Science.gov

Sample records for ring barrier buckets

  1. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  2. Stability of barrier buckets with short barrier separations

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    A barrier bucket with very short or zero rf-barrier separation (relative to the barrier widths) has its synchrotron tune decreasing from a very large value towards the bucket boundary. As a result, chaotic region may form near the bucket center and extends outward under increasing modulation of rf voltage and/or rf phase. Application is made to those barrier buckets used in momentum mining at the Fermilab Recycler Ring.

  3. Stability of barrier buckets with zero RF-barrier separations

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-03-01

    A barrier bucket with very small separation between the rf barriers (relative to the barrier widths) or even zero separation has its synchrotron tune decreasing rather slowly from a large value towards the boundary of the bucket. As a result, large area at the bucket edges can become unstable under the modulation of rf voltage and/or rf phase. In addition, chaotic regions may form near the bucket center and extend outward under increasing modulation. Application is made to those barrier buckets used in the process of momentum mining at the Fermilab Recycler Ring.

  4. Gated current integrator for the beam in the RR barrier buckets

    SciTech Connect

    A. Cadorn; C. Bhat; J. Crisp

    2003-06-10

    At the Fermilab Recycler Ring (RR), the antiproton (pbar) beam will be stored azimuthally in different segments created by barrier buckets. The beam in each segment may have widely varying intensities. They have developed a gated integrator system to measure the beam intensity in each of the barrier bucket. Here they discuss the design of the system and the results of beam measurements using the integrator.

  5. Injection method of barrier bucket supported by off-aligned electron cooling for CRing of HIAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guo-Dong; Yang, Jian-Cheng; Xia, Jia-Wen; Mao, Li-Jun; Yin, Da-Yu; Chai, Wei-Ping; Shi, Jian; Sheng, Li-Na; Smirnov, A.; Wu, Bo; Zhao, He

    2016-08-01

    A new accelerator complex, HIAF (the High Intensity Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility), has been approved in China. It is designed to provide intense primary and radioactive ion beams for research in high energy density physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics as well as other applications. In order to achieve a high intensity of up to 5×1011 ppp 238U34+, the Compression Ring (CRing) needs to stack more than 5 bunches transferred from the Booster Ring (BRing). However, the normal bucket to bucket injection scheme can only achieve an intensity gain of 2, so an injection method, fixed barrier bucket (BB) supported by electron cooling, is proposed. To suppress the severe space charge effect during the stacking process, off-alignment is adopted in the cooler to control the transverse emittance. In this paper, simulation and optimization with the BETACOOL program are presented. Supported by New Interdisciplinary and Advanced Pilot Fund of Chinese Academy of Sciences

  6. Stability of Flat Bunches in the Recycler Barrier Bucket

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, T.; Bhat, C.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    We examine the stability of intense flat bunches in barrier buckets used in the Fermilab Recycler. We consider some common stationary distributions and show that they would be unstable against rigid dipole oscillations. We discuss the measurements which identify stable distributions. We also report on experimental studies on the impact of creating a local extremum of the incoherent frequency within the rf bucket. We considered two typical stationary distributions and found they were not adequate descriptions of the Recycler bunches. From the measured line density distribution we find (a) the tanh function is a good fit to the line density, and (b) the coherent frequency of the rigid dipole mode for this distribution is within the incoherent spread at nominal intensities. Stability diagrams when the beam couples to space charge and external impedances will be discussed elsewhere. Our initial experimental investigations indicate that longitudinal stability in the Recycler is, consistent with expectations, influenced by the ratio T{sub 2}/(4T{sub 1}) which determines the location of the extremum of the incoherent tune. The coherent tune depends strongly on the distribution in the bunch tails which is difficult to measure. Numerical studies using both a conventional tracking code and a Vlasov solver are in progress and should provide more insight into conditions that may lead to unstable behavior.

  7. Simulations of RF capture with barrier bucket in booster at injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.J.

    2012-01-23

    As part of the effort to increase the number of ions per bunch in RHIC, a new scheme for RF capture of EBIS ions in Booster at injection has been developed. The scheme was proposed by M. Blaskiewicz and J.M. Brennan. It employs a barrier bucket to hold a half turn of beam in place during capture into two adjacent harmonic 4 buckets. After acceleration, this allows for 8 transfers of 2 bunches from Booster into 16 buckets on the AGS injection porch. During the Fall of 2011 the necessary hardware was developed and implemented by the RF and Controls groups. The scheme is presently being commissioned by K.L. Zeno with Au32+ ions from EBIS. In this note we carry out simulations of the RF capture. These are meant to serve as benchmarks for what can be achieved in practice. They also allow for an estimate of the longitudinal emittance of the bunches on the AGS injection porch.

  8. Stacking of 3 GeV Antiprotons with a Moving Barrier Bucket Method at the GSI-RESR

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, T.; Beller, P.; Franzke, B.; Nesmiyan, I.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Moehl, D.; Kikuchi, T.

    2006-03-20

    At the FAIR project at GSI, 3GeV pbar beams are to be accumulated in the RESR ring up to the intensity of 1.0e11. Every 5 seconds a new batch of 1.0e8 pbars is transferred from a Collector Ring (CR) where the pbar beams are pre-cooled to the momentum spread of 0.1% with stochastic cooling. The main task of the RESR is the accumulation of 1000 batches from the CR. In the classical way established at CERN's AA/AC, a new batch is injected on the injection orbit and is stacked in the radially separated stacking region. In the present paper, an alternative way, azimuthal separation with barrier bucket is proposed. The process is simulated up to 1000 injections and the emittance growth and the intra-beam scattering effects are evaluated.

  9. Applications of barrier bucket RF systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, the barrier rf systems have become important tools in a variety of beam manipulation applications at synchrotrons. Four out of six proton synchrotrons at Fermilab are equipped with broad-band barrier rf systems. All of the beam manipulations pertaining to the longitudinal phase space in the Fermilab Recycler (synchrotron used for antiproton storage) are carried out using a barrier system. Recently, a number of new applications of barrier rf systems have been developed- the longitudinal momentum mining, longitudinal phase-space coating, antiproton stacking, fast bunch compression and more. Some of these techniques have been critical for the recent spectacular success of the collider performance at the Fermilab Tevatron. Barrier bunch coalescing to produce bright proton bunches has a high potential to increase proton antiproton luminosity significantly. In this paper, I will describe some of these techniques in detail. Finally, I make a few general remarks on issues related to barrier systems.

  10. Self-Aligned Guard Rings For Schottky-Barrier Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1990-01-01

    Proposed self-aligned guard ring increases active area of Schottky-barrier infrared detector. Concept developed for silicide Schottky-barrier diodes in which platinum silicide or iridium silicide Schottky-contacts provide cutoff wavelengths of about 6 or 10 micrometers. Grid of silicon dioxide doped with phosphorus etched on silicon wafer, and phosphorus from grid diffused into substrate, creating n-type guard rings. Silicide layers formed in open areas of grid. Overlap of guard rings and silicide layers small.

  11. Structure, Vibrational Spectra and Ring Puckering Barrier of Cyclobutane

    SciTech Connect

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2006-09-02

    We present the results of high level ab initio calculations on the structure and puckering barrier of cyclobutane in an effort to establish the minimum theoretical requirements needed for their accurate description. Our best computed value for the puckering angle is 29.68o. Furthermore we found that accurate estimates for the barrier between the minimum (D2d) and transition state (D4h) configurations require both higher levels of electron correlation [MP4, CCSD(T)] and basis sets of quadruple-z quality or larger. By performing CCSD(T) calculations with basis sets as large as cc-pV5Z we obtained a complete basis set (CBS) estimate of 498 cm-1 for the puckering barrier. Our estimate for the barrier is within 10 cm-1 to the value proposed originally, but it lies ~50 cm-1 higher than the one obtained more recently, therefore revisiting the analysis of the experimental data might be warranted. The results of the current study can serve as a guide for calculations on the substituted four member ring compounds. To this end we present a method for estimating the barrier height at higher levels of electron correlation [MP4, CCSD(T)] from the MP2 results.

  12. Ring distributions leading to species formation: a global topographic analysis of geographic barriers associated with ring species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the mid 20th century, Ernst Mayr and Theodosius Dobzhansky championed the significance of circular overlaps or ring species as the perfect demonstration of speciation, yet in the over 50 years since, only a handful of such taxa are known. We developed a topographic model to evaluate whether the geographic barriers that favor processes leading to ring species are common or rare, and to predict where other candidate ring barriers might be found. Results Of the 952,147 geographic barriers identified on the planet, only about 1% are topographically similar to barriers associated with known ring taxa, with most of the likely candidates occurring in under-studied parts of the world (for example, marine environments, tropical latitudes). Predicted barriers separate into two distinct categories: (i) single cohesive barriers (< 50,000 km2), associated with taxa that differentiate at smaller spatial scales (salamander: Ensatina eschscholtzii; tree: Acacia karroo); and (ii) composite barriers - formed by groups of barriers (each 184,000 to 1.7 million km2) in close geographic proximity (totaling 1.9 to 2.3 million km2) - associated with taxa that differentiate at larger spatial scales (birds: Phylloscopus trochiloides and Larus (sp. argentatus and fuscus)). When evaluated globally, we find a large number of cohesive barriers that are topographically similar to those associated with known ring taxa. Yet, compared to cohesive barriers, an order of magnitude fewer composite barriers are similar to those that favor ring divergence in species with higher dispersal. Conclusions While these findings confirm that the topographic conditions that favor evolutionary processes leading to ring speciation are, in fact, rare, they also suggest that many understudied natural systems could provide valuable demonstrations of continuous divergence towards the formation of new species. Distinct advantages of the model are that it (i) requires no a priori information on the relative

  13. 32. BUCKET POSING OVER CARGO HOLD; NOTE OPERATOR OVER BUCKET. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. BUCKET POSING OVER CARGO HOLD; NOTE OPERATOR OVER BUCKET. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. ORE BUCKET ON TRAM. NOTE THAT BUCKET ROLLS ALONG UPPER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ORE BUCKET ON TRAM. NOTE THAT BUCKET ROLLS ALONG UPPER, STATIONARY SUSPENSION CABLE, PULLED BY LOWER, MOVING TRACTION CABLE. FOREGROUND CABLES ARE FOR BUCKET'S TRIP FROM MINE TO MILL. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  15. Chemically accurate energy barriers of small gas molecules moving through hexagonal water rings.

    PubMed

    Hjertenæs, Eirik; Trinh, Thuat T; Koch, Henrik

    2016-07-21

    We present chemically accurate potential energy curves of CH4, CO2 and H2 moving through hexagonal water rings, calculated by CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ with counterpoise correction. The barriers are extracted from a potential energy surface obtained by allowing the water ring to expand while the gas molecule diffuses through. State-of-the-art XC-functionals are evaluated against the CCSD(T) potential energy surface. PMID:27345929

  16. One-dimensional rings with barriers: a Luttinger liquid approach to precision measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragole, Stephen; Taylor, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments have realized ring shaped traps for ultracold atoms in which the atoms can be manipulated in several interesting ways. Here, we consider 1D ring system with a moving weak barrier within the framework of Luttinger liquid theory. We find that classical theory suggests high precision sensors can be constructed from these systems; we extend these results into the quantum regime. Funding provided by the Physics Frontier Center at the JQI and by DARPA QUASAR.

  17. Buckets, Clusters and Dienst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Shen, Stewart N. T.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe NCSTRL+, a unified, canonical digital library for scientific and technical information (STI). NCSTRL+ is based on the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL), a World Wide Web (WWW) accessible digital library (DL) that provides access to over 80 university departments and laboratories. NCSTRL+ implements two new technologies: cluster functionality and publishing "buckets." We have extended the Dienst protocol, the protocol underlying NCSTRL, to provide the ability to "cluster" independent collections into a logically centralized digital library based upon subject category classification, type of organization, and genres of material. The concept of "buckets" provides a mechanism for publishing and managing logically linked entities with multiple data formats. The NCSTRL+ prototype DL contains the holdings of NCSTRL and the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). The prototype demonstrates the feasibility of publishing into a multi-cluster DL, searching across clusters, and storing and presenting buckets of information. We show that the overhead for these additional capabilities is minimal to both the author and the user when compared to the equivalent process within NCSTRL.

  18. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Bhat; John P. Marriner

    2003-06-10

    The Recycler Ring (RR) is a new 8Gev antiproton storage ring at Fermilab. Presently, this machine is being commissioned using protons from the Booster. It uses barrier buckets for stacking, un-stacking and storing the beam. At any given time, the RR is capable of storing proton or antiproton beams in multiple segments azimuthally. These segments of the beam may have widely differing longitudinal emittance and beam intensities and bunch lengths. It is highly essential to be able to measure the longitudinal emittance and keep track of the longitudinal dynamics at various stages of the operation of the RR. In this paper, the authors discuss a few methods of longitudinal emittance measurements in barrier buckets and discuss their merits and demerits

  19. Slug bucket lifting yoke analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElfresh, A.J.

    1994-11-14

    There are baskets of fuel in the storage pools in the Purex facility (202-A). These baskets (called slug buckets) need to be removed from Purex and taken to the K-Basins. The current slug bucket lifting yoke is of sufficient age to be in question structurally. Therefore new yokes need to be fabricated. Prior to fabricating new yokes, the slug bucket lifting yoke DWG needs to be updated for fabrication. However, the design needs to be refined so that the yoke will be easier to fabricate. These calculations are prepared to demonstrate the adequacy of the new design. The objective of these calculations is to select appropriately sized structural members and weld sizes to serve as components in the slug bucket lifting yoke.

  20. Spatiotemporal correlation between microdischarges in concentric ring pattern in dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Lifang; Liu Liang; Wang Yongjie; Yue Han; Li Xinchun

    2012-06-15

    The spatiotemporal correlation between microdischarges of the concentric ring pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge in argon at atmospheric pressure is studied by the wavelet-correlation technique for the first time. The concentric ring patterns lasting more than 5 min have been obtained under circular boundaries with different sizes by suddenly raising the applied voltage. The average correlation coefficient between microdischarge clusters increases with their discharge region increasing. The wavelet-correlation shows a higher correlation degree between the microdischarge clusters at the edge where (d|U{sub appl}|/dt)<0 than at the edge where (d|U{sub appl}|/dt)>0 in per half-cycle of the applied voltage U{sub appl}.

  1. Effect of sight barriers in pens of breeding ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) II. Reproductive parameters.

    PubMed

    Deeming, D C; Hodges, H R; Cooper, J J

    2011-08-01

    1. The effects of sight barriers in the pens of breeding ring-necked pheasants were investigated on a commercial game farm over a 10-week laying season. 2. Reproductive performance was recorded as egg production, numbers of eggs rejected for hatching together with measures of fertility, embryonic mortality and hatchability for 11 pens with barriers and 11 pens that were left open and acted as controls. 3. Egg production per pen and the numbers of rejected eggs were not significantly affected by the presence of the barriers. 4. Fertility was significantly higher and persisted for longer in the barrier pens, particularly towards the end of the laying season. 5. Embryonic mortality was unaffected by the presence of the barriers but hatchability was significantly lower in the open pens, which was associated with lower levels of fertility. 6. Establishing sight barriers in breeder pens for commercial pheasants would appear not only to offer improved welfare but also significant commercial advantages. PMID:21919568

  2. Ring-Shaped Microlanes and Chemical Barriers as a Platform for Probing Single-Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Christoph; Segerer, Felix J.; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification and discrimination of pharmaceutical and disease-related effects on cell migration requires detailed characterization of single-cell motility. In this context, micropatterned substrates that constrain cells within defined geometries facilitate quantitative readout of locomotion. Here, we study quasi-one-dimensional cell migration in ring-shaped microlanes. We observe bimodal behavior in form of alternating states of directional migration (run state) and reorientation (rest state). Both states show exponential lifetime distributions with characteristic persistence times, which, together with the cell velocity in the run state, provide a set of parameters that succinctly describe cell motion. By introducing PEGylated barriers of different widths into the lane, we extend this description by quantifying the effects of abrupt changes in substrate chemistry on migrating cells. The transit probability decreases exponentially as a function of barrier width, thus specifying a characteristic penetration depth of the leading lamellipodia. Applying this fingerprint-like characterization of cell motion, we compare different cell lines, and demonstrate that the cancer drug candidate salinomycin affects transit probability and resting time, but not run time or run velocity. Hence, the presented assay allows to assess multiple migration-related parameters, permits detailed characterization of cell motility, and has potential applications in cell biology and advanced drug screening. PMID:27242099

  3. Ring-Shaped Microlanes and Chemical Barriers as a Platform for Probing Single-Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Christoph; Segerer, Felix J; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas; Rädler, Joachim O

    2016-01-01

    Quantification and discrimination of pharmaceutical and disease-related effects on cell migration requires detailed characterization of single-cell motility. In this context, micropatterned substrates that constrain cells within defined geometries facilitate quantitative readout of locomotion. Here, we study quasi-one-dimensional cell migration in ring-shaped microlanes. We observe bimodal behavior in form of alternating states of directional migration (run state) and reorientation (rest state). Both states show exponential lifetime distributions with characteristic persistence times, which, together with the cell velocity in the run state, provide a set of parameters that succinctly describe cell motion. By introducing PEGylated barriers of different widths into the lane, we extend this description by quantifying the effects of abrupt changes in substrate chemistry on migrating cells. The transit probability decreases exponentially as a function of barrier width, thus specifying a characteristic penetration depth of the leading lamellipodia. Applying this fingerprint-like characterization of cell motion, we compare different cell lines, and demonstrate that the cancer drug candidate salinomycin affects transit probability and resting time, but not run time or run velocity. Hence, the presented assay allows to assess multiple migration-related parameters, permits detailed characterization of cell motility, and has potential applications in cell biology and advanced drug screening. PMID:27242099

  4. Second Stage Turbine Bucket Airfoil.

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Liming; Ahmadi, Majid; Humanchuk, David John; Moretto, Nicholas; Delehanty, Richard Edward

    2003-05-06

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  5. Turbine bucket natural frequency tuning rib

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; Norton, Paul Francis; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Jacala, Ariel Caesar-Prepena

    2002-01-01

    A tuning rib is added preferably in the aft cavity of a cored turbine bucket to alter the bucket's natural frequencies. The tuning rib may be a solid rib or a segmented rib and is particularly suited for altering high order frequency modes such as 2T, 4F and 1-3S. As such, detrimental crossings of natural bucket frequencies and gas turbine stimuli can be avoided to thereby improve the reliability of a gas turbine without impacting other features of the bucket that are important to the performance of the gas turbine.

  6. Potential-well distortion in barrier Rf

    SciTech Connect

    King Ng

    2004-04-29

    Head-tail asymmetry has been observed in the longitudinal beam profiles in the Fermilab Recycler Ring where protons or antiprotons are stored in rf barrier buckets. The asymmetry is caused by the distortion of the rf potential well in the presence of resistive impedance. Gaussian energy distribution can fit the observed asymmetric beam profile but not without discrepancy. It can also fit the measured energy distribution. On the other hand, generalized elliptic distribution gives a better fit to the beam profile. However, it fails to reproduce the observed energy distribution.

  7. Bucket structure in carbonate accumulations of the Maldive, Chagos and Laccadive archipelagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Wolfgang; Purkis, Samuel J.

    2013-11-01

    Peritidal platforms rimmed by reefs, and raised reefs rimming deep lagoons, are characteristic morphologies of the tropical carbonate factory; their geometry contrasts sharply with the seaward-sloping shelves of siliciclastic margins. The structure has been compared to a bucket—stiff reef rims holding a pile of loose sediment. Remote-sensing data from the Maldive, Chagos and Laccadive archipelagos of the Indian Ocean show that ring reefs with bucket structure are the dominant depositional pattern from patch reefs of tens of meters to archipelagos of hundreds of kilometers in diameter, that is, over more than 4 orders of magnitude in linear size. Over 2.5 orders of magnitude, the bucket structures qualify as statistical fractals, exhibiting self-similar patterns and size distributions following power laws. However, most regional or genetic subsets of the data follow lognormal distributions and small subsets of lagoon reefs exhibit exponential distributions. Seismic data and boreholes in the Maldives indicate that the bucket has been a dominant depositional motif since the Oligocene. Ecological and hydrodynamic studies on modern reefs suggest that the bucket structure is a form of biotic self-organization: the edge position in a reef is favored over the center position because bottom shear is higher and the diffusive boundary layer between reef and water thinner. Thus, the reef edge has easier access to nutrients and is less likely to be buried by sediment. The bucket structure reflects these conditions. Karst processes have accentuated the surface relief of the buckets, particularly in the late Quaternary.

  8. 46 CFR 181.610 - Fire bucket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire bucket. 181.610 Section 181.610 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.610 Fire bucket. A vessel not required to have a power...

  9. 46 CFR 181.610 - Fire bucket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire bucket. 181.610 Section 181.610 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.610 Fire bucket. A vessel not required to have a power...

  10. Holey buckets! Monitoring plot-scale runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, D. E.; Stewart, R. D.; Abou Najm, M. R.; Selker, J. S.; Selker, F.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2011-12-01

    Measurement of plot-scale surface runoff is commonly achieved by diverting flow through a flume or tipping bucket system, or into a storage tank, such as bucket. The principle advantages of the "bucket method" are relative simplicity and low cost. The principle drawback is that the bucket requires frequent emptying during heavy runoff, unless the bucket volume is very large. As a solution to the problem of emptying the bucket while still retaining the properties of simplicity and economy, we used a holey bucket. Our "bucket" is vertical 4"-diameter ABS pipe, sealed at the bottom, and with holes along the side of the pipe. A screen in the pipe catches debris that could block the holes. The holes' diameters and locations were chosen to capture both low (<1 L min-1) and high (>100 L min-1) flows. Runoff is diverted into the top of the pipe. The runoff rate is determined from the water level and the rate of change in water level: the water level gives the flow rate out of the submerged holes (using Torricelli's Law) and the change in water level gives the rate of change in storage in the pipe. The runoff is calculated as the sum of the hole discharge and the rate of change in storage. A calibration parameter is applied to account for departures from assumptions of the theory. The design is currently being utilized to monitor runoff from experimental plots on a rural hillslope in Chile.

  11. 46 CFR 181.610 - Fire bucket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire bucket. 181.610 Section 181.610 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.610 Fire bucket. A vessel not required to have a power...

  12. 46 CFR 181.610 - Fire bucket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire bucket. 181.610 Section 181.610 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.610 Fire bucket. A vessel not required to have a power...

  13. 46 CFR 181.610 - Fire bucket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire bucket. 181.610 Section 181.610 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.610 Fire bucket. A vessel not required to have a power...

  14. Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The essence of vortex physics is that at certain low-energy scales elementary excitations of a point particle theory can behave like strings rather than particles. Vortices are the resulting string-like solutions; their thickness sets the distance scale beyond which physics is string-like rather than particle-like. String degrees of freedom are massless in the sense that excitations on a string can have an arbitrarily low frequency. Non-string degrees of freedom correspond to massive particles and are absent from the low energy spectrum. This article considers only field theories with vortices at low energies. The possible existence of a class of solitons in these vortex theories will be discussed. They are vortex rings: they are localized and finite in energy, and able to carry the quantum numbers of point particles. Rings are thus particle-like solutions of a vortex theory, which is itself a limit of a point particle field theory.

  15. Barrier transmission map of one-dimensional nonlinear split-ring-resonator-based metamaterials: Bright, dark, and gray soliton resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGurn, Arthur R.

    2013-10-01

    The barrier transmission characteristics of a one-dimensional chain of optically linear split-ring resonators (SRRs) containing a barrier composed of optically nonlinear split-ring resonators are studied. (This is an analogy to the quantum mechanical problem of the resonant transmission of a particle through a finite barrier potential.) The SRRs are idealized as inductor-resistor-capacitor-equivalent resonator circuits where the capacitance is either from a linear dielectric medium (optically linear SRRs) or from a Kerr-type nonlinear dielectric medium (optically nonlinear SRRs). The SRRs are arrayed in a one-dimensional chain and interact with one another through weak nearest-neighbor mutually inductive couplings. The transmission maxima of the SRR barrier problem are studied as they are located in a two-dimensional parameter space characterizing the linear mutually inductive coupling and the nonlinear Kerr dielectric of the SRRs of the barrier. The result is a two-dimensional map giving the conditions for the existence of the resonant-barrier modes that are excited in the transmission process. The various lines of transmission maxima in the two-dimensional plot are associated with different types of resonant excitations in the barrier. The map is similar to one recently made in McGurn [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.77.115105 77, 115105 (2008)] for the resonant-transmission modes of a nonlinear barrier in a photonic crystal waveguide. The SRR problem, however, is quite different from the photonic crystal problem as the nonlinear difference equations of the two systems are different in the nature of their nonlinear interactions. Consequently, the results for the two systems are briefly compared. The transmission maxima of the SRR system occur along lines in the two-dimensional plot, which are associated with modes resonantly excited in the barrier. These lines of resonant modes either originate as a simple evolution from the resonant modes of the

  16. DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET AUTOMATIC LOCKING MECHANISM ON LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET AUTOMATIC LOCKING MECHANISM ON LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING WEST. AS EMPTY BUCKETS PASSED THROUGH THIS MECHANISM, A LEVER ON THE BUCKET WAS ACTIVATED THAT LOCKED THE BUCKET TO THE MOVING CABLE, CARRYING IT ALONG BACK UP TO THE MINES. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  17. Fixing the Hole in My Bucket

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitkewicz, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    Like many people, the author has spent the better part of his life fashioning a list of places he wanted to go and things he wanted to do. Because he is a typical American male, his "Bucket List" is mostly populated by sporting venues he wants to visit and sporting events he wants to witness. Sharing his "Bucket List" with his son would be a gift…

  18. Buckets: Smart Objects for Digital Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Current discussion of digital libraries (DLs) is often dominated by the merits of the respective storage, search and retrieval functionality of archives, repositories, search engines, search interfaces and database systems. While these technologies are necessary for information management, the information content is more important than the systems used for its storage and retrieval. Digital information should have the same long-term survivability prospects as traditional hardcopy information and should be protected to the extent possible from evolving search engine technologies and vendor vagaries in database management systems. Information content and information retrieval systems should progress on independent paths and make limited assumptions about the status or capabilities of the other. Digital information can achieve independence from archives and DL systems through the use of buckets. Buckets are an aggregative, intelligent construct for publishing in DLs. Buckets allow the decoupling of information content from information storage and retrieval. Buckets exist within the Smart Objects and Dumb Archives model for DLs in that many of the functionalities and responsibilities traditionally associated with archives are pushed down (making the archives dumber) into the buckets (making them smarter). Some of the responsibilities imbued to buckets are the enforcement of their terms and conditions, and maintenance and display of their contents.

  19. Reaction barrier heights for cycloreversion of heterocyclic rings: An Achilles' heel for DFT and standard ab initio procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li-Juan; Sarrami, Farzaneh; O'Reilly, Robert J.; Karton, Amir

    2015-09-01

    We introduce a database of 20 accurate cycloreversion barrier heights of 5-membered heterocyclic rings (to be known as the CRBH20 database). In these reactions, dioxazole and oxathiazole rings are fragmented to form isocyanates, isothiocyanates, and carbonyls. The reference reaction barrier heights are obtained by means of the high-level, ab initio W1-F12 and W1w thermochemical protocols. We evaluate the performance of 65 contemporary density functional theory (DFT) and double-hybrid DFT (DHDFT) procedures. The CRBH20 database represents an extremely challenging test for these methods. Most of the conventional DFT functionals (74%) result in root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) between 10 and 81 kJ mol-1. The rest of the DFT functionals attain RMSDs = 5 - 10 kJ mol-1. Of the 12 tested DHDFT functionals, only five result in RMSDs < 10 kJ mol-1. The CRBH20 dataset also proves to be a surprisingly challenging target for composite and standard ab initio procedures.

  20. Preserving the Pyramid of STI Using Buckets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    The product of research projects is information. Through the life cycle of a project, information comes from many sources and takes many forms. Traditionally, this body of information is summarized in a formal publication, typically a journal article. While formal publications enjoy the benefits of peer review and technical editing, they are also often compromises in media format and length. As such, we consider a formal publication to represent an abstract to a larger body of work: a pyramid of scientific and technical information (STI). While this abstract may be sufficient for some applications, an in-depth use or analysis is likely to require the supporting layers from the pyramid. We have developed buckets to preserve this pyramid of STI. Buckets provide an archive- and protocol-independent container construct in which all related information objects can be logically grouped together, archived, and manipulated as a single object. Furthermore, buckets are active archival objects and can communicate with each other, people, or arbitrary network services. Buckets are an implementation of the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) DL model. In SODA, data objects are more important than the archives that hold them. Much of the functionality traditionally associated with archives is pushed down into the objects, such as enforcing terms and conditions, negotiating display, and content maintenance. In this paper, we discuss the motivation, design, and implication of bucket use in DLs with respect to grey literature.

  1. Historical habitat barriers prevent ring-like genetic continuity throughout the distribution of threatened Alameda Striped Racers (Coluber lateralis euryxanthus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Wood, Dustin A.; Swaim, Karen; Fisher, Robert N.; Vandergast, Amy

    2016-01-01

    We used microsatellites and mtDNA sequences to examine the mixed effects of geophysical, habitat, and contemporary urban barriers on the genetics of threatened Alameda Striped Racers (Coluber lateralis euryxanthus), a species with close ties to declining coastal scrub and chaparral habitat in the eastern San Francisco Bay area of California. We used cluster assignments to characterize population genetic structuring with respect to land management units and approximate Bayesian analysis to rank the ability of five alternative evolutionary hypotheses to explain the inferred structure. Then, we estimated rates of contemporary and historical migration among the major clusters and measured the fit of different historical migration models to better understand the formation of the current population structure. Our results reveal a ring-like pattern of historical connectivity around the Tri-Valley area of the East Bay (i.e., San Ramon, Amador, and Livermore valleys), with clusters largely corresponding to different management units. We found no evidence of continuous gene flow throughout the ring, however, and that the main gap in continuity is centered across the Livermore Valley. Historical migration models support higher rates of gene flow away from the terminal ends of the ring on the north and south sides of the Valley, compared with rates into those areas from western sites that border the interior San Francisco Bay. We attribute the break in ring-like connectivity to the presence of unsuitable habitat within the Livermore Valley that has been reinforced by 20th century urbanization, and the asymmetry in gene flow rates to spatial constraints on movement and east–west environmental gradients influenced by the proximity of the San Francisco Bay.

  2. Second-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; By, Robert Romany; Sims, Calvin L.; Hyde, Susan Marie

    2002-01-01

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X and Y values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket. The second-stage wheel has sixty buckets.

  3. Modular Pick-and-Bucket Mining Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, M. D.; Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Concept for improved conventional pick-and-bucket mining machine offered as backup for hydrojet-jaw mining machine. Picks on chain dislodge coal and buckets on chain scoop it up. Depending on width cut, unit composed of only two end modules or end modules plus one, two, or three incremental modules. Folding curved shields protect sides of miner from falling coal and rock. Two side stabilizers - extendable hydraulic members - anchor miner against lateral drift. Unlike conventional machines, new version tilts cutters vertically and skews them horizontally to changing floor slopes and seam heights.

  4. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOEpatents

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios; Xu, Liming; Lewis, Doyle C.

    2002-01-01

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  5. 63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE RECOVERY TANK LEFT OF FLAME BUCKET; LIQUID OXYGEN CATCH TANK RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. Cooling in a compound bucket

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Hu, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Electron cooling in the Fermilab Recycler ring is found to create correlation between longitudinal and transverse tails of the antiproton distribution. By separating the core of the beam from the tail and cooling the tail using 'gated' stochastic cooling while applying electron cooling on the entire beam, one may be able to significantly increase the overall cooling rate. In this paper, we describe the procedure and first experimental results.

  7. The Adventures of the Bucket Buddies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Through Bucket Buddies--a collaborative online project developed and administered by The Center for Improved Engineering Science and Education (CIESE) at Stevens Institute of Technology, in Hoboken, New Jersey--elementary students from more than 150 schools in 33 states and 6 countries have taken samples from local ponds and teamed up to answer…

  8. Liquid cooled counter flow turbine bucket

    DOEpatents

    Dakin, James T.

    1982-09-21

    Means and a method are provided whereby liquid coolant flows radially outward through coolant passages in a liquid cooled turbine bucket under the influence of centrifugal force while in contact with countercurrently flowing coolant vapor such that liquid is entrained in the flow of vapor resulting in an increase in the wetted cooling area of the individual passages.

  9. Beam position monitors for the Fermilab recycler ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsotti, E.; Lackey, S.; McClure, C.; Meadowcroft, R.

    1998-12-01

    Fermilab's new Recycler Ring will recover and cool "used" antiprotons at the end of a Tevatron store and also accumulate "new" antiprotons from the antiproton source. A wideband rf system based on barrier buckets will result in unbunched beam, grouped in one to three separate partitions throughout the ring. A new beam position monitor system will measure position of any one partition at a time, using low-frequency signals from beam distribution edges. A signal path including an elliptical split-plate detector, radiation-resistant tunnel preamplifiers, and logarithmic amplifiers, will result in a held output voltage nearly proportional to position. The results will be digitized using Industry Pack technology and a Motorola MVME162 processor board. The data acquisition subsystem, including digitization and timing for 80 position channels, will occupy two VME slots. System design will be described, with some additional emphasis on the use of logamp chips.

  10. Third-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Pirolla, Peter Paul; Siden, Gunnar Leif; Humanchuk, David John; Brassfield, Steven Robert; Wilson, Paul Stuart

    2002-01-01

    The third-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  11. Bucket platform cooling scheme and related method

    DOEpatents

    Abuaf, Nesim; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Chopra, Sanjay; Kercher, David Max; Kellock, Iain Robertson; Lenahan, Dean Thomas; Nellian, Sankar; Starkweather, John Howard; Lupe, Douglas Arthur

    2002-01-01

    A turbine bucket includes an airfoil extending from a platform, having high and low pressure sides; a wheel mounting portion; a hollow shank portion located radially between the platform and the wheel mounting portion, the platform having an under surface. An impingement cooling plate is located in the hollow shank portion, spaced from the under surface, and the impingement plate is formed with a plurality of impingement cooling holes therein.

  12. Gas turbine bucket with impingement cooled platform

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Raphael Durand

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine bucket having an airfoil portion and a root portion, with a substantially planar platform at an interface between the airfoil portion and root portion, a platform cooling arrangement including at least one bore in the root portion and at least one impingement cooling tube seated in the bore, the tube extending beyond the bore with an outlet in close proximity to a targeted area on an underside of the platform.

  13. Buckets: Aggregative, Intelligent Agents for Publishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Shen, Stewart N. T.; Zubair, Mohammad

    1998-01-01

    Buckets are an aggregative, intelligent construct for publishing in digital libraries. The goal of research projects is to produce information. This information is often instantiated in several forms, differentiated by semantic types (report, software, video, datasets, etc.). A given semantic type can be further differentiated by syntactic representations as well (PostScript version, PDF version, Word version, etc.). Although the information was created together and subtle relationships can exist between them, different semantic instantiations are generally segregated along currently obsolete media boundaries. Reports are placed in report archives, software might go into a software archive, but most of the data and supporting materials are likely to be kept in informal personal archives or discarded altogether. Buckets provide an archive-independent container construct in which all related semantic and syntactic data types and objects can be logically grouped together, archived, and manipulated as a single object. Furthermore, buckets are active archival objects and can communicate with each other, people, or arbitrary network services.

  14. Internal cooling circuit for gas turbine bucket

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Susan Marie; Davis, Richard Mallory

    2005-10-25

    In a gas turbine bucket having a shank portion and an airfoil portion having leading and trailing edges and pressure and suction sides, an internal cooling circuit, the internal cooling circuit having a serpentine configuration including plural radial outflow passages and plural radial inflow passages, and wherein a coolant inlet passage communicates with a first of the radial outflow passages along the trailing edge, the first radial outflow passage having a plurality of radially extending and radially spaced elongated rib segments extending between and connecting the pressure and suction sides in a middle region of the first passage to prevent ballooning of the pressure and suction sides at the first radial outflow passage.

  15. Diving into the Ice Bucket Challenge

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Kathleen; Batra, Ayush; Klein, Joshua P.; Henderson, Galen V.

    2015-01-01

    Triggered by facial exposure to cold water and apnea, the mammalian diving reflex consists of bradycardia and peripheral arteriolar vasoconstriction leading to an increase in central arterial pressure. It has been previously associated with ischemic stroke but not definitively with intracerebral hemorrhage. We present a case of intracerebral hemorrhage occurring in a woman with poorly controlled hypertension following her participation in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis fund-raising “Ice Bucket Challenge,” in which ice-cold water was poured on her head. We suspect that facial exposure to ice-cold water triggered the diving reflex, causing a hypertensive surge and ultimately the intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:26288676

  16. 65. FIRE SUPPRESSION PIPES BEHIND FLAME BUCKET. PIPES TO UMBILICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. FIRE SUPPRESSION PIPES BEHIND FLAME BUCKET. PIPES TO UMBILICAL MAST IN LOWER LEFT CORNER; PIPES TO LAUNCHER IN UPPER LEFT CORNER; PIPES TO FLAME BUCKET IN LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF PHOTOGRAPH. POTABLE WATER PIPING IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF PHOTO. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  17. 23. VIEW DOWN INTO LAUNCHER AND FLAME BUCKET FROM STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW DOWN INTO LAUNCHER AND FLAME BUCKET FROM STATION 48 IN SLC-3W MST. NOTE REMOVABLE METAL PLANKS BELOW LAUNCHER AND ROPE NET OVER FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  18. 62. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET BELOW LAUNCHER ON SOUTH END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET BELOW LAUNCHER ON SOUTH END OF LAUNCH PAD. FIRE SUPPRESSION EQUIPMENT RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. SOUTH FACE OF MST IS IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING WEST. NOTE ARRIVING BUCKET ON RAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING WEST. NOTE ARRIVING BUCKET ON RAIL IN CENTER, DEPARTING BUCKET IN LEFT BACKGROUND, TRACTION CABLE IN PULLEYS, AND SUSPENSION CABLE ANGLING DOWN THROUGH FLOOR. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  20. Microwave instability in {alpha}-like quasi-isochronous buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.

