of psychoanalysis for more than 40 years, will be critically reviewed. By involving Reimut Reiche's and Jean Laplanche's arguments, a continuative psychological gender theory will be drafted, which does not normatively and reductively claim the demarcation of gender, but rather opens up a space for gender diversity. PMID:25296507

  19. High temperatures produced by bubble collapse near a rigid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin; Aboulhasanzadeh, Bahman; Johnsen, Eric

    2015-11-01

    The collapse of a cavitation bubble is known to have damaging effects on its surroundings. Although numerous investigations have been conducted to predict the pressures produced by this process, fewer have been devoted to determine the heating produced by the bubble collapse. Such heating of the surrounding medium may be important for materials whose mechanical properties depend on temperature (e.g., polymeric coatings). A newly developed computational method to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for gas/liquid flows is used to investigate the dynamics of non-spherical collapse of gas bubbles near rigid surfaces. The subsequent temperature fields are characterized based on the relevant non-dimensional parameters entering the problem, and a model is developed to determine the temperature of the wall based on the temperature of the flow in contact with the wall. We demonstrate that significant wall temperatures may be achieved, depending on the initial location of the collapsing bubble and the heat diffusivity of the material.

  20. Dynamical analysis of an orbiting three-rigid-body system

    SciTech Connect

    Pagnozzi, Daniele E-mail: james.biggs@strath.ac.uk; Biggs, James D. E-mail: james.biggs@strath.ac.uk

    2014-12-10

    The development of multi-joint-spacecraft mission concepts calls for a deeper understanding of their nonlinear dynamics to inform and enhance system design. This paper presents a study of a three-finite-shape rigid-body system under the action of an ideal central gravitational field. The aim of this paper is to gain an insight into the natural dynamics of this system. The Hamiltonian dynamics is derived and used to identify relative attitude equilibria of the system with respect to the orbital reference frame. Then a numerical investigation of the behaviour far from the equilibria is provided using tools from modern dynamical systems theory such as energy methods, phase portraits and Poincarè maps. Results reveal a complex structure of the dynamics as well as the existence of connections between some of the equilibria. Stable equilibrium configurations appear to be surrounded by very narrow regions of regular and quasi-regular motions. Trajectories evolve on chaotic motions in the rest of the domain.

  1. Non-rigid registration of cervical spine MRI volumes.

    PubMed

    Aktar, Mst Nargis; Alam, Md Jahangir; Pickering, Mark; Webb, Alexandra; Perriman, Diana

    2015-08-01

    Whiplash is the colloquial term for neck injuries caused by sudden extension of the cervical spine. Patients with chronic whiplash associated disorder (WAD) can experience neck pain for many years after the original injury. Researchers have found some evidence to suggest that chronic whiplash is related to the amount of intra-muscular fat in the cervical spine muscles. Hence, an important step towards developing a treatment for chronic WAD is a technique to accurately and efficiently measure the amount of intra-muscular fat in the muscles of the cervical spine. Our proposed technique for making this measurement is to automatically segment the cervical spine muscles using a fused volume created from multi-modal MRI volumes of the cervical spine. Multiple modes are required to enhance the boundaries between the different muscles to assist the following automatic segmentation process. However, before these multiple modes can be fused it is first necessary to accurately register these volumes. Hence, in this paper, we have proposed a new non-rigid multi-modal registration algorithm using the sum of conditional variance (SCV) with partial volume interpolation (PVI) similarity measure and Gauss-Newton (GN) optimization for the accurate registration of multi-modal cervical spine MRI volumes. The performance of the proposed approach is compared with the existing SCV based registration algorithm and the sum of the conditional squared deviation from the mode (SCSDM) method. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach provides superior performance than the best existing approaches. PMID:26736677

  2. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-01-01

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy–entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy–entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme. PMID:27354533

  3. Maximizing the rigidity of a large planar orifice air bearing.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Michael; Broadhurst, John