    1996-10-01

    The problem of microwave instability inside an {alpha}-like quasi- isochronous bucket is addressed. The coupling impedance at wavelengths shorter than the length of the short bunches is found to be not small. The Keil-Schnell criterion is modified for such a bucket using the concept of self-bunching. The mechanism of particle loss during a microwave growth is examined.

  1. Use of buckets as tools by Western lowland gorillas.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Susan W; Steele, Gary R; Kleinfelder, Raymond E

    2012-01-01

    While all great apes have been documented to use tools, gorillas are arguably the least proficient tool users. In 2009, a Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the Buffalo Zoo was observed using a bucket, which had been provided as part of normal enrichment, as a tool to collect water. We conducted a brief, ad libitum investigation to confirm the validity of the initial observation. We then carried out a systematic investigation of the behavior in 2010. We collected 72 hr of videotaped data and tested the null hypothesis that the gorillas did not differ in their prevalence of engaging in bucket-use behaviors. We documented that all four adult gorillas in the group used buckets as drinking tools; however, there was significant individual variation in frequency and type of use of buckets. Four of the eight behaviors showed significant variation among individuals. The silverback male and the youngest adult female contacted and held the bucket significantly more than the remaining two adult females. The young female carried and drank from the bucket significantly more than any other individual. Furthermore, she was observed to fill the bucket with water four of the six times during which this behavior was observed. These data provide evidence of the ability of gorillas to utilize tools, given the appropriate environmental conditions. We continue to explore the abilities of gorillas to recognize the functionality of buckets as tools. PMID:22290615

  2. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE DEPARTING ORE BUCKET "12" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE DEPARTING ORE BUCKET "12" AND SUSPENSION CABLE ANGLING DOWN THROUGH FLOOR AT LOWER LEFT. LARGE LEVER ON SIDE OF BUCKET ALLOWS IT TO BE ROTATED FOR DUMPING ORE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  3. 33. REPAIRMEN ARE AT WORK ON THE HULETT'S GRAB BUCKET. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. REPAIRMEN ARE AT WORK ON THE HULETT'S GRAB BUCKET. BUCKET IS SEEN HERE IN ITS FULL OPEN POSITION. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. A note on the temporal behavior of bucket hydrologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of a "canopy' bucket to more accurately represent evapotranspiration over land surfaces is explained. The temporal behavior of the traditional bucket model is compared with one that mimics the effects of interception loss. Results are presented in terms of the spectral response of the parameterization to a hypothetical white noise forcing.

  5. New fire-fighting water bucket is lifted by helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter lifts a high-impact-resistant flexible plastic bucket that will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, the 324-gallon container will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  6. New fire-fighting water bucket is filled for demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    - A NASA helicopter hovers over the water while a high-impact- resistant flexible plastic bucket fills. The 324-gallon container will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, it will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  7. Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew. MJ

    2009-12-01

    The Distromet disdrometer model RD-80 and NovaLynx tipping bucket rain gauge model 260-2500E-12 are two devices deployed a few meters apart to measure the character and amount of liquid precipitation. The main purpose of the disdrometer is to measure drop size distribution, which it does over 20 size classes from 0.3 mm to 5.4 mm. The data from both instruments can be used to determine rain rate. The disdrometer results can also be used to infer several properties including drop number density, radar reflectivity, liquid water content, and energy flux. Two coefficients, N0 and Λ, from an exponential fit between drop diameter and drop number density, are routinely calculated. Data are collected once a minute. The instruments make completely different kinds of measurements. Rain that falls on the disdrometer sensor moves a plunger on a vertical axis. The disdrometer transforms the plunger motion into electrical impulses whose strength is proportional to drop diameter. The rain gauge is the conventional tipping bucket type. Each tip collects an amount equivalent to 0.01 in. of water, and each tip is counted by a data acquisition system anchored by a Campbell CR1000 data logger.

  8. Airfoil shape for a turbine bucket

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Susan Marie; By, Robert Romany; Tressler, Judd Dodge; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Sims, Calvin Levy

    2005-06-28

    Third stage turbine buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth Table I wherein X and Y values are in inches and the Z values are non-dimensional values from 0 to 0.938 convertible to Z distances in inches by multiplying the Z values by the height of the airfoil in inches. The X and Y values are distances which, when connected by smooth continuing arcs, define airfoil profile sections at each distance Z. The profile sections at each distance Z are joined smoothly to one another to form a complete airfoil shape. The X and Y distances may be scalable as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled up or scaled down airfoil section for the bucket. The nominal airfoil given by the X, Y and Z distances lies within an envelop of .+-.0.150 inches in directions normal to the surface of the airfoil.

  9. Bunch coalescing in the Fermilab Main Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, D.; Martin, P.; Meisner, K.; Miller, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    A new rf system has been installed in the Fermilab Main Ring to coalesce up to 13 individual bunches of protons or antiprotons into a single high-intensity bunch. The coalescing process consists of adiabatically reducing the h = 1113 Main Ring rf voltage from 1 MV to less than 1 kV, capturing the debunched beam in a linearized h = 53 and h = 106 bucket, rotating for a quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period, and then recapturing the beam in a single h = 1113 bucket. The new system will be described and the results of recent coalescing experiments will be compared with computer-generated particle tracking simulations.

  10. Identification of barriers to rotation of DNA segments in yeast from the topology of DNA rings excised by an inducible site-specific recombinase.

    PubMed Central

    Gartenberg, M R; Wang, J C

    1993-01-01

    Controlled excision of DNA segments to yield intracellular DNA rings of well-defined sequences was utilized to study the determinants of transcriptional supercoiling of closed circular DNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In delta top1 top2ts strains of S. cerevisiae expressing Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I, accumulation of positive supercoils in intracellular DNA normally occurs upon thermal inactivation of DNA topoisomerase II because of the simultaneous generation of positively and negatively supercoiled domains by transcription and the preferential relaxation of the latter by the bacterial enzyme. Positive supercoil accumulation in DNA rings is shown to depend on the presence of specific sequence elements; one likely cause of this dependence is that the persistence of oppositely supercoiled domains in an intracellular DNA ring requires the presence of barriers to rotation of the DNA segments connecting the domains. Analysis of the S. cerevisiae 2-microns plasmid partition system by this approach suggests that the plasmid-encoded REP1 and REP2 proteins are involved in forming such a barrier in DNA containing the REP3 sequence. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8248138

  11. Ring meniscus mistaken for incomplete discoid meniscus: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Dinesh, K V N; Acharya, Kiran K V; Rao, P Sripathi

    2010-04-01

    Ring meniscus is a known but rare abnormal variant of a meniscus. An incomplete discoid meniscus or an old bucket handle tear of a meniscus can be easily mistaken for a ring meniscus. In this case; during the first arthroscopy, the ring lateral meniscus was mistaken for an incomplete discoid lateral meniscus. On repeat arthroscopy, it was confirmed as ring lateral meniscus. PMID:19784627

  12. Experimental and numerical analyses of high voltage 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky rectifiers with linearly graded field limiting ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang-Dong; Deng, Xiao-Chuan; Wang, Yong-Wei; Wang, Yong; Wen, Yi; Zhang, Bo

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the successful fabrication of 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky (JBS) rectifiers with a linearly graded field limiting ring (LG-FLR). Linearly variable ring spacings for the FLR termination are applied to improve the blocking voltage by reducing the peak surface electric field at the edge termination region, which acts like a variable lateral doping profile resulting in a gradual field distribution. The experimental results demonstrate a breakdown voltage of 5 kV at the reverse leakage current density of 2 mA/cm2 (about 80% of the theoretical value). Detailed numerical simulations show that the proposed termination structure provides a uniform electric field profile compared to the conventional FLR termination, which is responsible for 45% improvement in the reverse blocking voltage despite a 3.7% longer total termination length.

  13. Effect of sight barriers in pens of breeding ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus): I. Behaviour and welfare.

    PubMed

    Deeming, D C; Hodges, H R; Cooper, J J

    2011-08-01

    1. The study investigated the effects of providing sight barriers in breeding pens on pheasant mortality, feather damage and behaviour. 2. Data were collected from 11 conventional pens (control) and 11 pens with additional sight barriers (barrier) over the course of a ten week breeding season. Each pen contained 8 males and 56 females at the beginning of the season. 3. There was a higher rate of mortality in males (6 x 25%) than females (2 x 11%) that was unaffected by treatment. 4. Feather damage increased over the breeding season and both male and female pheasants showed better feather condition in the pens with barriers at the end of the season. 5. The pheasants spent most of their time walking or standing. Providing barriers increased perching, but reduced preening. 6. The provision of sight barriers had no effect on the incidence of courtship and mating, but did reduce aggressive interactions such as pecking and chasing. 7. The study provides baseline data on the behaviour of breeding pheasants under these husbandry conditions, and suggests that barriers may improve pheasant welfare by reducing potentially harmful aggressive interactions, without affecting activity patterns or reproductive behaviour. PMID:21919567

  14. 'Ice Bucket Challenge' Funds a Boon to ALS Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ice Bucket Challenge donations, led to this important discovery," said study co-leader John Landers, from the ... of ALS cases, according to the researchers. "The discovery of NEK1 highlights the value of 'big data' ...

  15. 18. EASTERLY VIEW ALONG THE SPILLWAY BUCKET, SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS....

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. EASTERLY VIEW ALONG THE SPILLWAY BUCKET, SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS.... Volume XX, No. 5, September 5, 1940. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  16. 20. WESTERLY VIEW SHOWING SPILLWAY BUCKET COMPLETED, EXCEPT FOR WING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. WESTERLY VIEW SHOWING SPILLWAY BUCKET COMPLETED, EXCEPT FOR WING WALL IN THE FOREGROUND.... Volume XX, No. 7, September 25, 1940. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  17. A New Use for an Old Pickle Bucket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitschele, Jonathan

    1994-01-01

    Uses the top three inches of a bucket with a vertical notch about three inches wide removed to demonstrate centripetal force and the minimum size of opening needed for a ball rolling inside to leave. Provides a mathematical explanation. (MVL)

  18. Cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket and tip shroud

    DOEpatents

    Willett, Fred Thomas; Itzel, Gary Michael; Stathopoulos, Dimitrios; Plemmons, Larry Wayne; Plemmons, Helen M.; Lewis, Doyle C.

    2002-01-01

    An open cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket wherein the bucket has an airfoil portion, and a tip shroud, the cooling circuit including a plurality of radial cooling holes extending through the airfoil portion and communicating with an enlarged internal area within the tip shroud before exiting the tip shroud such that a cooling medium used to cool the airfoil portion is subsequently used to cool the tip shroud.

  19. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  20. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector’s fast response, a scene’s 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers. PMID:27103168

  1. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector's fast response, a scene's 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers. PMID:27103168

  2. Bucket shaking stops bunch dancing in Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Bunches in Tevatron are known to be longitudinally unstable: their collective oscillations, also called dancing bunches, persist without any signs of decay. Typically, a damper is used to stop these oscillations, but recently, it was theoretically predicted that the oscillations can be stabilized by means of small bucket shaking. Dedicated measurements in Tevatron have shown that this method does stop the dancing. According to predictions of Refs. [2,3], the flattening of the bunch distribution at low amplitudes should make the bunch more stable against LLD. An experiment has been devised to flatten the distribution by modulating the RF phase at the low-amplitude synchrotron frequency for a few degrees of amplitude. These beam studies show that stabilisation really happens. After several consecutive shakings, the dancing disappears and the resulting bunch profile becomes smoother at the top. Although not shown in this report, sometimes a little divot forms at the centre of the distribution. These experiments confirm that resonant RF shaking flattens the bunch distribution at low amplitudes, and the dancing stops.

  3. DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET FRAME, SHOWING CLAMPING MECHANISM,WITHOUT ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET FRAME, SHOWING CLAMPING MECHANISM,WITHOUT ORE BUCKET AND WHEELS. THE FRAME IS LYING ON ITS SIDE. THE ORE BUCKET WAS ATTACHED TO THE LEFT SIDE, AND TWO WHEELS WERE ATTACHED TO THE SPINDLE ON THE RIGHT. THE FRAME AND BUCKET ARE SUSPENDED FROM THE STATIONARY CABLE BY THE TWO WHEELS, WITH THE ORE BUCKET HANGING BELOW. THE WHEEL AND LEVER AT CENTER WERE ACTIVATED BY THE OPENING AND CLOSING MECHANISMS ON THE TRAM TERMINALS TO LOCK OR RELEASE THE BUCKET ONTO THE MOVING CABLE THAT RAN THROUGH THE SQUARE BLOCK AT CENTER. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  4. Reaction pathways by quantum Monte Carlo: Insight on the torsion barrier of 1,3-butadiene, and the conrotatory ring opening of cyclobutene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barborini, Matteo; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2012-12-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are used to investigate the intramolecular reaction pathways of 1,3-butadiene. The ground state geometries of the three conformers s-trans, s-cis, and gauche, as well as the cyclobutene structure are fully optimised at the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) level, obtaining an excellent agreement with the experimental results and other quantum chemistry high level calculations. Transition state geometries are also estimated at the VMC level for the s-trans to gauche torsion barrier of 1,3-butadiene and for the conrotatory ring opening of cyclobutene to the gauche-1,3-butadiene conformer. The energies of the conformers and the reaction barriers are calculated at both variational and diffusional Monte Carlo levels providing a precise picture of the potential energy surface of 1,3-butadiene and supporting one of the two model profiles recently obtained by Raman spectroscopy [Boopalachandran et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 8920 (2011), 10.1021/jp2051596]. Considering the good scaling of QMC techniques with the system's size, our results also demonstrate how variational Monte Carlo calculations can be applied in the future to properly investigate the reaction pathways of large and correlated molecular systems.

  5. Selection of operating machinery parameters for a bucket excavator

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrichnyi, Y.F.; Baboshin, K.V.; Etinger, I.M.; Mekk, V.A.

    1985-05-01

    The mining industry uses extensively single-bucket excavators of the straight shovel type, like the EKG-4.6, as the most effective way of loading previously loosened hard and abrasive excavated rocks. Therefore, an increase in their working efficiency, mainly as regards increasing productivity, reducing load on the operating machinery, and reducing wear of the operating machinery elements, is of particular importance. Analysis shows that the possibilities for this lie in the correct selection of movement trajectory parameters for the excavator bucket, which for existing excavators are inadequate for loading excavated rock. The authors study here the effect of trajectory parameters on excavator bucket filling, and on their basis they select parameters for the operating machinery.

  6. Removable inner turbine shell with bucket tip clearance control

    DOEpatents

    Sexton, Brendan F.; Knuijt, Hans M.; Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Myers, Albert; Coneybeer, Kyle E.; Johnson, David Martin; Kellock, Iain R.

    2000-01-01

    A turbine includes a plurality of inner shell sections mounting first and second stage nozzle and shroud portions. The inner shell sections are pinned to an outer containment shell formed of sections to preclude circumferential movement of the inner shell relative to the outer shell and enable thermal expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. Positive bucket tip clearance control is afforded by passing a thermal medium about the inner shell in heat transfer relation with the shrouds about the first and second stage bucket tips, the thermal medium being provided from a source of heating/cooling fluid independent of the turbine. Access is provided to the rotor and turbine buckets by removing the outer and inner shell sections.

  7. Stage 3 bucket shank bypass holes and related method

    DOEpatents

    Leone, Sal Albert; Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin; Lupe, Douglas Arthur

    2002-01-01

    In a multi-stage turbine wherein at least one turbine wheel supports a row of buckets for rotation, and wherein the turbine wheel is located axially between first and second annular fixed arrays of nozzles, a cooling air circuit for purging a wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the second fixed annular array of nozzles comprising a flowpath through a shank portion of one or more buckets connecting a wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the first fixed annular array of nozzles with the wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the second fixed annular array of nozzles.

  8. Relaxation of persistent current and the energy barrier Ueff(J) close to Tc in a grain-aligned YBa2Cu3O7-δ ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaac, I.; Jung, J.; Murakami, M.; Tanaka, S.; Mohamed, M. A.-K.; Friedrich, L.

    1995-05-01

    Abrikosov flux-creep-induced relaxation of persistent current was investigated close to Tc in a ring-shaped grain-aligned MPMG-processed YBa2Cu3O7-δ (with the c axis perpendicular to the ring's plane). The measurements were performed for a wide range of current (0ring. The magnitude of the current and its decay were inferred from the magnitude and decay of the magnetic field at the ring's center. Relaxation measurements were performed over a time scale between 30 s and 3×104 s. The results revealed two distinct relaxation regimes: (1) a steady-state logarithmic relaxation of the persistent current from an initial value J0 close to Jc and (2) a slow nonsteady nonlogarithmic initial relaxation at low values of J0, which eventually converges to a long-time steady-state logarithmic relaxation. The logarithmic decay of the persistent current is consistent with the Anderson flux-creep model. The slow nonlogarithmic initial relaxation of the persistent current for low values of J0 is due to a transient redistribution of magnetic flux over the sample volume, consistent with a theoretical analysis of nonlinear flux diffusion [Gurevich and Küpfer, Phys. Rev. B 48, 6477 (1993)]. At fixed value of time, Ueff(J) calculated from the Beasley, Labusch, and Webb [Phys. Rev. 181, 682 (1969)] rate equation for thermally activated motion of flux, is current independent up to about 0.6-0.7Jc and at higher currents it drops linearly with increasing current. Ueff(J,T) for a steady-state logarithmic relaxation provides a high-temperature extension of Ueff(J) measured at low temperatures in grain-aligned YBa2Cu3O7-δ with Maley's method [Phys. Rev. B 48, 13 992 (1993)], suggesting a gradual conversion of the flux-creep process from a vortex-glass or collective flux

  9. Sign of coupling in barrier-separated Bose-Einstein condensates and stability of double-ring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.; Haigh, T. J.; Zuelicke, U.

    2010-02-15

    We revisit recent claims about the instability of nonrotating tunnel coupled annular Bose-Einstein condensates leading to the emergence of angular momentum Josephson oscillation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 050401 (2007)]. It was predicted that all stationary states with uniform density become unstable in certain parameter regimes. By careful analysis, we arrive at a different conclusion. We show that there is a stable nonrotating and uniform ground state for any value of the tunnel coupling and repulsive interactions. The instability of an excited state with {pi} phase difference between the condensates can be interpreted in terms of the familiar snake instability. We further discuss the sign of the tunnel coupling through a separating barrier, which carries significance for the nature of the stationary states. It is found to always be negative for physical reasons.

  10. 30 CFR 56.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall not...

  11. 30 CFR 56.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall not...

  12. 30 CFR 56.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall not...

  13. 30 CFR 57.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall...

  14. 30 CFR 57.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall...

  15. 30 CFR 57.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall...

  16. DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRY/EXIT POINT OF TRAM BUCKETS ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF ENTRY/EXIT POINT OF TRAM BUCKETS ON THE LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. THE CABLE CARRYING EMPTY BUCKETS AT TOP RIGHT IS THINNER IN DIAMETER THAN THE CABLE CARRYING LOADED BUCKETS ON THE TOP CENTER. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  17. Blast-free mining of coal seams by excavators equipped with rotary dynamic buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Labutin, V.N.; Mattis, A.R.; Zaitseva, A.A.

    2005-04-01

    The necessity to equip cable excavators with rotary buckets is substantiated. The results of graphic-analytical analysis of the rotary bucket operation are presented, and its main advantages are determined in comparison with conventional buckets in mining coal seams of complex structure.

  18. 30 CFR 56.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall not...

  19. 30 CFR 57.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall...

  20. 30 CFR 56.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall not...

  1. 30 CFR 57.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall...

  2. Correction of electronic record for weighing bucket precipitation gauge measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electronic sensors generate valuable streams of forcing and validation data for hydrologic models, but are often subject to noise, which must be removed as part of model input and testing database development. We developed Automated Precipitation Correction Program (APCP) for weighting bucket preci...

  3. 19. WESTERLY VIEW ALONG SPILLWAY BUCKET, SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. WESTERLY VIEW ALONG SPILLWAY BUCKET, SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS IN PROGRESS. THE DAM EMBANKMENT IS SHOWN IN THE LEFT DISTANCE.... Volume XX, No. 6, September 5, 1940. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  4. Buckets: A New Digital Library Technology for Preserving NASA Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the need for preserving and disseminating scientific and technical information through digital libraries and describes buckets, an intelligent construct for publishing that contains data and metadata and methods for accessing them. Explains SODA (Smart Object, Dumb Archive) and discusses experiences using these technologies in NASA and…

  5. On the robustness of bucket brigade quantum RAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Srinivasan; Gheorghiu, Vlad; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Mosca, Michele; Varshinee Srinivasan, Priyaa

    2015-12-01

    We study the robustness of the bucket brigade quantum random access memory model introduced by Giovannetti et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett.100 160501). Due to a result of Regev and Schiff (ICALP ’08 733), we show that for a class of error models the error rate per gate in the bucket brigade quantum memory has to be of order o({2}-n/2) (where N={2}n is the size of the memory) whenever the memory is used as an oracle for the quantum searching problem. We conjecture that this is the case for any realistic error model that will be encountered in practice, and that for algorithms with super-polynomially many oracle queries the error rate must be super-polynomially small, which further motivates the need for quantum error correction. By contrast, for algorithms such as matrix inversion Harrow et al (2009 Phys. Rev. Lett.103 150502) or quantum machine learning Rebentrost et al (2014 Phys. Rev. Lett.113 130503) that only require a polynomial number of queries, the error rate only needs to be polynomially small and quantum error correction may not be required. We introduce a circuit model for the quantum bucket brigade architecture and argue that quantum error correction for the circuit causes the quantum bucket brigade architecture to lose its primary advantage of a small number of ‘active’ gates, since all components have to be actively error corrected.

  6. First-stage high pressure turbine bucket airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Theresa A.; Ahmadi, Majid; Clemens, Eugene; Perry, II, Jacob C.; Holiday, Allyn K.; Delehanty, Richard A.; Jacala, Ariel Caesar

    2004-05-25

    The first-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  7. BOREAS HYD-9 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouwen, Nick; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Soulis, Ric; Jenkinson, Wayne; Graham, Allyson; Neff, Todd; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS HYD-9 team collected several data sets containing precipitation and strearnflow measurements over the BOREAS study areas. This data set contains the measurements from the tipping bucket rain gauges at the BOREAS NSA and SSA. These measurements were submitted in 15-minute and 1-hour intervals. Only the 15-minute interval data set was loaded into the data base tables. Data were collected from the tipping bucket gauges from mid-April until mid-October in 1994, 1995, and 1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Kicking the Bucket: It's All about Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Kekailoa

    2013-01-01

    In Hawai'i there is a myth known as the alamihi crab syndrome. The myth is a creation of foreign origin used to explain a Western worldview of Hawaiians. It is deployed to explain everything from the 1893 overthrow of the monarchy to the reason why Hawaiians can never better their lives. Crabs in a bucket have a tendency to struggle and fight…

  9. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Preface: a personal view of planetary rings; 1. Introduction: the allure of the ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2013; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Uranus' rings and moons; 13. Neptune's partial rings; 14. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo and New Horizons; 15. Ring photometry; 16. Dusty rings; 17. Concluding remarks; Afterword; Glossary; References; Index.

  10. Symptomatic ring-shaped lateral meniscus. MRI findings.

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    Ring-shaped lateral meniscus is a rare clinical entity that is usually asymptomatic. Moreover, diagnosis is always based on arthroscopic exploration of lateral meniscus. MRI has not been proven useful so far because the inner portion of the ring-shaped lateral meniscus is usually misinterpreted as a bucket-handle tear. The authors report a case of a 16-year-old girl with ring-shaped lateral meniscus in combination with a meniscal cyst. MRI demonstrated a cyst arising from lateral meniscus and meniscal tissue into the inner portion of the lateral compartment mimicking displaced meniscal fragment. Bucket-handle tears have not been reported to cause or accompany meniscal cysts. As a result the diagnosis of a ring-shaped lateral meniscus along with meniscal cyst was assumed based on MRI and confirmed during arthroscopy. The patient was treated with arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy and intra-articular cyst debridement. PMID:22669990

  11. Displaced Medial and Lateral Bucket Handle Meniscal Tears With Intact ACL and PCL.

    PubMed

    Boody, Barrett S; Omar, Imran M; Hill, James A

    2015-08-01

    Bucket handle lesions are vertical longitudinal tears in the meniscus that may displace centrally into the respective medial or lateral compartment, frequently causing mechanical symptoms, including pain, perceived instability, and mechanical locking. Bucket handle meniscal tears are most commonly from a traumatic etiology and are frequently found with concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Multiple imaging signs and associations have been described for the diagnosis of bucket handle meniscus tears, including coronal truncation, absent bow tie sign, double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), double ACL, displacement of the bucket handle fragment, and disproportionate posterior horn signs. Among meniscal pathology encountered on magnetic resonance imaging or during arthroscopy, bucket handle meniscal tears are infrequent occurrences. Furthermore, the occurrence of displaced medial and lateral bucket handle tears found on imaging and during arthroscopy is very uncommon and is only sparsely reported in the literature. When displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal segments are visualized within the intercondylar notch along with the ACL and PCL, the radiologic findings are referred to as the "quadruple cruciate" sign or the "Jack and Jill lesion." Of the few case reports described in the literature, only one noted displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscus tears with an intact ACL and PCL. The current case report outlines a similar rare case of the quadruple cruciate sign: displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal tears located within the intercondylar notch and an intact ACL and PCL. PMID:26270763

  12. Design, operations planning and experience from the marine operations for the Europipe jacket with bucket foundations

    SciTech Connect

    Rusaas, P.; Baerheim, M. [Statoil A Giske, S.R.; Barrett, G.; Christiansen, P.E.

    1995-12-01

    The Europipe 16/11-E riser platform was successfully installed in the Norwegian part of the North Sea last summer. Rather than having the traditional piled foundations, the platform has bucket foundations consisting of one inverted 12m diameter bucket in each of the four Jacket corners. After set down of the Jacket on the seabed and self weight penetration, the Jacket legs were waterfilled and the buckets thus gained further penetration. Finally suction within the buckets penetrated them to target penetration. This paper describes the preparatory work and the installation of the structure, discusses the main problem areas and experiences gained from the installation.

  13. Performance of Inconel 739 Buckets in J33-9 Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyorgak, C A; Johnston, J R

    1956-01-01

    Investigation of the performance of Inconel 739 (a nickel-base alloy of low critical-element content) buckets in a J33-9 engine showed that Inconel 739 had an engine life at least equivalent if not superior to S-816 buckets operated at 1500 degrees F. Inconel 739 buckets had a small scatter in life and exhibited lower total elongation than S-816. Bucket life was less than that predicted on; the basis of stress-rupture considerations alone. The failure mechanism was probably influenced by fatigue.

  14. Using a double-frequency RF system to facilitate on-axis beam accumulation in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B. C.; Zhao, Z. T.; Tian, S. Q.; Zhang, M. Z.; Zhang, Q. L.

    2016-04-01

    An on-axis injection scheme using a double-frequency RF system in a storage ring with small dynamic aperture is proposed. By altering RF voltages, empty RF buckets can be created which will be used for on-axis injection. After bunches are injected, a reverse RF voltage altering process is performed and the injected bunches can be longitudinally dumped to the main RF buckets. The scheme allows reaping the advantages of the on-axis injection while still performing accumulation.

  15. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2011-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the allure of ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2004; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-Body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Neptune's partial rings; 13. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo; 14. Ring photometry; 15. Dusty rings; 16. Cassini observations; 17. Summary: the big questions; Glossary; References; Index.

  16. Results of Dynamic Calibration of Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvicera, V.; Grabner, M.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental research in the Department of Frequency Engineering in the Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) in Prague, the Czech Republic, is focused on stability of received signal on terrestrial radio and optical paths. Rain can cause serious attenuation of electromagnetic waves in the frequency bands over 10 GHz. Therefore, our experimental research is also focused on our own meteorological measurement in the vicinity of experimental radio and optical paths. The heated tipping-bucket raingauge MR3H manufactured by Meteoservis, the Czech Republic, with the collector area of 500 cm2 and the rain amount per tip of 0.1 mm is used at CMI for the measurement of rainfall intensities. The time of tips is recorded with uncertainty of 0.1 second. The obtained time of tips are stored by PC and recorded on CD-ROM. It is generally known higher rainfall intensities measured by tipping-bucket rain gauges are underestimated. Therefore, after static calibration the tipping-bucket rain gauge was dynamically calibrated by water flowmeters. The Brooks FLOMEGA Flow Meters models 5882 and 3750 were used for the rain gauge calibration in the range from 2.6 mm/h to 530 mm/h. The used method of dynamic calibration of raingauges and our experience obtained will be described. The dependence of the measured rain intensity on the reference rain intensity (calibration curve) will be presented. Both the results obtained and the influence of dynamic calibration on our results concerning attenuation of electromagnetic waves due to rain will be discussed. Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under the Project No. OC09076 supported the described work.

  17. A BUNCH TO BUCKET PHASE DETECTOR USING DIGITAL RECEIVER TECHNOLOGY.

    SciTech Connect

    DELONG,J.; BRENNAN, J. M.; HAYES,T.; TUONG, N. LE,; SMITH, K.

    2003-05-12

    Transferring high-speed digital signals to a Digital Signal Processor is limited by the IO bandwidth of the DSP. A digital receiver circuit is used to translate high frequency W signals to base-band. The translated output frequency is close to DC and the data rate can be reduced, by decimation, before transfer to the DSP. By translating both the longitudinal beam (bunch) and RF cavity pick-ups (bucket) to DC, a DSP can be used to measure their relative phase angle. The result can be used as an error signal in a beam control servo loop and any phase differences can be compensated.

  18. Gas turbine bucket cooling circuit and related process

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Doyle C.; Barb, Kevin Joseph

    2002-01-01

    A turbine bucket includes an airfoil portion having leading and trailing edges; at least one radially extending cooling passage within the airfoil portion, the airfoil portion joined to a platform at a radially inner end of the airfoil portion; a dovetail mounting portion enclosing a cooling medium supply passage; and, a crossover passage in fluid communication with the cooling medium supply passage and with at least one radially extending cooling passage, the crossover passage having a portion extending along and substantially parallel to an underside surface of the platform.

  19. Fermilab Recycler Ring BPM Upgrade Based on Digital Receiver Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.; Crisp, J.; Prieto, P.; Voy, D.; Briegel, C.; McClure, C.; West, R.; Pordes, S.; Mengel, M.

    2004-11-10

    Electronics for the 237 BPMs in the Fermilab Recycler Ring have been upgraded from a log-amplifier based system to a commercially produced digitizer-digital down converter based system. The hardware consists of a pre-amplifier connected to a split-plate BPM, an analog differential receiver-filter module and an 8-channel 80-MHz digital down converter VME board. The system produces position and intensity with a dynamic range of 30 dB and a resolution of {+-}10 microns. The position measurements are made on 2.5-MHz bunched beam and barrier buckets of the un-bunched beam. The digital receiver system operates in one of six different signal processing modes that include 2.5-MHz average, 2.5-MHz bunch-by-bunch, 2.5-MHz narrow band, unbunched average, un-bunched head/tail and 89-kHz narrow band. Receiver data is acquired on any of up to sixteen clock events related to Recycler beam transfers and other machine activities. Data from the digital receiver board are transferred to the front-end CPU for position and intensity computation on an on-demand basis through the VME bus. Data buffers are maintained for each of the acquisition events and support flash, closed orbit and turn-by-turn measurements. A calibration system provides evaluation of the BPM signal path and application programs.

  20. New fire-fighting water bucket releases its water for a demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter releases 324 gallons of water onto a building in a simulated fire control demonstration. The high-impact- resistant flexible plastic bucket will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, it will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  1. New fire-fighting water bucket is lifted from water for a demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter lifts a high-impact-resistant flexible plastic bucket filled with water. The container will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center.. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, it will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  2. New fire-fighting water bucket releases its load for a demonstration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter releases the contents of the high-impact- resistant flexible plastic bucket it holds. The 324-gallon container will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, it will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  3. New fire-fighting water bucket is readied for a demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers attach a high-impact-resistant flexible plastic bucket to a NASA helicopter. Holding 324 gallons of water, it will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, it will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  4. Modeling the effect of executive device of a bucket-wheel excavator on the coal face

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, A.A.; Cheskidov, V.I.; Zaitsev, G.D.

    2005-11-15

    An algorithm is proposed and substantiated to calculate the optimum trajectory of scooping for the dynamic bucket-wheel and stationary bucket excavators. The applicability of the developed program in determining mineral losses and impoverishment during selective and bulk-selective mining in bedded deposits is demonstrated.

  5. Doubling Main Injector beam intensity using RF barrier

    SciTech Connect

    King-Yuen Ng

    2002-09-30

    Using rf barriers, 12 booster batches can be injected into the Fermilab Main Injector continuously, thus doubling the usual beam intensity. After that, adiabatic capture of the beam into 53 MHz buckets can be accomplished in about 10 ms. The beam loading voltages in the rf cavities are small and they can be eliminated by a combination of counterphasing and mechanical shorts.

  6. Free medial meniscal fragment which mimics the dislocated bucket-handle tear on MRI.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Faik; Korucu, Ismail Hakkı; Sever, Cem; Demirayak, Mehmet; Goncü, Gani; Toker, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The bucket-handle meniscal tear is a specific type of meniscal injuries which has specific signs on MRI. An attached fragment displaced away from the meniscus with any type of tear causes bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most commonly used diagnostic tool for meniscal injuries. We present a case of free medial meniscal fragment which mimics the dislocated bucket-handle tear on MRI. The presence of "fragment within the intercondylar notch sign" and "the absence of the bow tie sign" may be an indication of a free meniscal fragment. This should be considered during diagnosis. PMID:25002980

  7. Planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.; Brahic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of planetary ring research, the view of planetary rings in astronomy and cosmology over the period 1600-1900, the characteristics of the ring systems of Saturn and Uranus, the ethereal rings of Jupiter and Saturn, dust-magnetosphere interactions, the effects of radiation forces on dust particles, the collisional interactions and physical nature of ring particles, transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms, and collision-induced transport processes in planetary rings. Also discussed are planetary ring waves, ring particle dynamics in resonances, the dynamics of narrow rings, the origin and evolution of planetary rings, the solar nebula and planetary disk, future studies of the planetary rings by space probes, ground-based observatories and earth-orbiting satellites, and unsolved problems in planetary ring dynamics.

  8. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; CAMERON,P.R.; SHEA,T.J.; CONNOLLY,R.C.; KESSELMAN,M.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be constructed by a multi-laboratory collaboration with BNL responsible for the transfer lines and ring. [1] The 1 MW beam power necessitates careful monitoring to minimize un-controlled loss. This high beam power will influence the design of the monitors in the high energy beam transport line (HEBT) from linac to ring, in the ring, and in the ring-to-target transfer line (RTBT). The ring instrumentation must cover a 3-decade range of beam intensity during accumulation. Beam loss monitoring will be especially critical since un-controlled beam loss must be kept below 10{sup -4}. A Beam-In-Gap (BIG) monitor is being designed to assure out-of-bucket beam will not be lost in the ring.

  9. Bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears of the knee: A case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Hasan Basri; Arikan, Yavuz; Armagan, Raffi; Eren, Osman Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Meniscal tears may cause knee pain and functional impairment. Bilateral bucket-handle meniscal tears is an uncommon condition. PRESENTATION OF CASE This report presents the case of a 35-year-old male patient with bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears that occurred nonsimultaneously. The lesions were treated arthroscopically with partial resection in one knee and meniscal suture in the other. DISCUSSION Bucket handle meniscal tear of meniscus without underlying meniscal, ligamentous pathology or lower limb deformity is a rare condition. CONCLUSION To our knowledge, bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears without underlying meniscal anomalies have been reported in only two cases before, and our case is the third one. PMID:24012575

  10. Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    When seen from the unlit side, the rings of Saturn present a much different appearance from that familiar to telescopic observers. Relatively opaque areas like the B Ring turn black, while lightly populated zones, such as the C Ring and the Cassini Division, prove to excellent diffuse transmitters of sunlight. The A Ring, with intermediate opacity, is at an intermediate level of brightness.

  11. THE BARRIERS TO RING ROTATION IN 1,1' ,4,4'-TETRA-t-BUTYLURANOCENE AND 1,1', 3,3'-TETRA-t-BUTYLFERROCENE

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, Wayne D.; Streitwieser, Jr., Andrew

    1980-10-01

    The {sup 1}H-NMR spectra of 1,1',4,4'~tetra-t~butyluranocene show a singlet for the t~butyl protons and three singlets for the ring protons. Coalescence occurs at -65 to -85°C with splitting of each peak at lower temperatures, corresponding to {Delta}G{sup {ne}} of rotation of 8.3 Kcal mol{sup -1} Coalescence was also observed for 1,1' ,3,3'- tetra-t~butylferrocene and a corresponding {Delta}G{sup {ne}} = 13.1 Kcal mol{sup 1} was obtained.