    2014-08-01

    A rotating support for a large astronomical mirror has been implemented using an opposed surface planar orifice air bearing. This bearing needs to provide rotation as free as possible of static and dynamic friction, as well as maximizing the resistance to sudden angular deviations produced by wind gusts. Information on the design of traditional bearings, namely, a cavity supplied with air under pressure through an orifice or diffuser flow restriction and closed by the moving member, has been published in detail. These traditional bearings are not suitable for the application described, due to their slow speed of response to transient changes in forces, a considerable volume of air being needed to change the pressure in the cavity. The air bearing used in this application has no cavity but consists of two flat surfaces in close proximity with air under pressure introduced at the center of one of the surfaces. The volume of air in the bearing is therefore minimized, improving the response to load change transients. The load capacity of this type bearing is reduced as the air between the bearing surfaces is not at constant pressure, but is expanding from the center point of injection to its escape at the edges. This paper indicates a quantitative method of determining the size of the air supply orifices to achieve the maximum rigidity orthogonal to the direction of motion. The approach described can also be applied to optimizing the geometry of other non-cavity air bearings. PMID:25173317

  4. 3-D rigid body tracking using vision and depth sensors.

    PubMed

    Gedik, O Serdar; Alatan, A Aydn

    2013-10-01

    In robotics and augmented reality applications, model-based 3-D tracking of rigid objects is generally required. With the help of accurate pose estimates, it is required to increase reliability and decrease jitter in total. Among many solutions of pose estimation in the literature, pure vision-based 3-D trackers require either manual initializations or offline training stages. On the other hand, trackers relying on pure depth sensors are not suitable for AR applications. An automated 3-D tracking algorithm, which is based on fusion of vision and depth sensors via extended Kalman filter, is proposed in this paper. A novel measurement-tracking scheme, which is based on estimation of optical flow using intensity and shape index map data of 3-D point cloud, increases 2-D, as well as 3-D, tracking performance significantly. The proposed method requires neither manual initialization of pose nor offline training, while enabling highly accurate 3-D tracking. The accuracy of the proposed method is tested against a number of conventional techniques, and a superior performance is clearly observed in terms of both objectively via error metrics and subjectively for the rendered scenes. PMID:23955795

  5. Temporal Changes in the Rigidity Spectrum of Forbush Decreases Based on Neutron Monitor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, M. V.; Wawrzynczak, A.; Sdobnov, V. E.; Kravtsova, M. V.

    2013-09-01

    The Forbush decrease (Fd) of the Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity and disturbances in the Earth's magnetic field generally take place simultaneously and are caused by the same phenomenon, namely a coronal mass ejection (CME) or a shock wave created after violent processes in the solar atmosphere. The magnetic cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field changes because of the disturbances, leading to additional changes in the GCR intensity observed by neutron monitors and muon telescopes. Therefore, one may expect distortion in the temporal changes in the power-law exponent of the rigidity spectrum calculated from neutron monitor data without correcting for the changes in the cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field. We compare temporal changes in the rigidity spectrum of Fds calculated from neutron monitor data corrected and uncorrected for the geomagnetic disturbances. We show some differences in the power-law exponent of the rigidity spectrum of Fds, particularly during large disturbances of the cut-off rigidity of the Earth's magnetic field. However, the general features of the temporal changes in the rigidity spectrum of Fds remain valid as they were found in our previous study. Namely, at the initial phase of the Fd, the rigidity spectrum is relatively soft and it gradually becomes hard up to the time of the minimum level of the GCR intensity. Then during the recovery phase of the Fd, the rigidity spectrum gradually becomes soft. This confirms that the structural changes of the interplanetary magnetic field turbulence in the range of frequencies of 10-6 - 10-5 Hz are generally responsible for the time variations in the rigidity spectrum we found during the Fds.

  6. Role of sufficient phosphorus in biodiesel production from diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shi-Jin; Shen, Xiao-Fei; Ge, Huo-Qing; Zheng, Hang; Chu, Fei-Fei; Hu, Hao; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-08-01

    In order to study the role of sufficient phosphorus (P) in biodiesel production by microalgae, Phaeodactylum tricornutum were cultivated in six different media treatments with combination of nitrogen (N) sufficiency/deprivation and phosphorus sufficiency/limitation/deprivation. Profiles of N and P, biomass, and fatty acids (FAs) content and compositions were measured during a 7-day cultivation period. The results showed that the FA content in microalgae biomass was promoted by P deprivation. However, statistical analysis showed that FA productivity had no significant difference (p = 0.63, >0.05) under the treatments of N deprivation with P sufficiency (N-P) and N deprivation with P deprivation (N-P-), indicating P sufficiency in N deprivation medium has little effect on increasing biodiesel productivity from P. triornutum. It was also found that the P absorption in N-P medium was 1.41 times higher than that in N sufficiency and P sufficiency (NP) medium. N deprivation with P limitation (N-P-l) was the optimal treatment for producing biodiesel from P. triornutum because of both the highest FA productivity and good biodiesel quality. PMID:27260287