  12. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  13. Estimating Rain Rates from Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Fisher, Brad L.; Wolff, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the cubic spline based operational system for the generation of the TRMM one-minute rain rate product 2A-56 from Tipping Bucket (TB) gauge measurements. Methodological issues associated with applying the cubic spline to the TB gauge rain rate estimation are closely examined. A simulated TB gauge from a Joss-Waldvogel (JW) disdrometer is employed to evaluate effects of time scales and rain event definitions on errors of the rain rate estimation. The comparison between rain rates measured from the JW disdrometer and those estimated from the simulated TB gauge shows good overall agreement; however, the TB gauge suffers sampling problems, resulting in errors in the rain rate estimation. These errors are very sensitive to the time scale of rain rates. One-minute rain rates suffer substantial errors, especially at low rain rates. When one minute rain rates are averaged to 4-7 minute or longer time scales, the errors dramatically reduce. The rain event duration is very sensitive to the event definition but the event rain total is rather insensitive, provided that the events with less than 1 millimeter rain totals are excluded. Estimated lower rain rates are sensitive to the event definition whereas the higher rates are not. The median relative absolute errors are about 22% and 32% for 1-minute TB rain rates higher and lower than 3 mm per hour, respectively. These errors decrease to 5% and 14% when TB rain rates are used at 7-minute scale. The radar reflectivity-rainrate (Ze-R) distributions drawn from large amount of 7-minute TB rain rates and radar reflectivity data are mostly insensitive to the event definition.

  14. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  15. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  16. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra M. Bhat

    2004-06-28

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications.

  17. The Application of High-temperature Strain Gauges to the Measurements of Vibratory Stresses in Gas-turbine Buckets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, R H; Morgan, W C; Manson, S S

    1947-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring the vibration in the buckets of a gas turbine under service conditions of speed and temperature was determined by use of a high temperature wire strain gauge cemented to a modified supercharger turbine bucket. A high-temperature wire strain gauge and the auxiliary mechanical and electrical equipment developed for the investigation are described.

  18. Metadata and Buckets in the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Croom, Delwin R., Jr.; Robbins, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    We present the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) model for digital libraries (DLs), and discuss the role of metadata in SODA. The premise of the SODA model is to "push down" many of the functionalities generally associated with archives into the data objects themselves. Thus the data objects become "smarter", and the archives "dumber". In the SODA model, archives become primarily set managers, and the objects themselves negotiate and handle presentation, enforce terms and conditions, and perform data content management. Buckets are our implementation of smart objects, and da is our reference implementation for dumb archives. We also present our approach to metadata translation for buckets.

  19. Turbine bucket for use in gas turbine engines and methods for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-06-03

    A turbine bucket for use with a turbine engine. The turbine bucket includes an airfoil that extends between a root end and a tip end. The airfoil includes an outer wall that defines a cavity that extends from the root end to the tip end. The outer wall includes a first ceramic matrix composite (CMC) substrate that extends a first distance from the root end to the tip end. An inner wall is positioned within the cavity. The inner wall includes a second CMC substrate that extends a second distance from the root end towards the tip end that is different than the first distance.

  20. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M. K.; Araki, S.; Black, G. J.; Bosh, A. S.; Brahic, A.; Brooks, S. M.; Charnoz, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Dones, L.; Durisen, R. H.; Esposito, L. W.; Ferrari, C.; Festou, M.; French, R. G.; Giuliatti-Winter, S. M.; Graps, A. L.; Hamilton, D. P.; Horanyi, M.; Karjalainen, R. M.; Krivov, A. V.; Krueger, H.; Larson, S. M.; Levison, H. F.; Lewis, M. C.; Lissauer, J. J.; Murray, C. D.; Namouni, F.; Nicholson, P. D.; Olkin, C. B.; Poulet, F.; Rappaport, N. J.; Salo, H. J.; Schmidt, J.; Showalter, M. R.; Spahn, F.; Spilker, L. J.; Srama, R.; Stewart, G. R.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.

    2002-08-01

    The past two decades have witnessed dramatic changes in our view and understanding of planetary rings. We now know that each of the giant planets in the Solar System possesses a complex and unique ring system. Recent studies have identified complex gravitational interactions between the rings and their retinues of attendant satellites. Among the four known ring systems, we see elegant examples of Lindblad and corotation resonances (first invoked in the context of galactic disks), electromagnetic resonances, spiral density waves and bending waves, narrow ringlets which exhibit internal modes due to collective instabilities, sharp-edged gaps maintained via tidal torques from embedded moonlets, and tenuous dust belts created by meteoroid impact onto, or collisions between, parent bodies. Yet, as far as we have come, our understanding is far from complete. The fundamental questions confronting ring scientists at the beginning of the twenty-first century are those regarding the origin, age and evolution of the various ring systems, in the broadest context. Understanding the origin and age requires us to know the current ring properties, and to understand the dominant evolutionary processes and how they influence ring properties. Here we discuss a prioritized list of the key questions, the answers to which would provide the greatest improvement in our understanding of planetary rings. We then outline the initiatives, missions, and other supporting activities needed to address those questions, and recommend priorities for the coming decade in planetary ring science.

  1. The tale of two buckets and associated containers: impact on aedes albopictus oviposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aedes albopictus is an invasive species. Its oviposition behavior is the subject of several projects in our research unit. The main emphasis of this presentation is a study which utilizes two five gallon buckets, one heated and one with ambient temperature. The heat is provided by an aquarium hea...

  2. Understanding Exponential Growth: As Simple as a Drop in a Bucket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Fred; Shuman, James

    1984-01-01

    Provides procedures for a simple laboratory activity on exponential growth and its characteristic doubling time. The equipment needed consists of a large plastic bucket, an eyedropper, a stopwatch, an assortment of containers and graduated cylinders, and a supply of water. (JN)

  3. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  4. A comparative assessment of R. M. Young and tipping bucket rain gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Gebo, Norman E.

    1992-01-01

    Rain rates as derived from standard tipping bucket rain gauges have variable integration times corresponding to the interval between bucket tips. For example, the integration time for the Weathertronics rain gauge is given by delta(T) = 15.24/R (min), where R is the rain rate expressed in mm/h and delta(T) is the time between tips expressed in minutes. It is apparent that a rain rate of 1 mm/h has an integration time in excess of 15 minutes. Rain rates larger than 15.24 mm/h will have integration times smaller than 1 minute. The integration time is dictated by the time it takes to fill a small tipping bucket where each tip gives rise to 0.254 mm of rainfall. Hence, a uniform rain rate of 1 mm/h over a 15 minute period will give rise to the same rain rate as 0 mm/h rainfall over the first 14 minutes and 15 mm/h between 14 to 15 minutes from the reference tip. Hence, the rain intensity fluctuations may not be captured with the tipping bucket rain gauge for highly variable rates encompassing lower and higher values over a given integration time. The objective of this effort is to provide an assessment of the features of the R. M. Young capacitive gauge and to compare these features with those of the standard tipping bucket rain gauge. A number of rain rate-time series derived from measurements with approximately co-located gauges are examined.

  5. Sliding-Ring Catenanes.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Isurika R; Frasconi, Marco; Wu, Yilei; Liu, Wei-Guang; Wasielewski, Michael R; Goddard, William A; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-08-17

    Template-directed protocols provide a routine approach to the synthesis of mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), in which the mechanical bonds are stabilized by a wide variety of weak interactions. In this Article, we describe a strategy for the preparation of neutral [2]catenanes with sliding interlocked electron-rich rings, starting from two degenerate donor-acceptor [2]catenanes, consisting of a tetracationic cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) cyclophane (CBPQT(4+)) and crown ethers containing either (i) hydroquinone (HQ) or (ii) 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) recognition units and carrying out four-electron reductions of the cyclophane components to their neutral forms. The donor-acceptor interactions between the CBPQT(4+) ring and both HQ and DNP units present in the crown ethers that stabilize the [2]catenanes are weakened upon reduction of the cyclophane components to their radical cationic states and are all but absent in their fully reduced states. Characterization in solution performed by UV-vis, EPR, and NMR spectroscopic probes reveals that changes in the redox properties of the [2]catenanes result in a substantial decrease of the energy barriers for the circumrotation and pirouetting motions of the interlocked rings, which glide freely through one another in the neutral states. The solid-state structures of the fully reduced catenanes reveal profound changes in the relative dispositions of the interlocked rings, with the glycol chains of the crown ethers residing in the cavities of the neutral CBPQT(0) rings. Quantum mechanical investigations of the energy levels associated with the four different oxidation states of the catenanes support this interpretation. Catenanes and rotaxanes with sliding rings are expected to display unique properties. PMID:27398609

  6. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  7. Compensating the unequal bunch spacing in the NLC damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Wilson, P.B.; Kubo, K.

    1996-06-01

    The damping rings of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), at any given time, will contain four trains of 90 bunches each. Within each train the bunches populate adjacent buckets and between trains there is a gap that extends over 43 buckets. A consequence of an uneven filling scheme is that within each train the synchronous phase will vary from bunch to bunch. In the NLC after extraction the beam enters the bunch compressor and then the X-band linac. The phase variation in the ring, if uncompensated, will lead to a phase variation in the X-band linac which, in turn, will result in an unacceptable spread in the final energy of the individual bunches of a train. The synchronous phase variation, however, can be compensated, either in the damping ring itself or in the bunch compressor that follows. The subject of this paper is compensation in the damping ring. In this report we begin by finding the synchronous phase variation in damping rings with bunch trains and gaps of arbitrary length. These results are then applied to the parameters of the NLC damping rings. Finally, we study two methods of compensating this phase variation: in the first method two passive subharmonic cavities are employed, and in the second the klystron output is varied as a function of time. We find that, for the NLC, a nominal phase variation of 6 degrees within a train can be reduced by almost an order of magnitude by either method of compensation, with the cost of the second method being an extra 10% in output power capability of the klystron.

  8. Wear reduction systems liquid piston ring

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R.J.; Chen, T.N.; DiNanno, L.

    1990-09-01

    The overall objective of the program was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of achieving an acceptable wear rate for the cylinder liner, piston, and piston rings in a coal/water-slurry-fueled engine that utilized the concept of a liquid piston ring above the conventional piston rings and to identify technical barriers and required research and development. The study included analytical modeling of the system, a bench study of the fluid motion in the liquid piston ring, and a single-cylinder test rig for wear comparison. A system analysis made on the different variations of the liquid supply system showed the desirability of the once-through version from the standpoint of system simplicity. The dynamics of the liquid ring were modeled to determine the important design parameters that influence the pressure fluctuation in the liquid ring during a complete engine cycle and the integrity of the liquid ring. This analysis indicated the importance of controlling heat transfer to the liquid ring through piston and liner to avoid boiling the liquid. A conceptual piston design for minimizing heat transfer is presented in this report. Results showed that the liquid piston ring effectively reduced the solid particles on the wall by scrubbing, especially in the case where a surfactant was added to the water. The wear rates were reduced by a factor of 2 with the liquid ring. However, leakage of the contaminated liquid ring material past the top ring limited the effectiveness of the liquid ring concept. 8 refs., 33 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Cooling circuit for and method of cooling a gas turbine bucket

    DOEpatents

    Jacala, Ariel C. P.

    2002-01-01

    A closed internal cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket includes axial supply and return passages in the dovetail of the bucket. A first radial outward supply passage provides cooling medium to and along a passageway adjacent the leading edge and then through serpentine arranged passageways within the airfoil to a chamber adjacent the airfoil tip. A second radial passage crosses over the radial return passage for supplying cooling medium to and along a pair of passageways along the trailing edge of the airfoil section. The last passageway of the serpentine passageways and the pair of passageways communicate one with the other in the chamber for returning spent cooling medium radially inwardly along divided return passageways to the return passage. In this manner, both the leading and trailing edges are cooled using the highest pressure, lowest temperature cooling medium.

  10. Simultaneous bicompartmental bucket-handle meniscal tears with intact anterior cruciate ligament: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Bucket handle tear of the menisci is a common type of lesion resulting from injury to the knee joint. Bucket handle injury of both menisci in almost all cases is associated with a lesion to either the anterior or the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee joint. We describe a case of acute bucket-handle tear of the medial and lateral menisci with intact anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments in a dancer. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of this type of injury in the literature. Case presentation A 28-year-old Caucasian Greek woman presented to the emergency department after sustaining an injury to her right knee during dancing. An MRI evaluation demonstrated tears in both menisci of the right knee, while the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were found to be intact. A partial medial and lateral meniscectomy was then performed. At a follow-up examination six months after her injury, clinical tests demonstrated that our patient's right knee was stable, had a full range of motion and had no tenderness. She was satisfied with the outcome of the operation and returned to her pre-injury activities. Conclusion We present the first case in the literature that describes a combined bucket-handle injury of both the medial and lateral menisci with an intact anterior cruciate ligament. The clinical examination of the anterior cruciate ligament was unremarkable, with no signs of deficiency or rupture. The posterior cruciate ligament was also intact. On magnetic resonance imaging, the ligaments were visualised as intact in all their length. These findings were confirmed by arthroscopic evaluation. PMID:20181059

  11. Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10{sup -6} eV to 3.5 x 10{sup 12} eV (LHC, 7 x 10{sup 12} eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or

  12. Data-dependent bucketing improves reference-free compression of sequencing reads

    PubMed Central

    Patro, Rob; Kingsford, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The storage and transmission of high-throughput sequencing data consumes significant resources. As our capacity to produce such data continues to increase, this burden will only grow. One approach to reduce storage and transmission requirements is to compress this sequencing data. Results: We present a novel technique to boost the compression of sequencing that is based on the concept of bucketing similar reads so that they appear nearby in the file. We demonstrate that, by adopting a data-dependent bucketing scheme and employing a number of encoding ideas, we can achieve substantially better compression ratios than existing de novo sequence compression tools, including other bucketing and reordering schemes. Our method, Mince, achieves up to a 45% reduction in file sizes (28% on average) compared with existing state-of-the-art de novo compression schemes. Availability and implementation: Mince is written in C++11, is open source and has been made available under the GPLv3 license. It is available at http://www.cs.cmu.edu/∼ckingsf/software/mince. Contact: carlk@cs.cmu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25910696

  13. Barrier breaching device

    DOEpatents

    Honodel, C.A.

    1983-06-01

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  14. Barrier breaching device

    DOEpatents

    Honodel, Charles A.

    1985-01-01

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  15. The use of knowledge-based Genetic Algorithm for starting time optimisation in a lot-bucket MRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridwan, Muhammad; Purnomo, Andi

    2016-01-01

    In production planning, Material Requirement Planning (MRP) is usually developed based on time-bucket system, a period in the MRP is representing the time and usually weekly. MRP has been successfully implemented in Make To Stock (MTS) manufacturing, where production activity must be started before customer demand is received. However, to be implemented successfully in Make To Order (MTO) manufacturing, a modification is required on the conventional MRP in order to make it in line with the real situation. In MTO manufacturing, delivery schedule to the customers is defined strictly and must be fulfilled in order to increase customer satisfaction. On the other hand, company prefers to keep constant number of workers, hence production lot size should be constant as well. Since a bucket in conventional MRP system is representing time and usually weekly, hence, strict delivery schedule could not be accommodated. Fortunately, there is a modified time-bucket MRP system, called as lot-bucket MRP system that proposed by Casimir in 1999. In the lot-bucket MRP system, a bucket is representing a lot, and the lot size is preferably constant. The time to finish every lot could be varying depends on due date of lot. Starting time of a lot must be determined so that every lot has reasonable production time. So far there is no formal method to determine optimum starting time in the lot-bucket MRP system. Trial and error process usually used for it but some time, it causes several lots have very short production time and the lot-bucket MRP would be infeasible to be executed. This paper presents the use of Genetic Algorithm (GA) for optimisation of starting time in a lot-bucket MRP system. Even though GA is well known as powerful searching algorithm, however, improvement is still required in order to increase possibility of GA in finding optimum solution in shorter time. A knowledge-based system has been embedded in the proposed GA as the improvement effort, and it is proven that the

  16. Ring Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennefeld, M.; Materne, J.

    1980-09-01

    Among the 338 exotic, intriguing and/or fascinating objects contained in Arp's catalogue of peculiar galaxies, two, Arp 146 and 147, are calling special attention as a presumably separate class of objects displaying closed rings with almost empty interior. It is difficult to find out when, historically speaking, attention was called first to this type of object as a peculiar class, but certainly ga1axies with rings were widely found and recognized in the early sixties, ul}der others by Vorontsov-Velyaminov (1960), Sandage (1961) in the Hubble Atlas or de Vaucouleurs (1964) in the first reference catalogue of ga1axies. The most recent estimates by Arp and Madore (1977) from a search on about 200 Schmidt plates covering 7,000 square degrees give 3.6 per cent of ring galaxies among 2,784 peculiar galaxies found. However, despite the mythological perfection associated with a circle, some ordering is necessary before trying to understand the nature of such objects. This is particularly true because a large fraction of those galaxies with rings are probably normal spiral galaxies of type RS or S(r) as defined by de Vaucouleurs, where the spiral arms are simply "closing the circle". A good example of such "ordinary" galaxy is NGC 3081 in the Hubble Atlas .

  17. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  18. A bunch to bucket phase detector for the RHIC LLRF upgrade platform

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.S.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Narayan, G.; Polizzo, S.; Severino, F.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the overall development effort for the RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform [1,2,3], a generic four channel 16 bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) daughter module was developed to provide high speed, wide dynamic range digitizing and processing of signals from DC to several hundred megahertz. The first operational use of this card was to implement the bunch to bucket phase detector for the RHIC LLRF beam control feedback loops. This paper will describe the design and performance features of this daughter module as a bunch to bucket phase detector, and also provide an overview of its place within the overall LLRF platform architecture as a high performance digitizer and signal processing module suitable to a variety of applications. In modern digital control and signal processing systems, ADCs provide the interface between the analog and digital signal domains. Once digitized, signals are then typically processed using algorithms implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA) logic, general purpose processors (GPPs), digital signal processors (DSPs) or a combination of these. For the recently developed and commissioned RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform, we've developed a four channel ADC daughter module based on the Linear Technology LTC2209 16 bit, 160 MSPS ADC and the Xilinx V5FX70T FPGA. The module is designed to be relatively generic in application, and with minimal analog filtering on board, is capable of processing signals from DC to 500 MHz or more. The module's first application was to implement the bunch to bucket phase detector (BTB-PD) for the RHIC LLRF system. The same module also provides DC digitizing of analog processed BPM signals used by the LLRF system for radial feedback.

  19. Diving into the Ice Bucket Challenge: Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage and the Mammalian Diving Reflex.

    PubMed

    McKee, Kathleen; Nelson, Sarah; Batra, Ayush; Klein, Joshua P; Henderson, Galen V

    2015-07-01

    Triggered by facial exposure to cold water and apnea, the mammalian diving reflex consists of bradycardia and peripheral arteriolar vasoconstriction leading to an increase in central arterial pressure. It has been previously associated with ischemic stroke but not definitively with intracerebral hemorrhage. We present a case of intracerebral hemorrhage occurring in a woman with poorly controlled hypertension following her participation in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis fund-raising "Ice Bucket Challenge," in which ice-cold water was poured on her head. We suspect that facial exposure to ice-cold water triggered the diving reflex, causing a hypertensive surge and ultimately the intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:26288676

  20. Cooling supply system for stage 3 bucket of a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin; Burns, James Lee; Palmer, Gene David; Leone, Sal Albert; Drlik, Gary Joseph; Gibler, Edward Eugene

    2002-01-01

    In a land based gas turbine including a compressor, a combustor and turbine section including at least three stages, an improvement comprising an inlet into a third stage nozzle from the compressor for feeding cooling air from the compressor to the third stage nozzle; at least one passageway running substantially radially through each airfoil of the third stage nozzle and an associated diaphragm, into an annular space between the rotor and the diaphragm; and passageways communicating between the annular space and individual buckets of the third stage.

  1. A new method for automated dynamic calibration of tipping-bucket rain gauges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphrey, M.D.; Istok, J.D.; Lee, J.Y.; Hevesi, J.A.; Flint, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Existing methods for dynamic calibration of tipping-bucket rain gauges (TBRs) can be time consuming and labor intensive. A new automated dynamic calibration system has been developed to calibrate TBRs with minimal effort. The system consists of a programmable pump, datalogger, digital balance, and computer. Calibration is performed in two steps: 1) pump calibration and 2) rain gauge calibration. Pump calibration ensures precise control of water flow rates delivered to the rain gauge funnel; rain gauge calibration ensures precise conversion of bucket tip times to actual rainfall rates. Calibration of the pump and one rain gauge for 10 selected pump rates typically requires about 8 h. Data files generated during rain gauge calibration are used to compute rainfall intensities and amounts from a record of bucket tip times collected in the field. The system was tested using 5 types of commercial TBRs (15.2-, 20.3-, and 30.5-cm diameters; 0.1-, 0.2-, and 1.0-mm resolutions) and using 14 TBRs of a single type (20.3-cm diameter; 0.1-mm resolution). Ten pump rates ranging from 3 to 154 mL min-1 were used to calibrate the TBRs and represented rainfall rates between 6 and 254 mm h-1 depending on the rain gauge diameter. All pump calibration results were very linear with R2 values greater than 0.99. All rain gauges exhibited large nonlinear underestimation errors (between 5% and 29%) that decreased with increasing rain gauge resolution and increased with increasing rainfall rate, especially for rates greater than 50 mm h-1. Calibration curves of bucket tip time against the reciprocal of the true pump rate for all rain gauges also were linear with R2 values of 0.99. Calibration data for the 14 rain gauges of the same type were very similar, as indicated by slope values that were within 14% of each other and ranged from about 367 to 417 s mm h-1. The developed system can calibrate TBRs efficiently, accurately, and virtually unattended and could be modified for use with other

  2. Actual evapotranspiration and precipitation measured by lysimeters: a comparison with eddy covariance and tipping bucket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebler, S.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Pütz, T.; Post, H.; Schmidt, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-05-01

    This study compares actual evapotranspiration (ETa) measurements by a set of six weighable lysimeters, ETa estimates obtained with the eddy covariance (EC) method, and evapotranspiration calculated with the full-form Penman-Monteith equation (ETPM) for the Rollesbroich site in the Eifel (western Germany). The comparison of ETa measured by EC (including correction of the energy balance deficit) and by lysimeters is rarely reported in the literature and allows more insight into the performance of both methods. An evaluation of ETa for the two methods for the year 2012 shows a good agreement with a total difference of 3.8% (19 mm) between the ETa estimates. The highest agreement and smallest relative differences (< 8%) on a monthly basis between both methods are found in summer. ETa was close to ETPM, indicating that ET was energy limited and not limited by water availability. ETa differences between lysimeter and EC were mainly related to differences in grass height caused by harvest and the EC footprint. The lysimeter data were also used to estimate precipitation amounts in combination with a filter algorithm for the high-precision lysimeters recently introduced by Peters et al. (2014). The estimated precipitation amounts from the lysimeter data differ significantly from precipitation amounts recorded with a standard rain gauge at the Rollesbroich test site. For the complete year 2012 the lysimeter records show a 16 % higher precipitation amount than the tipping bucket. After a correction of the tipping bucket measurements by the method of Richter (1995) this amount was reduced to 3%. With the help of an on-site camera the precipitation measurements of the lysimeters were analyzed in more detail. It was found that the lysimeters record more precipitation than the tipping bucket, in part related to the detection of rime and dew, which contribute 17% to the yearly difference between both methods. In addition, fog and drizzle explain an additional 5.5% of the total

  3. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  4. NCSTRL+: Adding Multi-Discipline and Multi-Genre Support to the Dienst Protocol Using Clusters and Buckets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Shen, Stewart N. T.; Zubair, Mohammad

    1998-01-01

    We describe NCSTRL+, a unified, canonical digital library for scientific and technical information (STI). NCSTRL+ is based on the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL), a World Wide Web (WWW) accessible digital library (DL) that provides access to over 100 university departments and laboratories. NCSTRL+ implements two new technologies: cluster functionality and publishing buckets. We have extended Dienst, the protocol underlying NCSTRL, to provide the ability to cluster independent collections into a logically centralized digital library based upon subject category classification, type of organization, and genres of material. The bucket construct provides a mechanism for publishing and managing logically linked entities with multiple data forms as a single object. The NCSTRL+ prototype DL contains the holdings of NCSTRL and the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). The prototype demonstrates the feasibility of publishing into a multi-cluster DL, searching across clusters, and storing and presenting buckets of information.

  5. Use of midlatitude soil moisture and meteorological observations to validate soil moisture simulations with biosphere and bucket models

    SciTech Connect

    Robock, A.; Vinnikov, K.Ya.; Schlosser, C.A.; Xue, Y.; Speranskaya, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Soil moisture observations in sites with natural vegetation were made for several decades in the former Soviet Union at hundreds of stations. In this paper, the authors use data from six of these stations from different climatic regimes, along with ancillary meteorological and actinometric data, to demonstrate a method to validate soil moisture simulations with biosphere and bucket models. Some early and current general circulation models (GCMs) use bucket models for soil hydrology calculations. More recently, the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) was developed to incorporate the effects of vegetation on fluxes of moisture, momentum, and energy at the earth`s surface into soil hydrology models. Until now, the bucket and SiB have been verified by comparison with actual soil moisture data only on a limited basis. In this study, a Simplified SiB (SSiB) soil hydrology model and a 15-cm bucket model are forced by observed meteorological and actinometric data every 3 h for 6-yr simulations at the six stations. The model calculations of soil are compared to observations of soil moisture, literally {open_quotes}ground truth,{close_quotes} snow cover, surface albedo, and net radiation, and with each other. For three of the stations, the SSiB and 15-cm bucket models produce good simulations of seasonal cycles and interannual variations of soil moisture. For the other three stations, there are large errors in the simulations by both models. Inconsistencies in specification of field capacity, may be partly responsible. There is no evidence that the SSiB simulations are superior in simulating soil moisture variations. In fact, the models are quite similar since SSiB implicitly has a bucket embedded in it. One of the main differences between the models is in the treatment of runoff due to melting snow in the spring - SSiB incorrectly puts all the snowmelt into runoff. 34 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Rocket Motor Joint Construction Including Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal barrier for extremely high temperature applications consists of a carbon fiber core and one or more layers of braided carbon fibers surrounding the core. The thermal barrier is preferably a large diameter ring, having a relatively small cross-section. The thermal barrier is particularly suited for use as part of a joint structure in solid rocket motor casings to protect low temperature elements such as the primary and secondary elastomeric O-ring seals therein from high temperature gases of the rocket motor. The thermal barrier exhibits adequate porosity to allow pressure to reach the radially outward disposed O-ring seals allowing them to seat and perform the primary sealing function. The thermal barrier is disposed in a cavity or groove in the casing joint, between the hot propulsion gases interior of the rocket motor and primary and secondary O-ring seals. The characteristics of the thermal barrier may be enhanced in different applications by the inclusion of certain compounds in the casing joint, by the inclusion of RTV sealant or similar materials at the site of the thermal barrier, and/or by the incorporation of a metal core or plurality of metal braids within the carbon braid in the thermal barrier structure.

  7. Microfluidic size separation of cells and particles using a swinging bucket centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular separation is crucial for downstream analysis. Separation technique mainly relies on centrifugal sedimentation. However, minuscule sample volume separation and extraction is difficult with conventional centrifuge. Furthermore, conventional centrifuge requires density gradient centrifugation which is laborious and time-consuming. To overcome this challenge, we present a novel size-selective bioparticles separation microfluidic chip on a swinging bucket minifuge. Size separation is achieved using passive pressure driven centrifugal fluid flows coupled with centrifugal force acting on the particles within the microfluidic chip. By adopting centrifugal microfluidics on a swinging bucket rotor, we achieved over 95% efficiency in separating mixed 20 μm and 2 μm colloidal dispersions from its liquid medium. Furthermore, by manipulating the hydrodynamic resistance, we performed size separation of mixed microbeads, achieving size efficiency of up to 90%. To further validate our device utility, we loaded spiked whole blood with MCF-7 cells into our microfluidic device and subjected it to centrifugal force for a mere duration of 10 s, thereby achieving a separation efficiency of over 75%. Overall, our centrifugal microfluidic device enables extremely rapid and label-free enrichment of different sized cells and particles with high efficiency. PMID:26487900

  8. Beyond the bucket: testing the effect of experimental design on rate and sequence of decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbott, Sarah; Murdock, Duncan; Purnell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Experimental decay has revealed the potential for profound biases in our interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils, with non-random sequences of character loss distorting the position of fossil taxa in phylogenetic trees. By characterising these sequences we can rewind this distortion and make better-informed interpretations of the affinity of enigmatic fossil taxa. Equally, rate of character loss is crucial for estimating the preservation potential of phylogentically informative characters, and revealing the mechanisms of preservation themselves. However, experimental decay has been criticised for poorly modeling 'real' conditions, and dismissed as unsophisticated 'bucket science'. Here we test the effect of a differing experimental parameters on the rate and sequence of decay. By doing so, we can test the assumption that the results of decay experiments are applicable to informing interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils from diverse preservational settings. The results of our experiments demonstrate the validity of using the sequence of character loss as a phylogenetic tool, and sheds light on the extent to which environment must be considered before making decay-informed interpretations, or reconstructing taphonomic pathways. With careful consideration of experimental design, driven by testable hypotheses, decay experiments are robust and informative - experimental taphonomy needn't kick the bucket just yet.

  9. The twins and the bucket: How Einstein made gravity rather than motion relative in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Michel

    2012-08-01

    In publications in 1914 and 1918, Einstein claimed that his new theory of gravity in some sense relativizes the rotation of a body with respect to the distant stars (a stripped-down version of Newton's rotating bucket experiment) and the acceleration of the traveler with respect to the stay-at-home in the twin paradox. What he showed was that phenomena seen as inertial effects in a space-time coordinate system in which the non-accelerating body is at rest can be seen as a combination of inertial and gravitational effects in a (suitably chosen) space-time coordinate system in which the accelerating body is at rest. Two different relativity principles play a role in these accounts: (a) the relativity of non-uniform motion, in the weak sense that the laws of physics are the same in the two space-time coordinate systems involved; (b) what Einstein in 1920 called the relativity of the gravitational field, the notion that there is a unified inertio-gravitational field that splits differently into inertial and gravitational components in different coordinate systems. I provide a detailed reconstruction of Einstein's rather sketchy accounts of the twins and the bucket and examine the role of these two relativity principles. I argue that we can hold on to (b) but that (a) is either false or trivial.

  10. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  11. Electronic Properties of Semiconductor Quantum-Ring Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Mónica; Fuster, Gonzalo; Barticevic, Zdenka

    2002-03-01

    Motivated by the interesting electronic properties exhibited by these nanorings when they are threaded by a magnetic field, we studied a new semiconductor structure formed by two coupled rings which are concentrically disposed. In order to calculate the two-ring electronic spectrum it is assumed that the in-plane electronic-potential of each ring is generated by a rotation, around the ring axis, of a one-dimensional parabolic potential centered to a distance ρ=ρo of the ring center. The potential of the two-rings system is then assumed as a superposition of a potential for each ring with their minimum at different radii and being truncated in the intersection point. In this way a potential barrier is formed in between the rings. We solve the in-plane problem by expanding the corresponding envelope function as a linear combination of solutions of isolated rings. We have made a detailed study about the influence of the characteristic confinement-parameters of each rings, and of the barrier strength, on the electronic energy spectrum of the system. A uniform magnetic field is applied along the common ring axis and we explore the effects on the Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations in the energy levels caused by the particular geometry of two coupled quantum-rings.

  12. Measurement errors in tipping bucket rain gauges under different rainfall intensities and their implication to hydrologic models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurements from tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRs) consist of systematic and random errors as an effect of external factors, such as mechanical limitations, wind effects, evaporation losses, and rainfall intensity. Two different models of TBRs, viz. ISCO-674 and TR-525 (TexasInstr., Inc.), being us...

  13. An event-based comparison of two types of automated-recording, weighing bucket rain gauges 1890

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-year, multi-gage comparison of two types of automated-recording weighing-bucket raingages was conducted using precipitation data collected at the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service’s Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in Southeast Arizona. The compariso...

  14. Actual evapotranspiration and precipitation measured by lysimeters: a comparison with eddy covariance and tipping bucket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebler, S.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Pütz, T.; Post, H.; Schmidt, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    This study compares actual evapotranspiration (ETa) measurements by a set of six weighable lysimeters, ETa estimates obtained with the eddy covariance (EC) method, and potential crop evapotranspiration according to FAO (ETc-FAO) for the Rollesbroich site in the Eifel (Western Germany). The comparison of ETa measured by EC (including correction of the energy balance deficit) and by lysimeters is rarely reported in literature and allows more insight into the performance of both methods. An evaluation of ETa for the two methods for the year 2012 shows a good agreement with a total difference of 3.8% (19 mm) between the ETa estimates. The highest agreement and smallest relative differences (<8%) on monthly basis between both methods are found in summer. ETa was close to ETc-FAO, indicating that ET was energy limited and not limited by water availability. ETa differences between lysimeter, ETc-FAO, and EC were mainly related to differences in grass height caused by harvesting management and the EC footprint. The lysimeter data were also used to estimate precipitation amounts in combination with a filter algorithm for high precision lysimeters recently introduced by Peters et al. (2014). The estimated precipitation amounts from the lysimeter data show significant differences compared to the precipitation amounts recorded with a standard rain gauge at the Rollesbroich test site. For the complete year 2012 the lysimeter records show a 16% higher precipitation amount than the tipping bucket. With the help of an on-site camera the precipitation measurements of the lysimeters were analyzed in more detail. It was found that the lysimeters record more precipitation than the tipping bucket in part related to the detection of rime and dew, which contributes 17% to the yearly difference between both methods. In addition, fog and drizzle explain an additional 5.5% of the total difference. Larger differences are also recorded for snow and sleet situations. During snowfall, the

  15. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  16. Simultaneous multicolor imaging of wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy with four-bucket detection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kwan Seob; Kim, Dong Uk; Lee, Jooran; Kim, Geon Hee; Chang, Ki Soo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous imaging of multiple fluorophores using wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy with a monochrome camera. The intensities of the three lasers are modulated by a sinusoidal waveform in order to excite each fluorophore with the same modulation frequency and a different time-delay. Then, the modulated fluorescence emissions are simultaneously detected by a camera operating at four times the excitation frequency. We show that two different fluorescence beads having crosstalk can be clearly separated using digital processing based on the phase information. In addition, multiple organelles within multi-stained single cells are shown with the phase mapping method, demonstrating an improved dynamic range and contrast compared to the conventional fluorescence image. These findings suggest that wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy with four-bucket detection could be utilized for high-contrast multicolor imaging applications such as drug delivery and fluorescence in situ hybridization. PMID:27375944

  17. Orbiter Payload Bay Bucket Hoist Mishap...An Accident We Should Never Forget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, Bradford P.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the accident that occurred in 1985 when a bay bucket hoist fell from its stowed position. This accident damaged the orbiter, injured a technician, and delayed the launch. The accident was investigated, and the cause of the accident was determined to be the practice of two-blocking. Two-blocking is the result of hoisting beyond the intended safe upper limit of hook travel to the point of solid contact between the load block and the upper block or hoist/trolley structure. The usual result is immediate failure of the wire rope, due to the ropes being cut by the grooves of the drum or sheaves. The design of the hoist, the inspection, and the operator training were all in part responsible for this failure.

  18. Energy supply processes for magnetospheric substorms and solar flares - Tippy bucket model or pitcher model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, both magnetospheric substorms and solar flares have almost exclusively been discussed in terms of explosive magnetic reconnection. Such a model may conceptually be illustrated by the so-called 'tippy-bucket model', which causes sudden unloading processes, namely a sudden (catastrophic, stochastic, and unpredictable) conversion of stored magnetic energy. However, recent observations indicate that magnetospheric substorms can be understood as a result of a directly driven process which can conceptually be illustrated by the 'pitcher model' in which the output rate varies in harmony with the input rate. It is also possible that solar flare phenomena are directly driven by a photospheric dynamo. Thus, explosive magnetic reconnection may simply be an unworkable hypothesis and may not be a puzzle to be solved as the primary energy supply process for magnetospheric substorms and solar flares.

  19. Cavitation-free buckets of YS-920 and NACA 66 (MOD) foil sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y. T.

    1982-07-01

    Based on a wing section design theory and boundary layer calculations, a new series of hydrofoil sections with improved cavitation inception characteristics were theoretically developed and presented in previous papers. To verify these theoretical results experimentally, two hydrofoil models, one a newly developed profile designated YS-920 and the other an NACA-66 (MOD) wing section, were tested in high-speed water tunnel. The measurements included force and moment data, flow visualization, cavitation characteristics, and surface roughness effect on cavitation. In this report, the measured cavitation-free buckets of YS-920 and NACA-66 (MOD) foil sections are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. The ability to achieve a significant delay in cavitation inception with a newly designed profile is clearly demonstrated experimentally.

  20. Simultaneous multicolor imaging of wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy with four-bucket detection.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan Seob; Kim, Dong Uk; Lee, Jooran; Kim, Geon Hee; Chang, Ki Soo

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous imaging of multiple fluorophores using wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy with a monochrome camera. The intensities of the three lasers are modulated by a sinusoidal waveform in order to excite each fluorophore with the same modulation frequency and a different time-delay. Then, the modulated fluorescence emissions are simultaneously detected by a camera operating at four times the excitation frequency. We show that two different fluorescence beads having crosstalk can be clearly separated using digital processing based on the phase information. In addition, multiple organelles within multi-stained single cells are shown with the phase mapping method, demonstrating an improved dynamic range and contrast compared to the conventional fluorescence image. These findings suggest that wide-field epi-fluorescence microscopy with four-bucket detection could be utilized for high-contrast multicolor imaging applications such as drug delivery and fluorescence in situ hybridization. PMID:27375944

  1. Large Aperture "Photon Bucket" Optical Receiver Performance in High Background Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Hoppe, D.