  7. IFACEwat: the interfacial water-implemented re-ranking algorithm to improve the discrimination of near native structures for protein rigid docking

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    . Conclusions With the inclusion of interfacial water, the IFACEwat improves mostly results of the initial rigid docking, especially for Antigen/Antibody complexes. The improvement is achieved by explicitly taking into account the contribution of water during the protein interactions, which was ignored or not fully presented by the initial rigid docking and other re-ranking techniques. In addition, the IFACEwat maintains sufficient computational efficiency of the initial docking algorithm, yet improves the ranks as well as the number of the near native structures found. As our implementation so far targeted to improve the results of ZDOCK3.0.2, and particularly for the Antigen/Antibody complexes, it is expected in the near future that more implementations will be conducted to be applicable for other initial rigid docking algorithms. PMID:25521441

  8. Sloshing response of layered liquids in rigid tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Shivakumar, P.

    1993-04-01

    Whereas the response to earthquakes of tanks containing a uniform, homogeneous liquid has been the subject of numerous studies in recent years, there is a paucity of information concerning the corresponding response of tanks containing layers of liquid of different densities. Current interest in the response of tanks with layered liquids is motivated by two factors: (1) many waste storage tanks in nuclear facilities contain two or more layers of liquid or liquid-like material of different densities; and (2) recent processing for the recovery and decontamination of discharge fuel materials is typically carried out in tanks containing two-layered liquids. The sloshing action of layered liquids in rigid cylindrical and long rectangular tanks is investigated considering both their free vibrational characteristics and their response to a horizontal component of base shaking. Special attention is given to the maximum surface displacement induced by the base motion. The analysis is formulated for systems with N superimposed layers of different thicknesses and densities, and it is illustrated by a numerical example. In addition, comprehensive numerical data are presented for two-layered and some three-layered systems which elucidate the underlying response mechanisms and the effects and relative importance of the numerous parameters involved. It is shown that for each horizontal natural mode of vibration, there are N distinct vertical modes, the frequencies of which are lower than the natural frequency of a homogeneous liquid of the same total depth. It is further shown that the maximum surface sloshing displacement of the base-excited layered system is typically larger than of the corresponding homogeneous system, and that the results for the long rectangular and the cylindrical tanks are quite similar.

  9. Rotation of rigid Venus: a complete precession-nutation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottereau, L.; Souchay, J.

    2009-12-01

    Context: With the increasing knowledge of the terrestrial planets due to recent space probes it is possible to model their rotation with increasing accuracy. Despite that fact, an accurate determination of Venus precession and nutation is lacking Aims: Although Venus rotation has been studied in several aspects, a full and precise analytical model of its precession-nutation motion remains to be constructed. We propose to determine this motion with up-to-date physical parameters of the planet Methods: We adopt a theoritical framework already used for a precise precession-nutation model of the Earth, based on a Hamiltonian formulation, canonical equations and an accurate development of the perturbing function due to the Sun. Results: After integrating the disturbing function and applying the canonical equations, we can evaluate the precession constant dot{Psi} and the coefficients of nutation, both in longitude and in obliquity. We get dot{Psi} = 4474farcs35/Jcy ± 66.5 , corresponding to a precession period of 28 965.10±437 years. This result, based on recent estimations of the Venus moment of inertia is significantly different from previous estimations. The largest nutation coefficient in longitude with an argument 2 LS (where LS is the longitude of the Sun) has a 2''19 amplitude and a 112.35 d period. We show that the coefficients of nutation of Venus due to its triaxiality are of the same order of amplitude as these values due to its dynamical flattening, unlike of the Earth, for which they are negligible. Conclusions: We have constucted a complete theory of the rotation of a rigid body applied to Venus, with up-to-date determinations of its physical and rotational parameters. This allowed us to set up a new and better constrained value of the Venus precession constant and to calculate its nutation coefficients for the first time.

  10. Post-Newtonian conservation laws in rigid quasilocal frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Paul L.; Chanona, Melanie; Epp, Richard J.; Koop, Michael J.; Mann, Robert B.

    2014-05-01

    In recent work we constructed completely general conservation laws for energy (McGrath et al 2012 Class. Quantum Grav. 29 215012) and linear and angular momentum (Epp et al 2013 Class. Quantum Grav. 30 195019) of extended systems in general relativity based on the notion of a rigid quasilocal frame (RQF). We argued at a fundamental level that these RQF conservation laws are superior to conservation laws based on the local stress-energy-momentum tensor of matter because (1) they do not rely on spacetime symmetries and (2) they properly account for both matter and gravitational effects. Moreover, they provide simple, exact, operational expressions for fluxes of gravitational energy and linear and angular momentum. In this paper we derive the form of these laws in a general first post-Newtonian (1PN) approximation, and then apply these approximate laws to the problem of gravitational tidal interactions. We obtain formulas for tidal heating and tidal torque that agree with the literature, but without resorting to the use of pseudotensors. We describe the physical mechanism of these tidal interactions not in the traditional terms of a Newtonian gravitational force, but in terms of a much simpler and universal mechanism that is an exact, quasilocal manifestation of the equivalence principle in general relativity. As concrete examples, we look at the tidal heating of Jupiter’s moon Io and angular momentum transfer in the Earth-Moon system that causes a gradual spin-down of the Earth and recession of the Moon. In both examples we find agreement with observation.

  11. Robust rigid registration of retinal angiograms through optimization.

    PubMed

    Dréo, Johann; Nunes, Jean-Claude; Siarry, Patrick

    2006-12-01

    Retinal fundus photographs are employed as standard diagnostic tools in ophthalmology. Serial photographs of the flow of fluorescein and indocyanine green (ICG) dye are used to determine the areas of the retinal lesions. For objective measurements of features, the registration of the images is a necessity. In this paper, we employ optimization techniques for registration with the help of 2-parameter translational motion model of retinal angiograms, based on non-linear pre-processing (Wiener filtering and morphological gradient) and computation of the similarity criteria for the alignment of the two gradient images for any given rigid transformation. The optimization methods are effectively employed to minimize the similarity criterion. The presence of noise, the variations in the background and the temporal variation of the fluorescence level pose serious problems in obtaining a robust registration of the retinal images. Moreover, local search strategies are not robust in the case of ICG angiograms, even if one uses a multiresolution approach. The present work makes a systematic comparison of different optimization techniques, namely the minimization method derived from the optical flow formulation, the Nelder-Mead local search and the HCIAC ant colony metaheuristic, each optimizing a similarity criterion for the gradient images. The impact of the resolution and median filtering of gradient image is studied and the robustness of the approaches is tested through experimental studies, performed on macular fluorescein and ICG angiographies. Our proposed optimization techniques have shown interesting results especially for high resolution difficult registration problems. Moreover, this approach seems promising for affine (6-parameter motion model) or elastical registrations. PMID:17034991

  12. Vision based tunnel inspection using non-rigid registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badshah, Amir; Ullah, Shan; Shahzad, Danish

    2015-04-01

    Growing numbers of long tunnels across the globe has increased the need for safety measurements and inspections of tunnels in these days. To avoid serious damages, tunnel inspection is highly recommended at regular intervals of time to find any deformations or cracks at the right time. While following the stringent safety and tunnel accessibility standards, conventional geodetic surveying using techniques of civil engineering and other manual and mechanical methods are time consuming and results in troublesome of routine life. An automatic tunnel inspection by image processing techniques using non rigid registration has been proposed. There are many other image processing methods used for image registration purposes. Most of the processes are operation of images in its spatial domain like finding edges and corners by Harris edge detection method. These methods are quite time consuming and fail for some or other reasons like for blurred or images with noise. Due to use of image features directly by these methods in the process, are known by the group, correlation by image features. The other method is featureless correlation, in which the images are converted into its frequency domain and then correlated with each other. The shift in spatial domain is the same as in frequency domain, but the processing is order faster than in spatial domain. In the proposed method modified normalized phase correlation has been used to find any shift between two images. As pre pre-processing the tunnel images i.e. reference and template are divided into small patches. All these relative patches are registered by the proposed modified normalized phase correlation. By the application of the proposed algorithm we get the pixel movement of the images. And then these pixels shifts are converted to measuring units like mm, cm etc. After the complete process if there is any shift in the tunnel at described points are located.