    2011-01-01

    The potential development of large aperture groundbased "photon bucket" optical receivers for deep space communications, with acceptable performance even when pointing close to the sun, is receiving considerable attention. Sunlight scattered by the atmosphere becomes significant at micron wavelengths when pointing to a few degrees from the sun, even with the narrowest bandwidth optical filters. In addition, high quality optical apertures in the 10-30 meter range are costly and difficult to build with accurate surfaces to ensure narrow fields-of-view (FOV). One approach currently under consideration is to polish the aluminum reflector panels of large 34-meter microwave antennas to high reflectance, and accept the relatively large FOV generated by state-of-the-art polished aluminum panels with rms surface accuracies on the order of a few microns, corresponding to several-hundred micro-radian FOV, hence generating centimeter-diameter focused spots at the Cassegrain focus of 34-meter antennas. Assuming pulse-position modulation (PPM) and Poisson-distributed photon-counting detection, a "polished panel" photon-bucket receiver with large FOV will collect hundreds of background photons per PPM slot, along with comparable signal photons due to its large aperture. It is demonstrated that communications performance in terms of PPM symbol-error probability in high-background high-signal environments depends more strongly on signal than on background photons, implying that large increases in background energy can be compensated by a disproportionally small increase in signal energy. This surprising result suggests that large optical apertures with relatively poor surface quality may nevertheless provide acceptable performance for deep-space optical communications, potentially enabling the construction of cost-effective hybrid RF/optical receivers in the future.

  2. Assessment of measurement errors and dynamic calibration methods for three different tipping bucket rain gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedekar, Vinayak S.; King, Kevin W.; Fausey, Norman R.; Soboyejo, Alfred B. O.; Harmel, R. Daren; Brown, Larry C.

    2016-09-01

    Three different models of tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRs), viz. HS-TB3 (Hydrological Services Pty Ltd.), ISCO-674 (Isco, Inc.) and TR-525 (Texas Electronics, Inc.), were calibrated in the lab to quantify measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities (5 mm·h- 1 to 250 mm·h- 1) and three different volumetric settings. Instantaneous and cumulative values of simulated rainfall were recorded at 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20-min intervals. All three TBR models showed a substantial deviation (α = 0.05) in measurements from actual rainfall depths, with increasing underestimation errors at greater rainfall intensities. Simple linear regression equations were developed for each TBR to correct the TBR readings based on measured intensities (R2 > 0.98). Additionally, two dynamic calibration techniques, viz. quadratic model (R2 > 0.7) and T vs. 1/Q model (R2 = > 0.98), were tested and found to be useful in situations when the volumetric settings of TBRs are unknown. The correction models were successfully applied to correct field-collected rainfall data from respective TBR models. The calibration parameters of correction models were found to be highly sensitive to changes in volumetric calibration of TBRs. Overall, the HS-TB3 model (with a better protected tipping bucket mechanism, and consistent measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities) was found to be the most reliable and consistent for rainfall measurements, followed by the ISCO-674 (with susceptibility to clogging and relatively smaller measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities) and the TR-525 (with high susceptibility to clogging and frequent changes in volumetric calibration, and highly intensity-dependent measurement errors). The study demonstrated that corrections based on dynamic and volumetric calibration can only help minimize-but not completely eliminate the measurement errors. The findings from this study will be useful for correcting field data from TBRs; and may have major

  3. The hydrodynamics of a Graesser ("raining bucket") contactor with a reverse micellar phase.

    PubMed

    Jarudilokkul, S; Paulsen, E; Stuckey, D C

    2000-01-01

    A variety of contactor types have been assessed for the liquid-liquid extraction of proteins using reversed micelles; however, many of these contactors suffer from drawbacks such as emulsion formation and poor mass transfer performance. In this study, a small (1.25 L) Graesser "raining bucket" contactor was assessed for use with this system since it has the potential to ameliorate many of these problems. The aim of the work was to evaluate the hydrodynamics of the contactor in order to use this information for future work on mass transfer performance. Hydrodynamic characteristics such as the axial mixing coefficient were determined by residence time distribution studies using a tracer injection method. The effect of rotor speed and flow rate of each phase on axial mixing was investigated, and as a result of its unusual structure, i.e., falling/rising sheet, the interfacial mass transfer area in the Graesser was determined by image analysis. It was found that rotor speed had more influence on the axial mixing coefficient in the aqueous phase than in the reverse micellar phase. The axial mixing coefficient in each phase increased by increasing the flow rate of the same phase. The images obtained in a dropping cell showed that under the conditions of this study (3 rpm, 22 degrees C), the bucket pours one phase through the other in the form of a curtain or sheet. A new image technique was developed to determine the interfacial area of both phases, and it was found that the specific area was 8.6 m(2)/m(3), which was higher than in a spray column but considerably lower than in a RDC or a Graesser run at high rotational speed (50 rpm) without the addition of a surfactant. PMID:11101336

  4. Simultaneous estimation of precipitation and actual evapotranspiration by lysimeters - Comparison with tipping bucket and eddy covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Gebler, S.; Puetz, T.; Post, H.; Schmidt, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Although precipitation and actual evapotranspiration measurements have a long tradition, accurate estimates of precipitation (P) and actual evapotranspiration (ETa) remain a challenge. Our study compares actual evapotranspiration estimates acquired with the Eddy-Covariance (EC) method and ETa measurements by a set of six redundant weighable lysimeters for a managed grassland site at Rollesbroich (Eifel, Western Germany). The comparison of ETa measured by EC (accounting for energy balance deficit correction) and by lysimeters is hardly reported in literature and gains more insight into the performance of both techniques. The evaluation of ETa estimates by both methods for the year 2012 shows a good agreement with a total difference of ca. 4 %, which is mainly related to variations in grass height at the lysimeters and in the EC footprint. We also used the lysimeter records to estimate precipitation amounts in combination with the AWAT filter algorithm. The estimated precipitation volumes of the lysimeter measurements show significant differences compared to the precipitation data of the Hellman type tipping bucket rain gauge at the test site. For the entire year 2012 the lysimeter measurements exhibit a 16 % higher precipitation amount than the tipping bucket data. With help of an on-site video surveillance system the precipitation data of the lysimeters were investigated in more detail. It was found that the precipitation surplus in lysimeter records in part is related to the detection of rime and dew, which contributes 17 % to the yearly difference between both methods. We concluded that weighable lysimeter data can be used to simultaneously estimate precipitation and actual evapotranspiration in a reliable fashion. Furthermore, lysimeter allow a plausible detection of rime and dew in contrast to standard rain gauges.

  5. Transmissibility of the Ice Bucket Challenge among globally influential celebrities: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Brandford H Y; Leung, Gabriel M; Lau, Eric H Y; Pang, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the transmissibility of the Ice Bucket Challenge among globally influential celebrities and to identify associated risk factors. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Social media (YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram). Participants David Beckham, Cristiano Ronaldo, Benedict Cumberbatch, Stephen Hawking, Mark Zuckerberg, Oprah Winfrey, Homer Simpson, and Kermit the Frog were defined as index cases. We included contacts up to the fifth generation seeded from each index case and enrolled a total of 99 participants into the cohort. Main outcome measures Basic reproduction number R0, serial interval of accepting the challenge, and odds ratios of associated risk factors based on fully observed nomination chains; R0 is a measure of transmissibility and is defined as the number of secondary cases generated by a single index in a fully susceptible population. Serial interval is the duration between onset of a primary case and onset of its secondary cases. Results Based on the empirical data and assuming a branching process we estimated a mean R0 of 1.43 (95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.65) and a mean serial interval for accepting the challenge of 2.1 days (median 1 day). Higher log (base 10) net worth of the participants was positively associated with transmission (odds ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 2.50), adjusting for age and sex. Conclusions The Ice Bucket Challenge was moderately transmissible among a group of globally influential celebrities, in the range of the pandemic A/H1N1 2009 influenza. The challenge was more likely to be spread by richer celebrities, perhaps in part reflecting greater social influence. PMID:25514905

  6. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  7. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  8. Use of midlatitude soil moisture and meteorological observations to validate soil moisture simulations with biosphere and bucket models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan; Vinnikov, Konstantin YA.; Schlosser, C. Adam; Speranskaya, Nina A.; Xue, Yongkang

    1995-01-01

    Soil moisture observations in sites with natural vegetation were made for several decades in the former Soviet Union at hundreds of stations. In this paper, the authors use data from six of these stations from different climatic regimes, along with ancillary meteorological and actinometric data, to demonstrate a method to validate soil moisture simulations with biosphere and bucket models. Some early and current general circulation models (GCMs) use bucket models for soil hydrology calculations. More recently, the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) was developed to incorporate the effects of vegetation on fluxes of moisture, momentum, and energy at the earth's surface into soil hydrology models. Until now, the bucket and SiB have been verified by comparison with actual soil moisture data only on a limited basis. In this study, a Simplified SiB (SSiB) soil hydrology model and a 15-cm bucket model are forced by observed meteorological and actinometric data every 3 h for 6-yr simulations at the six stations. The model calculations of soil moisture are compared to observations of soil moisture, literally 'ground truth,' snow cover, surface albedo, and net radiation, and with each other. For three of the stations, the SSiB and 15-cm bucket models produce good simulations of seasonal cycles and interannual variations of soil moisture. For the other three stations, there are large errors in the simulations by both models. Inconsistencies in specification of field capacity may be partly responsible. There is no evidence that the SSiB simulations are superior in simulating soil moisture variations. In fact, the models are quite similar since SSiB implicitly has a bucket embedded in it. One of the main differences between the models is in the treatment of runoff due to melting snow in the spring -- SSiB incorrectly puts all the snowmelt into runoff. While producing similar soil moisture simulations, the models produce very different surface latent and sensible heat fluxes, which

  9. Actin Rings of Power.

    PubMed

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles. PMID:27326928

  10. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  11. Locked bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci with simultaneous anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments injury.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Kyparlis, Dimitris; Koumis, Panagiotis; Lola, Despoina; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 38-year-old male who presented to the accident and emergency department with a locked knee after falling from a height. The knee was locked at 35° of flexion without any signs of instability in clinical examination. The patient was operated within 6 h from injury. During arthroscopy bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci were found. The bucket-handle fragments were displaced into the intercondylar notch causing the knee to lock. Additionally, tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) were also found. The patient underwent ACL reconstruction with hamstrings autograft, medial subtotal meniscectomy and lateral meniscus repair. The MCL was treated conservatively. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient returned to the preinjury level of activity within 8 months. The patient remains asymptomatic 2 years postoperatively. PMID:22691631

  12. Locked bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci with simultaneous anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments injury

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Kyparlis, Dimitris; Koumis, Panagiotis; Lola, Despoina; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 38-year-old male who presented to the accident and emergency department with a locked knee after falling from a height. The knee was locked at 35° of flexion without any signs of instability in clinical examination. The patient was operated within 6 h from injury. During arthroscopy bucket-handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci were found. The bucket-handle fragments were displaced into the intercondylar notch causing the knee to lock. Additionally, tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) were also found. The patient underwent ACL reconstruction with hamstrings autograft, medial subtotal meniscectomy and lateral meniscus repair. The MCL was treated conservatively. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient returned to the preinjury level of activity within 8 months. The patient remains asymptomatic 2 years postoperatively. PMID:22691631

  13. The double flipped meniscus sign: unusual MRI findings in bucket-handle tear of the lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Yim, Soo Jae; Seo, Yu Seok; Ko, Taeg Su; Lee, Joon Hee

    2014-01-01

    Bucket-handle meniscal tears are either longitudinal, vertical, or oblique in direction with an attached tear fragment displaced from the meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs are widely used in the diagnosis of these tears, including the 'fragment within the intercondylar notch sign', 'flipped meniscus sign', 'double anterior horn sign', 'absence of the bow tie sign', 'double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) sign', 'posterior double PCL sign', and 'triple PCL sign'. We report an unusual case, not yet described in previous studies, of a bucket-handle tear presenting as a double longitudinal tear of the lateral meniscus (LM). Two longitudinal tears were observed in the white-white zone and the red-white zone of the LM, where both fragments were shown to be displaced and locked within the intercondylar notch. Partial menisectomy was performed for the central fragment and a repair with modified all-inside sutures was performed for the peripheral fragment. PMID:24156924

  14. [The "Ice Bucket Challenge": wondering about the impact of social networks to promote public health interventions].

    PubMed

    Gualano, Maria Rosaria; Bert, Fabrizio; Gili, Renata; Andriolo, Violetta; Scaioli, Giacomo; Siliquini, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    The "Ice Bucket Challenge" was an activity launched to promote awareness of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and encourage donations to research for this disease. The campaign went viral on social media during July to August 2014. It consisted in nominating people and challenging them to donate 100 dollars to the ALS Association or pour a bucket of ice water over their head and post the video on the web. Participants in turn then had to challenge others to do the same. The initiative was hugely successful, involved millions of people and, just in the US, collected 35 times more money than in the same time period in 2013. We analyzed possible factors that determined the success of this initiative, to identify strengths and weaknesses of the activity and evaluate the possibility of applying the same model to promote public health interventions. Several features of the challenge were identified as strengths: the involvement of wellknown people from different contexts, the "public platform" which triggers a positive combination of competitiveness, social pressure and narcissism, the chain-letter like method of nomination, the ironic and entertaining nature of the performance. Besides these strengths, weaknesses were also identified: information spread via social media can only partially reach potential donors and supporters, due to the digital divide phenomenon which excludes people who do not have web access. Also, it is not possible to predict if the message will be long-lasting or will cease shortly after the end of the campaign. The latter could be acceptable for fund-raising, where the aim is simply to collect as much money as possible, but not for a public health intervention program, whose success requires that the intended message has a long-lasting effect to produce an effective change in people's behavior. Despite the above-mentioned limits, social networks undeniably show great potential to spread messages to the community and to involve a large number of

  15. The bucket and the searchlight: formulating and testing risk hypotheses about the weediness and invasiveness potential of transgenic crops.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The bucket and the searchlight are metaphors for opposing theories of the growth of scientific knowledge. The bucket theory proposes that knowledge is gained by observing the world without preconceptions, and that knowledge emerges from the accumulation of observations that support a hypothesis. There are many problems with this theory, the most serious of which is that it does not appear to offer a means to distinguish between the many hypotheses that could explain a particular set of observations. The searchlight theory proposes that preconceptions are unavoidable and that knowledge advances through the improvement of our preconceptions - our hypotheses - by continuous criticism and revision. A hypothesis is a searchlight that illuminates observations that test the hypothesis and reveal its flaws, and knowledge thereby increases through the elimination of false hypotheses. Research into the risks posed by the cultivation of transgenic crops often appears to apply the bucket theory; many data are produced, but knowledge of risk is not advanced. Application of the searchlight theory, whereby risk assessments test hypotheses that transgenic crops will not be harmful, seems to offer a better way to characterise risk. The effectiveness of an environmental risk assessment should not be measured by the size of the bucket of observations on a transgenic crop, but by the power of the risk hypothesis searchlights to clarify the risks that may arise from cultivation of that crop. These points are illustrated by examples of hypotheses that could be tested to assess the risks from transgenic crops and their hybrids becoming weeds or invading non-agricultural habitats. PMID:21975253

  16. Optimizing Thomson's jumping ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjossem, Paul J. H.; Brost, Elizabeth C.

    2011-04-01

    The height to which rings will jump in a Thomson jumping ring apparatus is the central question posed by this popular lecture demonstration. We develop a simple time-averaged inductive-phase-lag model for the dependence of the jump height on the ring material, its mass, and temperature and apply it to measurements of the jump height for a set of rings made by slicing copper and aluminum alloy pipe into varying lengths. The data confirm a peak jump height that grows, narrows, and shifts to smaller optimal mass when the rings are cooled to 77 K. The model explains the ratio of the cooled/warm jump heights for a given ring, the reduction in optimal mass as the ring is cooled, and the shape of the mass resonance. The ring that jumps the highest is found to have a characteristic resistance equal to the inductive reactance of the set of rings.

  17. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  18. On semi ring bornologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, A. N.; Rakhimov, I. S.; Husain, Sh. K. Said

    2016-06-01

    Our main focus in this work is to introduce new structure bornological semi rings. This generalizes the theory of algebraic semi rings from the algebraic setting to the framework of bornological sets. We give basic properties for this new structure. As well as, We study the fundamental construction of bornological semi ring as product, inductive limits and projective limits and their extensions on bornological semi ring. Additionally, we introduce the category of bornological semi rings and study product and pullback (fiber product) in the category of bornological semi rings.

  19. Fano quadrupole in a nanoscale ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satanin, Arkady; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2005-03-01

    In solid state systems such as Aharonov-Bohm (AB) rings, two-dimensional electronic waveguides, and barriers, interference of a localized wave with propagating states produces Fano resonances in the conductance. The scattering amplitude near a Fano zero-pole pair behaves like the amplitude of a dipole when the pole and the zero play the roles of a particle and an antiparticle, respectively [1]. This separate Fano-dipole has been already observed in the AB ring with an embedded quantum dot (QD) [2]. In the present work, we examine new effects on the collision of Fano dipoles and its manifestation in the transmission. The numerical results for a realistic AB ring with two embedded QD's will be presented. We show that the two Fano-dipoles form a new quasi-particle, which behaves as a coupled object -- the Fano quadrupole. This property gives an additional possibility of manipulating transmission resonances (a collapse of particle and hole) in a nanoscale ring by changing the parameters of the system. We discuss an analogy of Fano collision in an AB ring and a γ-X barrier [3]. [1] Z. Shao et al., PRB 49, 7453 (1994). [2] K. Kobayashi, et al. PRL, 85, 256806 (2002). [3] R. C. Bowen, et al. PRB 52, 2754 (1995).

  20. Subsurface exploration using bucket auger borings and down-hole geologic inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Scullin, C.M. )

    1994-03-01

    The down-hole geologic inspection of 24 in. bucket auger borings has been a hands-on technique for collecting valuable geologic structural and lithologic detail in southern California investigations for over 35 yr. Although it has been used for all types of investigations for hillside urban development, it is of particular benefit in landslide investigations and evaluations. The benefits of down-hole geologic inspection during detailed mapping of large landslide complexes with multiple slide planes are discussed in this paper. Many of the geotechnical investigations of these massive landslide complexes have been very limited in their determinations of accurate landslide parameters and very deficient in proper engineering analysis while based upon this limited data. This has resulted in many cases where the geotechnical consultant erroneously concludes that ancient landslides don't move and it is all right to build upon them, even though they have neither justified the landslide parameters, nor the slope stability or safety. Because this author and the many consultants contacted during the preparation of this paper were not aware of other publications regarding this method of collecting detailed geologic data, this author included the safety considerations, safety equipment, the cost and the Cal OSHA requirements for entering exploration shafts.

  1. Air-floating towing behaviors of multi-bucket foundation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Cong-huan; Ding, Hong-yan; Zhang, Pu-yang

    2013-10-01

    Air-floating towing behaviors of multi-bucket foundation platform (MBFP) are investigated with the 1/20-scale model tests and hydrodynamic software MOSES. MOSES numerical model was validated by test results, and MOSES prototype model of MBFP can eliminate scale effect of model. The influences of towing factors of towing speed, water depth, freeboard, and wave direction on air-floating towing stability of MBFP were analyzed by model tests and validated MOSES prototype model. It is shown that the reduction of towing speed can effectively decrease the towing force and surge acceleration to improve towing stability. Water depth is another factor in towing stability. Obvious shallow water effect will appear in shallow water with small water depth-draft ratio and it will disappear gradually and air-floating towing becomes more stable with the increase of water depth. Accelerations of surge, sway and heave are small and they have modest changes when freeboard increases from 0.5 to 2 m. For MBFP, the freeboard is not suggested to be larger than 2 m in following wave. Wave direction has large influence on the towing stability, the surge acceleration and towing force are sensitive to the variation of wave direction, the surge acceleration and towing force in following wave (0°) and counter wave (180°) are much larger than that in transverse sea (90° and 270°).

  2. Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process

    DOEpatents

    Schilke, Peter W.; Muth, Myron C.; Schilling, William F.; Rairden, III, John R.

    1983-01-01

    In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

  3. Language barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ngwakongnwi, Emmanuel; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Musto, Richard; King-Shier, Kathryn M.; Quan, Hude

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of regular medical doctors (RMDs), as well as awareness and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services, by official language minorities (OLMs) in Canada. Design Analysis of data from the 2006 postcensal survey on the vitality of OLMs. Setting Canada. Participants In total, 7691 English speakers in Quebec and 12 376 French speakers outside Quebec, grouped into those who experienced language barriers and those with no language barriers. Main outcome measures Health services utilization (HSU) by the presence of language barriers; HSU measures included having an RMD, use of an RMD’s services, and awareness of and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services. Multivariable models examined the associations between HSU and language barriers. Results After adjusting for age and sex, English speakers residing in Quebec with limited proficiency in French were less likely to have RMDs (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.66, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.87) and to use the services of their RMDs (AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.86), but were more likely to be aware of the existence of (AOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.93) and to use (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.11) telephone health lines or telehealth services. This pattern of having and using RMDs and telehealth services was not observed for French speakers residing outside of Quebec. Conclusion Overall we found variation in HSU among the language barrier populations, with lower use observed in Quebec. Age older than 45 years, male sex, being married or in common-law relationships, and higher income were associated with having RMDs for OLMs. PMID:23242902

  4. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-01

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings. PMID:16601188

  5. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  6. Neptune - full ring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This pair of Voyager 2 images (FDS 11446.21 and 11448.10), two 591-s exposures obtained through the clear filter of the wide angle camera, show the full ring system with the highest sensitivity. Visible in this figure are the bright, narrow N53 and N63 rings, the diffuse N42 ring, and (faintly) the plateau outside of the N53 ring (with its slight brightening near 57,500 km).

  7. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 0.75 million km from Saturn on 12 November 1980. The kinks and braids of this tightly-constrained ring are visible along with the outer edge of the A Ring. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  8. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  9. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  10. Jovian Ring System Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Galileo spacecraft acquired this mosaic of Jupiter's ring system (top) when the spacecraft was in Jupiter's shadow looking back toward the Sun. Jupiter's ring system (inset diagram) is composed of three parts: an outermost gossamer ring, a flat main ring, and an innermost donut-shaped halo. These rings are made up of dust-sized particles that are blasted off of the nearby inner satellites by small impacts. This image was taken on November 9, 1996 at a distance of 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles).

  11. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus. PMID:19812546

  12. Intra-articular Patterns of Bucket Handle Meniscal Tears and Its Relation to Reducibility

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hong Chul; Bae, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Taik-Sun; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Park, Sung-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the intra-articular patterns in the rotational deformities of bucket handle meniscal tears (BHMTs) based on arthroscopic findings and their clinical relevance. Methods From 2004 to 2009, 42 patients with a BHMT diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging underwent arthroscopic surgery. The arthroscopic data (all procedures were recorded) were evaluated retrospectively, and BHMTs were classified according to the rotational directions of centrally displaced fragments. To assess the reliability of the agreement in this classification, 2 orthopedic surgeons re-classified BHMTs, 1 week after first trial. Intra- and interobserver reliabilities were assessed using kappa statistics. In addition, we address specific tear patterns, associated anterior cruciate ligament injury, medio-lateral difference, reducibility, chronicity, and reparability. Results Most of the tears could be categorized into one of 3 morphologic patterns. Of the tears, 4.8% could not be categorized. BHMTs were classified, based on the rotational directions of centrally displaced fragments, as follows; the upward rotation group (type 1), the downward rotation group (type 2) and the reverse group (type 3). The most common intra-articular pattern was type 1 (29 patients, 69%). The occurrence of the other patterns was: type 2 in 7 patients (16.7%), type 3 in 4 patients (9.5%); we were not able to make a classification of type in 2 patients (4.8%). Intra-observer reliability was 0.86 in terms of kappa statistics, which implies almost perfect agreement. Mean interobserver reliability (0.73) showed substantial agreement. Type 1 and 2 tears were easily reduced, whereas all type 3 tears (4/4) needed additional procedures to achieve reduction. Conclusions Based on arthroscopic findings, we describe a comprehensive BHMT classification scheme that encompasses 95.2% of all tears. Tear type was correlated with reducibility. PMID:22662298

  13. Designing a simple physically-based bucket SVAT model for spatialisation of water needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhal, A.; Boulet, G.; Lakhal, L.; Er-Raki, S.; Duchemin, B.; Chehbouni, G.; Timouk, F.

    2003-04-01

    Within the frame of both IRRIMED and SUDMED projects one needs a robust and simple tool to provide space-time estimates of the water requirements in flat semi-arid agricultural zones. This is the task of the simplest water balance equations, which can be seen as simple SVAT schemes. Most of the simplest SVAT schemes use the classical bucket representation of soil moisture exchange through the soil-canopy-air continuum. They usually rely on empirical relationships such as the “beta function” that are not well suited for all climate, soil and vegetation conditions. Some of them for instance greatly simplify the deep drainage parameterization, or overlook the first to second stage evaporation processes. Several authors have proposed physically-based simple expressions, such as the desorptive approach, which gives accurate integrated capillary flows under constant boundary conditions. We propose here a simple SVAT schemes that uses the same approach but reduces as much as possible the number of empirical relationships. It is tested against 1) a physically based complex SVAT scheme SiSPAT and 2) experimental data acquired during the SALSA and the SUDMED field experiments in Mexico and Morocco (respectively) for a large range of vegetation types (olive trees, wheat crop, grassland). This simple SVAT is well suited to simulate long time series of soil moisture evolution, and proves to give accurate predictions of first to second-stage evaporation time series for the bare soil and fully vegetated cover conditions. An insight into model adjustment for sparse vegetation (which usually prevails under semi-arid conditions) is proposed and partially evaluated against SiSPAT outputs.

  14. Measurement of the beam longitudinal profile in a storage ring bynon-linear laser mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Turner, W.; Zolotorev, M.

    2004-05-03

    We report on the development of a new technique for the measurement of the longitudinal beam profile in storage rings. This technique, which has been successfully demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source, mixes the synchrotron radiation with the light from a mode-locked solid state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal. The up-converted radiation is then detected with a photomultiplier and processed to extract, store, and display the required information. The available choices of laser repetition frequency, pulse width, and phase modulation give a wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of a particular storage ring. Besides the dynamic measurement of the longitudinal profile of each bunch, the instrument can monitor the evolution of the bunch tails, the presence of untrapped particles and their diffusion into nominally empty RF buckets (''ghostbunches'').

  15. Development of an abort gap monitor for high-energy proton rings

    SciTech Connect

    Beche, Jean-Francois; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Denes, Peter; Placidi, Massimo; Turner, William; Zolotorev, Max

    2004-05-03

    The fill pattern in proton synchrotrons usually features an empty gap, longer than the abort kicker raise time, for machine protection. This gap is referred to as the ''abort gap'' and any particles, which may accumulate in it due to injection errors and diffusion between RF buckets, would be lost inside the ring, rather than in the beam dump, during the kicker firing. In large proton rings, due to the high energies involved, it is vital to monitor the build up of charges in the abort gap with a high sensitivity. We present a study of an abort gap monitor based on a photomultiplier with a gated microchannel plate, which would allow for detecting low charge densities by monitoring the synchrotron radiation emitted. We show results of beam test experiments at the Advanced Light Source using a Hamamatsu 5916U MCP-PMT and compare them to the specifications for the Large Hadron Collider

  16. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  17. Traceable Ring Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Koutarou

    The ring signature allows a signer to leak secrets anonymously, without the risk of identity escrow. At the same time, the ring signature provides great flexibility: No group manager, no special setup, and the dynamics of group choice. The ring signature is, however, vulnerable to malicious or irresponsible signers in some applications, because of its anonymity. In this paper, we propose a traceable ring signature scheme. A traceable ring scheme is a ring signature except that it can restrict “excessive” anonymity. The traceable ring signature has a tag that consists of a list of ring members and an issue that refers to, for instance, a social affair or an election. A ring member can make any signed but anonymous opinion regarding the issue, but only once (per tag). If the member submits another signed opinion, possibly pretending to be another person who supports the first opinion, the identity of the member is immediately revealed. If the member submits the same opinion, for instance, voting “yes” regarding the same issue twice, everyone can see that these two are linked. The traceable ring signature can suit to many applications, such as an anonymous voting on a BBS. We formalize the security definitions for this primitive and show an efficient and simple construction in the random oracle model.

  18. Sunset on Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This is a rare view of Saturn's rings seen just after the Sun has set below the ring plane, taken with the Hubble Space Telescope on Nov. 21, 1995.

    This perspective is unusual because the Earth is slightly above (2.7 degrees latitude) Saturn's rings and the Sun is below them. Normally we see the rings fully illuminated by the Sun.

    The photograph shows three bright ring features: the F Ring, the Cassini Division, and the C Ring (moving from the outer rings to the inner). The low concentration of material in these rings allows light from the Sun to shine through them. The A and B rings are much denser, which limits the amount of light that penetrates through them. Instead, they are faintly visible because they reflect light from Saturn's disk.

    Scientists believe that the F Ring is slightly warped because it disappears part way around on the right (West) side. Hubble's high resolution shows the that A Ring's shadow obscures part of the F ring (right).

    The image was assembled from 20 exposures taken with Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 over 8 hours.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  19. Overcoming Barriers.

    PubMed

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie; Schmidt, Kari L

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Neal-Boylan's program of scholarship has always focused on nurse workforce issues. She recently published two books related to how nurses work. One (The Nurse's Reality Gap: Overcoming Barriers Between Academic Achievement and Clinical Success; Neal-Boylan, 2013) focused on the experience of new graduates from baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral programs. The second book, The Nurse's Reality Shift: Using Our History to Transform Our Future (Neal-Boylan, 2014), focuses on the problems nursing continues to face throughout our history and has failed to correct. PMID:26200309

  20. Wrisberg variant of the discoid lateral meniscus with flipped meniscal fragments simulating bucket-handle tear: MRI and arthroscopic correlation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Brian W; Gupta, Anil K; Moorman, Claude T; Garrett, William E; Helms, Clyde A

    2011-08-01

    An MRI diagnosis of the Wrisberg variant discoid lateral meniscus should be considered in patients presenting with an anteriorly flipped posterior horn fragment without a definable peripheral rim. We present four cases discovered on arthroscopy that were thought to resemble bucket-handle tears on preoperative MRI. Posterior hypermobility poses a surgical challenge as excessive debridement without careful attention to underlying meniscal morphology may lead to further instability. Although this diagnosis can be difficult to make on MRI, alerting the orthopedic surgeon preoperatively may influence repair technique and meniscus conservation. PMID:21340450

  1. Arc discharge regulation of a megawatt hot cathode bucket ion source for the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yahong; Hu Chundong; Liu Sheng; Jiang Caichao; Li Jun; Liang Lizhen; Collaboration: NBI Team

    2012-01-15

    Arc discharge of a hot cathode bucket ion source tends to be unstable what attributes to the filament self-heating and energetic electrons backstreaming from the accelerator. A regulation method, which based on the ion density measurement by a Langmuir probe, is employed for stable arc discharge operation and long pulse ion beam generation. Long pulse arc discharge of 100 s is obtained based on this regulation method of arc power. It establishes a foundation for the long pulse arc discharge of a megawatt ion source, which will be utilized a high power neutral beam injection device.

  2. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  3. Features in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Harris, Craig C.; Simmons, Karen E.

    1987-01-01

    A systematic, uniform search of Voyage 2 photopolarimeter system (PSS) data set for all significant features of Saturn's rings is described. On August 25, 1981, the PSS observed the occultation of the star Delta Scorpii by the rings of Saturn, and the timing of the data taking was rapid enough that the spatial resolution in the radial direction in the ring plane was better than 100 m. Tabular information and figures for 216 significant features that were found are presented.

  4. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  5. Ion Trapping in the SLAC B-factory High Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Villevald, D.; Heifets, S.; /SLAC

    2006-09-07

    The presence of trapped ions in electron storage rings has caused significant degradation in machine performance. The best known way to prevent the ion trapping is to leave a gap in the electron bunch train. The topic of this paper is the dynamics of ions in the field of the bunch train with uneven bunch filling. We consider High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B-factory. In the first section we summarize mechanisms of the ion production. Then the transverse and longitudinal dynamics are analyzed for a beam with and without gap. After that, the effect of the ions is considered separating all ions in the ring in several groups depending on their transverse and longitudinal stability. The main effects of the ions are the tune shift and the tune spread of the betatron oscillations of the electrons. The tune spread is produced by bunch to bunch variation of the electric field of ions and by nonlinearity of the field. It is shown that the main contribution to the shift and spread of the betatron tune of the beam is caused by two groups of ions: one-turn ions and trapped ions. One-turn ions are the ions generated during the last passage of the bunch train. Trapped ions are the ions with stable transverse and longitudinal motion. In the last section we discuss shortly related problems of parameters of the clearing electrodes, injection scenario, and collective effects. Clearing electrodes should be located at the defocusing in x-plane quadrupole magnets. An electric DC field of value 1.0 kv/cm will be enough to prevent the ion trapping process. During the injection, it is recommended to fill the bucket with the design number of the particles per bunch N{sub B} before going to the next bucket. In addition, it is recommended to have the sequential filling of the ring, i.e. the filling from one bucket to the next sequentially. It was shown that ions will not be trapped at the location of the interaction point. The reason for this is that the current of the positron beam is

  6. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  7. Integrated semiconductor ring lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezierski, A. F.; Laybourn, P. J. R.

    1988-02-01

    Ring-waveguide and pill-box structures down to 12 microns in diameter, made in GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructure material, have been designed with output stripe waveguides coupled to the rings via Y-junctions. The waveguides were defined by reactive ion etching, although the inner boundaries of some of the ring waveguides relied on stress and carrier confinement. Lasing has been observed with pulsed drive current, and has been shown to correspond to resonances in the rings, although other resonances have been observed in some of the structures. This type of structure is suitable for use as a light source in monolithic integrated optics.

  8. Viscosity in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Shu, F. H.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of estimating the viscosity in Saturn's rings from the damping rate of waves observed to be propagating within the rings is discussed. The wavetrains of attempts using spiral density waves as a diagnostic suffer significant complications that compromise the interpretations. A method that considers the damping of spiral bending waves was used to deduce a kinematic viscosity of 260 (+150, -100) sqcm/sec for the middle of the A ring where bending waves are excited by the 5:3 vertical resonance with Mimas. This value implies upper limits on the particle velocity dispersion and local ring thickness of 0.4 cm/sec and 30 m, respectively.

  9. Longitudinal phase-space coating of beam in a storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. M.

    2014-06-01

    In this Letter, I report on a novel scheme for beam stacking without any beam emittance dilution using a barrier rf system in synchrotrons. The general principle of the scheme called longitudinal phase-space coating, validation of the concept via multi-particle beam dynamics simulations applied to the Fermilab Recycler, and its experimental demonstration are presented. In addition, it has been shown and illustrated that the rf gymnastics involved in this scheme can be used in measuring the incoherent synchrotron tune spectrum of the beam in barrier buckets and in producing a clean hollow beam in longitudinal phase space. The method of beam stacking in synchrotrons presented here is the first of its kind.

  10. Ring Around a Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Space Telescope Science Institute astronomers are giving the public chances to decide where to aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Guided by 8,000 Internet voters, Hubble has already been used to take a close-up, multi-color picture of the most popular object from a list of candidates, the extraordinary 'polar-ring' galaxy NGC 4650A. Located about 130 million light-years away, NGC 4650A is one of only 100 known polar-ring galaxies. Their unusual disk-ring structure is not yet understood fully. One possibility is that polar rings are the remnants of colossal collisions between two galaxies sometime in the distant past, probably at least 1 billion years ago. What is left of one galaxy has become the rotating inner disk of old red stars in the center. Meanwhile, another smaller galaxy which ventured too close was probably severely damaged or destroyed. The bright bluish clumps, which are especially prominent in the outer parts of the ring, are regions containing luminous young stars, examples of stellar rebirth from the remnants of an ancient galactic disaster. The polar ring appears to be highly distorted. No regular spiral pattern stands out in the main part of the ring, and the presence of young stars below the main ring on one side and above on the other shows that the ring is warped and does not lie in one plane. Determining the typical ages of the stars in the polar ring is an initial goal of our Polar Ring Science Team that can provide a clue to the evolution of this unusual galaxy. The HST exposures were acquired by the Hubble Heritage Team, consisting of Keith Noll, Howard Bond, Carol Christian, Jayanne English, Lisa Frattare, Forrest Hamilton, Anne Kinney and Zolt Levay, and guest collaborators Jay Gallagher (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Lynn Matthews (National Radio Astronomy Observatory-Charlottesville), and Linda Sparke (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

  11. Using Bucket Samples to Calibrate the Wilcock Two-Fraction Bed Load Equation in a Mid-Atlantic Piedmont Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallonee, J. D.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Reed, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    Bed load transport was measured at 2 contiguous reaches at Beaver Run, a small gravel-bedded stream, with a watershed area of 13.0 km2, in Chester County, Pennsylvania. One reach had forested riparian vegetation while the other had grassy riparian vegetation. Eight (8) different storm events were sampled from March to October of 1999, including Hurricane Floyd. To capture bed load, 5 gallon plastic buckets were buried along approximately 90% of the stream width in both reaches. Bed load transport data for sand and gravel and hydraulic parameters, were plotted using the methods of Wilcock (2002) to create a single well-defined sediment transport function with separate reference Shields stresses for sand and gravel. Data from forested and grassed reaches follow a single transport function with the same reference Shields stresses, indicating that bed load transport processes are not influenced by riparian vegetation. Sand is the major constituent of bed load. Transport rates are greater in the forested reach than in the grassed reach because the water surface slope is greater in the forested reach. Bucket samplers appear to be a reliable method for calibrating bed load transport models in small streams with low transport rates.

  12. Temperature histories from tree rings and corals

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E.R.

    1995-05-01

    Recent temperature trends in long tree-ring and coral proxy temperature histories are evaluated and compared in an effort to objectively determine how anomalous twentieth century temperature changes have been. These histories mostly reflect regional variations in summer warmth from the tree rings and annual warmth from the corals. In the Northern Hemisphere. the North American tree-ring temperature histories and those from the north Polar Urals, covering the past 1000 or more years, indicate that the twentieth century has been anomalously warm relative to the past. In contrast, the tree-ring history from northern Fennoscandia indicates that summer temperatures during the {open_quote}Medieval Warm Period{close_quote} were probably warmer on average than those than during this century. In the Southern Hemisphere, the tree-ring temperature histories from South America show no indication of recent warming, which is in accordance with local instrumental records. In contrast, the tree-ring, records from Tasmania and New Zealand indicate that the twentieth century has been unusually warm particularly since 1960. The coral temperature histories from the Galapagos Islands and the Great Barrier Reef are in broad agreement with the tree-ring temperature histories in those sectors, with the former showing recent cooling and the latter showing recent warming that may be unprecedented. Overall, the regional temperature histories evaluated here broadly support the larger-scale evidence for anomalous twentieth century warming based on instrumental records. However, this warming cannot be confirmed as an unprecedented event in all regions. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  14. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  15. Lower esophageal ring (Schatzki)

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrowed area to stretch the ring. Sometimes, a balloon is placed in the area and inflated, to help widen the ring. Outlook (Prognosis) Swallowing problems may return. You may need repeat treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you ...

  16. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  17. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  18. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  19. Telemetry carrier ring and support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A telemetry carrier ring for use in a gas turbine engine includes an annular support ring connected to the engine and an annular carrier ring coupled to the support ring, each ring exhibiting different growth characteristics in response to thermal and mechanical loading. The carrier ring is coupled to the support ring by a plurality of circumferentially spaced web members which are relatively thin in an engine radial direction to provide a predetermined degree of radial flexibility. the web members have a circumferential width and straight axial line of action selected to transfer torque and thrust between the support ring and the carrier ring without substantial deflection. The use of the web members with radial flexibility provides compensation between the support ring and the carrier ring since the carrier ring grows at a different rate than the supporting ring.

  20. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  1. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  2. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  3. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  4. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  5. Seal ring installation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, L. Haynes (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A seal ring tool that allows an installer to position a primary seal ring between hub ends of pipe flanges that are being assembled together. The tool includes a pivoting handle member and extension arms attached to the pivoting handle member. The ends of the arms have side indentation type longitudinal grooves angled toward one another for holding the primary seal ring in place between the hubs of respective pipes that are to be attached together. The arms of the tool can also have flat sides that can be used to abut against an optional second larger seal that is supported within a groove in one of the hub ends so that the second hub end can then be moved against the other side of the primary seal ring. Once the seal ring is positioned between the pipe hubs, the pipe hubs can be moved about the seal ring due to the flat sides of the arms of the tool. The tool eliminates the chances of damaging and contaminating seal rings being installed within pipe hubs that are being attached to one another.

  6. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  7. Molecular ring rotation in solid ferrocene revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Markus; Frick, Bernhard; Spehr, Tinka Luise; Stühn, Bernd

    2015-03-21

    We report on quasielastic neutron spectroscopy experiments on ferrocene (bis(η{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl)iron) in its three different crystalline phases: the disordered monoclinic crystalline phase (T > 164 K), the metastable triclinic phase (T < 164 K), and the stable orthorhombic phase (T < 250 K). The cyclopentadienyl rings in ferrocene are known to undergo rotational reorientations for which the analysis of our large data set suggests partially a revision of the known picture of the dynamics and allows for an extension and completion of previous studies. In the monoclinic phase, guided by structural information, we propose a model for rotational jumps among non-equivalent sites in contrast to the established 5-fold jump rotation model. The new model takes the dynamical disorder into account and allows the cyclopentadienyl rings to reside in two different configurations which are found to be twisted by an angle of approximately 30°. In the triclinic phase, our analysis demands the use of a 2-ring model accounting for crystallographically independent sites with different barriers to rotation. For the orthorhombic phase of ferrocene, we confirm a significantly increased barrier of rotation using neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Our data analysis includes multiple scattering corrections and presents a novel approach of simultaneous analysis of different neutron scattering data by combining elastic and inelastic fixed window temperature scans with energy spectra, providing a very robust and reliable mean of extracting the individual activation energies of overlapping processes.

  8. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  9. Theodolite Ring Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  10. Dynamics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, S.

    1991-02-01

    The modeling of the dynamics of particle collisions within planetary rings is discussed. Particles in the rings collide with one another because they have small random motions in addition to their orbital velocity. The orbital speed is roughly 10 km/s, while the random motions have an average speed of about a tenth of a millimeter per second. As a result, the particle collisions are very gentle. Numerical analysis and simulation of the ring dynamics, performed with the aid of a supercomputer, is outlined.

  11. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  12. Attraction of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) and Nontarget Insects to Methyl Eugenol Bucket Traps with Different Preservative Fluids on Oahu Island, Hawaiian Islands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Attraction of B. dorsalis and nontarget insects to preservative fluids ethylene glycol antifreeze, propylene glycol antifreeze, or mineral oil in bucket traps, which contained captured decaying male oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), a male lure (methyl eugenol), and a toxicant (DDVP ...

  13. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  14. Near Two-Decade Instrument Performance for Hydrological Monitoring at the Prototype Hanford Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, C. E.; Clayton, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Surface barriers have been proposed for use at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site as a means to isolate certain radioactive waste sites that, for reasons of cost or worker safety, may not be exhumed. The Hanford Prototype Barrier was constructed in 1994 using mostly natural materials to demonstrate its long-term performance. The barrier is expected to perform for at least 1000 years by limiting water, plant, animal, and human intrusion and minimizing erosion. Extensive instrumentation is used to monitor the hydrological regime above, within, below, and around the barrier. Specifically, natural precipitation and irrigation are measured with rain gauges, runoff water with a runoff flume, soil water content within the barrier at 12 stations with a neutron probe, a capacitance probe, and time-domain-reflectometry probes, and soil water pressure with gypsum blocks and heat-dissipation-units. Drainage through the barrier and the side slopes is measured with 12 water collection vaults, respectively, for 12 zones. Each drainage vault is equipped with a dosing siphon, a dose counter, a pressure transducer to measure the water level, and a tipping bucket to measure the inflow. During the near two-decade monitoring period, some of the instruments stopped functioning, while others still function normally till present. This presentation will summarize the performance of these instruments. Recommendations for future barrier monitoring will be given.

  15. Combination Thermal Barrier And Wear Coatings For Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingart, Mike; Moller, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Thermal-barrier layers covered with self-lubricating surface layers. Zirconia thermal-barrier coat applied to surface of combustion chamber in engine by plasma-arc spraying. Then PS-200 plasma-arc sprayed onto zirconia. Self-lubricating coat prevents sliding contact between thermal barrier and piston ring, effectively preventing both wear and production of additional heat via friction. Other combinations of thermal-barrier and self-lubricating, wear-resistant coating materials used as long as two materials adhere to each other, applied by use of similar or compatible processes, have similar coefficients of thermal expansion, sufficiently strong at high temperatures, and affordable.

  16. Storage Ring EDM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Dedicated storage ring electric dipole moment (EDM) methods show great promise advancing the sensitivity level by a couple orders of magnitude over currently planned hadronic EDM experiments. We describe the present status and recent updates of the field.

  17. Heating Saturn's Clumpy Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Neal J.; Morishima, Ryuji; Spilker, Linda J.

    2015-11-01

    We model Cassini CIRS data using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer -- thermal balance technique first developed for protostellar disks, with the goals of:1. Exploring whether the A- and B-ring temperatures' variation with viewing angle is consistent with the wake structures suggested by the observed azimuthal asymmetry in optical depth, by analytic arguments, and by numerical N-body modeling.2. Better constraining the shape, size, spacing and optical depths of substructure in the A-ring, using the unexpectedly high temperatures observed at equinox. If the wake features have high enough contrast, Saturn-shine may penetrate the gaps between the wakes and heat thering particles both top and bottom.3. Determining how much of the heating of the A- and B-rings' unlit sides is due to radiative transport and how much is due to particle motions, especially vertical motions. This will help in constraining the rings' surface densities and masses.

  18. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mosaic of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This detailed mosaic of the underside of the Cassini Division was obtained by Voyager 1 with a resolution of about 10 kilometers. The classical Cassini Division appears here to the right of center as five bright rings with substantial blacks gap on either side. The inner edge of the A Ring, to the left of center, is the brightest part of this image. The fine-scale wave structure in this region has been interpreted as being the result of gravitational density waves.

  20. Saturn's B rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's B Ring and Cassini Division was taken through the Clear filter from a distance of 12.6 million km on 3 November 1980. The Cassini Division separating the A and B Rings is clearly not an empty region. The Division shows several substantial well-defined ringlets. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  1. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specifications: ACRR Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) Bucket Environment (ACRR-PLG-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parm, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 37 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  2. Saturn's E ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, W. A.; Kreidl, T.; Westphal, J. A.; Danielson, G. E.; Seidelmann, P. K.; Pascu, D.; Currie, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the tenuous E ring of Saturn made by an earth-based CCD system at the time of the ring-plane crossing of March 1980 are presented. The observations were made with the CCD system attached to the 1.8-m Perkins reflector at Lowell Observatory using a pupil mask behind a focal plane mask to suppress telescopic diffraction. Photometric analysis of the CCD images reveal the edge-on brightness profile of the ring, beginning at a distance of 3 Saturn radii, to peak sharply in the vicinity of the orbit of Enceladus at about 4 Saturn radii, then decrease to a distance of over 8 Saturn radii. In addition, beyond Enceladus, the edge-on width of the ring is observed to increase with radial distance, reaching nearly 5 arcsec at 7 Saturn radii. Observations suggest, on the one hand, that the E ring is associated with Enceladus and possibly represents material ejected from the satellite, and on the other, that the ring is at an early stage in its evolution.

  3. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings [5, 8]. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~ 100m in size) have been identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images [10, 7, 9, 11]. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring [6, 2]. In this paper we present our new results about by now classical A ring propellers and more enigmatic B ring population. Due to the presence of self-gravity wakes the analysis of propeller brightness in ISS images always bears some ambiguity [7, 9] and consequently the exact morphology of propellers is not a settled issue. In 2008 we obtained a fortunate Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation of the largest A ring propeller Bleriot. Utilizing Cassini ISS images we obtain Bleriot orbit and demonstrate that UVIS Persei Rev42 occultation did cut across Bleriot about 100km downstream from the center. The occultation itself shows a prominent partial gap and higher density outer flanking wakes, while their orientation is consistent with a downstream cut. While in the UVIS occultation the partial gap is more prominent than the flanking wakes, the features mostly seen in Bleriot images are actually flanking wakes. One of the most interesting aspects of the A ring propellers are their wanderings, or longitudinal deviations from a pure circular orbit [11]. We numerically investigated the possibility of simple moon

  4. Thermal barrier research

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, K.G.

    1990-03-07

    The thermal barrier region in the TARA device is a complex arrangement combining ion-plugging by sloshing ions with an ECRH-generated thermal barrier plasma. An axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio magnetic field, adjacent to the central cell, provides the confinement of the thermal barrier plasma and sloshing ions. This paper discusses research being done in this thermal barrier region.

  5. What's up with witch rings?

    PubMed

    Heard, Priscilla; Phillips, David

    2015-01-01

    'Witch rings' are well-known novelty rings that show a size-change illusion when rotated. We have replicated the illusion of expansion of the reflections in the rings in a variety of contexts with animations, though not as yet so successfully imitated the sense that the whole ring expands and contracts. PMID:26489222

  6. Geodesic detection of Agulhas rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beron-Vera, F. J.; Wang, Y.; Olascoaga, M. J.; Goni, G. J.; Haller, G.

    2012-12-01

    Mesoscale oceanic eddies are routinely detected from instantaneous velocities. While simple to implement, this Eulerian approach gives frame-dependent results and often hides true material transport by eddies. Building on the recent geodesic theory of transport barriers, we develop an objective (i.e., frame-independent) method for accurately locating coherent Lagrangian eddies. These eddies act as compact water bodies, with boundaries showing no leakage or filamentation over long periods of time. Applying the algorithm to altimetry-derived velocities in the South Atlantic, we detect, for the first time, Agulhas rings that preserve their material coherence for several months, while eddy candidates yielded by other approaches tend to disperse or leak within weeks. These findings suggest that current Eulerian estimates of the Agulhas leakage need significant revision.Temporal evolution of fluid patches identified as eddies by different methods. First column: eddies extracted using geodesic eddy identification [1,2]. Second column: eddies identified from sea surface height (SSH) using the methodology of Chelton et al. [2] with U/c > 1. Third column: eddies identified as elliptic regions by the Okubo-Weiss (OW) criterion [e.g., 3]. Fourth column: eddies identified as mesoelliptic (ME) regions by Mezic et al.'s [4] criterion. References: [1] Beron-Vera et al. (2012). Geodesic eddy detection suggests reassessment of Agulhas leakage. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, submitted. [2] Haller & Beron-Vera (2012). Geodesic theory of transport barriers in two-dimensional flows. Physica D, in press. [2] Chelton et al. (2011). Prog. Oceanog. 91, 167. [3] Chelton et al. (2007). Geophys. Res. Lett. 34, L5606. [4] Mezic et al. (2010). Science 330, 486.

  7. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2016-02-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant differences from the AC case. In particular, the ring does not fly off the core but rises a short distance and then falls back. If the ring jumps high enough, the rising and the falling motion of the ring does not follow simple vertical motion of a projectile. This indicates that there are additional forces on the ring in each part of its motion. Four possible stages of the motion of the ring with DC are identified, which result from the ring current changing directions during the jump in response to a changing magnetic flux through the moving ring.

  8. Ring species as demonstrations of the continuum of species formation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ricardo J; Wake, David B

    2015-11-01

    In the mid-20th century, Ernst Mayr (1942) and Theodosius Dobzhansky (1958) championed the significance of 'circular overlaps' or 'ring species' as the perfect demonstration of the gradual nature of species formation. As an ancestral species expands its range, wrapping around a geographic barrier, derived taxa within the ring display interactions typical of populations, such as genetic and morphological intergradation, while overlapping taxa at the terminus of the ring behave largely as sympatric, reproductively isolated species. Are ring species extremely rare or are they just difficult to detect? What conditions favour their formation? Modelling studies have attempted to address these knowledge gaps by estimating the biological parameters that result in stable ring species (Martins et al. 2013), and determining the necessary topographic parameters of the barriers encircled (Monahan et al. 2012). However, any generalization is undermined by a major limitation: only a handful of ring species are known to exist in nature. In addition, many of them have been broken into multiple species presumed to be evolving independently, usually obscuring the evolutionary dynamics that generate diversity. A paper in this issue of Molecular Ecology by Fuchs et al. (2015), focused on the entire genealogy of a bulbul (Alophoixus) species complex, offers key insights into the evolutionary processes underlying diversification of this Indo-Malayan bird. Their findings fulfil most of the criteria that can be expected for ring species (Fig. ): an ancestor has colonized the mainland from Sundaland, expanded along the forested habitat wrapping around Thailand's lowlands, adjacent taxa intergrade around the ring distribution, and terminal taxa overlap at the ring closure. Although it remains unclear whether ring divergence has resulted in restrictive gene flow relative to that observed around the ring, their results suggest that circular overlaps might be more common in nature than

  9. Mapping Ring Particle Cooling across Saturn's Rings with Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Shawn M.; Spilker, L. J.; Edgington, S. G.; Pilorz, S. H.; Deau, E.

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the rings' thermal inertia, a measure of their response to changes in the thermal environment, varies from ring to ring. Thermal inertia can provide insight into the physical structure of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths. Low thermal inertia and quick temperature responses are suggestive of ring particles that have more porous or fluffy regoliths or that are riddled with cracks. Solid, coherent particles can be expected to have higher thermal inertias (Ferrari et al. 2005). Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded millions of spectra of Saturn's rings since its arrival at Saturn in 2004 (personal communication, M. Segura). CIRS records far infrared radiation between 10 and 600 cm-1 (16.7 and 1000 µm) at focal plane 1 (FP1), which has a field of view of 3.9 mrad. Thermal emission from Saturn's rings peaks in this wavelength range. FP1 spectra can be used to infer ring temperatures. By tracking how ring temperatures vary, we can determine the thermal inertia of the rings. In this work we focus on CIRS observations of the shadowed portion of Saturn's rings. The thermal budget of the rings is dominated by the solar radiation absorbed by its constituent particles. When ring particles enter Saturn's shadow this source of energy is abruptly cut off. As a result, ring particles cool as they traverse Saturn's shadow. From these shadow observations we can create cooling curves at specific locations across the rings. We will show that the rings' cooling curves and thus their thermal inertia vary not only from ring to ring, but by location within the individual rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2010 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  10. Saturn's Other Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crary, F. J.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's main rings orbit the planet within an atmosphere and ionosphere of water, oxygen and hydrogen, produced by meteoritic impacts on and ultraviolet photodesorbtion of the ring particles [Johnson et al., 2006; Luhmann et al., 2006; Tseng et al., 2010]. The neutral atmosphere itself has only been tentatively detected through ultraviolet fluorescents of OH [Hall et al., 1996] while the ionosphere was observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft shortly after orbital insertion [Coates et al.,2005; Tokar et al. 2005, Waite et al. 2005]. Although the plasma flow velocity of this ionosphere is not well-constrained, but the close association with the rings suggests that its speed would be couppled to the keplarian velocity of the rings themselves. As a result, the motion of the plasma through Saturn's magnetic field would produce an induced voltage, oriented away from the planet outside synchronous orbit and towards the planet inside synchronous orbit. Such a potential could result in currents flowing across the ring plane and closeing along magnetic field lines and through Saturn's ionosphere at latitudes between 36o and 48o. Cassini observations of whistler-mode plasma wave emissions [Xin et al.,2006] centered on synchronous orbit (1.76 Rs, mapping to 41o latitude) have been interpreted as a product of field-aligned electron beams associated with such a current. This presentation will investigate the magnitude of these currents and the resulting Joule heating of the ionosphere. An important constraint is that no auroral ultraviolet emissions have been observed at the relevant latitudes. In contrast, Joule heating could affect infrared emissions from H3+. Variations in H3+ emission associated with Saturn's rings have been reported by O'Donoghue et al., 2013, and interpreted as a result of ring "rain", i.e. precipitating water group species from the rings which alter ionosphereic chemistry and H3+ densities. As noted by O'Donoghue et al., this interpretation may be

  11. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  12. Stacked Corrugated Horn Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief describes a method of machining and assembly when the depth of corrugations far exceeds the width and conventional machining is not practical. The horn is divided into easily machined, individual rings with shoulders to control the depth. In this specific instance, each of the corrugations is identical in profile, and only differs in diameter and outer profile. The horn is segmented into rings that are cut with an interference fit (zero clearance with all machining errors biased toward contact). The interference faces can be cut with a reverse taper to increase the holding strength of the joint. The taper is a compromise between the interference fit and the clearance of the two faces during assembly. Each internal ring is dipped in liquid nitrogen, then nested in the previous, larger ring. The ring is rotated in the nest until the temperature of the two parts equalizes and the pieces lock together. The resulting assay is stable, strong, and has an internal finish that cannot be achieved through other methods.

  13. Rings in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, J.B.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    Saturn, Jupiter, and Uranus have rings with different structure and composition. The rings consist of tiny masses in independent orbits. Photographs and data obtained by the Voyager project have aided in the understanding of Saturn's rings. Spokes have been found in B ring and boards, knots, and twist in F ring. Particles on the order of a micrometer in size are believed to occur in F, B, and A rings. The dominant component is water ice. The rings of Uranus are narrow and separated by broad empty regions. The technique used to study them has been stellar occulation. Nothing is known of particle size. The dominant component is believed to be silicates rich in compounds that absorb sunlight. Jupiter's rings consist of 3 main parts: a bright ring, a diffuse disk, and a halo. Use of Pioneer 10 data and other techniques have indicated particle sizes on the order of several micrometers and some at least a centimeter in diameter. The architecture of the ring system results from the interplay of a number of forces. These include gravitational forces due to moons outside the rings and moonlets embedded in them, electromagnetic forces due to the planet's rotating magnetic field, and even the gentle forces exerted by the dilute gaseous medium in which the rings rotate. Each of these forces is discussed. Several alternative explanations of how the rings arose are considered. The primary difference in these hypotheses is the account of the relationship between the ring particles of today and the primordial ring material. (SC)

  14. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  15. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  16. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  17. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus with hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Cátia; Castro, Ricardo; Cadilha, Rui; Raposo, Frederico; Melão, Lina

    2015-12-01

    Knee joint lesions can be solitary or occur concomitantly with other lower limb abnormalities. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus (RSM) and hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are two rare malformations. The therapeutic management of such abnormalities is not consensual, and highly depends on clinical symptomatology. We report a case of a 25-year-old girl with progressive knee pain whose MRI demonstrated a continuous segment of lateral meniscus situated along the medial aspect of the lateral compartment, continuous with the otherwise normal-appearing lateral meniscus, compatible with an RSM. This anatomic variant can be mistaken by a displaced meniscal fragment, like a bucket-handle tear, a central tear of a discoid meniscus, or incomplete discoid meniscus, as previously reported. Her MRI examination also showed a thinned ACL with anomalous lateral course. This abnormality may be mistaken for an ACL rupture and/or a meniscofemoral ligament with agenesis of ACL. Multiple images in different planes as well as following the course of meniscal and ligaments are critical clues to avoid misdiagnosis. As a result, the diagnosis of an RSM along with hypoplasic ACL with abnormal attachment was assumed based on MRI and confirmed during arthroscopy. The patient was treated conservatively with clinical outcome improvement. PMID:26178136

  18. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  19. Ringed Accretion Disks: Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the possibility that several instability points may be formed, due to the Paczyński mechanism of violation of mechanical equilibrium, in the orbiting matter around a supermassive Kerr black hole. We consider a recently proposed model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several tori (rings) that can be corotating or counter-rotating relative to the Kerr attractor due to the history of the accretion process. Each torus is governed by the general relativistic hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. We prove that the number of the instability points is generally limited and depends on the dimensionless spin of the rotating attractor.

  20. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1994-09-20

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity is disclosed. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction. 21 figs.

  1. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction.

  2. The covariant chiral ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, Antoine; Troost, Jan

    2016-03-01

    We construct a covariant generating function for the spectrum of chiral primaries of symmetric orbifold conformal field theories with N = (4 , 4) supersymmetry in two dimensions. For seed target spaces K3 and T 4, the generating functions capture the SO(21) and SO(5) representation theoretic content of the chiral ring respectively. Via string dualities, we relate the transformation properties of the chiral ring under these isometries of the moduli space to the Lorentz covariance of perturbative string partition functions in flat space.

  3. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2004-01-01

    The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by the seasonal Yarkovsky effect and the Yarkovsky-Schach effect; the two effects confine the rings between approximately 1.68 and approximately 2.23 Saturn radii, in reasonable agreement with the observed values of 1.525 and 2.267. The C ring may be sparsely populated because its particles are transients on their way to Saturn; the infall may create a luminous Ring of Fire around Saturn's equator. The ring system may be young: in the past heat flow from Saturn's interior much above its present value would not permit rings to exist.

  4. Reading, Writing, and Rings!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pamela; Li, Erika; Hammon, Art

    2008-01-01

    "Reading, Writing, and Rings!" was created by a team of elementary teachers, literacy experts, and scientists in order to integrate science and literacy. These free units bring students inside NASA's Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn. The authors--a science teacher and education outreach specialist and two evaluators of educational programs--have…

  5. Field reversed ion rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.; Omelchenko, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp region into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. Assuming the characteristic ionization time is much shorter than the long ({ital t}{approx_gt}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}}) beam evolution time scale, we investigate the formation of an ion ring in the background plasma followed by field reversal, using a 21/2-D hybrid, PIC code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. We show that beam bunching and trapping occurs downstream in a ramped magnetic field for an appropriate set of experimental parameters. We find that a compact ion ring is formed and a large field reversal {zeta}={delta}{ital B}/{ital B}{approx_gt}1 on axis develops. We also observe significant deceleration of the ring on reflection due to the transfer of its axial momentum to the background ions, which creates favorable trapping conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Models of planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Brophy, T. G.; Stewart, Glen R.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager occultations provide several uniform and high quality data sets for Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. These data are intercompared, and theoretical models for the particle sizes and the particle transport are developed. The major topics covered include: ring size distribution, torques and resonances, and satellite wakes.

  7. Tool Support Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tool support ring requires only single repositioning to give broaching tool access to series of 66 holes located on circle. Permits use of tools designed for hand-held use (such as electric drill) where less portable setup (such as milling machine) otherwise required.

  8. Flushing Ring for EDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earwood, L.

    1985-01-01

    Removing debris more quickly lowers cutting time. Operation, cutting oil and pressurized air supplied to ring placed around workpiece. Air forces oil through small holes and agitates oil as it flows over workpiece. High flow rate and agitation dislodge and remove debris. Electrical discharge removes material from workpiece faster.

  9. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  10. Ring laser scatterometer

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-28

    A scatterometer utilizes the dead zone resulting from lockup caused by scatter from a sample located in the optical path of a ring laser at a location where counter-rotating pulses cross. The frequency of one pulse relative to the other is varied across the lockup dead zone.

  11. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  12. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  13. Do tree ring chronologies have missing rings that distort volcanic cooling signal?: Tree ring records not distorted by missing rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-09-01

    Tree ring records are often used as a proxy for past climate. Trees form a new growth ring each year, and ring widths are related to temperature and other conditions at cold sites. Some recent studies have noted that tree ring width chronologies and resulting climate reconstructions do not appear to show the widespread cooling in the past millennium that would be expected following large volcanic eruptions. One hypothesis suggests that regional cooling after a volcanic eruption could be so severe that many trees do not form a ring at all, which leads researchers to misdate the tree ring chronology.

  14. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  15. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  16. Wafer-level packaging with compression-controlled seal ring bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Farino, Anthony J

    2013-11-05

    A device may be provided in a sealed package by aligning a seal ring provided on a first surface of a first semiconductor wafer in opposing relationship with a seal ring that is provided on a second surface of a second semiconductor wafer and surrounds a portion of the second wafer that contains the device. Forcible movement of the first and second wafer surfaces toward one another compresses the first and second seal rings against one another. A physical barrier against the movement, other than the first and second seal rings, is provided between the first and second wafer surfaces.

  17. A bunch killer for the NSLS x-ray electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocky, R.J.; Bergmann, U.; Siddons, D.P.

    1993-07-01

    In the NSLS x-ray electron storage ring, which operates at a harmonic number of 30, the beam may be stored in many different bunch patterns. The minimum spacing between bunches is approximately 19 nsec. While most of the experimenters are primarily interested in photon flux, some experiments are sensitive to bunch spacing. Time resolved nuclear resonance scattering experiments, for example, need pulses of x-rays spaced of the order of 100 nsec apart and a very low noise floor (10{sup {minus}6}) between pulses. Perhaps even more important than the level of the background is that it be reproducible and homogeneous in time. It has been found in practice that a small number of electrons always get trapped in the ``empty`` rf buckets during injection into the storage ring and remain as low level stray bunches. These extra bunches produce an unacceptable temporally localized, non-reproducible background which is difficult if not impossible to correct for. A ``bunch killer`` system based on the rf knockout technique has been developed and installed on the ring to remove the unwanted bunches. The authors describe the operation of this system and present experimental results to illustrate its effectiveness.

  18. Building Multi-Discipline, Multi-Format Digital Libraries Using Clusters and Buckets. Degree rewarded by Old Dominion Univ. on Aug. 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Our objective was to study the feasibility of extending the Dienst protocol to enable a multi-discipline, multi-format digital library. We implemented two new technologies: cluster functionality and publishing buckets. We have designed a possible implementation of clusters and buckets, and have prototyped some aspects of the resultant digital library. Currently, digital libraries are segregated by the disciplines they serve (computer science, aeronautics, etc.), and by the format of their holdings (reports, software, datasets, etc.). NCSTRL+ is a multi-discipline, multi-format digital library (DL) prototype created to explore the feasibility of the design and implementation issues involved with created a unified, canonical scientific and technical information (STI) DL. NCSTRL+ is based on the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL), a World Wide Web (WWW) accessible DL that provides access to over 80 university departments and laboratories. We have extended the Dienst protocol (version 4.1.8), the protocol underlying NCSTRL, to provide the ability to cluster independent collections into a logically centralized DL based upon subject category classification, type of organization, and genre of material. The concept of buckets provides a mechanism for publishing and managing logically linked entities with multiple data formats.

  19. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David

    2004-01-01

    Saturn's icy ring particles, with their low thermal conductivity, are almost ideal for the operation of the Yarkovsky effects. The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by a near balancing of the seasonal Yarkovsky effect with the Yarkovsky- Schach effect. The two effects, which are photon thrust due to temperature gradients, may confine the A and B rings to within their observed dimensions. The C ring may be sparsely populated with icy particles because Yarkovsky drag has pulled them into Saturn, leaving the more slowly orbitally decaying rocky particles. Icy ring particles ejected from the B ring and passing through the C ring, as well as some of the slower rocky particles, should fall on Saturn's equator, where they may create a luminous "Ring of Fire" around Saturn's equator. This predicted Ring of Fire may be visible to Cassini's camera. Curiously, the speed of outwards Yarkovsky orbital evolution appears to peak near the Cassini Division. The connection between the two is not clear. D. Nesvorny has speculated that the resonance at the outer edge of the B ring may impede particles from evolving via Yarkovsky across the Division. If supply from the B ring is largely cut off, then Yarkovsky may push icy particles outward, away from the inner edge of the A ring, leaving only the rocky ones in the Division. The above scenarios depend delicately on the properties of the icy particles.

  20. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Ramsey, David R.; Stampfer, Joseph F.; Macdonald, John M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  1. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  2. Development of Thermal Barriers for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed using conventional 0-ring seals. The 5500+F combustion gases are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation. Special joint-fill compounds are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flowpath to the seals. On a number of occasions. NASA has observed in several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints hot gas penetration through defects in the joint- fill compound. The current nozzle-to-case joint design incorporates primary, secondary and wiper (inner-most) 0-rings and polysulfide joint-fill compound. In the current design, 1 out of 7 motors experience hot gas to the wiper 0-ring. Though the condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas to the wiper 0-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. NASA and solid rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and a thermal barrier, This paper presents burn-resistance, temperature drop, flow and resiliency test results for several types of NASA braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the thermal barriers when exposed to the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Thermal barriers braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over 6 minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Tests were performed on two thermal barrier braid architectures, denoted Carbon-3 and Carbon-6, to measure the temperature drop across and along the barrier in a compressed state when subjected to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch. Carbon-3 and Carbon-6 thermal barriers were excellent insulators causing temperature drops through their diameter of up to a 2800 and 2560 F. respectively. Gas temperature 1/4" downstream of the thermal barrier were within the

  3. Planetary rings: Structure and history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L.

    The composition and structure of planetary rings provide the key evidence to understand their origin and evolution. Before the first space observations, we were able to maintain an idealized view of the rings around Saturn, the only known ring system at that time. Rings were then discovered around Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune. Saturn's F ring was discovered by Pioneer 11. Our ideal view of circular, planar, symmetric and unchanging rings was shattered by observations of inclined, eccentric rings, waves and wavy edges, and numerous processes acting at rates that give timescales much younger than the solar system. Moons within and near the rings sculpt them and are the likely progenitors of future rings. The moonlet lifetimes are much less than Saturn's age. The old idea of ancient rings gave rise to youthful rings, that are recently created by erosion and destruction of small nearby moons. Although this explanation may work well for most rings, Saturn's massive ring system provides a problem. It is extremely improbable that Saturn's rings were recently created by the destruction of a moon as large as Mimas, or even by the breakup of a large comet that passed too close to Saturn. The history of Saturn's rings has been a difficult problem, now made even more challenging by the close-up Cassini measurements. Cassini observations show unexpected ring variability in time and space. Time variations are seen in ring edges, in the thinner D and F rings, and in the neutral oxygen cloud, which outweighs the E ring in the same region around Saturn. The rings are inhomogeneous, with structures on all scales, sharp gradients and edges. Compositional gradients are sharper than expected, but nonetheless cross structural boundaries. This is evidence for ballistic transport that has not gone to completion. The autocovariance maximizes in the middle of the A ring, with smaller structure near the main rings' outer edge. Density wave locations have a fresher ice composition. The

  4. Connector contact-ring bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligon, J.

    1976-01-01

    Use of device eliminates crimp connectors and ferrules, resulting in compact termination assembly and efficient use of back-shell space. Pair of insulator rings, one at each end of assembly, provides spacing between disc caps and contact rings.

  5. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  6. A ring galaxy in Canes Venatici and related ring galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, Ken-ichi; Nishida, M.T. Kobe Women's University )

    1991-04-01

    A spectroscopic observation was made of a ring-shaped object in Canes Venatici. A bright knot at the edge of the ring has a recession velocity of 10,960 + or - 30 km/s and so is confirmed as an extragalactic object. It shows no sign of nuclear activity but appears to be an H II region of intermediate excitation class. The linear diameter of the ring is 14.2 + or - 0.8 kpc, a typical size for ring galaxies. Recession velocities of several other ring galaxies are also given. 24 refs.

  7. Uranus: the rings are black.

    PubMed

    Sinton, W M

    1977-11-01

    An upper limit of 0.05 is established for the geometric albedo of the newly discovered rings of Uranus. In view of this very low albedo, the particles of the rings cannot be ice-covered as are those of rings A and B of Saturn. PMID:17842136

  8. Electrostatic forces in planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Shan, Linhua; Havnes, O.

    1988-01-01

    The average charge on a particle in a particle-plasma cloud, the plasma potential inside the cloud, and the Coulomb force acting on the particle are calculated. The net repulsive electrostatic force on a particle depends on the plasma density, temperature, density of particles, particle size, and the gradient of the particle density. In a uniformly dense ring the electrostatic repulsion is zero. It is also shown that the electrostatic force acts like a pressure force, that even a collisionless ring can be stable against gravitational collapse, and that a finite ring thickness does not necessarily imply a finite velocity dispersion. A simple criterion for the importance of electrostatic forces in planetary rings is derived which involves the calculation of the vertical ring thickness which would result if only electrostatic repulsion were responsible for the finite ring thickness. Electrostatic forces are entirely negligible in the main rings of Saturn and the E and G rings. They may also be negligible in the F ring. However, the Uranian rings and Jupiter's ring seem to be very much influenced by electrostatic repulsion. In fact, electrostatic forces could support a Jovian ring which is an order of magnitude more dense than observed.

  9. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  10. Ringed Accretion Disks: Equilibrium Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  11. Saturn Ring Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Answering fundamental questions about ring particle characteristics, and individual and group behavior, appears to require close-proximity (a few km) observations. Saturn's magnificent example of a ring system offers a full range of particle sizes, densities, and behaviors for study, so it is a natural choice for such detailed investigation. Missions implementing these observations require post-approach Delta(V) of approximately 10 km/s or more, so past mission concepts called upon Nuclear Electric Propulsion. The concept described here reduces the propulsive Delta(V) requirement to as little as 3.5 km/s, difficult but not impossible for high-performance chemical propulsion systems. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Satellite Rings Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie clip (of which the release image is a still frame), taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft as it approached Jupiter, shows the motions, over a 16 hour-period, of two satellites embedded in Jupiter's ring. The moon Adrastea is the fainter of the two, and Metis the brighter. Images such as these will be used to refine the orbits of the two bodies.

    The movie was made from images taken during a 40-hour sequence of the Jovian ring on December 11, 2000.

    Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  13. Future of 34 meniscectomies after bucket-handle meniscus tear: a retrospective study with a follow-up over 22 years.

    PubMed

    Vautrin, Matthias; Schwartz, Claude

    2016-05-01

    After a bucket-handle meniscus tear, a partial meniscectomy by arthroscopy is recommended, when a meniscal suture is impossible. Short-term results of meniscectomy after bucket-handle meniscus tear, without cartilage or ligament additional injury, are mostly excellent: pain and blocking disappear, return to sports activities is possible. The aim of this retrospective study is to follow a partial meniscectomy evolution with a long follow-up between March 1990 and April 1994, and a senior surgeon operated 34 meniscectomies for bucket-handle meniscus tear by 34 patients (29 male and 5 female) with a mean age of 31.7 years (16-52 years) at time of surgery. The bucket-handle meniscus tear had a traumatic etiology on a knee with no cartilage lesion. The functional results were assessed by IKDC subjective score (International Knee Documentation Committee) and ARPEGE score (Association pour la Recherche et la Promotion de l'Etude du Genou). These scores were obtained by phone call questionnaire in March 2014 with a mean follow-up of 22.7 years (20-24 years). In this study, patients were reviewed and got a clinical examination to determine the Lequesne score, a radiological knee assessment according to Ahlbäck classification and a weight-bearing teleradiography. With an IKDC mean score of 85.8 after surgery, we observed that 29 patients go back to sports activities with the same level as before injury. The level of sports activity, with a regular practice after a mean follow-up of 22.7 years, was the same as immediately after surgery or just the level under for 85.3 % of patients. With ARPEGE score, 48.5 % of patients had a global excellent result and 38.2 % had a global good result after a long follow-up. With a mean Lequesne score of 2.38, osteoarthritis of knee is still clinical minimal after meniscectomy at long term. The score was worse after external meniscectomy (EM) than after an internal meniscectomy (IM). 57.7 % of patients have osteoarthritis on X

  14. Oligomeric ferrocene rings.

    PubMed

    Inkpen, Michael S; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J P; Winter, Rainer F; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category-differently sized rings comprising only 1,1'-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5-7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp-Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e(-) waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (∼10(7) s(-1)), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ∼1-2 nm). PMID:27554408

  15. Swarming rings of bacteria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, M. P.; Levitov, L. S.

    1996-03-01

    The behavior of bacterii controlled by chemotaxis can lead to a complicated spatial organization, producing swarming rings, and steady or moving aggregates( E. O. Budrene, and H. C. Berg, Complex patterns formed by motile cells of Escherichia coli. Nature 349, 630-633 (1991). ). We present a simple theory that explains the experimentally observed structures, by solving analytically two coupled differential equations, for the densities of bacterii and of chemoattractant. The equations have an interesting relation to the exactly solvable Burgers equation, and admit soliton-like solutions, that can be steady or moving. In addition, we find that there are singular solutions to the equations in which the bacterial density diverges. The theory agrees very well with the experiment: the solitons correspond to the observed travelling rings, the singularities describe formation of aggregates. In particular, the theory explains why the velocity of swarming rings decreases with the increase of the food concentration, the fact apparently not accounted by other existing approaches( L. Tsimring et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 75, 1859 (1995); Woodward, et al, Biophysical Journal, 68, 2181-2189 (1995). ).