  13. Assessing sufficiency of thermal riverscapes for resilient salmon and steelhead populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resilient salmon populations require river networks that provide water temperature regimes sufficient to support a diversity of salmonid life histories across space and time. Efforts to protect, enhance and restore watershed thermal regimes for salmon may target specific location...

  14. Does low gas permeability of rigid-shelled gekkotan eggs affect embryonic development?

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robin M; Thompson, Michael B; Greene, Virginia W

    2013-06-01

    Parchment-shelled eggs are characteristic of most squamates, including the basal clades of gekkotan lizards. The majority of gekkotan lizards, however, produce rigid-shelled eggs that are highly impermeable to gas exchange; eggs are laid in dry sites and experience a net loss of water during incubation. We tested the hypothesis that the 1,000-fold lower rate of oxygen diffusion through the shells of rigid- compared to parchment-shelled eggs imposes a physiological cost on development. To do this, we contrasted species with rigid and with parchment shells with regards to (1) rates of embryonic metabolism and (2) rates and patterns of development of the yolk sac and chorioallantois, the vascularized extra-embryonic membranes that transport oxygen to embryonic tissues. Metabolic rates of embryos from the rigid-shelled eggs of Gehyra variegata did not differ from those of the parchment-shelled eggs of Oedura lesueurii. Moreover, maximum metabolic rates of gekkotans with rigid shells did not differ from those of gekkotan or scincid lizards with parchment shells. In contrast, the yolk sac covered more of the surface area of the egg at oviposition, and the chorioallantois reached its full extent earlier for the species with rigid shelled eggs (Chondrodactylus turneri, G. variegata) than for the species with parchment-shelled eggs (Eublepharis macularius, O. lesueurii). Differences in the temporal patterns of yolk sac and chorioallantois development would thus serve to compensate for low rates of oxygen diffusion through rigid shells of gekkotans. PMID:23495191

  15. Haemodynamic effects of negative pressure wound therapy when using a rigid barrier to prevent heart rupture.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Ingemansson, Richard; Malmsjo, Malin

    2011-08-01

    Right ventricular heart rupture is a devastating complication associated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in cardiac surgery. The use of a rigid barrier has been suggested to offer protection against this lethal complication by preventing the heart from being drawn up and damaged by the sharp sternum bone edges. The aim of this study was to investigate the haemodynamic effects of placing a rigid barrier over the heart to protect it from rupture during NPWT. Eight pigs underwent median sternotomy followed by NPWT at --70 and --120 mmHg, using foam, with or without a rigid plastic disc between the heart and the sternal edges. The heart frequency, cardiac output, mean systemic arterial pressure, mean pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure and left atrial pressure were recorded. Cardiac output was not affected by NPWT, regardless of whether a rigid barrier was used. Heart frequency decreased during NPWT without a disc, and showed a tendency towards a decrease when using a rigid disc. The blood pressure decreased during NPWT without a disc, and showed only a tendency towards a decrease when a disc was inserted between the heart and the sternum. In conclusion, the results of this haemodynamic study show that a rigid disc can safely be placed over the heart during NPWT, to prevent heart rupture. The haemodynamic effects of NPWT in sternotomy wounds are slightly reduced by the presence of the rigid disc. PMID:21585658

  16. Apparatus for integrating a rigid structure into a flexible wall of an inflatable structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J. (Inventor); Patterson, Ross M. (Inventor); Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    For an inflatable structure having a flexible outer shell or wall structure having a flexible restraint layer comprising interwoven, load-bearing straps, apparatus for integrating one or more substantially rigid members into the flexible shell. For each rigid member, a corresponding opening is formed through the flexible shell for receiving the rigid member. A plurality of connection devices are mounted on the rigid member for receiving respective ones of the load-bearing straps. In one embodiment, the connection devices comprise inner connecting mechanisms and outer connecting mechanisms, the inner and outer connecting mechanisms being mounted on the substantially rigid structure and spaced along a peripheral edge portion of the structure in an interleafed array in which respective outer connecting mechanisms are interposed between adjacent pairs of inner connecting mechanisms, the outer connecting mechanisms projecting outwardly from the peripheral edge portion of the substantially rigid structure beyond the adjacent inner connecting mechanisms to form a staggered array of connecting mechanisms extending along the panel structure edge portion. In one embodiment, the inner and outer connecting mechanisms form part of an integrated, structure rotatably mounted on the rigid member peripheral edge portion.