  16. Comparing barrier algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Jordan, Harry F.

    1987-01-01

    A barrier is a method for synchronizing a large number of concurrent computer processes. After considering some basic synchronization mechanisms, a collection of barrier algorithms with either linear or logarithmic depth are presented. A graphical model is described that profiles the execution of the barriers and other parallel programming constructs. This model shows how the interaction between the barrier algorithms and the work that they synchronize can impact their performance. One result is that logarithmic tree structured barriers show good performance when synchronizing fixed length work, while linear self-scheduled barriers show better performance when synchronizing fixed length work with an imbedded critical section. The linear barriers are better able to exploit the process skew associated with critical sections. Timing experiments, performed on an eighteen processor Flex/32 shared memory multiprocessor, that support these conclusions are detailed.

  17. Comparing barrier algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Jordan, Harry F.

    1989-01-01

    A barrier is a method for synchronizing a large number of concurrent computer processes. After considering some basic synchronization mechanisms, a collection of barrier algorithms with either linear or logarithmic depth are presented. A graphical model is described that profiles the execution of the barriers and other parallel programming constructs. This model shows how the interaction between the barrier algorithms and the work that they synchronize can impact their performance. One result is that logarithmic tree structured barriers show good performance when synchronizing fixed length work, while linear self-scheduled barriers show better performance when synchronizing fixed length work with an imbedded critical section. The linear barriers are better able to exploit the process skew associated with critical sections. Timing experiments, performed on an eighteen processor Flex/32 shared memory multiprocessor that support these conclusions, are detailed.

  18. Uranus rings and two moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Voyager 2 has discovered two 'shepherd' satellites associated with the rings of Uranus. The two moons -- designated 1986U7 and 1986U8 -- are seen here on either side of the bright epsilon ring; all nine of the known Uranian rings are visible. The image was taken Jan. 21, 1986, at a distance of 4.1 million kilometers (2.5 million miles) and resolution of about 36 km (22 mi). The image was processed to enhance narrow features. The epsilon ring appears surrounded by a dark halo as a result of this processing; occasional blips seen on the ring are also artifacts. Lying inward from the epsilon ring are the delta, gamma and eta rings; then the beta and alpha rings; and finally the barely visible 4, 5 and 6 rings. The rings have been studied since their discovery in 1977, through observations of how they diminish the light of stars they pass in front of. This image is the first direct observation of all nine rings in reflected sunlight. They range in width from about 100 km (60 mi) at the widest part of the epsilon ring to only a few kilometers for most of the others. The discovery of the two ring moons 1986U7 and 1986U8 is a major advance in our understanding of the structure of the Uranian rings and is in good agreement with theoretical predictions of how these narrow rings are kept from spreading out. Based on likely surface brightness properties, the moons are of roughly 2O- and 3O-km diameter, respectively. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  19. New instability of Saturn's ring

    SciTech Connect

    Goertz, C.K.; Morfill, G.

    1988-05-01

    Perturbations in the Saturn ring's mass density are noted to be prone to instabilities through the sporadic elevation of submicron-size dust particles above the rings, which furnishes an effective angular momentum exchange between the rings and Saturn. The dust thus elevated from the ring settles back onto it at a different radial distance. The range of wavelength instability is determinable in light of the dust charge, the average radial displacement of the dust, and the fluctuation of these quantities. It is suggested that at least some of the B-ring's ringlets may arise from the instability.

  20. Planetary ring dynamics and morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Durisen, Richard H.; Shu, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for a moonlet belt in the region between Saturn's close-in moonrings Pandora and Prometheus is discussed. It is argued that little-known observations of magnetospheric electron density by Pioneer 11 imply substantial, ongoing injections of mass into the 2000 km region which surrounds the F ring. A hypothesis is presented that these events result naturally from interparticle collisions between the smaller members of an optically thin belt of moonlets. Also discussed is work on Uranus ring structure and photometry, image processing and analysis of the Jonian ring strucure, photometric and structural studies of the A ring of Saturn, and improvements to an image processing system for ring studies.

  1. New rings found around Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-10-01

    Images of Saturn taken by the Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera in September, with the Sun directly behind the planet, have revealed the existence of two new rings around the planet and have confirmed the presence of two other suspected rings, NASA announced on11 October. Two of the rings are associated with, and share the orbits of, one or more Saturn moonlets, and scientists expect to find a moonlet in at least one of the other two rings. Because the moonlets are so small, their gravity is too weak to retain material on their surfaces when struck by meteoroids, and this material creates diffuse rings along theirpaths.

  2. Mass of Saturn's A ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The mass of Saturn's A ring is reestimated using the behavior of spiral density waves embedded in the ring. The Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) observed the star delta-Scorpii as it was occulted by Saturn's rings during the Voyager 2 flyby of Saturn in 1981 producing a radial profile of the rings. We examined forty spiral density waves in the Voyager PPS data of the A ring including 10 weaker waves that have not been previously analyzed by means of an autoregressive power spectral technique called Burg. The strengths of this new method for ring studies are that weaker, less extended waves are easily detected and characterized. This method is also the first one which does not require precise knowledge of the resonance location and phase of the wave in order to calculate the surface mass density. Uncertainties of up to 3 km are present in the currently available radial scales for Saturn's rings.

  3. Development of Thermal Barriers For Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Joints in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors are sealed by O-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket that reach pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. To provide protection for the O-rings, the motors are insulated with either phenolic or rubber insulation. Gaps in the joints leading up to the O-rings are filled with polysulfide joint-fill compounds as an additional level of protection. The current RSRM nozzle-to-case joint design incorporating primary, secondary, and wiper O-rings experiences gas paths through the joint-fill compound to the innermost wiper O-ring in about one out of every seven motors. Although this does not pose a safety hazard to the motor, it is an undesirable condition that NASA and rocket manufacturer Thiokol want to eliminate. Each nozzle-to-case joint gas path results in extensive reviews and evaluation before flights can be resumed. Thiokol and NASA Marshall are currently working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design that has been used successfully in the field and igniter joint. They are also planning to incorporate the NASA Glenn braided carbon fiber thermal barrier into the joint. The thermal barrier would act as an additional level of protection for the O-rings and allow the elimination of the joint-fill compound from the joint.

  4. Tree Rings: Timekeepers of the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, R. L.; McGowan, J.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science issues, this booklet describes the uses of tree rings in historical and biological recordkeeping. Separate sections cover the following topics: dating of tree rings, dating with tree rings, tree ring formation, tree ring identification, sample collections, tree ring cross dating, tree…

  5. Clusters in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hvelplund, P.; Andersen, J. U.; Hansen, K.

    1999-01-15

    Anions of fullerenes and small metal clusters have been stored in the storage rings ASTRID and ELISA. Decays on a millisecond time scale are due to electron emission from metastable excited states. For the fullerenes the decay curves have been interpreted in terms of thermionic emission quenched by radiative cooling. The stored clusters were heated by a Nd:YAG laser resulting in increased emission rates. With an OPO laser this effect was used to study the wavelength dependence of the absorption of light in hot C{sub 60}{sup -} ion molecules.

  6. The Structure of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, J. E.; Nicholson, P. D.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Murray, C. D.; French, R. G.; Marouf, E. A.

    Our understanding of the structure of Saturn's rings has evolved steadily since their discovery by Galileo Galilei in 1610. With each advance in observations of the rings over the last four centuries, new structure has been revealed, starting with the recognition that the rings are a disk by Huygens in 1656 through discoveries of the broad organization of the main rings and their constituent gaps and ringlets to Cassini observations that indirectly reveal individual clumps of particles tens of meters in size. The variety of structure is as broad as the range in scales. The main rings have distinct characteristics on a spatial scale of 104 km that suggest dramatically different evolution and perhaps even different origins. On smaller scales, the A and C ring and Cassini Division are punctuated by gaps from tens to hundreds of kilometer across, while the B ring is littered with unexplained variations in optical depth on similar scales. Moons are intimately involved with much of the structure in the rings. The outer edges of the A and B rings are shepherded and sculpted by resonances with the Janus—Epimetheus coorbitals and Mimas, respectively. Density waves at the locations of orbital resonances with nearby and embedded moons make up the majority of large-scale features in the A ring. Moons orbiting within the Encke and Keeler gaps in the A ring create those gaps and produce wakes in the nearby ring. Other gaps and wave-like features await explanation. The largest ring particles, while not massive enough to clear a gap, produce localized propeller-shaped disturbances hundreds of meters long. Particles throughout the A and B rings cluster into strands or self-gravity wakes tens of meters across that are in equilibrium between gravitational accretion and Keplerian shear. In the peaks of strong density waves particles pile together in a cosmic traffic jam that results in kilometer-long strands that may be larger versions of self-gravity wakes. The F ring is a showcase

  7. Multilayer moisture barrier

    DOEpatents

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  8. The herring gull complex is not a ring species.

    PubMed Central

    Liebers, Dorit; de Knijff, Peter; Helbig, Andreas J.

    2004-01-01

    Under what circumstances speciation in sexually reproducing animals can occur without geographical disjunction is still controversial. According to the ring-species model, a reproductive barrier may arise through 'isolation by distance' when peripheral populations of a species meet after expanding around some uninhabitable barrier. The classical example of this kind of speciation is the herring gull (Larus argentatus) complex, with a circumpolar distribution in the Northern Hemisphere. Based on mitochondrial DNA variation among 21 gull taxa, we show that members of this complex differentiated largely in allopatry following multiple vicariance and long-distance-colonization events, not primarily through isolation by distance. Reproductive isolation evolved more rapidly between some lineages than between others, irrespective of their genetic distance. Extant taxa are the result of divergent as well as reticulate evolution between two ancestral lineages originally separated in a North Atlantic refugium and a continental Eurasian refugium, respectively. Continental birds expanded along the entire north Eurasian coast and via Beringia into North America. Contrary to the ring-species model, we find no genetic evidence for a closure of the circumpolar ring through colonization of Europe by North American herring gulls. However, closure of the ring in the opposite direction may be imminent, with lesser black-backed gulls about to colonize North America. PMID:15255043

  9. Practical estimates of field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of bedrock outcrops using a modified bottomless bucket method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Perkins, Kim S.

    2012-01-01

    The bottomless bucket (BB) approach (Nimmo et al., 2009a) is a cost-effective method for rapidly characterizing field-saturated hydraulic conductivity Kfs of soils and alluvial deposits. This practical approach is of particular value for quantifying infiltration rates in remote areas with limited accessibility. A similar approach for bedrock outcrops is also of great value for improving quantitative understanding of infiltration and recharge in rugged terrain. We develop a simple modification to the BB method for application to bedrock outcrops, which uses a non-toxic, quick-drying silicone gel to seal the BB to the bedrock. These modifications to the field method require only minor changes to the analytical solution for calculating Kfs on soils. We investigate the reproducibility of the method with laboratory experiments on a previously studied calcarenite rock and conduct a sensitivity analysis to quantify uncertainty in our predictions. We apply the BB method on both bedrock and soil for sites on Pahute Mesa, which is located in a remote area of the Nevada National Security Site. The bedrock BB tests may require monitoring over several hours to days, depending on infiltration rates, which necessitates a cover to prevent evaporative losses. Our field and laboratory results compare well to Kfs values inferred from independent reports, which suggests the modified BB method can provide useful estimates and facilitate simple hypothesis testing. The ease with which the bedrock BB method can be deployed should facilitate more rapid in-situ data collection than is possible with alternative methods for quantitative characterization of infiltration into bedrock.

  10. Empirical relationships between soil moisture, albedo, and the planetary boundary layer height: a two-layer bucket model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Z. M.; Papuga, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    In semiarid regions, where water resources are limited and precipitation dynamics are changing, understanding land surface-atmosphere interactions that regulate the coupled soil moisture-precipitation system is key for resource management and planning. We present a modeling approach to study soil moisture and albedo controls on planetary boundary layer height (PBLh). We used data from the Santa Rita Creosote Ameriflux site and Tucson Airport atmospheric sounding to generate empirical relationships between soil moisture, albedo and PBLh. We developed empirical relationships and show that at least 50% of the variation in PBLh can be explained by soil moisture and albedo. Then, we used a stochastically driven two-layer bucket model of soil moisture dynamics and our empirical relationships to model PBLh. We explored soil moisture dynamics under three different mean annual precipitation regimes: current, increase, and decrease, to evaluate at the influence on soil moisture on land surface-atmospheric processes. While our precipitation regimes are simple, they represent future precipitation regimes that can influence the two soil layers in our conceptual framework. For instance, an increase in annual precipitation, could impact on deep soil moisture and atmospheric processes if precipitation events remain intense. We observed that the response of soil moisture, albedo, and the PBLh will depend not only on changes in annual precipitation, but also on the frequency and intensity of this change. We argue that because albedo and soil moisture data are readily available at multiple temporal and spatial scales, developing empirical relationships that can be used in land surface - atmosphere applications are of great value.

  11. Orbits of nine Uranian rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, J. L.; French, R. G.; Frogel, J. A.; Elias, J. H.; Mink, D. J.; Liller, W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of a stellar occultation by Uranus and its nine rings are presented and used to examine the structures and kinematics of the rings. The observations of the occultation of the K giant star KM 12 were obtained in the K band with the 4-m CTIO telescope at a signal-to-noise ratio higher than any previously obtained. Ring occultation profiles reveal the alpha ring to possibly have a double structure and less abrupt boundaries than the gamma ring, which exhibits diffraction fringes, while the eta ring is a broad ring with an unresolved narrow component at its inner edge. The present timing data, as well as previous occultation timings, are fit to a kinematic model in which all nine rings are treated as coplanar eclipses of zero inclination, precessing due to the zonal harmonics of the Uranian gravitational potential to obtain solutions for the ring orbits. Analysis of the residuals from the fitted orbits reveals that the proposed model is a good representation of ring kinematics. The reference system defined by the orbit solutions has also been used to obtain a value of 0.022 + or - 0.003 for the ellipticity of Uranus and a Uranian rotation period of 15.5 h.

  12. Observational studies of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porco, Carolyn C.

    1987-01-01

    Several noteworthy phenomena in Saturn's rings were investigated which have until now received an inadequate amount of attention. Among these are the periodic variation of the spokes in the B ring and eccentric features throughout the rings. One of the major discoveries by Voyager was the existence of eccentric features within the predominantly circular rings of Saturn. Several of these nonaxisymmetric features are narrow elliptical rings which share many characteristics with the rings of Uranus. In recent work, two narrow ringlets were added to the list of eccentric features in the rings of Saturn. Voyager imaging and occultation data are now in hand, as well as image-processing software which allows accurate absolute positional measurements to be made in Voyager imaging data. Work is in progress to re-examine this region of Saturn's rings and to study the possibility of a dynamical interaction between the outer B ring edge, the Huygens ringlet and the nearby Mimas 2:1 resonance. An understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of this region promises to yield important clues to a matter of great interest in both theoretical and observation ring studies.

  13. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    PubMed Central

    Pasquino, Rossana; Vasilakopoulos, Thodoris C.; Jeong, Youn Cheol; Lee, Hyojoon; Rogers, Simon; Sakellariou, George; Allgaier, Jürgen; Takano, Atsushi; Brás, Ana R.; Chang, Taihyun; Gooßen, Sebastian; Pyckhout-Hintzen, Wim; Wischnewski, Andreas; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Richter, Dieter; Rubinstein, Michael; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/η0,ring=2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of rings viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1ring~ Z1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring~ Z1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/η0,ring~ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the- art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year old problem. PMID:26229737

  14. Bulk-barrier transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, H.; Mueller, R.; Beinvogl, W.

    1983-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented on a bulk-barrier transistor (BBT). In this device the charge-carrier transportation is determined by an energy barrier, which is located inside a semiconductor. The barrier is the result of a space-charge region in a three-layered n-p-n or p-n-p structure with a very thin middle layer. The height of the energy barrier, which is adjustable by technological parameters, can be controlled by an external voltage.

  15. Ring Image Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Ring Image Analyzer software analyzes images to recognize elliptical patterns. It determines the ellipse parameters (axes ratio, centroid coordinate, tilt angle). The program attempts to recognize elliptical fringes (e.g., Newton Rings) on a photograph and determine their centroid position, the short-to-long-axis ratio, and the angle of rotation of the long axis relative to the horizontal direction on the photograph. These capabilities are important in interferometric imaging and control of surfaces. In particular, this program has been developed and applied for determining the rim shape of precision-machined optical whispering gallery mode resonators. The program relies on a unique image recognition algorithm aimed at recognizing elliptical shapes, but can be easily adapted to other geometric shapes. It is robust against non-elliptical details of the image and against noise. Interferometric analysis of precision-machined surfaces remains an important technological instrument in hardware development and quality analysis. This software automates and increases the accuracy of this technique. The software has been developed for the needs of an R&TD-funded project and has become an important asset for the future research proposal to NASA as well as other agencies.

  16. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  17. Thermal Barrier/Seal for Extreme Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Phelps, Jack; Bauer, Paul; Bond, Bruce; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large solid rocket motors, as found on the Space Shuttle, are fabricated in segments for manufacturing considerations, bolted together, and sealed using conventional Viton O-ring seals. Similarly the nine large solid rocket motor nozzles are assembled from several different segments, bolted together, and sealed at six joint locations using conventional O-ring seals. The 5500 F combustion gases are generally kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic or rubber insulation. Joint-fill compounds, including RTV (room temperature vulcanized compound) and polysulfide filler, are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flow-path to the O-rings. Normally these two stages of protection are enough to prevent a direct flow-path of the 900-psi hot gases from reaching the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. However, in the current design 1 out of 15 Space Shuttle solid rocket motors experience hot gas effects on the Joint 6 wiper (sacrificial) O-rings. Also worrisome is the fact that joints have experienced heat effects on materials between the RTV and the O-rings, and in two cases O-rings have experienced heat effects. These conditions lead to extensive reviews of the post-flight conditions as part of the effort to monitor flight safety. We have developed a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier to replace the joint fill compounds in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzles to reduce the incoming 5500 F combustion gas temperature and permit only cool (approximately 100 F) gas to reach the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. Implementation of this thermal barrier provides more robust, consistent operation with shorter turn around times between Shuttle launches.

  18. Spiral waves in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    1989-01-01

    Spiral density waves and spiral bending waves have been observed at dozens of locations within Saturn's rings. These waves are excited by resonant gravitational perturbations from moons orbiting outside the ring system. Modeling of spiral waves yields the best available estimates for the mass and the thickness of Saturn's ring system. Angular momentum transport due to spiral density waves may cause significant orbital evolution of Saturn's rings and inner moons. Similar angular momentum transfer may occur in other astrophysical systems such as protoplanetary disks, binary star systems with disks and spiral galaxies with satellites.

  19. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.

    For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.

    The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.

    This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).

    Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science

  20. Gravitomagnetic field of rotating rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the so-called gravitoelectromagnetic formalism, according to which the equations of the gravitational field can be written in analogy with classical electromagnetism, we study the gravitomagnetic field of a rotating ring, orbiting around a central body. We calculate the gravitomagnetic component of the field, both in the intermediate zone between the ring and the central body, and far away from the ring and central body. We evaluate the impact of the gravitomagnetic field on the motion of test particles and, as an application, we study the possibility of using these results, together with the Solar System ephemeris, to infer information on the spin of ring-like structures.

  1. Images of Jupiter's Sulfur Ring.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, C B

    1980-01-11

    Images of the ring of singly ionized sulfur encircling Jupiter obtained on two successive nights in April 1979 show that the ring characteristics may change dramatically in approximately 24 hours. On the first night the ring was narrow and confined to the magnetic equator inside Io's orbit. On the second it was confined symmetrically about the centrifugal symmetry surface and showed considerable radial structure, including a "fan" extending to Io's orbit. Many of the differences in the ring on the two nights can be explained in terms of differences in sulfur plasma temperature. PMID:17809102

  2. Formation of lunar basin rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, C.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the multiple concentric rings that characterize lunar impact basins, and the probable depth and diameter of the transient crater have been widely debated. As an alternative to prevailing "megaterrace" hypotheses, we propose that the outer scarps or mountain rings that delineate the topographic rims of basins-the Cordilleran at Orientale, the Apennine at Imbrium, and the Altai at Nectaris-define the transient cavities, enlarged relatively little by slumping, and thus are analogous to the rim crests of craters like Copernicus; inner rings are uplifted rims of craters nested within the transient cavity. The magnitude of slumping that occurs on all scarps is insufficient to produce major inner rings from the outer. These conclusions are based largely on the observed gradational sequence in lunar central uplifts:. from simple peaks through somewhat annular clusters of peaks, peak and ring combinations and double ring basins, culminating in multiring structures that may also include peaks. In contrast, belts of slump terraces are not gradational with inner rings. Terrestrial analogs suggest two possible mechanisms for producing rings. In some cases, peaks may expand into rings as material is ejected from their cores, as apparently occurred at Gosses Bluff, Australia. A second process, differential excavation of lithologically diverse layers, has produced nested experimental craters and is, we suspect, instrumental in the formation of terrestrial ringed impact craters. Peak expansion could produce double-ring structures in homogeneous materials, but differential excavation is probably required to produce multiring and peak-in-ring configurations in large lunar impact structures. Our interpretation of the representative lunar multiring basin Orientale is consistent with formation of three rings in three layers detected seismically in part of the Moon-the Cordillera (basin-bounding) ring in the upper crust, the composite Montes Rook ring in the underlying

  3. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOEpatents

    Sammel, Alfred G.

    1996-01-01

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  4. Ground Movement in SSRL Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

  5. Assessing barriers to immunization.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, Victoria; Ferris, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Parental barriers to childhood immunizations vary among countries, states and communities. There is a plethora of studies that exist to examine barriers to immunizations including many intervention studies designed to improve immunization rates in children. Often, intervention studies designed to minimize barriers and increase immunization uptake among children lack the inclusion of a standardized instrument to measure accurately parental barriers to childhood immunizations before and after interventions. The Searching for Hardships and Obstacles To Shots (SHOTS) survey is a standardized survey instrument to measure parental barriers to childhood immunizations. In several studies, the SHOTS survey has demonstrated consistent reliability and has been validated in diverse populations. The inclusion of the SHOTS survey instrument in studies to examine barriers to childhood immunization will provide researchers and clinicians with a better understanding of parents' individualized barriers to immunizations. Furthermore, use of the SHOTS survey instrument to collect information about parental barriers to immunizations can lead to targeted interventions to minimize these obstacles at the individual and community level and to help us to achieve our national, state and community childhood immunization goals. PMID:26810618

  6. Penetration resistant barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, William R.; Mead, Keith E.; Street, Henry K.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a barrier for resisting penetration by such as hand tools and oxy-acetylene cutting torches. The barrier comprises a layer of firebrick, which is preferably epoxy impregnated sandwiched between inner and outer layers of steel. Between the firebrick and steel are layers of resilient rubber-like filler.

  7. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  8. Regeneration of ring-shaped lateral meniscus after partial resection of discoid meniscus with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction☆

    PubMed Central

    Soejima, Takashi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Tabuchi, Kousuke; Noguchi, Kouji; Inoue, Takashi; Murakami, Hidetaka

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The ring-shaped lateral meniscus is very rare. Although it is essentially known as a congenital anomaly, a central tear in an incomplete discoid meniscus or an old bucket-handle tear in a meniscus may be easily mistaken for a ring-shaped meniscus. We experienced a ring-shaped lateral meniscus that regenerated after partial resection of a discoid meniscus together with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 37-year-old female patient still experienced unrelenting knee pain 6 months after ACL reconstruction and partial meniscectomy of a discoid lateral meniscus. A repeat arthroscopy was performed. The lateral tibial plateau was covered in the form of a ring by meniscus-like tissue. The meniscus-like tissue appeared to have regenerated inward toward the center from the stump after the partial meniscectomy and was connected from the anterior to posterior horn, forming an interhorn bridge. Partial meniscectomy was repeated. Histologically, the regenerated tissue was not meniscal, but comprised mature fibrocartilage; macroscopically; however, it was very similar to meniscal tissue. Two years after the initial operation, the patient had no complaints and experienced full return of function. DISCUSSION The reason for such regeneration is unknown, but may have been attributed to the specific intra-articular environment that developed after the ACL reconstruction. CONCLUSION This is the first report of regenerative development of a ring-shaped lateral meniscus. When a ring-shaped lateral meniscus is diagnosed, we must accurately determine whether it is a true congenital anomaly in consideration of the present case. PMID:24240076

  9. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  10. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  11. Black ring deconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gimon, Eric; Gimon, Eric G.; Levi, Thomas S.

    2007-06-22

    We present a sample microstate for a black ring in four and five dimensional language. The microstate consists of a black string microstate with an additional D6-brane. We show that with an appropriate choice of parameters the piece involving the black string microstate falls down a long AdS throat, whose M-theory lift is AdS_3 x S2. We wrap a spinning dipole M2-brane on the S2 in the probe approximation. In IIA, this corresponds to a dielectric D2-brane carrying only D0-charge. We conjecture this is the firstapproximation to a cloud of D0-branes blowing up due to their non-abelian degrees of freedom and the Myers effect.

  12. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Silchenko, O.; Sokoloff, D.; Horellou, C.; Beck, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. The investigation of these magnetic fields can be helpful for understanding galactic evolution; however, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Aims: Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. Methods: We use tested methods for modelling α-Ω galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Results: Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513, where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers in such counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration that is unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. Conclusions: We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes, and evolution.

  13. Spectroscopic and Ab Initio Determination of the Ring-Twisting Potential Energy Function for 1,3-Cyclohexadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrey, Daniel; Choo, Jaebum; Laane, Jaan

    2000-10-01

    The ring-twisting vibration of 1,3-cyclohexadiene has been studied using Raman and infrared spectroscopy of the molecule in the vapor phase. The Raman spectrum shows five ring-twisting transitions in the 150 - 200 cm-1 region. The far-infrared spectrum shows only two transitions for this vibration, which is infrared forbidden in the C_2v (planar) approximation. Three ring-twisting combination bands were also observed off a fundamental vibration at 926.1 cm-1. A coordinate dependent kinetic energy expansion for the ring-twisting motion was calculated, and this was used to determine the ring-twisting potential function. Ab initio calculations were performed using Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) using different basis sets. The barrier to planarity of 1150 cm-1 was determined from the spectroscopic data. The various ab initio calculations gave barriers to planarity in the 1197 - 1593 cm-1 range.

  14. Implementation of a Non-Metallic Barrier in an Electric Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    M?Sadoques, George; Carra, Michael; Beringer, Woody

    2012-01-01

    Electric motors that run in pure oxygen must be sealed, or "canned," for safety reasons to prevent the oxygen from entering into the electrical portion of the motor. The current canning process involves designing a metallic barrier around the rotor to provide the separation. This metallic barrier reduces the motor efficiency as speed is increased. In higher-speed electric motors, efficiency is greatly improved if a very thin, nonmetallic barrier can be utilized. The barrier thickness needs to be approximately 0.025-in. (.0.6-mm) thick and can be made of a brittle material such as glass. The motors, however, designed for space applications are typically subject to high-vibration environments. A fragile, non-metallic barrier can be utilized in a motor assembly if held in place by a set of standard rubber O-ring seals. The O-rings provide the necessary sealing to keep oxygen away from the electrical portion of the motor and also isolate the fragile barrier from the harsh motor vibration environment. The compliance of the rubber O-rings gently constrains the fragile barrier and isolates it from the harsh external motor environment. The use of a non-metallic barrier greatly improves motor performance, especially at higher speeds, while isolating the electronics from the working fluid with an inert liner.

  15. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified

  16. Engineered Barrier Testing at the INEEL Engineered Barriers Test Facility: FY-1997 and FY-1999

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, K. N.; Porro, I.

    1998-09-01

    Engineered barriers of two designs are being tested at the Engineered Barriers Test Facility (EBTF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report describes the test facility, barrier designs, and instruments used to monitor the test plots. Wetting tests conducted on the test plots in FY-97 are described and data collected from monitoring the test plots before, during and after the wetting tests are used to evaluate the performance of the covers during FY-97 and FY-98. Replicates of two engineered barrier designs were constructed in the EBTF cells. The first design comprises a thick, vegetated soil cover. The second design incorporates a capillary/biobarrier within the vegtated soil cover. The capillary barrier uses the textural break between an upper, fine textured soil and a lower, coarser-textured gravel layer to inhibit drainage under unsaturated conditions while increasing soil moisture storage in the root zone. Evaporation and transpiration by plants (although the test plots have not yet been vegetated) are used to recycle water stored in the soil back to the atmosphere. A geotextile fabric is used to maintain separation of the soil and gravel layers. A thick layer of cobbles beneath the gravel layer serves as a biobarrier to prevent intrusion of plant roots and burrowing animals into underlying waste (there is no waste in the test plots). Each test plot was instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes and neutron probe access tubes to measure moisture contents, tensiometers, heat dissipation sensors, and thermocouple psychrometers to measure matric potentials, thermocouples to measure soil temperature, and ion-exchange resin beads to monitor tracer movement. Each drainage sump is equipped with a tipping bucket instrument and pressure transducer to measure drainage. Precipitation is measured using a heated rain gauge located at the EBTF. Instrument calibration equation coefficients are presented, and data reduction

  17. Provenance and composition of unusually chrome and nickel-rich bucket-shaped pottery from Rogaland (southwestern Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Udo; Kristoffersen, Elna Siv; Fredriksen, Per Ditlef; Bertolino, Silvana A. R.; Andò, Sergio; Bersani, Danilo

    2016-05-01

    We report results from FE-SEM-EDS, geochemical, mineralogical analyses and Raman spectroscopy of pottery of bucket-shaped ceramic from Rogaland (southwestern Norway) dated between the 5th and 6th Century. The study reveals a very rare pottery composition including asbestos-group minerals and an unusual enrichment in compatible elements like Cr (8-27 × Post Archean average shale (PAS), McLennan et al., 2006), Ni (2-8 × normal shale) and Co (2-3 × PAS). X-Rray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy could pinpoint that Ni is introduced by specific Ni-rich talc mineral and chlorite minerals and Cr occurs in a rare Cr-rich talc, and possibly in a Cr-chlorite, these minerals are the most abundant in the pottery, which is supported by strong enrichment in Mg (10-20 × PAS). The addition of Mg, Cr, Ni and Co and other compatible trace elements is to our current knowledge not caused by anthropogenic activity but related to the used materials, which are alteration products of mafic and ultramafic rocks or genetically related to mafic and ultramafic rocks. Rocks of this type are exposed in vicinity of the sampling areas in a region called Karmøy, hosting a world famous ophiolite complex, which is identified as the major source for the mafic and ultramafic component, as the next succession of a similar composition is far further north located in Norway and a number of rock types on Karmøy matches the chemical composition of the pottery. The here reported composition is spectacular and extremely rare - if ever found - in pottery. Our study shows that unusual material sources have been used in pottery production, and this opens for discussion whether the materials were deliberately selected by the manufacturers, thereby expressing a specific social function, in a time period where more functional clay types and additives, and certainly functional and sufficient for use in pottery, where abundant in areas of Rogaland closer to where the pots were found.

  18. Running Rings Around the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Irene E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development and current status of WebRing, a service that links related Web sites into a central hub. Discusses it as a viable alternative to other search engines and examines issues of free speech, use by the business sector, and implications for WebRing after its purchase by Yahoo! (LRW)

  19. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  20. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  1. How Jupiter's Ring Was Discovered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, James; Kerr, Richard

    1985-01-01

    "Rings" (by astronomer James Elliot and science writer Richard Kerr) is a nontechnical book about the discovery and exploration of ring systems from the time of Galileo to the era of the Voyager spacecraft. One of this book's chapters is presented. (JN)

  2. Particle Motion Near a Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheeres, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamics of a particle moving near a classical ring is studied under a Hill-type approximation. A classical ring is comprised of particles of equal mass arranged symmetrically about a massive central body, the particles having a uniform rotation rate.

  3. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper. 2 tabs.

  4. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment, and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  5. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  6. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; Wowczuk, Andrew; Vellenoweth, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

  7. Uranus rings - An optical search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The discovery of rings surrounding Uranus has prompted reexamination of telescopic observations made a year ago with a solid-state area detector called a charge-coupling device (CCD). The extreme narrowness of the rings apparently caused them to be hidden in glare from the planet, the reflectivity of which is very high in the blue and green regions of the spectrum. However, Uranus appears as a much darker image in the near-infrared spectral regions detected by the CCD. Although no direct evidence of the rings is obtainable from the CCD images, some simplifying assumptions permit the deduction from the CCD data that average reflectivity of individual particles composing the rings is at most a few percent, much closer to that of carbonaceous chondritic material than to that of the ice-coated particles in Saturn's rings.

  8. Highway noise barrier perceived benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. N.; Osman, M. M.

    1980-05-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed in which 82 subjects judged the benefit of a noise barrier by listening to tape recordings of before-barrier and after-barrier traffic noise. These perceived benefit judgments were related by regression analysis to the barrier attenuation, the before-barrier traffic sound level, and a music background level, all of which were varied over the course of the experiment. Prediction equations were developed for barrier benefit in terms of these sound levels, their purpose being to provide a model for barrier benefit that can be used in barrier site selection and design. An unexpected finding was that barrier benefit was highest when before-barrier sound levels were lowest: i.e., subjects preferred a noise barrier that solved a moderate noise problem over an equally-attenuating barrier that only partially solved a more severe noise problem.

  9. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An infrared detector having a hole barrier region adjacent to one side of an absorber region, an electron barrier region adjacent to the other side of the absorber region, and a semiconductor adjacent to the electron barrier.

  10. Evaluation of the two-photon absorption characteristics of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings

    SciTech Connect

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R.; Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A.

    2014-07-28

    The optical parameters describing the sub-bandgap response of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings solar cells have been obtained from photocurrent measurements using a modulated pseudo-monochromatic light source in combination with a second, continuous photo-filling source. By controlling the charge state of the quantum rings, the photoemission cross-sections describing the two-photon sub-bandgap transitions could be determined independently. Temperature dependent photo-response measurements also revealed that the barrier for thermal hole emission from the quantum rings is significantly below the quantum ring localisation energy. The temperature dependence of the sub-bandgap photo-response of the solar cell is also described in terms of the photo- and thermal-emission characteristics of the quantum rings.

  11. Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce heat transfer between a hot gas heat source and a metallic engine component, a thermal insulating layer of material is placed between them. This thermal barrier coating is applied by plasma spray processing the thin films. The coating has been successfully employed in aerospace applications for many years. Lewis Research Center, a leader in the development engine components coating technology, has assisted Caterpillar, Inc. in applying ceramic thermal barrier coatings on engines. Because these large engines use heavy fuels containing vanadium, engine valve life is sharply decreased. The barrier coating controls temperatures, extends valve life and reduces operating cost. Additional applications are currently under development.

  12. Attraction of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) and nontarget insects to methyl eugenol bucket traps with different preservative fluids on Oahu Island, Hawaiian Islands.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Grant K; Mackey, Bruce E; McInnis, Donald O; Vargas, Roger I

    2007-06-01

    Attraction of oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), and nontarget insects to preservative fluids ethylene glycol antifreeze, propylene glycol antifreeze, or mineral oil in bucket traps that contained captured decaying male oriental fruit flies, a male lure (methyl eugenol), and a toxicant (DDVP vapor insecticidal strip) were compared with dry control traps. Significantly (P < 0.05) greater numbers of B. dorsalis were captured in propylene glycol antifreeze traps than in other attractant trap types. Among attractant trap types with lowest negative impacts on nontarget insects, control traps captured significantly lower numbers of three species and one morphospecies of scavenger flies, one species of plant-feeding fly, and one species each of sweet-and lipid-feeding ants. Mineral oil traps captured significantly lower numbers of two species of scavengers flies and one morphospecies of plant-feeding fly, and one species of sweet-feeding ant. Because of the fragile nature of endemic Hawaiian insect fauna, the propylene glycol antifreeze bucket trap is best suited for use in environments (e.g., non-native habitats) where endemic species are known to be absent and mineral oil traps are more suited for minimizing insect captures in environmentally sensitive habitats. PMID:17598531

  13. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  14. Paint Bucket Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Michael Todd; Harper, Suzanne R.

    2010-01-01

    During a two-week summer professional development workshop, teams of intermediate-level school teachers and college methods instructors crafted mathematics learning modules--activities, lesson plans, work sheets, and technology-oriented tasks--with the primary goal of strengthening students' understanding of various geometric concepts. They recast…

  15. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Methane Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chong; Fridman, Alexander; Rabinovich, Alexander; Dobrynin, Danil

    2015-09-01

    With the large amount of nature gas discovery every year, there is an increasing interest on modification of methane. The fact that methane is gaseous makes it less economic and efficient than liquid fuel. Here we propose a new way of converting methane from gas phase to liquid phase. Dielectric barrier discharge is used to treat methane and nitrogen mixture bubbles inside of liquid fuel. Nitrogen is here to help activate methane into an excited state, then it is possible for the excited molecules to react with other liquid hydrocarbon. Gaseous methane is converted in to liquid phase when excited methane replace a hydrogen and add onto the carbon chain. In this study some preliminary experiments is done to verify this hypothesis. There is equivalent weight increases with methane and nitrogen mixture discharging in diesel when compare to only nitrogen discharging in diesel. The same experiment have also been done with gas mixture discharged in 1-methylnaphthalene. And FTIR analysis of the after treatment hydrocarbon liquid all indicates that there is an increasing in C-H bond concentration and a decreasing in phenyl ring structure.

  16. Ring Buffered Network Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the research effort to demonstrate the integration of a data sharing technology, Ring Buffered Network Bus, in development by Dryden Flight Research Center, with an engine simulation application, the Java Gas Turbine Simulator, in development at the University of Toledo under a grant from the Glenn Research Center. The objective of this task was to examine the application of the RBNB technologies as a key component in the data sharing, health monitoring and system wide modeling elements of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AVSP) [Golding, 1997]. System-wide monitoring and modeling of aircraft and air safety systems will require access to all data sources which are relative factors when monitoring or modeling the national airspace such as radar, weather, aircraft performance, engine performance, schedule and planning, airport configuration, flight operations, etc. The data sharing portion of the overall AVSP program is responsible for providing the hardware and software architecture to access and distribute data, including real-time flight operations data, among all of the AVSP elements. The integration of an engine code capable of numerically "flying" through recorded flight paths and weather data using a software tool that allows for distributed access of data to this engine code demonstrates initial steps toward building a system capable of monitoring and modeling the National Airspace.

  17. The Ring Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the sharpest view yet of the most famous of all planetary nebulae, the Ring Nebula (M57). In this October 1998 image, the telescope has looked down a barrel of gas cast off by a dying star thousands of years ago. This photo reveals elongated dark clumps of material embedded in the gas at the edge of the nebula; the dying central star floating in a blue haze of hot gas. The nebula is about a light-year in diameter and is located some 2,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Lyra. The colors are approximately true colors. The color image was assembled from three black-and-white photos taken through different color filters with the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Blue isolates emission from very hot helium, which is located primarily close to the hot central star. Green represents ionized oxygen, which is located farther from the star. Red shows ionized nitrogen, which is radiated from the coolest gas, located farthest from the star. The gradations of color illustrate how the gas glows because it is bathed in ultraviolet radiation from the remnant central star, whose surface temperature is a white-hot 216,000 degrees Fahrenheit (120,000 degrees Celsius).

  18. Information barriers and authentication.

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D. W.; Wolford, J. K.

    2001-01-01

    Acceptance of nuclear materials into a monitoring regime is complicated if the materials are in classified shapes or have classified composition. An attribute measurement system with an information barrier can be emplo,yed to generate an unclassified display from classified measurements. This information barrier must meet two criteria: (1) classified information cannot be released to the monitoring party, and (2) the monitoring party must be convinced that the unclassified output accurately represents the classified input. Criterion 1 is critical to the host country to protect the classified information. Criterion 2 is critical to the monitoring party and is often termed the 'authentication problem.' Thus, the necessity for authentication of a measurement system with an information barrier stems directly from the description of a useful information barrier. Authentication issues must be continually addressed during the entire development lifecycle of the measurement system as opposed to being applied only after the system is built.

  19. Barrier Island Hazard Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkey, Orrin H.; Neal, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes efforts to evaluate and map the susceptibility of barrier islands to damage from storms, erosion, rising sea levels and other natural phenomena. Presented are criteria for assessing the safety and hazard potential of island developments. (WB)

  20. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  1. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a

  2. Edge-on Look at Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronomers are studying the unusual appearance of Saturn's rings. The top portion of this Hubble Space Telescope snapshot shows Saturn with its rings barely visible. Normally, astronomers see Saturn with its rings tilted, but because the Earth was almost in the plane of Saturn's rings, they appear edge-on. Positioned above the ring plane, the Sun is causing the rings to cast a shadow on Saturn. The bottom photograph shows Saturn with its rings slightly tilted, and displays a faint narrow ring, the F-ring, just outside the main ring, which is normally invisible from Earth. The moon called Dion, on the lower right, is casting a long, thin shadow across the whole ring system due to the setting of the sun on the ring plane.

  3. Particle properties and processes in Uranus' rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Brahic, A.; Burns, J. A.; Marouf, Essam A.

    1991-01-01

    The particle properties and processes in the Uranian rings are analyzed from Voyager observations and ground-based data. Occultation observations of the epsilon ring are interpreted to yield an effective size of the ring particles that exceeds 70 cm, a surface mass density that exceeds 80 g/sq cm, and a ring vertical thickness greater than tens of meters for solid ice particles. The particles forming the classic rings are dark and gray, with albedo of 0.014 +/-0.004. It is argued that the small amount of dust that exists in the classical rings and between the rings in bands is created by erosion of ring particles and unseen satellites resulting from collisions and micrometeoroid bombardment. As proposed for regions of the other known ring systems, new ring material can be continually created by the destruction of small moons near the rings, which may explain the youthful appearance of the Uranian rings.

  4. Modeling piston-ring dynamics, blowby, and ring-twist effects

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, T.; Noordzij, L.B.; Wong, V.W.; Heywood, J.B.

    1996-12-31

    A ring-dynamics and gas-flow model has been developed to study ring/groove contact, blowby, and the influence of ring static twist, keystone ring/groove configurations, and other piston and ring parameters. The model is developed for a ring pack with three rings. The dynamics of the top two rings and the gas pressures in the regions above the oil control ring are simulated. Distributions of oil film thickness and surface roughness on the groove and ring surfaces are assumed in the model to calculate the forces generated by the ring/groove contact. Ring static and dynamic twists are considered as well as different keystone ring/groove configurations. Ring dynamics and gas flows are coupled in the formulation and an implicit scheme is implemented, enabling the model to resolve detailed events such as ring flutter. Studies on a spark ignition engine found that static twist or, more generally speaking, the relative angle between rings and their grooves, has great influence on ring/groove contact characteristics, ring stability, and blowby. Ring flutter is found to occur for the second ring with a negative static twist under normal operating conditions and for the top ring with a negative static twist under high-speed/low-load operating conditions. Studies on a diesel engine show that different keystone ring/groove configurations result in different twist behaviors of the ring that may affect the wear pattern of the keystone ring running surfaces.

  5. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; McQueen, Miles A.

    1996-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests stable in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use.

  6. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

    1996-04-16

    A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

  7. Ring-Ringlet Interactions in Saturn's C Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, N. J.

    1997-01-01

    The overall obejective of this work is to derive a theoretical model for the formation of gaps harboring isolated ringlets in order to explain the presence of such features in Saturn's C ring and Cassini division.

  8. Voyager 2 and the Uranian rings

    SciTech Connect

    Porco, C.C.

    1986-12-01

    Voyager 2 data on the Uranian disk system are presented and examined. The disk system consists of nine narrow rings, ranging in width from a few km to about 100 km. The Uranian rings are eccentric, inclined to the planet's equatorial plane, and precessing. The Uranian ring characteristics detected in the Voyager data are described and compared with those of the Saturn rings. The origin and maintenance of the rings are discussed, and the particle distribution in the ring system is studied.

  9. Treatment of Unstable Pelvic Ring Injuries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic fractures are classified according to the stability of the pelvic ring. Unlike stable pelvic fractures, which heal without complications, unstable fractures may lead to pelvic ring deformities, which cause severe complications. An orthopedic surgeon must determine the stability of the pelvic ring by radiography and physical examination of the patient in order to ensure early, prompt treatment. This article includes anatomy of the pelvic ring, classification of pelvic ring injuries, its treatment algorithm, and corresponding cases involving unstable pelvic ring injury.

  10. Electromagnetic effects on planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Morfill, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The role of electromagnetic effects in planetary rings is reviewed. The rings consist of a collection of solid particles with a size spectrum ranging from submicron to 10's of meters (at least in the case of Saturn's rings). Due to the interaction with the ambient plasma, and solar UV radiation, the particles carry electrical charges. Interactions of particles with the planetary electromagnetic field, both singly and collectively, are described, as well as the reactions and influence on plasma transients. The latter leads to a theory for the formation of Saturn's spokes, which is briefly reviewed.

  11. Researches on the Piston Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehihara, Keikiti

    1944-01-01

    In internal combustion engines, steam engines, air compressors, and so forth, the piston ring plays an important role. Especially, the recent development of Diesel engines which require a high compression pressure for their working, makes, nowadays, the packing action of the piston ring far more important than ever. Though a number of papers have been published in regard to researches on the problem of the piston ring, none has yet dealt with an exact measurement of pressure exerted on the cylinder wall at any given point of the ring. The only paper that can be traced on this subject so far is Mr. Nakagawa's report on the determination of the relative distribution of pressure on the cylinder wall, but the measuring method adopted therein appears to need further consideration. No exact idea has yet been obtained as to how the obturation of gas between the piston and cylinder, the frictional resistance of the piston, and the wear of the cylinder wall are affected by the intensity and the distribution of the radial pressure of the piston ring. Consequently, the author has endeavored, by employing an apparatus of his own invention, to get an exact determination of the pressure distribution of the piston ring. By means of a newly devised ring tester, to which piezoelectricity of quartz was applied, the distribution of the radial pressure of many sample rings on the market was accurately determined. Since many famous piston rings show very irregular pressure distribution, the author investigated and achieved a manufacturing process of the piston ring which will exert uniform pressure on the cylinder wall. Temperature effects on the configuration and on the mean spring power have also been studied. Further, the tests were performed to ascertain how the gas tightness of the piston ring may be affected by the number or spring power. The researches as to the frictional resistance between the piston ring and the cylinder wall were carried out, too. The procedure of study, and

  12. HESYRL storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Pang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, H.; Zhang, Z.; Jiang, D.; Xu, B.; Xu, S.

    1988-09-30

    The Storage Ring Vacuum System of the Synchrotron Radiation source project of HESYRL (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory) in USTC, Hefei, Anhui, China, will be completed this year. Since the designed beam current of the 800 MeV electron storage ring is 300 mA, synchrotron radiation and hence high photon stimulated degassing will occur in the vacuum chamber. In order to get the stored beam lifetime of several hours, the pressure must be maintained at 10/sup -8/ approx.10/sup -9/ Torr. The gas desorption from synchrotron radiation and thermal outgas has been calculated. The UHV system of the storage ring and vacuum pretreatment methods are described in this paper.

  13. New concepts for damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Wolski, A.

    2002-05-30

    The requirements for very low emittance and short damping time in the damping rings of future linear colliders, naturally lead to very small beta functions and dispersion in the ring arcs. This makes it difficult to make chromatic correction while maintaining good dynamics. We have therefore developed a lattice with very simple arcs (designed to give the best product of emittance and damping time), and with separate chromatic correction in a dedicated section. The chromatic correction is achieved using a series of non-interleaved sextupole pairs. The performance of such a solution is comparable to that of current damping ring designs, while there are a number of potential advantages.

  14. Ladder supported ring bar circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An improved slow wave circuit especially useful in backward wave oscillators includes a slow wave circuit in a waveguide. The slow wave circuit is comprised of rings disposed between and attached to respective stubs. The stubs are attached to opposing sidewalls of the waveguide. To the end that opposed, interacting magnetic fields will be established to provide a very high coupling impedance for the slow wave structure, axially orientated bars are connected between rings in alternate spaces and adjacent to the attachment points of stubs. Similarly, axial bars are connected between rings in the spaces which do not include bars and at points adjacent to the attachment of bars.

  15. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Mark A.

    1985-01-01

    A laser pulse is injected into an unstable ring resonator-amplifier structure. Inside this resonator the laser pulse is amplified, spatially filtered and magnified. The laser pulse is recirculated in the resonator, being amplified, filtered and magnified on each pass. The magnification is chosen so that the beam passes through the amplifier in concentric non-overlapping regions similar to a single pass MOPA. After a number of passes around the ring resonator the laser pulse is spatially large enough to exit the ring resonator system by passing around an output mirror.

  16. Codes over infinite family of rings : Equivalence and invariant ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwansyah, Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan; Muchlis, Ahmad; Barra, Aleams; Suprijanto, Djoko

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we study codes over the ring Bk=𝔽pr[v1,…,vk]/(vi2=vi,∀i =1 ,…,k ) . For instance, we focus on two topics, i.e. characterization of the equivalent condition between two codes over Bk using a Gray map into codes over finite field 𝔽pr, and finding generators for invariant ring of Hamming weight enumerator for Euclidean self-dual codes over Bk.

  17. On the dust ring current of Saturn's F-ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. R.; Mendis, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The thin F-ring of Saturn, which is well within the corotating portion of the Saturnian magnetosphere, has been shown by Voyager 1 and 2 observations to be largely composed of small dust grains. Mendis et al. (1982) have argued that with plausible values of the ambient plasma density and temperature near the F-ring, these grains will be charged to around -40 volts. Mendis et al. have shown that within the corotating portion of the magnetosphere such negatively charged grains can move in circular orbits in the equatorial plane. In connection with a relative motion between the negatively charged grains and the corotating positive ions, the F-ring constitutes a ring current. The present investigation has the objective to calculate this current and to show that it would significantly alter the magnetospheric dipole field in the vicinity of the ring. A current of approximately 12,0000 A is obtained. The change in the magnetic field produced by the current could be measured by a spacecraft approaching to within 100 km above or below the F-ring plane.

  18. 21 CFR 870.3800 - Annuloplasty ring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. An annuloplasty ring is a rigid or flexible ring implanted around the mitral or tricuspid heart valve for reconstructive treatment of valvular insufficiency. (b) Classification. Class II...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3800 - Annuloplasty ring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. An annuloplasty ring is a rigid or flexible ring implanted around the mitral or tricuspid heart valve for reconstructive treatment of valvular insufficiency. (b) Classification. Class II...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3800 - Annuloplasty ring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. An annuloplasty ring is a rigid or flexible ring implanted around the mitral or tricuspid heart valve for reconstructive treatment of valvular insufficiency. (b) Classification. Class II...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3800 - Annuloplasty ring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. An annuloplasty ring is a rigid or flexible ring implanted around the mitral or tricuspid heart valve for reconstructive treatment of valvular insufficiency. (b) Classification. Class II...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3800 - Annuloplasty ring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. An annuloplasty ring is a rigid or flexible ring implanted around the mitral or tricuspid heart valve for reconstructive treatment of valvular insufficiency. (b) Classification. Class II...

  3. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA) , Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (LAOG) and the DESPA and DASGAL laboratories of the Observatoire de Paris in France, in collaboration with ESO. The CONICA infra-red camera was built, under an ESO contract, by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) (Heidelberg) and the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) (Garching) in Germany, in collaboration with ESO. Saturn - Lord of the rings ESO PR Photo 04a/02 ESO PR Photo 04a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 460 x 400 pix - 54k] [Normal - JPEG: 1034 x 800 pix - 200k] Caption : PR Photo 04a/02 shows the giant planet Saturn, as observed with the VLT NAOS-CONICA Adaptive Optics instrument on December 8, 2001; the distance was 1209 million km. It is a composite of exposures in two near-infrared wavebands (H and K) and displays well the intricate, banded structure of the planetary atmosphere and the rings. Note also the dark spot at the south pole at the bottom of the image. One of the moons, Tethys, is visible as a small point of light below the planet. It was used to guide the telescope and to perform the adaptive optics "refocussing" for this observation. More details in the text. Technical information about this photo is available below. This NAOS/CONICA image of Saturn ( PR Photo 04a/02 ), the second-largest planet in the solar system, was obtained at a time when Saturn was close to summer solstice in the southern hemisphere. At this moment, the tilt of the rings was about as large as it can be, allowing the best possible view of the planet's South Pole. That area was on Saturn's night side in 1982 and could therefore not be photographed during the Voyager encounter. The dark spot close to the South Pole is a remarkable structure that measures approximately 300 km across. It was only recently observed in visible light from the ground with a telescope at the Pic du Midi Observatory in the Pyrenees (France) - this is the first infrared image to

  4. Theoretical analysis of intramolecular double-hydrogen transfer in bridged-ring compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedarchina, Zorka K.; Siebrand, Willem

    1993-08-01

    Model calculations are reported on double-hydrogen and double-deuterium transfer rates in two bridged-ring molecules recently investigated by Mackenzie. [Tetrahedron Letters, 33 (1992) 5629]. The calculations indicate that, contrary to an earlier interpretation, the two atoms are transferred by asynchronous tunnelling, the observed activation energy being representative of the energy of the biradical intermediate rather than the barrier height.

  5. The Particle inside a Ring: A Two-Dimensional Quantum Problem Visualized by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The one-dimensional particle-in-a-box model used to introduce quantum mechanics to students suffers from a tenuous connection to a real physical system. This article presents a two-dimensional model, the particle confined within a ring, that directly corresponds to observations of surface electrons in a metal trapped inside a circular barrier.…

  6. Exploring the RING-catalyzed ubiquitin transfer mechanism by MD and QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Yunmei; Qin, Guangrong; Luo, Cheng; Jiang, Hualiang; Yu, Kunqian; Chen, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is a universal mechanism for controlling cellular functions. A large family of ubiquitin E3 ligases (E3) mediates Ubiquitin (Ub) modification. To facilitate Ub transfer, RING E3 ligases bind both the substrate and ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (E2) linked to Ub via a thioester bond to form a catalytic complex. The mechanism of Ub transfer catalyzed by RING E3 remains elusive. By employing a combined computational approach including molecular modeling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, we characterized this catalytic mechanism in detail. The three-dimensional model of dimeric RING E3 ligase RNF4 RING, E2 ligase UbcH5A, Ub and the substrate SUMO2 shows close contact between the substrate and Ub transfer catalytic center. Deprotonation of the substrate lysine by D117 on UbcH5A occurs with almost no energy barrier as calculated by MD and QM/MM calculations. Then, the side chain of the activated lysine gets close to the thioester bond via a conformation change. The Ub transfer pathway begins with a nucleophilic addition that forms an oxyanion intermediate of a 4.23 kcal/mol energy barrier followed by nucleophilic elimination, resulting in a Ub modified substrate by a 5.65 kcal/mol energy barrier. These results provide insight into the mechanism of RING-catalyzed Ub transfer guiding the discovery of Ub system inhibitors. PMID:25003393

  7. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Horn, Bart; Parikh, Sarthak

    2016-02-01

    We study pairs of coaxial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  8. Why ring regenerative amplification (regen)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanovsky, V.; Felix, C.; Mourou, G.

    2002-06-01

    We show that ring cavity regenerative amplifiers (regens) have distinct advantages over the linear ones for applications in chirped pulse amplification. Larger energy, better contrast and better isolation from the oscillator are experimentally demonstrated.

  9. Why ring regenerative amplification (regen)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanovsky, V.; Felix, C.; Mourou, G.

    We show that ring cavity regenerative amplifiers (regens) have distinct advantages over the linear ones for applications in chirped pulse amplification. Larger energy, better contrast and better isolation from the oscillator are experimentally demonstrated.

  10. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, Roger P.

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  11. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  12. Incipient ring speciation revealed by a migratory divide.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Darren E

    2009-07-01

    Ever since Ernst Mayr (1942) called ring species the 'perfect demonstration of speciation', they have attracted much interest from researchers examining how two species evolve from one. In a ring species, two sympatric and reproductively isolated forms are connected by a long chain of intermediate populations that encircle a geographic barrier. Ring species have the potential to demonstrate that speciation can occur without complete geographic isolation, in contrast to the classic model of allopatric speciation. They also allow researchers to examine the causes of reproductive isolation in the contact zone and to use spatial variation to infer the steps by which speciation occurs. According to the classical definition, a ring species must have (i) gradual variation through a chain of populations connecting two divergent and sympatric forms, and (ii) complete or nearly complete reproductive isolation between the terminal forms. But evolutionary biologists now recognize that the process of speciation might often occur with some periods of geographic contact and hybridization between diverging forms; during these phases, even partial reproductive isolation can limit gene flow and permit further divergence to occur. In this issue Bensch et al. (2009) make an exciting and important contribution by extending the ring species concept to a case in which the divergence is much younger and not yet advanced to full reproductive isolation. Their study of geographic variation in willow warblers (Phylloscopus trochilus; Fig. 1) provides a beautiful example of gradual variation through a ring of populations connecting two forms that are partially reproductively isolated where they meet, possibly due to divergent migratory behaviours of the terminal forms. PMID:19457189

  13. THE CIRCULAR RFQ STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO,A.G.

    1998-10-20

    This paper presents a novel idea of storage ring for the accumulation of intense beams of light and heavy ions at low energy. The new concept is a natural development of the combined features used in a conventional storage ring and an ion trap, and is basically a linear RFQ bend on itself. In summary the advantages are: smaller beam dimensions, higher beam intensity, and a more compact storage device.

  14. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  15. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-05-30

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8{degree} angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3{degree} angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design.

  16. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  17. Resonance capture and Saturn's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    We have assigned the resonances apparently responsible for the stabilization of the Saturn's shepherd satellites and for the substructure seen in the F-ring and the ringlets in the C-ring. We show that Saturn's narrow ringlets have a substructure determined by three-body resonances with Saturn's ringmoons and the sun. We believe such resonances have important implications to satellite formation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Krueger, H.

    2007-10-01

    Thebe's gossamer ring, the outermost and faintest of Jupiter's rings, has an outward extension that we have previously argued is due to a shadow resonance (Hamilton 2003, DPS meeting #35, #11.09). A shadow resonance arises from the abrupt shutoff of photoelectric charging when a dust particle enters Jupiter's shadow which, in turn, affects the strength of the electromagnetic perturbation from the planet's intense magnetic field. The result is a coupled oscillation between a particle's orbital eccentricity and its semimajor axis. Ring material spreads outward from Thebe while maintaining its vertical thickness just as observed by Galileo imaging. In addition to cameras, the Galileo spacecraft was also equipped with dust and plasma detectors. The spacecraft made two passes through the ring and its dust detector found that 1) dust fluxes drop immediately interior to Thebe's orbit, 2) some grains have inclinations in excess of 20 degrees and 3) submicron particles are present in the Amalthea ring in much greater numbers than in the Thebe ring. These findings can all be explained in the context of our shadow resonance model: the inner boundary is a direct consequence of the conservation of the Electromagnetic Jacobi Constant, the high inclinations are forced by a vertical resonance, and the excess submicron particles are a consequence of the weakening of electromagnetic forces in the vicinity of synchronous orbit. In this talk, we will present the data sets as well as detailed numerical simulations that back up these claims.

  19. Collar nut and thrust ring

    DOEpatents

    Lowery, Guy B.

    1991-01-01

    A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

  20. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA) , Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (LAOG) and the DESPA and DASGAL laboratories of the Observatoire de Paris in France, in collaboration with ESO. The CONICA infra-red camera was built, under an ESO contract, by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) (Heidelberg) and the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) (Garching) in Germany, in collaboration with ESO. Saturn - Lord of the rings ESO PR Photo 04a/02 ESO PR Photo 04a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 460 x 400 pix - 54k] [Normal - JPEG: 1034 x 800 pix - 200k] Caption : PR Photo 04a/02 shows the giant planet Saturn, as observed with the VLT NAOS-CONICA Adaptive Optics instrument on December 8, 2001; the distance was 1209 million km. It is a composite of exposures in two near-infrared wavebands (H and K) and displays well the intricate, banded structure of the planetary atmosphere and the rings. Note also the dark spot at the south pole at the bottom of the image. One of the moons, Tethys, is visible as a small point of light below the planet. It was used to guide the telescope and to perform the adaptive optics "refocussing" for this observation. More details in the text. Technical information about this photo is available below. This NAOS/CONICA image of Saturn ( PR Photo 04a/02 ), the second-largest planet in the solar system, was obtained at a time when Saturn was close to summer solstice in the southern hemisphere. At this moment, the tilt of the rings was about as large as it can be, allowing the best possible view of the planet's South Pole. That area was on Saturn's night side in 1982 and could therefore not be photographed during the Voyager encounter. The dark spot close to the South Pole is a remarkable structure that measures approximately 300 km across. It was only recently observed in visible light from the ground with a telescope at the Pic du Midi Observatory in the Pyrenees (France) - this is the first infrared image to

  1. Micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  2. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-10-09

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  3. UPGRADING THE SNS COMPRESSOR RING TO 3 MW.

    SciTech Connect

    WENG,W.T.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; FEDOTOV,A.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; WEI,J.; DANILOV,V.; HENDERSON,S.; HOLMES,J.; HOLTKAMP,N.

    2002-06-03

    The initial performance goal for the SNS compressor ring is 1.4 MW with 1.0 GeV linac beam. During the design phase many considerations and provisions have been made to allow progressive increase in power level of the ring, ultimately to 3.0 MW and beyond after years of improvements. The most important provision for future higher power operation is an increase in beam energy from 1.0 to 1.3 GeV. Other possible upgrades covered in this report include ion source current, new stripper foil material, injection and extraction systems, transverse damper, barrier cavity, and electron clearing to avoid e-p instability.

  4. Thermal Barriers Developed for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed with conventional O-ring seals that are shielded from 5500 F combustion gases by thick layers of insulation and by special joint-fill compounds that fill assembly splitlines in the insulation. On a number of occasions, NASA has observed hot gas penetration through defects in the joint-fill compound of several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints. In the current nozzle-to-case joint, NASA has observed penetration of hot combustion gases through the joint-fill compound to the inboard wiper O-ring in one out of seven motors. Although this condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas penetration to the wiper O-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. The solid rocket motor manufacturer (Thiokol) approached the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field about the possibility of applying Glenn's braided fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. Glenn and Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and by using a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier that would resist any hot gases that the J-leg does not block.

  5. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature oxidation resistant, thermal barrier coating system is disclosed for a nickel cobalt, or iron base alloy substrate. An inner metal bond coating contacts the substrate, and a thermal barrier coating covers the bond coating. NiCrAlR, FeCrAlR, and CoCrAlR alloys are satisfactory as bond coating compositions where R=Y or Yb. These alloys contain, by weight, 24.9-36.7% chromium, 5.4-18.5% aluminum, and 0.05 to 1.55% yttrium or 0.05 to 0.53% ytterbium. The coatings containing ytterbium are preferred over those containing yttrium. An outer thermal barrier coating of partial stabilized zirconium oxide (zirconia) which is between 6% and 8%, by weight, of yttrium oxide (yttria) covers the bond coating. Partial stabilization provides a material with superior durability. Partially stabilized zirconia consists of mixtures of cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phases.

  6. Skin barrier in rosacea.

    PubMed

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  7. Segmented Thermal Barrier Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The article has a macro-segmented thermal barrier coating due to the presence of a pattern of three-dimensional features. The features may be a series of raised ribs formed on the substrate surface and being spaced from 0.05 inches to 0.30 apart. The ribs have a width ranging from 0.005 inches to 0.02 inches, and a height ranging from 25% to 100% of the thickness of the barrier coating. Alternately, the features may be a similar pattern of grooves formed in the surface of the substrate. Other embodiments provide segmentation by grooves or ribs in the bond coat or alternately grooves formed in the thermal barrier layer.

  8. Skin barrier in rosacea*

    PubMed Central

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  9. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.; Leibert, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A coating system which contains a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating is applied to metal surfaces such as turbine blades and provides both low thermal conductivity and improved adherence when exposed to high temperature gases or liquids. The bond coating contains NiCrAlY and the thermal barrier coating contains a reflective oxide. The reflective oxides ZrO2-Y2O3 and ZrO2-MgO have demonstrated significant utility in high temperature turbine applications.

  10. Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

  11. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

    2003-02-24

    This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

  12. Ice barrier construction

    SciTech Connect

    Finucane, R. G.; Jahns, H. O.

    1985-06-18

    A method is provided for constructing spray ice barriers to protect offshore structures in a frigid body of water from mobile ice, waves and currents. Water is withdrawn from the body of water and is sprayed through ambient air which is below the freezing temperature of the water so that a substantial amount of the water freezes as it passes through the air. The sprayed water is directed to build up a mass of ice having a size and shape adapted to protect the offshore structure. Spray ice barriers can also be constructed for the containment of pollutant spills.

  13. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  14. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR 44 Inch Lead-Boron (LB44) Bucket Environment (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the 44 inch Lead-Boron (LB44) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  15. Study for ILC Damping Ring at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, J.W.; Fukuma, H.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Koiso, H.; Masuzawa, M.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Y.; Oide, Katsunobu; Suetsugu, Y.; Tobiyama, M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    ILC damping ring consists of very low emittance electron and positron storage rings. It is necessary for ILC damping ring to study electron cloud effects in such low emittance positron ring. We propose a low emittance operation of KEKB to study the effects.

  16. Plasma deposited rider rings for hot displacer

    DOEpatents

    Kroebig, Helmut L.

    1976-01-01

    A hot cylinder for a cryogenic refrigerator having two plasma spray deposited rider rings of a corrosion and abrasion resistant material provided in the rider ring grooves, wherein the rider rings are machined to the desired diameter and width after deposition. The rider rings have gas flow flats machined on their outer surface.

  17. Reinforcement core facilitates O-ring installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Reinforcement core holds O-ring in place within a structure while adjacent parts are being assembled. The core in the O-ring adds circumferential rigidity to the O-ring material. This inner core does not appreciably affect the sectional elasticity or gland-sealing characteristics of the O-ring.

  18. Double acting stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1986-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  19. Architecture of the fungal nuclear pore inner ring complex.

    PubMed

    Stuwe, Tobias; Bley, Christopher J; Thierbach, Karsten; Petrovic, Stefan; Schilbach, Sandra; Mayo, Daniel J; Perriches, Thibaud; Rundlet, Emily J; Jeon, Young E; Collins, Leslie N; Huber, Ferdinand M; Lin, Daniel H; Paduch, Marcin; Koide, Akiko; Lu, Vincent; Fischer, Jessica; Hurt, Ed; Koide, Shohei; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Hoelz, André

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) constitutes the sole gateway for bidirectional nucleocytoplasmic transport. We present the reconstitution and interdisciplinary analyses of the ~425-kilodalton inner ring complex (IRC), which forms the central transport channel and diffusion barrier of the NPC, revealing its interaction network and equimolar stoichiometry. The Nsp1•Nup49•Nup57 channel nucleoporin heterotrimer (CNT) attaches to the IRC solely through the adaptor nucleoporin Nic96. The CNT•Nic96 structure reveals that Nic96 functions as an assembly sensor that recognizes the three-dimensional architecture of the CNT, thereby mediating the incorporation of a defined CNT state into the NPC. We propose that the IRC adopts a relatively rigid scaffold that recruits the CNT to primarily form the diffusion barrier of the NPC, rather than enabling channel dilation. PMID:26316600

  20. Wrocław's motorway ring-road--noise protection.

    PubMed

    Rudno-Rudzińska, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The 35.4-km stretch of the A8 motorway, i.e., Wrocław's motorway ring-road (WMRR), passes through the north-west part of the city of Wrocław and 4 neighbouring districts. Analyses have shown that WMRR will be a source of noise in the environment, which may adversely affect large areas. Normative environmental protection acts mandate taking all the necessary technical and organizational measures to reduce noise generated by the operation of WMRR in order to comply with the acoustic environment quality standards. The paper presents the research methodology adopted for assessing noise impact and designing acoustic barriers, and proposed designs of acoustic barriers which take into account the acoustic requirements, technical limitations, urban development, and architectural conditions. PMID:18082022

  1. Architecture of the nuclear pore inner ring complex

    PubMed Central

    Stuwe, Tobias; Bley, Christopher J.; Thierbach, Karsten; Petrovic, Stefan; Schilbach, Sandra; Mayo, Daniel J.; Perriches, Thibaud; Rundlet, Emily J.; Jeon, Young E.; Collins, Leslie N.; Huber, Ferdinand M.; Lin, Daniel H.; Paduch, Marcin; Koide, Akiko; Lu, Vincent; Fischer, Jessica; Hurt, Ed; Koide, Shohei; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Hoelz, André

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) constitutes the sole gateway for bidirectional nucleocytoplasmic transport. We present the reconstitution and interdisciplinary analyses of the ~425-kDa inner ring complex (IRC), which forms the central transport channel and diffusion barrier of the NPC, revealing its interaction network and equimolar stoichiometry. The Nsp1•Nup49•Nup57 channel nucleoporin hetero-trimer (CNT) attaches to the IRC solely through the adaptor nucleoporin Nic96. The CNT•Nic96 structure reveals that Nic96 functions as an assembly sensor that recognizes the three dimensional architecture of the CNT, thereby mediating the incorporation of a defined CNT state into the NPC. We propose that the IRC adopts a relatively rigid scaffold that recruits the CNT to primarily form the diffusion barrier of the NPC, rather than enabling channel dilation. PMID:26316600

  2. Barrier methods of contraception.

    PubMed

    Skrine, R L

    1985-05-01

    Barrier methods of contraception make up an essential part of the present contraceptive range, and doctors need to know in detail how to choose and fit them as well as how to instruct patients in their use. This discussion reviews the mode of action of the barrier method and then focuses on the vaginal diaphragm, the cervical or vault cap, the collatex (Today) sponge, condoms, emotionl problems associated with the use of barrier methods, advantages of barrier methods, and future developments. Barrier methods of contraception are only effective if used consistently and carefully. Failure rates vary greatly between studies, but in selected populations the failure rate for the diaphragm with spermicide can be as low as 1.9/100 woman years (wy) and for the condom 3.6 per 100wy (Vessey et al., 1982). If known user failures are removed, the figure for the condom can drop to as low as 0.4 per 100wy (John, 1973), which compares favorably with that of the combined oral contraceptive. Other studies quote failure rates of 10 per 100wy or more. These methods call for considerable participation by the patient at or before each act of intercourse and there is, therefore, great scope for inefficient use, either as a result of poor instruction or because couples find that they interfere with happy, relaxed sexual activity -- or fear that they may do so. Doctors need to understand the feelings of their patients before recommending them. The aim of a barrier method is to prevent live sperm from meeting the ovum. This is accomplished by the combination of a physical barrier with a spermicide. In the case of the condom, the integrity of the physical barrier is the most important factor, although some patients feel more secure with an additional spermicide. The vaginal barriers used at present do not produce a "water-tight" fit, and the principle is that the spermicide is held over the cervix by the barrier. It is also possible that the device acts partially by holding the alkaline

  3. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-08-24

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion. 3 figs.

  4. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion.

  5. Atlas V Launch Incorporated NASA Glenn Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    In the Spring of 2002, Aerojet experienced a major failure during a qualification test of the solid rocket motor that they were developing for the Atlas V Enhanced Expendable Launch Vehicle. In that test, hot combustion gas reached the O-rings in the nozzle-to-case joint and caused a structural failure that resulted in loss of the nozzle and aft dome sections of the motor. To improve the design of this joint, Aerojet decided to incorporate three braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The thermal barriers were used to block the searing-hot 5500 F pressurized gases from reaching the temperature-sensitive O-rings that seal the joint. Glenn originally developed the thermal barriers for the nozzle joints of the space shuttle solid rocket motors, and Aerojet decided to use them on the basis of the results of several successful ground tests of the thermal barriers in the shuttle rockets. Aerojet undertook an aggressive schedule to redesign the rocket nozzle-to-case joint with the thermal barriers and to qualify it in time for a launch planned for the middle of 2003. They performed two successful qualification tests (Oct. and Dec. 2002) in which the Glenn thermal barriers effectively protected the O-rings. These qualification tests saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in development costs and put the Lockheed-Martin/Aerojet team back on schedule. On July 17, 2003, the first flight of an Atlas V boosted with solid rocket motors successfully launched a commercial satellite into orbit from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Aero-jet's two 67-ft solid rocket boosters performed flawlessly, with each providing thrust in excess of 250,000 lbf. Both motors incorporated three Glenn-developed thermal barriers in their nozzle-to-case joints. The Cablevision satellite launched on this mission will be used to provide direct-to-home satellite television programming for the U.S. market starting in late 2003. The Atlas V is a product of the

  6. Intrinsic structure in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, N.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's rings are the most prominent in our Solar system and one example of granular matter in space. Dominated by tides and inelastic collisions the system is highly flattened being almost 300000km wide while only tens of meters thick. Individual particles are composed of primarily water ice and range from microns to few tens of meters in size. Apparent patterns comprise ringlets, gaps, kinematic wakes, propellers, bending waves, and the winding spiral arms of density waves. These large-scale structures are perturbations foremost created by external as well as embedded moons. Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft currently in orbit around Saturn show these structures in unprecedented detail. But high-resolution measurements reveal the presence of small-scale structures throughout the system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), overstable waves (100-300m), subkm structure at the A and B ring edges, "straw" and "ropy" structures (1-3km), and the C ring "ghosts". Most of these had not been anticipated and are found in perturbed regions, driven by resonances with external moons, where the system undergoes periodic phases of compression and relaxation that correlate with the presence of structure. High velocity dispersion and the presence of large clumps imply structure formation on time scales as short as one orbit (about 10 hours). The presence of these intrinsic structures is seemingly the response to varying local conditions such as internal density, optical depth, underlying particle size distribution, granular temperature, and distance from the central planet. Their abundance provides evidence for an active and dynamic ring system where aggregation and fragmentation are ongoing on orbital timescales. Thus a kinetic description of the rings may be more appropriate than the fluid one. I will present Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) occultations, Voyager 1 and 2 Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), and high

  7. Thermal Studies of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorz, S.; Altobelli, N.; Leyrat, C.; Spilker, L.