  17. Modeling and analysis of floating performances of stratospheric semi-rigid airships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojian; Fang, Xiande; Dai, Qiuming; Zhou, Zhanru

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the study of semi-rigid airship has revived with the development of airships. Semi-rigid airships have some characteristics of rigid airships and non-rigid airships. Due to the flexibility of the envelope of the non-rigid airship, the variation of the temperature of the inner gas will lead to its structure deformation and affect its flight altitude. This paper develops the structural mechanics model, thermodynamic model and dynamic model of the semi-rigid airship, based on which nonlinear finite element analysis is employed for geometrically nonlinear deformation of the airship upper film in consideration of thermodynamics and structural mechanics coupling. Based on the thermal-structural interaction, the thermal characteristics and flight performances of the airship during floating flight are investigated. The 3-D solar radiation and temperature distribution of the airship skin and the temperature variation of the inner gas are presented to investigate the thermal performance of the airship, flight velocity, acceleration and flight altitude are simulated to investigate the flight performance, and the variations of the volume and pressure difference of the inner gas are calculated to provide a basis for structure design. The results of the simulation can be referenced for the design of the semi-rigid airship, and can be used for the further study on the attitude control of the airship during its floating flight.

  18. Necessary and sufficient conditions for self-focusing of short ultraintense laser pulse in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.L.; Sudan, R.N. )

    1993-04-05

    We analyze the propagation of a short intense laser pulse in underdense cold plasma. When no electron cavitation is present, a global invariant [ital H] is obtained, and its relation with self-focusing is studied. For relativistic self-focusing, [ital H][lt]0 is a sufficient and necessary condition. For relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing, [ital H][lt]0 is sufficient but not necessary. Numerical simulations are performed to confirm the above points.

  19. Error analysis of rigid body posture measurement system based on circular feature points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Ju; Cui, Jishan; Yang, Ning

    2015-02-01

    For monocular vision pose parameters determine the problem, feature-based target feature points on the plane quadrilateral, an improved two-stage iterative algorithm is proposed to improve the optimization of rigid body posture measurement calculating model. Monocular vision rigid body posture measurement system is designed; experimentally in each coordinate system determined coordinate a unified method to unify the each feature point measure coordinates; theoretical analysis sources of error from rigid body posture measurement system simulation experiments. Combined with the actual experimental analysis system under the condition of simulation error of pose accuracy of measurement, gives the comprehensive error of measurement system, for improving measurement precision of certain theoretical guiding significance.

  20. Use of interseismic GPS data: a novel way to evaluate the lithosphere rigidity variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Severine; Peyret, Michel; Chéry, Jean; Mohammadi, Bijan

    2016-04-01

    Although the flexure of the lithosphere is well constrained using a simple secular cooling model in the ocean (Stewart and Watts, 1997), this mechanical parameter is not obvious to determine in the continents. One commonly estimates the flexural rigidity, expressed through the effective elastic thickness (Te) of the lithosphere, by studying the lithosphere's vertical motion induced by long-term geological loads. Here, we suggest a similar approach, using the horizontal velocities to evaluate lateral rigidity variations. To illustrate our method, we select the Western United States zone, where areas with high rigidity (Sierra Nevada) are connected with others displaying low rigidities (San Andreas Fault). Our technique is based on an inversion problem, aiming to infer the effective rigidity from interseismic strain distribution measured by geodetic methods. The forward problem is defined using the equations of linear elasticity in a plane stress finite element code. This method involves the minimisation of a cost function defined as the quadratic measure of the differences between measured and modeled velocity fields on a discrete set of points. Gradient of the functional, with respect to the independent parameters of the model, is computed using an adjoint formulation. Thanks to this construction, the mapping of the rigidity can be fulfilled with a large number of parameters. The optimisation chart is validated first on synthetic velocity data sets corresponding to the surface motion of a screw dislocation with different locking depths. Then, the effective rigidity variations of the Western United States are estimated using a dense geodetic network. The inversion displays low effective rigidities along the San Andreas Fault and in the Eastern California Shear zone, while rigid areas are found in the Sierra Nevada and in the South Basin and Range. High rigidity values are strongly correlated with regions presenting small deformations and vice-versa. In addition to