    2007-12-01

    The observed thermal emission from Saturn's rings has a locational and directional variation that ultimately results from the time dependent response of individual ring particles to the quasi-periodic radiation forcing they experience as they orbit Saturn. The observed thermal emission from any radial region of the rings is representative of a large ensemble of particles or structures which are subject to statistically similar conditions as they orbit. Near any particular radius, the thermal forcing and response are quasi-periodic around an orbit, varying secularly with Saturn's twenty-nine year seasonal cycle. This talk will discuss the coupled thermal and radiative transfer processes within the rings as determined by the interplay between individual particle properties and those of the ensemble (i.e., the ring structure), and the constraints that are placed on those by the most comprehensive thermal observations of the rings to date, taken with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). Over one hundred thousand thermal-infrared spectra of the rings, between 10 and 500 cm-1, have been taken with the CIRS Focal Plane 1 (FP1) detector since Cassini orbit insertion in July, 2004. They resemble scaled Planck functions with well resolved peaks indicative of temperatures between approximately 60 and 120 K. We investigate the properties of a mapping from a space of physical parameters describing ring particles and their distribution onto predicted time-dependent spectral thermal emission. Ring emission is modeled using a radiative transfer code augmented with ray tracing calculations; a thermal model is embedded within the calculation to model the particles as a thermal source, and statistical averaging is incorporated. The model is specified by a vector of parameters describing a vertically varying particle size distribution, spin distribution, thermal inertia, albedo and optical depth, and when driven by radiation calculated from ephemeris parameters it produces a self

  8. Archiving of Planetary Ring Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Stellar occultation data provide our only Earth-based means of probing planetary rings at kilometer spatial resolution. The occultation data archive at MIT contains original data and analysis products of stellar occultations by the ring systems of the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune observed by members of the group (and other groups) from 1977 to the present. During this time period, several media have been used to record and store the original and processed data: (1) chart records; (2) printed output, (3) audio reel tape; (4) audio cassette tape; (5) 7-track, 1/2-inch computer tape; (6) 9-track, 1/2-inch computer tape at 800, 1600, and 6250 bpi; (7) NOVA disk platters (2.5 and 5.0 Mbyte); (8) write once optical disks; (9) punched cards; and (10) read-write optical disks. With the rapid change of computer technology over this time period, some of these media have become not only obsolete, but nearly extinct. In particular, it has become nearly impossible to find any facilities that can still read 800 bpi tapes, which contain the only copies of several important data sets for the ring system of Uranus. In particular, we have an extensive ring data collection that includes data sets for the following Uranian ring occultations: U0, U11, U12, U13, U14, U25, U17, and U36.

  9. Ring wormholes via duality rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2016-09-01

    We apply duality rotations and complex transformations to the Schwarzschild metric to obtain wormhole geometries with two asymptotically flat regions connected by a throat. In the simplest case these are the well-known wormholes supported by phantom scalar field. Further duality rotations remove the scalar field to yield less well known vacuum metrics of the oblate Zipoy-Voorhees-Weyl class, which describe ring wormholes. The ring encircles the wormhole throat and can have any radius, whereas its tension is always negative and should be less than -c4 / 4 G. If the tension reaches the maximal value, the geometry becomes exactly flat, but the topology remains non-trivial and corresponds to two copies of Minkowski space glued together along the disk encircled by the ring. The geodesics are straight lines, and those which traverse the ring get to the other universe. The ring therefore literally produces a hole in space. Such wormholes could perhaps be created by negative energies concentrated in toroidal volumes, for example by vacuum fluctuations.

  10. Ring Beholds a Delicate Flower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope finds a delicate flower in the Ring Nebula, as shown in this image. The outer shell of this planetary nebula looks surprisingly similar to the delicate petals of a camellia blossom. A planetary nebula is a shell of material ejected from a dying star. Located about 2,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra, the Ring Nebula is also known as Messier Object 57 and NGC 6720. It is one of the best examples of a planetary nebula and a favorite target of amateur astronomers.

    The 'ring' is a thick cylinder of glowing gas and dust around the doomed star. As the star begins to run out of fuel, its core becomes smaller and hotter, boiling off its outer layers. The telescope's infrared array camera detected this material expelled from the withering star. Previous images of the Ring Nebula taken by visible-light telescopes usually showed just the inner glowing loop of gas around the star. The outer regions are especially prominent in this new image because Spitzer sees the infrared light from hydrogen molecules. The molecules emit infrared light because they have absorbed ultraviolet radiation from the star or have been heated by the wind from the star.

    Download the QuickTime movie for the animated version of this Ring Nebula image.

  11. On the formation of ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2011-08-01

    The formation scenario of ring galaxies is addressed in this paper. We focus on the P-type ring galaxies presented in Madore, Nelson & Petrillo (2009), particularly on the axis-symmetric ones. Our simulations show that a ring can form through the collision of disc and dwarf galaxies, and the locations, widths, and density contrasts of the ring are well determined. We find that a ring galaxy such as AM 2302-322 can be produced by this collision scenario.

  12. Softened-Stainless-Steel O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Waters, William I.

    1993-01-01

    In fabrication of O-ring of new type, tube of 304 stainless steel bent around mandril into circle and welded closed into ring. Ring annealed in furnace to make it soft and highly ductile. In this condition, used as crushable, deformable O-ring seal. O-ring replacements used in variety of atmospheres and temperatures, relatively inexpensive, fabricated with minimum amount of work, amenable to one-of-a-kind production, reusable, and environmentally benign.

  13. Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A better than average view of the Great Barrier Reef was captured by SeaWiFS on a recent overpass. There is sunglint northeast of the reef and there appears to be some sort of filamentous bloom in the Capricorn Channel.

  14. Barriers to obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Marina; Taylor, Valerie; Wharton, Sean; Sharma, Arya M

    2008-05-01

    Obesity, one of the most prevalent health problems in the Western world, is a chronic and progressive condition. Therefore, as with other chronic diseases, patients with obesity require lifelong treatment. Long-term efficacy and effectiveness of obesity treatments is notoriously poor. This may in part be attributable to the substantial barriers that undermine long-term obesity management strategies. These can include lack of recognition of obesity as a chronic condition, low socioeconomic status, time constraints, intimate saboteurs, and a wide range of comorbidities including mental health, sleep, chronic pain, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and endocrine disorders. Furthermore, medications used to treat some of these disorders may further undermine weight-loss efforts. Lack of specific obesity training of health professionals, attitudes and beliefs as well as coverage and availability of obesity treatments can likewise pose important barriers. Health professionals need to take care to identify, acknowledge and address these barriers where possible to increase patient success as well as compliance and adherence with treatments. Failure to do so may further undermine the sense of failure, low self esteem and self efficacy already common among obese individuals. Addressing treatment barriers can save resources and increase the prospect of long-term success. PMID:18395160

  15. Barriers Regarding Using Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekenoogen, John Russell

    2014-01-01

    The University of Florida (UF) used an open-source course management system (CMS) called Sakai. Sakai was the fourth CMS the university has used to help teach live, blended (or hybrid), and online courses over the past ten years. The objective of this dissertation was to identify what barriers may be preventing university personnel from using…

  16. Overcoming Language Barriers

    PubMed Central

    De Buda, Yvonne

    1976-01-01

    Many family physicians in Canada experience language and cultural barriers between themselves and their patients. Several aspects of the ensuing problems are described and some practical suggestions for solutions are made. The importance of health education for new Canadians in the family physician's office as well as through the media and community projects is stressed. Imagesp68-ap68-bp70-a PMID:21308059

  17. Barriers to Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurman, Ernest B.

    The under-representation of women in prestigious occupations and the lower average pay women earn has been of concern for many years. This study investigated two alternative explanations for this under-representation of females in prestigious and higher paying occupations. The first explanation was external barriers such as discrimination, and the…

  18. Breaking Down Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Beverly T.

    1994-01-01

    Faculty at 11 higher education institutions in California, New Mexico, Texas, and northern Mexico have been experimenting with computer conferencing on the BESTNET (Bilingual English-Spanish Telecommunications Network). The growing system is credited with creating an international student-faculty community that crosses cultural barriers for…

  19. Thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  20. Barrier Free Site Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Richard K., Ed.

    The booklet provides information for the design and evaluation of a barrier free outdoor environment for handicapped individuals. Section 1 discusses the scope of the study, defines terms, cites pertinent laws and legislation, describes cost/benefit factors, and surveys population statistics. Section 2 considers recommended design details in the…

  1. The Fission Barrier Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L. G.

    2008-04-17

    Fission excitation functions have been measured for a chain of neighboring compound nuclei from {sup 207}Po to {sup 212}Po. We present a new analysis which provides a determination of the fission barriers and ground state shell effects with nearly spectroscopic accuracy. The accuracy achieved in this analysis may lead to a future detailed exploration of the saddle mass surface and its spectroscopy.

  2. Some Suggested Techniques for Achieving Required Main Ring Low Level RF Performance for the Tevatron I Program

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.E.; MacLachlan, J.

    1984-05-01

    These techniques are derived from experience with the existing low level rf system and from the results of accelerator experiments directed at the Tev I requirements which were performed using a specially modified low level rf system. The techniques suggested here are not necessarily unique and other techniques may be acceptable. It is important to realize that certain performance requirements on the Booster and Main Ring are substantially different in the Tev I program from those which have been acceptable in the fixed target program. For example, the longitudinal emittance of the bunches has been routinely and intentionally blown up by the 'bunch spreader' during acceleration to improve the smoothness of the spill. In the Tev I case, the 'bunch narrowing' procedure preceding {bar p} production and in bunch coalescing is facilitated by maintaining the smallest possible longitudinal emittance (i.e. the largest possible longitudinal phase space density). Also, during fixed target physics the Main Ring is essentially full (i.e. approx. 1090 of 1113 buckets occupied) so transient beam loading of the rf system is negligible except during injection, whereas for {bar p} production a single high intensity Booster batch (approx. 83 bunches) is to be accelerated causing substantial transient beam induced phase shift of the rf voltage during each passage. The low level phase and position error signals are normally derived from an essentially full ring during fixed target operation whereas in the Tev I program the systems must perform adequately with as few as ten adjacent buckets occupied. Because of the differences in emphasis between fixed target operation and Tevatron I operation is seems sensible to use separate low level rf systems for these two modes of operation. If a single low level system were to be used for both modes of operation some compromises may be necessary which might cause performance in either mode to be less than adequate. Because of the severe demands

  3. Beam uniformization and low frequency RF cavities in compact electron storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Alfonse N.

    An electron storage ring is currently under construction at Indiana University for extreme environment radiation effects experiments, x-ray production, and particle beam dynamics experiments. For an electron bunch to be successfully stored for long durations, a radio-frequency (RF) resonant structure will be used to provide an adequate RF bucket for longitudinal focusing and replenishment of energy electrons loses via synchrotron radiation. Due to beam line space limitation that are inherent to compact circular particle accelerators, a unique ferrite-loaded quarter-wave RF resonant cavity has been designed and constructed for use in the electron storage ring. The physics of particle accelerators and beams, ferrite-loaded RF resonant cavity theory, and results of the Poisson-SUPERFISH electromagnetic field simulations that were used to guide the specification and design of the RF cavity will be presented. Low-power resonant cavity characterization measurements were used to benchmark the performance of the RF cavity. High-power characterization and measurements with electron beams will be used to validate the performance of the cavity in the electron storage ring. To fulfill the requirements for radiation effect experiments, the storage ring manipulation of beams that utilizes a phase space beam dilution method have been developed for the broadening of the radiation damped electron bunch with longitudinal particle distribution uniformity. The method relies on phase modulation applied to a double RF system to generate large regions of bounded chaotic particle motion in phase space. These region are formed by a multitude of overlapping parametric resonances. Parameters of the double RF system and applied phase modulation can be adjusted to vary the degree of beam dilution. The optimal RF parameters have been found for maximal bunch broadening, uniform longitudinal particle distribution, and bounded particle diffusion. Implementation of the phase space dilution method

  4. CMB lensing and giant rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  5. Remote Sensing of Dipole Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; Mied, Richard P.; Brown, James W.; Kirwan, A. D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Historical satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) data are reanalyzed with a zebra color palette and a thermal separatrix method. The new results from this reanalysis are as follows: (a) Thirteen observational sequences of six rings from the Gulf Stream and the Brazil Current, which have historically been interpreted as solitary vortices or monopoles are shown to have a dipolar character; (b) some of these dipole rings have been observed in the open ocean, thereby eliminating the possibility that they are sustained by topographic interactions with the continental slope; (c) whether interacting with other features or evolving as isolated circulations, dipoles are seen to rotate within a relatively narrow range of approximately 4-8 deg/day (interacting) and 10-11 deg/day (isolated); and (d) feature tracking delineates energetic fluid in both vortices and eliminates the possibility of interpreting dipole rings as transient features produced by active monopoles and patches of entrained fluid.

  6. Improvement of current limitation in the storage ring NIJI-IV

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, M.; Kawai, M.; Hamada, S.

    1995-12-31

    The storage ring NIJI-IV dedicated to free-electron lasers was completed in December 1990. Lasing at 595-352 nm by using the NIJI-IV was accomplished by April 1994. The NIJI-IV has 16 rf-buckets. The electron bunch contributed to FEL gain of the NIJI-IV is only one of 16. In order to get the redundant bunch, make beam quality better, and make the FEL operation easier, a single bunch injection (SBI) system by using a short pulse beam from an electron gun was prepared. The quality of the beam accelerated and bunched by a buncher section has already been investigated. It was convinced that the accelerated short pulse beam satisfies the performance required on the SBI of the NIJI-IV. At present, the operation of the SBI system is being tested. Storage efficiency (the ratio of storage current to injection current) and limitation of storage current by using the SBI system will be reported in this conference. We expect lasing at below 352nm by the SBI.

  7. Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Krueger, H.

    2008-05-01

    Thebe's gossamer ring, the outermost and faintest of Jupiter's rings, extends outward by at least half a jovian radius from its source satellite while maintaining a constant vertical thickness. This structure is created by an electromagnetic perturbation known as a shadow resonance (Hamilton 2003, DPS meeting #35, #11.09). A shadow resonance arises from the abrupt shutoff of photoelectric charging when a dust particle enters Jupiter's shadow which, in turn, affects the strength of the electromagnetic perturbation from the planet's intense magnetic field. The result is a coupled oscillation between a particle's orbital eccentricity and its semimajor axis. Ring material spreads outward from Thebe while maintaining its vertical thickness just as observed by Galileo imaging. In addition to cameras, the Galileo spacecraft was also equipped with dust and plasma detectors. The spacecraft made two passes through the ring and its dust detector found that 1) dust fluxes drop immediately interior to Thebe's orbit, 2) some grains have inclinations in excess of 20 degrees and 3) submicron particles are present in the Amalthea ring in much greater numbers than in the Thebe ring. These findings can all be explained in the context of our shadow resonance model: the inner boundary is a direct consequence of the conservation of the Electromagnetic Jacobi Constant, the high inclinations are forced by a vertical version of the shadow resonance, and the excess submicron particles are a consequence of the weakening of electromagnetic forces in the vicinity of synchronous orbit. In this talk, we will present the data sets as well as detailed numerical simulations that back up these claims.

  8. Ynamides in Ring Forming Transformations

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XIAO-NA; YEOM, HYUN-SUK; FANG, LI-CHAO; HE, SHUZHONG; MA, ZHI-XIONG; KEDROWSKI, BRANT L.; HSUNG, RICHARD P.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus The ynamide functional group activates carbon-carbon triple bonds through an attached nitrogen atom that bears an electron-withdrawing group. As a result, the alkyne has both electrophilic and nucleophilic properties. Through the selection of the electron-withdrawing group attached to nitrogen chemists can modulate the electronic properties and reactivity of ynamides, making these groups versatile synthetic building blocks. The reactions of ynamides also lead directly to nitrogen-containing products, which provides access to important structural motifs found in natural products and molecules of medicinal interest. Therefore, researchers have invested increasing time and research in the chemistry of ynamides in recent years. This Account surveys and assesses new organic transformations involving ynamides developed in our laboratory and in others around the world. We showcase the synthetic power of ynamides for rapid assembly of complex molecular structures. Among the recent reports of ynamide transformations, ring-forming reactions provide a powerful tool for generating molecular complexity quickly. In addition to their synthetic utility, such reactions are mechanistically interesting. Therefore, we focus primarily on the cyclization chemistry of ynamides. This Account highlights ynamide reactions that are useful in the rapid synthesis of cyclic and polycyclic structural manifolds. We discuss the mechanisms active in the ring formations and describe representative examples that demonstrate the scope of these reactions and provide mechanistic insights. In this discussion we feature examples of ynamide reactions involving radical cyclizations, ring-closing metathesis, transition metal and non-transition metal mediated cyclizations, cycloaddition reactions, and rearrangements. The transformations presented rapidly introduce structural complexity and include nitrogen within, or in close proximity to, a newly formed ring (or rings). Thus, ynamides have emerged

  9. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  10. The ring arcs of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    After the corotation resonance with an exterior satellite proved inapplicable to the Neptune ring arc confinement, a search for other mechanisms settled on the possible influence of Neptune's magnetic field. The areas of greater optical depth around the ring are much dustier than the low optical depth regions. These particles reside in a plasma; therefore, they must carry some charge. The components of Neptune's magnetic field on the equator at the radius of the ring arcs as a function of Neptunian longitude are shown. The components are those of an offset tilted dipole model. Although the dipole model is probably not a good approximation so close to the planet, the magnitude of the field that is given is probably close to the actual value. The possible importance of the magnetic field on the smallest particles in the ring is indicated by the ratio of the magnetic field on the smallest particles in the ring is indicated by the ratio of the magnetic force to the central gravitation attraction with the field strength of B = 0.01 gauss at the ring distance. A preferred position in the orbit for magnetically perturbed particles seems to require a commensurability between the rotation of the planet and the motion of the particle in the orbit. The period of rotation is assumed to be that of the radio bursts at 16.11 hours. However, without a model for the radio emission, one cannot be absolutely sure. Jupiter's decametric radiation depends on Io's orbital position as well as the rotation, so a synodic periodicity might be appropriate. But the latter radiation is highly directed, whereas Neptune's was seen all along the spacecraft trajectory on the 16.11 hour schedule, i.e., with no shifts in phase relative to a fixed longitude on the planet. The ring orbital period is 10.536 hours which is not commensurate with the rotation period. If the 16.11 hours is interpreted as a synodic period between the rotation and a satellite motion, the closest rotation periods to 16 hours

  11. Power Supplies for Precooler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fuja, Raymond; Praeg, Walter

    1980-12-12

    Eight power supplies will energize the antiproton Precooler ring. there will be two series connected supplies per quadrant. These supplies will power 32 dipole and 19 quadrupole magnets. The resistance and inductance per quadrant is R = 1.4045 Ohms and L = 0.466. Each powr supply will have 12-phase series bridge rectifiers and will be energized from the 480 V 3-phase grid. The total of eight power supplies are numbered IA, IIA, IIIA, IVA, and IB, IIB, IIIB, and IVB. Each quadrant will contain one A and one B supply. A block diagram of the Precooler ring with its power supplies is shown in Figure 1.

  12. Chaotic correlations in barrier billiards with arbitrary barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbaldestin, A. H.; Adamson, L. N. C.

    2013-06-01

    We study autocorrelation functions in symmetric barrier billiards for golden mean trajectories with arbitrary barriers. Renormalization analysis reveals the presence of a chaotic invariant set and thus that, for a typical barrier, there are chaotic correlations. The chaotic renormalization set is the analogue of the so-called orchid that arises in a generalized Harper equation.

  13. Ring Dynamics Up Close With the Saturn Ring Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, T. R.; Abelson, R. D.; Shirley, J. H.; Spilker, L. J.

    2005-12-01

    The National Research Council's Solar System Exploration Decadal Survey identified a Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission concept as one of two "promising concepts for longer-term missions" to the outer solar system. The spacecraft would orbit Saturn in a (mildly) non-Keplerian orbit within a km or two of Saturn's ring plane. Details of dynamical processes in Saturn's rings, thought by some researchers to have important implications for the dynamics of protoplanetary disks, appear to be observable only in situ, by stationing an observing platform sufficiently close to the rings to observe and characterize the collisions of cm-size and larger particles. Larger-scale (up to a few km) processes, including clumping and agglomeration behavior strongly suggested by Cassini data, can also be observed from this vantage point and related to the behavior of individual particles. Direct insertion from approach into such a "ring hover" orbit requires a propulsive delta-V of ~10 km/s. This exceeds the feasible limits for post-launch chemical propulsion, so this approach is a candidate for fission-powered electric propulsion. But such systems are decades in the future. A nearer-term implementation could insert via aerocapture using Saturn's atmosphere and then propulsively circularize into the hover orbit. Post-aerocapture clean-up and circularization maneuvers could use a standard chemical propulsion system that provides a much more palatable (for chemical systems) delta-V of ~3.5 km/s. We evaluated a year-long science mission that would begin with insertion into the hover orbit at a Kronocentric radius of 110,000 km, moving weekly to a more distant radial location to view scientifically interesting parts of Saturn's A and B rings, eventually traversing ~20,000 km radially across the rings. A Radioisotope Power System (RPS) powers the orbiter, including multiple instruments and the rather capable telecommunications system needed to return a large data volume from Saturn. This

  14. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  15. Uranus' Rings: Leading up to RPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, I.; Showalter, M.; Hammel, H.; Gibbard, S.; Lissauer, J.

    We summarize recent HST and Keck observations of the uranian ring system, taken over the past years while the viewing geometry is changing. Some highlights of our campaign to date include: i) Detection of a ring system outside of Uranus main ring system by HST (Showalter and Lissauer, Science 311, p.973, 2006), followed by color information from Keck (de Pater et al, Science 312, p.92, 2006). This system consists of two rings. The inner ring, U2, is red and relatively narrow like Saturn's G ring, while the outer ring, U1, is much broader in extent and very blue, like Saturn's E ring. Just like Enceladus is located within the E ring, moon Mab is inside U1. Saturn's E ring is most likely produced by geyser activity on Enceladus. Mab, being over 20 times smaller, is unlikely to be geologically active. However, being this small, its size is optimal to produce a ring via meteorite sputtering. ii) Detection of a ring interior to the main ring system, which might be ring 1986U2R, discovered by Voyager, though its extent and location is different from the Voyager ring. iii) Dust sheets in between the main ring. These may be similar to the dust sheets seen by Voyager in forward scattered light, yet our observations indicate large changes from the Voyager era iv) New moons were detected by HST. The orbits of some of these moons appear to be somewhat erratic. The color of moon Mab appears to be more similar to that of the large outer moons than the small inner moons. Earth will cross Uranus' ring plane three times in 2007-2008 (2 May, 16 Aug. 2007, 20 Feb. 2008), and the Sun will cross it once (7 Dec. 2007). At these times optically thin dusty rings will brighten considerably, making this period an ideal time to study Uranus' outer ring system. Between the May and August crossings, as well as between December and February, the Earth and Sun are on opposite sides of the rings, so that any optically thick rings will essentially be invisible. This allows phenomena normally

  16. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  17. A new type of half-quantum circulation in a macroscopic polariton spinor ring condensate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangqiang; Snoke, David W; Daley, Andrew; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken

    2015-03-01

    We report the observation of coherent circulation in a macroscopic Bose-Einstein condensate of polaritons in a ring geometry. Because they are spinor condensates, half-quanta are allowed in where there is a phase rotation of π in connection with a polarization vector rotation of π around a closed path. This half-quantum behavior is clearly seen in the experimental observations of the polarization rotation around the ring. In our ring geometry, the half-quantum state that we see is one in which the handedness of the spin flips from one side of the ring to the other side in addition to the rotation of the linear polarization component; such a state is allowed in a ring geometry but will not occur in a simply connected geometry. This state is lower in energy than a half-quantum state with no change of the spin direction and corresponds to a superposition of two different elementary half-quantum states. The direction of circulation of the flow around the ring fluctuates randomly between clockwise and counterclockwise from one shot to the next; this fluctuation corresponds to spontaneous breaking of time-reversal symmetry in the system. This type of macroscopic polariton ring condensate allows for the possibility of direct control of the circulation to excite higher quantized states and the creation of Josephson junction tunneling barriers. PMID:25730875

  18. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  19. Barrier RF Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-08

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  20. Barrier RF Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver ±7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  1. Skin Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Like other inflammatory dermatoses, the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) has been largely attributed to abnormalities in adaptive immunity. T helper (Th) cell types 1 and 2 cell dysregulation, IgE production, mast cell hyperactivity, and dendritic cell signaling are thought to account for the chronic, pruritic, and inflammatory dermatosis that characterizes AD. Not surprisingly, therapy has been directed toward ameliorating Th2-mediated inflammation and pruritus. Here, we review emerging evidence that inflammation in AD occurs downstream to inherited and acquired insults to the barrier. Therapy based upon this new view of pathogenesis should emphasize approaches that correct the primary abnormality in barrier function, which drives downstream inflammation and allows unrestricted antigen access. PMID:18606081

  2. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOEpatents

    Saha, Anuj J.; Grant, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  3. Can-Filled Crash Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Crash barrier composed largely of used aluminum beverage cans protects occupants of cars in collisions with poles or trees. Lightweight, can-filled barrier very effective in softening impact of an automobile in head-on and off-angle collisions. Preliminary results indicate barrier is effective in collisions up to 40 mi/h (64 km/h).

  4. Baroclinic Structure of Oceanic Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Sun, C.

    One of the most important analytical solutions to the two dimensional incompressible flow is circular Rankin vortex that has a solid-body core and an approximately irrotational far field. For an f-plane rotating flow, Ingersoll (1969) presented a closed-form ring solution superposed with a zonal flow. So far most studies have been concerned with two dimensional and barotropic situations.

  5. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, G.G. Jr.

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  6. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, Jr., Gordon G.

    1984-01-01

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials which has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  7. The EMMA Main Ring Lattice.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg,J.S.

    2008-02-21

    I give a brief introduction to the purpose and goals of the EMMA experiment and describe how they will impact the design of the main EMMA ring. I then describe the mathematical model that is used to describe the EMMA lattice. Finally, I show how the different lattice configurations were obtained and list their parameters.

  8. Structure and evolution of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    It is noted that many Voyager observations on the structure and evolution of Saturn's rings remain largely unexplained. The variation of ring thickness and particle size with composition may be partly explained by the input of density waves in the 'heating' of such rings as the outer A ring; in addition, the particles appear to resemble Weidenschilling et al.'s (1984) 'ephemeral bodies' rather than chunks of ice. It is suggested that many current difficulties may be resolved by positing that at least ring A is young, having been created by the destruction of one of the ring moons.

  9. Cavity-locked ring down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Harb, Charles C.; Spence, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Distinct locking and sampling light beams are used in a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system to perform multiple ring-down measurements while the laser and ring-down cavity are continuously locked. The sampling and locking light beams have different frequencies, to ensure that the sampling and locking light are decoupled within the cavity. Preferably, the ring-down cavity is ring-shaped, the sampling light is s-polarized, and the locking light is p-polarized. Transmitted sampling light is used for ring-down measurements, while reflected locking light is used for locking in a Pound-Drever scheme.

  10. The formation of Jupiter's faint rings

    PubMed

    Burns; Showalter; Hamilton; Nicholson; de Pater I; Ockert-Bell; Thomas

    1999-05-14

    Observations by the Galileo spacecraft and the Keck telescope showed that Jupiter's outermost (gossamer) ring is actually two rings circumscribed by the orbits of the small satellites Amalthea and Thebe. The gossamer rings' unique morphology-especially the rectangular end profiles at the satellite's orbit and the enhanced intensities along the top and bottom edges of the rings-can be explained by collisional ejecta lost from the inclined satellites. The ejecta evolves inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. This mechanism may also explain the origin of Jupiter's main ring and suggests that faint rings may accompany all small inner satellites of the other jovian planets. PMID:10325220

  11. Multiwavelength studies of Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.; Deau, E.; Filacchione, G.; Morishima, R.; Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, D.; Colwell, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling the changes in brightness, color, temperature and spectral parameters, significant progress can be made in understanding the character of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths with changing viewing geometry. We are studying Saturn's rings over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly being studied using scans of the lit and unlit main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Phase curves are also being generated for different ring regions. Using multi-wavelength data sets allows us to test different thermal models by combining effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, and particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize regions such as the C ring plateaus and ringlets, where albedo differences may be present. The CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle over a range of solar elevations with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that IR water ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The

  12. Barrier infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A superlattice-based infrared absorber and the matching electron-blocking and hole-blocking unipolar barriers, absorbers and barriers with graded band gaps, high-performance infrared detectors, and methods of manufacturing such devices are provided herein. The infrared absorber material is made from a superlattice (periodic structure) where each period consists of two or more layers of InAs, InSb, InSbAs, or InGaAs. The layer widths and alloy compositions are chosen to yield the desired energy band gap, absorption strength, and strain balance for the particular application. Furthermore, the periodicity of the superlattice can be "chirped" (varied) to create a material with a graded or varying energy band gap. The superlattice based barrier infrared detectors described and demonstrated herein have spectral ranges covering the entire 3-5 micron atmospheric transmission window, excellent dark current characteristics operating at least 150K, high yield, and have the potential for high-operability, high-uniformity focal plane arrays.

  13. High-Speed Ring Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocky, Terry; Kopf, Edward, Jr.; Katanyoutananti, Sunant; Steiner, Carl; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The high-speed ring bus at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) allows for future growth trends in spacecraft seen with future scientific missions. This innovation constitutes an enhancement of the 1393 bus as documented in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1393-1999 standard for a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus. It allows for high-bandwidth and time synchronization of all nodes on the ring. The JPL ring bus allows for interconnection of active units with autonomous operation and increased fault handling at high bandwidths. It minimizes the flight software interface with an intelligent physical layer design that has few states to manage as well as simplified testability. The design will soon be documented in the AS-1393 standard (Serial Hi-Rel Ring Network for Aerospace Applications). The framework is designed for "Class A" spacecraft operation and provides redundant data paths. It is based on "fault containment regions" and "redundant functional regions (RFR)" and has a method for allocating cables that completely supports the redundancy in spacecraft design, allowing for a complete RFR to fail. This design reduces the mass of the bus by incorporating both the Control Unit and the Data Unit in the same hardware. The standard uses ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) packets, standardized by ITU-T, ANSI, ETSI, and the ATM Forum. The IEEE-1393 standard uses the UNI form of the packet and provides no protection for the data portion of the cell. The JPL design adds optional formatting to this data portion. This design extends fault protection beyond that of the interconnect. This includes adding protection to the data portion that is contained within the Bus Interface Units (BIUs) and by adding to the signal interface between the Data Host and the JPL 1393 Ring Bus. Data transfer on the ring bus does not involve a master or initiator. Following bus protocol, any BIU may transmit data on the ring whenever it has data received from its host. There

  14. Bunch coalescing in the main ring to form intense proton and antiproton bunches without RF counterphasing

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.E.; MacLachlan, J.A.; Nicholls, G.N.; Qian, Z.B.

    1984-08-09

    Both the proton and antiproton bunches which will collide in the Tevatron have longitudinal emittance greater than can be accelerated by the main ring from 8 GeV without large loss and emittance growth. We have previously described the technique of combining several smaller bunches at the Tevatron injection energy with little increase in the total emittance and negligible loss. This technique requires adiabatic debunching of several adjacent 53 MHz bunches by smooth reduction of the RF voltage from approx. 1 MV to approx. 100 V. The very low voltage is extremely difficult to attain with a high-Q system designed for megavolt accelerating potential. The counterphasing technique of voltage reduction which we have used in main ring experiments and proposed for the TeV I project is to divide the accelerating cavities into two closely matched groups and to smoothly shift the relative phase of the drive to the two groups by 180 degrees. When the net voltage has been reduced by this means to the lowest practical level, about 10 kV, the final voltage reduction may be performed by turning off the high-Q system and using a low-Q cavity. The voltage induced on the undriven gaps of the high-Q system is low enough not to be a major problem because the total intensity is low. However, the effects are not negligible, and dynamic beam loading compensation is required. This memo proposes that the process described above be simplified somewhat by replacing the counterphasing voltage reduction with a zero-voltage spreading of the bunches for several milliseconds followed by a few hundred microseconds of rotation to minimum energy spread in buckets produced at high voltage.

  15. Ring-shaped Wigner crystals of trapped ions at the micronscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haokun; Urban, Erik; Noel, Crystal; Chuang, Alexander; Xia, Yang; Hemmerling, Borge; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang; Haeffner, Hartmut

    Trapped ion crystals are ideal platforms to study many-body physics and quantum information processing, with both the internal electronic states and external motional degree-of-freedoms controllable at the single quantum level. In contrast to conventional, finite, linear chains of ions, a ring topology exhibiting periodic boundary conditions and rotational symmetry opens up a new directions to diverse topics. However, previous implementations of ion rings result in small aspect ratios (<0.07) of ion-electrode distance to ring diameter, making the rotational symmetry of the ion crystals prone to stray electric fields from imperfections of the trap electrodes, particularly evident at low temperatures. Here, using a new trap design with a 60-fold improvement of this aspect ratio, we demonstrate crystallization of 40Ca+ ions in a ring with rotational energy barriers comparable to the thermal energy of Doppler laser cooled ion crystals. When further reducing the rotational energy barriers, we observe delocalization of the ion rings. With this result, we enter a regime where quantum topological effects can be studied and novel quantum computation and simulation experiments can be implemented.

  16. Dynamics of the direct intrusion of Gulf Stream ring water onto the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weifeng G.; Gawarkiewicz, Glen G.

    2015-09-01

    Onshore intrusions of offshore waters onto the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf can greatly affect shelf circulation, biogeochemistry, and fisheries. Previous studies have concentrated on onshore intrusions of slope water. Here we present a direct intrusion of Gulf Stream warm-core ring water onto the shelf representing a previously unknown exchange process at the shelfbreak. Impingement of warm-core rings at the shelfbreak generates along-isobath intrusions that grow like Pinocchio's nose, extending hundreds of kilometers to the southwest. By combining satellite and Ocean Observatory Initiative Pioneer Array data and idealized numerical simulations, we discover that the intrusion results from topographically induced vorticity variation of the ring water, rather than from entrainment of the shelfbreak frontal jet. This intrusion of the Gulf Stream ring water has important biogeochemical implications and could facilitate migration of marine species across the shelfbreak barrier and transport low-nutrient surface Gulf Stream ring water to the otherwise productive shelfbreak region.

  17. Autosomal ring chromosomes in human genetic disorders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ring chromosomes arise following breakage and rejoining in both chromosome arms. They are heterogeneous with variable size and genetic content and can originate from any chromosome. Phenotypes associated with ring chromosomes are highly variable as apart from any deletion caused by ring formation, imbalances from ring instability can also occur. Of interest is ring chromosome 20 which has a significant association with epilepsy with seizure onset in early childhood. Severe growth deficiency without major malformations is a common finding in the ring chromosome carrier. This phenotype associated with ring behaviour and mitotic instability and independent of the chromosome involved has been termed the “ring syndrome”. Precise genotype-phenotype correlations for ring chromosomes may not be possible as influencing factors vary depending on the extent of deletion in ring formation, ring instability and the level of mosaicism. Although ring chromosomes usually arise as de novo events, familial transmission of rings from carrier to offspring has been described and prenatal diagnosis for any pregnancies should always be considered. PMID:26835370

  18. The Canarias Einstein ring: a newly discovered optical Einstein ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettinelli, M.; Simioni, M.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Cassisi, S.; Walker, A. R.; Piotto, G.; Valdes, F.

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery of an optical Einstein ring in the Sculptor constellation, IAC J010127-334319, in the vicinity of the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. It is an almost complete ring (˜300°) with a diameter of ˜4.5 arcsec. The discovery was made serendipitously from inspecting Dark Energy Camera (DECam) archive imaging data. Confirmation of the object nature has been obtained by deriving spectroscopic redshifts for both components, lens and source, from observations at the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) with the spectrograph OSIRIS. The lens, a massive early-type galaxy, has a redshift of z = 0.581, while the source is a starburst galaxy with redshift of z = 1.165. The total enclosed mass that produces the lensing effect has been estimated to be Mtot = (1.86 ± 0.23) × 1012 M⊙.

  19. Ring-Puckering Motion in 1-Chloro-cyclopentene: Rotational Spectrum and ab InitioCalculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminati, Walther; Danieli, Roberto; Fantoni, Adolfo C.; Lopez, Juan C.

    1997-01-01

    The rotational spectra of 35Cl and 37Cl 1-chloro-cyclopentene have been investigated in the frequency range 26-40 GHz. The inversion splittings due to the ring-puckering motion have been determined to be 42320(10) and 42270(10) MHz for the two isotopomers, respectively. Four more vibrational states have been analyzed for the most abudant ( 35Cl) species. The barrier hindering the ring-puckering has been evaluated. According to the ab initiocalculations, it is lower than that in cyclopentene.

  20. Cold atoms in one-dimensional rings: a Luttinger liquid approach to precision measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragole, Stephen; Taylor, Jacob

    Recent experiments have realized ring shaped traps for ultracold atoms. We consider the one-dimensional limit of these ring systems with a moving weak barrier, such as a blue-detuned laser beam. In this limit, we employ Luttinger liquid theory and find an analogy with the superconducting charge qubit. In particular, we find that strongly-interacting atoms in such a system could be used for precision rotation sensing. We compare the performance of this new sensor to the state of the art non-interacting atom interferometry. Funding provided by the Physics Frontier Center at the JQI and by DARPA QUASAR.